WorldWideScience

Sample records for brain integrating models

  1. Efficient multilevel brain tumor segmentation with integrated bayesian model classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, J J; Sharon, E; Dube, S; El-Saden, S; Sinha, U; Yuille, A

    2008-05-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data that takes a step toward bridging the gap between bottom-up affinity-based segmentation methods and top-down generative model based approaches. The main contribution of the paper is a Bayesian formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are conventionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm, and apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumor and edema in multichannel magnetic resonance (MR) volumes. The computationally efficient method runs orders of magnitude faster than current state-of-the-art techniques giving comparable or improved results. Our quantitative results indicate the benefit of incorporating model-aware affinities into the segmentation process for the difficult case of glioblastoma multiforme brain tumor.

  2. Multilevel Segmentation and Integrated Bayesian Model Classification with an Application to Brain Tumor Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Corso, Jason J.; Eitan Sharon; Alan Yuille

    2006-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic segmentation of heterogeneous image data, which is very common in medical image analysis. The main contribution of the paper is a mathematical formulation for incorporating soft model assignments into the calculation of affinities, which are traditionally model free. We integrate the resulting model-aware affinities into the multilevel segmentation by weighted aggregation algorithm. We apply the technique to the task of detecting and segmenting brain tumo...

  3. Gene set based integrated data analysis reveals phenotypic differences in a brain cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Petersen

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the data analysis of biological high-throughput experiments is to handle the often low number of samples in the experiments compared to the number of biomolecules that are simultaneously measured. Combining experimental data using independent technologies to illuminate the same biological trends, as well as complementing each other in a larger perspective, is one natural way to overcome this challenge. In this work we investigated if integrating proteomics and transcriptomics data from a brain cancer animal model using gene set based analysis methodology, could enhance the biological interpretation of the data relative to more traditional analysis of the two datasets individually. The brain cancer model used is based on serial passaging of transplanted human brain tumor material (glioblastoma--GBM through several generations in rats. These serial transplantations lead over time to genotypic and phenotypic changes in the tumors and represent a medically relevant model with a rare access to samples and where consequent analyses of individual datasets have revealed relatively few significant findings on their own. We found that the integrated analysis both performed better in terms of significance measure of its findings compared to individual analyses, as well as providing independent verification of the individual results. Thus a better context for overall biological interpretation of the data can be achieved.

  4. The effects of ultrasound on BBB integration in ischemic brain injury model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaib A.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound (US has been used in neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia, however the mechanism of action remains unclearly. We have previously shown the protective effect of ultrasound on infarction volume and brain edema in ischemic brain injured at normothermic condition. Ultrasound may also amplify the effect of fibrinolytic medications in thrombolysis process .We have also shown that hyperthermia can exacerbate cerebral ischemic injury and that the efficacy of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is reduced in the presence of hyperthermia. In this study, the effects of US alone or in combination with tPA on brain ischemic injury were evaluated.Methods: Focal ischemic brain injury was induced by emblazing a pre-formed clot into the middle cerebral artery in rats. Principally, we examined whether US can reduce the perfusion deficits and, the damage of blood- brain barrier (BBB in the ischemic injured brain. There are two series of experiments at this study .in the first series, animals were randomly assigned to four groups (n=7 per group as follows: 1-control (saline, 2-US (1W/cm2, 10 duty cycle , 3- US+high- tPA (1W/cm2, 10 duty cycle +20 mg/kg and 4- high -tPA (20 mg/kg. We also examined the effects of US and tPA on BBB integrity after ischemic injury. The animals were assigned into four groups (n=7 per group, treatment is the same as above. BBB permeability was assessed by the Evans blue (EB extravasations method at 8 h after MCA occlusion. BBB permeability was evaluated by fluorescent detection of extravagated Evans blue dye and Perfusion deficits were analyzed using an Evans blue staining procedure. The perfused microvessels in the brain were visualized using fluorescent microscopy. Areas of perfusion deficits in the brain were traced, calculated and expressed in mm2.Results: The results showed that US improved neurological deficits significantly (p<0.05. The administration of US significantly decreased perfusion deficits and BBB

  5. Modeling community integration in workers with delayed recovery from mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, T.; Shapiro, C. M.; Mollayeva, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delayed recovery in persons after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is poorly understood. Community integration (CI) is endorsed by persons with neurological disorders as an important outcome. We aimed to describe CI and its associated factors in insured Ontario workers with delayed...... recovery following mTBI. Methods: A cross-sectional study of insured workers in the chronic phase following mTBI was performed at a rehabilitation hospital in Ontario, Canada. Sociodemographic, occupational, injury-related, clinical, and claim-related data were collected from self-reports, medical...... assessments, and insurers' referral files. Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) scores were compared using analysis of variance or Spearman's correlation tests. Stepwise multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations with CI. Results: Ninety-four workers with mTBI (45...

  6. MRI confirms loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H M L P; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Lizak, Martin J; Nayak, Debasis; McGavern, Dorian B; Roberts, David D

    2013-09-01

    Disseminated candidiasis primarily targets the kidneys and brain in mice and humans. Damage to these critical organs leads to the high mortality associated with such infections, and invasion across the blood-brain barrier can result in fungal meningoencephalitis. Candida albicans can penetrate a brain endothelial cell barrier in vitro through transcellular migration, but this mechanism has not been confirmed in vivo. MRI using the extracellular vascular contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid demonstrated that integrity of the blood-brain barrier is lost during C. albicans invasion. Intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy was used to provide the first real-time demonstration of C. albicans colonizing the living brain, where both yeast and filamentous forms of the pathogen were found. Furthermore, we adapted a previously described method utilizing MRI to monitor inflammatory cell recruitment into infected tissues in mice. Macrophages and other phagocytes were visualized in kidney and brain by the administration of ultrasmall iron oxide particles. In addition to obtaining new insights into the passage of C. albicans across the brain microvasculature, these imaging methods provide useful tools to study further the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections, to define the roles of Candida virulence genes in kidney versus brain infection and to assess new therapeutic measures for drug development.

  7. C5a alters blood-brain barrier integrity in a human in vitro model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Supriya D; Parikh, Neil U; Woodruff, Trent M; Jarvis, James N; Lopez, Molly; Hennon, Teresa; Cunningham, Patrick; Quigg, Richard J; Schwartz, Stanley A; Alexander, Jessy J

    2015-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a crucial role in brain homeostasis, thereby maintaining the brain environment precise for optimal neuronal function. Its dysfunction is an intriguing complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is a systemic autoimmune disorder where neurological complications occur in 5-50% of cases and is associated with impaired BBB integrity. Complement activation occurs in SLE and is an important part of the clinical profile. Our earlier studies demonstrated that C5a generated by complement activation caused the loss of brain endothelial layer integrity in rodents. The goal of the current study was to determine the translational potential of these studies to a human system. To assess this, we used a two dimensional in vitro BBB model constructed using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells and astroglial cells, which closely emulates the in vivo BBB allowing the assessment of BBB integrity. Increased permeability monitored by changes in transendothelial electrical resistance and cytoskeletal remodelling caused by actin fiber rearrangement were observed when the cells were exposed to lupus serum and C5a, similar to the observations in mice. In addition, our data show that C5a/C5aR1 signalling alters nuclear factor-κB translocation into nucleus and regulates the expression of the tight junction proteins, claudin-5 and zonula occludens 1 in this setting. Our results demonstrate for the first time that C5a regulates BBB integrity in a neuroinflammatory setting where it affects both endothelial and astroglial cells. In addition, we also demonstrate that our previous findings in a mouse model, were emulated in human cells in vitro, bringing the studies one step closer to understanding the translational potential of C5a/C5aR1 blockade as a promising therapeutic strategy in SLE and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Markers for blood-brain barrier integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in brain barriers and various roles their intrinsic mechanisms may play in neurological disorders. Such studies require suitable models and markers to demonstrate integrity and functional changes at the interfaces between blood, brain......, and cerebrospinal fluid. Studies of brain barrier mechanisms and measurements of plasma volume using dyes have a long-standing history, dating back to the late nineteenth-century. Their use in blood-brain barrier studies continues in spite of their known serious limitations in in vivo applications. These were well...... known when first introduced, but seem to have been forgotten since. Understanding these limitations is important because Evans blue is still the most commonly used marker of brain barrier integrity and those using it seem oblivious to problems arising from its in vivo application. The introduction...

  9. Modeling invariant object processing based on tight integration of simulated and empirical data in a Common Brain Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Carolien Peters

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Both in the field of Computer Vision and Experimental Neuroscience, recent advances have been made regarding the mechanisms underlying invariant object recognition. However, the differential methodological aims in both fields caused an independent model evolvement. A tighter integration of simulations and empirical observations may contribute to cross-fertilized development of 1 neurobiologically plausible computational models and 2 computationally-defined empirical theories, incrementally merged into a comprehensive brain model.We review recent fMRI findings on object invariance and suggest how they can be quantitatively compared to model simulations by projecting predicted and observed data in one Common Brain Space". The simultaneous matching of activity patterns within and across multiple processing stages in the simulated and empirical large-scale network may help to clarify how high-order invariant representations are created from low-level features. Given that columnar-level imaging is now in reach, due to the advent of high-resolution fMRI, it is time to capitalize on this new window into the brain and test which predictions of the various object recognition models are supported by this novel empirical evidence.

  10. The "proactive" model of learning: Integrative framework for model-free and model-based reinforcement learning utilizing the associative learning-based proactive brain concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsuga, Judit; Biro, Klara; Papp, Csaba; Tajti, Gabor; Gesztelyi, Rudolf

    2016-02-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL) is a powerful concept underlying forms of associative learning governed by the use of a scalar reward signal, with learning taking place if expectations are violated. RL may be assessed using model-based and model-free approaches. Model-based reinforcement learning involves the amygdala, the hippocampus, and the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). The model-free system involves the pedunculopontine-tegmental nucleus (PPTgN), the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the ventral striatum (VS). Based on the functional connectivity of VS, model-free and model based RL systems center on the VS that by integrating model-free signals (received as reward prediction error) and model-based reward related input computes value. Using the concept of reinforcement learning agent we propose that the VS serves as the value function component of the RL agent. Regarding the model utilized for model-based computations we turned to the proactive brain concept, which offers an ubiquitous function for the default network based on its great functional overlap with contextual associative areas. Hence, by means of the default network the brain continuously organizes its environment into context frames enabling the formulation of analogy-based association that are turned into predictions of what to expect. The OFC integrates reward-related information into context frames upon computing reward expectation by compiling stimulus-reward and context-reward information offered by the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Furthermore we suggest that the integration of model-based expectations regarding reward into the value signal is further supported by the efferent of the OFC that reach structures canonical for model-free learning (e.g., the PPTgN, VTA, and VS).

  11. Community-integrated brain injury rehabilitation: Treatment models and challenges for civilian, military, and veteran populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M; Nidiffer, F Don; Barth, Jeffrey T

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health problem in civilian, military, and veteran populations. Individuals experiencing moderate to severe TBI require a continuum of care involving acute hospitalization and postacute rehabilitation, including community reintegration and, one would hope, a return home to function as a productive member of the community. In the military, the goal is to help individuals with TBI return to active duty or make an optimal return to civilian life if the extent of their injuries necessitates a "medical board" discharge. Whether civilian, military, or veteran with TBI, individuals who move beyond the need to live in a facility must be reintegrated back into the community. This article discusses four treatment models for community reintegration, reviews treatment standardization and outcome issues, and describes a manualized rehabilitation pilot program designed to provide community reintegration and return to duty/work for civilians, veterans, and military personnel with TBI.

  12. Brain Network Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther

    Three main topics are presented in this thesis. The first and largest topic concerns network modelling of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI). In particular nonparametric Bayesian methods are used to model brain networks derived from resting state f...... for their ability to reproduce node clustering and predict unseen data. Comparing the models on whole brain networks, BCD and IRM showed better reproducibility and predictability than IDM, suggesting that resting state networks exhibit community structure. This also points to the importance of using models, which...... allow for complex interactions between all pairs of clusters. In addition, it is demonstrated how the IRM can be used for segmenting brain structures into functionally coherent clusters. A new nonparametric Bayesian network model is presented. The model builds upon the IRM and can be used to infer...

  13. Identification of neuronal and angiogenic growth factors in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model system: Relevance in barrier integrity and tight junction formation and complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Christian; Hanada, Sanshiro; Fallier-Becker, Petra; Kirkpatrick, C James; Unger, Ronald E

    2017-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that the co-cultivation of endothelial cells with neural cells resulted in an improved integrity of the in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB), and that this model could be useful to evaluate the transport properties of potential central nervous system disease drugs through the microvascular brain endothelial. In this study we have used real-time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, protein arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to determine which neural- and endothelial cell-derived factors are produced in the co-culture and improve the integrity of the BBB. In addition, a further improvement of the BBB integrity was achieved by adjusting serum concentrations and growth factors or by the addition of brain pericytes. Under specific conditions expression of angiogenic, angiostatic and neurotrophic factors such as endostatin, pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF/serpins-F1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) closely mimicked the in vivo situation. Freeze-fracture analysis of these cultures demonstrated the quality and organization of the endothelial tight junction structures and their association to the two different lipidic leaflets of the membrane. Finally, a multi-cell culture model of the BBB with a transendothelial electrical resistance up to 371 (±15) Ω×cm(2) was developed, which may be useful for preliminary screening of drug transport across the BBB and to evaluate cellular crosstalk of cells involved in the neurovascular unit.

  14. Brain networks for integrative rhythm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Thaut

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance of externally paced rhythmic movements requires brain and behavioral integration of sensory stimuli with motor commands. The underlying brain mechanisms to elaborate beat-synchronized rhythm and polyrhythms that musicians readily perform may differ. Given known roles in perceiving time and repetitive movements, we hypothesized that basal ganglia and cerebellar structures would have greater activation for polyrhythms than for on-the-beat rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using functional MRI methods, we investigated brain networks for performing rhythmic movements paced by auditory cues. Musically trained participants performed rhythmic movements at 2 and 3 Hz either at a 1:1 on-the-beat or with a 3:2 or a 2:3 stimulus-movement structure. Due to their prior musical experience, participants performed the 3:2 or 2:3 rhythmic movements automatically. Both the isorhythmic 1:1 and the polyrhythmic 3:2 or 2:3 movements yielded the expected activation in contralateral primary motor cortex and related motor areas and ipsilateral cerebellum. Direct comparison of functional MRI signals obtained during 3:2 or 2:3 and on-the-beat rhythms indicated activation differences bilaterally in the supplementary motor area, ipsilaterally in the supramarginal gyrus and caudate-putamen and contralaterally in the cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The activated brain areas suggest the existence of an interconnected brain network specific for complex sensory-motor rhythmic integration that might have specificity for elaboration of musical abilities.

  15. The modular and integrative functional architecture of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolero, Maxwell A; Yeo, B T Thomas; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Network-based analyses of brain imaging data consistently reveal distinct modules and connector nodes with diverse global connectivity across the modules. How discrete the functions of modules are, how dependent the computational load of each module is to the other modules' processing, and what the precise role of connector nodes is for between-module communication remains underspecified. Here, we use a network model of the brain derived from resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data and investigate the modular functional architecture of the human brain by analyzing activity at different types of nodes in the network across 9,208 experiments of 77 cognitive tasks in the BrainMap database. Using an author-topic model of cognitive functions, we find a strong spatial correspondence between the cognitive functions and the network's modules, suggesting that each module performs a discrete cognitive function. Crucially, activity at local nodes within the modules does not increase in tasks that require more cognitive functions, demonstrating the autonomy of modules' functions. However, connector nodes do exhibit increased activity when more cognitive functions are engaged in a task. Moreover, connector nodes are located where brain activity is associated with many different cognitive functions. Connector nodes potentially play a role in between-module communication that maintains the modular function of the brain. Together, these findings provide a network account of the brain's modular yet integrated implementation of cognitive functions.

  16. Integrable Bogoliubov Transform and Integrable Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁

    2003-01-01

    By defining Bogoliubov transform as a function of parameters, the integrability of the Bogoliubov transform in parameter space is investigated. It is shown that integrable Bogoliubov transform is closely related to the known integrable model. The relation between the integrable Bogoliubov transform and geometric phase of vacuum induced by the Bogoliubov transform is also discussed.

  17. Structural model integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Lahey, R. S.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the practical aspects and problems of ensuring the integrity of a structural model are discussed, as well as the steps which have been taken in the NASTRAN system to assure that these checks can be routinely performed. Model integrity as used applies not only to the structural model but also to the loads applied to the model. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that when dealing with substructure analysis, all of the checking procedures discussed should be applied at the lowest level of substructure prior to any coupling.

  18. Brain temperature changes during selective cooling with endovascular intracarotid cold saline infusion: simulation using human data fitted with an integrated mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimark, Matthew Aaron Harold; Konstas, Angelos Aristeidis; Lee, Leslie; Laine, Andrew Francis; Pile-Spellman, John; Choi, Jae

    2013-03-01

    The feasibility of rapid cerebral hypothermia induction in humans with intracarotid cold saline infusion (ICSI) was investigated using a hybrid approach of jugular venous bulb temperature (JVBT) sampling and mathematical modeling of transient and steady state brain temperature distribution. This study utilized both forward mathematical modeling, in which brain temperatures were predicted based on input saline temperatures, and inverse modeling, where brain temperatures were inferred based on JVBT. Changes in ipsilateral anterior circulation territory temperature (IACT) were estimated in eight patients as a result of 10 min of a cold saline infusion of 33 ml/min. During ICSI, the measured JVBT dropped by 0.76±0.18°C while the modeled JVBT decreased by 0.86±0.18°C. The modeled IACT decreased by 2.1±0.23°C. In the inverse model, IACT decreased by 1.9±0.23°C. The results of this study suggest that mild cerebral hypothermia can be induced rapidly and safely with ICSI in the neuroangiographical setting. The JVBT corrected mathematical model can be used as a non-invasive estimate of transient and steady state cerebral temperature changes.

  19. Data integration technologies to support integrated modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapen, M.J.R.; Roosenschoon, O.R.; Lokers, R.M.; Janssen, S.J.C.; Randen, van Y.; Verweij, P.J.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the recent years the scientific activities of our organisation in large research projects show a shifting priority from model integration to the integration of data itself. Our work in several large projects on integrated modelling for impact assessment studies has clearly shown the importance

  20. Cyberinfrastructure for the digital brain: spatial standards for integrating rodent brain atlases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eZaslavsky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical research entails capture and analysis of massive data volumes and new discoveries arise from data-integration and mining. This is only possible if data can be mapped onto a common framework such as the genome for genomic data. In neuroscience, the framework is intrinsically spatial and based on a number of paper atlases. This cannot meet today’s data-intensive analysis and integration challenges. A scalable and extensible software infrastructure that is standards based but open for novel data and resources, is required for integrating information such as signal distributions, gene-expression, neuronal connectivity, electrophysiology, anatomy, and developmental processes. Therefore, the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF initiated the development of a spatial framework for neuroscience data integration with an associated Digital Atlasing Infrastructure (DAI. A prototype implementation of this infrastructure for the rodent brain is reported here. The infrastructure is based on a collection of reference spaces to which data is mapped at the required resolution, such as the Waxholm Space (WHS, a 3D reconstruction of the brain generated using high-resolution, multi-channel microMRI. The core standards of the digital atlasing service-oriented infrastructure include Waxholm Markup Language (WaxML: XML schema expressing a uniform information model for key elements such as coordinate systems, transformations, points of interest (POIs, labels, and annotations; and Atlas Web Services: interfaces for querying and updating atlas data. The services return WaxML-encoded documents with information about capabilities, spatial reference systems and structures, and execute coordinate transformations and POI-based requests. Key elements of INCF-DAI cyberinfrastructure have been prototyped for both mouse and rat brain atlas sources, including the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, UCSD Cell-Centered Database, and Edinburgh Mouse Atlas

  1. A Culture-Behavior-Brain Loop Model of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Ma, Yina

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cultural influences on brain activity are associated with multiple cognitive and affective processes. These findings prompt an integrative framework to account for dynamic interactions between culture, behavior, and the brain. We put forward a culture-behavior-brain (CBB) loop model of human development that proposes that culture shapes the brain by contextualizing behavior, and the brain fits and modifies culture via behavioral influences. Genes provide a fundamental basis for, and interact with, the CBB loop at both individual and population levels. The CBB loop model advances our understanding of the dynamic relationships between culture, behavior, and the brain, which are crucial for human phylogeny and ontogeny. Future brain changes due to cultural influences are discussed based on the CBB loop model.

  2. Work-up times in an integrated brain cancer pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Laursen, Emilie; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    The integrated brain cancer pathway (IBCP) aims to ensure fast-track diagnostics and treatment for brain cancers in Denmark. This paper focuses on the referral pattern and the time frame of key pathway elements during the first two years following implementation of the IBCP in a regional neurology...

  3. Searching for the one and many emotional brains. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-06-01

    Over the past hundred years or so, several neurally-based, or at least neurally-inspired, models of emotion have been proposed, with varying degrees of acceptance and success. Early ones were mostly based on data obtained from experiments conducted in non-human animals using classical conditioning paradigms, thus focusing on defensive (threat) and appetitive (reward) behaviors. Some features of the models were sometimes confirmed as being also applicable to humans, usually in experiments with patients suffering from focal brain lesions - although inconsistent, or even contradictory findings were often reported.

  4. Q-ball imaging models: comparison between high and low angular resolution diffusion-weighted MRI protocols for investigation of brain white matter integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caiazzo, Giuseppina; Trojsi, Francesca; Cirillo, Mario; Tedeschi, Gioacchino [MRI Research Center SUN-FISM-Neurological Institute for Diagnosis and Care ' ' Hermitage Capodimonte' ' , Naples (Italy); Second University of Naples, Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences, Naples (Italy); Esposito, Fabrizio [University of Salerno, Department of Medicine and Surgery, Baronissi (Salerno) (Italy); Maastricht University, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Q-ball imaging (QBI) is one of the typical data models for quantifying white matter (WM) anisotropy in diffusion-weighted MRI (DwMRI) studies. Brain and spinal investigation by high angular resolution DwMRI (high angular resolution imaging (HARDI)) protocols exhibits higher angular resolution in diffusion imaging compared to low angular resolution models, although with longer acquisition times. We aimed to assess the difference between QBI-derived anisotropy values from high and low angular resolution DwMRI protocols and their potential advantages or shortcomings in neuroradiology. Brain DwMRI data sets were acquired in seven healthy volunteers using both HARDI (b = 3000 s/mm{sup 2}, 54 gradient directions) and low angular resolution (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 32 gradient directions) acquisition schemes. For both sequences, tract of interest tractography and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) measures were extracted by using QBI model and were compared between the two data sets. QBI tractography and voxel-wise analyses showed that some WM tracts, such as corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal, and uncinate fasciculi, were reconstructed as one-dominant-direction fiber bundles with both acquisition schemes. In these WM tracts, mean percent different difference in GFA between the two data sets was less than 5 %. Contrariwise, multidirectional fiber bundles, such as corticospinal tract and superior longitudinal fasciculus, were more accurately depicted by HARDI acquisition scheme. Our results suggest that the design of optimal DwMRI acquisition protocols for clinical investigation of WM anisotropy by QBI models should consider the specific brain target regions to be explored, inducing researchers to a trade-off choice between angular resolution and acquisition time. (orig.)

  5. Hierarchical models in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Friston

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a general model that subsumes many parametric models for continuous data. The model comprises hidden layers of state-space or dynamic causal models, arranged so that the output of one provides input to another. The ensuing hierarchy furnishes a model for many types of data, of arbitrary complexity. Special cases range from the general linear model for static data to generalised convolution models, with system noise, for nonlinear time-series analysis. Crucially, all of these models can be inverted using exactly the same scheme, namely, dynamic expectation maximization. This means that a single model and optimisation scheme can be used to invert a wide range of models. We present the model and a brief review of its inversion to disclose the relationships among, apparently, diverse generative models of empirical data. We then show that this inversion can be formulated as a simple neural network and may provide a useful metaphor for inference and learning in the brain.

  6. What Brain Sciences Reveal about Integrating Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Theory and practice are integrated in the human brain. Situation recognition and response are key to this integration. Scholars of decision making and expertise have found that people with great expertise are more adept at situational recognition and intentional about their decision-making processes. Several interdisciplinary fields of inquiry…

  7. New Ideas for Brain Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Greer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes some biologically-inspired processes that could be used to build the sort of networks that we associate with the human brain. New to this paper, a ‘refined’ neuron will be proposed. This is a group of neurons that by joining together can produce a more analogue system, but with the same level of control and reliability that a binary neuron would have. With this new structure, it will be possible to think of an essentially binary system in terms of a more variable set of values. The paper also shows how recent research can be combined with established theories, to produce a more complete picture.The propositions are largely in line with conventional thinking, but possibly with one or two more radical suggestions. An earlier cognitive model can be filled in with more specific details, based on the new research results, where the components appear to fit together almost seamlessly. The intention of the research has been to describe plausible ‘mechanical’ processes that can produce the appropriate brain structures and mechanisms, but that could be used without the magical ‘intelligence’ part that is still not fully understood.There are also some important updates from an earlier version of this paper.Keywords: neuron, neural network, cognitive model, self-organise, analogue, resonance.

  8. Integrated Environmental Assessment Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guardanz, R.; Gimeno, B. S.; Bermejo, V.; Elvira, S.; Martin, F.; Palacios, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Donaire, I. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the results of the Spanish participation in the project Coupling CORINAIR data to cost-effect emission reduction strategies based on critical threshold. (EU/LIFE97/ENV/FIN/336). The subproject has focused on three tasks. Develop tools to improve knowledge on the spatial and temporal details of emissions of air pollutants in Spain. Exploit existing experimental information on plant response to air pollutants in temperate ecosystem and Integrate these findings in a modelling framework that can asses with more accuracy the impact of air pollutants to temperate ecosystems. The results obtained during the execution of this project have significantly improved the models of the impact of alternative emission control strategies on ecosystems and crops in the Iberian Peninsula. (Author) 375 refs.

  9. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging have become the most important noninvasive windows to the human brain. A major challenge in the analysis of brain networks is to establish the similarities and dissimilarities between functional and structural connectivity. We formulate a non...... significant structures that are consistently shared across subjects and data splits. This provides an unsupervised approach for modeling of structure-function relations in the brain and provides a general framework for multimodal integration.......-parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...

  10. Exercise maintains blood-brain barrier integrity during early stages of brain metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Gretchen; Davidson, Sarah J; Wrobel, Jagoda K; Toborek, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Tumor cell extravasation into the brain requires passage through the blood-brain barrier, which is a highly protected microvascular environment fortified with tight junction (TJ) proteins. TJ integrity can be regulated under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. There is evidence that exercise can modulate oxidation status within the brain microvasculature and protect against tumor cell extravasation and metastasis formation. In order to study these events, mature male mice were given access to voluntary exercise on a running wheel (exercise) or access to a locked wheel (sedentary) for five weeks. The average running distance was 9.0 ± 0.2 km/day. Highly metastatic tumor cells (murine Lewis lung carcinoma) were then infused into the brain microvasculature through the internal carotid artery. Analyses were performed at early stage (48 h) and late stage (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed fewer isolated tumor cells extravasating into the brain at both 48 h and 3 weeks post surgery in exercised mice. Occludin protein levels were reduced in the sedentary tumor group, but maintained in the exercised tumor group at 48 h post tumor cell infusion. These results indicate that voluntary exercise may participate in modulating blood-brain barrier integrity thereby protecting the brain during metastatic progression.

  11. Integrated genomic and epigenomic analysis of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodour Salhia

    Full Text Available The brain is a common site of metastatic disease in patients with breast cancer, which has few therapeutic options and dismal outcomes. The purpose of our study was to identify common and rare events that underlie breast cancer brain metastasis. We performed deep genomic profiling, which integrated gene copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation datasets on a collection of breast brain metastases. We identified frequent large chromosomal gains in 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, and 20q and frequent broad-level deletions involving 8p, 17p, 21p and Xq. Frequently amplified and overexpressed genes included ATAD2, BRAF, DERL1, DNMTRB and NEK2A. The ATM, CRYAB and HSPB2 genes were commonly deleted and underexpressed. Knowledge mining revealed enrichment in cell cycle and G2/M transition pathways, which contained AURKA, AURKB and FOXM1. Using the PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic classifier, Luminal B, Her2+/ER negative, and basal-like tumors were identified as the most commonly represented breast cancer subtypes in our brain metastasis cohort. While overall methylation levels were increased in breast cancer brain metastasis, basal-like brain metastases were associated with significantly lower levels of methylation. Integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed defects in cell migration and adhesion due to hypermethylation and downregulation of PENK, EDN3, and ITGAM. Hypomethylation and upregulation of KRT8 likely affects adhesion and permeability. Genomic and epigenomic profiling of breast brain metastasis has provided insight into the somatic events underlying this disease, which have potential in forming the basis of future therapeutic strategies.

  12. Integrated genomic and epigenomic analysis of breast cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhia, Bodour; Kiefer, Jeff; Ross, Julianna T D; Metapally, Raghu; Martinez, Rae Anne; Johnson, Kyle N; DiPerna, Danielle M; Paquette, Kimberly M; Jung, Sungwon; Nasser, Sara; Wallstrom, Garrick; Tembe, Waibhav; Baker, Angela; Carpten, John; Resau, Jim; Ryken, Timothy; Sibenaller, Zita; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Ramanathan, Ramesh K; Berens, Michael E; Tran, Nhan L

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a common site of metastatic disease in patients with breast cancer, which has few therapeutic options and dismal outcomes. The purpose of our study was to identify common and rare events that underlie breast cancer brain metastasis. We performed deep genomic profiling, which integrated gene copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation datasets on a collection of breast brain metastases. We identified frequent large chromosomal gains in 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, and 20q and frequent broad-level deletions involving 8p, 17p, 21p and Xq. Frequently amplified and overexpressed genes included ATAD2, BRAF, DERL1, DNMTRB and NEK2A. The ATM, CRYAB and HSPB2 genes were commonly deleted and underexpressed. Knowledge mining revealed enrichment in cell cycle and G2/M transition pathways, which contained AURKA, AURKB and FOXM1. Using the PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic classifier, Luminal B, Her2+/ER negative, and basal-like tumors were identified as the most commonly represented breast cancer subtypes in our brain metastasis cohort. While overall methylation levels were increased in breast cancer brain metastasis, basal-like brain metastases were associated with significantly lower levels of methylation. Integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed defects in cell migration and adhesion due to hypermethylation and downregulation of PENK, EDN3, and ITGAM. Hypomethylation and upregulation of KRT8 likely affects adhesion and permeability. Genomic and epigenomic profiling of breast brain metastasis has provided insight into the somatic events underlying this disease, which have potential in forming the basis of future therapeutic strategies.

  13. Integration of the antennal lobe glomeruli and three projection neurons in the standard brain atlas of the moth Heliothis virescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarte B Løfaldli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Digital three dimensional standard brain atlases are valuable tools for integrating neuroimaging data of different preparations. In insects, standard brain atlases of five species are available, including the atlas of the female Heliothis virescens moth brain. Like for the other species, the antennal lobes of the moth brain atlas were integrated as one material identity without internal structures. Different from the others, the H. virescens standard brain atlas exclusively included the glomerular layer of the antennal lobe. This was an advantage in the present study for performing a direct registration of the glomerular layer of individual preparations into the standard brain. We here present the H. virescens female standard brain atlas with a new model of the antennal lobe glomeruli integrated into the atlas, i.e. with each of the 66 glomeruli identified and labelled with a specific number. The new model differs from the previous H. virescens antennal lobe model both in respect to the number of glomeruli and the numbering system; the latter according to the system used for the antennal lobe atlases of two other heliothine species. For identifying female specific glomeruli comparison with the male antennal lobe was necessary. This required a new male antennal lobe atlas, included in this paper. As demonstrated by the integration of three antennal lobe projection neurons of different preparations, the new standard brain atlas with the integrated glomruli is a helpful tool for determining the glomeruli innervated as well as the relative position of the axonal projections in the protocerebrum.

  14. Modeling Pediatric Brain Trauma: Piglet Model of Controlled Cortical Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Jennifer C Munoz; Keeley, Kristen; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Dodge, Carter P

    2016-01-01

    The brain has different responses to traumatic injury as a function of its developmental stage. As a model of injury to the immature brain, the piglet shares numerous similarities in regards to morphology and neurodevelopmental sequence compared to humans. This chapter describes a piglet scaled focal contusion model of traumatic brain injury that accounts for the changes in mass and morphology of the brain as it matures, facilitating the study of age-dependent differences in response to a comparable mechanical trauma.

  15. Branes and integrable lattice models

    CERN Document Server

    Yagi, Junya

    2016-01-01

    This is a brief review of my work on the correspondence between four-dimensional $\\mathcal{N} = 1$ supersymmetric field theories realized by brane tilings and two-dimensional integrable lattice models. I explain how to construct integrable lattice models from extended operators in partially topological quantum field theories, and elucidate the correspondence as an application of this construction.

  16. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice.

  17. Brain activity patterns uniquely supporting visual feature integration after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali eRaja Beharelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI patients typically respond more slowly and with more variability than controls during tasks of attention requiring speeded reaction time. These behavioral changes are attributable, at least in part, to diffuse axonal injury (DAI, which affects integrated processing in distributed systems. Here we use a multivariate method sensitive to distributed neural activity to compare brain activity patterns of patients with chronic phase moderate-to-severe TBI to those of controls during performance on a visual feature-integration task assessing complex attentional processes that has previously shown sensitivity to TBI. The TBI patients were carefully screened to be free of large focal lesions that can affect performance and brain activation independently of DAI. The task required subjects to hold either one or three features of a target in mind while suppressing responses to distracting information. In controls, the multi-feature condition activated a distributed network including limbic, prefrontal, and medial temporal structures. TBI patients engaged this same network in the single-feature and baseline conditions. In multi-feature presentations, TBI patients alone activated additional frontal, parietal, and occipital regions. These results are consistent with neuroimaging studies using tasks assessing different cognitive domains, where increased spread of brain activity changes was associated with TBI. Our results also extend previous findings that brain activity for relatively moderate task demands in TBI patients is similar to that associated with of high task demands in controls.

  18. Simple models of human brain functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértes, Petra E; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron F; Gogtay, Nitin; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Bullmore, Edward T

    2012-04-10

    Human brain functional networks are embedded in anatomical space and have topological properties--small-worldness, modularity, fat-tailed degree distributions--that are comparable to many other complex networks. Although a sophisticated set of measures is available to describe the topology of brain networks, the selection pressures that drive their formation remain largely unknown. Here we consider generative models for the probability of a functional connection (an edge) between two cortical regions (nodes) separated by some Euclidean distance in anatomical space. In particular, we propose a model in which the embedded topology of brain networks emerges from two competing factors: a distance penalty based on the cost of maintaining long-range connections; and a topological term that favors links between regions sharing similar input. We show that, together, these two biologically plausible factors are sufficient to capture an impressive range of topological properties of functional brain networks. Model parameters estimated in one set of functional MRI (fMRI) data on normal volunteers provided a good fit to networks estimated in a second independent sample of fMRI data. Furthermore, slightly detuned model parameters also generated a reasonable simulation of the abnormal properties of brain functional networks in people with schizophrenia. We therefore anticipate that many aspects of brain network organization, in health and disease, may be parsimoniously explained by an economical clustering rule for the probability of functional connectivity between different brain areas.

  19. Ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and prefrontal cortex rodent organotypic brain slices as an integrated model to study the cellular changes induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reperfusion: effect of neuroprotective agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Laura; Parravicini, Chiara; Lecca, Davide; Dossi, Elena; Heine, Claudia; Cimino, Mauro; Wanke, Enzo; Illes, Peter; Franke, Heike; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2014-01-01

    Unveiling the roles of distinct cell types in brain response to insults is a partially unsolved challenge and a key issue for new neuroreparative approaches. In vivo models are not able to dissect the contribution of residential microglia and infiltrating blood-borne monocytes/macrophages, which are fundamentally undistinguishable; conversely, cultured cells lack original tissue anatomical and functional complexity, which profoundly alters reactivity. Here, we tested whether rodent organotypic co-cultures from mesencephalic ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and prefrontal cortex (VTA/SN-PFC) represent a suitable model to study changes induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R). OGD/R induced cytotoxicity to both VTA/SN and PFC slices, with higher VTA/SN susceptibility. Neurons were highly affected, with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes undergoing very mild damage. Marked reactive astrogliosis was also evident. Notably, OGD/R triggered the activation of CD68-expressing microglia and increased expression of Ym1 and Arg1, two markers of "alternatively" activated beneficial microglia. Treatment with two well-known neuroprotective drugs, the anticonvulsant agent valproic acid and the purinergic P2-antagonist PPADS, prevented neuronal damage. Thus, VTA/SN-PFC cultures are an integrated model to investigate OGD/R-induced effects on distinct cells and easily screen neuroprotective agents. The model is particularly adequate to dissect the microglia phenotypic shift in the lack of a functional vascular compartment.

  20. Quantitative genetic analysis of brain size variation in sticklebacks: support for the mosaic model of brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreikiene, Kristina; Herczeg, Gábor; Gonda, Abigél; Balázs, Gergely; Husby, Arild; Merilä, Juha

    2015-07-07

    The mosaic model of brain evolution postulates that different brain regions are relatively free to evolve independently from each other. Such independent evolution is possible only if genetic correlations among the different brain regions are less than unity. We estimated heritabilities, evolvabilities and genetic correlations of relative size of the brain, and its different regions in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus). We found that heritabilities were low (average h(2) = 0.24), suggesting a large plastic component to brain architecture. However, evolvabilities of different brain parts were moderate, suggesting the presence of additive genetic variance to sustain a response to selection in the long term. Genetic correlations among different brain regions were low (average rG = 0.40) and significantly less than unity. These results, along with those from analyses of phenotypic and genetic integration, indicate a high degree of independence between different brain regions, suggesting that responses to selection are unlikely to be severely constrained by genetic and phenotypic correlations. Hence, the results give strong support for the mosaic model of brain evolution. However, the genetic correlation between brain and body size was high (rG = 0.89), suggesting a constraint for independent evolution of brain and body size in sticklebacks.

  1. IMMIGRANTS’ INTEGRATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARMEN UZLĂU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the European population aging trend, and while the birth rate is still at a low level, the immigrants may contribute to the support of the EU economy and to finance the national social protection systems. But this would be possible only if they have been fully integrated in the host countries, the integration policies being a task of the national governments. The European Union may still offer support and stimulation through financing, policies coordination and good practices exchange facilitation. The new measures should encourage local level actions, including cooperation between local authorities, employers, migrants’ organizations, service providers and local population. Within the EU, there live 20.1 million immigrants (approximately 4% of the entire population coming from outside European area. An important element of the common EU policy on immigration is the one regarding the development of a policy on immigrants’ integration, which should provide a fair treatment within the member states, and guarantee rights and obligations comparable with the ones of the Union citizens.

  2. Integrated undergraduate research experience for the study of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Clifford L; Sierra, Michelle; Delay, Eugene R

    2003-01-01

    We developed a series of hands-on laboratory exercises on "Brain Injury" designed around several pedagogical goals that included the development of: 1) knowledge of the scientific method, 2) student problem solving skills by testing cause and effect relationships, 3) student analytical and critical thinking skills by evaluating and interpreting data, identifying alternative explanations for data, and identifying confounding variables, and 4) student writing skills by reporting their findings in manuscript form. Students, facilitated by the instructor, developed a testable hypothesis on short-term effects of brain injury by analyzing lesion size and astrocytic activity. Four sequential laboratory exercises were used to present and practice ablation techniques, histological processing, microscopic visualization and image-capture, and computer aided image analysis. This exercise culminated in a laboratory report that mimicked a research article. The effectiveness of the laboratory sequence was assessed by measuring the acquisition of 1) content on anatomical, physiological, and cellular responses of the brain to traumatic brain injury, and 2) laboratory skills and methods of data-collection and analysis using surgical procedures, histology, microscopy, and image analysis. Post-course test scores, significantly greater than pre-course test scores and greater than scores from a similar but unstructured laboratory class, indicated that this hands-on approach to teaching an undergraduate research laboratory was successful. Potential variations in the integrated laboratory exercise, including multidisciplinary collaborations, are also noted.

  3. Melanoma Brain Metastasis: Mechanisms, Models, and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, David A; Silvis, Mark R; Cho, Joseph H; Holmen, Sheri L

    2016-09-02

    The development of brain metastases in patients with advanced stage melanoma is common, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their development are poorly understood. Melanoma brain metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality and confer a poor prognosis; traditional therapies including whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy yield only modest increases in overall survival (OS) for these patients. While recently approved therapies have significantly improved OS in melanoma patients, only a small number of studies have investigated their efficacy in patients with brain metastases. Preliminary data suggest that some responses have been observed in intracranial lesions, which has sparked new clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy in melanoma patients with brain metastases. Simultaneously, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of melanoma cell dissemination to the brain have revealed novel and potentially therapeutic targets. In this review, we provide an overview of newly discovered mechanisms of melanoma spread to the brain, discuss preclinical models that are being used to further our understanding of this deadly disease and provide an update of the current clinical trials for melanoma patients with brain metastases.

  4. Modeling for integrated micromanipulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣伟彬; 曲东升; 孙立宁; 楼朝飞; 蔡鹤皋

    2003-01-01

    According to the principle of a piezoelectric scanner, a three degree-of-freedom (D. O. F) micromanipulator driven by piezoelectric tubes was developed to realize the integration of mechanism and actuator.Through the static analysis of the deflection of piezoelectric tube into four quadrants, a formula has been establish for the relationship between micro-displacement and driving voltage and accordingly, the angular error is analyzed. Experiments show that the micro-displacement calculated using the formula is in good agreement with the measurements. The relative error is less than 5%. Some performances of the micromanipulator show that it can be applied to some micromanipulations.

  5. Understanding How Exercise Promotes Cognitive Integrity in the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitman, Benjamin M; John, Gareth R

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the structure and organization of the aging central nervous system (CNS), and associated functional deficits, result in cognitive decline and increase susceptibility to neurodegeneration. Age-related changes to the neurovascular unit (NVU), and their consequences for cerebrovascular function, are implicated as driving cognitive impairment during aging as well as in neurodegenerative disease. The molecular events underlying these effects are incompletely characterized. Similarly, the mechanisms underlying effects of factors that reduce the impact of aging on the brain, such as physical exercise, are also opaque. A study in this issue of PLOS Biology links the NVU to cognitive decline in the aging brain and suggests a potential underlying molecular mechanism. Notably, the study further links the protective effects of chronic exercise on cognition to neurovascular integrity during aging.

  6. Human emotion in the brain and the body: Why language matters. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Cornelia

    2015-06-01

    What is an Emotion? This question has fascinated scientific research since William James. Despite the fact that a consensus has been reached about the biological origin of emotions, uniquely human aspects of emotions are still poorly understood. One of these blind spots concerns the relationship between emotion and human language. Historically, many theories imply a duality between emotions on the one hand and cognitive functions such as language on the other hand. Especially for symbolic forms of written language and word processing, it has been assumed that semantic information would bear no relation to bodily, affective, or sensorimotor processing (for an overview see Ref. [1]). The Quartet Theory proposed by Koelsch and colleagues [2] could provide a solution to this problem. It offers a novel, integrative neurofunctional model of human emotions which considers language and emotion as closely related. Crucially, language - be it spoken or written - is assumed to "regulate, modulate, and partly initiate" activity in core affective brain systems in accord with physical needs and individual concerns [cf. page 34, line 995]. In this regard, the Quartet Theory combines assumptions from earlier bioinformational theories of emotions [3], contemporary theories of embodied cognition [4], and appraisal theories such as the Component Process Model [5] into one framework, thereby providing a holistic model for the neuroscientific investigation of human emotion processing at the interface of emotion and cognition, mind and body.

  7. Neural and Cognitive Modeling with Networks of Leaky Integrator Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graben, Peter beim; Liebscher, Thomas; Kurths, Jürgen

    After reviewing several physiological findings on oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and their possible explanations by dynamical modeling, we present neural networks consisting of leaky integrator units as a universal paradigm for neural and cognitive modeling. In contrast to standard recurrent neural networks, leaky integrator units are described by ordinary differential equations living in continuous time. We present an algorithm to train the temporal behavior of leaky integrator networks by generalized back-propagation and discuss their physiological relevance. Eventually, we show how leaky integrator units can be used to build oscillators that may serve as models of brain oscillations and cognitive processes.

  8. Integrated Debugging of Modelica Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Pop

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high abstraction level of equation-based object-oriented (EOO languages such as Modelica has the drawback that programming and modeling errors are often hard to find. In this paper we present integrated static and dynamic debugging methods for Modelica models and a debugger prototype that addresses several of those problems. The goal is an integrated debugging framework that combines classical debugging techniques with special techniques for equation-based languages partly based on graph visualization and interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first Modelica debugger that supports both equation-based transformational and algorithmic code debugging in an integrated fashion.

  9. Integrated Modeling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    American Economic Review , 71:1 (March 1981). 181 J.M. Jones and F. Zufryden. "Adding Explanatory Variables to a Consumer Purchase Behavior Model: An...McCall. "An Operational Measure of Liquidity," The American Economic Review , 761 (March 1986). WMSI Working Paper 329. 212 Nelson, R., R. Sarin, and R

  10. Integrated Computational Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    68.5%, 9.6% and 21.9%, respectively. The alloy density and Vickers microhardness were ρ = 8.23 ± 0.01 g/cm3 and Hv = 5288 ± 1 MPa. [3...and 3-D. Techniques to mechanically test materials at smaller scales were developed to better inform the deformation models. Also methods were...situ microscale tension testing technique was adapted to enable microscale fatigue testing on tensile dog-bone specimens. Microscale tensile fatigue

  11. Separations and safeguards model integration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

  12. Developing integrated care. Towards a development model for integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Minkman, Mirella M.N

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated care. Based on a systematic approach in which a literature study, a delphi study, a concept mapping study and questionnaire research are combined, a development model for integrated care is created....

  13. Developing Integrated Care: Towards a development model for integrated care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.N. Minkman (Mirella)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe thesis adresses the phenomenon of integrated care. The implementation of integrated care for patients with a stroke or dementia is studied. Because a generic quality management model for integrated care is lacking, the study works towards building a development model for integrated c

  14. Nano-Modeling and Computation in Bio and Brain Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Di Sia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of brain dynamics currently utilizes the new features of nanobiotechnology and bioengineering. New geometric and analytical approaches appear very promising in all scientific areas, particularly in the study of brain processes. Efforts to engage in deep comprehension lead to a change in the inner brain parameters, in order to mimic the external transformation by the proper use of sensors and effectors. This paper highlights some crossing research areas of natural computing, nanotechnology, and brain modeling and considers two interesting theoretical approaches related to brain dynamics: (a the memory in neural network, not as a passive element for storing information, but integrated in the neural parameters as synaptic conductances; and (b a new transport model based on analytical expressions of the most important transport parameters, which works from sub-pico-level to macro-level, able both to understand existing data and to give new predictions. Complex biological systems are highly dependent on the context, which suggests a “more nature-oriented” computational philosophy.

  15. An architecture for integration of multidisciplinary models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey; Holst, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , Enterprise Application Integration, and Integration Design Patterns. We developed an architecture of a multidisciplinary model integration framework that brings these three aspects of integration together. Service-oriented-based platform independent architecture that enables to establish loosely coupled...

  16. Exiting prostitution: an integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lynda M; Dalla, Rochelle L; Williamson, Celia

    2010-05-01

    Exiting street-level prostitution is a complex, convoluted process. Few studies have described this process within any formal conceptual framework. This article reviews two general models and two prostitution-specific models and their applicability to the exiting process. Barriers encountered as women attempt to leave the streets are identified. Based on the four models, the barriers, the prostitution literature, and the authors' experience with prostituted women, a new integrated six-stage model that is comprehensive in scope and sensitive to women's attempts to exit prostitution is offered as a foundation for continued research on the process of women leaving the streets.

  17. Virtual Heterogeneous Model Integration Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Memon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The classic way of building a software today sim-plistically consists in connecting a piece of code calling a method with the piece of code implementing that method. We consider these piece of code (software systems not calling anything, behaving in a non deterministic way and providing complex sets of services in different domains. In software engineering reusability is the holly grail, and specially the reusability of code from autonomus tools requires powerful compostion/integration mechanisms. These systems are developed by different developers and being modified inceremently. Integrating these autonomous tools generate various conflicts. To deal with these conflicts, current integration mechanisms defines specific set of rules to resolve these conflicts and accompalish integration. Indeed still there is a big chance that changes made by other developers, or they update their changes in order to make them compliant with other developers cancel the updates done by others. The approach presented here claims three contributions in the field of Hetrogeneous Software Integration. First, this approach eliminate the need of conflicts resolving mechanism. Secondly, it provides the mechanism to work in the presence of conflicts without resolving them. Finally, contribution is that the integration mechanism does not affect if either of the system evolves. We do this by introducing an intermediate virtual layer between two systems that introduce a delta models which consist of three parts; viability that share required elements, hiding that hide conflicting elements and aliasing that aliases same concepts in both systems.

  18. Melatonin Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Permeability via Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himakarnika Alluri

    Full Text Available Microvascular hyperpermeability that occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB often leads to vasogenic brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury (TBI. At a cellular level, tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells maintain the integrity of the BBB via TJ associated proteins particularly, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 that binds to the transmembrane TJPs and actin cytoskeleton intracellularly. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β as well as the proteolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are key mediators of trauma-associated brain edema. Recent studies indicate that melatonin a pineal hormone directly binds to MMP-9 and also might act as its endogenous inhibitor. We hypothesized that melatonin treatment will provide protection against TBI-induced BBB hyperpermeability via MMP-9 inhibition. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells grown as monolayers were used as an in vitro model of the BBB and a mouse model of TBI using a controlled cortical impactor was used for all in vivo studies. IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 2 hours-induced endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability was significantly attenuated by melatonin (10 μg/mL; 1 hour, GM6001 (broad spectrum MMP inhibitor; 10 μM; 1 hour, MMP-9 inhibitor-1 (MMP-9 specific inhibitor; 5 nM; 1 hour or MMP-9 siRNA transfection (48 hours in vitro. Melatonin and MMP-9 inhibitor-1 pretreatment attenuated IL-1β-induced MMP-9 activity, loss of ZO-1 junctional integrity and f-actin stress fiber formation. IL-1β treatment neither affected ZO-1 protein or mRNA expression or cell viability. Acute melatonin treatment attenuated BBB hyperpermeability in a mouse controlled cortical impact model of TBI in vivo. In conclusion, one of the protective effects of melatonin against BBB hyperpermeability occurs due to enhanced BBB integrity via MMP-9 inhibition. In addition, acute melatonin treatment provides protection against BBB

  19. Integrated modeling: a look back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Clark

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses applications and implementation approaches used for integrated modeling of structural systems with optics over the past 30 years. While much of the development work focused on control system design, significant contributions were made in system modeling and computer-aided design (CAD) environments. Early work appended handmade line-of-sight models to traditional finite element models, such as the optical spacecraft concept from the ACOSS program. The IDEAS2 computational environment built in support of Space Station collected a wider variety of existing tools around a parametric database. Later, IMOS supported interferometer and large telescope mission studies at JPL with MATLAB modeling of structural dynamics, thermal analysis, and geometric optics. IMOS's predecessor was a simple FORTRAN command line interpreter for LQG controller design with additional functions that built state-space finite element models. Specialized language systems such as CAESY were formulated and prototyped to provide more complex object-oriented functions suited to control-structure interaction. A more recent example of optical modeling directly in mechanical CAD is used to illustrate possible future directions. While the value of directly posing the optical metric in system dynamics terms is well understood today, the potential payoff is illustrated briefly via project-based examples. It is quite likely that integrated structure thermal optical performance (STOP) modeling could be accomplished in a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tool set. The work flow could be adopted, for example, by a team developing a small high-performance optical or radio frequency (RF) instrument.

  20. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ̆ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ̆cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ̄ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  1. Research on Perfusion CT in Rabbit Brain Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Bon Chul; Kwak, Byung Kook; Jung, Ji Sung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Chung Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated the vascular characteristics of tumors and normal tissue using perfusion CT in the rabbit brain tumor model. The VX2 carcinoma concentration of 1 x 10{sup 7} cells/ml(0.1 ml) was implanted in the brain of nine New Zealand white rabbits (weight: 2.4 kg-3.0 kg, mean: 2.6 kg). The perfusion CT was scanned when the tumors were grown up to 5 mm. The tumor volume and perfusion value were quantitatively analyzed by using commercial workstation (advantage windows workstation, AW, version 4.2, GE, USA). The mean volume of implanted tumors was 316{+-}181 mm{sup 3}, and the biggest and smallest volumes of tumor were 497 mm{sup 3} and 195 mm{sup 3}, respectively. All the implanted tumors in rabbits are single-nodular tumors, and intracranial metastasis was not observed. In the perfusion CT, cerebral blood volume (CBV) were 74.40{+-}9.63, 16.8{+-}0.64, 15.24{+-}3.23 ml/100g in the tumor core, ipsilateral normal brain, and contralateral normal brain, respectively (p{<=}0.05). In the cerebral blood flow (CBF), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (962.91{+-}75.96 vs. 357.82{+-}12.82 vs. 323.19{+-}83.24 ml/100g/min). In the mean transit time (MTT), there were significant differences between the tumor core and both normal brains (p{<=}0.05), but no significant differences between ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (4.37{+-}0.19 vs. 3.02{+-}0.41 vs. 2.86{+-}0.22 sec). In the permeability surface (PS), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains (47.23{+-}25.44 vs. 14.54{+-}1.60 vs. 6.81{+-}4.20 ml/100g/min)(p{<=}0.05). In the time to peak (TTP) were no significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and contralateral normal brains. In the positive enhancement integral (PEI), there were significant differences among the tumor core, ipsilateral and

  2. Comparing Structural Brain Connectivity by the Infinite Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Herlau, Tue; Dyrby, Tim;

    2013-01-01

    The growing focus in neuroimaging on analyzing brain connectivity calls for powerful and reliable statistical modeling tools. We examine the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) as a tool to identify and compare structure in brain connectivity graphs by contrasting its performance on graphs from...... modeling tool for the identification of structure and quantification of similarity in graphs of brain connectivity in general....

  3. Soliton interactions of integrable models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan Hangyu E-mail: hyruan@mail.nbip.net; Chen Yixin

    2003-08-01

    The solution of integrable (n+1)-dimensional KdV system in bilinear form yields a dromion solution that is localized in all directions. The interactions between two dromions are studied both in analytical and in numerical for three (n+1)-dimensional KdV-type equations (n=1, 2, 3). The same interactive properties between two dromions (solitons) are revealed for these models. The interactions between two dromions (solitons) may be elastic or inelastic for different form of solutions.

  4. Soliton interactions of integrable models

    CERN Document Server

    Ruan Hang Yu

    2003-01-01

    The solution of integrable (n+1)-dimensional KdV system in bilinear form yields a dromion solution that is localized in all directions. The interactions between two dromions are studied both in analytical and in numerical for three (n+1)-dimensional KdV-type equations (n=1, 2, 3). The same interactive properties between two dromions (solitons) are revealed for these models. The interactions between two dromions (solitons) may be elastic or inelastic for different form of solutions.

  5. Blast and the Consequences on Traumatic Brain Injury-Multiscale Mechanical Modeling of Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    brain and spinal cord injury, is the largest contributor to a poor neurological outcome in survivors of brain and spinal cord trauma. Microscale...anatomical features of a 50th percentile male head, including the brain, falx and tentorium, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), duramater, piamater, facial...discretized finite elements. (b) Sections of the head model; the right half of the head model is shown with the brain, the meningeal layers (dura

  6. The integrated environmental control model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.S.; Berkenpas, M.B.; Kalagnanam, J.R. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The capability to estimate the performance and cost of emission control systems is critical to a variety of planning and analysis requirements faced by utilities, regulators, researchers and analysts in the public and private sectors. The computer model described in this paper has been developed for DOe to provide an up-to-date capability for analyzing a variety of pre-combustion, combustion, and post-combustion options in an integrated framework. A unique capability allows performance and costs to be modeled probabilistically, which allows explicit characterization of uncertainties and risks.

  7. Brain-on-a-chip integrated neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    The brain-on-a-chip technology aims to provide an efficient and economic in vitro platform for brain disease study. In the well-known literature on brain-on-a-chip systems, nonstructured surfaces were conventionally used for the cell attachment in a culture chamber, therefore the neuronal networks g

  8. Cotangent Models for Integrable Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesenhofer, Anna; Miranda, Eva

    2017-03-01

    We associate cotangent models to a neighbourhood of a Liouville torus in symplectic and Poisson manifolds focusing on b-Poisson/ b-symplectic manifolds. The semilocal equivalence with such models uses the corresponding action-angle theorems in these settings: the theorem of Liouville-Mineur-Arnold for symplectic manifolds and an action-angle theorem for regular Liouville tori in Poisson manifolds (Laurent- Gengoux et al., IntMath Res Notices IMRN 8: 1839-1869, 2011). Our models comprise regular Liouville tori of Poisson manifolds but also consider the Liouville tori on the singular locus of a b-Poisson manifold. For this latter class of Poisson structures we define a twisted cotangent model. The equivalence with this twisted cotangent model is given by an action-angle theorem recently proved by the authors and Scott (Math. Pures Appl. (9) 105(1):66-85, 2016). This viewpoint of cotangent models provides a new machinery to construct examples of integrable systems, which are especially valuable in the b-symplectic case where not many sources of examples are known. At the end of the paper we introduce non-degenerate singularities as lifted cotangent models on b-symplectic manifolds and discuss some generalizations of these models to general Poisson manifolds.

  9. Combining the boundary shift integral and tensor-based morphometry for brain atrophy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalkiewicz, Mateusz; Pai, Akshay; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sommer, Stefan; Darkner, Sune; Sørensen, Lauge; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-03-01

    Brain atrophy from structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is widely used as an imaging surrogate marker for Alzheimers disease. Their utility has been limited due to the large degree of variance and subsequently high sample size estimates. The only consistent and reasonably powerful atrophy estimation methods has been the boundary shift integral (BSI). In this paper, we first propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method to measure voxel-wise atrophy that we combine with BSI. The combined model decreases the sample size estimates significantly when compared to BSI and TBM alone.

  10. The digital bee brain: integrating and managing neurons in a common 3D reference system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Rybak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The honeybee standard brain (HSB serves as an interactive tool for relating morphologies of bee brain neurons and provides a reference system for functional and bibliographical properties (http://www.neurobiologie.fu-berlin.de/beebrain/. The ultimate goal is to document not only the morphological network properties of neurons collected from separate brains, but also to establish a graphical user interface for a neuron-related data base. Here, we review the current methods and protocols used to incorporate neuronal reconstructions into the HSB. Our registration protocol consists of two separate steps applied to imaging data from two-channel confocal microscopy scans: (1 The reconstruction of the neuron, facilitated by an automatic extraction of the neuron’s skeleton based on threshold segmentation, and (2 the semi-automatic 3D segmentation of the neuropils and their registration with the HSB. The integration of neurons in the HSB is performed by applying the transformation computed in step (2 to the reconstructed neurons of step (1. The most critical issue of this protocol in terms of user interaction time – the segmentation process – is drastically improved by the use of a model-based segmentation process. Furthermore, the underlying statistical shape models (SSM allow the visualization and analysis of characteristic variations in large sets of bee brain data. The anatomy of neural networks composed of multiple neurons that are registered into the HSB are visualized by depicting the 3D reconstructions together with semantic information with the objective to integrate data from multiple sources (electrophysiology, imaging, immunocytochemistry, molecular biology. Ultimately, this will allow the user to specify cell types and retrieve their morphologies along with physiological characterizations.

  11. DIRECT INTEGRATION METHODS WITH INTEGRAL MODEL FOR DYNAMIC SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕和祥; 于洪洁; 裘春航

    2001-01-01

    A new approach which is a direct integration method with integral model ( DIM IM) to solve dynamic governing equations is presented. The governing equations are integrated into the integral equations. An algorithm with explicit and predict-correct and selfstarting and fourth-order accuracy to integrate the integral equations is given.Theoretical analysis and numerical examples show that DIM-IM discribed in this paper suitable for strong nonlinear and non-conservative system have higher accuracy than central difference, Houbolt , Newmark and Wilson- Theta methods.

  12. Neural mass model-based tracking of anesthetic brain states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Levin; Freestone, Dean R.; Manton, Jonathan H.; Heyse, Bjorn; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Lipping, Tarmo; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Liley, David T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Neural mass model-based tracking of brain states from electroencephalographic signals holds the promise of simultaneously tracking brain states while inferring underlying physiological changes in various neuroscientific and clinical applications. Here, neural mass model-based tracking of brain state

  13. Imatinib treatment reduces brain injury in a murine model of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enming Joe Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for Traumatic brain injury (TBI focus on stabilizing individuals and on preventing further damage from the secondary consequences of TBI. A major complication of TBI is cerebral edema, which can be caused by the loss of blood brain barrier (BBB integrity. Recent studies in several CNS pathologies have shown that activation of latent platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC within the brain can promote BBB permeability through PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα signaling, and that blocking this pathway improves outcomes. In this study we examine the efficacy for the treatment of TBI of an FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα, Imatinib. Using a murine model we show that Imatinib treatment, begun 45 minutes after TBI and given twice daily for 5 days, significantly reduces BBB dysfunction. This is associated with significantly reduced lesion size 24 hours, 7 days, and 21 days after TBI, reduced cerebral edema, determined from apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC measurements, and with the preservation of cognitive function. Finally, analysis of CSF from human TBI patients suggests a possible correlation between high PDGF-CC levels and increased injury severity. Thus, our data suggests a novel strategy for the treatment of TBI with an existing FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα.

  14. Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM) is a decision-support software product for resource-and-capacity planning. Users can evaluate changing constraints on schedule performance, projected cost, and resource use. IRPM is a unique software tool that can analyze complex business situations from a basic supply chain to an integrated production facility to a distributed manufacturing complex. IRPM can be efficiently configured through a user-friendly graphical interface to rapidly provide charts, graphs, tables, and/or written results to summarize postulated business scenarios. There is not a similar integrated resource planning software package presently available. Many different businesses (from government to large corporations as well as medium-to-small manufacturing concerns) could save thousands of dollars and hundreds of labor hours in resource and schedule planning costs. Those businesses also could avoid millions of dollars of revenue lost from fear of overcommitting or from penalties and lost future business for failing to meet promised delivery by using IRPM to perform what-if business-case evaluations. Tough production planning questions that previously were left unanswered can now be answered with a high degree of certainty. Businesses can anticipate production problems and have solutions in hand to deal with those problems. IRPM allows companies to make better plans, decisions, and investments.

  15. On a Quantum Model of Brain Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, K.-H.; Fichtner, L.; Freudenberg, W.; Ohya, M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main activities of the brain is the recognition of signals. A first attempt to explain the process of recognition in terms of quantum statistics was given in [6]. Subsequently, details of the mathematical model were presented in a (still incomplete) series of papers (cf. [7, 2, 5, 10]). In the present note we want to give a general view of the principal ideas of this approach. We will introduce the basic spaces and justify the choice of spaces and operations. Further, we bring the model face to face with basic postulates any statistical model of the recognition process should fulfill. These postulates are in accordance with the opinion widely accepted in psychology and neurology.

  16. Diffusion Based Modeling of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    CERN Document Server

    Namazi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Human brain response is the overall ability of the brain in analyzing internal and external stimuli in the form of transferred energy to the mind/brain phase-space and thus, making the proper decisions. During the last decade scientists discovered about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research there was less effort which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling of human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, due to receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equation. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus, this model can be used as a strong representative of the human brain activity.

  17. Brain Dynamics An Introduction to Models and Simualtions

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Brain Dynamics serves to introduce graduate students and nonspecialists from various backgrounds to the field of mathematical and computational neurosciences. Some of the advanced chapters will also be of interest to the specialists. The book approaches the subject through pulse-coupled neural networks, with at their core the lighthouse and integrate-and-fire models, which allow for the highly flexible modelling of realistic synaptic activity, synchronization and spatio-temporal pattern formation. Topics also include pulse-averaged equations and their application to movement coordination. The book closes with a short analysis of models versus the real neurophysiological system. The second edition has been thoroughly updated and augmented by two extensive chapters that discuss the interplay between pattern recognition and synchronization. Further, to enhance the usefulness as textbook and for self-study, the detailed solutions for all 34 exercises throughout the text have been added.

  18. An integrated modelling framework for neural circuits with multiple neuromodulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemana, Vinith

    2017-01-01

    Neuromodulators are endogenous neurochemicals that regulate biophysical and biochemical processes, which control brain function and behaviour, and are often the targets of neuropharmacological drugs. Neuromodulator effects are generally complex partly owing to the involvement of broad innervation, co-release of neuromodulators, complex intra- and extrasynaptic mechanism, existence of multiple receptor subtypes and high interconnectivity within the brain. In this work, we propose an efficient yet sufficiently realistic computational neural modelling framework to study some of these complex behaviours. Specifically, we propose a novel dynamical neural circuit model that integrates the effective neuromodulator-induced currents based on various experimental data (e.g. electrophysiology, neuropharmacology and voltammetry). The model can incorporate multiple interacting brain regions, including neuromodulator sources, simulate efficiently and easily extendable to large-scale brain models, e.g. for neuroimaging purposes. As an example, we model a network of mutually interacting neural populations in the lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus, which are major sources of neuromodulator orexin/hypocretin, serotonin and norepinephrine/noradrenaline, respectively, and which play significant roles in regulating many physiological functions. We demonstrate that such a model can provide predictions of systemic drug effects of the popular antidepressants (e.g. reuptake inhibitors), neuromodulator antagonists or their combinations. Finally, we developed user-friendly graphical user interface software for model simulation and visualization for both fundamental sciences and pharmacological studies. PMID:28100828

  19. Multiscale modeling and simulation of brain blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perdikaris, Paris, E-mail: parisp@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Grinberg, Leopold, E-mail: leopoldgrinberg@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J Watson Research Center, 1 Rogers St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 (United States); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: george-karniadakis@brown.edu [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of recent advances in multi-scale modeling of brain blood flow. In particular, we present some approaches that enable the in silico study of multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena in the cerebral vasculature. We discuss the formulation of continuum and atomistic modeling approaches, present a consistent framework for their concurrent coupling, and list some of the challenges that one needs to overcome in achieving a seamless and scalable integration of heterogeneous numerical solvers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is demonstrated in a realistic case involving modeling the thrombus formation process taking place on the wall of a patient-specific cerebral aneurysm. This highlights the ability of multi-scale algorithms to resolve important biophysical processes that span several spatial and temporal scales, potentially yielding new insight into the key aspects of brain blood flow in health and disease. Finally, we discuss open questions in multi-scale modeling and emerging topics of future research.

  20. The BRAIN Initiative Provides a Unifying Context for Integrating Core STEM Competencies into a Neurobiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jennifer E

    2016-01-01

    The Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative introduced by the Obama Administration in 2013 presents a context for integrating many STEM competencies into undergraduate neuroscience coursework. The BRAIN Initiative core principles overlap with core STEM competencies identified by the AAAS Vision and Change report and other entities. This neurobiology course utilizes the BRAIN Initiative to serve as the unifying theme that facilitates a primary emphasis on student competencies such as scientific process, scientific communication, and societal relevance while teaching foundational neurobiological content such as brain anatomy, cellular neurophysiology, and activity modulation. Student feedback indicates that the BRAIN Initiative is an engaging and instructional context for this course. Course module organization, suitable BRAIN Initiative commentary literature, sample primary literature, and important assignments are presented.

  1. Brain systems for probabilistic and dynamic prediction: computational specificity and integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill X O'Reilly

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A computational approach to functional specialization suggests that brain systems can be characterized in terms of the types of computations they perform, rather than their sensory or behavioral domains. We contrasted the neural systems associated with two computationally distinct forms of predictive model: a reinforcement-learning model of the environment obtained through experience with discrete events, and continuous dynamic forward modeling. By manipulating the precision with which each type of prediction could be used, we caused participants to shift computational strategies within a single spatial prediction task. Hence (using fMRI we showed that activity in two brain systems (typically associated with reward learning and motor control could be dissociated in terms of the forms of computations that were performed there, even when both systems were used to make parallel predictions of the same event. A region in parietal cortex, which was sensitive to the divergence between the predictions of the models and anatomically connected to both computational networks, is proposed to mediate integration of the two predictive modes to produce a single behavioral output.

  2. Genetic basis of neurocognitive decline and reduced white-matter integrity in normal human brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glahn, David C; Kent, Jack W; Sprooten, Emma; Diego, Vincent P; Winkler, Anderson M; Curran, Joanne E; McKay, D Reese; Knowles, Emma E; Carless, Melanie A; Göring, Harald H H; Dyer, Thomas D; Olvera, Rene L; Fox, Peter T; Almasy, Laura; Charlesworth, Jac; Kochunov, Peter; Duggirala, Ravi; Blangero, John

    2013-11-19

    Identification of genes associated with brain aging should markedly improve our understanding of the biological processes that govern normal age-related decline. However, challenges to identifying genes that facilitate successful brain aging are considerable, including a lack of established phenotypes and difficulties in modeling the effects of aging per se, rather than genes that influence the underlying trait. In a large cohort of randomly selected pedigrees (n = 1,129 subjects), we documented profound aging effects from young adulthood to old age (18-83 y) on neurocognitive ability and diffusion-based white-matter measures. Despite significant phenotypic correlation between white-matter integrity and tests of processing speed, working memory, declarative memory, and intelligence, no evidence for pleiotropy between these classes of phenotypes was observed. Applying an advanced quantitative gene-by-environment interaction analysis where age is treated as an environmental factor, we demonstrate a heritable basis for neurocognitive deterioration as a function of age. Furthermore, by decomposing gene-by-aging (G × A) interactions, we infer that different genes influence some neurocognitive traits as a function of age, whereas other neurocognitive traits are influenced by the same genes, but to differential levels, from young adulthood to old age. In contrast, increasing white-matter incoherence with age appears to be nongenetic. These results clearly demonstrate that traits sensitive to the genetic influences on brain aging can be identified, a critical first step in delineating the biological mechanisms of successful aging.

  3. Modified Heisenberg Ferromagnet Model and Integrable Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate some integrable modified Heisenberg ferromagnet models by using the prolongation structure theory. Through associating them with the motion of curve in Minkowski space, the corresponding coupled integrable equations are presented.

  4. Model human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2008-01-01

    A new model is suggested and used to mimic various spatial or temporal designs in biological or non biological formations where the focus is on the normal or irregular electrical signals coming from human heart (ECG) or brain (EEG). The electrical activities in several muscles (EMG) or neurons or other organs of human or various animals, such as lobster pyloric neuron, guinea pig inferior olivary neuron, sepia giant axon and mouse neocortical pyramidal neuron and some spatial formations are also considered (in Appendix). In the biological applications, several elements (cells or tissues) in an organ are taken as various entries in a representative lattice (mesh) where the entries are connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences. The biological elements evolve in time (with the given tissue or organ) in terms of the mentioned connections (interactions) besides some individual feedings. The anatomical diversity of the species (or organs) is handled in terms o...

  5. Modeling brain resonance phenomena using a neural mass model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spiegler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation with rhythmic light flicker (photic driving plays an important role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, mood disorder, migraine, and epilepsy. In particular, the adjustment of spontaneous brain rhythms to the stimulus frequency (entrainment is used to assess the functional flexibility of the brain. We aim to gain deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this technique and to predict the effects of stimulus frequency and intensity. For this purpose, a modified Jansen and Rit neural mass model (NMM of a cortical circuit is used. This mean field model has been designed to strike a balance between mathematical simplicity and biological plausibility. We reproduced the entrainment phenomenon observed in EEG during a photic driving experiment. More generally, we demonstrate that such a single area model can already yield very complex dynamics, including chaos, for biologically plausible parameter ranges. We chart the entire parameter space by means of characteristic Lyapunov spectra and Kaplan-Yorke dimension as well as time series and power spectra. Rhythmic and chaotic brain states were found virtually next to each other, such that small parameter changes can give rise to switching from one to another. Strikingly, this characteristic pattern of unpredictability generated by the model was matched to the experimental data with reasonable accuracy. These findings confirm that the NMM is a useful model of brain dynamics during photic driving. In this context, it can be used to study the mechanisms of, for example, perception and epileptic seizure generation. In particular, it enabled us to make predictions regarding the stimulus amplitude in further experiments for improving the entrainment effect.

  6. Associations between insulin action and integrity of brain microstructure differ with familial longevity and with age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola A. Akintola

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired glucose metabolism and type 2 diabetes have been associated with cognitive decline, dementia, and with structural and functional brain features. However, it is unclear whether these associations differ in individuals that differ in familial longevity or age. Here, we investigated the association between parameters of glucose metabolism and microstructural brain integrity in offspring of long-lived families (offspring and controls; and age categories thereof. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants underwent oral glucose tolerance test to assess glycemia (fasted glucose and glucose area-under-the-curve (AUC, insulin resistance (fasted insulin, AUCinsulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and pancreatic Beta cell secretory capacity (insulinogenic index. 3Tesla MRI and Magnetization Transfer (MT imaging MT-ratio peak-height was used to quantify differences in microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity that remain invisible on conventional MRI. Analyses were performed in offspring and age-matched controls, with and without stratification for age.In the full offspring group only, reduced peak-height in grey and white matter was inversely associated with AUCinsulin, fasted insulin, HOMA-IR and insulinogenic-index (all p65 years: in younger controls, significantly stronger inverse associations were observed between peak-height and fasted glucose, AUCglucose, fasted insulin, AUCinsulin and HOMA-IR in grey matter; and for AUCglucose, fasted insulin and HOMA-IR in white matter (all P-interaction<0.05. Although the strength of the associations tended to attenuate with age in the offspring group, the difference between age groups was not statistically significant. Thus, associations between impaired insulin action and reduced microstructural brain parenchymal tissue homogeneity were stronger in offspring compared to controls, and seemed to diminish with age.

  7. Architectural view model for an integration platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Górski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common architectural view model is "4+1" by Philipe Kruchten. This model presents the views required for a full description of computer system architecture. By contrast, this model seems to be insufficient to describe architecture of integration platform. Definitely lacks the view of integrated business processes. In the serviceoriented approach, one of the basic elements is a contract. It should also be included in the description of the architecture. Moreover, very important are integration mechanisms and mediation flows that should be presented in the description of architecture. Hence the need for integrated services view, and manner of their integration on the enterprise service bus. Use case view should also be extended by stereotypes required for presenting functionality exposed for other computer systems. It is therefore proposed architectural view model “1+5” for an integration platform. This model has following architectural views: Integrated processes, Use Cases, Logical, Integrated Services, Contracts, Deployment. Furthermore, in article was presented new UML profile "UML Profile for Integration Flows". In the profile were placed stereotypes corresponding to integration patterns and mediation mechanisms. It is important, that UML activity diagram was extended and its special form was obtained to model mediation flows on integration platform. Thus was proposed a new UML diagram: mediation flows diagram.

  8. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited Although blast-induced traumatic brain injury (BI- TBI ) is a significant cause of morbidity and behavioral...survival model of BI- TBI in swine. Traumatic Brain Injury , Swine, Blast, Model Development U U U 7 USAMRMC W81XWH-08-2-0082... Injury , TBI Scientific Advisor, Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury ) and Dr. Tamara Crowder at the DoD

  9. Impaired Visual Integration in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: An Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Königs (Marsh); W.D. Weeda (Wouter D.); L.W.E. Van Heurn (L.W. Ernest); R.J. Vermeulen (R. Jeroen); J.C. Goslings (Carel); J.S.K. Luitse (Jan S.K.); B.T. Poll-Thé (Bwee Tien); A. Beelen (Anita); M. Van Der Wees (Marleen); R.J.J.K. Kemps (Rachèl J.J.K.); C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets (Coriene); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground Axonal injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may cause impaired sensory integration. We aim to determine the effects of childhood TBI on visual integration in relation to general neurocognitive functioning. Methods We compared children aged 6-13 diagnosed with TBI (n = 103

  10. Modeling the brain-pituitary-gonad axis in salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghan; Hayton, William L.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2006-08-24

    To better understand the complexity of the brain-pituitary-gonad axis (BPG) in fish, we developed a biologically based pharmacodynamic model capable of accurately predicting the normal functioning of the BPG axis in salmon. This first-generation model consisted of a set of 13 equations whose formulation was guided by published values for plasma concentrations of pituitary- (FSH, LH) and ovary- (estradiol, 17a,20b-dihydroxy-4-pregnene-3-one) derived hormones measured in Coho salmon over an annual spawning period. In addition, the model incorporated pertinent features of previously published mammalian models and indirect response pharmacodynamic models. Model-based equations include a description of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis and release from the hypothalamus, which is controlled by environmental variables such as photoperiod and water temperature. GnRH stimulated the biosynthesis of mRNA for FSH and LH, which were also influenced by estradiol concentration in plasma. The level of estradiol in the plasma was regulated by the oocytes, which moved along a maturation progression. Estradiol was synthesized at a basal rate and as oocytes matured, stimulation of its biosynthesis occurred. The BPG model can be integrated with toxico-genomic, -proteomic data, allowing linkage between molecular based biomarkers and reproduction in fish.

  11. Volatile anesthetics influence blood-brain barrier integrity by modulation of tight junction protein expression in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge C Thal

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI. As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be important to elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ such as zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and claudin-5 (cl5 play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthetics sevoflurane and isoflurane on in-vitro BBB integrity was investigated by quantification of the electrical resistance (TEER in murine brain endothelial monolayers and neurovascular co-cultures of the BBB. Secondly brain edema and TJ expression of ZO-1 and cl5 were measured in-vivo after exposure towards volatile anesthetics in native mice and after controlled cortical impact (CCI. In in-vitro endothelial monocultures, both anesthetics significantly reduced TEER within 24 hours after exposure. In BBB co-cultures mimicking the neurovascular unit (NVU volatile anesthetics had no impact on TEER. In healthy mice, anesthesia did not influence brain water content and TJ expression, while 24 hours after CCI brain water content increased significantly stronger with isoflurane compared to sevoflurane. In line with the brain edema data, ZO-1 expression was significantly higher in sevoflurane compared to isoflurane exposed CCI animals. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed disruption of ZO-1 at the cerebrovascular level, while cl5 was less affected in the pericontusional area. The study demonstrates that anesthetics influence brain edema formation after experimental TBI. This effect may be attributed to modulation of BBB permeability by differential TJ protein expression. Therefore, selection of anesthetics may influence the barrier function and introduce a strong bias in experimental research on pathophysiology of BBB dysfunction. Future research is required to investigate

  12. Digital, Three-dimensional Average Shaped Atlas of the Heliothis Virescens Brain with Integrated Gustatory and Olfactory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvello, Pål; Løfaldli, Bjarte Bye; Rybak, Jürgen; Menzel, Randolf; Mustaparta, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    We use the moth Heliothis virescens as model organism for studying the neural network involved in chemosensory coding and learning. The constituent neurons are characterised by intracellular recordings combined with staining, resulting in a single neuron identified in each brain preparation. In order to spatially relate the neurons of different preparations a common brain framework was required. We here present an average shaped atlas of the moth brain. It is based on 11 female brain preparations, each stained with a fluorescent synaptic marker and scanned in confocal laser-scanning microscope. Brain neuropils of each preparation were manually reconstructed in the computer software Amira, followed by generating the atlas using the Iterative Shape Average Procedure. To demonstrate the application of the atlas we have registered two olfactory and two gustatory interneurons, as well as the axonal projections of gustatory receptor neurons into the atlas, visualising their spatial relationships. The olfactory interneurons, showing the typical morphology of inner-tract antennal lobe projection neurons, projected in the calyces of the mushroom body and laterally in the protocerebral lobe. The two gustatory interneurons, responding to sucrose and quinine respectively, projected in different areas of the brain. The wide projections of the quinine responding neuron included a lateral area adjacent to the projections of the olfactory interneurons. The sucrose responding neuron was confined to the suboesophageal ganglion with dendritic arborisations overlapping the axonal projections of the gustatory receptor neurons on the proboscis. By serving as a tool for the integration of neurons, the atlas offers visual access to the spatial relationship between the neurons in three dimensions, and thus facilitates the study of neuronal networks in the Heliothis virescens brain. The moth standard brain is accessible at http://www.ntnu.no/biolog/english/neuroscience/brain.

  13. Performance modeling of a wearable brain PET (BET) camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtlein, C. R.; Turner, J. N.; Thompson, M. O.; Mandal, K. C.; Häggström, I.; Zhang, J.; Humm, J. L.; Feiglin, D. H.; Krol, A.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To explore, by means of analytical and Monte Carlo modeling, performance of a novel lightweight and low-cost wearable helmet-shaped Brain PET (BET) camera based on thin-film digital Geiger Avalanche Photo Diode (dGAPD) with LSO and LaBr3 scintillators for imaging in vivo human brain processes for freely moving and acting subjects responding to various stimuli in any environment. Methods: We performed analytical and Monte Carlo modeling PET performance of a spherical cap BET device and cylindrical brain PET (CYL) device, both with 25 cm diameter and the same total mass of LSO scintillator. Total mass of LSO in both the BET and CYL systems is about 32 kg for a 25 mm thick scintillator, and 13 kg for 10 mm thick scintillator (assuming an LSO density of 7.3 g/ml). We also investigated a similar system using an LaBr3 scintillator corresponding to 22 kg and 9 kg for the 25 mm and 10 mm thick systems (assuming an LaBr3 density of 5.08 g/ml). In addition, we considered a clinical whole body (WB) LSO PET/CT scanner with 82 cm ring diameter and 15.8 cm axial length to represent a reference system. BET consisted of distributed Autonomous Detector Arrays (ADAs) integrated into Intelligent Autonomous Detector Blocks (IADBs). The ADA comprised of an array of small LYSO scintillator volumes (voxels with base a×a: 1.0 50% better noise equivalent count (NEC) performance relative to the CYL geometry, and >1100% better performance than a WB geometry for 25 mm thick LSO and LaBr3. For 10 mm thick LaBr3 equivalent mass systems LSO (7 mm thick) performed ~40% higher NEC than LaBr3. Analytic and Monte Carlo simulations also showed that 1×1×3 mm scintillator crystals can achieve ~1.2 mm FWHM spatial resolution. Conclusions: This study shows that a spherical cap brain PET system can provide improved NEC while preserving spatial resolution when compared to an equivalent dedicated cylindrical PET brain camera and shows greatly improved PET performance relative to a conventional

  14. PLATO: data-oriented approach to collaborative large-scale brain system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannon, Takayuki; Inagaki, Keiichiro; Kamiji, Nilton L; Makimura, Kouji; Usui, Shiro

    2011-11-01

    The brain is a complex information processing system, which can be divided into sub-systems, such as the sensory organs, functional areas in the cortex, and motor control systems. In this sense, most of the mathematical models developed in the field of neuroscience have mainly targeted a specific sub-system. In order to understand the details of the brain as a whole, such sub-system models need to be integrated toward the development of a neurophysiologically plausible large-scale system model. In the present work, we propose a model integration library where models can be connected by means of a common data format. Here, the common data format should be portable so that models written in any programming language, computer architecture, and operating system can be connected. Moreover, the library should be simple so that models can be adapted to use the common data format without requiring any detailed knowledge on its use. Using this library, we have successfully connected existing models reproducing certain features of the visual system, toward the development of a large-scale visual system model. This library will enable users to reuse and integrate existing and newly developed models toward the development and simulation of a large-scale brain system model. The resulting model can also be executed on high performance computers using Message Passing Interface (MPI).

  15. Brain Wave Biofeedback: Benefits of Integrating Neurofeedback in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jane E.; Young, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the "2009 Standards" of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs, counselors must understand neurobiological behavior in individuals of all developmental levels. This requires understanding the brain and strategies for applying neurobiological concepts in counseling practice, training, and…

  16. Field theory model of brain extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Molochkov, Alexander; Goy, Vladimir; Tolstonogov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    The perineural net (PNN) is responsible for synaptic stabilization of adult brain. It plays an important role in brain signal processing and non-synaptic signal transfer as well [ 1]. Since it is composed of largely negatively charged chains of disaccharides, it can be easily affected by strong external electromagnetic field irradiated by high-energy particles passing brain tissues. One of the effects of such exposure is a cognitive impairment. Since outside of the Bragg peak area local elect...

  17. The selectivity and promiscuity of brain-neuroregenerative inhibitors between ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms: An integration of SB-QSSR modelling, QM/MM analysis and in vitro kinase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Yang, Y; Lu, X

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) have long been recognized as an attractive therapeutic target for various neurological diseases; selective inhibition of ROCK1 and ROCK2 isoforms would result in distinct biological effects on neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and neuroregeneration after brain surgery and traumatic brain injury. However, the discovery and design of isoform-selective inhibitors remain a great challenge due to the high conservation and similarity between the kinase domains of ROCK1 and ROCK2. Here, a structure-based quantitative structure-selectivity relationship (SB-QSSR) approach was used to correlate experimentally measured selectivity with the difference in inhibitor binding to the two kinase isoforms. The resulting regression models were examined rigorously through both internal cross-validation and external blind validation; a nonlinear predictor was found to have high fitting stability and strong generalization ability, which was then employed to perform virtual screening against a structurally diverse, drug-like compound library. Consequently, five and seven hits were identified as promising candidates of 1-o-2 and 2-o-1 selective inhibitors, respectively, from which seven purchasable compounds were tested in vitro using a standard kinase assay protocol to determine their inhibitory activity against and selectivity between ROCK1 and ROCK2. The structural basis, energetic property and biological implication underlying inhibitor selectivity and promiscuity were also investigated systematically using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) scheme.

  18. Integrated spatial sampling modeling of geospatial data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lianfa; WANG Jinfeng

    2004-01-01

    Spatial sampling is a necessary and important method for extracting geospatial data and its methodology directly affects the geo-analysis results. Counter to the deficiency of separate models of spatial sampling, this article analyzes three crucial elements of spatial sampling (frame, correlation and decision diagram) and induces its general integrated model. The program of Spatial Sampling Integration (SSI) has been developed with Component Object Model (COM) to realize the general integrated model. In two practical applications, i.e. design of the monitoring network of natural disasters and sampling survey of the areas of non-cultivated land, SSI has produced accurate results at less cost, better realizing the cost-effective goal of sampling toward the geo-objects with spatial correlation. The two cases exemplify expanded application and convenient implementation of the general integrated model with inset components in an integrated environment, which can also be extended to other modeling of spatial analysis.

  19. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  20. Action and Language Mechanisms in the Brain: Data, Models and Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arbib, Michael A.; Bonaiuto, James J.; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2014-01-01

    We assess the challenges of studying action and language mechanisms in the brain, both singly and in relation to each other to provide a novel perspective on neuroinformatics, integrating the development of databases for encoding - separately or together - neurocomputational models and empirical...

  1. Modeling Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    02139 D. Moore Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (WRAMC) 6900 Georgia Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20307 L. Noels University of Liege Chemin des...chevreuils 1, B4000 Liege , Belgium ABSTRACT Recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the wartime effect of traumatic brain in

  2. Galectin-1 suppresses methamphetamine induced neuroinflammation in human brain microvascular endothelial cells: Neuroprotective role in maintaining blood brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Neil U; Aalinkeel, R; Reynolds, J L; Nair, B B; Sykes, D E; Mammen, M J; Schwartz, S A; Mahajan, S D

    2015-10-22

    Methamphetamine (Meth) abuse can lead to the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity leading to compromised CNS function. The role of Galectins in the angiogenesis process in tumor-associated endothelial cells (EC) is well established; however no data are available on the expression of Galectins in normal human brain microvascular endothelial cells and their potential role in maintaining BBB integrity. We evaluated the basal gene/protein expression levels of Galectin-1, -3 and -9 in normal primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that constitute the BBB and examined whether Meth altered Galectin expression in these cells, and if Galectin-1 treatment impacted the integrity of an in-vitro BBB. Our results showed that BMVEC expressed significantly higher levels of Galectin-1 as compared to Galectin-3 and -9. Meth treatment increased Galectin-1 expression in BMVEC. Meth induced decrease in TJ proteins ZO-1, Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was reversed by Galectin-1. Our data suggests that Galectin-1 is involved in BBB remodeling and can increase levels of TJ proteins ZO-1 and Claudin-3 and adhesion molecule ICAM-1 which helps maintain BBB tightness thus playing a neuroprotective role. Galectin-1 is thus an important regulator of immune balance from neurodegeneration to neuroprotection, which makes it an important therapeutic agent/target in the treatment of drug addiction and other neurological conditions.

  3. Fluid-percussion–induced traumatic brain injury model in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Various attempts have been made to replicate clinical TBI using animal models. The fluid-percussion model (FP) is one of the oldest and most commonly used models of experimentally induced TBI. Both central (CFP) and lateral (LFP) variations of the model have been used. Developed initially for use in larger species, the standard FP device was adapted more than 20 years ago to induce consistent degrees of brain injury in ...

  4. Modeling Brain Circuitry over a Wide Range of Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eFua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available If we are ever to unravel the mysteries of brain function at its most fundamental level, we will need a precise understanding of how its component neurons connect to each other. Electron Microscopes (EM can now provide the nanometer resolution that is needed to image synapses, and therefore connections, while Light Microscopes (LM see at the micrometer resolution required to model the 3D structure of the dendritic network. Since both the topology and the connection strength are integral parts of the brain's wiring diagram, being able to combine these two modalities is critically important.In fact, these microscopes now routinely produce high-resolution imagery in such large quantities that the bottleneck becomes automated processing and interpretation, which is needed for such data to be exploited to its full potential. In this paper, we briefly review the Computer Vision techniques we have developed at EPFL to address this need. They include delineating dendritic arbors from LM imagery, segmenting organelles from EM, and combining the two into a consistent representation.

  5. MEASURING INFORMATION INTEGR-ATION MODEL FOR CAD/CMM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A CAD/CMM workpiece modeling system based on IGES file is proposed. The modeling system is implemented by using a new method for labelling the tolerance items of 3D workpiece. The concept-"feature face" is used in the method. First the CAD data of workpiece are extracted and recognized automatically. Then a workpiece model is generated, which is the integration of pure 3D geometry form with its corresponding inspection items. The principle of workpiece modeling is also presented. At last, the experiment results are shown and correctness of the model is certified.

  6. NF-κB and epigenetic mechanisms as integrative regulators of brain resilience to anoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnico, Ilenia; Branca, Caterina; Lanzillotta, Annamaria; Porrini, Vanessa; Benarese, Marina; Spano, Pier Franco; Pizzi, Marina

    2012-10-02

    Brain cells display an amazing ability to respond to several different types of environmental stimuli and integrate this response physiologically. Some of these responses can outlive the original stimulus by days, weeks or even longer. Long-lasting changes in both physiological and pathological conditions occurring in response to external stimuli are almost always mediated by changes in gene expression. To effect these changes, cells have developed an impressive repertoire of signaling systems designed to modulate the activity of numerous transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms affecting the chromatin structure. Since its initial characterization in the nervous system, NF-κB has shown to respond to multiple signals and elicit pleiotropic activities suggesting that it may play a pivotal role in integration of different types of information within the brain. Ample evidence demonstrates that NF-κB factors are engaged in and necessary for neuronal development and synaptic plasticity, but they also regulate brain response to environmental noxae. By focusing on the complexity of NF-κB transcriptional activity in neuronal cell death, it emerged that the composition of NF-κB active dimers finely tunes the neuronal vulnerability to brain ischemia. Even though we are only beginning to understand the contribution of distinct NF-κB family members to the regulation of gene transcription in the brain, an additional level of regulation of NF-κB activity has emerged as operated by the epigenetic mechanisms modulating histone acetylation. We will discuss NF-κB and epigenetic mechanisms as integrative regulators of brain resilience to anoxic stress and useful drug targets for restoration of brain function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration.

  7. Acquisition Integration Models: How Large Companies Successfully Integrate Startups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Carbone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A have been popular means for many companies to address the increasing pace and level of competition that they face. Large companies have pursued acquisitions to more quickly access technology, markets, and customers, and this approach has always been a viable exit strategy for startups. However, not all deals deliver the anticipated benefits, in large part due to poor integration of the acquired assets into the acquiring company. Integration can greatly impact the success of the acquisition and, indeed, the combined company’s overall market success. In this article, I explore the implementation of several integration models that have been put into place by a large company and extract principles that may assist negotiating parties with maximizing success. This perspective may also be of interest to smaller companies as they explore exit options while trying to ensure continued market success after acquisition. I assert that business success with acquisitions is dependent on an appropriate integration model, but that asset integration is not formulaic. Any integration effort must consider the specific market context and personnel involved.

  8. Integrated modelling in materials and process technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    processes from the viewpoint of combined materials and process modelling are presented: solidification of thin walled ductile cast iron, integrated modelling of spray forming and multiphysics modelling of friction stir welding. The fourth example describes integrated modelling applied to a failure analysis...... of premature rupture of a stellite weld on a P91 valve used in a power plant. For all four examples, the focus is put on modelling results rather than describing the models in detail. Proper comparison with experimental work is given in all examples for model validation as well as relevant references...

  9. No need to talk, I know you: familiarity influences early multisensory integration in a songbird's brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle GEORGE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that visual information can affect auditory perception, as in the famous McGurk effect, but little is known concerning the processes involved. To address this issue, we used the best-developed animal model to study language-related processes in the brain: songbirds. European starlings were exposed to audiovisual compared to auditory-only playback of conspecific songs, while electrophysiological recordings were made in their primary auditory area (Field L. The results show that the audiovisual condition modulated the auditory responses. Enhancement and suppression were both observed, depending on the stimulus familiarity. Seeing a familiar bird led to suppressed auditory responses while seeing an unfamiliar bird led to response enhancement, suggesting that unisensory perception may be enough if the stimulus is familiar while redundancy may be required for unfamiliar items. This is to our knowledge the first evidence that multisensory integration may occur in a low-level, putatively unisensory area of a non-mammalian vertebrate brain, and also that familiarity of the stimuli may influence modulation of auditory responses by vision.

  10. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  11. Digital, three-dimensional average shaped atlas of the heliothis virescens brain with integrated gustatory and olfactory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål Kvello

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We use the moth Heliothis virescens as model organism for studying the neural network involved in chemosensory coding and learning. The constituent neurons are characterised by intracellular recordings combined with staining, resulting in a single neuron identified in each brain preparation. In order to spatially relate the neurons of different preparations a common brain framework was required. We here present an average shaped atlas of the moth brain. It is based on 11 female brain preparations, each stained with a fluorescent synaptic marker and scanned in confocal laser-scanning microscope. Brain neuropils of each preparation were manually reconstructed in the computer software AMIRA, followed by generating the atlas using the Iterative Shape Average Procedure. To demonstrate the application of the atlas we have registered two olfactory and two gustatory interneurons, as well as the axonal projections of gustatory receptor neurons into the atlas, visualising their spatial relationships. The olfactory interneurons, showing the typical morphology of inner-tract antennal lobe projection neurons, projected in the calyces of the mushroom body and laterally in the protocerebral lobe. The two gustatory interneurons, responding to sucrose and quinine respectively, projected in different areas of the brain. The wide projections of the quinine responding neuron included a lateral area adjacent to the projections of the olfactory interneurons. The sucrose responding neuron was confined to the suboesophageal ganglion with dendritic arborizations overlapping the axonal projections of the gustatory receptor neurons on the proboscis. By serving as a tool for the integration of neurons, the atlas offers visual access to the spatial relationship between the neurons in three dimensions, and thus facilitates the study of neuronal networks in the Heliothis virescens brain. The moth standard brain is accessible at http://www.nt.ntnu.no/users/kvello/H_virescens_standardbrain/

  12. Integrating Concepts into Curricular Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Helen M.

    1981-01-01

    Movement is motivated, encouraged, and governed by psycho-social development, motor development, and humanistic principles as well as by exercise physiology and kinesiology. The Basic Stuff series identifies the body of knowledge which underlies purposeful movement and can be integrated into concept or fundamental skill curricula. (JN)

  13. Animal models of brain dysfunction in phenylketonuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martynyuk, A. E.; van Spronsen, F. J.; Van der Zee, E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disorder that results in significant brain dysfunction if untreated. Although phenylalanine restricted diets instituted at birth have clearly improved PKU outcomes, neuropsychological deficits and neurological changes still represent substantial problems. The spe

  14. CSF transthyretin neuroprotection in a mouse model of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Sofia Duque; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2010-01-01

    Brain injury caused by ischemia is a major cause of human mortality and physical/cognitive disability worldwide. Experimentally, brain ischemia can be induced surgically by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Using this model, we studied the influence of transthyretin in ischemic stroke...... neuronal cell death, edema and inflammation, thereby influencing the survival of endangered neurons in cerebral ischemia....

  15. Progress on the paternal brain: theory, animal models, human brain research, and mental health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Dayton, C J; Kim, P; Tolman, R M; Volling, B L

    2014-01-01

    With a secure foundation in basic research across mammalian species in which fathers participate in the raising of young, novel brain-imaging approaches are outlining a set of consistent brain circuits that regulate paternal thoughts and behaviors in humans. The newest experimental paradigms include increasingly realistic baby-stimuli to provoke paternal cognitions and behaviors with coordinated hormone measures to outline brain networks that regulate motivation, reflexive caring, emotion regulation, and social brain networks with differences and similarities to those found in mothers. In this article, on the father brain, we review all brain-imaging studies on PubMed to date on the human father brain and introduce the topic with a selection of theoretical models and foundational neurohormonal research on animal models in support of the human work. We discuss potentially translatable models for the identification and treatment of paternal mood and father-child relational problems, which could improve infant mental health and developmental trajectories with potentially broad public health importance.

  16. Reptiles: a new model for brain evo-devo research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Ono, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Yasunori

    2013-03-01

    Vertebrate brains exhibit vast amounts of anatomical diversity. In particular, the elaborate and complex nervous system of amniotes is correlated with the size of their behavioral repertoire. However, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying species-specific brain morphogenesis remain elusive. In this review we introduce reptiles as a new model organism for understanding brain evolution. These animal groups inherited ancestral traits of brain architectures. We will describe several unique aspects of the reptilian nervous system with a special focus on the telencephalon, and discuss the genetic mechanisms underlying reptile-specific brain morphology. The establishment of experimental evo-devo approaches to studying reptiles will help to shed light on the origin of the amniote brains.

  17. Delta Shell: Integrated Modeling by Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchyts, G.; Jagers, B.; Baart, F.; Geer, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    We present the integrated modeling environment Delta Shell. It supports the full workflow of integrated environmental modeling: setup, configuration, simulation, analysis and reporting of results. Many components of the environment can be reused independently, allowing development of scientific, geospatial and other applications focused on data analysis, editing, visualization and storage. One of the unique features is that the Delta Shell environment integrates models from many different fields, such as hydrodynamics, hydrology, morphology, ecology, water quality, geospatial and decision support systems. This integration is possible due to flexible general data types, lightweight model coupling framework, the plugin system and the inclusion of a number of high quality open source components. Here we will use the open source morphological model XBeach as an example showing how to integrate models into the Delta Shell environment. Integration of XBeach adds a graphical interface which can be used to make testing coastal safety for complicated coastal areas easier. By using this example, we give an overview of the modeling framework and its possibilities. To increase the usability, the model is integrated with a coastal profile data set covering the whole coast of the Netherlands. This gives the end user a system to easily use the model for scanning the safety of the Dutch coast. The reuse of the components of the environment individually or combined is encouraged. They are available as separate components and have minimal or no dependencies on other components. This includes libraries to work with scientific multidimensional data, geospatial data (in particular geospatial coverages: values of some quantities defined on a spatial domain), editors, visualisation of time-dependent data and the modeling framework (projects, data linking, workflow management, model integration). Most components and the XBeach example are available as open source.

  18. Toward defining the anatomo-proteomic puzzle of the human brain: An integrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Labarga, Alberto; Zabaleta, Aintzane; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zelaya, María Victoria; Santamaria, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    The human brain is exceedingly complex, constituted by billions of neurons and trillions of synaptic connections that, in turn, define ∼900 neuroanatomical subdivisions in the adult brain (Hawrylycz et al. An anatomically comprehensive atlas of the human brain transcriptome. Nature 2012, 489, 391-399). The human brain transcriptome has revealed specific regional transcriptional signatures that are regulated in a spatiotemporal manner, increasing the complexity of the structural and molecular organization of this organ (Kang et al. Spatio-temporal transcriptome of the human brain. Nature 2011, 478, 483-489). During the last decade, neuroproteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to profile neural proteomes using shotgun-based MS, providing complementary information about protein content and function at a global level. Here, we revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in human brain, with special emphasis on proteome mapping of anatomical macrostructures, specific subcellular compartments, and cerebrospinal fluid. Moreover, we have performed an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale human brain proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of human brain biology. Finally, we also discuss the potential contribution of our meta-analysis to the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project initiative.

  19. Allen Brain Atlas: an integrated spatio-temporal portal for exploring the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkin, Susan M; Ng, Lydia; Lau, Chris; Dolbeare, Tim; Gilbert, Terri L; Thompson, Carol L; Hawrylycz, Michael; Dang, Chinh

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas (http://www.brain-map.org) provides a unique online public resource integrating extensive gene expression data, connectivity data and neuroanatomical information with powerful search and viewing tools for the adult and developing brain in mouse, human and non-human primate. Here, we review the resources available at the Allen Brain Atlas, describing each product and data type [such as in situ hybridization (ISH) and supporting histology, microarray, RNA sequencing, reference atlases, projection mapping and magnetic resonance imaging]. In addition, standardized and unique features in the web applications are described that enable users to search and mine the various data sets. Features include both simple and sophisticated methods for gene searches, colorimetric and fluorescent ISH image viewers, graphical displays of ISH, microarray and RNA sequencing data, Brain Explorer software for 3D navigation of anatomy and gene expression, and an interactive reference atlas viewer. In addition, cross data set searches enable users to query multiple Allen Brain Atlas data sets simultaneously. All of the Allen Brain Atlas resources can be accessed through the Allen Brain Atlas data portal.

  20. Modeling the brain morphology distribution in the general aging population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, W.; Poot, D. H. J.; Roshchupkin, G.; Bron, E. E.; Ikram, M. A.; Vernooij, M. W.; Rueckert, D.; Niessen, W. J.; Klein, S.

    2016-03-01

    Both normal aging and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease cause morphological changes of the brain. To better distinguish between normal and abnormal cases, it is necessary to model changes in brain morphology owing to normal aging. To this end, we developed a method for analyzing and visualizing these changes for the entire brain morphology distribution in the general aging population. The method is applied to 1000 subjects from a large population imaging study in the elderly, from which 900 were used to train the model and 100 were used for testing. The results of the 100 test subjects show that the model generalizes to subjects outside the model population. Smooth percentile curves showing the brain morphology changes as a function of age and spatiotemporal atlases derived from the model population are publicly available via an interactive web application at agingbrain.bigr.nl.

  1. Integrating language models into classifiers for BCI communication: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speier, W.; Arnold, C.; Pouratian, N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. The present review systematically examines the integration of language models to improve classifier performance in brain-computer interface (BCI) communication systems. Approach. The domain of natural language has been studied extensively in linguistics and has been used in the natural language processing field in applications including information extraction, machine translation, and speech recognition. While these methods have been used for years in traditional augmentative and assistive communication devices, information about the output domain has largely been ignored in BCI communication systems. Over the last few years, BCI communication systems have started to leverage this information through the inclusion of language models. Main results. Although this movement began only recently, studies have already shown the potential of language integration in BCI communication and it has become a growing field in BCI research. BCI communication systems using language models in their classifiers have progressed down several parallel paths, including: word completion; signal classification; integration of process models; dynamic stopping; unsupervised learning; error correction; and evaluation. Significance. Each of these methods have shown significant progress, but have largely been addressed separately. Combining these methods could use the full potential of language model, yielding further performance improvements. This integration should be a priority as the field works to create a BCI system that meets the needs of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis population.

  2. From hippocampus to whole-brain: The role of integrative processing in episodic memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geib, Benjamin R; Stanley, Matthew L; Dennis, Nancy A; Woldorff, Marty G; Cabeza, Roberto

    2017-01-23

    Multivariate functional connectivity analyses of neuroimaging data have revealed the importance of complex, distributed interactions between disparate yet interdependent brain regions. Recent work has shown that topological properties of functional brain networks are associated with individual and group differences in cognitive performance, including in episodic memory. After constructing functional whole-brain networks derived from an event-related fMRI study of memory retrieval, we examined differences in functional brain network architecture between forgotten and remembered words. This study yielded three main findings. First, graph theory analyses showed that successfully remembering compared to forgetting was associated with significant changes in the connectivity profile of the left hippocampus and a corresponding increase in efficient communication with the rest of the brain. Second, bivariate functional connectivity analyses indicated stronger interactions between the left hippocampus and a retrieval assembly for remembered versus forgotten items. This assembly included the left precuneus, left caudate, bilateral supramarginal gyrus, and the bilateral dorsolateral superior frontal gyrus. Integrative properties of the retrieval assembly were greater for remembered than forgotten items. Third, whole-brain modularity analyses revealed that successful memory retrieval was marginally significantly associated with a less segregated modular architecture in the network. The magnitude of the decreases in modularity between remembered and forgotten conditions was related to memory performance. These findings indicate that increases in integrative properties at the nodal, retrieval assembly, and whole-brain topological levels facilitate memory retrieval, while also underscoring the potential of multivariate brain connectivity approaches for providing valuable new insights into the neural bases of memory processes. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Social outcomes in childhood brain disorder: a heuristic integration of social neuroscience and developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2007-05-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer interactions and relationships, social problem solving and communication, social-affective and cognitive-executive processes, and their neural substrates. The model is illustrated by research on a specific form of childhood brain disorder, traumatic brain injury. The heuristic model may promote research regarding the neural and cognitive-affective substrates of children's social development. It also may engender more precise methods of measuring impairments and disabilities in children with brain disorder and suggest ways to promote their social adaptation.

  4. Model Identification of Integrated ARMA Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnytska, Tetiana; Braun, Simone; Werner, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates the Smallest Canonical Correlation Method (SCAN) and the Extended Sample Autocorrelation Function (ESACF), automated methods for the Autoregressive Integrated Moving-Average (ARIMA) model selection commonly available in current versions of SAS for Windows, as identification tools for integrated processes. SCAN and ESACF can…

  5. Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagami, Jason

    2013-01-01

    ICT integration of teacher preparation programmes was undertaken by the Australian Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project in all 39 Australian teacher education institutions and highlighted the need for guidelines to inform systemic ICT integration approaches. A Social Ecological Model (SEM) was used to positively inform integration…

  6. Challenges in horizontal model integration

    OpenAIRE

    Kolczyk, K.; Conradi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Systems Biology has motivated dynamic models of important intracellular processes at the pathway level, for example, in signal transduction and cell cycle control. To answer important biomedical questions, however, one has to go beyond the study of isolated pathways towards the joint study of interacting signaling pathways or the joint study of signal transduction and cell cycle control. Thereby the reuse of established models is preferable, as it will generally reduce the modeling...

  7. An integrated communications demand model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubleday, C. F.

    1980-11-01

    A computer model of communications demand is being developed to permit dynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of demand for communications media in the U.K. to be made under alternative assumptions about social, economic and technological trends in British Telecom's business environment. The context and objectives of the project and the potential uses of the model are reviewed, and four key concepts in the demand for communications media, around which the model is being structured are discussed: (1) the generation of communications demand; (2) substitution between media; (3) technological convergence; and (4) competition. Two outline perspectives on the model itself are given.

  8. Brain activity related to integrative processes in visual object recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerlach, Christian; Aaside, C T; Humphreys, G W

    2002-01-01

    We report evidence from a PET activation study that the inferior occipital gyri (likely to include area V2) and the posterior parts of the fusiform and inferior temporal gyri are involved in the integration of visual elements into perceptual wholes (single objects). Of these areas, the fusiform...... with access to stored structural knowledge, was found with recognizable stimuli, but not with unrecognizable stimuli. This latter finding also indicates: (i) that subjects may not refrain from (automatically) identifying objects even if they only have to attend to the objects' global shape, and (ii......) that perceptual and memorial processes can be dissociated on both functional and anatomical grounds. No evidence was obtained for the involvement of the parietal lobes in the integration of single objects....

  9. Introduction to the Integrated Domain Modeling Toolset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slihte Armands

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Integrated Domain Modeling approach and introduces the supporting toolset as a solution to the complex domain-modeling task. This approach integrates artificial intelligence (AI and system analysis by exploiting ontology, natural language processing (NLP, use cases and model-driven architecture (MDA for knowledge engineering and domain modeling. The IDM toolset provides the opportunity to automatically generate the initial AS-IS model from the formally defined domain knowledge. In this paper, we describe in detail the scope, architecture and implementation of the toolset.

  10. A propositional representation model of anatomical and functional brain data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Pablo; Batrancourt, Bénédicte

    2011-01-01

    Networks can represent a large number of systems. Recent advances in the domain of networks have been transferred to the field of neuroscience. For example, the graph model has been used in neuroscience research as a methodological tool to examine brain networks organization, topology and complex dynamics, as well as a framework to test the structure-function hypothesis using neuroimaging data. In the current work we propose a graph-theoretical framework to represent anatomical, functional and neuropsychological assessment instruments information. On the one hand, interrelationships between anatomic elements constitute an anatomical graph. On the other hand, a functional graph contains several cognitive functions and their more elementary cognitive processes. Finally, the neuropsychological assessment instruments graph includes several neuropsychological tests and scales linked with their different sub-tests and variables. The two last graphs are connected by relations of type "explore" linking a particular instrument with the cognitive function it explores. We applied this framework to a sample of patients with focal brain damage. Each patient was related to: (i) the cerebral entities injured (assessed with structural neuroimaging data) and (ii) the neusopsychological assessment tests carried out (weight by performance). Our model offers a suitable platform to visualize patients' relevant information, facilitating the representation, standardization and sharing of clinical data. At the same time, the integration of a large number of patients in this framework will make possible to explore relations between anatomy (injured entities) and function (performance in different tests assessing different cognitive functions) and the use of neurocomputational tools for graph analysis may help diagnostic and contribute to the comprehension of neural bases of cognitive functions.

  11. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  12. Modeling of Brain Shift Phenomenon for Different Craniotomies and Solid Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Valencia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of different solid models on predictions of brain shift for three craniotomies. We created a generic 3D brain model based on healthy human brain and modeled the brain parenchyma as single continuum and constrained by a practically rigid skull. We have used elastic model, hyperelastic 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Ogden models, and hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin with 2- and 5-parameter models. A pressure on the brain surface at craniotomy region was applied to load the model. The models were solved with the finite elements package ANSYS. The predictions on stress and displacements were compared for three different craniotomies. The difference between the predictions of elastic solid model and a hyperelastic Ogden solid model of maximum brain displacement and maximum effective stress is relevant.

  13. Mathematical modeling of brain tumors: effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powathil, G [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kohandel, M [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Sivaloganathan, S [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Oza, A [Center for Mathematical Medicine, Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3J1 (Canada); Milosevic, M [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2007-06-07

    Gliomas, the most common primary brain tumors, are diffusive and highly invasive. The standard treatment for brain tumors consists of a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Over the past few years, mathematical models have been applied to study untreated and treated brain tumors. In an effort to improve treatment strategies, we consider a simple spatio-temporal mathematical model, based on proliferation and diffusion, that incorporates the effects of radiotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic treatments. We study the effects of different schedules of radiation therapy, including fractionated and hyperfractionated external beam radiotherapy, using a generalized linear quadratic (LQ) model. The results are compared with published clinical data. We also discuss the results for combination therapy (radiotherapy plus temozolomide, a new chemotherapy agent), as proposed in recent clinical trials. We use the model to predict optimal sequencing of the postoperative (combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant, neo-adjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy) treatments for brain tumors.

  14. A novel three-phase model of brain tissue microstructure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana L Gevertz

    Full Text Available We propose a novel biologically constrained three-phase model of the brain microstructure. Designing a realistic model is tantamount to a packing problem, and for this reason, a number of techniques from the theory of random heterogeneous materials can be brought to bear on this problem. Our analysis strongly suggests that previously developed two-phase models in which cells are packed in the extracellular space are insufficient representations of the brain microstructure. These models either do not preserve realistic geometric and topological features of brain tissue or preserve these properties while overestimating the brain's effective diffusivity, an average measure of the underlying microstructure. In light of the highly connected nature of three-dimensional space, which limits the minimum diffusivity of biologically constrained two-phase models, we explore the previously proposed hypothesis that the extracellular matrix is an important factor that contributes to the diffusivity of brain tissue. Using accurate first-passage-time techniques, we support this hypothesis by showing that the incorporation of the extracellular matrix as the third phase of a biologically constrained model gives the reduction in the diffusion coefficient necessary for the three-phase model to be a valid representation of the brain microstructure.

  15. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...

  16. Integrated climate and hydrology modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl

    global warming and increased frequency of extreme events. The skill in developing projections of both the present and future climate depends essentially on the ability to numerically simulate the processes of atmospheric circulation, hydrology, energy and ecology. Previous modelling efforts of climate...... and hydrology models to more directly include the interaction between the atmosphere and the land surface. The present PhD study is motivated by an ambition of developing and applying a modelling tool capable of including the interaction and feedback mechanisms between the atmosphere and the land surface...... to the LSM in HIRHAM. A wider range of processes are included at the land surface, subsurface flow is distributed in three dimensions and the temporal and spatial resolution is higher. Secondly, the feedback mechanisms of e.g. soil moisture and recipitation between the two models are included...

  17. Effects of Yishendaluo decoction on blood-brain barrier integrity in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqing Wu; Ying Gao; Lingqun Zhu; Yonghong Gao; Dongmei Zhang; Lixia Lou; Yanfang Yan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Yishendaluo decoction on the loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in mice exhibiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.To this end,we used real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR to measure the levels of mRNAs specific to the T cell markers CD4 and CD8,and the monocyte marker CD11b.In addition,we used Evans blue dye extravasation in the spinal cord and brain tissues to assess blood-brain barrier permeability.The results indicated that an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was associated with an increase in CD4,CD8 and CD11b mRNA expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.Yishendaluo decoction administration significantly reversed inflammatory cell accumulation in cerebral tissues of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

  18. A normalization model of multisensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Tomokazu; Angelaki, Dora E; DeAngelis, Gregory C

    2011-06-01

    Responses of neurons that integrate multiple sensory inputs are traditionally characterized in terms of a set of empirical principles. However, a simple computational framework that accounts for these empirical features of multisensory integration has not been established. We propose that divisive normalization, acting at the stage of multisensory integration, can account for many of the empirical principles of multisensory integration shown by single neurons, such as the principle of inverse effectiveness and the spatial principle. This model, which uses a simple functional operation (normalization) for which there is considerable experimental support, also accounts for the recent observation that the mathematical rule by which multisensory neurons combine their inputs changes with cue reliability. The normalization model, which makes a strong testable prediction regarding cross-modal suppression, may therefore provide a simple unifying computational account of the important features of multisensory integration by neurons.

  19. Efficient numerical integrators for stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    De Fabritiis, G; Español, P; Coveney, P V

    2006-01-01

    The efficient simulation of models defined in terms of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) depends critically on an efficient integration scheme. In this article, we investigate under which conditions the integration schemes for general SDEs can be derived using the Trotter expansion. It follows that, in the stochastic case, some care is required in splitting the stochastic generator. We test the Trotter integrators on an energy-conserving Brownian model and derive a new numerical scheme for dissipative particle dynamics. We find that the stochastic Trotter scheme provides a mathematically correct and easy-to-use method which should find wide applicability.

  20. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  1. Finite element modeling of human brain response to football helmet impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T; Muthuswamy, J; Rajan, S D

    2016-10-01

    The football helmet is used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. While the current helmet design methodology may be adequate for reducing linear acceleration of the head and minimizing TBI, it however has had less effect in minimizing mTBI. The objectives of this study are (a) to develop and validate a coupled finite element (FE) model of a football helmet and the human body, and (b) to assess responses of different regions of the brain to two different impact conditions - frontal oblique and crown impact conditions. The FE helmet model was validated using experimental results of drop tests. Subsequently, the integrated helmet-human body FE model was used to assess the responses of different regions of the brain to impact loads. Strain-rate, strain, and stress measures in the corpus callosum, midbrain, and brain stem were assessed. Results show that maximum strain-rates of 27 and 19 s(-1) are observed in the brain-stem and mid-brain, respectively. This could potentially lead to axonal injuries and neuronal cell death during crown impact conditions. The developed experimental-numerical framework can be used in the study of other helmet-related impact conditions.

  2. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  3. Ontology modeling in physical asset integrity management

    CERN Document Server

    Yacout, Soumaya

    2015-01-01

    This book presents cutting-edge applications of, and up-to-date research on, ontology engineering techniques in the physical asset integrity domain. Though a survey of state-of-the-art theory and methods on ontology engineering, the authors emphasize essential topics including data integration modeling, knowledge representation, and semantic interpretation. The book also reflects novel topics dealing with the advanced problems of physical asset integrity applications such as heterogeneity, data inconsistency, and interoperability existing in design and utilization. With a distinctive focus on applications relevant in heavy industry, Ontology Modeling in Physical Asset Integrity Management is ideal for practicing industrial and mechanical engineers working in the field, as well as researchers and graduate concerned with ontology engineering in physical systems life cycles. This book also: Introduces practicing engineers, research scientists, and graduate students to ontology engineering as a modeling techniqu...

  4. Models and theories of brain function in cognition within a framework of behavioral cognitive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Sirel; Başar, Erol

    2006-05-01

    The present article presents a nonexhaustive collection of contemporary models and theories on brain function and discusses these models and theories within a framework of explanatory formulations in behavioral cognitive psychology. Such a mission was accomplished by evaluating the cognitive implications in the explanatory formulations with respect to established laws/principles and models/theories of behavioral cognitive psychology. The article also points to problem areas of behavioral cognitive psychology for which the explanatory formulations have solutions to offer. The article shows that the cinematographic hypothesis, the new visual model, the synergetic model, and the theory of whole-brain-work emphasize various aspects of perception. The formulations on P300 theory emphasize attention and also working memory. The theory on cognits is a comprehensive account of memory. Characteristic to all of these explanatory formulations and also to that on the complexity and its evolution and that on neurocognitive networks is the emphasis on selective distribution, integration to the point of supersynergy, and dynamicity. Such a viewpoint was not only applied to the operations of the brain but also of cognition. With such a conceptualization, the explanatory formulations could account for cognitive processes other than the ones emphasized. A common aspect in a majority of the formulations is the utilization of the oscillatory activity as the valid activity of the brain. The article points out that a frontier in cognitive psychophysiology would be the study of the genetics of brain oscillations.

  5. Dynamic description logic model for data integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoshun HAO; Shilong MA; Yuefei SUI; Jianghua LV

    2008-01-01

    Data integration is the issue of retrieving and combining data residing at distributed and heterogeneous sources,and of providing users with transparent access without being aware of the details of the sources.Data integration is a very important issue because it deals with data infrastructure issues of coordinated computing systems.Despite its importance,the following key challenges make data integration one of the longest standing problems around:1) how to solve the system heterogeneity;2) how to build a global model;3) how to process queries automatically and correctly;and 4) how to solve semantic heterogeneity. This paper presents an extended dynamic description logic language to describe systems with dynamic actions.By this language,a-universal and unified model for relational database systems and a model for data integration are presented.This paper presents a universal and unified description logic model for relational databases.The model is universal because any relational database system can be automatically transformed to the model;it is unified because it integrates three essential components of relational databases together:description logic knowledge bases modeling the relational data,atomic modalities modeling the atomic relational operations,and combined modalities modeling the combined relational operations-queries. Furthermore,a description logic model for data integration is proposed which contains four layers of ontologies.Based on the model,a solution for each key challenge is proposed:a universal model eliminates system heterogeneity;a novel global model including three ontologies is proposed with some important benefits;a query process mechanism is provided by which user queries can be decomposed to queries over the sources;and for solving the semantic heterogeneity,this paper provides a framework under which semantic relations can be expressed and inferred. In summary,this paper presents a dynamic knowledge base framework by an extended

  6. Integrating systems biology models and biomedical ontologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bono Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology is an approach to biology that emphasizes the structure and dynamic behavior of biological systems and the interactions that occur within them. To succeed, systems biology crucially depends on the accessibility and integration of data across domains and levels of granularity. Biomedical ontologies were developed to facilitate such an integration of data and are often used to annotate biosimulation models in systems biology. Results We provide a framework to integrate representations of in silico systems biology with those of in vivo biology as described by biomedical ontologies and demonstrate this framework using the Systems Biology Markup Language. We developed the SBML Harvester software that automatically converts annotated SBML models into OWL and we apply our software to those biosimulation models that are contained in the BioModels Database. We utilize the resulting knowledge base for complex biological queries that can bridge levels of granularity, verify models based on the biological phenomenon they represent and provide a means to establish a basic qualitative layer on which to express the semantics of biosimulation models. Conclusions We establish an information flow between biomedical ontologies and biosimulation models and we demonstrate that the integration of annotated biosimulation models and biomedical ontologies enables the verification of models as well as expressive queries. Establishing a bi-directional information flow between systems biology and biomedical ontologies has the potential to enable large-scale analyses of biological systems that span levels of granularity from molecules to organisms.

  7. Music plus Music Integration: A Model for Music Education Policy Reform That Reflects the Evolution and Success of Arts Integration Practices in 21st Century American Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scripp, Lawrence; Gilbert, Josh

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the special case of integrative teaching and learning in music as a model for 21st century music education policy reform based on the principles that have evolved out of arts integration research and practices over the past century and informed by the recent rising tide of evidence of music's impact on brain capacity and…

  8. Research on an Integrated Enterprise Workflow Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An integrated enterprise workflow model called PPROCE is presented firstly. Then, an enterprise's ontology established by TOVE and Process Specification Language (PSL) is studied. Combined with TOVE's partition idea, PSL is extended and new PSL Extensions is created to define the ontology of process, organization, resource and product in the PPROCE model. As a result, PPROCE model can be defined by a set of corresponding formal language. It facilitates the future work not only in the model verification, model optimization and model simulation, but also in the model translation.

  9. Integrated modeling of European migration

    OpenAIRE

    Raymer, James; Wiśniowski, Arkadiusz; Forster, Jonathan J.; Peter W. F. Smith; Bijak, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    International migration data in Europe are collected by individual countries with separate collection systems and designs. As a result, reported data are inconsistent in availability, definition and quality. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model to overcome the limitations of the various data sources. The focus is on estimating recent international migration flows amongst 31 countries in the European Union and European Free Trade Association from 2002 to 2008, using data collated by Euro...

  10. Exposure to lipopolysaccharide and/or unconjugated bilirubin impair the integrity and function of brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa L Cardoso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis and jaundice are common conditions in newborns that can lead to brain damage. Though lipopolysaccharide (LPS is known to alter the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, little is known on the effects of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB and even less on the joint effects of UCB and LPS on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monolayers of primary rat BMEC were treated with 1 µg/ml LPS and/or 50 µM UCB, in the presence of 100 µM human serum albumin, for 4 or 24 h. Co-cultures of BMEC with astroglial cells, a more complex BBB model, were used in selected experiments. LPS led to apoptosis and UCB induced both apoptotic and necrotic-like cell death. LPS and UCB led to inhibition of P-glycoprotein and activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 in mono-cultures. Transmission electron microscopy evidenced apoptotic bodies, as well as damaged mitochondria and rough endoplasmic reticulum in BMEC by either insult. Shorter cell contacts and increased caveolae-like invaginations were noticeable in LPS-treated cells and loss of intercellular junctions was observed upon treatment with UCB. Both compounds triggered impairment of endothelial permeability and transendothelial electrical resistance both in mono- and co-cultures. The functional changes were confirmed by alterations in immunostaining for junctional proteins β-catenin, ZO-1 and claudin-5. Enlargement of intercellular spaces, and redistribution of junctional proteins were found in BMEC after exposure to LPS and UCB. CONCLUSIONS: LPS and/or UCB exert direct toxic effects on BMEC, with distinct temporal profiles and mechanisms of action. Therefore, the impairment of brain endothelial integrity upon exposure to these neurotoxins may favor their access to the brain, thus increasing the risk of injury and requiring adequate clinical management of sepsis and jaundice in the neonatal period.

  11. Adolescent emotional maturation through divergent models of brain organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Víctor Orón Semper

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning.

  12. Social Outcomes in Childhood Brain Disorder: A Heuristic Integration of Social Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Bigler, Erin D.; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose a heuristic model of the social outcomes of childhood brain disorder that draws on models and methods from both the emerging field of social cognitive neuroscience and the study of social competence in developmental psychology/psychopathology. The heuristic model characterizes the relationships between social adjustment, peer…

  13. New challenges in integrated water quality modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rode, M.; Arhonditsis, G.; Balin, D.; Kebede, T.; Krysanova, V.; Griensven, A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing pressure for development of integrated water quality models that effectively couple catchment and in-stream biogeochemical processes. This need stems from increasing legislative requirements and emerging demands related to contemporary climate and land use changes. Modelling w

  14. An Integrated Model of Outplacement Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilanti, Tara M.; Leroux, Janice

    1999-01-01

    The Aquilanti Integrated Model of Outplacement was developed from various aspects of existing grief and career theories. It comprises many practical elements that are present in the other models as well personal experience and knowledge of career counseling. It involves four phases: loss, grieving, and transition; personal development; job search;…

  15. An introduction to Space Weather Integrated Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, D.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    The need for a software toolkit that integrates space weather models and data is one of many challenges we are facing with when applying the models to space weather forecasting. To meet this challenge, we have developed Space Weather Integrated Modeling (SWIM) that is capable of analysis and visualizations of the results from a diverse set of space weather models. SWIM has a modular design and is written in Python, by using NumPy, matplotlib, and the Visualization ToolKit (VTK). SWIM provides data management module to read a variety of spacecraft data products and a specific data format of Solar-Interplanetary Conservation Element/Solution Element MHD model (SIP-CESE MHD model) for the study of solar-terrestrial phenomena. Data analysis, visualization and graphic user interface modules are also presented in a user-friendly way to run the integrated models and visualize the 2-D and 3-D data sets interactively. With these tools we can locally or remotely analysis the model result rapidly, such as extraction of data on specific location in time-sequence data sets, plotting interplanetary magnetic field lines, multi-slicing of solar wind speed, volume rendering of solar wind density, animation of time-sequence data sets, comparing between model result and observational data. To speed-up the analysis, an in-situ visualization interface is used to support visualizing the data 'on-the-fly'. We also modified some critical time-consuming analysis and visualization methods with the aid of GPU and multi-core CPU. We have used this tool to visualize the data of SIP-CESE MHD model in real time, and integrated the Database Model of shock arrival, Shock Propagation Model, Dst forecasting model and SIP-CESE MHD model developed by SIGMA Weather Group at State Key Laboratory of Space Weather/CAS.

  16. Model of local temperature changes in brain upon functional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher M; Smith, Michael B; Turner, Robert

    2004-12-01

    Experimental results for changes in brain temperature during functional activation show large variations. It is, therefore, desirable to develop a careful numerical model for such changes. Here, a three-dimensional model of temperature in the human head using the bioheat equation, which includes effects of metabolism, perfusion, and thermal conduction, is employed to examine potential temperature changes due to functional activation in brain. It is found that, depending on location in brain and corresponding baseline temperature relative to blood temperature, temperature may increase or decrease on activation and concomitant increases in perfusion and rate of metabolism. Changes in perfusion are generally seen to have a greater effect on temperature than are changes in metabolism, and hence active brain is predicted to approach blood temperature from its initial temperature. All calculated changes in temperature for reasonable physiological parameters have magnitudes <0.12 degrees C and are well within the range reported in recent experimental studies involving human subjects.

  17. A pairwise maximum entropy model accurately describes resting-state human brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Hirose, Satoshi; Wada, Hiroyuki; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    The resting-state human brain networks underlie fundamental cognitive functions and consist of complex interactions among brain regions. However, the level of complexity of the resting-state networks has not been quantified, which has prevented comprehensive descriptions of the brain activity as an integrative system. Here, we address this issue by demonstrating that a pairwise maximum entropy model, which takes into account region-specific activity rates and pairwise interactions, can be robustly and accurately fitted to resting-state human brain activities obtained by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, to validate the approximation of the resting-state networks by the pairwise maximum entropy model, we show that the functional interactions estimated by the pairwise maximum entropy model reflect anatomical connexions more accurately than the conventional functional connectivity method. These findings indicate that a relatively simple statistical model not only captures the structure of the resting-state networks but also provides a possible method to derive physiological information about various large-scale brain networks.

  18. PT-symmetric deformations of integrable models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fring, Andreas

    2013-04-28

    We review recent results on new physical models constructed as PT-symmetrical deformations or extensions of different types of integrable models. We present non-Hermitian versions of quantum spin chains, multi-particle systems of Calogero-Moser-Sutherland type and nonlinear integrable field equations of Korteweg-de Vries type. The quantum spin chain discussed is related to the first example in the series of the non-unitary models of minimal conformal field theories. For the Calogero-Moser-Sutherland models, we provide three alternative deformations: a complex extension for models related to all types of Coxeter/Weyl groups; models describing the evolution of poles in constrained real-valued field equations of nonlinear integrable systems; and genuine deformations based on antilinearly invariant deformed root systems. Deformations of complex nonlinear integrable field equations of Korteweg-de Vries type are studied with regard to different kinds of PT-symmetrical scenarios. A reduction to simple complex quantum mechanical models currently under discussion is presented.

  19. Beyond neural cubism: promoting a multidimensional view of brain disorders by enhancing the integration of neurology and psychiatry in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joseph J; Williams, Nolan R; George, Mark S

    2015-05-01

    Cubism was an influential early-20th-century art movement characterized by angular, disjointed imagery. The two-dimensional appearance of Cubist figures and objects is created through juxtaposition of angles. The authors posit that the constrained perspectives found in Cubism may also be found in the clinical classification of brain disorders. Neurological disorders are often separated from psychiatric disorders as if they stemmed from different organ systems. Maintaining two isolated clinical disciplines fractionalizes the brain in the same way that Pablo Picasso fractionalized figures and objects in his Cubist art. This Neural Cubism perpetuates a clinical divide that does not reflect the scope and depth of neuroscience. All brain disorders are complex and multidimensional, with aberrant circuitry and resultant psychopharmacology manifesting as altered behavior, affect, mood, or cognition. Trainees should receive a multidimensional education based on modern neuroscience, not a partial education based on clinical precedent. The authors briefly outline the rationale for increasing the integration of neurology and psychiatry and discuss a nested model with which clinical neuroscientists (neurologists and psychiatrists) can approach and treat brain disorders.

  20. A Measure for Brain Complexity: Relating Functional Segregation and Integration in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Sporns, Olaf; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1994-05-01

    In brains of higher vertebrates, the functional segregation of local areas that differ in their anatomy and physiology contrasts sharply with their global integration during perception and behavior. In this paper, we introduce a measure, called neural complexity (C_N), that captures the interplay between these two fundamental aspects of brain organization. We express functional segregation within a neural system in terms of the relative statistical independence of small subsets of the system and functional integration in terms of significant deviations from independence of large subsets. C_N is then obtained from estimates of the average deviation from statistical independence for subsets of increasing size. C_N is shown to be high when functional segregation coexists with integration and to be low when the components of a system are either completely independent (segregated) or completely dependent (integrated). We apply this complexity measure in computer simulations of cortical areas to examine how some basic principles of neuroanatomical organization constrain brain dynamics. We show that the connectivity patterns of the cerebral cortex, such as a high density of connections, strong local connectivity organizing cells into neuronal groups, patchiness in the connectivity among neuronal groups, and prevalent reciprocal connections, are associated with high values of C_N. The approach outlined here may prove useful in analyzing complexity in other biological domains such as gene regulation and embryogenesis.

  1. Towards an Integrative Model of Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Heslop, Ben

    of the European Commission to improve the European market for KT between research institutions and industry. Two, various barriers exist that hinder efficient KT in Europe, especially in transition economies that recently joined the EU where the issues of restructuring higher education, building trust between...... of the emergent integrative model of knowledge transfer. In an attempt to bring it to a higher level of generalizability, the integrative model of KT is further conceptualized from a ‘sociology of markets’ perspective resulting in an emergent architecture of a single market for knowledge. Future research......This paper aims to contribute towards the advancement of an efficient architecture of a single market for knowledge through the development of an integrative model of knowledge transfer. Within this aim, several points of departure can be singled out. One, the article builds on the call...

  2. Integrated Modelling - the next steps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated modelling (IM) has made considerable advances over the past decade but it has not yet been taken up as an operational tool in the way that its proponents had hoped. The reasons why will be discussed in Session U17. This talk will propose topics for a research and development programme and suggest an institutional structure which, together, could overcome the present obstacles. Their combined aim would be first to make IM into an operational tool useable by competent public authorities and commercial companies and, in time, to see it evolve into the modelling equivalent of Google Maps, something accessible and useable by anyone with a PC or an iphone and an internet connection. In a recent study, a number of government agencies, water authorities and utilities applied integrated modelling to operational problems. While the project demonstrated that IM could be used in an operational setting and had benefit, it also highlighted the advances that would be required for its widespread uptake. These were: greatly improving the ease with which models could be a) made linkable, b) linked and c) run; developing a methodology for applying integrated modelling; developing practical options for calibrating and validating linked models; addressing the science issues that arise when models are linked; extending the range of modelling concepts that can be linked; enabling interface standards to pass uncertainty information; making the interface standards platform independent; extending the range of platforms to include those for high performance computing; developing the concept of modelling components as web services; separating simulation code from the model’s GUI, so that all the results from the linked models can be viewed through a single GUI; developing scenario management systems so that that there is an audit trail of the version of each model and dataset used in each linked model run. In addition to the above, there is a need to build a set of integrated

  3. Dynamic causal modelling of brain-behaviour relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoux, L; Daunizeau, J

    2015-08-15

    In this work, we expose a mathematical treatment of brain-behaviour relationships, which we coin behavioural Dynamic Causal Modelling or bDCM. This approach aims at decomposing the brain's transformation of stimuli into behavioural outcomes, in terms of the relative contribution of brain regions and their connections. In brief, bDCM places the brain at the interplay between stimulus and behaviour: behavioural outcomes arise from coordinated activity in (hidden) neural networks, whose dynamics are driven by experimental inputs. Estimating neural parameters that control network connectivity and plasticity effectively performs a neurobiologically-constrained approximation to the brain's input-outcome transform. In other words, neuroimaging data essentially serves to enforce the realism of bDCM's decomposition of input-output relationships. In addition, post-hoc artificial lesions analyses allow us to predict induced behavioural deficits and quantify the importance of network features for funnelling input-output relationships. This is important, because this enables one to bridge the gap with neuropsychological studies of brain-damaged patients. We demonstrate the face validity of the approach using Monte-Carlo simulations, and its predictive validity using empirical fMRI/behavioural data from an inhibitory control task. Lastly, we discuss promising applications of this work, including the assessment of functional degeneracy (in the healthy brain) and the prediction of functional recovery after lesions (in neurological patients).

  4. Integrated Model of Bioenergy and Agriculture System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurjonsson, Hafthor Ægir; Elmegaard, Brian; Clausen, Lasse Røngaard

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased burden on the environment caused by human activities, focus on industrial ecology designs are gaining more attention. In that perspective an environ- mentally effective integration of bionergy and agriculture systems has significant potential. This work introduces a modeling...... approach that builds on Life Cycle Inventory and carries out Life Cycle Impact Assessment for a con- sequential Life Cycle Assessment on integrated bioenergy and agriculture systems. The model framework is built in Python which connects various freely available soft- ware that handle different aspects...

  5. Integrated modelling of two xenobiotic organic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindblom, Erik Ulfson; Gernaey, K.V.; Henze, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic mathematical model that describes the fate and transport of two selected xenobiotic organic compounds (XOCs) in a simplified representation. of an integrated urban wastewater system. A simulation study, where the xenobiotics bisphenol A and pyrene are used as reference...... rate and concentration profiles. The wet weather day induces resuspension of stored sediments, which increases the pollutant load on the downstream system. The potential of the model to elucidate important phenomena related to origin and fate of the model compounds is demonstrated....... compounds, is carried out. Sorption and specific biological degradation processes are integrated with standardised water process models to model the fate of both compounds. Simulated mass flows of the two compounds during one dry weather day and one wet weather day are compared for realistic influent flow...

  6. Permeability of PEGylated Immunoarsonoliposomes Through In Vitro Blood Brain Barrier-Medulloblastoma Co-culture Models for Brain Tumor Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Shehri, A.; Favretto, M.E.; Ioannou, P.V.; Romero, I.A.; Couraud, P.O.; Weksler, B.B.; Parker, T.L.; Kallinteri, P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Owing to restricted access of pharmacological agents into the brain due to blood brain barrier (BBB) there is a need: 1. to develop a more representative 3-D-co-culture model of tumor-BBB interaction to investigate drug and nanoparticle transport into the brain for diagnostic and therapeuti

  7. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  8. A mechanical model predicts morphological abnormalities in the developing human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budday, Silvia; Raybaud, Charles; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-07-01

    The developing human brain remains one of the few unsolved mysteries of science. Advancements in developmental biology, neuroscience, and medical imaging have brought us closer than ever to understand brain development in health and disease. However, the precise role of mechanics throughout this process remains underestimated and poorly understood. Here we show that mechanical stretch plays a crucial role in brain development. Using the nonlinear field theories of mechanics supplemented by the theory of finite growth, we model the human brain as a living system with a morphogenetically growing outer surface and a stretch-driven growing inner core. This approach seamlessly integrates the two popular but competing hypotheses for cortical folding: axonal tension and differential growth. We calibrate our model using magnetic resonance images from very preterm neonates. Our model predicts that deviations in cortical growth and thickness induce morphological abnormalities. Using the gyrification index, the ratio between the total and exposed surface area, we demonstrate that these abnormalities agree with the classical pathologies of lissencephaly and polymicrogyria. Understanding the mechanisms of cortical folding in the developing human brain has direct implications in the diagnostics and treatment of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism.

  9. Classical Wave Model of Quantum-Like Processing in Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrennikov, A.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the conjecture on quantum-like (QL) processing of information in the brain. It is not based on the physical quantum brain (e.g., Penrose) - quantum physical carriers of information. In our approach the brain created the QL representation (QLR) of information in Hilbert space. It uses quantum information rules in decision making. The existence of such QLR was (at least preliminary) confirmed by experimental data from cognitive psychology. The violation of the law of total probability in these experiments is an important sign of nonclassicality of data. In so called "constructive wave function approach" such data can be represented by complex amplitudes. We presented 1,2 the QL model of decision making. In this paper we speculate on a possible physical realization of QLR in the brain: a classical wave model producing QLR . It is based on variety of time scales in the brain. Each pair of scales (fine - the background fluctuations of electromagnetic field and rough - the cognitive image scale) induces the QL representation. The background field plays the crucial role in creation of "superstrong QL correlations" in the brain.

  10. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  11. Data and Model Integration Promoting Interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, T.

    2014-12-01

    It is very difficult to reflect accumulated subsystem knowledge into holistic knowledge. Knowledge about a whole system can rarely be introduced into a targeted subsystem. In many cases, knowledge in one discipline is inapplicable to other disciplines. We are far from resolving cross-disciplinary issues. It is critically important to establish interdisciplinarity so that scientific knowledge can transcend disciplines. We need to share information and develop knowledge interlinkages by building models and exchanging tools. We need to tackle a large increase in the volume and diversity of data from observing the Earth. The volume of data stored has exponentially increased. Previously, almost all of the large-volume data came from satellites, but model outputs occupy the largest volume in general. To address the large diversity of data, we should develop an ontology system for technical and geographical terms in coupling with a metadata design according to international standards. In collaboration between Earth environment scientists and IT group, we should accelerate data archiving by including data loading, quality checking and metadata registration, and enrich data-searching capability. DIAS also enables us to perform integrated research and realize interdisciplinarity. For example, climate change should be addressed in collaboration between the climate models, integrated assessment models including energy, economy, agriculture, health, and the models of adaptation, vulnerability, and human settlement and infrastructure. These models identify water as central to these systems. If a water expert can develop an interrelated system including each component, the integrated crisis can be addressed by collaboration with various disciplines. To realize this purpose, we are developing a water-related data- and model-integration system called a water cycle integrator (WCI).

  12. Renewed mer model of integral management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Belak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The research work on entrepreneurship, enterprise's policy and management, which started in 1992, successfully continued in the following years. Between 1992 and 2011, more than 400 academics and other researchers have participated in research work (MER research program whose main orientation has been the creation of their own model of integral management. Results: In past years, academics (researchers and authors of published papers from Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Byelorussia, Canada, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Estonia, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Romania, Russia, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Switzerland, Ukraine, and the US have cooperated in MER programs, coming from more than fifty institutions. Thus, scientific doctrines of different universities influenced the development of the MER model which is based on both horizontal and vertical integration of the enterprises' governance and management processes, instruments and institutions into a consistently operating unit. Conclusions: The presented MER model is based on the multi-layer integration of governance and management with an enterprise and its environment, considering the fundamental desires for the enterprises' existence and, thus, their quantitative as well as qualitative changes. The process, instrumental, and institutional integrity of the governance and management is also the initial condition for the implementation of all other integration factors.

  13. EEG-fMRI integration for the study of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2014-11-15

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have proved to be extremely valuable tools for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Moreover, due to a notable degree of complementarity between the two modalities, the combination of EEG and fMRI data has been actively sought in the last two decades. Although initially focused on epilepsy, EEG-fMRI applications were rapidly extended to the study of healthy brain function, yielding new insights into its underlying mechanisms and pathways. Nevertheless, EEG and fMRI have markedly different spatial and temporal resolutions, and probe neuronal activity through distinct biophysical processes, many aspects of which are still poorly understood. The remarkable conceptual and methodological challenges associated with EEG-fMRI integration have motivated the development of a wide range of analysis approaches over the years, each relying on more or less restrictive assumptions, and aiming to shed further light on the mechanisms of brain function along with those of the EEG-fMRI coupling itself. Here, we present a review of the most relevant EEG-fMRI integration approaches yet proposed for the study of brain function, supported by a general overview of our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms coupling the signals obtained from the two modalities.

  14. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...... tractography. Although probabilistic tractography currently holds great promise as a powerful non-invasive connectivity-measurement tool, its accuracy and limitations remain to be evaluated. Probabilistic tractography was assessed post mortem in an in vitro environment. Postmortem DWI benefits from...... environment differs from that of in vivo both due to a lowered environmental temperature and due to the fixation process itself. We argue that the perfusion fixation procedure employed in this thesis ensures that the postmortem tissue is as close to that of in vivo as possible. Different fibre reconstruction...

  15. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain......-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models....... Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging...

  16. The relation of structural integrity and task-related functional connectivity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burianová, Hana; Marstaller, Lars; Choupan, Jeiran; Sepehrband, Farshid; Ziaei, Maryam; Reutens, David

    2015-10-01

    The relations among structural integrity, functional connectivity (FC), and cognitive performance in the aging brain are still understudied. Here, we used multimodal and multivariate approaches to specifically examine age-related changes in task-related FC, gray-matter volumetrics, white-matter integrity, and performance. Our results are two-fold, showing (i) age-related differences in FC of the working memory network and (ii) age-related recruitment of a compensatory network associated with better accuracy on the task. Increased connectivity in the compensatory network correlates positively with preserved white-matter integrity in bilateral frontoparietal tracks and with larger gray-matter volume of right inferior parietal lobule. These findings demonstrate the importance of structural integrity and FC in working memory performance associated with healthy aging.

  17. Postnatal experiences influence how the brain integrates information from different senses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry E Stein

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD is characterized by anomalous reactions to, and integration of, sensory cues. Although the underlying etiology of SPD is unknown, one brain region likely to reflect these sensory and behavioral anomalies is the Superior Colliculus (SC; a structure involved in the synthesis of information from multiple sensory modalities and the control of overt orientation responses. In this review we describe normal functional properties of this structure, the manner in which its individual neurons integrate cues from different senses, and the overt SC-mediated behaviors that are believed to manifest this “multisensory integration.” Of particular interest here is how SC neurons develop their capacity to engage in multisensory integration during early postnatal life as a consequence of early sensory experience, and that it is the intimate communication between cortex and the midbrain makes this developmental process possible.

  18. Fitness, but not physical activity, is related to functional integrity of brain networks associated with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Michelle W; Weng, Timothy B; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Wong, Chelsea N; Cooke, Gillian E; Clark, Rachel; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Gothe, Neha P; Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F

    2016-05-01

    Greater physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with reduced age-related cognitive decline and lower risk for dementia. However, significant gaps remain in the understanding of how physical activity and fitness protect the brain from adverse effects of brain aging. The primary goal of the current study was to empirically evaluate the independent relationships between physical activity and fitness with functional brain health among healthy older adults, as measured by the functional connectivity of cognitively and clinically relevant resting state networks. To build context for fitness and physical activity associations in older adults, we first demonstrate that young adults have greater within-network functional connectivity across a broad range of cortical association networks. Based on these results and previous research, we predicted that individual differences in fitness and physical activity would be most strongly associated with functional integrity of the networks most sensitive to aging. Consistent with this prediction, and extending on previous research, we showed that cardiorespiratory fitness has a positive relationship with functional connectivity of several cortical networks associated with age-related decline, and effects were strongest in the default mode network (DMN). Furthermore, our results suggest that the positive association of fitness with brain function can occur independent of habitual physical activity. Overall, our findings provide further support that cardiorespiratory fitness is an important factor in moderating the adverse effects of aging on cognitively and clinically relevant functional brain networks.

  19. Resolving structural variability in network models and the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Klimm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling--in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy. This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful

  20. Towards an integrated model of international migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. MASSEY

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Demographers have yet to develop a suitable integrated model of international migration and consequently have been very poor at forecasting immigration. This paper outlines the basic elements of an integrated model and surveys recent history to suggest the key challenges to model construction. A comprehensive theory must explain the structural forces that create a supply of people prone to migrate internationally, the structural origins of labour demand in receiving countries, the motivations of those who respond to these forces by choosing to migrate internationally, the growth and structure of transnational networks that arise to support international movement, the behaviour states in response to immigrant flows, and the influence of state actions on the behaviour of migrants. Recent history suggests that a good model needs to respect the salience of markets, recognize the circularity of migrant flows, appreciate the power of feedback effects, and be alert unanticipated consequences of policy actions.

  1. Integration of Dynamic Models in Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    This work addresses the various model interactions in real-time to make an efficient internet based decision making tool for Shuttle launch. The decision making tool depends on the launch commit criteria coupled with physical models. Dynamic interaction between a wide variety of simulation applications and techniques, embedded algorithms, and data visualizations are needed to exploit the full potential of modeling and simulation. This paper also discusses in depth details of web based 3-D graphics and applications to range safety. The advantages of this dynamic model integration are secure accessibility and distribution of real time information to other NASA centers.

  2. Rethinking School Bullying: Towards an Integrated Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    What would make anti-bullying initiatives more successful? This book offers a new approach to the problem of school bullying. The question of what constitutes a useful theory of bullying is considered and suggestions are made as to how priorities for future research might be identified. The integrated, systemic model of school bullying introduced…

  3. Accurate Electromagnetic Modeling Methods for Integrated Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheng, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The present development of modern integrated circuits (IC’s) is characterized by a number of critical factors that make their design and verification considerably more difficult than before. This dissertation addresses the important questions of modeling all electromagnetic behavior of features on t

  4. Brain network analysis: separating cost from topology using cost-integration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric E Ginestet

    Full Text Available A statistically principled way of conducting brain network analysis is still lacking. Comparison of different populations of brain networks is hard because topology is inherently dependent on wiring cost, where cost is defined as the number of edges in an unweighted graph. In this paper, we evaluate the benefits and limitations associated with using cost-integrated topological metrics. Our focus is on comparing populations of weighted undirected graphs that differ in mean association weight, using global efficiency. Our key result shows that integrating over cost is equivalent to controlling for any monotonic transformation of the weight set of a weighted graph. That is, when integrating over cost, we eliminate the differences in topology that may be due to a monotonic transformation of the weight set. Our result holds for any unweighted topological measure, and for any choice of distribution over cost levels. Cost-integration is therefore helpful in disentangling differences in cost from differences in topology. By contrast, we show that the use of the weighted version of a topological metric is generally not a valid approach to this problem. Indeed, we prove that, under weak conditions, the use of the weighted version of global efficiency is equivalent to simply comparing weighted costs. Thus, we recommend the reporting of (i differences in weighted costs and (ii differences in cost-integrated topological measures with respect to different distributions over the cost domain. We demonstrate the application of these techniques in a re-analysis of an fMRI working memory task. We also provide a Monte Carlo method for approximating cost-integrated topological measures. Finally, we discuss the limitations of integrating topology over cost, which may pose problems when some weights are zero, when multiplicities exist in the ranks of the weights, and when one expects subtle cost-dependent topological differences, which could be masked by cost-integration.

  5. Read My Lips: Brain Dynamics Associated with Audiovisual Integration and Deviance Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Chun-Yu; Gratton, Gabriele; Garnsey, Susan M; Novak, Michael A; Fabiani, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Information from different modalities is initially processed in different brain areas, yet real-world perception often requires the integration of multisensory signals into a single percept. An example is the McGurk effect, in which people viewing a speaker whose lip movements do not match the utterance perceive the spoken sounds incorrectly, hearing them as more similar to those signaled by the visual rather than the auditory input. This indicates that audiovisual integration is important for generating the phoneme percept. Here we asked when and where the audiovisual integration process occurs, providing spatial and temporal boundaries for the processes generating phoneme perception. Specifically, we wanted to separate audiovisual integration from other processes, such as simple deviance detection. Building on previous work employing ERPs, we used an oddball paradigm in which task-irrelevant audiovisually deviant stimuli were embedded in strings of non-deviant stimuli. We also recorded the event-related optical signal, an imaging method combining spatial and temporal resolution, to investigate the time course and neuroanatomical substrate of audiovisual integration. We found that audiovisual deviants elicit a short duration response in the middle/superior temporal gyrus, whereas audiovisual integration elicits a more extended response involving also inferior frontal and occipital regions. Interactions between audiovisual integration and deviance detection processes were observed in the posterior/superior temporal gyrus. These data suggest that dynamic interactions between inferior frontal cortex and sensory regions play a significant role in multimodal integration.

  6. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy: toward an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, T B

    1982-09-01

    The author reviews historical trends, hypotheses, and problems in the application of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy and uses research findings to develop an integrative model. He portrays a chronology of models over three decades; an "additive" relationship represents the decade of 1970 to 1980. He presents factors that must be considered in determining the effects of pharmacotherapy plus psychotherapy and recommends refinement of these variables in future research.

  7. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  8. Integrable extended van der Waals model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Francesco; Landolfi, Giulio; Moro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the recent developments in the study of the thermodynamics of van der Waals fluids via the theory of nonlinear conservation laws and the description of phase transitions in terms of classical (dissipative) shock waves, we propose a novel approach to the construction of multi-parameter generalisations of the van der Waals model. The theory of integrable nonlinear conservation laws still represents the inspiring framework. Starting from a macroscopic approach, a four parameter family of integrable extended van der Waals models is indeed constructed in such a way that the equation of state is a solution to an integrable nonlinear conservation law linearisable by a Cole-Hopf transformation. This family is further specified by the request that, in regime of high temperature, far from the critical region, the extended model reproduces asymptotically the standard van der Waals equation of state. We provide a detailed comparison of our extended model with two notable empirical models such as Peng-Robinson and Soave's modification of the Redlich-Kwong equations of state. We show that our extended van der Waals equation of state is compatible with both empirical models for a suitable choice of the free parameters and can be viewed as a master interpolating equation. The present approach also suggests that further generalisations can be obtained by including the class of dispersive and viscous-dispersive nonlinear conservation laws and could lead to a new type of thermodynamic phase transitions associated to nonclassical and dispersive shock waves.

  9. Misaligned Image Integration With Local Linear Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Ryo; Shirai, Keiichiro; Okuda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    We present a new image integration technique for a flash and long-exposure image pair to capture a dark scene without incurring blurring or noisy artifacts. Most existing methods require well-aligned images for the integration, which is often a burdensome restriction in practical use. We address this issue by locally transferring the colors of the flash images using a small fraction of the corresponding pixels in the long-exposure images. We formulate the image integration as a convex optimization problem with the local linear model. The proposed method makes it possible to integrate the color of the long-exposure image with the detail of the flash image without causing any harmful effects to its contrast, where we do not need perfect alignment between the images by virtue of our new integration principle. We show that our method successfully outperforms the state of the art in the image integration and reference-based color transfer for challenging misaligned data sets.

  10. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-10-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  11. A Bayesian model of category-specific emotional brain responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor D Wager

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding emotion is critical for a science of healthy and disordered brain function, but the neurophysiological basis of emotional experience is still poorly understood. We analyzed human brain activity patterns from 148 studies of emotion categories (2159 total participants using a novel hierarchical Bayesian model. The model allowed us to classify which of five categories--fear, anger, disgust, sadness, or happiness--is engaged by a study with 66% accuracy (43-86% across categories. Analyses of the activity patterns encoded in the model revealed that each emotion category is associated with unique, prototypical patterns of activity across multiple brain systems including the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other structures. The results indicate that emotion categories are not contained within any one region or system, but are represented as configurations across multiple brain networks. The model provides a precise summary of the prototypical patterns for each emotion category, and demonstrates that a sufficient characterization of emotion categories relies on (a differential patterns of involvement in neocortical systems that differ between humans and other species, and (b distinctive patterns of cortical-subcortical interactions. Thus, these findings are incompatible with several contemporary theories of emotion, including those that emphasize emotion-dedicated brain systems and those that propose emotion is localized primarily in subcortical activity. They are consistent with componential and constructionist views, which propose that emotions are differentiated by a combination of perceptual, mnemonic, prospective, and motivational elements. Such brain-based models of emotion provide a foundation for new translational and clinical approaches.

  12. Inferring brain-computational mechanisms with models of activity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution functional imaging is providing increasingly rich measurements of brain activity in animals and humans. A major challenge is to leverage such data to gain insight into the brain's computational mechanisms. The first step is to define candidate brain-computational models (BCMs) that can perform the behavioural task in question. We would then like to infer which of the candidate BCMs best accounts for measured brain-activity data. Here we describe a method that complements each BCM by a measurement model (MM), which simulates the way the brain-activity measurements reflect neuronal activity (e.g. local averaging in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) voxels or sparse sampling in array recordings). The resulting generative model (BCM-MM) produces simulated measurements. To avoid having to fit the MM to predict each individual measurement channel of the brain-activity data, we compare the measured and predicted data at the level of summary statistics. We describe a novel particular implementation of this approach, called probabilistic representational similarity analysis (pRSA) with MMs, which uses representational dissimilarity matrices (RDMs) as the summary statistics. We validate this method by simulations of fMRI measurements (locally averaging voxels) based on a deep convolutional neural network for visual object recognition. Results indicate that the way the measurements sample the activity patterns strongly affects the apparent representational dissimilarities. However, modelling of the measurement process can account for these effects, and different BCMs remain distinguishable even under substantial noise. The pRSA method enables us to perform Bayesian inference on the set of BCMs and to recognize the data-generating model in each case. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574316

  13. Animal models of brain maldevelopment induced by cycad plant genotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisby, Glen E; Moore, Holly; Spencer, Peter S

    2013-12-01

    Cycads are long-lived tropical and subtropical plants that contain azoxyglycosides (e.g., cycasin, macrozamin) and neurotoxic amino acids (notably β-N-methylamino-l-alanine l-BMAA), toxins that have been implicated in the etiology of a disappearing neurodegenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and parkinsonism-dementia complex that has been present in high incidence among three genetically distinct populations in the western Pacific. The neuropathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism-dementia complex includes features suggestive of brain maldevelopment, an experimentally proven property of cycasin attributable to the genotoxic action of its aglycone methylazoxymethanol (MAM). This property of MAM has been exploited by neurobiologists as a tool to study perturbations of brain development. Depending on the neurodevelopmental stage, MAM can induce features in laboratory animals that model certain characteristics of epilepsy, schizophrenia, or ataxia. Studies in DNA repair-deficient mice show that MAM perturbs brain development through a DNA damage-mediated mechanism. The brain DNA lesions produced by systemic MAM appear to modulate the expression of genes that regulate neurodevelopment and contribute to neurodegeneration. Epigenetic changes (histone lysine methylation) have also been detected in the underdeveloped brain after MAM administration. The DNA damage and epigenetic changes produced by MAM and, perhaps by chemically related substances (e.g., nitrosamines, nitrosoureas, hydrazines), might be an important mechanism by which early-life exposure to genotoxicants can induce long-term brain dysfunction.

  14. FACETS -- Infrastructure for Integrated Fusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Cary, John; Carlsson, Johan; Hakim, Ammar; Kruger, Scott; Miah, Mahmood; Pletzer, Alexander; Vadlamani, Srinath; Wade-Stein, David; Balay, Satish; McInnes, Lois; Zhang, Hong; Candy, Jeff; Fahey, Mark; Cohen, Ron; Epperly, Tom; Rognlien, Tom; Estep, Don; Pankin, Alexei; Malony, Allen; Morris, Alan; Shende, Sameer; Indireshkumar, Keshavamurthy; McCune, Douglas; Pigarov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    It is desirable that an infrastructure for integrated fusion modeling has support for: legacy and new components used interchangeably; consistent management of components lifecycle; allocating parallel resources consistent with the nature of participating components and the problem scope; components written in multiple programming languages; composition of sequentially and concurrently executing components respecting dependencies; tight and loose coupling of components; testing and validation of separate and integrated components; and use of multiple platforms from desktops to LCFs. In this poster we will describe the status of the FACETS with respect to these features.

  15. Paradox of integration -- a computational model

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Malgorzata J

    2016-01-01

    The paradoxical aspect of integration of a social group has been highlighted by Peter Blau (Exchange and Power in Social Life, Wiley and Sons, 1964). During the integration process, the group members simultaneously compete for social status and play the role of the audience. Here we show that when the competition prevails over the desire of approval, a sharp transition breaks all friendly relations. However, as was described by Blau, people with high status are inclined to bother more with acceptance of others; this is achieved by praising others and revealing her/his own weak points. In our model, this action smooths the transition and improves interpersonal relations.

  16. Paradox of integration-A computational model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The paradoxical aspect of integration of a social group has been highlighted by Blau (1964). During the integration process, the group members simultaneously compete for social status and play the role of the audience. Here we show that when the competition prevails over the desire of approval, a sharp transition breaks all friendly relations. However, as was described by Blau, people with high status are inclined to bother more with acceptance of others; this is achieved by praising others and revealing her/his own weak points. In our model, this action smooths the transition and improves interpersonal relations.

  17. Novel Hybrid Model: Integrating Scrum and XP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaigham Mushtaq

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrum does not provide any direction about how to engineer a software product. The project team has to adopt suitable agile process model for the engineering of software. XP process model is mainly focused on engineering practices rather than management practices. The design of XP process makes it suitable for simple and small size projects and not appropriate for medium and large projects. A fine integration of management and engineering practices is desperately required to build quality product to make it valuable for customers. In this research a novel framework hybrid model is proposed to achieve this integration. The proposed hybrid model is actually an express version of Scrum model. It possesses features of engineering practices that are necessary to develop quality software as per customer requirements and company objectives. A case study is conducted to validate the proposal of hybrid model. The results of the case study reveal that proposed model is an improved version of XP and Scrum model.

  18. Multigrid Nonlocal Gaussian Mixture Model for Segmentation of Brain Tissues in Magnetic Resonance Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunjie; Zhan, Tianming; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel segmentation method based on regional and nonlocal information to overcome the impact of image intensity inhomogeneities and noise in human brain magnetic resonance images. With the consideration of the spatial distribution of different tissues in brain images, our method does not need preestimation or precorrection procedures for intensity inhomogeneities and noise. A nonlocal information based Gaussian mixture model (NGMM) is proposed to reduce the effect of noise. To reduce the effect of intensity inhomogeneity, the multigrid nonlocal Gaussian mixture model (MNGMM) is proposed to segment brain MR images in each nonoverlapping multigrid generated by using a new multigrid generation method. Therefore the proposed model can simultaneously overcome the impact of noise and intensity inhomogeneity and automatically classify 2D and 3D MR data into tissues of white matter, gray matter, and cerebral spinal fluid. To maintain the statistical reliability and spatial continuity of the segmentation, a fusion strategy is adopted to integrate the clustering results from different grid. The experiments on synthetic and clinical brain MR images demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed model comparing with several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  19. A neurovascular blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M; White, Robin; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature possesses certain cellular features that constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Abbott et al., Neurobiol Dis 37:13-25, 2010). This dynamic barrier separates the brain parenchyma from peripheral blood flow and is of tremendous clinical importance: for example, BBB breakdown as in stroke is associated with the development of brain edema (Rosenberg and Yang, Neurosurg Focus 22:E4, 2007), inflammation (Kuhlmann et al., Neurosci Lett 449:168-172, 2009; Coisne and Engelhardt, Antioxid Redox Signal 15:1285-1303, 2011), and increased mortality. In vivo, the BBB consists of brain endothelial cells (BEC) that are embedded within a precisely regulated environment containing astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. These cells experience modulation by various pathways of intercellular communication and by pathophysiological processes, e.g., through neurovascular coupling (Attwell et al., Nature 468:232-243, 2010), cortical spreading depression (Gursoy-Ozdemir et al., J Clin Invest 113:1447-1455, 2004), or formation of oxidative stress (Yemisci et al., Nat Med 15:1031-1037, 2009). Hence, this interdependent assembly of cells is referred to as the neurovascular unit (NVU) (Zlokovic, Nat Med 16:1370-1371, 2010; Zlokovic, Neuron 57:178-201, 2008). Experimental approaches to investigate the BBB in vitro are highly desirable to study the cerebral endothelium in health and disease. However, due to the complex interactions taking place within the NVU in vivo, it is difficult to mimic this interplay in vitro.Here, we describe a murine blood-brain barrier coculture model consisting of cortical organotypic slice cultures and brain endothelial cells that includes most of the cellular components of the NVU including neurons, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. This model allows the experimental analysis of several crucial BBB parameters such as transendothelial electrical resistance or tight junction protein localization by

  20. Brain mechanisms in religion and spirituality: An integrative predictive processing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elk, Michiel; Aleman, André

    2017-02-01

    We present the theory of predictive processing as a unifying framework to account for the neurocognitive basis of religion and spirituality. Our model is substantiated by discussing four different brain mechanisms that play a key role in religion and spirituality: temporal brain areas are associated with religious visions and ecstatic experiences; multisensory brain areas and the default mode network are involved in self-transcendent experiences; the Theory of Mind-network is associated with prayer experiences and over attribution of intentionality; top-down mechanisms instantiated in the anterior cingulate cortex and the medial prefrontal cortex could be involved in acquiring and maintaining intuitive supernatural beliefs. We compare the predictive processing model with two-systems accounts of religion and spirituality, by highlighting the central role of prediction error monitoring. We conclude by presenting novel predictions for future research and by discussing the philosophical and theological implications of neuroscientific research on religion and spirituality.

  1. Separate Brain Circuits Support Integrative and Semantic Priming in the Human Language System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gangyi; Chen, Qi; Zhu, Zude; Wang, Suiping

    2016-07-01

    Semantic priming is a crucial phenomenon to study the organization of semantic memory. A novel type of priming effect, integrative priming, has been identified behaviorally, whereby a prime word facilitates recognition of a target word when the 2 concepts can be combined to form a unitary representation. We used both functional and anatomical imaging approaches to investigate the neural substrates supporting such integrative priming, and compare them with those in semantic priming. Similar behavioral priming effects for both semantic (Bread-Cake) and integrative conditions (Cherry-Cake) were observed when compared with an unrelated condition. However, a clearly dissociated brain response was observed between these 2 types of priming. The semantic-priming effect was localized to the posterior superior temporal and middle temporal gyrus. In contrast, the integrative-priming effect localized to the left anterior inferior frontal gyrus and left anterior temporal cortices. Furthermore, fiber tractography showed that the integrative-priming regions were connected via uncinate fasciculus fiber bundle forming an integrative circuit, whereas the semantic-priming regions connected to the posterior frontal cortex via separated pathways. The results point to dissociable neural pathways underlying the 2 distinct types of priming, illuminating the neural circuitry organization of semantic representation and integration.

  2. Calcium-activated potassium channels mediated blood-brain tumor barrier opening in a rat metastatic brain tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong John M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB impedes the delivery of therapeutic agents to brain tumors. While adequate delivery of drugs occurs in systemic tumors, the BTB limits delivery of anti-tumor agents into brain metastases. Results In this study, we examined the function and regulation of calcium-activated potassium (KCa channels in a rat metastatic brain tumor model. We showed that intravenous infusion of NS1619, a KCa channel agonist, and bradykinin selectively enhanced BTB permeability in brain tumors, but not in normal brain. Iberiotoxin, a KCa channel antagonist, significantly attenuated NS1619-induced BTB permeability increase. We found KCa channels and bradykinin type 2 receptors (B2R expressed in cultured human metastatic brain tumor cells (CRL-5904, non-small cell lung cancer, metastasized to brain, human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMEC and human lung cancer brain metastasis tissues. Potentiometric assays demonstrated the activity of KCa channels in metastatic brain tumor cells and HBMEC. Furthermore, we detected higher expression of KCa channels in the metastatic brain tumor tissue and tumor capillary endothelia as compared to normal brain tissue. Co-culture of metastatic brain tumor cells and brain microvessel endothelial cells showed an upregulation of KCa channels, which may contribute to the overexpression of KCa channels in tumor microvessels and selectivity of BTB opening. Conclusion These findings suggest that KCa channels in metastatic brain tumors may serve as an effective target for biochemical modulation of BTB permeability to enhance selective delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to metastatic brain tumors.

  3. Integrated Process Model on Intercultural Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bebenova - Nikolova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes an integrated model on intercultural competence, which attempts to present intercultural communication and competence from the term point of the dialectical approach, described by Martin and Nakayama (2010. The suggested concept deploys from previously developed and accepted models, both structure-oriented and process-oriented. At the same time it replies to the principles of the “Theory of Models” as outlined by Balboni and Caon (2014. In the near future, the model will be applied to assess intercultural competence of cross-border project teams, working under the CBC program between Romania – Bulgaria 2007-2014.

  4. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  5. Stochastic model of Tsc1 lesions in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Prabhakar

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder due to mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 that affects many organs with hamartomas and tumors. TSC-associated brain lesions include subependymal nodules, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and tubers. Neurologic manifestations in TSC comprise a high frequency of mental retardation and developmental disorders including autism, as well as epilepsy. Here, we describe a new mouse model of TSC brain lesions in which complete loss of Tsc1 is achieved in multiple brain cell types in a stochastic pattern. Injection of an adeno-associated virus vector encoding Cre recombinase into the cerebral ventricles of mice homozygous for a Tsc1 conditional allele on the day of birth led to reduced survival, and pathologic findings of enlarged neurons, cortical heterotopias, subependymal nodules, and hydrocephalus. The severity of clinical and pathologic findings as well as survival was shown to be dependent upon the dose and serotype of Cre virus injected. Although several other models of TSC brain disease exist, this model is unique in that the pathology reflects a variety of TSC-associated lesions involving different numbers and types of cells. This model provides a valuable and unique addition for therapeutic assessment.

  6. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.

  7. How Anatomy Shapes Dynamics: A Semi-Analytical Study of the Brain at Rest by a Simple Spin Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo eDeco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Resting state networks show a surprisingly coherent and robust spatiotemporal organization. Previous theoretical studies demonstrated that these patterns can be understood as emergent on the basis of the underlying neuroanatomical connectivity skeleton. Integrating the biologically realistic DTI/DSI based neuroanatomical connectivity into a brain model of Ising spin dynamics, we found the presence of latent ghost multi-stable attractors, which can be studied analytically. The multistable attractor landscape defines a functionally meaningful dynamic repertoire of the brain network that is inherently present in the neuroanatomical connectivity. We demonstrate that the more entropy of attractors exists, the richer is the dynamical repertoire and consequently the brain network displays more capabilities of computation. We hypothesize therefore that human brain connectivity developed a scale free type of architecture in order to be able to store a large number of different and flexibly accessible brain functions

  8. The effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on blood-brain barrier integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Nihal Gunes; Orhan, Nurcan; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Arican, Nadir; Ahishali, Bulent; Kucuk, Mutlu; Kaya, Mehmet; Toklu, Akin Savas

    2013-09-19

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment yields conflicting results on blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity under various pathological conditions and the effects of HBO on healthy brain is poorly understood. In this experimental study, the effects of HBO on BBB integrity were investigated in comparison with hyperbaric air (HBA) in intact rats. Four sessions of HBA or HBO were applied to intact rats in 24h. BBB integrity was functionally and structurally evaluated by determining extravasation of Evans blue (EB) dye and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracers. In immunohistochemical evaluation, relative staining intensity for occludin, a tight junction (TJ) protein, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water-channel protein, was detected in the barrier type of microvessels of brain by image analysis. BBB permeability to EB dye significantly increased in animals in HBO treatment group compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.05). The immunoreactivity of occludin, a tight junction protein, remained essentially unaltered in capillaries of hippocampus in all groups. In animals exposed to HBO, AQP4 immunoreactivity significantly increased in parietal cortex compared to those in HBA and control groups (p<0.01). Ultrastructurally, frequent vesicles containing HRP reaction products were observed in capillary endothelial cells in cerebral cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to both HBA and HBO. Our results indicate that the HBO administration to intact rats increased BBB permeability to both EB and HRP while HBA increased only HRP extravasation in these animals. The results of this study suggest that HBA also impairs the BBB integrity in intact rats as well as HBO.

  9. Adaptive integration of local region information to detect fine-scale brain activity patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, the spatial resolution of fMRI data is continuously growing. This pro- vides us the possibility to detect the fine-scale patterns of brain activities. The es- tablished univariate and multivariate methods to analyze fMRI data mostly focus on detecting the activation blobs without considering the distributed fine-scale pat- terns within the blobs. To improve the sensitivity of the activation detection, in this paper, multivariate statistical method and univariate statistical method are com- bined to discover the fine-grained activity patterns. For one voxel in the brain, a local homogenous region is constructed. Then, time courses from the local ho- mogenous region are integrated with multivariate statistical method. Univariate statistical method is finally used to construct the interests of statistic for that voxel. The approach has explicitly taken into account the structures of both activity pat- terns and existing noise of local brain regions. Therefore, it could highlight the fine-scale activity patterns of the local regions. Experiments with simulated and real fMRI data demonstrate that the proposed method dramatically increases the sensitivity of detection of fine-scale brain activity patterns which contain the subtle information about experimental conditions.

  10. Comparative Evaluation for Brain Structural Connectivity Approaches: Towards Integrative Neuroinformatics Tool for Epilepsy Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Ghosh, Kaushik; Lacuey-Lecumberri, Nuria; Lhatoo, Samden D.; Sahoo, Satya S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in brain fiber tractography algorithms and diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data collection techniques are providing new approaches to study brain white matter connectivity, which play an important role in complex neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Epilepsy affects approximately 50 million persons worldwide and it is often described as a disorder of the cortical network organization. There is growing recognition of the need to better understand the role of brain structural networks in the onset and propagation of seizures in epilepsy using high resolution non-invasive imaging technologies. In this paper, we perform a comparative evaluation of two techniques to compute structural connectivity, namely probabilistic fiber tractography and statistics derived from fractional anisotropy (FA), using diffusion MRI data from a patient with rare case of medically intractable insular epilepsy. The results of our evaluation demonstrate that probabilistic fiber tractography provides a more accurate map of structural connectivity and may help address inherent complexities of neural fiber layout in the brain, such as fiber crossings. This work provides an initial result towards building an integrative informatics tool for neuroscience that can be used to accurately characterize the role of fiber tract connectivity in neurological disorders such as epilepsy. PMID:27570685

  11. The Virtual Brain: Modeling Biological Correlates of Recovery after Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, Maria Inez; Riley, Jeffrey D; Jirsa, Viktor; McIntosh, Anthony R; Shereen, Ahmed D; Chen, E Elinor; Solodkin, Ana

    2015-01-01

    There currently remains considerable variability in stroke survivor recovery. To address this, developing individualized treatment has become an important goal in stroke treatment. As a first step, it is necessary to determine brain dynamics associated with stroke and recovery. While recent methods have made strides in this direction, we still lack physiological biomarkers. The Virtual Brain (TVB) is a novel application for modeling brain dynamics that simulates an individual's brain activity by integrating their own neuroimaging data with local biophysical models. Here, we give a detailed description of the TVB modeling process and explore model parameters associated with stroke. In order to establish a parallel between this new type of modeling and those currently in use, in this work we establish an association between a specific TVB parameter (long-range coupling) that increases after stroke with metrics derived from graph analysis. We used TVB to simulate the individual BOLD signals for 20 patients with stroke and 10 healthy controls. We performed graph analysis on their structural connectivity matrices calculating degree centrality, betweenness centrality, and global efficiency. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that long-range coupling is negatively correlated with global efficiency (P = 0.038), but is not correlated with degree centrality or betweenness centrality. Our results suggest that the larger influence of local dynamics seen through the long-range coupling parameter is closely associated with a decreased efficiency of the system. We thus propose that the increase in the long-range parameter in TVB (indicating a bias toward local over global dynamics) is deleterious because it reduces communication as suggested by the decrease in efficiency. The new model platform TVB hence provides a novel perspective to understanding biophysical parameters responsible for global brain dynamics after stroke, allowing the design of focused therapeutic

  12. Pedagogic process modeling: Humanistic-integrative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boritko Nikolaj M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with some current problems of modeling the dynamics of the subject-features development of the individual. The term "process" is considered in the context of the humanistic-integrative approach, in which the principles of self education are regarded as criteria for efficient pedagogic activity. Four basic characteristics of the pedagogic process are pointed out: intentionality reflects logicality and regularity of the development of the process; discreteness (stageability in dicates qualitative stages through which the pedagogic phenomenon passes; nonlinearity explains the crisis character of pedagogic processes and reveals inner factors of self-development; situationality requires a selection of pedagogic conditions in accordance with the inner factors, which would enable steering the pedagogic process. Offered are two steps for singling out a particular stage and the algorithm for developing an integrative model for it. The suggested conclusions might be of use for further theoretic research, analyses of educational practices and for realistic predicting of pedagogical phenomena. .

  13. Search of novel model for integrative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Bhushan; Mutalik, Gururaj

    2014-03-01

    This article provides global and Indian scenario with strengths and limitations of present health care system. Affordability, accessibility and availability of health care coupled with disproportionate growth and double burden of diseases have become major concerns in India. This article emphasizes need for mindset change from illness-disease-drug centric curative to person-health-wellness centric preventive and promotive approaches. It highlights innovation deficit faced pharmaceutical industry and drugs being withdrawn from market for safety reasons. Medical pluralism is a growing trend and people are exploring various options including modern, traditional, complementary and alternative medicine. In such a situation, knowledge from Ayurveda, yoga, Chinese medicine and acupuncture may play an important role. We can evolve a suitable model by integrating modern and traditional systems of medicine for affordable health care. In the larger interest of global community, Indian and Chinese systems should share knowledge and experiences for mutual intellectual enrichments and work together to evolve a novel model of integrative medicine.

  14. Through the Immune Looking Glass: A Model for Brain Memory Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eSánchez-Ramón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are complex cognitive networks involved in defining the identity (self of the individual through recognition and memory processes that enable one to anticipate responses to stimuli. Brain memory has traditionally been classified as either implicit or explicit on psychological and anatomical grounds, with reminiscences of the evolutionarily-based innate-adaptive IS responses. Beyond the multineuronal networks of the CNS, we propose a theoretical model of brain memory integrating the CNS as a whole. This is achieved by analogical reasoning between the operational rules of recognition and memory processes in both systems, coupled to an evolutionary analysis. In this new model, the hippocampus is no longer specifically ascribed to explicit memory but rather it both becomes part of the innate (implicit memory system and tightly controls the explicit memory system. Alike the antigen presenting cells for the IS, the hippocampus would integrate transient and pseudo-specific (i.e. danger-fear memories and would drive the formation of long-term and highly specific or explicit memories (i.e. the taste of the Proust’s madeleine cake by the more complex and recent, evolutionarily speaking, neocortex. Experimental and clinical evidence is provided to support the model. We believe that the singularity of this model’s approximation could help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms operating in brain memory strategies from a large-scale network perspective.

  15. Ontological Modeling for Integrated Spacecraft Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Current spacecraft work as a cooperative group of a number of subsystems. Each of these requiresmodeling software for development, testing, and prediction. It is the goal of my team to create anoverarching software architecture called the Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA) to aid in deploying the discrete subsystems' models. Such a plan has been attempted in the past, and has failed due to the excessive scope of the project. Our goal in this version of ISCA is to use new resources to reduce the scope of the project, including using ontological models to help link the internal interfaces of subsystems' models with the ISCA architecture.I have created an ontology of functions specific to the modeling system of the navigation system of a spacecraft. The resulting ontology not only links, at an architectural level, language specificinstantiations of the modeling system's code, but also is web-viewable and can act as a documentation standard. This ontology is proof of the concept that ontological modeling can aid in the integration necessary for ISCA to work, and can act as the prototype for future ISCA ontologies.

  16. Integrable Lattice Models From Gauge Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Witten, Edward

    2016-01-01

    These notes provide an introduction to recent work by Kevin Costello in which integrable lattice models of classical statistical mechanics in two dimensions are understood in terms of quantum gauge theory in four dimensions. This construction will be compared to the more familiar relationship between quantum knot invariants in three dimensions and Chern-Simons gauge theory. (Based on a Whittaker Colloquium at the University of Edinburgh and a lecture at Strings 2016 in Beijing.)

  17. Modelling Brain Temperature and Perfusion for Cerebral Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Stephen; Valluri, Prashant; Marshall, Ian; Andrews, Peter; Harris, Bridget; Thrippleton, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Brain temperature relies heavily on two aspects: i) blood perfusion and porous heat transport through tissue and ii) blood flow and heat transfer through embedded arterial and venous vasculature. Moreover brain temperature cannot be measured directly unless highly invasive surgical procedures are used. A 3D two-phase fluid-porous model for mapping flow and temperature in brain is presented with arterial and venous vessels extracted from MRI scans. Heat generation through metabolism is also included. The model is robust and reveals flow and temperature maps in unprecedented 3D detail. However, the Karmen-Kozeny parameters of the porous (tissue) phase need to be optimised for expected perfusion profiles. In order to optimise the K-K parameters a reduced order two-phase model is developed where 1D vessels are created with a tree generation algorithm embedded inside a 3D porous domain. Results reveal that blood perfusion is a strong function of the porosity distribution in the tissue. We present a qualitative comparison between the simulated perfusion maps and those obtained clinically. We also present results studying the effect of scalp cooling on core brain temperature and preliminary results agree with those observed clinically.

  18. Models to Tailor Brain Stimulation Therapies in Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Plow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge facing stroke rehabilitation is the lack of information on how to derive targeted therapies. As such, techniques once considered promising, such as brain stimulation, have demonstrated mixed efficacy across heterogeneous samples in clinical studies. Here, we explain reasons, citing its one-type-suits-all approach as the primary cause of variable efficacy. We present evidence supporting the role of alternate substrates, which can be targeted instead in patients with greater damage and deficit. Building on this groundwork, this review will also discuss different frameworks on how to tailor brain stimulation therapies. To the best of our knowledge, our report is the first instance that enumerates and compares across theoretical models from upper limb recovery and conditions like aphasia and depression. Here, we explain how different models capture heterogeneity across patients and how they can be used to predict which patients would best respond to what treatments to develop targeted, individualized brain stimulation therapies. Our intent is to weigh pros and cons of testing each type of model so brain stimulation is successfully tailored to maximize upper limb recovery in stroke.

  19. Blood-Brain Barrier Alterations Provide Evidence of Subacute Diaschisis in an Ischemic Stroke Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Tajiri, Naoki; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Abraham, Jerry V.; Pabon, Mibel; Wagner, Andrew; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Haller, Edward; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB) competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. Methodology/Principal Findings In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB) parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:23675488

  20. Blood-brain barrier alterations provide evidence of subacute diaschisis in an ischemic stroke rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke.

  1. Fuzzy local Gaussian mixture model for brain MR image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zexuan; Xia, Yong; Sun, Quansen; Chen, Qiang; Xia, Deshen; Feng, David Dagan

    2012-05-01

    Accurate brain tissue segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an essential step in quantitative brain image analysis. However, due to the existence of noise and intensity inhomogeneity in brain MR images, many segmentation algorithms suffer from limited accuracy. In this paper, we assume that the local image data within each voxel's neighborhood satisfy the Gaussian mixture model (GMM), and thus propose the fuzzy local GMM (FLGMM) algorithm for automated brain MR image segmentation. This algorithm estimates the segmentation result that maximizes the posterior probability by minimizing an objective energy function, in which a truncated Gaussian kernel function is used to impose the spatial constraint and fuzzy memberships are employed to balance the contribution of each GMM. We compared our algorithm to state-of-the-art segmentation approaches in both synthetic and clinical data. Our results show that the proposed algorithm can largely overcome the difficulties raised by noise, low contrast, and bias field, and substantially improve the accuracy of brain MR image segmentation.

  2. Vascular Functions and Brain Integrity in Midlife: Effects of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreana P. Haley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intact cognitive function is the best predictor of quality of life and functional ability in older age. Thus, preventing cognitive decline is central to any effort to guarantee successful aging for our growing population of elderly. The purpose of the work discussed in this outlook paper is to bridge knowledge from basic and clinical neuroscience with the aim of improving how we understand, predict, and treat age- and disease-related cognitive impairment. Over the past six years, our research team has focused on intermediate neuroimaging phenotypes of brain vulnerability in midlife and isolating the underlying physiological mechanisms. The ultimate goal of this work was to pave the road for the development of early interventions to enhance cognitive function and preserve brain integrity throughout the lifespan.

  3. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  4. Corticonic models of brain mechanisms underlying cognition and intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Nabil H.

    The concern of this review is brain theory or more specifically, in its first part, a model of the cerebral cortex and the way it: (a) interacts with subcortical regions like the thalamus and the hippocampus to provide higher-level-brain functions that underlie cognition and intelligence, (b) handles and represents dynamical sensory patterns imposed by a constantly changing environment, (c) copes with the enormous number of such patterns encountered in a lifetime by means of dynamic memory that offers an immense number of stimulus-specific attractors for input patterns (stimuli) to select from, (d) selects an attractor through a process of “conjugation” of the input pattern with the dynamics of the thalamo-cortical loop, (e) distinguishes between redundant (structured) and non-redundant (random) inputs that are void of information, (f) can do categorical perception when there is access to vast associative memory laid out in the association cortex with the help of the hippocampus, and (g) makes use of “computation” at the edge of chaos and information driven annealing to achieve all this. Other features and implications of the concepts presented for the design of computational algorithms and machines with brain-like intelligence are also discussed. The material and results presented suggest, that a Parametrically Coupled Logistic Map network (PCLMN) is a minimal model of the thalamo-cortical complex and that marrying such a network to a suitable associative memory with re-entry or feedback forms a useful, albeit, abstract model of a cortical module of the brain that could facilitate building a simple artificial brain. In the second part of the review, the results of numerical simulations and drawn conclusions in the first part are linked to the most directly relevant works and views of other workers. What emerges is a picture of brain dynamics on the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales that gives a glimpse of the nature of the long sought after brain code

  5. An integrated neuromechanical model of insect locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukillaya, Raghavendra

    We develop a biologically-plausible feedforward neuromechanical model for running insects that includes a simplified hexapedal leg geometry with agonist-antagonist muscle pairs actuating each leg joint. It is driven by a neural network modeling the central pattern generator (CPG) and the motoneurons which activate the muscles. This final goal is achieved in three stages. First, a relatively simple mechanical hexapedal model is constructed in which the joint torques are produced via actuated linear torsional springs with constant stiffness. In the second stage, this system is upgraded to a muscle-actuated hexapedal model in which each joint is actuated by a pair of agonist-antagonist Hill-type muscles. Muscles are driven by stylized action potentials that are characteristic of fast motoneurons, and modeled using an activation function and nonlinear length and shortening velocity dependence. In the final stage, the full neuromechanical model is obtained by integrating the above muscle-actuated hexapedal model with a CPG-motoneuron complex, feedforward input to the muscles now being supplied by action potentials from motoneurons. Restricting to dynamics in the horizontal plane and neglecting leg masses, we reduce the model (at each stage) to three degrees of freedom describing translational and yawing motions of the body. Collectively for all the models, parameter values are based on measurements from depressor motoneurons and muscles, and observations of kinematics and dynamics of the cockroach Blaberus discoidalis. Specifically, actuation inputs for the mechanical and muscle-actuated models are chosen to approximately achieve joint torques that are consistent with measured ground reaction forces. This is done by optimizing the time-dependent torque-free joint angles in the first model, and by optimizing motoneuronal outputs and muscle force levels in the second and third models. We show that the model (at each stage) has stable double-tripod gaits over the animal

  6. Recurrent network models for perfect temporal integration of fluctuating correlated inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okamoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporal integration of input is essential to the accumulation of information in various cognitive and behavioral processes, and gradually increasing neuronal activity, typically occurring within a range of seconds, is considered to reflect such computation by the brain. Some psychological evidence suggests that temporal integration by the brain is nearly perfect, that is, the integration is non-leaky, and the output of a neural integrator is accurately proportional to the strength of input. Neural mechanisms of perfect temporal integration, however, remain largely unknown. Here, we propose a recurrent network model of cortical neurons that perfectly integrates partially correlated, irregular input spike trains. We demonstrate that the rate of this temporal integration changes proportionately to the probability of spike coincidences in synaptic inputs. We analytically prove that this highly accurate integration of synaptic inputs emerges from integration of the variance of the fluctuating synaptic inputs, when their mean component is kept constant. Highly irregular neuronal firing and spike coincidences are the major features of cortical activity, but they have been separately addressed so far. Our results suggest that the efficient protocol of information integration by cortical networks essentially requires both features and hence is heterotic.

  7. A prospective study to evaluate a new residential community reintegration programme for severe chronic brain injury: the Brain Integration Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Martina, J.D.; Heugten, C.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of a residential community reintegration programme for participants with chronic sequelae of severe acquired brain injury that hamper community functioning. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four participants with acquired brain injury (traumatic

  8. Dimethyl fumarate attenuates cerebral edema formation by protecting the blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Reiner; Urrutia, Andrés; Hoffmann, Angelika; Liu, Hui; Helluy, Xavier; Pham, Mirko; Reischl, Stefan; Korff, Thomas; Marti, Hugo H

    2015-04-01

    Brain edema is a hallmark of various neuropathologies, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We aim to characterize how tissue hypoxia, together with oxidative stress and inflammation, leads to capillary dysfunction and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In a mouse stroke model we show that systemic treatment with dimethyl fumarate (DMF), an antioxidant drug clinically used for psoriasis and multiple sclerosis, significantly prevented edema formation in vivo. Indeed, DMF stabilized the BBB by preventing disruption of interendothelial tight junctions and gap formation, and decreased matrix metalloproteinase activity in brain tissue. In vitro, DMF directly sustained endothelial tight junctions, inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, and attenuated leukocyte transmigration. We also demonstrate that these effects are mediated via activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2). DMF activated the Nrf2 pathway as shown by up-regulation of several Nrf2 target genes in the brain in vivo, as well as in cerebral endothelial cells and astrocytes in vitro, where DMF also increased protein abundance of nuclear Nrf2. Finally, Nrf2 knockdown in endothelial cells aggravated subcellular delocalization of tight junction proteins during ischemic conditions, and attenuated the protective effect exerted by DMF. Overall, our data suggest that DMF protects from cerebral edema formation during ischemic stroke by targeting interendothelial junctions in an Nrf2-dependent manner, and provide the basis for a completely new approach to treat brain edema.

  9. Avoiding unintentional eviction from integral projection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Miller, Tom E X; Ellner, Stephen P

    2012-09-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) are increasingly being applied to study size-structured populations. Here we call attention to a potential problem in their construction that can have important consequences for model results. IPMs are implemented using an approximating matrix and bounded size range. Individuals near the size limits can be unknowingly "evicted" from the model because their predicted future size is outside the range. We provide simple measures for the magnitude of eviction and the sensitivity of the population growth rate (lambda) to eviction, allowing modelers to assess the severity of the problem in their IPM. For IPMs of three plant species, we found that eviction occurred in all cases and caused underestimation of the population growth rate (lambda) relative to eviction-free models; it is likely that other models are similarly affected. Models with frequent eviction should be modified because eviction is only possible when size transitions are badly mis-specified. We offer several solutions to eviction problems, but we emphasize that the modeler must choose the most appropriate solution based on an understanding of why eviction occurs in the first place. We recommend testing IPMs for eviction problems and resolving them, so that population dynamics are modeled more accurately.

  10. Integrated statistical modelling of spatial landslide probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergili, M.; Chu, H.-J.

    2015-09-01

    Statistical methods are commonly employed to estimate spatial probabilities of landslide release at the catchment or regional scale. Travel distances and impact areas are often computed by means of conceptual mass point models. The present work introduces a fully automated procedure extending and combining both concepts to compute an integrated spatial landslide probability: (i) the landslide inventory is subset into release and deposition zones. (ii) We employ a simple statistical approach to estimate the pixel-based landslide release probability. (iii) We use the cumulative probability density function of the angle of reach of the observed landslide pixels to assign an impact probability to each pixel. (iv) We introduce the zonal probability i.e. the spatial probability that at least one landslide pixel occurs within a zone of defined size. We quantify this relationship by a set of empirical curves. (v) The integrated spatial landslide probability is defined as the maximum of the release probability and the product of the impact probability and the zonal release probability relevant for each pixel. We demonstrate the approach with a 637 km2 study area in southern Taiwan, using an inventory of 1399 landslides triggered by the typhoon Morakot in 2009. We observe that (i) the average integrated spatial landslide probability over the entire study area corresponds reasonably well to the fraction of the observed landside area; (ii) the model performs moderately well in predicting the observed spatial landslide distribution; (iii) the size of the release zone (or any other zone of spatial aggregation) influences the integrated spatial landslide probability to a much higher degree than the pixel-based release probability; (iv) removing the largest landslides from the analysis leads to an enhanced model performance.

  11. Completely integrable models of nonlinear optics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrey I Maimistov

    2001-11-01

    The models of the nonlinear optics in which solitons appeared are considered. These models are of paramount importance in studies of nonlinear wave phenomena. The classical examples of phenomena of this kind are the self-focusing, self-induced transparency and parametric interaction of three waves. At present there are a number of theories based on completely integrable systems of equations, which are, both, generations of the original known models and new ones. The modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation, Sine–Gordon equation, the reduced Maxwell–Bloch equation, Hirota equation, the principal chiral field equations, and the equations of massive Thirring model are some soliton equations, which are usually to be found in nonlinear optics theory.

  12. Integrated Model for E-Learning Acceptance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadiani; Rodziah, A.; Hasan, S. M.; Rusli, A.; Noraini, C.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is not going to work if the system is not used in accordance with user needs. User Interface is very important to encourage using the application. Many theories had discuss about user interface usability evaluation and technology acceptance separately, actually why we do not make it correlation between interface usability evaluation and user acceptance to enhance e-learning process. Therefore, the evaluation model for e-learning interface acceptance is considered important to investigate. The aim of this study is to propose the integrated e-learning user interface acceptance evaluation model. This model was combined some theories of e-learning interface measurement such as, user learning style, usability evaluation, and the user benefit. We formulated in constructive questionnaires which were shared at 125 English Language School (ELS) students. This research statistics used Structural Equation Model using LISREL v8.80 and MANOVA analysis.

  13. Integrated modeling of submillimeter radio telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Dan; Andersen, Torben

    2002-07-01

    Integrated models are inherently complex and often obscure to any but those who write them. Their usefulness can be greatly enhanced through well-structured, object-oriented design. A robust and computationally efficient Simulink/C++ library of optics, control, finite-element, and visualization routines for modeling radio telescope performance under various operating conditions is being developed and is described. The library is being developed in conjunction with an end-to-end model of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) antennas. The model includes the mechanical structure, optics, servos, and potential laser gyros, and can be used to investigate such issues as tracking performance, compliance with error budgets, wind sensitivity, and effectiveness of an internal metrology system. It will also be a good tool for comparison of different antenna designs.

  14. Self-organized criticality model for brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-20

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  15. Neuroinflammation in animal models of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liao, Yi-En; Yang, Ling-Yu; Wang, Jing-Ya; Tweedie, David; Karnati, Hanuma K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Neuroinflammation is prominent in the short and long-term consequences of neuronal injuries that occur after TBI. Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glia, including microglia and astrocytes, to release inflammatory mediators within the brain, and the subsequent recruitment of peripheral immune cells. Various animal models of TBI have been developed that have proved valuable to elucidate the pathophysiology of the disorder and to assess the safety and efficacy of novel therapies prior to clinical trials. These models provide an excellent platform to delineate key injury mechanisms that associate with types of injury (concussion, contusion, and penetration injuries) that occur clinically for the investigation of mild, moderate, and severe forms of TBI. Additionally, TBI modeling in genetically engineered mice, in particular, has aided the identification of key molecules and pathways for putative injury mechanisms, as targets for development of novel therapies for human TBI. This Review details the evidence showing that neuroinflammation, characterized by the activation of microglia and astrocytes and elevated production of inflammatory mediators, is a critical process occurring in various TBI animal models, provides a broad overview of commonly used animal models of TBI, and overviews representative techniques to quantify markers of the brain inflammatory process. A better understanding of neuroinflammation could open therapeutic avenues for abrogation of secondary cell death and behavioral symptoms that may mediate the progression of TBI. PMID:27382003

  16. MR Vascular Fingerprinting in Stroke and Brain Tumors Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasson, B.; Pannetier, N.; Coquery, N.; Boisserand, Ligia S. B.; Collomb, Nora; Schuff, N.; Moseley, M.; Zaharchuk, G.; Barbier, E. L.; Christen, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated an MRI fingerprinting approach (MRvF) designed to provide high-resolution parametric maps of the microvascular architecture (i.e., blood volume fraction, vessel diameter) and function (blood oxygenation) simultaneously. The method was tested in rats (n = 115), divided in 3 models: brain tumors (9 L, C6, F98), permanent stroke, and a control group of healthy animals. We showed that fingerprinting can robustly distinguish between healthy and pathological brain tissues with different behaviors in tumor and stroke models. In particular, fingerprinting revealed that C6 and F98 glioma models have similar signatures while 9 L present a distinct evolution. We also showed that it is possible to improve the results of MRvF and obtain supplemental information by changing the numerical representation of the vascular network. Finally, good agreement was found between MRvF and conventional MR approaches in healthy tissues and in the C6, F98, and permanent stroke models. For the 9 L glioma model, fingerprinting showed blood oxygenation measurements that contradict results obtained with a quantitative BOLD approach. In conclusion, MR vascular fingerprinting seems to be an efficient technique to study microvascular properties in vivo. Multiple technical improvements are feasible and might improve diagnosis and management of brain diseases.

  17. Breaking symmetry: the zebrafish as a model for understanding left-right asymmetry in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussigne, Myriam; Blader, Patrick; Wilson, Stephen W

    2012-03-01

    How does left-right asymmetry develop in the brain and how does the resultant asymmetric circuitry impact on brain function and lateralized behaviors? By enabling scientists to address these questions at the levels of genes, neurons, circuitry and behavior,the zebrafish model system provides a route to resolve the complexity of brain lateralization. In this review, we present the progress made towards characterizing the nature of the gene networks and the sequence of morphogenetic events involved in the asymmetric development of zebrafish epithalamus. In an attempt to integrate the recent extensive knowledge into a working model and to identify the future challenges,we discuss how insights gained at a cellular/developmental level can be linked to the data obtained at a molecular/genetic level. Finally, we present some evolutionary thoughts and discuss how significant discoveries made in zebrafish should provide entry points to better understand the evolutionary origins of brain lateralization.

  18. Typological and Integrative Models of Sexual Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidova L.Y.,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the basic typological and integrative theoretical models that explain the occurrence of child sexual abuse and the differences detected among the perpetrators of crimes against sexual integrity of minors. A comprehensive review of the theoretical concepts of sexual abuse in our country, in fact has not been carried out, and in this paper for the first time we made such an attempt. It is shown that the existing notions of sexual abuse largely overlap each other, but each of the models somehow takes into account the factors not explicitly addressed in other concepts. Systematic consideration of the theoretical models of sexual abuse can generalize and systematize the available data on the mechanisms of pedophile behavior. This review provides an opportunity to develop a new benchmark in the study of sexual abuse, get closer to building the most accurate and comprehensive model. In turn, this may contribute to solving the questions about the factors, dynamics, and the prevention of criminal sexual conduct against children

  19. Integrated Hydrosystem Modeling of the California Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, J. H.; Hwang, H. T.; Sudicky, E. A.; Mallia, D.; Lin, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Western United States is facing one of the worst droughts on record. Climate change projections predict warmer temperatures, higher evapotranspiration rates, and no foreseeable increase in precipitation. California, in particular, has supplemented their decreased surface water supplies by mining deep groundwater. However, this supply of groundwater is limited, especially with reduced recharge. These combined factors place California's water-demanding society at dire risk. In an effort to quantify California's risks, we present a fully integrated water cycle model that captures the dynamics of the subsurface, land surface, and atmospheric domains over the entire California basin. Our water cycle model combines HydroGeoSphere (HGS), a 3-D control-volume finite element model that accommodates variably-saturated subsurface and surface water flow with evapotranspiration processes to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a 3-D finite difference nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric simulator. The two-way coupling within our model, referred to as HGS-WRF, tightly integrates the water cycling processes by passing precipitation and potential evapotranspiration data from WRF to HGS, while exchanging actual evapotranspiration and soil saturation data from HGS to WRF. Furthermore, HGS-WRF implements a flexible coupling method that allows each model to use a unique mesh while maintaining mass conservation within and between domains. Our simulation replicated field measured evapotranspiration fluxes and showed a strong correlation between the soil saturation (depth to groundwater table) and latent heat fluxes. Altogether, the HGS-WRF California basin model is currently the most complete water resource simulation framework as it combines groundwater, surface water, the unsaturated zone, and the atmosphere into one coupled system.

  20. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  1. Combination radiotherapy in an orthotopic mouse brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Tamalee R; Camphausen, Kevin

    2012-03-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are the most common and aggressive adult primary brain tumors. In recent years there has been substantial progress in the understanding of the mechanics of tumor invasion, and direct intracerebral inoculation of tumor provides the opportunity of observing the invasive process in a physiologically appropriate environment. As far as human brain tumors are concerned, the orthotopic models currently available are established either by stereotaxic injection of cell suspensions or implantation of a solid piece of tumor through a complicated craniotomy procedure. In our technique we harvest cells from tissue culture to create a cell suspension used to implant directly into the brain. The duration of the surgery is approximately 30 minutes, and as the mouse needs to be in a constant surgical plane, an injectable anesthetic is used. The mouse is placed in a stereotaxic jig made by Stoetling (figure 1). After the surgical area is cleaned and prepared, an incision is made; and the bregma is located to determine the location of the craniotomy. The location of the craniotomy is 2 mm to the right and 1 mm rostral to the bregma. The depth is 3 mm from the surface of the skull, and cells are injected at a rate of 2 μl every 2 minutes. The skin is sutured with 5-0 PDS, and the mouse is allowed to wake up on a heating pad. From our experience, depending on the cell line, treatment can take place from 7-10 days after surgery. Drug delivery is dependent on the drug composition. For radiation treatment the mice are anesthetized, and put into a custom made jig. Lead covers the mouse's body and exposes only the brain of the mouse. The study of tumorigenesis and the evaluation of new therapies for GBM require accurate and reproducible brain tumor animal models. Thus we use this orthotopic brain model to study the interaction of the microenvironment of the brain and the tumor, to test the effectiveness of different therapeutic agents with and without

  2. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, R.

    2015-11-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a dimensionless model parameter c, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural c = 1 line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the latter case, the bound on c is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on c obtained from various observational tests.

  3. Visualization and modelling of STLmax topographic brain activity maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammone, Nadia; Principe, José C; Morabito, Francesco C; Shiau, Deng S; Sackellares, J Chris

    2010-06-15

    This paper evaluates the descriptive power of brain topography based on a dynamical parameter, the Short-Term Maximum Lyapunov Exponent (STLmax), estimated from EEG, for finding out a relationship of STLmax spatial distribution with the onset zone and with the mechanisms leading to epileptic seizures. Our preliminary work showed that visual assessment of STLmax topography exhibited a link with the location of seizure onset zone. The objective of the present work is to model the spatial distribution of STLmax in order to automatically extract these features from the maps. One-hour preictal segments from four long-term continuous EEG recordings (two scalp and two intracranial) were processed and the corresponding STLmax profiles were estimated. The spatial STLmax maps were modelled by a combination of two Gaussians functions. The parameters of the fitted model allow automatic extraction of quantitative information about the spatial distribution of STLmax: the EEG signal recorded from the brain region where seizures originate exhibited low-STLmax levels, long before the seizure onset, in 3 out of 4 patients (1 out of 2 of scalp patients and 2 out of 2 in intracranial patients). Topographic maps extracted directly from the EEG power did not provide useful information about the location, therefore we conclude that the analysis so far carried out suggests the possibility of using a model of STLmax topography as a tool for monitoring the evolution of epileptic brain dynamics. In the future, a more elaborate approach will be investigated in order to improve the specificity of the method.

  4. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Horvat

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB. It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a dimensionless model parameter c, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural c=1 line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the latter case, the bound on c is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on c obtained from various observational tests.

  5. Data-driven forward model inference for EEG brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hauberg, Søren; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-06-13

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is a flexible and accessible tool with excellent temporal resolution but with a spatial resolution hampered by volume conduction. Reconstruction of the cortical sources of measured EEG activity partly alleviates this problem and effectively turns EEG into a brain imaging device. The quality of the source reconstruction depends on the forward model which details head geometry and conductivities of different head compartments. These person-specific factors are complex to determine, requiring detailed knowledge of the subject's anatomy and physiology. In this proof-of-concept study, we show that, even when anatomical knowledge is unavailable, a suitable forward model can be estimated directly from the EEG. We propose a data-driven approach that provides a low-dimensional parametrization of head geometry and compartment conductivities, built using a corpus of forward models. Combined with only a recorded EEG signal, we are able to estimate both the brain sources and a person-specific forward model by optimizing this parametrization. We thus not only solve an inverse problem, but also optimize over its specification. Our work demonstrates that personalized EEG brain imaging is possible, even when the head geometry and conductivities are unknown.

  6. Integrated modeling of the Euro50

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Torben E.; Browne, Michael T.; Enmark, Anita; Moraru, Dan; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Riewaldt, Holger

    2004-07-01

    The Euro50 is a proposed 50 m optical and infrared telescope. It will have thousands of control loops to keep the optics aligned under influence of wind, gravity and thermal loads. Cross-disciplinary integrated modeling is used to study the overall performance of the Euro50. A sub-model of the mechanical structure originates from finite element modeling. The optical performance is determined using ray tracing, both non-linear and linearized. The primary mirror segment alignment control system is modeled with the 618 segments taken as rigid bodies. Adaptive optics is included using a layered model of the atmosphere and sub-models of the wavefront sensor, reconstructor and controller. The deformable mirror is, so far, described by a simple influence function and a second order dynamical transfer function but more detailed work is in progress. The model has been implemented using Matlab/Simulink on individual computers but it will shortly be implemented on a Beowulf cluster within a trusted network. Communication routines between Matlab on the cluster processors have been written and are being benchmarked. Representative results from the simulations are shown.

  7. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  8. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an imp...

  9. Androgen modulation of social decision making mechanisms in the brain: an integrative and embodied perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui F Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Apart from their role in reproduction androgens also respond to social challenges and this response has been seen as a way to regulate the expression of behaviour according to the perceived social environment (Challenge hypothesis, Wingfield et al. 1990. This hypothesis implies that social decision-making mechanisms localized in the central nervous system (CNS are open to the influence of peripheral hormones that ultimately are under the control of the CNS through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Therefore, two puzzling questions emerge at two different levels of biological analysis: (1 Why does the brain, which perceives the social environment and regulates androgen production in the gonad, need feedback information from the gonad to adjust its social decision-making processes? (2 How does the brain regulate gonadal androgen responses to social challenges and how do these feedback into the brain? In this paper, we will address these two questions using the integrative approach proposed by Niko Tinbergen, who proposed that a full understanding of behaviour requires its analysis at both proximate (physiology, ontogeny and ultimate (ecology, evolution levels.

  10. A generalized SHGI integrable hierarchy and its expanding integrable model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-Feng

    2004-01-01

    An anti-symmetric loop algebra A2 is constructed. It follows that an integrable system is obtained by use of Tu's scheme. The eminent feature of this integrable system is that it is reduced to a generalized Schrodinger equation, the well-known heat-conduction equation and a Gerdjkov-Ivanov (GI) equation. Therefore, we call it a generalized SHGI hierarchy. Next, a new high-dimensional subalgebra G of the loop algebra A2 is constructed. As its application, a new expanding integrable system with six potential functions is engendered.

  11. Epistemic Games in Integration: Modeling Resource Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Katrina E.; Wittmann, Michael C.

    2007-11-01

    As part of an ongoing project to understand how mathematics is used in advanced physics to guide one's conceptual understanding of physics, we focus on students' interpretation and use of boundary and initial conditions when solving integrals. We discuss an interaction between two students working on a group quiz problem. After describing the interaction, we briefly discuss the procedural resources that we use to model the students' solutions. We then use the procedural resources introduced earlier to draw resources graphs describing the two epistemic game facets used by the students in our transcript.

  12. Differential and Integral Models of TOKAMAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Dolezel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of 3D electromagnetic phenomena in TOKAMAK with typically distributed main and additional coils is not an easy business. Evaluated must be not only distribution of the magnetic field, but also forces acting in particular coils. Use of differential methods (such as FDM or FEM for this purpose may be complicated because of geometrical incommensurability of particular subregions in the investigated area or problems with the boundary conditions. That is why integral formulation of the problem may sometimes be an advantages. The theoretical analysis is illustrated on an example processed by both methods, whose results are compared and discussed.

  13. Social competence in pediatric brain tumor survivors: application of a model from social neuroscience and developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C; McCurdy, Mark; Turner, Elise; Kazak, Anne E; Noll, Robert B; Phillips, Peter; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-03-01

    Pediatric brain tumor (BT) survivors are at risk for psychosocial late effects across many domains of functioning, including neurocognitive and social. The literature on the social competence of pediatric BT survivors is still developing and future research is needed that integrates developmental and cognitive neuroscience research methodologies to identify predictors of survivor social adjustment and interventions to ameliorate problems. This review discusses the current literature on survivor social functioning through a model of social competence in childhood brain disorder and suggests future directions based on this model. Interventions pursuing change in survivor social adjustment should consider targeting social ecological factors.

  14. Modeling mitochondrial bioenergetics with integrated volume dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason N Bazil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of mitochondrial bioenergetics provide powerful analytical tools to help interpret experimental data and facilitate experimental design for elucidating the supporting biochemical and physical processes. As a next step towards constructing a complete physiologically faithful mitochondrial bioenergetics model, a mathematical model was developed targeting the cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic based upon previous efforts, and corroborated using both transient and steady state data. The model consists of several modified rate functions of mitochondrial bioenergetics, integrated calcium dynamics and a detailed description of the K(+-cycle and its effect on mitochondrial bioenergetics and matrix volume regulation. Model simulations were used to fit 42 adjustable parameters to four independent experimental data sets consisting of 32 data curves. During the model development, a certain network topology had to be in place and some assumptions about uncertain or unobserved experimental factors and conditions were explicitly constrained in order to faithfully reproduce all the data sets. These realizations are discussed, and their necessity helps contribute to the collective understanding of the mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  15. Modeling mitochondrial bioenergetics with integrated volume dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazil, Jason N; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of mitochondrial bioenergetics provide powerful analytical tools to help interpret experimental data and facilitate experimental design for elucidating the supporting biochemical and physical processes. As a next step towards constructing a complete physiologically faithful mitochondrial bioenergetics model, a mathematical model was developed targeting the cardiac mitochondrial bioenergetic based upon previous efforts, and corroborated using both transient and steady state data. The model consists of several modified rate functions of mitochondrial bioenergetics, integrated calcium dynamics and a detailed description of the K(+)-cycle and its effect on mitochondrial bioenergetics and matrix volume regulation. Model simulations were used to fit 42 adjustable parameters to four independent experimental data sets consisting of 32 data curves. During the model development, a certain network topology had to be in place and some assumptions about uncertain or unobserved experimental factors and conditions were explicitly constrained in order to faithfully reproduce all the data sets. These realizations are discussed, and their necessity helps contribute to the collective understanding of the mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  16. A population model of integrative cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, William A; Husband, Leland D; Husband, Graham; Dakhlalla, Muhammad; Bellamy, Kyle; Coleman, Thomas G; Hester, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    We present a small integrative model of human cardiovascular physiology. The model is population-based; rather than using best fit parameter values, we used a variant of the Metropolis algorithm to produce distributions for the parameters most associated with model sensitivity. The population is built by sampling from these distributions to create the model coefficients. The resulting models were then subjected to a hemorrhage. The population was separated into those that lost less than 15 mmHg arterial pressure (compensators), and those that lost more (decompensators). The populations were parametrically analyzed to determine baseline conditions correlating with compensation and decompensation. Analysis included single variable correlation, graphical time series analysis, and support vector machine (SVM) classification. Most variables were seen to correlate with propensity for circulatory collapse, but not sufficiently to effect reasonable classification by any single variable. Time series analysis indicated a single significant measure, the stressed blood volume, as predicting collapse in situ, but measurement of this quantity is clinically impossible. SVM uncovered a collection of variables and parameters that, when taken together, provided useful rubrics for classification. Due to the probabilistic origins of the method, multiple classifications were attempted, resulting in an average of 3.5 variables necessary to construct classification. The most common variables used were systemic compliance, baseline baroreceptor signal strength and total peripheral resistance, providing predictive ability exceeding 90%. The methods presented are suitable for use in any deterministic mathematical model.

  17. A population model of integrative cardiovascular physiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Pruett

    Full Text Available We present a small integrative model of human cardiovascular physiology. The model is population-based; rather than using best fit parameter values, we used a variant of the Metropolis algorithm to produce distributions for the parameters most associated with model sensitivity. The population is built by sampling from these distributions to create the model coefficients. The resulting models were then subjected to a hemorrhage. The population was separated into those that lost less than 15 mmHg arterial pressure (compensators, and those that lost more (decompensators. The populations were parametrically analyzed to determine baseline conditions correlating with compensation and decompensation. Analysis included single variable correlation, graphical time series analysis, and support vector machine (SVM classification. Most variables were seen to correlate with propensity for circulatory collapse, but not sufficiently to effect reasonable classification by any single variable. Time series analysis indicated a single significant measure, the stressed blood volume, as predicting collapse in situ, but measurement of this quantity is clinically impossible. SVM uncovered a collection of variables and parameters that, when taken together, provided useful rubrics for classification. Due to the probabilistic origins of the method, multiple classifications were attempted, resulting in an average of 3.5 variables necessary to construct classification. The most common variables used were systemic compliance, baseline baroreceptor signal strength and total peripheral resistance, providing predictive ability exceeding 90%. The methods presented are suitable for use in any deterministic mathematical model.

  18. INTEGRATED SPEED ESTIMATION MODEL FOR MULTILANE EXPREESSWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungjoon; Oguchi, Takashi

    In this paper, an integrated speed-estimation model is developed based on empirical analyses for the basic sections of intercity multilane expressway un der the uncongested condition. This model enables a speed estimation for each lane at any site under arb itrary highway-alignment, traffic (traffic flow and truck percentage), and rainfall conditions. By combin ing this model and a lane-use model which estimates traffic distribution on the lanes by each vehicle type, it is also possible to es timate an average speed across all the lanes of one direction from a traffic demand by vehicle type under specific highway-alignment and rainfall conditions. This model is exp ected to be a tool for the evaluation of traffic performance for expressways when the performance me asure is travel speed, which is necessary for Performance-Oriented Highway Planning and Design. Regarding the highway-alignment condition, two new estimators, called effective horizo ntal curvature and effective vertical grade, are proposed in this paper which take into account the influence of upstream and downstream alignment conditions. They are applied to the speed-estimation model, and it shows increased accuracy of the estimation.

  19. Developing Metrics in Systems Integration (ISS Program COTS Integration Model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the complications in developing metrics for systems integration. Specifically it reviews a case study of how two programs within NASA try to develop and measure performance while meeting the encompassing organizational goals.

  20. Treatment of pathological gambling - integrative systemic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenović, Ivica; Lažetić, Goran; Lečić-Toševski, Dušica; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling was classified under impulse control disorders within the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) (WHO 1992), but the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-V), (APA 2013), has recognized pathological gambling as a first disorder within a new diagnostic category of behavioral addictions - Gambling disorder. Pathological gambling is a disorder in progression, and we hope that our experience in the treatment of pathological gambling in the Daily Hospital for Addictions at The Institute of Mental Health, through the original "Integrative - systemic model" would be of use to colleagues, dealing with this pathology. This model of treatment of pathological gambling is based on multi-systemic approach and it primarily represents an integration of family and cognitive-behavioral therapy, with traces of psychodynamic, existential and pharmacotherapy. The model is based on the book "Pathological gambling - with self-help manual" by Dr Mladenovic and Dr Lazetic, and has been designed in the form of a program that lasts 10 weeks in the intensive phase, and then continues for two years in the form of "extended treatment" ("After care"). The intensive phase is divided into three segments: educational, insight with initial changes and analysis of the achieved changes with the definition of plans and areas that need to be addressed in the extended treatment. "Extended treatment" lasts for two years in the form of group therapy, during which there is a second order change of the identified patient, but also of other family members. Pathological gambling has been treated in the form of systemic-family therapy for more than 10 years at the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), in Belgrade. For second year in a row the treatment is carried out by the modern "Integrative-systemic model". If abstinence from gambling witihin the period of one year after completion of the intensive phase of treatment is taken as the main criterion of

  1. The role of right frontal brain regions in integration of spatial relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiahui; Cao, Bihua; Cao, Yunfei; Gao, Heming; Li, Fuhong

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have explored the neural mechanisms of spatial reasoning on a two-dimensional (2D) plane; however, it remains unclear how spatial reasoning is conducted in a three-dimensional (3D) condition. In the present study, we presented 3D geometric objects to 16 adult participants, and asked them to process the spatial relationship between different corners of the geometric objects. In premise-1, the first two corners of a geometric shape (e.g., A vs. B) were displayed. In premise-2, the second and third corners (e.g., B vs. C) were displayed. After integrating the two premises, participants were required to infer the spatial relationship between the first and the third corners (e.g., A and C). Finally, the participants were presented with a conclusion object, and they were required to judge whether the conclusion was true or false based on their inference. The event-related potential evoked by premise-2 revealed that (1) compared with 2D spatial reasoning, 3D reasoning elicited a smaller P3b component, and (2) in the right frontal areas, increased negativities were found in the 3D condition during the N400 and late negative components (LNC). These findings imply that higher brain activity in the right frontal brain regions were related with the integration and maintenance of spatial information in working memory for reasoning.

  2. Avoiding Boltzmann Brain domination in holographic dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, R

    2015-01-01

    In a spatially infinite and eternal universe approaching ultimately a de Sitter (or quasi-de Sitter) regime, structure can form by thermal fluctuations as such a space is thermal. The models of Dark Energy invoking holographic principle fit naturally into such a category, and spontaneous formation of isolated brains in otherwise empty space seems the most perplexing, creating the paradox of Boltzmann Brains (BB). It is thus appropriate to ask if such models can be made free from domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here we consider only the simplest model, but adopt both the local and the global viewpoint in the description of the Universe. In the former case, we find that if a parameter $c$, which modulates the Dark Energy density, lies outside the exponentially narrow strip around the most natural $c = 1$ line, the theory is rendered BB-safe. In the later case, the bound on $c$ is exponentially stronger, and seemingly at odds with those bounds on $c$ obtained from various observational tests.

  3. Coastal Ecosystem Integrated Compartment Model (ICM): Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meselhe, E. A.; White, E. D.; Reed, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) was developed as part of the 2017 Coastal Master Plan modeling effort. It is a comprehensive and numerical hydrodynamic model coupled to various geophysical process models. Simplifying assumptions related to some of the flow dynamics are applied to increase the computational efficiency of the model. The model can be used to provide insights about coastal ecosystems and evaluate restoration strategies. It builds on existing tools where possible and incorporates newly developed tools where necessary. It can perform decadal simulations (~ 50 years) across the entire Louisiana coast. It includes several improvements over the approach used to support the 2012 Master Plan, such as: additional processes in the hydrology, vegetation, wetland and barrier island morphology subroutines, increased spatial resolution, and integration of previously disparate models into a single modeling framework. The ICM includes habitat suitability indices (HSIs) to predict broad spatial patterns of habitat change, and it provides an additional integration to a dynamic fish and shellfish community model which quantitatively predicts potential changes in important fishery resources. It can be used to estimate the individual and cumulative effects of restoration and protection projects on the landscape, including a general estimate of water levels associated with flooding. The ICM is also used to examine possible impacts of climate change and future environmental scenarios (e.g. precipitation, Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, tropical storms, etc.) on the landscape and on the effectiveness of restoration projects. The ICM code is publically accessible, and coastal restoration and protection groups interested in planning-level modeling are encouraged to explore its utility as a computationally efficient tool to examine ecosystem response to future physical or ecological changes, including the implementation of restoration and protection strategies.

  4. Industrial ecology in integrated assessment models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Arvesen, Anders; Stadler, Konstantin; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2017-01-01

    Technology-rich integrated assessment models (IAMs) address possible technology mixes and future costs of climate change mitigation by generating scenarios for the future industrial system. Industrial ecology (IE) focuses on the empirical analysis of this system. We conduct an in-depth review of five major IAMs from an IE perspective and reveal differences between the two fields regarding the modelling of linkages in the industrial system, focussing on AIM/CGE, GCAM, IMAGE, MESSAGE, and REMIND. IAMs ignore material cycles and recycling, incoherently describe the life-cycle impacts of technology, and miss linkages regarding buildings and infrastructure. Adding IE system linkages to IAMs adds new constraints and allows for studying new mitigation options, both of which may lead to more robust and policy-relevant mitigation scenarios.

  5. Gauge theories and integrable lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Edward

    1989-08-01

    Investigations of new knot polynomials discovered in the last few years have shown them to be intimately connected with soluble models of two dimensional lattice statistical mechanics. In this paper, these results, which in time may illuminate the whole question of why integrable lattice models exist, are reconsidered from the point of view of three dimensional gauge theory. Expectation values of Wilson lines in three dimensional Chern-Simons gauge theories can be computed by evaluating the partition functions of certain lattice models on finite graphs obtained by projecting the Wilson lines to the plane. The models in question — previously considered in both the knot theory and statistical mechanics — are IRF models in which the local Boltzmann weights are the matrix elements of braiding matrices in rational conformal field theories. These matrix elements, in turn, can be presented in three dimensional gauge theory in terms of the expectation value of a certain tetrahedral configuration of Wilson lines. This representation makes manifest a surprising symmetry of the braiding matrix elements in conformal field theory.

  6. Describing Ecosystem Complexity through Integrated Catchment Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, C. L.; Tenhunen, J. D.; Peiffer, S.

    2011-12-01

    Land use and climate change have been implicated in reduced ecosystem services (ie: high quality water yield, biodiversity, and agricultural yield. The prediction of ecosystem services expected under future land use decisions and changing climate conditions has become increasingly important. Complex policy and management decisions require the integration of physical, economic, and social data over several scales to assess effects on water resources and ecology. Field-based meteorology, hydrology, soil physics, plant production, solute and sediment transport, economic, and social behavior data were measured in a South Korean catchment. A variety of models are being used to simulate plot and field scale experiments within the catchment. Results from each of the local-scale models provide identification of sensitive, local-scale parameters which are then used as inputs into a large-scale watershed model. We used the spatially distributed SWAT model to synthesize the experimental field data throughout the catchment. The approach of our study was that the range in local-scale model parameter results can be used to define the sensitivity and uncertainty in the large-scale watershed model. Further, this example shows how research can be structured for scientific results describing complex ecosystems and landscapes where cross-disciplinary linkages benefit the end result. The field-based and modeling framework described is being used to develop scenarios to examine spatial and temporal changes in land use practices and climatic effects on water quantity, water quality, and sediment transport. Development of accurate modeling scenarios requires understanding the social relationship between individual and policy driven land management practices and the value of sustainable resources to all shareholders.

  7. MEG inversion using spherical head model combined with brain-shaped head model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun

    2001-01-01

    The spherical head model has been widely used in magnetoen cephalography (MEG) as a simple forward model for calculating the external mag netic field producing by neural currents in a human brain. But this model may lead to an inaccurate result, even if the computation speed is fast. For more precise computation, realistic brain-shaped head model is used with the boundary element method (BME), but at greatly increased computational cost. When solving MEG inverse problem by using optimization methods, the forward problem must often be solved for thousands of possible source configurations. So if the brain-shaped head model is used in all iterative steps of optimization, it may be computationally infeasible for practical application. In this paper, we present a method about using compound head model in MEG inverse solution. In this method, first spherical head model is used for a rough estimation, then brain-shaped head model is adopted for more precise solution. Numerical simulation indicates that under the condition of same accuracy, the computation speed for the present method is about three times faster than a method using the brain-shaped head model at all iterations.

  8. A Study on Integrated Model of Decision Support Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Zan; FENG Shan; TANG Chao

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two kinds of systems integrated models available to DSS: Multi-AgentBased Model and Application-Framework-Oriented Model. Both of them are application-oriented integration so it is possible to combine them at the level of application. Based on this theory, this paper presents a new model, MAAFUM, which combines two models and applies them synthetically in DSS.

  9. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Paulus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches.

  10. A theoretical model of phase transitions in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, V K; Friedrich, R; Haken, H; Kelso, J A

    1994-01-01

    An experiment using a multisensor SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) array was performed by Kelso and colleagues (1992) which combined information from three different sources: perception, motor response, and brain signals. When an acoustic stimulus frequency is changed systematically, a spontaneous transition in coordination occurs at a critical frequency in both motor behavior and brain signals. Qualitatively analogous transitions are known for physical and biological systems such as changes in the coordination of human hand movements (Kelso 1981, 1984). In this paper we develop a theoretical model based on methods from the interdisciplinary field of synergetics (Haken 1983, 1987) and nonlinear oscillator theory that reproduces the main experimental features very well and suggests a formulation of a fundamental biophysical coupling.

  11. Building better biomarkers: brain models in translational neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Choong-Wan; Chang, Luke J; Lindquist, Martin A; Wager, Tor D

    2017-02-23

    Despite its great promise, neuroimaging has yet to substantially impact clinical practice and public health. However, a developing synergy between emerging analysis techniques and data-sharing initiatives has the potential to transform the role of neuroimaging in clinical applications. We review the state of translational neuroimaging and outline an approach to developing brain signatures that can be shared, tested in multiple contexts and applied in clinical settings. The approach rests on three pillars: (i) the use of multivariate pattern-recognition techniques to develop brain signatures for clinical outcomes and relevant mental processes; (ii) assessment and optimization of their diagnostic value; and (iii) a program of broad exploration followed by increasingly rigorous assessment of generalizability across samples, research contexts and populations. Increasingly sophisticated models based on these principles will help to overcome some of the obstacles on the road from basic neuroscience to better health and will ultimately serve both basic and applied goals.

  12. Quantification of Brain Access of Exendin-4 in the C57BL Mouse Model by SPIM Fluorescence Imaging and the Allen Mouse Brain Reference Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Secher, Anna; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob;

    2015-01-01

    With the recent advance in 3D microscopy such as Single Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM) it is possible to obtain high resolution image volumes of the entire mouse brain. These data can be used to study the access of several peptides such as the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue Exendin...... construct a SPIM brain atlas based on the Allen mouse brain 3D reference model and use it to analyze the access of peripherally injected Exendin-4 into the brain compared to a negative control group. The constructed atlas consists of an average SPIM volume obtained from eight C57BL mouse brains using group......-wise registration. A cross-modality registration is performed between the constructed average volume and the Allen mouse brain reference model to allow propagation of annotations to the SPIM average brain. Finally, manual corrections of the annotations are performed and validated by visual inspection. The study...

  13. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.

  14. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  15. A comparison of hyperelastic constitutive models applicable to brain and fat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, L Angela; Chin, LiKang; Janmey, Paul A; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-06

    In some soft biological structures such as brain and fat tissues, strong experimental evidence suggests that the shear modulus increases significantly under increasing compressive strain, but not under tensile strain, whereas the apparent Young's elastic modulus increases or remains almost constant when compressive strain increases. These tissues also exhibit a predominantly isotropic, incompressible behaviour. Our aim is to capture these seemingly contradictory mechanical behaviours, both qualitatively and quantitatively, within the framework of finite elasticity, by modelling a soft tissue as a homogeneous, isotropic, incompressible, hyperelastic material and comparing our results with available experimental data. Our analysis reveals that the Fung and Gent models, which are typically used to model soft tissues, are inadequate for the modelling of brain or fat under combined stretch and shear, and so are the classical neo-Hookean and Mooney-Rivlin models used for elastomers. However, a subclass of Ogden hyperelastic models are found to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. Our findings provide explicit models suitable for integration in large-scale finite-element computations.

  16. Multiscale modeling of brain dynamics: from single neurons and networks to mathematical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siettos, Constantinos; Starke, Jens

    2016-09-01

    The extreme complexity of the brain naturally requires mathematical modeling approaches on a large variety of scales; the spectrum ranges from single neuron dynamics over the behavior of groups of neurons to neuronal network activity. Thus, the connection between the microscopic scale (single neuron activity) to macroscopic behavior (emergent behavior of the collective dynamics) and vice versa is a key to understand the brain in its complexity. In this work, we attempt a review of a wide range of approaches, ranging from the modeling of single neuron dynamics to machine learning. The models include biophysical as well as data-driven phenomenological models. The discussed models include Hodgkin-Huxley, FitzHugh-Nagumo, coupled oscillators (Kuramoto oscillators, Rössler oscillators, and the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron), Integrate and Fire, networks of neurons, and neural field equations. In addition to the mathematical models, important mathematical methods in multiscale modeling and reconstruction of the causal connectivity are sketched. The methods include linear and nonlinear tools from statistics, data analysis, and time series analysis up to differential equations, dynamical systems, and bifurcation theory, including Granger causal connectivity analysis, phase synchronization connectivity analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), independent component analysis (ICA), and manifold learning algorithms such as ISOMAP, and diffusion maps and equation-free techniques. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:438-458. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1348 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  17. Integrating Visualizations into Modeling NEST Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowke, Christian; Zielasko, Daniel; Weyers, Benjamin; Peyser, Alexander; Hentschel, Bernd; Kuhlen, Torsten W

    2015-01-01

    Modeling large-scale spiking neural networks showing realistic biological behavior in their dynamics is a complex and tedious task. Since these networks consist of millions of interconnected neurons, their simulation produces an immense amount of data. In recent years it has become possible to simulate even larger networks. However, solutions to assist researchers in understanding the simulation's complex emergent behavior by means of visualization are still lacking. While developing tools to partially fill this gap, we encountered the challenge to integrate these tools easily into the neuroscientists' daily workflow. To understand what makes this so challenging, we looked into the workflows of our collaborators and analyzed how they use the visualizations to solve their daily problems. We identified two major issues: first, the analysis process can rapidly change focus which requires to switch the visualization tool that assists in the current problem domain. Second, because of the heterogeneous data that results from simulations, researchers want to relate data to investigate these effectively. Since a monolithic application model, processing and visualizing all data modalities and reflecting all combinations of possible workflows in a holistic way, is most likely impossible to develop and to maintain, a software architecture that offers specialized visualization tools that run simultaneously and can be linked together to reflect the current workflow, is a more feasible approach. To this end, we have developed a software architecture that allows neuroscientists to integrate visualization tools more closely into the modeling tasks. In addition, it forms the basis for semantic linking of different visualizations to reflect the current workflow. In this paper, we present this architecture and substantiate the usefulness of our approach by common use cases we encountered in our collaborative work.

  18. Integrating Visualizations into Modeling NEST Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eNowke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling large-scale spiking neural networks showing realistic biological behavior in their dynamics is a complex and tedious task. Since these networks consist of millions of interconnected neurons, their simulation produces an immense amount of data. In recent years it has become possible to simulate even larger networks. However, solutions to assist researchers in understanding the simulation's complex emergent behavior by means of visualization are still lacking. While developing tools to partially fill this gap, we encountered the challenge to integrate these tools easily into the neuroscientists' daily workflow. To understand what makes this so challenging, we looked into the workflows of our collaborators and analyzed how they use the visualizations to solve their daily problems. We identified two major issues: first, the analysis process can rapidly change focus which requires to switch the visualization tool that assists in the current problem domain. Second, because of the heterogeneous data that results from simulations, researchers want to relate data to investigate these effectively. Since a monolithic application model, processing and visualizing all data modalities and reflecting all combinations of possible workflows in a holistic way, is most likely impossible to develop and to maintain, a software architecture that offers specialized visualization tools that run simultaneously and can be linked together to reflect the current workflow, is a more feasible approach. To this end, we have developed a software architecture that allows neuroscientists to integrate visualization tools more closely into the modeling tasks. In addition, it forms the basis for semantic linking of different visualizations to reflect the current workflow. In this paper, we present this architecture and substantiate the usefulness of our approach by common use cases we encountered in our collaborative work.

  19. Integrability of the eta-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    CERN Document Server

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the eta-deformed AdS_5 x S^5 background. For this integrable model we construct a 4x4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the eta-deformed Neumann and (AdS_5 x S^5)_eta geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  20. Automatic segmentation of meningioma from non-contrasted brain MRI integrating fuzzy clustering and region growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Chun-Chih

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become important in brain tumor diagnosis. Using this modality, physicians can locate specific pathologies by analyzing differences in tissue character presented in different types of MR images. This paper uses an algorithm integrating fuzzy-c-mean (FCM and region growing techniques for automated tumor image segmentation from patients with menigioma. Only non-contrasted T1 and T2 -weighted MR images are included in the analysis. The study's aims are to correctly locate tumors in the images, and to detect those situated in the midline position of the brain. Methods The study used non-contrasted T1- and T2-weighted MR images from 29 patients with menigioma. After FCM clustering, 32 groups of images from each patient group were put through the region-growing procedure for pixels aggregation. Later, using knowledge-based information, the system selected tumor-containing images from these groups and merged them into one tumor image. An alternative semi-supervised method was added at this stage for comparison with the automatic method. Finally, the tumor image was optimized by a morphology operator. Results from automatic segmentation were compared to the "ground truth" (GT on a pixel level. Overall data were then evaluated using a quantified system. Results The quantified parameters, including the "percent match" (PM and "correlation ratio" (CR, suggested a high match between GT and the present study's system, as well as a fair level of correspondence. The results were compatible with those from other related studies. The system successfully detected all of the tumors situated at the midline of brain. Six cases failed in the automatic group. One also failed in the semi-supervised alternative. The remaining five cases presented noticeable edema inside the brain. In the 23 successful cases, the PM and CR values in the two groups were highly related. Conclusions Results indicated

  1. A reaction-diffusion model of human brain development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Lefèvre

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cortical folding exhibits both reproducibility and variability in the geometry and topology of its patterns. These two properties are obviously the result of the brain development that goes through local cellular and molecular interactions which have important consequences on the global shape of the cortex. Hypotheses to explain the convoluted aspect of the brain are still intensively debated and do not focus necessarily on the variability of folds. Here we propose a phenomenological model based on reaction-diffusion mechanisms involving Turing morphogens that are responsible for the differential growth of two types of areas, sulci (bottom of folds and gyri (top of folds. We use a finite element approach of our model that is able to compute the evolution of morphogens on any kind of surface and to deform it through an iterative process. Our model mimics the progressive folding of the cortical surface along foetal development. Moreover it reveals patterns of reproducibility when we look at several realizations of the model from a noisy initial condition. However this reproducibility must be tempered by the fact that a same fold engendered by the model can have different topological properties, in one or several parts. These two results on the reproducibility and variability of the model echo the sulcal roots theory that postulates the existence of anatomical entities around which the folding organizes itself. These sulcal roots would correspond to initial conditions in our model. Last but not least, the parameters of our model are able to produce different kinds of patterns that can be linked to developmental pathologies such as polymicrogyria and lissencephaly. The main significance of our model is that it proposes a first approach to the issue of reproducibility and variability of the cortical folding.

  2. Modelling Spark Integration in Science Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Paz E. Morales

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study critically explored how a PASCO-designed technology (SPARK ScienceLearning System is meaningfully integrated into the teaching of selected topics in Earth and Environmental Science. It highlights on modelling the effectiveness of using the SPARK Learning System as a primary tool in learning science that leads to learning and achievement of the students. Data and observation gathered and correlation of the ability of the technology to develop high intrinsic motivation to student achievement were used to design framework on how to meaningfully integrate SPARK ScienceLearning System in teaching Earth and Environmental Science. Research instruments used in this study were adopted from standardized questionnaires available from literature. Achievement test and evaluation form were developed and validated for the purpose of deducing data needed for the study. Interviews were done to delve into the deeper thoughts and emotions of the respondents. Data from the interviews served to validate all numerical data culled from this study. Cross-case analysis of the data was done to reveal some recurring themes, problems and benefits derived by the students in using the SPARK Science Learning System to further establish its effectiveness in the curriculum as a forerunner to the shift towards the 21st Century Learning.

  3. A monolithic integrated low-voltage deep brain stimulator with wireless power and data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Ye, Tan; Jianmin, Zeng; Xu, Han; Xin, Cheng; Guangjun, Xie

    2016-09-01

    A monolithic integrated low-voltage deep brain stimulator with wireless power and data transmission is presented. Data and power are transmitted to the stimulator by mutual inductance coupling, while the in-vitro controller encodes the stimulation parameters. The stimulator integrates the digital control module and can generate the bipolar current with equal amplitude in four channels. In order to reduce power consumption, a novel controlled threshold voltage cancellation rectifier is proposed in this paper to provide the supply voltage of the stimulator. The monolithic stimulator was fabricated in a SMIC 0.18 μm 1-poly 6-metal mixed-signal CMOS process, occupying 0.23 mm2, and consumes 180 μW on average. Compared with previously published stimulators, this design has advantages of large stimulated current (0-0.8 mA) with the double low-voltage supply (1.8 and 3.3 V), and high-level integration. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61404043, 61401137), the Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Nos. IIMDKFJJ-13-06, IIMDKFJJ-14-03), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015HGZX0026).

  4. Full feature data model for spatial information network integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Ji-qiu; BAO Guang-shu

    2006-01-01

    In allusion to the difficulty of integrating data with different models in integrating spatial information,the characteristics of raster structure, vector structure and mixed model were analyzed, and a hierarchical vectorraster integrative full feature model was put forward by integrating the advantage of vector and raster model and using the object-oriented method. The data structures of the four basic features, i.e. point, line, surface and solid,were described. An application was analyzed and described, and the characteristics of this model were described. In this model, all objects in the real world are divided into and described as features with hierarchy, and all the data are organized in vector. This model can describe data based on feature, field, network and other models, and avoid the disadvantage of inability to integrate data based on different models and perform spatial analysis on them in spatial information integration.

  5. Modeling DNA Dynamics by Path Integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Zoli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Complementary strands in DNA double helix show temporary fluctuational openings which are essential to biological functions such as transcription and replication of the genetic information. Such large amplitude fluctuations, known as the breathing of DNA, are generally localized and, microscopically, are due to the breaking of the hydrogen bonds linking the base pairs (\\emph{bps}). I apply imaginary time path integral techniques to a mesoscopic Hamiltonian which accounts for the helicoidal geometry of a short circular DNA molecule. The \\emph{bps} displacements with respect to the ground state are interpreted as time dependent paths whose amplitudes are consistent with the model potential for the hydrogen bonds. The portion of the paths configuration space contributing to the partition function is determined by selecting the ensemble of paths which fulfill the second law of thermodynamics. Computations of the thermodynamics in the denaturation range show the energetic advantage for the equilibrium helicoidal g...

  6. Integrated Semantic Similarity Model Based on Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-Jun; ZHAO Yun

    2004-01-01

    To solve the problem of the inadequacy of semantic processing in the intelligent question answering system, an integrated semantic similarity model which calculates the semantic similarity using the geometric distance and information content is presented in this paper.With the help of interrelationship between concepts, the information content of concepts and the strength of the edges in the ontology network, we can calculate the semantic similarity between two concepts and provide information for the further calculation of the semantic similarity between user's question and answers in knowlegdge base.The results of the experiments on the prototype have shown that the semantic problem in natural language processing can also be solved with the help of the knowledge and the abundant semantic information in ontology.More than 90% accuracy with less than 50 ms average searching time in the intelligent question answering prototype system based on ontology has been reached.The result is very satisfied.

  7. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  8. Using data-driven model-brain mappings to constrain formal models of cognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelmer P Borst

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a method to create data-driven mappings from components of cognitive models to brain regions. Cognitive models are notoriously hard to evaluate, especially based on behavioral measures alone. Neuroimaging data can provide additional constraints, but this requires a mapping from model components to brain regions. Although such mappings can be based on the experience of the modeler or on a reading of the literature, a formal method is preferred to prevent researcher-based biases. In this paper we used model-based fMRI analysis to create a data-driven model-brain mapping for five modules of the ACT-R cognitive architecture. We then validated this mapping by applying it to two new datasets with associated models. The new mapping was at least as powerful as an existing mapping that was based on the literature, and indicated where the models were supported by the data and where they have to be improved. We conclude that data-driven model-brain mappings can provide strong constraints on cognitive models, and that model-based fMRI is a suitable way to create such mappings.

  9. Functional brain networks contributing to the Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory of Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakhtin, Andrei A; Ryman, Sephira G; Flores, Ranee A; Jung, Rex E

    2014-12-01

    The refinement of localization of intelligence in the human brain is converging onto a distributed network that broadly conforms to the Parieto-Frontal Integration Theory (P-FIT). While this theory has received support in the neuroimaging literature, no functional magnetic resonance imaging study to date has conducted a whole-brain network-wise examination of the changes during engagement in tasks that are reliable measures of general intelligence (e.g., Raven's Progressive Matrices Test; RPM). Seventy-nine healthy subjects were scanned while solving RPM problems and during rest. Functional networks were extracted from the RPM and resting state data using Independent Component Analysis. Twenty-nine networks were identified, 26 of which were detected in both conditions. Fourteen networks were significantly correlated with the RPM task. The networks' spatial maps and functional connectivity measures at 3 frequency levels (low, medium, & high) were compared between the RPM and rest conditions. The regions involved in the networks that were found to be task related were consistent with the P-FIT, localizing to the bilateral medial frontal and parietal regions, right superior frontal lobule, and the right cingulate gyrus. Functional connectivity in multiple component pairs was differentially affected across all frequency levels during the RPM task. Our findings demonstrate that functional brain networks are more stable than previously thought, and maintain their general features across resting state and engagement in a complex cognitive task. The described spatial and functional connectivity alterations that such components undergo during fluid reasoning provide a network-wise framework of the P-FIT that can be valuable for further, network based, neuroimaging inquiries regarding the neural underpinnings of intelligence.

  10. Learning Transfer Principles in a Comprehensive Integration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitel, Craig; Farkas, Kathleen; Fromm, Laurentine; Hokenstad, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a comprehensive integration model (CIM) based on learning transfer principles that promote integration by systematically and multidimensionally linking coursework with field education. This model improves the integration of classroom and field instruction by specifying how content in each course and in the…

  11. Parkin-independent mitophagy requires Drp1 and maintains the integrity of mammalian heart and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yusuke; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Seo, Kinya; Bedja, Djahida; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Andrabi, Shaida A; Chen, Weiran; Höke, Ahmet; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Gabrielson, Kathleen; Kass, David A; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy have been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial division dynamin Drp1 and the Parkinson's disease-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin synergistically maintain the integrity of mitochondrial structure and function in mouse heart and brain. Mice lacking cardiac Drp1 exhibited lethal heart defects. In Drp1KO cardiomyocytes, mitochondria increased their connectivity, accumulated ubiquitinated proteins, and decreased their respiration. In contrast to the current views of the role of parkin in ubiquitination of mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial ubiquitination was independent of parkin in Drp1KO hearts, and simultaneous loss of Drp1 and parkin worsened cardiac defects. Drp1 and parkin also play synergistic roles in neuronal mitochondrial homeostasis and survival. Mitochondrial degradation was further decreased by combination of Drp1 and parkin deficiency, compared with their single loss. Thus, the physiological importance of parkin in mitochondrial homeostasis is revealed in the absence of mitochondrial division in mammals. PMID:25349190

  12. Integrating mind and brain: Warren S. McCulloch, cerebral localization, and experimental epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Tara H

    2003-03-01

    Recently, historians have focused on Warren S. McCulloch's role in the cybernetics movement during the 1940s and 1950s, and his contributions to the development of computer science and communication theory. What has received less attention is McCulloch's early work in neurophysiology, and its relationship to his philosophical quest for an 'experimental epistemology' - a physiological theory of knowledge. McCulloch's early laboratory work during the 1930s addressed the problem of cerebral localization: localizing aspects of behaviour in the cerebral cortex of the brain. Most of this research was done with the Dutch neurophysiologist J.G. Dusser de Barenne at Yale University. The connection between McCulloch's philosophical interests and his experimental work can be expressed as a search for a physiological a priori, an integrated mechanism of sensation.

  13. Artificial brains. A million spiking-neuron integrated circuit with a scalable communication network and interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merolla, Paul A; Arthur, John V; Alvarez-Icaza, Rodrigo; Cassidy, Andrew S; Sawada, Jun; Akopyan, Filipp; Jackson, Bryan L; Imam, Nabil; Guo, Chen; Nakamura, Yutaka; Brezzo, Bernard; Vo, Ivan; Esser, Steven K; Appuswamy, Rathinakumar; Taba, Brian; Amir, Arnon; Flickner, Myron D; Risk, William P; Manohar, Rajit; Modha, Dharmendra S

    2014-08-01

    Inspired by the brain's structure, we have developed an efficient, scalable, and flexible non-von Neumann architecture that leverages contemporary silicon technology. To demonstrate, we built a 5.4-billion-transistor chip with 4096 neurosynaptic cores interconnected via an intrachip network that integrates 1 million programmable spiking neurons and 256 million configurable synapses. Chips can be tiled in two dimensions via an interchip communication interface, seamlessly scaling the architecture to a cortexlike sheet of arbitrary size. The architecture is well suited to many applications that use complex neural networks in real time, for example, multiobject detection and classification. With 400-pixel-by-240-pixel video input at 30 frames per second, the chip consumes 63 milliwatts.

  14. Sixty minutes of what? A developing brain perspective for activating children with an integrative exercise approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Edwards, Nicholas M; Clark, Joseph F; Best, Thomas M; Sallis, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    Current recommendations for physical activity in children overlook the critical importance of motor skill acquisition early in life. Instead, they focus on the quantitative aspects of physical activity (eg, accumulate 60 min of daily moderate to vigorous physical activity) and selected health-related components of physical fitness (eg, aerobic fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility and body composition). This focus on exercise quantity in youth may limit considerations of qualitative aspects of programme design which include (1) skill development, (2) socialisation and (3) enjoyment of exercise. The timing of brain development and associated neuroplasticity for motor skill learning makes the preadolescence period a critical time to develop and reinforce fundamental movement skills in boys and girls. Children who do not participate regularly in structured motor skill-enriched activities during physical education classes or diverse youth sports programmes may never reach their genetic potential for motor skill control which underlies sustainable physical fitness later in life. The goals of this review are twofold: (1) challenge current dogma that is currently focused on the quantitative rather than qualitative aspects of physical activity recommendations for youth and (2) synthesise the latest evidence regarding the brain and motor control that will provide the foundation for integrative exercise programming that provide a framework sustainable activity for life.

  15. Brain Death and Human Organismal Integration: A Symposium on the Definition of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa

    2016-06-01

    Does the ability of some brain dead bodies to maintain homeostasis with the help of artificial life support actually imply that those bodies are living human organisms? Or might it be possible that a brain dead body on life support is a mere collection of still-living cells, organs and tissues which can coordinate with one another, but which lack the genuine integration that is the hallmark of a unified human organism as a whole? To foster further study of these difficult and timely questions, a Symposium on the Definition of Death was held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. The Symposium brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines-law, medicine, biology, philosophy and theology-who all share a commitment to the dead donor rule and to a biological definition of death, but who have differing opinions regarding the validity of neurological criteria for human death. The papers found in this special issue are among the fruits of this Symposium.

  16. Spinal shock and brain death': somatic pathophysiological equivalence and implications for the integrative-unity rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, D A

    1999-05-01

    The somatic pathophysiology of high spinal cord injury (SCI) not only is of interest in itself but also sheds light on one of the several rationales proposed for equating 'brain death' (BD) with death, namely that the brain confers integrative unity upon the body, which would otherwise constitute a mere conglomeration of cells and tissues. Insofar as the neuropathology of BD includes infarction down to the foramen magnum, the somatic pathophysiology of BD should resemble that of cervico-medullary junction transection plus vagotomy. The endocrinologic aspects can be made comparable either by focusing on BD patients without diabetes insipidus or by supposing the victim of high SCI to have pre-existing therapeutically compensated diabetes insipidus. The respective literatures on intensive care for BD organ donors and high SCI corroborate that the two conditions are somatically virtually identical. If SCI victims are alive at the level of the 'organism as a whole', then so must be BD patients (the only significant difference being consciousness). Comparison with SCI leads to the conclusion that if BD is to be equated with death, a more coherent reason must be adduced than that the body as a biological organism is dead.

  17. White matter hyperintensities and normal-appearing white matter integrity in the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Clayden, Jonathan D; Royle, Natalie A; Murray, Catherine; Morris, Zoe; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-02-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) of presumed vascular origin are a common finding in brain magnetic resonance imaging of older individuals and contribute to cognitive and functional decline. It is unknown how WMH form, although white matter degeneration is characterized pathologically by demyelination, axonal loss, and rarefaction, often attributed to ischemia. Changes within normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in subjects with WMH have also been reported but have not yet been fully characterized. Here, we describe the in vivo imaging signatures of both NAWM and WMH in a large group of community-dwelling older people of similar age using biomarkers derived from magnetic resonance imaging that collectively reflect white matter integrity, myelination, and brain water content. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) were significantly lower, whereas mean diffusivity (MD) and longitudinal relaxation time (T1) were significantly higher, in WMH than NAWM (p < 0.0001), with MD providing the largest difference between NAWM and WMH. Receiver operating characteristic analysis on each biomarker showed that MD differentiated best between NAWM and WMH, identifying 94.6% of the lesions using a threshold of 0.747 × 10(-9) m(2)s(-1) (area under curve, 0.982; 95% CI, 0.975-0.989). Furthermore, the level of deterioration of NAWM was strongly associated with the severity of WMH, with MD and T1 increasing and FA and MTR decreasing in NAWM with increasing WMH score, a relationship that was sustained regardless of distance from the WMH. These multimodal imaging data indicate that WMH have reduced structural integrity compared with surrounding NAWM, and MD provides the best discriminator between the 2 tissue classes even within the mild range of WMH severity, whereas FA, MTR, and T1 only start reflecting significant changes in tissue microstructure as WMH become more severe.

  18. A Mixed Approach for Modeling Blood Flow in Brain Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrounette, M.; Sylvie, L.; Davit, Y.; Quintard, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated [1] that the vascular system of the healthy human brain cortex is a superposition of two structural components, each corresponding to a different spatial scale. At small-scale, the vascular network has a capillary structure, which is homogeneous and space-filling over a cut-off length. At larger scale, veins and arteries conform to a quasi-fractal branched structure. This structural duality is consistent with the functional duality of the vasculature, i.e. distribution and exchange. From a modeling perspective, this can be viewed as the superposition of: (a) a continuum model describing slow transport in the small-scale capillary network, characterized by a representative elementary volume and effective properties; and (b) a discrete network approach [2] describing fast transport in the arterial and venous network, which cannot be homogenized because of its fractal nature. This problematic is analogous to modeling problems encountered in geological media, e.g, in petroleum engineering, where fast conducting channels (wells or fractures) are embedded in a porous medium (reservoir rock). An efficient method to reduce the computational cost of fractures/continuum simulations is to use relatively large grid blocks for the continuum model. However, this also makes it difficult to accurately couple both structural components. In this work, we solve this issue by adapting the "well model" concept used in petroleum engineering [3] to brain specific 3-D situations. We obtain a unique linear system of equations describing the discrete network, the continuum and the well model coupling. Results are presented for realistic geometries and compared with a non-homogenized small-scale network model of an idealized periodic capillary network of known permeability. [1] Lorthois & Cassot, J. Theor. Biol. 262, 614-633, 2010. [2] Lorthois et al., Neuroimage 54 : 1031-1042, 2011. [3] Peaceman, SPE J. 18, 183-194, 1978.

  19. Volatile Anesthetics Influence Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity by Modulation of Tight Junction Protein Expression in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Thal, Serge C.; Clara Luh; Eva-Verena Schaible; Ralph Timaru-Kast; Jana Hedrich; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Kristin Engelhard; Zehendner, Christoph M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) results in cerebral edema formation, which is a major cause for high mortalityrnafter traumatic brain injury (TBI). As anesthetic care is mandatory in patients suffering from severe TBI it may be importantrnto elucidate the effect of different anesthetics on cerebral edema formation. Tight junction proteins (TJ) such as zonularnoccludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5 (cl5) play a central role for BBB stability. First, the influence of the volatile anesthet...

  20. Perinatal programming of emotional brain circuits:An integrative view from systems to molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eBock

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental influences such as perinatal stress have been shown to program the developing organism to adapt brain and behavioral functions to cope with daily life challenges. Evidence is now accumulating that the specific and individual effects of early life adversity on the functional development of brain and behavior emerge as a function of the type, intensity, timing and the duration of the adverse environment, and that early life stress (ELS is a major risk factor for developing behavioral dysfunctions and mental disorders. Results from clinical as well as experimental studies in animal models support the hypothesis that ELS can induce functional ‘scars’ in prefrontal and limbic brain areas, regions that are essential for emotional control, learning and memory functions. On the other hand, the concept of stress inoculation is emerging from more recent research, which revealed positive functional adaptations in response to early life stress resulting in resilience against stress and other adversities later in life. Moreover, recent studies indicate that early life experiences and the resulting behavioral consequences can be transmitted to the next generation, leading to a transgenerational cycle of adverse or positive adaptations of brain function and behavior. In this review we propose a unifying view of stress vulnerability and resilience by connecting genetic predisposition and programming sensitivity to the context of experience-expectancy and transgenerational epigenetic traits. The adaptive maturation of stress responsive neural and endocrine systems requires environmental challenges to optimize their functions. Repeated environmental challenges can be viewed within the framework of the match/mismatch hypothesis, the outcome, psychopathology or resilience, depends on the respective predisposition and on the context later in life.

  1. Perinatal programming of emotional brain circuits: an integrative view from systems to molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jörg; Rether, Kathy; Gröger, Nicole; Xie, Lan; Braun, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Environmental influences such as perinatal stress have been shown to program the developing organism to adapt brain and behavioral functions to cope with daily life challenges. Evidence is now accumulating that the specific and individual effects of early life adversity on the functional development of brain and behavior emerge as a function of the type, intensity, timing and the duration of the adverse environment, and that early life stress (ELS) is a major risk factor for developing behavioral dysfunctions and mental disorders. Results from clinical as well as experimental studies in animal models support the hypothesis that ELS can induce functional "scars" in prefrontal and limbic brain areas, regions that are essential for emotional control, learning and memory functions. On the other hand, the concept of "stress inoculation" is emerging from more recent research, which revealed positive functional adaptations in response to ELS resulting in resilience against stress and other adversities later in life. Moreover, recent studies indicate that early life experiences and the resulting behavioral consequences can be transmitted to the next generation, leading to a transgenerational cycle of adverse or positive adaptations of brain function and behavior. In this review we propose a unifying view of stress vulnerability and resilience by connecting genetic predisposition and programming sensitivity to the context of experience-expectancy and transgenerational epigenetic traits. The adaptive maturation of stress responsive neural and endocrine systems requires environmental challenges to optimize their functions. Repeated environmental challenges can be viewed within the framework of the match/mismatch hypothesis, the outcome, psychopathology or resilience, depends on the respective predisposition and on the context later in life.

  2. Modelling Human Cortical Network in Real Brain Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; FENG Hong-Bo; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Highly specific structural organization is of great significance in the topology of cortical networks.We introduce a human cortical network model.taking the specific cortical structure into account,in which nodes are brain sites placed in the actual positions of cerebral cortex and the establishment of edges depends on the spatial path length rather than the linear distance.The resulting network exhibits the essential features of cortical connectivity,properties of small-world networks and multiple clusters structure.Additionally.assortative mixing is also found in this roodel.All of these findings may be attributed to the spedtic cortical architecture.

  3. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates local brain metabolism, brain edema and inflammatory response in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Yang, Yanyan; Tang, Hong; Sun, Wenjiang; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Smerin, Daniel; Liu, Jiachuan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can provide some clinically curative effects on blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The specific mechanism by which this occurs still remains unknown, and no standardized time or course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment is currently used. In this study, bTBI was produced by paper detonators equivalent to 600 mg of TNT exploding at 6.5 cm vertical to the rabbit's head. HBO (100% O2 at 2.0 absolute atmospheres) was used once, 12 h after injury. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to investigate the impact of HBOT on the metabolism of local injured nerves in brain tissue. We also examined blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain water content, apoptotic factors, and some inflammatory mediators. Our results demonstrate that hyperbaric oxygen could confer neuroprotection and improve prognosis after explosive injury by promoting the metabolism of local neurons, inhibiting brain edema, protecting BBB integrity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and inhibiting the inflammatory response. Furthermore, timely intervention within 1 week after injury might be more conducive to improving the prognosis of patients with bTBI.

  4. Developing an Integrated Set of Production Planning and Control Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hui

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an integrated set of production planning and control models that can be applied in the Push system (Make-to-stock). The integrated model include forecasting, aggregate planning, materials requirements planning, inventory control, capacity planning and scheduling. This integrated model solves the planning issues via three levels, which include strategic level, tactical level and operational level. The model obtains the optimal production plan for each product type in each p...

  5. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Sergio Di [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Lutzemberger, Ludovico [Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67-56100 Pisa (Italy); Salvetti, Ovidio [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2003-12-21

    Recent developments of medical software applications from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  6. Experimental models of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, R C

    1993-01-01

    Animal research has provided important information on the pathogenesis of and neuropathologic responses to perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia. In experimental animals, structural brain damage from hypoxia-ischemia has been produced in immature rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, sheep and monkeys (18, 20, 24, 25, 38). Of the several available animal models, the fetal and newborn rhesus monkey and immature rat have been studied most extensively because of their similarities to humans in respect to the physiology of reproduction and their neuroanatomy at or shortly following birth. Given the frequency of occurrence of human perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage and the multiple, often severe neurologic handicaps which ensue in infants and children, it is not surprising that the above described animal models have been developed. These models have provided the basis for investigations to clarify not only physiologic and biochemical mechanisms of tissue injury but also the efficacy of specific management strategies. Hopefully, such animal research will continue to provide important information regarding how best to prevent or minimize the devastating consequences of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  7. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  8. Integrated Modeling for Flood Hazard Mapping Using Watershed Modeling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh S. Sadrolashrafi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this stduy, a new framework which integrates the Geographic Information System (GIS with the Watershed Modeling System (WMS for flood modeling is developed. It also interconnects the terrain models and the GIS software, with commercial standard hydrological and hydraulic models, including HEC-1, HEC-RAS, etc. The Dez River Basin (about 16213 km2 in Khuzestan province, IRAN, is domain of study because of occuring frequent severe flash flooding. As a case of study, a major flood in autumn of 2001 is chosen to examine the modeling framework. The model consists of a rainfall-runoff model (HEC-1 that converts excess precipitation to overland flow and channel runoff and a hydraulic model (HEC-RAS that simulates steady state flow through the river channel network based on the HEC-1, peak hydrographs. In addition, it delineates the maps of potential flood zonation for the Dez River Basin. These are achieved based on the state of the art GIS with using WMS software. Watershed parameters are calibrated manually to perform a good simulation of discharge at three sub-basins. With the calibrated discharge, WMS is capable of producing flood hazard map. The modeling framework presented in this study demonstrates the accuracy and usefulness of the WMS software for flash flooding control. The results of this research will benefit future modeling efforts by providing validate hydrological software to forecast flooding on a regional scale. This model designed for the Dez River Basin, while this regional scale model may be used as a prototype for model applications in other areas.

  9. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Xiao-lan; SONG Zhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    @@ The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.The linear elastic model only needs to drive the model using the surface displacement of exposed brain cortex,which is more convenient to be measured in the clinic.

  10. Model-integrating software components engineering flexible software systems

    CERN Document Server

    Derakhshanmanesh, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    In his study, Mahdi Derakhshanmanesh builds on the state of the art in modeling by proposing to integrate models into running software on the component-level without translating them to code. Such so-called model-integrating software exploits all advantages of models: models implicitly support a good separation of concerns, they are self-documenting and thus improve understandability and maintainability and in contrast to model-driven approaches there is no synchronization problem anymore between the models and the code generated from them. Using model-integrating components, software will be

  11. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamir, Munaf Syed [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beyeler, Walter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fellner, Karen Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hayden, Nancy Kay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jeffers, Robert Fredric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silver, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelke, Peter [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Burrow, Mat [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Keith, Bruce [United States Military Academy, West Point, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  12. The Simulation and Correction to the Brain Deformation Based on the Linear Elastic Model in IGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MUXiao-lan; SONGZhi-jian

    2004-01-01

    The brain deformation is a vital factor affecting the precision of the IGS and it becomes a hotspot to simulate and correct the brain deformation recently.The research organizations, which firstly resolved the brain deformation with the physical models, have the Image Processing and Analysis department of Yale University, Biomedical Modeling Lab of Vanderbilt University and so on. The former uses the linear elastic model; the latter uses the consolidation model.

  13. Using data-driven model-brain mappings to constrain formal models of cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, Jelmer P; Nijboer, Menno; Taatgen, Niels A; van Rijn, Hedderik; Anderson, John R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method to create data-driven mappings from components of cognitive models to brain regions. Cognitive models are notoriously hard to evaluate, especially based on behavioral measures alone. Neuroimaging data can provide additional constraints, but this requires a mapping f

  14. Integrated But Not Whole? Applying an Ontological Account of Human Organismal Unity to the Brain Death Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    As is clear in the 2008 report of the President's Council on Bioethics, the brain death debate is plagued by ambiguity in the use of such key terms as 'integration' and 'wholeness'. Addressing this problem, I offer a plausible ontological account of organismal unity drawing on the work of Hoffman and Rosenkrantz, and then apply that account to the case of brain death, concluding that a brain dead body lacks the unity proper to a human organism, and has therefore undergone a substantial change. I also show how my view can explain hard cases better than one in which biological integration (as understood by Alan Shewmon and the President's Council) is taken to imply ontological wholeness or unity.

  15. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN: a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian eDuan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks (CIMBN. CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network’s properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology.

  16. Modular organization as a basis for the functional integration/segregation in large-scale brain networks

    CERN Document Server

    Valencia, M; Fernandez-Seara, MA; Artieda, J; Martinerie, J; Chavez, M

    2009-01-01

    Modular structure is ubiquitous among real-world networks from related proteins to social groups. Here we analyze the modular organization of brain networks at a large-scale (voxel level) extracted from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals. By using a random walk-based method, we unveil the modularity of brain-webs, and show that modules with a spatial distribution that matches anatomical structures with functional significance. The functional role of each node in the network is studied by analyzing its patterns of inter- and intra-modular connections. Results suggest that the modular architecture constitutes the structural basis for the coexistence of functional integration of distant and specialized brain areas during normal brain activities at rest.

  17. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata;

    2016-01-01

    components of plasma and xenobiotics. This "blood-brain barrier" function is a major hindrance for drug uptake into the brain parenchyma. Cell culture models, based on either primary cells or immortalized brain endothelial cell lines, have been developed, in order to facilitate in vitro studies of drug...

  18. Integration of Design and Control through Model Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russel, Boris Mariboe; Henriksen, Jens Peter; Jørgensen, Sten Bay;

    2002-01-01

    A systematic computer aided analysis of the process model is proposed as a pre-solution step for integration of design and control problems. The process model equations are classified in terms of balance equations, constitutive equations and conditional equations. Analysis of the phenomena models...... (structure selection) issues for the integrated problems are considered. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, Andre; Hoek, Hans W.; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-01-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to

  20. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability......In this paper we propose a method for whole brain parcellation using the type of generative parametric models typically used in tissue classification. Compared to the non-parametric, multi-atlas segmentation techniques that have become popular in recent years, our method obtains state...... to handle multi-contrast (vector-valued intensities) MR data. We have validated our method by comparing its segmentations to manual delineations both within and across scanner platforms and pulse sequences, and show preliminary results on multi-contrast test-retest scans, demonstrating the feasibility...

  1. Integrated outburst detector sensor-model tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DZIURZY(N)SKI Wac(I)aw; WASILEWSKI Stanis(I)aw

    2011-01-01

    Outbursts of methane and rocks are,similarly to rock bursts,the biggest hazards in deep mines and are equally difficult to predict.The violent process of the outburst itself,along with the scale and range of hazards following the rapid discharge of gas and rocks,requires solutions which would enable quick and unambiguous detection of the hazard,immediate power supply cut-off and evacuation of personnel from potentially hazardous areas.For this purpose,an integrated outburst detector was developed.Assumed functions of the sensor which was equipped with three measuring and detection elements:a chamber for constant measurement of methane concentration,pressure sensor and microphone.Tests of the sensor model were carried out to estimate the parameters which characterize the dynamic properties of the sensor.Given the impossibility of carrying out the full scale experimental outburst,the sensor was tested during the methane and coal dust explosions in the testing gallery at KD Barbara.The obtained results proved that the applied solutions have been appropriate.

  2. Multistability in Large Scale Models of Brain Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Golos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noise driven exploration of a brain network's dynamic repertoire has been hypothesized to be causally involved in cognitive function, aging and neurodegeneration. The dynamic repertoire crucially depends on the network's capacity to store patterns, as well as their stability. Here we systematically explore the capacity of networks derived from human connectomes to store attractor states, as well as various network mechanisms to control the brain's dynamic repertoire. Using a deterministic graded response Hopfield model with connectome-based interactions, we reconstruct the system's attractor space through a uniform sampling of the initial conditions. Large fixed-point attractor sets are obtained in the low temperature condition, with a bigger number of attractors than ever reported so far. Different variants of the initial model, including (i a uniform activation threshold or (ii a global negative feedback, produce a similarly robust multistability in a limited parameter range. A numerical analysis of the distribution of the attractors identifies spatially-segregated components, with a centro-medial core and several well-delineated regional patches. Those different modes share similarity with the fMRI independent components observed in the "resting state" condition. We demonstrate non-stationary behavior in noise-driven generalizations of the models, with different meta-stable attractors visited along the same time course. Only the model with a global dynamic density control is found to display robust and long-lasting non-stationarity with no tendency toward either overactivity or extinction. The best fit with empirical signals is observed at the edge of multistability, a parameter region that also corresponds to the highest entropy of the attractors.

  3. Language Model Applications to Spelling with Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Mora-Cortes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Within the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL community, Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs have raised great hopes as they provide alternative communication means for persons with disabilities bypassing the need for speech and other motor activities. Although significant advancements have been realized in the last decade, applications of language models (e.g., word prediction, completion have only recently started to appear in BCI systems. The main goal of this article is to review the language model applications that supplement non-invasive BCI-based communication systems by discussing their potential and limitations, and to discern future trends. First, a brief overview of the most prominent BCI spelling systems is given, followed by an in-depth discussion of the language models applied to them. These language models are classified according to their functionality in the context of BCI-based spelling: the static/dynamic nature of the user interface, the use of error correction and predictive spelling, and the potential to improve their classification performance by using language models. To conclude, the review offers an overview of the advantages and challenges when implementing language models in BCI-based communication systems when implemented in conjunction with other AAL technologies.

  4. A dynamic in vivo-like organotypic blood-brain barrier model to probe metastatic brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Li, Zhongyu; Yu, Yue; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Ho, Winson S.; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhu, Guoli; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Zhuang, Zhengping; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the uptake of many neuro-therapeutic molecules, presenting a formidable hurdle to drug development in brain diseases. We proposed a new and dynamic in vivo-like three-dimensional microfluidic system that replicates the key structural, functional and mechanical properties of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. Multiple factors in this system work synergistically to accentuate BBB-specific attributes–permitting the analysis of complex organ-level responses in both normal and pathological microenvironments in brain tumors. The complex BBB microenvironment is reproduced in this system via physical cell-cell interaction, vascular mechanical cues and cell migration. This model possesses the unique capability to examine brain metastasis of human lung, breast and melanoma cells and their therapeutic responses to chemotherapy. The results suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and astrocytes in BBB microenvironment might affect the ability of malignant brain tumors to traverse between brain and vascular compartments. Furthermore, quantification of spatially resolved barrier functions exists within a single assay, providing a versatile and valuable platform for pharmaceutical development, drug testing and neuroscientific research.

  5. Resuscitation speed affects brain injury in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Johansson, Pär I

    2014-01-01

    infusion speed increment NS (n¿=¿7). Hemodynamic variables over a 6-hour observation phase were recorded. Following euthanasia, brains were harvested and lesion size as well as brain swelling was measured.ResultsBolus FFP resuscitation resulted in greater brain swelling (22.36¿±¿1.03% vs. 15.58¿±¿2.52%, p...

  6. Integrating histology and MRI in the first digital brain of common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peizhen; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Schilling, Kurt G.; Gao, Yurui; Janve, Vaibhav; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    This effort is a continuation of development of a digital brain atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. Here, we present the integration of histology with multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. The central concept of this work is to use block face photography to establish an intermediate common space in coordinate system which preserves the high resolution in-plane resolution of histology while enabling 3-D correspondence with MRI. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging (300 μm isotropic) and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging (600 um isotropic). Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (both 300 μm isotropic). Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections in-plane. We describe mapping of histology and MRI based data of the common squirrel monkey and construction of a viewing tool that enable online viewing of these datasets. The previously descried atlas MRI is used for its deformation to provide accurate conformation to the MRI, thus adding information at the histological level to the MRI volume. This paper presents the mapping of single 2D image slice in block face as a proof of concept and this can be extended to map the atlas space in 3D coordinate system as part of the future work and can be loaded to an XNAT system for further use.

  7. Integration of ultra-high field MRI and histology for connectome based research of brain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan eYang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI became increasingly relevant for in vivo neuroscientific research because of improved spatial resolutions. However, this is still the unchallenged domain of histological studies, which long played an important role in the investigation of neuropsychiatric disorders. While the field of biological psychiatry strongly advanced on macroscopic levels, current developments are rediscovering the richness of immunohistological information when attempting a multi-level systematic approach to brain function and dysfunction. For most studies, histology sections lost information on three-dimensional reconstructions. Translating histological sections to 3D-volumes would thus not only allow for multi-stain and multi-subject alignment in post mortem data, but also provide a crucial step in big data initiatives involving the network analyses currently performed with in vivo MRI. We therefore investigated potential pitfalls during integration of MR and histological information where no additional blockface information is available. We demonstrated that strengths and requirements from both methods seem to be ideally merged at a spatial resolution of 200 μm. However, the success of this approach is heavily dependent on choices of hardware, sequence and reconstruction. We provide a fully automated pipeline that optimizes histological 3D reconstructions, providing a potentially powerful solution not only for primary human post mortem research institutions in neuropsychiatric research, but also to help alleviate the massive workloads in neuroanatomical atlas initiatives. We further demonstrate (for the first time the feasibility and quality of ultra-high spatial resolution (150 µm isotopic imaging of the entire human brain MRI at 7T, offering new opportunities for analyses on MR-derived information.

  8. Integrating histology and MRI in the first digital brain of common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peizhen; Parvathaneni, Prasanna; Schilling, Kurt G; Gao, Yurui; Janve, Vaibhav; Anderson, Adam; Landman, Bennett A

    2015-03-17

    This effort is a continuation of development of a digital brain atlas of the common squirrel monkey, Saimiri sciureus, a New World monkey with functional and microstructural organization of central nervous system similar to that of humans. Here, we present the integration of histology with multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atlas constructed from the brain of an adult female squirrel monkey. The central concept of this work is to use block face photography to establish an intermediate common space in coordinate system which preserves the high resolution in-plane resolution of histology while enabling 3-D correspondence with MRI. In vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging (300 µm isotropic) and low resolution diffusion tensor imaging (600 um isotropic). Ex vivo MRI acquisitions include high resolution T2 structural imaging and high resolution diffusion tensor imaging (both 300 µm isotropic). Cortical regions were manually annotated on the co-registered volumes based on published histological sections in-plane. We describe mapping of histology and MRI based data of the common squirrel monkey and construction of a viewing tool that enable online viewing of these datasets. The previously descried atlas MRI is used for its deformation to provide accurate conformation to the MRI, thus adding information at the histological level to the MRI volume. This paper presents the mapping of single 2D image slice in block face as a proof of concept and this can be extended to map the atlas space in 3D coordinate system as part of the future work and can be loaded to an XNAT system for further use.

  9. CREATING EFFECTIVE MODELS OF VERTICAL INTEGRATED STRUCTURES IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Koliesnikov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of scientific research aimed at development of methodology-theoretical mechanisms of building the effective models of vertically-integrated structures are presented. A presence of vertically-integrated structures on natural-monopolistic markets at private and governmental sectors of economy and priority directions of integration are given.

  10. Integrated modelling requires mass collaboration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    add, “and are the plans sustainable?” To return to the present, although, it is now possible to ask the first question and obtain an answer through linked modelling; we are still at a very early stage and the associated uncertainties are large. The process of linking and running linked systems is not yet the simple, reliable process needed for widespread uptake. At this point, it is useful to look back over the development process which has taken us from paper maps to GIS and Google Maps; it was the result of tens of thousands of PhD and MSc projects over forty years. During the development of the OpenMI, it was quickly appreciated that to transform integrated modelling from something possible in a research lab to something that had the ease of use and reliability of Google Maps would require a similar process but on a far greater scale; one far larger than any single organisation or state could support. A dramatic change to the research and development process would be needed. Using the OpenMI Association’s strategy as an example, the presentation will describe how through openness, sharing and mass collaboration made possible by inexpensive communications and computing power and adoption of a minimum set of standards, the innovation and enterprise of thousands of individuals across the world can be brought to bear upon the problems.

  11. Integrated Enterprise Modeling Method Based on Workflow Model and Multiviews%Integrated Enterprise Modeling Method Based on Workflow Model and Multiviews

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林慧苹; 范玉顺; 吴澄

    2001-01-01

    Many enterprise modeling methods are proposed to model thebusiness process of enterprises and to implement CIM systems. But difficulties are still encountered when these methods are applied to the CIM system design and implementation. This paper proposes a new integrated enterprise modeling methodology based on the workflow model. The system architecture and the integrated modeling environment are described with a new simulation strategy. The modeling process and the relationship between the workflow model and the views are discussed.

  12. Consistent multi-time-point brain atrophy estimation from the boundary shift integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ourselin, Sébastien; Fox, Nick C

    2012-02-15

    Brain atrophy measurement is increasingly important in studies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), with particular relevance to trials of potential disease-modifying drugs. Automated registration-based methods such as the boundary shift integral (BSI) have been developed to provide more precise measures of change from a pair of serial MR scans. However, when a method treats one image of the pair (typically the baseline) as the reference to which the other is compared, this systematic asymmetry risks introducing bias into the measurement. Recent concern about potential biases in longitudinal studies has led to several suggestions to use symmetric image registration, though some of these methods are limited to two time-points per subject. Therapeutic trials and natural history studies increasingly involve several serial scans, it would therefore be useful to have a method that can consistently estimate brain atrophy over multiple time-points. Here, we use the log-Euclidean concept of a within-subject average to develop affine registration and differential bias correction methods suitable for any number of time-points, yielding a longitudinally consistent multi-time-point BSI technique. Baseline, 12-month and 24-month MR scans of healthy controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment and AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative are used for testing the bias in processing scans with different amounts of atrophy. Four tests are used to assess bias in brain volume loss from BSI: (a) inverse consistency with respect to ordering of pairs of scans 12 months apart; (b) transitivity consistency over three time-points; (c) randomly ordered back-to-back scans, expected to show no consistent change over subjects; and (d) linear regression of the atrophy rates calculated from the baseline and 12-month scans and the baseline and 24-month scans, where any additive bias should be indicated by a non-zero intercept. Results

  13. Computational modeling of pedunculopontine nucleus deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitella, Laura M.; Mohsenian, Kevin; Pahwa, Mrinal; Gloeckner, Cory; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) near the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) has been posited to improve medication-intractable gait and balance problems in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, clinical studies evaluating this DBS target have not demonstrated consistent therapeutic effects, with several studies reporting the emergence of paresthesia and oculomotor side effects. The spatial and pathway-specific extent to which brainstem regions are modulated during PPN-DBS is not well understood. Approach. Here, we describe two computational models that estimate the direct effects of DBS in the PPN region for human and translational non-human primate (NHP) studies. The three-dimensional models were constructed from segmented histological images from each species, multi-compartment neuron models and inhomogeneous finite element models of the voltage distribution in the brainstem during DBS. Main Results. The computational models predicted that: (1) the majority of PPN neurons are activated with -3 V monopolar cathodic stimulation; (2) surgical targeting errors of as little as 1 mm in both species decrement activation selectivity; (3) specifically, monopolar stimulation in caudal, medial, or anterior PPN activates a significant proportion of the superior cerebellar peduncle (up to 60% in the human model and 90% in the NHP model at -3 V) (4) monopolar stimulation in rostral, lateral or anterior PPN activates a large percentage of medial lemniscus fibers (up to 33% in the human model and 40% in the NHP model at -3 V) and (5) the current clinical cylindrical electrode design is suboptimal for isolating the modulatory effects to PPN neurons. Significance. We show that a DBS lead design with radially-segmented electrodes may yield improved functional outcome for PPN-DBS.

  14. Phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli - modeling of single action potential

    CERN Document Server

    Seetharaman, Karthik; Kulish, Vladimir V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we detail a phase lagging model of brain response to external stimuli. The model is derived using the basic laws of physics like conservation of energy law. This model eliminates the paradox of instantaneous propagation of the action potential in the brain. The solution of this model is then presented. The model is further applied in the case of a single neuron and is verified by simulating a single action potential. The results of this modeling are useful not only for the fundamental understanding of single action potential generation, but also they can be applied in case of neuronal interactions where the results can be verified against the real EEG signal.

  15. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low

  16. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood–brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K.; Thrippleton, Michael J.; Armitage, Paul A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Makin, Stephen D.; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n = 201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a “sham” DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and KTrans estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model

  17. Opioid Abuse After Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dependence development using both precipitated and spontaneous withdrawal. Key findings to date: • There was no difference in baseline nociception ( pain ...analgesia studies demonstrate that moderate brain injury does not result in an altered pain state or diminished response to oxycodone analgesia, the... pain medications. There is significant overlap in anatomical brain regions involved in reward pathways associated with addiction and the brain regions

  18. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamir, Munaf Syed [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beyeler, Walter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fellner, Karen Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hayden, Nancy Kay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jeffers, Robert Fredric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silver, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelke, Peter [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Burrow, Mat [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Keith, Bruce [United States Military Academy, West Point, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  19. The Genexpress IMAGE knowledge base of the human brain transcriptome: a prototype integrated resource for functional and computational genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piétu, G; Mariage-Samson, R; Fayein, N A; Matingou, C; Eveno, E; Houlgatte, R; Decraene, C; Vandenbrouck, Y; Tahi, F; Devignes, M D; Wirkner, U; Ansorge, W; Cox, D; Nagase, T; Nomura, N; Auffray, C

    1999-02-01

    Expression profiles of 5058 human gene transcripts represented by an array of 7451 clones from the first IMAGE Consortium cDNA library from infant brain have been collected by semiquantitative hybridization of the array with complex probes derived by reverse transcription of mRNA from brain and five other human tissues. Twenty-one percent of the clones corresponded to transcripts that could be classified in general categories of low, moderate, or high abundance. These expression profiles were integrated with cDNA clone and sequence clustering and gene mapping information from an upgraded version of the Genexpress Index. For seven gene transcripts found to be transcribed preferentially or specifically in brain, the expression profiles were confirmed by Northern blot analyses of mRNA from eight adult and four fetal tissues, and 15 distinct regions of brain. In four instances, further documentation of the sites of expression was obtained by in situ hybridization of rat-brain tissue sections. A systematic effort was undertaken to further integrate available cytogenetic, genetic, physical, and genic map informations through radiation-hybrid mapping to provide a unique validated map location for each of these genes in relation to the disease map. The resulting Genexpress IMAGE Knowledge Base is illustrated by five examples presented in the printed article with additional data available on a dedicated Web site at the address http://idefix.upr420.vjf.cnrs.fr/EXPR++ +/ welcome.html.

  20. Integrated RF/shim coil array for parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Darnell, Dean; Song, Allen W

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a novel integrated radiofrequency and shim (RF/shim) coil array that can perform parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain with the same coils, thereby maximizing both the signal-to-noise ratio and shimming efficiency. A 32-channel receive-only head coil array was modified to enable both RF currents (for signal reception) and direct currents (for B0 shimming) to flow in individual coil elements. Its in vivo performance was assessed in the frontal brain region, which is affected by large susceptibility-induced B0 inhomogeneities. The coil modifications did not reduce their quality factor or signal-to-noise ratio. Axial B0 maps and echo-planar images acquired in vivo with direct currents optimized to shim specific slices showed substantially reduced B0 inhomogeneities and image distortions in the frontal brain region. The B0 root-mean-square error in the anterior half of the brain was reduced by 60.3% as compared to that obtained with second-order spherical harmonic shimming. These results demonstrate that the integrated RF/shim coil array can perform parallel reception and localized B0 shimming in the human brain and provide a much more effective shimming than conventional spherical harmonic shimming alone, without taking up additional space in the magnet bore and without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio or shimming performance.

  1. Solutions to Integration Model of Rural Information Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xirong; GAO; Bo; TAO

    2014-01-01

    The integration of rural information resources is a key factor restricting rural informationization and effective operation of rural information services. To solve problems of separate rural information resources and departments acting willfully regardless of overall interest,this paper analyzed characteristics and distribution of rural information resources,built a basic framework for integration of rural information resources and a mathematic model of integration,and finally came up with specific solutions to integration of rural information resources.

  2. Toward an autonomous brain machine interface: integrating sensorimotor reward modulation and reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Brandi T; Tarigoppula, Venkata S Aditya; Chen, Chen; Francis, Joseph T

    2015-05-13

    For decades, neurophysiologists have worked on elucidating the function of the cortical sensorimotor control system from the standpoint of kinematics or dynamics. Recently, computational neuroscientists have developed models that can emulate changes seen in the primary motor cortex during learning. However, these simulations rely on the existence of a reward-like signal in the primary sensorimotor cortex. Reward modulation of the primary sensorimotor cortex has yet to be characterized at the level of neural units. Here we demonstrate that single units/multiunits and local field potentials in the primary motor (M1) cortex of nonhuman primates (Macaca radiata) are modulated by reward expectation during reaching movements and that this modulation is present even while subjects passively view cursor motions that are predictive of either reward or nonreward. After establishing this reward modulation, we set out to determine whether we could correctly classify rewarding versus nonrewarding trials, on a moment-to-moment basis. This reward information could then be used in collaboration with reinforcement learning principles toward an autonomous brain-machine interface. The autonomous brain-machine interface would use M1 for both decoding movement intention and extraction of reward expectation information as evaluative feedback, which would then update the decoding algorithm as necessary. In the work presented here, we show that this, in theory, is possible.

  3. The integrate model of emotion, thinking and self regulation: an application to the "paradox of aging".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leanne M; Gatt, Justine M; Hatch, Ainslie; Palmer, Donna M; Nagy, Marie; Rennie, Christopher; Cooper, Nicholas J; Morris, Charlotte; Grieve, Stuart; Dobson-Stone, Carol; Schofield, Peter; Clark, C Richard; Gordon, Evian; Arns, Martijn; Paul, Robert H

    2008-09-01

    This study was undertaken using the INTEGRATE Model of brain organization, which is based on a temporal continuum of emotion, thinking and self regulation. In this model, the key organizing principle of self adaption is the motivation to minimize danger and maximize reward. This principle drives brain organization across a temporal continuum spanning milliseconds to seconds, minutes and hours. The INTEGRATE Model comprises three distinct processes across this continuum. Emotion is defined by automatic action tendencies triggered by signals that are significant due to their relevance to minimizing danger-maximizing reward (such as abrupt, high contrast stimuli). Thinking represents cognitive functions and feelings that rely on brain and body feedback emerging from around 200 ms post-stimulus onwards. Self regulation is the modulation of emotion, thinking and feeling over time, according to more abstract adaptions to minimize danger-maximize reward. Here, we examined the impact of dispositional factors, age and genetic variation, on this temporal continuum. Brain Resource methodology provided a standardized platform for acquiring genetic, brain and behavioral data in the same 1000 healthy subjects. Results showed a "paradox" of declining function in the "thinking" time scale over the lifespan (6 to 80+ years), but a corresponding preservation or even increase in automatic functions of "emotion" and "self regulation". This paradox was paralleled by a greater loss of grey matter in cortical association areas (assessed using MRI) over age, but a relative preservation of subcortical grey matter. Genetic polymorphisms associated with both healthy function and susceptibility to disorder (including the BDNFVal(66)Met, COMTVal(158/108)Met, MAOA and DRD4 tandem repeat and 5HTT-LPR polymorphisms) made specific contributions to emotion, thinking and self regulatory functions, which also varied according to age.

  4. Informing pedagogy through the brain-targeted teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiman, Mariale

    2012-01-01

    Improving teaching to foster creative thinking and problem-solving for students of all ages will require two essential changes in current educational practice. First, to allow more time for deeper engagement with material, it is critical to reduce the vast number of topics often required in many courses. Second, and perhaps more challenging, is the alignment of pedagogy with recent research on cognition and learning. With a growing focus on the use of research to inform teaching practices, educators need a pedagogical framework that helps them interpret and apply research findings. This article describes the Brain-Targeted Teaching Model, a scheme that relates six distinct aspects of instruction to research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences.

  5. Integrating Seasonal Oscillations into Basel II Behavioural Scoring Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Klepac

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article introduces a new methodology of temporal influence measurement (seasonal oscillations, temporal patterns for behavioural scoring development purposes. The paper shows how significant temporal variables can be recognised and then integrated into the behavioural scoring models in order to improve model performance. Behavioural scoring models are integral parts of the Basel II standard on Internal Ratings-Based Approaches (IRB. The IRB approach much more precisely reflects individual risk bank profile.A solution of the problem of how to analyze and integrate macroeconomic and microeconomic factors represented in time series into behavioural scorecard models will be shown in the paper by using the REF II model.

  6. Developing engineering processes through integrated modelling of product and process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Bjerrum; Hvam, Lars

    2012-01-01

    activities as well as insight into how product features affect the engineering processes. The article suggests possible ways of integrating models of products with models of engineering processes. The models have been tested and further developed in an action research study carried out in collaboration......This article aims at developing an operational tool for integrated modelling of product assortments and engineering processes in companies making customer specific products. Integrating a product model in the design of engineering processes will provide a deeper understanding of the engineering...

  7. "Neuro-semeiotics" and "free-energy minimization" suggest a unified perspective for integrative brain actions: focus on receptor heteromers and Roamer type of volume transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Marcoli, Manuela; Genedani, Susanna; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel; Maura, Guido; Fuxe, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    Two far-reaching theoretical approaches, namely "Neuro-semeiotics" (NS) and "Free-energy Minimization" (FEM), have been recently proposed as frames within which to put forward heuristic hypotheses on integrative brain actions. In the present paper these two theoretical approaches are briefly discussed in the perspective of a recent model of brain architecture and information handling based on what we suggest calling Jacob's tinkering principle, whereby "to create is to recombine!". The NS and FEM theoretical approaches will be discussed from the perspective both of the Roamer-Type Volume Transmission (especially exosome-mediated) of intercellular communication and of the impact of receptor oligomers and Receptor-Receptor Interactions (RRIs) on signal recognition/decoding processes. In particular, the Bio-semeiotics concept of "adaptor" will be used to analyze RRIs as an important feature of NS. Furthermore, the concept of phenotypic plasticity of cells will be introduced in view of the demonstration of the possible transfer of receptors (i.e., adaptors) into a computational network via exosomes (see also Appendix). Thus, Jacob's tinkering principle will be proposed as a theoretical basis for some learning processes both at the network level (Turing-like type of machine) and at the molecular level as a consequence of both the plastic changes in the adaptors caused by the allosteric interactions in the receptor oligomers and the intercellular transfer of receptors. Finally, on the basis of NS and FEM theories, a unified perspective for integrative brain actions will be proposed.

  8. A Fuzzy Integral Ensemble Method in Visual P300 Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cavrini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the possibility of application of combination of classifiers using fuzzy measures and integrals to Brain-Computer Interface (BCI based on electroencephalography. In particular, we present an ensemble method that can be applied to a variety of systems and evaluate it in the context of a visual P300-based BCI. Offline analysis of data relative to 5 subjects lets us argue that the proposed classification strategy is suitable for BCI. Indeed, the achieved performance is significantly greater than the average of the base classifiers and, broadly speaking, similar to that of the best one. Thus the proposed methodology allows realizing systems that can be used by different subjects without the need for a preliminary configuration phase in which the best classifier for each user has to be identified. Moreover, the ensemble is often capable of detecting uncertain situations and turning them from misclassifications into abstentions, thereby improving the level of safety in BCI for environmental or device control.

  9. Reactive actuators and sensors integrated in one device: mimicking brain-muscles feedback communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Toribio F.; Martinez, Jose G.

    2013-04-01

    Artificial muscles based on carbon derivative molecular structures are chemical (electro-chemo-mechanical) actuators. The electrochemical reaction drives the film volume variation and the actuation. The applied current controls the movement rate and the charge controls the amplitude of the displacement (Faraday' motors). Any working or surrounding variable influencing the reaction rate will be sensed by the muscle potential, or by the consumed electrical energy, evolution during actuation. Experimental results and full theoretical description of the basic reactive material and of any dual electrochemical sensing-actuator will be presented. During current flow the muscle potential and the consumed electrical energy evolution are influenced by the working variables: temperature, electrolyte concentration, driving current, film volume variation (external pressure, applied strain, hanged masses, obstacles in its way). The working muscle becomes an electrochemical sensor. Only two connecting wires contain actuating (current) and sensing (potential) signals read and controlled, at any time from the computer-generator. One device integrates several sensing and actuating tools working simultaneously mimicking muscles/brain feedback communication.

  10. A Pilot Project of Early Integrated Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Kwaon Lui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Document acute neurosurgical and rehabilitation parameters of patients of all traumatic brain injury (TBI severities and determine whether early screening along with very early integrated TBI rehabilitation changes functional outcomes. Methods. Prospective study involving all patients with TBI admitted to a neurosurgical department of a tertiary hospital. They were assessed within 72 hours of admission by the rehabilitation team and received twice weekly rehabilitation reviews. Patients with further rehabilitation needs were then transferred to the attached acute inpatient TBI rehabilitation unit (TREATS and their functional outcomes were compared against a historical group of patients. Demographic variables, acute neurosurgical characteristics, medical complications, and rehabilitation outcomes were recorded. Results. There were 298 patients screened with an average age of 61.8±19.1 years. The most common etiology was falls (77.5%. Most patients were discharged home directly (67.4% and 22.8% of patients were in TREATS. The TREATS group functionally improved (P<0.001. Regression analysis showed by the intervention of TREATS, that there was a statistically significant FIM functional gain of 18.445 points (95% CI −30.388 to −0.6502, P=0.03. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated important epidemiological data on an unselected cohort of patients with TBI in Singapore and functional improvement in patients who further received inpatient rehabilitation.

  11. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a

  12. Integrability of the η-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Heinze, Martin; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the η-deformed \\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5} background. For this integrable model we construct a 4× 4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the η-deformed Neumann and {{≤ft(\\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5}\\right)}η} geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  13. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  14. Model-Driven Development in implementing integration flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Górski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Integration of many different IT systems makes the integration project highly complex. The process of constructing architectural models and source code can be automated through the application of transformations. As a result, the duration time of designing or implementa-tion, as well as the work input involved can be reduced. The purpose of the paper is to pre-sent an approach to automation of designing one of the key elements of an integration platform, namely, integration flows. The author proposes model-to-code transformation In-tegrationFlow-to-Java which automates the implementation of integration flows applica-tions for selected mediation patterns. The integration flows generator has been incorporated as a plug-in into the IBM Rational Software Architect (RSA. The RSA plug-in which generates complete Java EE application of integration flow from mediation flows diagram. Thus eliminates design and programming stage in WebSphere Integration Devel-oper which reduces development time and costs of licenses. Model-Driven Development is approach which can lead to automation of design and programming stage in software de-velopment. The IntegrationFlow-to-Java transformation offers an opportunity to reduce the duration time of the integration flows implementation forty times (with one hundred flows to be implemented. The outcomes support the significance of using transformations when designing complex IT systems, especially when integration solutions are developed.

  15. Traumatic brain injury–Modeling neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oz eMalkesman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the United States, approximately 1.5 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Victims of TBI can suffer from chronic post-TBI symptoms, such as sensory and motor deficits, cognitive impairments including problems with memory, learning, and attention, and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, aggression, and suicidal rumination. Although partially associated with the site and severity of injury, the biological mechanisms associated with many of these symptoms—and why some patients experience differing assortments of persistent maladies—are largely unknown. The use of animal models is a promising strategy for elucidation of the mechanisms of impairment and treatment, and learning, memory, sensory and motor tests have widespread utility in rodent models of TBI and psychopharmacology. Comparatively, behavioral tests for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptomatology are rarely employed in animal models of TBI and, as determined in this review, the results have been inconsistent. Animal behavioral studies contribute to the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which TBI is associated with neurobehavioral symptoms and offer a powerful means for pre-clinical treatment validation. Therefore, further exploration of the utility of animal behavioral tests for the study of injury mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of emotional symptoms are relevant and essential.

  16. [Pathogenic variants of brain injuries and pharmalogic cerebroprotection performed on the model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygan, N V; Trashkov, A P

    2014-10-01

    Developed and approved a pathogenic grounded experimental model of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery. Undertaken in Wistar rats research allowed to evaluate in detail effectiveness and safety of protracted cerebroprotective treatment. Advantages of this model are researches in laboratory animals with the aim to research condition of nerve tissue, not intensive procedures and consequently high reproducibility and possibility of complex evaluation of changes at every stage of research. Results of neurons, neuroglia and activation of neurotrophic mechanisms prove that simulation of brain condition during cardiovascular bypass surgery is accompanied with acute and delayed brain injuries. Use of Cytoflavin under pharmalogic cerebroprotection had prolonged multimodal and neuroprotactive effect, leading to improvement of neurotrophic protection from the first days.

  17. Combined antiretroviral therapy reduces brain viral load and pathological features of HIV encephalitis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Rajeth; Olive, M Foster; Tyor, William R

    2014-02-01

    The role of brain HIV load in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) is unclear. To try and determine if the amount of HIV drives the severity of pathology, a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of HIV encephalitis (HIVE) was utilized to determine the effectiveness of a systemically administered combined antiretroviral (cART) regimen. SCID mice were inoculated intracerebrally with HIV-infected or uninfected (control) human macrophages and treated subcutaneously with cART or saline for 10 days. Immunohistochemistry was then used to examine gliosis and neuronal damage. Drug levels were measured in brain and plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak plasma and brain levels of atazanavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine were determined to be 1 h post-injection of cART therapy. cART significantly reduced neuropathological features of HIVE, including astrogliosis and the presence of mononuclear phagocytes, and ameliorated reduced MAP2 (neuronal integrity) staining. However, cART did not eradicate HIV from the brain. Using this animal model of HIVE, these data indicate effective penetration of cART reduces brain viral loads and HIV pathology, possibly by eliminating the production of HIV proteins, virus infected cells, or both. Importantly, these data suggest that viral load directly affects the extent of pathology seen in the brain, particularly neuronal damage, which implies that more effective suppression of HIV in the CNS could reduce currently highly prevalent forms of HAND. However, these data also strongly suggest that cART will not eliminate HIV from the brain and that adjunctive therapies must be developed.

  18. Diffusion of flexible random-coil dextran polymers measured in anisotropic brain extracellular space by integrative optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Nicholson, Charles; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetová, Sabina

    2008-08-01

    There are a limited number of methods available to quantify the extracellular diffusion of macromolecules in an anisotropic brain region, e.g., an area containing numerous aligned fibers where diffusion is faster along the fibers than across. We applied the integrative optical imaging method to measure diffusion of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 488 (molecular weight (MW) 547) and fluorophore-labeled flexible random-coil dextran polymers (dex3, MW 3000; dex75, MW 75,000; dex282, MW 282,000; dex525, MW 525,000) in the extracellular space (ECS) of the anisotropic molecular layer of the isolated turtle cerebellum. For all molecules, two-dimensional images acquired an elliptical shape with major and minor axes oriented along and across, respectively, the unmyelinated parallel fibers. The effective diffusion coefficients, D*(major) and D*(minor), decreased with molecular size. The diffusion anisotropy ratio (DAR = D*(major)/D*(minor)) increased for Alexa Fluor 488 through dex75 but then unexpectedly reached a plateau. We argue that dex282 and dex525 approach the ECS width and deform to diffuse. In support of this concept, scaling theory shows the diffusion behavior of dex282 and dex525 to be consistent with transition to a reptation regime, and estimates the average ECS width at approximately 31 nm. These findings have implications for the interstitial transport of molecules and drugs, and for modeling neurotransmitter diffusion during ectopic release and spillover.

  19. Toward an Integrative Model of Global Business Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin

    fragmentation-integration-fragmentation-integration upward spiral. In response to the call for integrative approach to strategic management research, we propose an integrative model of global business strategy that aims at integrating not only strategy and IB but also the different paradigms within the strategy......In this paper, we first review the development of the strategy field by introducing Hoskisson et al.’s (1999) notion of ‘swings of a pendulum’. With problematization of this notion, we then offer an alternative interpretation of the advancement of strategy knowledge, namely, a recursive...

  20. 3D brain atlas reconstructor service--online repository of three-dimensional models of brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majka, Piotr; Kowalski, Jakub M; Chlodzinska, Natalia; Wójcik, Daniel K

    2013-10-01

    Brain atlases are important tools of neuroscience. Traditionally prepared in paper book format, more and more commonly they take digital form which extends their utility. To simplify work with different atlases, to lay the ground for developing universal tools which could abstract from the origin of the atlas, efforts are being made to provide common interfaces to these atlases. 3D Brain Atlas Reconstructor service (3dBARs) described here is a repository of digital representations of different brain atlases in CAF format which we recently proposed and a repository of 3D models of brain structures. A graphical front-end is provided for creating and viewing the reconstructed models as well as the underlying 2D atlas data. An application programming interface (API) facilitates programmatic access to the service contents from other websites. From a typical user's point of view, 3dBARs offers an accessible way to mine publicly available atlasing data with a convenient browser based interface, without the need to install extra software. For a developer of services related to brain atlases, 3dBARs supplies mechanisms for enhancing functionality of other software. The policy of the service is to accept new datasets as delivered by interested parties and we work with the researchers who obtain original data to make them available to the neuroscience community at large. The functionality offered by the 3dBARs situates it at the core of present and future general atlasing services tying it strongly to the global atlasing neuroinformatics infrastructure.

  1. Using chaotic artificial neural networks to model memory in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Zainab; Jafari, Sajad; Ma, Jun; Sprott, Julien C.; Zendehrouh, Sareh; Pham, Viet-Thanh

    2017-03-01

    In the current study, a novel model for human memory is proposed based on the chaotic dynamics of artificial neural networks. This new model explains a biological fact about memory which is not yet explained by any other model: There are theories that the brain normally works in a chaotic mode, while during attention it shows ordered behavior. This model uses the periodic windows observed in a previously proposed model for the brain to store and then recollect the information.

  2. Modeling Mitochondrial Bioenergetics with Integrated Volume Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bazil, Jason N.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Ann E Rundell

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary Mathematically modeling biological systems challenges our current understanding of the physical and biochemical events contributing to the observed dynamics. It requires careful consideration of hypothesized mechanisms, model development assumptions and details regarding the experimental conditions. We have adopted a modeling approach to translate these factors that explicitly considers the thermodynamic constraints, biochemical states and reaction mechanisms during model devel...

  3. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    nociception ( pain threshold) between the sham controls and the brain-injured subjects in either the spinally or supra-spinally mediated measures of acute pain ...brain injury does not result in an altered pain state or diminished response to oxycodone analgesia and the dependence studies show withdrawal is not...of persons who are prescribed opioid pain medications. There is significant overlap in anatomical brain regions involved in reward pathways

  4. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes 1,2. Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement 3,4. ...

  5. Development of Multisensory Integration Approach Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. Prasanna; Nathan, B. Sami

    2016-01-01

    Every teacher expects optimum level of processing in mind of them students. The level of processing is mainly depends upon memory process. Most of the students have retrieval difficulties on past learning. Memory difficulties directly related to sensory integration. In these circumstances the investigator made an attempt to construct Multisensory…

  6. Effects of tetrahydroxystilbene - glucoside on Animal Models of Dementia or Brain Aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LinLi; JinChu; LiLiu; LingZhao; LanZhang

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside(TSG) from a Chinese Medicinal Herb polygonum multiflorum on dementia or brain aging. Methods. The brain aging model of mice was developed by s. c. injection of D-galactose (50mg/kg/day) for 60 days. The Alzheimer disease (AD) model of mice

  7. Data Assimilation in Integrated and Distributed Hydrological Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Donghua

    Integrated hydrological models are frequently used in water-related environmental resource management. With our better understanding of the hydrological processes and the improved computational power, hydrological models are becoming increasingly more complex as they integrate multiple hydrological...... processes and provide simulations in refined temporal and spatial resolutions. Recent developments in measurement and sensor technologies have significantly improved the coverage, quality, frequency and diversity of hydrological observations. Data assimilation provides a great potential in relation...... to efficient use of traditional and new observational data in integrated hydrological models, as this technique can improve model prediction and reduce model uncertainty. The thesis investigates several challenges within the scope of data assimilation in integrated hydrological models. From the methodological...

  8. The dynamics of multimodal integration: The averaging diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon M; Gao, Juan; Koenig, Scott; Palfy, Dylan; L McClelland, James

    2017-03-08

    We combine extant theories of evidence accumulation and multi-modal integration to develop an integrated framework for modeling multimodal integration as a process that unfolds in real time. Many studies have formulated sensory processing as a dynamic process where noisy samples of evidence are accumulated until a decision is made. However, these studies are often limited to a single sensory modality. Studies of multimodal stimulus integration have focused on how best to combine different sources of information to elicit a judgment. These studies are often limited to a single time point, typically after the integration process has occurred. We address these limitations by combining the two approaches. Experimentally, we present data that allow us to study the time course of evidence accumulation within each of the visual and auditory domains as well as in a bimodal condition. Theoretically, we develop a new Averaging Diffusion Model in which the decision variable is the mean rather than the sum of evidence samples and use it as a base for comparing three alternative models of multimodal integration, allowing us to assess the optimality of this integration. The outcome reveals rich individual differences in multimodal integration: while some subjects' data are consistent with adaptive optimal integration, reweighting sources of evidence as their relative reliability changes during evidence integration, others exhibit patterns inconsistent with optimality.

  9. Towards Finite-Gap Integration of the Inozemtsev Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Takemura

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Inozemtsev model is considered to be a multivaluable generalization of Heun's equation. We review results on Heun's equation, the elliptic Calogero-Moser-Sutherland model and the Inozemtsev model, and discuss some approaches to the finite-gap integration for multivariable models.

  10. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Modern imaging methods allow a non-invasive assessment of both structural and functional brain connectivity. This has lead to the identification of disease-related alterations affecting functional connectivity. The mechanism of how such alterations in functional connectivity arise in a structured network of interacting neural populations is as yet poorly understood. Here we use a modeling approach to explore the way in which this can arise and to highlight the important role that local population dynamics can have in shaping emergent spatial functional connectivity patterns. The local dynamics for a neural population is taken to be of the Wilson-Cowan type, whilst the structural connectivity patterns used, describing long-range anatomical connections, cover both realistic scenarios (from the CoComac database) and idealized ones that allow for more detailed theoretical study. We have calculated graph-theoretic measures of functional network topology from numerical simulations of model networks. The effect of the form of local dynamics on the observed network state is quantified by examining the correlation between structural and functional connectivity. We document a profound and systematic dependence of the simulated functional connectivity patterns on the parameters controlling the dynamics. Importantly, we show that a weakly coupled oscillator theory explaining these correlations and their variation across parameter space can be developed. This theoretical development provides a novel way to characterize the mechanisms for the breakdown of functional connectivity in diseases through changes in local dynamics.

  11. Local Model of Arteriovenous Malformation of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadezhda Telegina, Ms; Aleksandr Chupakhin, Mr; Aleksandr Cherevko, Mr

    2013-02-01

    Vascular diseases of the human brain are one of the reasons of deaths and people's incapacitation not only in Russia, but also in the world. The danger of an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is in premature rupture of pathological vessels of an AVM which may cause haemorrhage. Long-term prognosis without surgical treatment is unfavorable. The reduced impact method of AVM treatment is embolization of a malformation which often results in complete obliteration of an AVM. Pre-surgical mathematical modeling of an arteriovenous malformation can help surgeons with an optimal sequence of the operation. During investigations, the simple mathematical model of arteriovenous malformation is developed and calculated, and stationary and non-stationary processes of its embolization are considered. Various sequences of embolization of a malformation are also considered. Calculations were done with approximate steady flow on the basis of balanced equations derived from conservation laws. Depending on pressure difference, a fistula-type AVM should be embolized at first, and then small racemose AVMs are embolized. Obtained results are in good correspondence with neurosurgical AVM practice.

  12. A Model for Information Integration Using Service Oriented Architectur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Punitha Devi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Business agility remains to be the keyword that drives the business into different directions and enabling a 360 degree shift in the business process. To achieve agility the organization should work on real time information and data. The need to have instant access to information appears to be ever shine requirement of all organizations or enterprise. Access to information does not come directly with a single query but a complex process termed Information integration. Information integration has been in existence for the past two decades and has been progressive up to now. The challenges and issues keep on persisting as information integration problem evolves by itself. This paper addresses the issues in the approaches, techniques and models pertaining to information integration and identifies the problem for a need for a complete model. As SOA is the architectural style that is changing the business patterns today, this paper proposes a service oriented model for information integration. The model mainly focuses on giving a complete structure for information integration that is adaptable to any environment and open in nature. Here information is converted into service and then the information services are integrated through service oriented integration to provide the integrated information also as service.

  13. An Integrated Learning Model In Collaboration With Industrial Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Schedin, Staffan; OSAMA A. B. HASSAN

    2014-01-01

    We present a recently developed learning model of work integrated learning in the Bachelor programs in Mechanical Engineering as well as Electronic and Computer Engineering at Umeå University, Sweden. The model is based on an organized collaboration with our industrial partners in the surrounding geographic region. As a part of the collaboration, each participating student is guaranteed internships at a chosen company over the summer period. In the model, company based projects are integrated...

  14. Academic Support through Information System : Srinivas Integrated Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aithal, Sreeramana; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    As part of imparting quality higher education for undergraduate and post graduate students, Srinivas Institute of Management Studies (SIMS) developed an education service model for integrated academic support known as Srinivas Integrated Model. Backed by the presumption that knowledge is power and information is fundamental to knowledge building and knowledge sharing, this model is aimed to provide information support to students for improved academic performance. Information on the college a...

  15. Fractional Diffusion Based Modelling and Prediction of Human Brain Response to External Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human brain response is the result of the overall ability of the brain in analyzing different internal and external stimuli and thus making the proper decisions. During the last decades scientists have discovered more about this phenomenon and proposed some models based on computational, biological, or neuropsychological methods. Despite some advances in studies related to this area of the brain research, there were fewer efforts which have been done on the mathematical modeling of the human brain response to external stimuli. This research is devoted to the modeling and prediction of the human EEG signal, as an alert state of overall human brain activity monitoring, upon receiving external stimuli, based on fractional diffusion equations. The results of this modeling show very good agreement with the real human EEG signal and thus this model can be used for many types of applications such as prediction of seizure onset in patient with epilepsy.

  16. Integrating Structure to Protein-Protein Interaction Networks That Drive Metastasis to Brain and Lung in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    H Billur Engin; Emre Guney; Ozlem Keskin; Baldo Oliva; Attila Gursoy

    2013-01-01

    Integrating Structure to Protein-Protein Interaction Networks That Drive Metastasis to Brain and Lung in Breast Cancer H. Billur Engin1, Emre Guney2, Ozlem Keskin1, Baldo Oliva2, Attila Gursoy1* 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey, 2 Structural Bioinformatics Group (GRIB), Universitat Pompeu Fabra Abstract Blocking specific protein interactions can lead to human diseases. Accordingly, protein i...

  17. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  18. A Comparative Study of Theoretical Graph Models for Characterizing Structural Networks of Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated both structural and functional brain networks via graph-theoretical methods. However, there is an important issue that has not been adequately discussed before: what is the optimal theoretical graph model for describing the structural networks of human brain? In this paper, we perform a comparative study to address this problem. Firstly, large-scale cortical regions of interest (ROIs are localized by recently developed and validated brain reference system named Dense Individualized Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL to address the limitations in the identification of the brain network ROIs in previous studies. Then, we construct structural brain networks based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data. Afterwards, the global and local graph properties of the constructed structural brain networks are measured using the state-of-the-art graph analysis algorithms and tools and are further compared with seven popular theoretical graph models. In addition, we compare the topological properties between two graph models, namely, stickiness-index-based model (STICKY and scale-free gene duplication model (SF-GD, that have higher similarity with the real structural brain networks in terms of global and local graph properties. Our experimental results suggest that among the seven theoretical graph models compared in this study, STICKY and SF-GD models have better performances in characterizing the structural human brain network.

  19. QMU in Integrated Spacecraft System Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ACTA and Sandia National Laboratories propose to quantify and propagate substructure modeling uncertainty for reduced-order substructure models to higher levels of...

  20. Integration models: multicultural and liberal approaches confronted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    European societies have been shaped by their Christian past, upsurge of international migration, democratic rule and liberal tradition rooted in religious tolerance. Boosting globalization processes impose new challenges on European societies, striving to protect their diversity. This struggle is especially clearly visible in case of minorities trying to resist melting into mainstream culture. European countries' legal systems and cultural policies respond to these efforts in many ways. Respecting identity politics-driven group rights seems to be the most common approach, resulting in creation of a multicultural society. However, the outcome of respecting group rights may be remarkably contradictory to both individual rights growing out from liberal tradition, and to reinforced concept of integration of immigrants into host societies. The hereby paper discusses identity politics upturn in the context of both individual rights and integration of European societies.

  1. A Few Expanding Integrable Models, Hamiltonian Structures and Constrained Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Two kinds of higher-dimensional Lie algebras and their loop algebras are introduced, for which a few expanding integrable models including the coupling integrable couplings of the Broer-Kaup (BK) hierarchy and the dispersive long wave (DLW) hierarchy as well as the TB hierarchy are obtained.From the reductions of the coupling integrable couplings, the corresponding coupled integrable couplings of the BK equation, the DLW equation, and the TB equation are obtained, respectively.Especially, the coupling integrable coupling of the TB equation reduces to a few integrable couplings of the well-known mKdV equation.The Hamiltonian structures of the coupling integrable couplings of the three kinds of soliton hierarchies are worked out, respectively, by employing the variational identity.Finally,we decompose the BK hierarchy of evolution equations into x-constrained flows and tn-constrained flows whose adjoint representations and the Lax pairs are given.

  2. Effects of exogenous ganglioside-1 on learning and memory in a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhi Li; Nong Xiao; Xiaoping Zhang; Ling Liu; Liyun Lin; Siyuan Chen; Yuxia Chen; Bei Xu

    2008-01-01

    greater in the hippocampal CA3 region compared to the model group I week after surgery (P < 0.05). In all three groups, brain weight of the right hemisphere was significantly less than the left hemisphere, in particular in the model group (P < 0.05). In the GMI group, the weight difference between two hemispheres, as well as the extent of damage in the right hemisphere, was less than the model group (P < 0.01). In the sham operation group, brain tissue consisted of integrated structures and ordered cells. In the model group, the cerebral cortex layers of the right hemisphere were not defined, neurons were damaged, and neurons were disarranged in the hippocampal area. In the GMI group, neurons were dense in the right cerebral cortex and hippocampal area, with no significant change in glial prolitferation. (2) The average time of escape latency in the GM1 group was shortened 4 weeks after surgery, and significantly less than the model group (P < 0.05), In addition, the frequency platform passing in the GM1 group was significantly greater than the model group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Exogenous GMI may reduce brain injury and improve learning and memory in hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage rats. This protection may be associated with increased growth-associated protein-43 expression, which is involved in neuronal remodeling processes.

  3. The HSG procedure for modelling integrated urban wastewater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschalla, D; Schütze, M; Schroeder, K; Bach, M; Blumensaat, F; Gruber, G; Klepiszewski, K; Pabst, M; Pressl, A; Schindler, N; Solvi, A-M; Wiese, J

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the importance of integrated modelling of urban wastewater systems is ever increasing, there is still no concise procedure regarding how to carry out such modelling studies. After briefly discussing some earlier approaches, the guideline for integrated modelling developed by the Central European Simulation Research Group (HSG - Hochschulgruppe) is presented. This contribution suggests a six-step standardised procedure to integrated modelling. This commences with an analysis of the system and definition of objectives and criteria, covers selection of modelling approaches, analysis of data availability, calibration and validation and also includes the steps of scenario analysis and reporting. Recent research findings as well as experience gained from several application projects from Central Europe have been integrated in this guideline.

  4. Model-Based Integration and Interpretation of Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Johannes

    2004-01-01

    Data integration and interpretation plays a crucial role in supervisory control. The paper defines a set of generic inference steps for the data integration and interpretation process based on a three-layer model of system representations. The three-layer model is used to clarify the combination...... of constraint and object-centered representations of the work domain throwing new light on the basic principles underlying the data integration and interpretation process of Rasmussen's abstraction hierarchy as well as other model-based approaches combining constraint and object-centered representations. Based...

  5. Effect of pharmacologic resuscitation on the brain gene expression profiles in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Sillesen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that addition of valproic acid (VPA; a histone deacetylase inhibitor) to hetastarch (Hextend [HEX]) resuscitation significantly decreases lesion size in a swine model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). However, the precise mechanisms...... have not been well defined. As VPA is a transcriptional modulator, the aim of this study was to investigate its effect on brain gene expression profiles. METHODS: Swine were subjected to controlled TBI and HS (40% blood volume), kept in shock for 2 hours, and resuscitated with HEX or HEX + VPA (n = 5...... per group). Following 6 hours of observation, brain RNA was isolated, and gene expression profiles were measured using a Porcine Gene ST 1.1 microarray (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Pathway analysis was done using network analysis tools Gene Ontology, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and Parametric Gene...

  6. 脑控:基于脑-机接口的人机融合控制%Brain Control: Human-computer Integration Control Based on Brain-computer Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王行愚; 金晶; 张宇; 王蓓

    2013-01-01

    近年来,一类被称之为脑控的新型控制系统发展迅速,这是一种基于脑-机接口(Brain-computer interface,BCI)的人机融合控制系统,也是一种基于人的意念和思维的控制系统.脑控系统己被成功应用于残疾人的生活辅助、中风病人和损伤肢体的康复训练、操作员状态的实时监控、游戏娱乐和智能家居等广泛的领域.本文在简要介绍了脑控的研究背景、基本原理、系统结构和发展概况的基础上,着重对脑电信号(Electroencephalogram,EEG)模式、控制信号转换算法和应用系统研究等主要问题的研究现状,进行了较为详细的论述和分析,并探讨了进一步研究的方向和思路.最后对脑控的未来发展方向和应用前景进行了分析和展望.%Recently, a new system called brain control system has been developed rapidly. Brain control system is a human-computer integration control system based on brain-computer interface (BCI), which relies on human's ideas and thinking. Brain control system has been successfully applied in wide fields, assisting disabled patients daily life, training patients with stroke or limb injury, monitoring the status of human operator, as well as entertainment and smart house etc. In this paper, the background, basic principle, system structure and developments are firstly introduced briefly. The current research status focusing on the problems of electroencephalogram (EEG) signal pattern, control signal transfer algorithm and system application is summarized and analyzed in detail. The further research direction and thoughts are discussed. Finally, the future development of brain control is analyzed and prospects are given.

  7. THE HAMILTONIAN STRUCTURE OF TWO INTEGRABLE EXPANDING MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Bin; Dong Huanhe; Li Zhu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,an extended loop algebra is constructed from which an isospectral problem established.It follows that the integrable couplings of the Tu hierarchy and M-AKNS-KN hierarchy are obtained.and their Hamilton structures are presented by the quadratic-form identity.Moreover,we guarantee that the expanding model we obtained are also Liouville integrable.

  8. Integration of Management Systems: A Process Based Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The paper discusses the barriers of integration of management systems (IMS). A model based on process is explored. It is indicated that integrating management systems should not ignore the characteristics of the management systems, especially scope issues. IMS needs to take into the continuous improvement.

  9. PT-symmetry in quasi-integrable models

    CERN Document Server

    Assis, P E G

    2015-01-01

    We reinforce the observations of almost stable scattering in nonintegrable models and show that $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry can be used as a guiding principle to select relevant systems also when it comes to integrability properties. We show that the presence of unbroken $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetry in classical field theories produces quasi-integrable excitations with asymptotically conserved charges.

  10. Applying Model Checking to Generate Model-Based Integration Tests from Choreography Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Kozyura, Vitaly; Roth, Andreas; Leuschel, Michael; Bendisposto, Jens; Plagge, Daniel; Schieferdecker, Ina

    Choreography models describe the communication protocols between services. Testing of service choreographies is an important task for the quality assurance of service-based systems as used e.g. in the context of service-oriented architectures (SOA). The formal modeling of service choreographies enables a model-based integration testing (MBIT) approach. We present MBIT methods for our service choreography modeling approach called Message Choreography Models (MCM). For the model-based testing of service choreographies, MCMs are translated into Event-B models and used as input for our test generator which uses the model checker ProB.

  11. Fractionally Integrated Models With ARCH Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, Michael A.; Kunst, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: We introduce ARFIMA-ARCH models which simultaneously incorporate fractional differencing and conditional heteroskedasticity. We develop the likelihood function and a numerical estimation procedure for this model class. Two ARCH models - Engle- and Weiss-type - are explicitly treated and stationarity conditions are derived. Finite-sample properties of the estimation procedure are explored by Monte Carlo simulation. An application to the Standard & Poor 500 Index indicates existence o...

  12. The mathematics of cancer: integrating quantitative models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrock, Philipp M; Liu, Lin L; Michor, Franziska

    2015-12-01

    Mathematical modelling approaches have become increasingly abundant in cancer research. The complexity of cancer is well suited to quantitative approaches as it provides challenges and opportunities for new developments. In turn, mathematical modelling contributes to cancer research by helping to elucidate mechanisms and by providing quantitative predictions that can be validated. The recent expansion of quantitative models addresses many questions regarding tumour initiation, progression and metastases as well as intra-tumour heterogeneity, treatment responses and resistance. Mathematical models can complement experimental and clinical studies, but also challenge current paradigms, redefine our understanding of mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and shape future research in cancer biology.

  13. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems: a longitudinal database, research, collaboration and knowledge translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, F M; Malec, J F

    2010-12-01

    In 1988, the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) launched the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) program, creating the longest and largest longitudinal database on individuals with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) available today. In addition to sustaining the longitudinal database, centers that successfully compete to be part of the TBIMS centers are also expected to complete local and collaborative research projects to further scientific knowledge about TBI. The research has focused on areas of the NIDRR Long Range Plan which emphasizes employment, health and function, technology for access and function, independent living and community integration, and other associated disability research areas. Centers compete for funded participation in the TBIMS on a 5-year cycle. Dissemination of scientific knowledge gained through the TBIMS is the responsibility of both individual centers and the TBIMS as a whole. This is accomplished through multiple venues that target a broad audience of those who need to receive the information and learn how to best apply it to practice. The sites produce many useful websites, manuals, publications and other materials to accomplish this translation of knowledge to practice.

  14. Integration of chemotherapy into current treatment strategies for brain metastases from solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamm Reinhard

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patients with brain metastases represent a heterogeneous group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. Eventually, a considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. Whole-brain radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has recently gained increasing attention and is hoped to augment the palliative effect of whole-brain radiotherapy alone and to extend survival in certain subsets of patients with controlled extracranial disease and good performance status. The randomized trials of whole-brain radiotherapy vs. whole-brain radiotherapy plus chemotherapy suggest that this concept deserves further study, although they failed to improve survival. However, survival might not be the most relevant endpoint in a condition, where most patients die from extracranial progression. Sometimes, the question arises whether patients with newly detected brain metastases and the indication for systemic treatment of extracranial disease can undergo standard systemic chemotherapy with the option of deferred rather than immediate radiotherapy to the brain. The literature contains numerous small reports on this issue, mainly in malignant melanoma, breast cancer, lung cancer and ovarian cancer, but very few sufficiently powered randomized trials. With chemotherapy alone, response rates were mostly in the order of 20–40%. The choice of chemotherapy regimen is often complicated by previous systemic treatment and takes into account the activity of the drugs in extracranial metastatic disease. Because the blood-brain barrier is partially disrupted in most macroscopic metastases, systemically administered agents can gain access to such tumor sites. Our systematic literature review suggests that both chemotherapy and radiochemotherapy for newly diagnosed brain metastases need further critical evaluation before standard clinical

  15. An integrated model for supplier selection process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In today's highly competitive manufacturing environment, the supplier selection process becomes one of crucial activities in supply chain management. In order to select the best supplier(s) it is not only necessary to continuously tracking and benchmarking performance of suppliers but also to make a tradeoff between tangible and intangible factors some of which may conflict. In this paper an integration of case-based reasoning (CBR), analytical network process (ANP) and linear programming (LP) is proposed to solve the supplier selection problem.

  16. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94.

  17. Brain networks engaged in audiovisual integration during speech perception revealed by persistent homology-based network filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Heejung; Hahm, Jarang; Lee, Hyekyoung; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-05-01

    The human brain naturally integrates audiovisual information to improve speech perception. However, in noisy environments, understanding speech is difficult and may require much effort. Although the brain network is supposed to be engaged in speech perception, it is unclear how speech-related brain regions are connected during natural bimodal audiovisual or unimodal speech perception with counterpart irrelevant noise. To investigate the topological changes of speech-related brain networks at all possible thresholds, we used a persistent homological framework through hierarchical clustering, such as single linkage distance, to analyze the connected component of the functional network during speech perception using functional magnetic resonance imaging. For speech perception, bimodal (audio-visual speech cue) or unimodal speech cues with counterpart irrelevant noise (auditory white-noise or visual gum-chewing) were delivered to 15 subjects. In terms of positive relationship, similar connected components were observed in bimodal and unimodal speech conditions during filtration. However, during speech perception by congruent audiovisual stimuli, the tighter couplings of left anterior temporal gyrus-anterior insula component and right premotor-visual components were observed than auditory or visual speech cue conditions, respectively. Interestingly, visual speech is perceived under white noise by tight negative coupling in the left inferior frontal region-right anterior cingulate, left anterior insula, and bilateral visual regions, including right middle temporal gyrus, right fusiform components. In conclusion, the speech brain network is tightly positively or negatively connected, and can reflect efficient or effortful processes during natural audiovisual integration or lip-reading, respectively, in speech perception.

  18. Development of the Integrated Communication Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hua-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Human communication is a critical issue in personal life. It also should be the indispensable core element of general education curriculum in universities and colleges. Based on literature analysis and the author's clinical observation, the importance of human communication, functions of model, and often seen human communication models were…

  19. Integrability and Quantum Phase Transitions in Interacting Boson Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dukelsky, J; García-Ramos, J E; Pittel, S

    2003-01-01

    The exact solution of the boson pairing hamiltonian given by Richardson in the sixties is used to study the phenomena of level crossings and quantum phase transitions in the integrable regions of the sd and sdg interacting boson models.

  20. Integrated Main Propulsion System Performance Reconstruction Process/Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Eduardo; Elliott, Katie; Snell, Steven; Evans, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Main Propulsion System (MPS) Performance Reconstruction process provides the MPS post-flight data files needed for postflight reporting to the project integration management and key customers to verify flight performance. This process/model was used as the baseline for the currently ongoing Space Launch System (SLS) work. The process utilizes several methodologies, including multiple software programs, to model integrated propulsion system performance through space shuttle ascent. It is used to evaluate integrated propulsion systems, including propellant tanks, feed systems, rocket engine, and pressurization systems performance throughout ascent based on flight pressure and temperature data. The latest revision incorporates new methods based on main engine power balance model updates to model higher mixture ratio operation at lower engine power levels.

  1. Integrated Visualization Environment for Science Mission Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is emphasizing the use of larger, more integrated models in conjunction with systems engineering tools and decision support systems. These tools place a...

  2. Integrated Krill Model WG-SAM-14/20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The integrated modeling framework for Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) has been extended to include estimates of krill growth consistent with survey data and to...

  3. An Integrated Approach to Flexible Modelling and Animated Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shuliang; Wu Zhenye

    1994-01-01

    Based on the software support of SIMAN/CINEMA, this paper presents an integrated approach to flexible modelling and simulation with animation. The methodology provides a structured way of integrating mathematical and logical model, statistical experinentation, and statistical analysis with computer animation. Within this methodology, an animated simulation study is separated into six different activities: simulation objectives identification , system model development, simulation experiment specification, animation layout construction, real-time simulation and animation run, and output data analysis. These six activities are objectives driven, relatively independent, and integrate through software organization and simulation files. The key ideas behind this methodology are objectives orientation, modelling flexibility,simulation and animation integration, and application tailorability. Though the methodology is closely related to SIMAN/CINEMA, it can be extended to other software environments.

  4. Assessing multifunctional innovation adoption via an integrative model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sääksjärvi, M.; Samiee, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes and tests an integrative model that incorporates the mental resources framework (MOA: motivation, opportunity, and ability) alongside traditional innovation adoption predictors for assessing the adoption of dual-functionality innovations (DFI), a special case of multifunctional i

  5. An Integrated Model of Information Literacy, Based upon Domain Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary B.; Lathey, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Grounded in Alexander's model of domain learning, this study presents an integrated micro-model of information literacy. It is predicated upon the central importance of domain learning for the development of the requisite research skills by students. Method. The authors reviewed previous models of information literacy and…

  6. Toward Integration: An Instructional Model of Science and Academic Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cecilia; Weinburgh, Molly; Malloy, Robert; Smith, Kathy Horak; Marshall, Jenesta Nettles

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors outline an instructional model that can be used to optimize science and language learning in the classroom. The authors have developed the 5R instructional model (Weinburgh & Silva, 2010) to support teachers as they integrate academic language into content instruction. The model combines five strategies already…

  7. EnergyPlus Air Source Integrated Heat Pump Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; Adams, Mark B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division; New, Joshua Ryan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Energy and Transportation Science Division

    2016-03-30

    This report summarizes the development of the EnergyPlus air-source integrated heat pump model. It introduces its physics, sub-models, working modes, and control logic. In addition, inputs and outputs of the new model are described, and input data file (IDF) examples are given.

  8. T helper 17 cells may drive neuroprogression in major depressive disorder: Proposal of an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slyepchenko, Anastasiya; Maes, Michael; Köhler, Cristiano A; Anderson, George; Quevedo, João; Alves, Gilberto S; Berk, Michael; Fernandes, Brisa S; Carvalho, André F

    2016-05-01

    The exact pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) remains elusive. The monoamine theory, which hypothesizes that MDD emerges as a result of dysfunctional serotonergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic pathways, has guided the therapy of this illness for several decades. More recently, the involvement of activated immune, oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways and of decreased levels of neurotrophic factors has provided emerging insights regarding the pathophysiology of MDD, leading to integrated theories emphasizing the complex interplay of these mechanisms that could lead to neuroprogression. In this review, we propose an integrative model suggesting that T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of MDD through (i) microglial activation, (ii) interactions with oxidative and nitrosative stress, (iii) increases of autoantibody production and the propensity for autoimmunity, (iv) disruption of the blood-brain barrier, and (v) dysregulation of the gut mucosa and microbiota. The clinical and research implications of this model are discussed.

  9. Integrative strategies to identify candidate genes in rodent models of human alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Julie A

    2006-01-01

    The search for genes underlying alcohol-related behaviours in rodent models of human alcoholism has been ongoing for many years with only limited success. Recently, new strategies that integrate several of the traditional approaches have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying ethanol's actions in the brain. We have used alcohol-preferring C57BL/6J (B6) and alcohol-avoiding DBA/2J (D2) genetic strains of mice in an integrative strategy combining high-throughput gene expression screening, genetic segregation analysis, and mapping to previously published quantitative trait loci to uncover candidate genes for the ethanol-preference phenotype. In our study, 2 genes, retinaldehyde binding protein 1 (Rlbp1) and syntaxin 12 (Stx12), were found to be strong candidates for ethanol preference. Such experimental approaches have the power and the potential to greatly speed up the laborious process of identifying candidate genes for the animal models of human alcoholism.

  10. Subacute administration of fluoxetine prevents short-term brain hypometabolism and reduces brain damage markers induced by the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiha, Ahmed Anis; de Cristóbal, Javier; Delgado, Mercedes; Fernández de la Rosa, Rubén; Bascuñana, Pablo; Pozo, Miguel A; García-García, Luis

    2015-02-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) in epileptogenesis still remains controversial. In this regard, it has been reported that serotonergic drugs can alter epileptogenesis in opposite ways. The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the selective 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine administered subacutely (10mg/kg/day×7 days) on the eventual metabolic impairment induced by the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy in rats. In vivo 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose ([(18)F] FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) was performed to assess the brain glucose metabolic activity on days 3 and 30 after the insult. In addition, at the end of the experiment (day 33), several histochemical and neurochemical assessments were performed for checking the neuronal functioning and integrity. Three days after the insult, a marked reduction of [(18)F] FDG uptake (about 30% according to the brain region) was found in all brain areas studied. When evaluated on day 30, although a hypometabolism tendency was observed, no statistically significant reduction was present in any region analyzed. In addition, lithium-pilocarpine administration was associated with medium-term hippocampal and cortical damage, since it induced neurodegeneration, glial activation and augmented caspase-9 expression. Regarding the effect of fluoxetine, subacute treatment with this SSRI did not significantly reduce the mortality rate observed after pilocarpine-induced seizures. However, fluoxetine did prevent not only the short-term metabolic impairment, but also the aforementioned signs of neuronal damage in surviving animals to lithium-pilocarpine protocol. Finally, fluoxetine increased the density of GABAA receptor both at the level of the dentate gyrus and CA1-CA2 regions in pilocarpine-treated animals. Overall, our data suggest a protective role for fluoxetine against pilocarpine-induced brain damage. Moreover, this action may be associated with an increase of

  11. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01-0.03 min-1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20-60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration.

  12. An integral representation of functions in gas-kinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perepelitsa, Misha

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the theory of kinetic models in gas dynamics, we obtain an integral representation of lower semicontinuous functions on {{{R}}^d,} {d≥1}. We use the representation to study the problem of compactness of a family of the solutions of the discrete time BGK model for the compressible Euler equations. We determine sufficient conditions for strong compactness of moments of kinetic densities, in terms of the measures from their integral representations.

  13. Hidden Markov Model Based Automated Fault Localization for Integration Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Ning; NAKAJIMA, SHIN; Pantel, Marc

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Integration testing is an expensive activity in software testing, especially for fault localization in complex systems. Model-based diagnosis (MBD) provides various benefits in terms of scalability and robustness. In this work, we propose a novel MBD approach for the automated fault localization in integration testing. Our method is based on Hidden Markov Model (HMM) which is an abstraction of system's component to simulate component's behaviour. The core of this metho...

  14. Peculiarities of designing Holistic Electronic Government Services Integration Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tadas Limba

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – the aim ok this paper is to develop a Holistic Electronic Government Services Integration Model which could ensure the efficient integration of electronic government services in the local self-government level. Methodology - the following analyses have been carried out in thirkpaper: theoretical-systematic; normative and conceptual comparative analysis of the researcha A method of modeling has also been applied. Finding – the scientific work analyzes the improvement opportunities of...

  15. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; He, Biyu J; Hagmann, Patric; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-08-01

    How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  16. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Ponce-Alvarez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals decrease in the task-driven activity. Here we examined the dynamics of a large-scale model of the human cortex to provide a mechanistic understanding of these observations. The model allows computing the statistics of synaptic activity in the spontaneous condition and in putative tasks determined by external inputs to a given subset of brain regions. We demonstrated that external inputs decrease the variance, increase the covariances, and decrease the autocovariance of synaptic activity as a consequence of single node and large-scale network dynamics. Altogether, these changes in network statistics imply a reduction of entropy, meaning that the spontaneous synaptic activity outlines a larger multidimensional activity space than does the task-driven activity. We tested this model's prediction on fMRI signals from healthy humans acquired during rest and task conditions and found a significant decrease of entropy in the stimulus-driven activity. Altogether, our study proposes a mechanism for increasing the information capacity of brain networks by enlarging the volume of possible activity configurations at rest and reliably settling into a confined stimulus-driven state to allow better transmission of stimulus-related information.

  17. Development and Integration of Control System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young K.

    1998-01-01

    The computer simulation tool, TREETOPS, has been upgraded and used at NASA/MSFC to model various complicated mechanical systems and to perform their dynamics and control analysis with pointing control systems. A TREETOPS model of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-1) dynamics and control system was developed to evaluate the AXAF-I pointing performance for Normal Pointing Mode. An optical model of Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) was also developed and its optical performance analysis was done using the MACOS software.

  18. Modeling of Amperometric Immunosensor for CMOS Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ce Li; Haigang Yang; Shanhong Xia; Chao Bian

    2006-01-01

    A circuit model of the Amperometric immunosensor for use in the biosensor system-on-chip simulation is proposed in this paper. The model parameters are extracted with several methods and verified by MATLAB and SPICE simulation. A CMOS potentiostat circuit required for conditioning the Amperometric immunosensor is also included in the circuit model. The mean square error norm of the simulated curve against the measured one is 8.65 × 10-17. The whole circuit has been fabricated in a 0.35am CMOS process.

  19. Integrated thermodynamic model for ignition target performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Springer P.T.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have derived a 3-dimensional synthetic model for NIF implosion conditions, by predicting and optimizing fits to a broad set of x-ray and nuclear diagnostics obtained on each shot. By matching x-ray images, burn width, neutron time-of-flight ion temperature, yield, and fuel ρr, we obtain nearly unique constraints on conditions in the hotspot and fuel in a model that is entirely consistent with the observables. This model allows us to determine hotspot density, pressure, areal density (ρr, total energy, and other ignition-relevant parameters not available from any single diagnostic. This article describes the model and its application to National Ignition Facility (NIF tritium–hydrogen–deuterium (THD and DT implosion data, and provides an explanation for the large yield and ρr degradation compared to numerical code predictions.

  20. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...... in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding...

  1. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  2. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Hollow Cone Spray Characterization and Integral Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bollweg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The thesis presents a computationally efficient spray model for hollow cone sprays suitable for engine system simulation of direct injecting gasoline internal combustion engines. The model describes the transient evolution of the spray as a two-phase jet. Spatial gradients are resolved along the main injection direction. Momentum exchange, droplet heat-up, and fuel evaporation are accounted for. Diffusive transport of momentum, energy, and fuel species mass between the dense spray zone an...

  4. Integrated Model for the Acoustics of Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the solid material. This model has been associated with seismic wave propagation in essentially dry soil. A second loss mechanism in fluid-saturated...multiple scattering (MS). [The left panel shows wave attenuations as functions of frequency with measured and modeled data points. The right panels...acoustic interaction with the ocean floor including penetration, reflection and scattering in support of MCM and ASW needs. OBJECTIVES The

  5. Integrated Model for the Acoustics of Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ocean sediments. HFEVA is based on the model found in the APL-UW handbook number 9407 [12]. Progress was achieved through the representation of the frame...This is the "swiss cheese " approximation, in which the frame bulk and shear moduli are essentially that of the solid material but diluted by the pores...High-Frequency Ocean Environmental Acoustic Models Handbook ," Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, U.S. APL-UW 9407, (1994). 13. N. P

  6. { P }{ T } symmetry in quasi-integrable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, P. E. G.

    2016-06-01

    Observations of almost stable scattering in nonintegrable models have been reinforced and a framework is proposed to describe quasi-integrability in terms of { P }{ T } symmetry. This new mechanism can be used to regard { P }{ T } symmetry in classical field theories as a guiding principle to also select relevant systems when it comes to integrability properties. It turns out that the if a deformed Lax pair is invariant under this symmetry, corresponding to the unbroken { P }{ T }-symmetric regime, quasi-integrable excitations are produced with asymptotically conserved charges. A generic nonlinear field equation is used in order to verify the validity of the assumptions but results for a specific non-integrable class of models are also presented. A set of quasi-integrable excitations is investigated and shown to have spectral functions with appropriate properties, which might lead to the determination of the almost conserved charges.

  7. Microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of a mouse model of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Evans

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Short-term increases in oxidative stress and decreases in motor function, including debilitating effects on balance and motor control, can occur following primary mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI. However, the long-term effects on motor unit impairment and integrity as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying secondary injuries are poorly understood. We hypothesized that changes in central nervous system-specific protein (CSP expression might correlate to these long-term effects. To test our hypothesis, we longitudinally assessed a closed-skull mTBI mouse model, vs. sham control, at 1, 7, 30, and 120 days post-injury. Motor impairment was determined by rotarod and grip strength performance measures, while motor unit integrity was determined using electromyography. Relative protein expression was determined by microwave and magnetic (M2 proteomics of ipsilateral brain tissue, as previously described. Isoprostane measurements were performed to confirm a primary oxidative stress response. Decoding the relative expression of 476 ± 56 top-ranked proteins for each specimen revealed statistically significant changes in the expression of two well-known CSPs at 1, 7 and 30 days post-injury: P < 0.001 for myelin basic protein (MBP and p < 0.05 for myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG. This was confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, MAG, αII-spectrin (SPNA2 and neurofilament light (NEFL expression at 30 days post-injury were directly related to grip strength (p < 0.05. While higher-powered studies of larger cohorts merit further investigation, this study supports the proof-of-concept that M2 proteomics is a rapid method to quantify putative protein biomarkers and therapeutic targets of mTBI and suggests the feasibility of CSP expression correlations to long-term effects on motor impairment.

  8. A mathematical model to elucidate brain tumor abrogation by immunotherapy with T11 target structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Banerjee

    Full Text Available T11 Target structure (T11TS, a membrane glycoprotein isolated from sheep erythrocytes, reverses the immune suppressed state of brain tumor induced animals by boosting the functional status of the immune cells. This study aims at aiding in the design of more efficacious brain tumor therapies with T11 target structure. We propose a mathematical model for brain tumor (glioma and the immune system interactions, which aims in designing efficacious brain tumor therapy. The model encompasses considerations of the interactive dynamics of glioma cells, macrophages, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CD8(+ T-cells, TGF-β, IFN-γ and the T11TS. The system undergoes sensitivity analysis, that determines which state variables are sensitive to the given parameters and the parameters are estimated from the published data. Computer simulations were used for model verification and validation, which highlight the importance of T11 target structure in brain tumor therapy.

  9. Modeling the effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation at the biophysical, network, and cognitive Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Bergmann, Til Ole; Herz, Damian Marc

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) is widely used to elucidate the contribution of different brain regions to various cognitive functions. Here we present three modeling approaches that are informed by functional or structural brain mapping or behavior profiling and discuss how...... these approaches advance the scientific potential of NTBS as an interventional tool in cognitive neuroscience. (i) Leveraging the anatomical information provided by structural imaging, the electric field distribution in the brain can be modeled and simulated. Biophysical modeling approaches generate testable...... predictions regarding the impact of interindividual variations in cortical anatomy on the injected electric fields or the influence of the orientation of current flow on the physiological stimulation effects. (ii) Functional brain mapping of the spatiotemporal neural dynamics during cognitive tasks can...

  10. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    rats induces structural changes in brain regions associated with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and...to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine pretreatment. A

  11. Revisiting hydrocephalus as a model to study brain resilience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Fernandes De Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocephalus is an entity which embraces a variety of diseases whose final result is the enlarged size of cerebral ventricular system, partially or completely. The physiopathology of hydrocephalus lies in the dynamics of circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The consequent CSF stasis in hydrocephalus interferes with cerebral and ventricular system development. Children and adults who sustain congenital or acquired brain injury typically experience a diffuse insult that impacts many areas of the brain. Development and recovery after such injuries reflects both restoration and reorganization of cognitive functions. Classic examples were already reported in literature. This suggests the presence of biological mechanisms associated with resilient adaptation of brain networks. We will settle a link between the notable modifications to neurophysiology secondary to hydrocephalus and the ability of neuronal tissue to reassume and reorganize its functions.Key words: hydrocephalus; resilience; brain; neural networks; plasticity.

  12. Oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation as an in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury model for studying blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alluri, Himakarnika; Anasooya Shaji, Chinchusha; Davis, Matthew L; Tharakan, Binu

    2015-05-07

    Ischemia-Reperfusion (IR) injury is known to contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality associated with ischemic strokes. Ischemic cerebrovascular accidents account for 80% of all strokes. A common cause of IR injury is the rapid inflow of fluids following an acute/chronic occlusion of blood, nutrients, oxygen to the tissue triggering the formation of free radicals. Ischemic stroke is followed by blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and vasogenic brain edema. Structurally, tight junctions (TJs) between the endothelial cells play an important role in maintaining the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). IR injury is an early secondary injury leading to a non-specific, inflammatory response. Oxidative and metabolic stress following inflammation triggers secondary brain damage including BBB permeability and disruption of tight junction (TJ) integrity. Our protocol presents an in vitro example of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD-R) on rat brain endothelial cell TJ integrity and stress fiber formation. Currently, several experimental in vivo models are used to study the effects of IR injury; however they have several limitations, such as the technical challenges in performing surgeries, gene dependent molecular influences and difficulty in studying mechanistic relationships. However, in vitro models may aid in overcoming many of those limitations. The presented protocol can be used to study the various molecular mechanisms and mechanistic relationships to provide potential therapeutic strategies. However, the results of in vitro studies may differ from standard in vivo studies and should be interpreted with caution.

  13. Bio-electromagnetic model of deep brain stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Walckiers, Grégoire

    2009-01-01

    Functional stimulation is one of the most fascinating applications of bioelectromagnetism. It deals with the stimulation of excitable biological tissues by electromagnetic fields. One of its most impressive medical applications is the subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (DBS). It consists in the insertion of an electrode into the deep brain, delivering electric pulses to treat Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. But despite its wide use throughout the world for almost twe...

  14. Improving brain computer interface research through user involvement - The transformative potential of integrating civil society organisations in research projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakunuma, Kutoma; Rainey, Stephen; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research on Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) often aims to provide solutions for vulnerable populations, such as individuals with diseases, conditions or disabilities that keep them from using traditional interfaces. Such research thereby contributes to the public good. This contribution to the public good corresponds to a broader drive of research and funding policy that focuses on promoting beneficial societal impact. One way of achieving this is to engage with the public. In practical terms this can be done by integrating civil society organisations (CSOs) in research. The open question at the heart of this paper is whether and how such CSO integration can transform the research and contribute to the public good. To answer this question the paper describes five detailed qualitative case studies of research projects including CSOs. The paper finds that transformative impact of CSO integration is possible but by no means assured. It provides recommendations on how transformative impact can be promoted. PMID:28207882

  15. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Assess Functional Connectivity in the Brain: Power and Sample Size Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios; Simos, Panagiotis; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Fletcher, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of sample size on the power and fit of structural equation modeling applied to functional brain connectivity hypotheses. The data consisted of time-constrained minimum norm estimates of regional brain activity during performance of a reading task obtained with magnetoencephalography. Power analysis was first…

  16. Characterization of a novel brain barrier ex vivo insect-based P-glycoprotein screening model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, O.; Badisco, L.; Hansen, A. H.;

    2014-01-01

    In earlier studies insects were proposed as suitable models for vertebrate blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability prediction and useful in early drug discovery. Here we provide transcriptome and functional data demonstrating the presence of a P-glycoprotein (Pgp) efflux transporter in the brain b...

  17. Development of luciferase tagged brain tumour models in mice for chemotherapy intervention studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, E.M.; Leenders, W.P.J.; Kusters, B.; Lyons, S.; Buckle, T.; Heerschap, A.; Boogerd, W.; Beijnen, J.H.; Tellingen, O.

    2006-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered one of the major causes for the low efficacy of cytotoxic compounds against primary brain tumours. The aim of this study was to develop intracranial tumour models in mice featuring intact or locally disrupted BBB properties, which can be used in testing ch

  18. Arbitrary modeling of TSVs for 3D integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Salah, Khaled; El-Rouby, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a wide-band and technology independent, SPICE-compatible RLC model for through-silicon vias (TSVs) in 3D integrated circuits. This model accounts for a variety of effects, including skin effect, depletion capacitance and nearby contact effects. Readers will benefit from in-depth coverage of concepts and technology such as 3D integration, Macro modeling, dimensional analysis and compact modeling, as well as closed form equations for the through silicon via parasitics. Concepts covered are demonstrated by using TSVs in applications such as a spiral inductor?and inductive-based

  19. Integrability in three dimensions: Algebraic Bethe ansatz for anyonic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Khachatryan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We extend basic properties of two dimensional integrable models within the Algebraic Bethe Ansatz approach to 2+1 dimensions and formulate the sufficient conditions for the commutativity of transfer matrices of different spectral parameters, in analogy with Yang–Baxter or tetrahedron equations. The basic ingredient of our models is the R-matrix, which describes the scattering of a pair of particles over another pair of particles, the quark-anti-quark (meson scattering on another quark-anti-quark state. We show that the Kitaev model belongs to this class of models and its R-matrix fulfills well-defined equations for integrability.

  20. Development of an Integrated Global Energy Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1999-07-08

    The primary objective of this research was to develop a forefront analysis tool for application to enhance understanding of long-term, global, nuclear-energy and nuclear-material futures. To this end, an existing economics-energy-environmental (E{sup 3}) model was adopted, modified, and elaborated to examine this problem in a multi-regional (13), long-term ({approximately}2,100) context. The E{sup 3} model so developed was applied to create a Los Alamos presence in this E{sup 3} area through ''niche analyses'' that provide input to the formulation of policies dealing with and shaping of nuclear-energy and nuclear-materials futures. Results from analyses using the E{sup 3} model have been presented at a variety of national and international conferences and workshops. Through use of the E{sup 3} model Los Alamos was afforded the opportunity to participate in a multi-national E{sup 3} study team that is examining a range of global, long-term nuclear issues under the auspices of the IAEA during the 1998-99 period . Finally, the E{sup 3} model developed under this LDRD project is being used as an important component in more recent Nuclear Material Management Systems (NMMS) project.

  1. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following top

  2. Hybrid models for hydrological forecasting: Integration of data-driven and conceptual modelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corzo Perez, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    This book presents the investigation of different architectures of integrating hydrological knowledge and models with data-driven models for the purpose of hydrological flow forecasting. The models resulting from such integration are referred to as hybrid models. The book addresses the following top

  3. Models for efficient integration of solar energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bacher, Peder

    the available flexibility in the system. In the present thesis methods related to operation of solar energy systems and for optimal energy use in buildings are presented. Two approaches for forecasting of solar power based on numerical weather predictions (NWPs) are presented, they are applied to forecast...... the power output from PV and solar thermal collector systems. The first approach is based on a developed statistical clear-sky model, which is used for estimating the clear-sky output solely based on observations of the output. This enables local effects such as shading from trees to be taken into account....... The second approach to solar power forecasting is based on conditional parametric modelling. It is well suited for forecasting of solar thermal power, since is it can be make non-linear in the inputs. The approach is also extended to a probabilistic solar power forecasting model. The statistical clear...

  4. Integrated model of a composite propellant rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The combustion of composite solid propellants was investigated and an available numerical model was improved for taking into account the change of pressure, when the process occurs in a confined environment, as inside a rocket. The pressure increase upon ignition is correctly described by the improved model for both sandwich and dispersed particles propellants. In the latter case, self-induced fluctuations in the pressure and in all other computed variables occur, as consequence of the periodic rise and depletion of oxidizer particles from the binder matrix. The comparison with the results of the constant pressure model shows a different fluctuating profile of gas velocity, with a possible second order effect induced by the pressure fluctuations.

  5. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology.

  6. Integrating interactive computational modeling in biology curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Cutucache, Christine E; Dahlquist, Lauren M; Herek, Tyler A; Larson, Joshua J; Rogers, Jim A

    2015-03-01

    While the use of computer tools to simulate complex processes such as computer circuits is normal practice in fields like engineering, the majority of life sciences/biological sciences courses continue to rely on the traditional textbook and memorization approach. To address this issue, we explored the use of the Cell Collective platform as a novel, interactive, and evolving pedagogical tool to foster student engagement, creativity, and higher-level thinking. Cell Collective is a Web-based platform used to create and simulate dynamical models of various biological processes. Students can create models of cells, diseases, or pathways themselves or explore existing models. This technology was implemented in both undergraduate and graduate courses as a pilot study to determine the feasibility of such software at the university level. First, a new (In Silico Biology) class was developed to enable students to learn biology by "building and breaking it" via computer models and their simulations. This class and technology also provide a non-intimidating way to incorporate mathematical and computational concepts into a class with students who have a limited mathematical background. Second, we used the technology to mediate the use of simulations and modeling modules as a learning tool for traditional biological concepts, such as T cell differentiation or cell cycle regulation, in existing biology courses. Results of this pilot application suggest that there is promise in the use of computational modeling and software tools such as Cell Collective to provide new teaching methods in biology and contribute to the implementation of the "Vision and Change" call to action in undergraduate biology education by providing a hands-on approach to biology.

  7. Computational model of an infant brain subjected to periodic motion simplified modelling and Bayesian sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterbee, D C; Sims, N D; Becker, W; Worden, K; Rowson, J

    2011-11-01

    Non-accidental head injury in infants, or shaken baby syndrome, is a highly controversial and disputed topic. Biomechanical studies often suggest that shaking alone cannot cause the classical symptoms, yet many medical experts believe the contrary. Researchers have turned to finite element modelling for a more detailed understanding of the interactions between the brain, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and surrounding tissues. However, the uncertainties in such models are significant; these can arise from theoretical approximations, lack of information, and inherent variability. Consequently, this study presents an uncertainty analysis of a finite element model of a human head subject to shaking. Although the model geometry was greatly simplified, fluid-structure-interaction techniques were used to model the brain, skull, and CSF using a Eulerian mesh formulation with penalty-based coupling. Uncertainty and sensitivity measurements were obtained using Bayesian sensitivity analysis, which is a technique that is relatively new to the engineering community. Uncertainty in nine different model parameters was investigated for two different shaking excitations: sinusoidal translation only, and sinusoidal translation plus rotation about the base of the head. The level and type of sensitivity in the results was found to be highly dependent on the excitation type.

  8. Model choice considerations and information integration using analytical hierarchy process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booker, Jane M [BOOKER SCIENTIFIC; Ross, Timothy J. [UNM

    2010-10-15

    Using the theory of information-gap for decision-making under severe uncertainty, it has been shown that model output compared to experimental data contains irrevocable trade-offs between fidelity-to-data, robustness-to-uncertainty and confidence-in-prediction. We illustrate a strategy for information integration by gathering and aggregating all available data, knowledge, theory, experience, similar applications. Such integration of information becomes important when the physics is difficult to model, when observational data are sparse or difficult to measure, or both. To aggregate the available information, we take an inference perspective. Models are not rejected, nor wasted, but can be integrated into a final result. We show an example of information integration using Saaty's Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP), integrating theory, simulation output and experimental data. We used expert elicitation to determine weights for two models and two experimental data sets, by forming pair-wise comparisons between model output and experimental data. In this way we transform epistemic and/or statistical strength from one field of study into another branch of physical application. The price to pay for utilizing all available knowledge is that inferences drawn for the integrated information must be accounted for and the costs can be considerable. Focusing on inferences and inference uncertainty (IU) is one way to understand complex information.

  9. Climbing the ladder: capability maturity model integration level 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Bryce; Lutteroth, Christof

    2011-02-01

    This article details the attempt to form a complete workflow model for an information and communication technologies (ICT) company in order to achieve a capability maturity model integration (CMMI) maturity rating of 3. During this project, business processes across the company's core and auxiliary sectors were documented and extended using modern enterprise modelling tools and a The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF) methodology. Different challenges were encountered with regard to process customisation and tool support for enterprise modelling. In particular, there were problems with the reuse of process models, the integration of different project management methodologies and the integration of the Rational Unified Process development process framework that had to be solved. We report on these challenges and the perceived effects of the project on the company. Finally, we point out research directions that could help to improve the situation in the future.

  10. System Dynamics Model for VMI&TPL Integrated Supply Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes VMI-APIOBPCS II model by extending VMI-APIOBPCS model from serial supply chain to distribution supply chain. Then TPL is introduced to this VMI distribution supply chain, and operational framework and process of VMI&TPL integrated supply chain are analyzed deeply. On this basis VMI-APIOBPCS II model is then changed to VMI&TPL-APIOBPCS model and VMI&TPL integrated operation mode is simulated. Finally, compared with VMI-APIOBPCS model, the TPL’s important role of goods consolidation and risk sharing in VMI&TPL integrated supply chain is analyzed in detail from the aspects of bullwhip effect, inventory level, service level, and so on.

  11. A depth integrated model for suspended transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galappatti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A new depth averaged model for suspended sediment transport in open channels has been developed based on an asymptotic solution to the two dimensional convection-diffusion equation in the vertical plane. The solution for the depth averaged concentration is derived from the bed boundary condition and

  12. An Integrative Model of Internationalization Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin; Gammelgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to critically review the ownership, location and internalization (OLI) model and the Uppsala internationalization process (UIP) framework. We suggest that the inclusion of concepts such as corporate entrepreneurship, host country institutions and regulatory focus in an i...

  13. Integration of Heterogenous Digital Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, R.; Ginzler, C.

    2011-08-01

    The application of extended digital surface models often reveals, that despite an acceptable global accuracy for a given dataset, the local accuracy of the model can vary in a wide range. For high resolution applications which cover the spatial extent of a whole country, this can be a major drawback. Within the Swiss National Forest Inventory (NFI), two digital surface models are available, one derived from LiDAR point data and the other from aerial images. Automatic photogrammetric image matching with ADS80 aerial infrared images with 25cm and 50cm resolution is used to generate a surface model (ADS-DSM) with 1m resolution covering whole switzerland (approx. 41000 km2). The spatially corresponding LiDAR dataset has a global point density of 0.5 points per m2 and is mainly used in applications as interpolated grid with 2m resolution (LiDAR-DSM). Although both surface models seem to offer a comparable accuracy from a global view, local analysis shows significant differences. Both datasets have been acquired over several years. Concerning LiDAR-DSM, different flight patterns and inconsistent quality control result in a significantly varying point density. The image acquisition of the ADS-DSM is also stretched over several years and the model generation is hampered by clouds, varying illumination and shadow effects. Nevertheless many classification and feature extraction applications requiring high resolution data depend on the local accuracy of the used surface model, therefore precise knowledge of the local data quality is essential. The commercial photogrammetric software NGATE (part of SOCET SET) generates the image based surface model (ADS-DSM) and delivers also a map with figures of merit (FOM) of the matching process for each calculated height pixel. The FOM-map contains matching codes like high slope, excessive shift or low correlation. For the generation of the LiDAR-DSM only first- and last-pulse data was available. Therefore only the point distribution can

  14. Pseudo-Differential Operators and Integrable Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sedra, M B

    2009-01-01

    The importance of the theory of pseudo-differential operators in the study of non linear integrable systems is point out. Principally, the algebra $\\Xi $ of nonlinear (local and nonlocal) differential operators, acting on the ring of analytic functions $u_{s}(x, t)$, is studied. It is shown in particular that this space splits into several classes of subalgebras $\\Sigma_{jr}, j=0,\\pm 1, r=\\pm 1$ completely specified by the quantum numbers: $s$ and $(p,q)$ describing respectively the conformal weight (or spin) and the lowest and highest degrees. The algebra ${\\huge \\Sigma}_{++}$ (and its dual $\\Sigma_{--}$) of local (pure nonlocal) differential operators is important in the sense that it gives rise to the explicit form of the second hamiltonian structure of the KdV system and that we call also the Gelfand-Dickey Poisson bracket. This is explicitly done in several previous studies, see for the moment \\cite{4, 5, 14}. Some results concerning the KdV and Boussinesq hierarchies are derived explicitly.

  15. Ontological Analysis of Integrated Process Models: testing hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosemann

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrated process modeling is achieving prominence in helping to document and manage business administration and IT processes in organizations. The ARIS framework is a popular example for a framework of integrated process modeling not least because it underlies the 800 or more reference models embedded in the world's most popular ERP package, SAP R/3. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of the Bunge-Wand-Weber (BWW representation model for evaluating modeling grammars such as those constituting ARIS. It reports some initial insights gained from pilot testing Green and Rosemann's (2000 evaluative propositions. Even when considering all five views of ARIS, modelers have problems representing business rules, the scope and boundary of systems, and decomposing models. However, even though it is completely ontologically redundant, users still find the function view useful in modeling.

  16. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST.

  17. InterWell: an integrated school-based primary care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The Intergenerational School is an innovative, high-performing public school in Cleveland, Ohio that fosters lifelong learning and individual and community health. Narrative approaches, information technology enhancements, art and music enrichments, and nature-based programming foster brain health in the service of purposeful and healthy living in the community. A newly designed integrated primary and public healthcare model, called InterWell, which is planned to be based in the school, has the potential to transform conceptions and practices of health. Interprofessional care supporting chronic disease self-management and transdisciplinary research are foundational to our model. Over the 13-year history of the school, barriers to acceptance of this model of education and health have been reduced and greater community support engendered, but challenges of priorities and funding remain. Can this new model help support human flourishing in this time of global ecological and social disruption?

  18. Brain slices as models for neurodegenerative disease and screening platforms to identify novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seongeun; Wood, Andrew; Bowlby, Mark R

    2007-03-01

    Recent improvements in brain slice technology have made this biological preparation increasingly useful for examining pathophysiology of brain diseases in a tissue context. Brain slices maintain many aspects of in vivo biology, including functional local synaptic circuitry with preserved brain architecture, while allowing good experimental access and precise control of the extracellular environment, making them ideal platforms for dissection of molecular pathways underlying neuronal dysfunction. Importantly, these ex vivo systems permit direct treatment with pharmacological agents modulating these responses and thus provide surrogate therapeutic screening systems without recourse to whole animal studies. Virus or particle mediated transgenic expression can also be accomplished relatively easily to study the function of novel genes in a normal or injured brain tissue context.In this review we will discuss acute brain injury models in organotypic hippocampal and co-culture systems and the effects of pharmacological modulation on neurodegeneration. The review will also cover the evidence of developmental plasticity in these ex vivo models, demonstrating emergence of injury-stimulated neuronal progenitor cells, and neurite sprouting and axonal regeneration following pathway lesioning. Neuro-and axo-genesis are emerging as significant factors contributing to brain repair following many acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore brain slice models may provide a critical contextual experimental system to explore regenerative mechanisms in vitro.

  19. Multi-modal approach for investigating brain and behavior changes in an animal model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Meghan E; Huang, Wei; Sicard, Kenneth M; Bratane, Bernt T; Sikoglu, Elif M; Zhang, Nanyin; Fisher, Marc; King, Jean A

    2013-06-01

    Use of novel approaches in imaging modalities is needed for enhancing diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes of persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study explored the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with behavioral measures to target dynamic changes in specific neural circuitries in an animal model of TBI. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups (traumatic brain injury/sham operation). TBI rats were subjected to the closed head injury (CHI) model. Any observable motor deficits and cognitive deficits associated with the injury were measured using beam walk and Morris water maze tests, respectively. fMRI was performed to assess the underlying post-traumatic cerebral anatomy and function in acute (24 hours after the injury) and chronic (7 and 21 days after the injury) phases. Beam walk test results detected no significant differences in motor deficits between groups. The Morris water maze test indicated that cognitive deficits persisted for the first week after injury and, to a large extent, resolved thereafter. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis detected initially diminished connectivity between cortical areas involved in cognition for the TBI group; however, the connectivity patterns normalized at 1 week and remained so at the 3 weeks post-injury time point. Taken together, we have demonstrated an objective in vivo marker for mapping functional brain changes correlated with injury-associated cognitive behavior deficits and offer an animal model for testing potential therapeutic interventions options.

  20. Mathematical modeling of the human energy metabolism based on the Selfish Brain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Matthias; Göbel, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Deregulations in the human energy metabolism may cause diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The origins of these pathologies are fairly unknown. The key role of the brain is the regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism. The Selfish Brain Theory identifies the priority of brain energy supply in the competition for available energy resources within the organism. Here, we review mathematical models of the human energy metabolism supporting central aspects of the Selfish Brain Theory. First, we present a dynamical system modeling the whole body energy metabolism. This model takes into account the two central control mechanisms of the brain, i.e., allocation and appetite. Moreover, we present mathematical models of regulatory subsystems. We examine a neuronal model which specifies potential elements of the brain to sense and regulate cerebral energy content. We investigate a model of the HPA system regulating the allocation of energy within the organism. Finally, we present a robust modeling approach of appetite regulation. All models account for a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus do shed light onto defects causing metabolic diseases.

  1. P-glycoprotein Mediated Efflux Limits Substrate and Drug Uptake in a Preclinical Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris E Adkins

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is a specialized vascular interface that restricts the entry of many compounds into brain. This is accomplished through the sealing of vascular endothelial cells together with tight junction proteins to prevent paracellular diffusion. In addition, the BBB has a high degree of expression of numerous efflux transporters which actively extrude compounds back into blood. However, when a metastatic lesion develops in brain the vasculature is typically compromised with increases in passive permeability (blood-tumor barrier; BTB. What is not well documented is to what degree active efflux retains function at the BTB despite the changes observed in passive permeability. In addition, there have been previous reports documenting both increased and decreased expression of P-gp in lesion vasculature. Herein, we simultaneously administer a passive diffusion marker (14C-AIB and a tracer subject to P-gp efflux (rhodamine 123 into a murine preclinical model of brain metastases of breast cancer. We observed that the metastatic lesions had similar expression (p>0.05; n=756-1214 vessels evaluated at the BBB and the BTB. Moreover, tissue distribution of R123 was not significantly (p>0.05 different between normal brain and the metastatic lesion. It is possible that the similar expression of P-gp on the BBB and the BTB contribute to this phenomenon. Additionally we observed P-gp expression at the metastatic cancer cells adjacent to the vasculature which may also contribute to reduced R123 uptake into the lesion. The data suggest that despite the disrupted integrity of the BTB, efflux mechanisms appear to be intact, and may be functionally comparable to the normal BBB. The BTB is a significant hurdle to delivering drugs to brain metastasis.

  2. Brain Based Teaching Model as Transformation of Learning Paradigm in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfani Sesmiarni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain -based teaching model is a new paradigm that can facilitate students in optimizing student learning by the functioning the brain as a whole. Lessons are held today assume that all students equally so that learning provide the same services to each student in the class. With this model, the students are given different stimulation according to their abilities and needs. Base on brain learning theory -based teaching, the learning should pay attention to the five needs of the brain in general. The fifth factor is the need for a sense of comfort, the need for interaction, the need for knowledge, the need for the activity and the need for self-reflection. All these needs will be connected if the lecturers able to present emotional learning, social learning, cognitive learning, physical learning and teaching reflection. Key Word : Instrucetional, Brain Based teaching, Learning.Copyright © 2015 by Al-Ta'lim All right reserved

  3. Trafficking of adeno-associated virus vectors across a model of the blood-brain barrier; a comparative study of transcytosis and transduction using primary human brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Steven F; Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Mu, Dakai; Hudry, Eloise; Hyman, Bradley T; Maguire, Casey A; Ramirez, Servio H

    2017-01-01

    Developing therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases is exceedingly difficult because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Notably, emerging technologies may provide promising new options for the treatment of CNS disorders. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) has been shown to transduce cells in the CNS following intravascular administration in rodents, cats, pigs, and non-human primates. These results suggest that AAV9 is capable of crossing the BBB. However, mechanisms that govern AAV9 transendothelial trafficking at the BBB remain unknown. Furthermore, possibilities that AAV9 may transduce brain endothelial cells or affect BBB integrity still require investigation. Using primary human brain microvascular endothelial cells as a model of the human BBB, we performed transduction and transendothelial trafficking assays comparing AAV9 to AAV2, a serotype that does not cross the BBB or transduce endothelial cells effectively in vivo. Results of our in vitro studies indicate that AAV9 penetrates brain microvascular endothelial cells barriers more effectively than AAV2, but has reduced transduction efficiency. In addition, our data suggest that (i) AAV9 penetrates endothelial barriers through an active, cell-mediated process, and (ii) AAV9 fails to disrupt indicators of BBB integrity such as transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction protein expression/localization, and inflammatory activation status. Overall, this report shows how human brain endothelial cells configured in BBB models can be utilized for evaluating transendothelial movement and transduction kinetics of various AAV capsids. Importantly, the use of a human in vitro BBB model can provide import insight into the possible effects that candidate AVV gene therapy vectors may have on the status of BBB integrity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page 192.

  4. Data assimilation in integrated hydrological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jørn

    are assimilated significant improvements are obtained in both stream flow and groundwater modeling. However, the successfulness of both the state updating and the parameter estimation is conditioned on a sufficiently large ensemble size, as spurious correlations often had a negative impact on the performance...... of the data assimilation algorithm. To reduce the impact of spurious correlation, an adaptive localization method is applied, which significantly improved the performance of the assimilation while reducing the computational requirements. Finally, as observation bias is common in groundwater head observations...

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology and health psychology: an integrative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutgendorf, Susan K; Costanzo, Erin S

    2003-08-01

    The biopsychosocial model describes interactions between psychosocial and biological factors in the etiology and progression of disease. How an individual interprets and responds to the environment determines responses to stress, influences health behaviors, contributes to the neuroendocrine and immune response, and may ultimately affect health outcomes. Health psychology interventions are designed to modulate the stress response and improve health behaviors by teaching individuals more adaptive methods of interpreting life challenges and more effective coping responses. These interactions are discussed in the context of aging.

  6. Discrete holomorphicity and integrability in loop models with open boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    de Gier, Jan; Rasmussen, Jorgen

    2012-01-01

    We consider boundary conditions compatible with discrete holomorphicity for the dilute O(n) and C_2^(1) loop models. In each model, for a general set of boundary plaquettes, multiple types of loops can appear. A generalisation of Smirnov's parafermionic observable is therefore required in order to maintain the discrete holomorphicity property in the bulk. We show that there exist natural boundary conditions for this observable which are consistent with integrability, that is to say that, by imposing certain boundary conditions, we obtain a set of linear equations whose solutions also satisfy the corresponding reflection equation. In both loop models, several new sets of integrable weights are found using this approach.

  7. Modeling of Electric Vehicles (EVs) for EV Grid Integration Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei; Nielsen, Arne Hejde; Østergaard, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    In order to successfully integrate EVs into power systems, it is necessary to develop a detailed EV model considering both the EV users’ driving requirements and the battery charging and discharging characteristics. A generic EV model was proposed which takes into account charging and discharging...

  8. Diagnostic indicators for integrated assessment models of climate policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Petermann, Nils; Krey, Volker; Schwanitz, Valeria Jana; Luderer, Gunnar; Ashina, Shuichi; Bosetti, Valentina; Eom, Jiyong; Kitous, Alban; Méjean, Aurélie; Paroussos, Leonidas; Sano, Fuminori; Turton, Hal; Wilson, Charlie; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated assessments of how climate policy interacts with energy-economy systems can be performed by a variety of models with different functional structures. In order to provide insights into why results differ between models, this article proposes a diagnostic scheme that can be applied to a wid

  9. Invention software support by integrating function and mathematical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chechurin, L.S.; Wits, W.W.; Bakker, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    New idea generation is imperative for successful product innovation and technology development. This paper presents the development of a novel type of invention support software. The support tool integrates both function modeling and mathematical modeling, thereby enabling quantitative analyses on a

  10. INTEGRATED MODEL OF A SOLAR CHIMNEY EQUIPPED WITH AXIAL TURBINES

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    An integrated model of solar chim??ney (solar collector; turbine; tower) is presented; validated against data of the Manzanares plant; extended to the case of a 1000m tower. The model includes off-design performance of collector/turbine.

  11. Integrating Tax Preparation with FAFSA Completion: Three Case Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daun-Barnett, Nathan; Mabry, Beth

    2012-01-01

    This research compares three different models implemented in four cities. The models integrated free tax-preparation services to assist low-income families with their completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). There has been an increased focus on simplifying the FAFSA process. However, simplification is not the only…

  12. Integrated modeling of ozonation for optimization of drinking water treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Helm, A.W.C.

    2007-01-01

    Drinking water treatment plants automation becomes more sophisticated, more on-line monitoring systems become available and integration of modeling environments with control systems becomes easier. This gives possibilities for model-based optimization. In operation of drinking water treatment plants

  13. Teaching Service Modelling to a Mixed Class: An Integrated Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jeremiah D.; Purvis, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Service modelling has become an increasingly important area in today's telecommunications and information systems practice. We have adapted a Network Design course in order to teach service modelling to a mixed class of both the telecommunication engineering and information systems backgrounds. An integrated approach engaging mathematics teaching…

  14. Integrating Environmental Optics into Multidisciplinary, Predictive Models of Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    development has been based on decades of published research, our depth-integrated, spectral model of photosynthesis and the absorption -based model of...color, chlorophyll fluorescence, or spectral absorption coefficients. We extend the approach to include additional biological properties such as...of laboratory experiments in which photosynthesis , fluorescence and optical properties of phytoplankton are measured under a range of conditions

  15. A Model of Teacher Professional Development to Support Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehman, Lee; Bonk, Curt; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the professional development model of Teacher Institute for Curriculum Knowledge about Integration of Technology (TICKIT). This paper will situate the TICKIT model with past findings from professional development research, and provide researchers and practitioners facilitating future programs advice based…

  16. Integrated modelling of Priority Pollutants in stormwater systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vezzaro, Luca; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2012-01-01

    The increasing focus on urban diffuse sources of Priority Pollutants (PPs) has highlighted stormwater as an important contributor to contamination of natural water bodies. This study presents an example of an integrated model developed to be able to quantify PP loads discharged by stormwater...... systems. The integrated model includes three submodels that simulate (a) stormwater pollutant sources in the catchments, (b) runoff quality and quantity and (c) stormwater treatment. These submodels employ all the generic available information that can be retrieved without extensive on-site data...... collection campaigns. Given the general lack of data regarding stormwater PPs and the inherent uncertainty of stormwater quality models, the Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) technique was applied to estimate the results’ uncertainty. The integrated model was used to estimate the total...

  17. Defining Scenarios: Linking Integrated Models, Regional Concerns, and Stakeholders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, H. C.; Stewart, S.; Liu, Y.; Mahmoud, M.

    2007-05-01

    Scenarios are important tools for long-term planning, and there is great interest in using integrated models in scenario studies. However, scenario definition and assessment are creative, as well as scientific, efforts. Using facilitated creative processes, we have worked with stakeholders to define regionally significant scenarios that encompass a broad range of hydroclimatic, socioeconomic, and institutional dimensions. The regional scenarios subsequently inform the definition of local scenarios that work with context-specific integrated models that, individually, can address only a subset of overall regional complexity. Based on concerns of stakeholders in the semi-arid US Southwest, we prioritized three dimensions that are especially important, yet highly uncertain, for long-term planning: hydroclimatic conditions (increased variability, persistent drought), development patterns (urban consolidation, distributed rural development), and the nature of public institutions (stressed, proactive). Linking across real-world decision contexts and integrated modeling efforts poses challenges of creatively connecting the conceptual models held by both the research and stakeholder communities.

  18. Integrating water resources management in eco-hydrological modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, H; Liersch, S; Hattermann, F F

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the integration of water resources management with regard to reservoir management in an eco-hydrological model is described. The model was designed to simulate different reservoir management options, such as optimized hydropower production, irrigation intake from the reservoir or optimized provisioning downstream. The integrated model can be used to investigate the impacts of climate variability/change on discharge or to study possible adaptation strategies in terms of reservoir management. The study area, the Upper Niger Basin located in the West African Sahel, is characterized by a monsoon-type climate. Rainfall and discharge regime are subject to strong seasonality. Measured data from a reservoir are used to show that the reservoir model and the integrated management options can be used to simulate the regulation of this reservoir. The inflow into the reservoir and the discharge downstream of the reservoir are quite distinctive, which points out the importance of the inclusion of water resources management.

  19. Building an Integrative Model for Managing Exploratory Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarmeen, Parisha; Turri, Vanessa Gina; Sanchez, Ron

    2014-01-01

    to be recognized and managed in order to sustain successful exploratory innovation processes. Findings: Reviews of our “Enhanced Integrated Model” with managers in the two companies suggest that our model would help them to recognize and manage key issues that were not addressed adequately in their prior efforts......Purpose: In this paper we develop an integrated model identifying the key factors involved in managing exploratory innovation processes while also maintaining current business models and processes. Methodology/approach: We first characterize the problem of innovation as consisting of “the four...... central problems” organizations face when trying to manage innovation processes (Van de Ven, 1986). We develop an enhanced version of O’Connor’s (2008) Discovery, Incubation and Acceleration (DIA) model by integrating elements of Sanchez’ (2012) theory of architectural isomorphism as well as Markides...

  20. Modeling Integrated Cellular Machinery Using Hybrid Petri-Boolean Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berestovsky, Natalie; Zhou, Wanding; Nagrath, Deepak; Nakhleh, Luay

    2013-01-01

    The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM) that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them using such more

  1. Modeling integrated cellular machinery using hybrid Petri-Boolean networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Berestovsky

    Full Text Available The behavior and phenotypic changes of cells are governed by a cellular circuitry that represents a set of biochemical reactions. Based on biological functions, this circuitry is divided into three types of networks, each encoding for a major biological process: signal transduction, transcription regulation, and metabolism. This division has generally enabled taming computational complexity dealing with the entire system, allowed for using modeling techniques that are specific to each of the components, and achieved separation of the different time scales at which reactions in each of the three networks occur. Nonetheless, with this division comes loss of information and power needed to elucidate certain cellular phenomena. Within the cell, these three types of networks work in tandem, and each produces signals and/or substances that are used by the others to process information and operate normally. Therefore, computational techniques for modeling integrated cellular machinery are needed. In this work, we propose an integrated hybrid model (IHM that combines Petri nets and Boolean networks to model integrated cellular networks. Coupled with a stochastic simulation mechanism, the model simulates the dynamics of the integrated network, and can be perturbed to generate testable hypotheses. Our model is qualitative and is mostly built upon knowledge from the literature and requires fine-tuning of very few parameters. We validated our model on two systems: the transcriptional regulation of glucose metabolism in human cells, and cellular osmoregulation in S. cerevisiae. The model produced results that are in very good agreement with experimental data, and produces valid hypotheses. The abstract nature of our model and the ease of its construction makes it a very good candidate for modeling integrated networks from qualitative data. The results it produces can guide the practitioner to zoom into components and interconnections and investigate them

  2. A Neurobiological Model of Borderline Personality Disorder: Systematic and Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, Anthony C; Carcone, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe mental disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The development and maintenance of BPD is sustained by diverse neurobiological factors that contribute to the disorder's complex clinical phenotype. These factors may be identified using a range of techniques to probe alterations in brain systems that underlie BPD. We systematically searched the scientific literature for empirical studies on the neurobiology of BPD, identifying 146 articles in three broad research areas: neuroendocrinology and biological specimens; structural neuroimaging; and functional neuroimaging. We consolidate the results of these studies and provide an integrative model that attempts to incorporate the heterogeneous findings. The model specifies interactions among endogenous stress hormones, neurometabolism, and brain structures and circuits involved in emotion and cognition. The role of the amygdala in BPD is expanded to consider its functions in coordinating the brain's dynamic evaluation of the relevance of emotional stimuli in the context of an individual's goals and motivations. Future directions for neurobiological research on BPD are discussed, including implications for the Research Domain Criteria framework, accelerating genetics research by incorporating endophenotypes and gene × environment interactions, and exploring novel applications of neuroscience findings to treatment research.

  3. Early treatment with lyophilized plasma protects the brain in a large animal model of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well as the assoc......Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well...

  4. Implicit integration of plasticity models for granular materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahadi, A.; Krenk, Steen

    2003-01-01

    A stress integration algorithm for granular materials based on fully implicit integration with explicit updating is presented. In the implicit method the solution makes use of the gradient to the potential surface at the final stress state which is unknown. The final stress and hardening parameters...... are determined solving the non-linear equations iteratively so that the stress increment fulfills the consistency condition. The integration algorithm is applicable for models depending on all the three stress invariants and it is applied to a characteristic state model for granular material. Since tensile...... of the integration algorithm are illustrated by simulating both drained and undrained triaxial tests on sand. The algorithm is developed in a standard format which can be implemented in several general purpose finite element codes. It has been implemented as an ABAQUS subroutine, and a traditional geotechnical...

  5. Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Adel; Koshak, Emad

    2014-01-01

    Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment.

  6. An Extended Enterprise Modeling Approach to Enterprise-based Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paradigm of extended enterprise is the core competency focused. An extended enterprise expands its scope from bounding a single enterprise to including additional processes performed by other enterprises. The integration of processes is enterprise based. This paper proposes a recursive enterprises interconnected chain model for the extended enterprise, and presents an enterprise-based integration framework for the extended enterprise. The case study is based on a motorcycle group corporation.

  7. Adapted nested force-gradient integrators for the Schwinger model

    CERN Document Server

    Shcherbakov, Dmitry; Günther, Michael; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Peardon, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study a novel class of numerical integrators, the adapted nested force-gradient schemes, used within the molecular dynamics step of the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) algorithm. We test these methods in the Schwinger model on the lattice, a well known benchmark problem. We derive the analytical basis of nested force-gradient type methods and demonstrate the advantage of the proposed approach, namely reduced computational costs compared with other numerical integration schemes in HMC.

  8. Model GC1312S Multifunction Integrated Optical Circuit Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Model GC1312S multifunction integrated optical circuit device (MIOC) used in inertial-grade interferometric fiber optics gyroscopes (IFOGs) is fabricated by annealing and proton exchange process (APE). The unique feature of the device is the incorporation of the beat detection circuit besides all the features the conventional single Y-branch multifunction integrated optical circuit devices have. The device structure, operation principle and typical characteristics, etc., are briefly presented in this paper.

  9. 5-lipoxygenase expression in a brain damage model induced by chronic oral administration of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongquan Pan; Peng Zhang; Junqing Yang; Qiang Su

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has found that the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, caffeic acid, has a marked protective effect on acute brain injury induced by intracerebroventricular microinjection of aluminum.In this experiment, chronic brain injury and neuronal degeneration model was established in rats by chronic oral administration of aluminum, and then intervened using caffeic acid. Results showed that caffeic acid can downregulate chronic aluminum overload-induced 5-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein expression, and repair the aluminum overload-induced hippocampal neuronal damage andspatial orientation impairment. It is suggested that direct intervention of 5-lipoxygenase expression has a neuroprotective role in the degeneration induced by chronic aluminum overload brain injury model.

  10. Investigation of Brain Arterial Circle Malformations Using Electrical Modelling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klara Capova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the cerebral arterial system investigation by means of electrical modelling and simulations. The main attention is paid to the brain arterial circle malformations (stenoses and aneurysms and their determination and evaluation by computer-aided methods as tools of a non-invasive diagnostics. The compensation possibilities of brain arterial circle in case of presence of concrete arterial malformations are modelled and simulated. The simulation results of brain arteries blood pressures and volume flow velocities time dependences are presented and discussed under various health conditions.

  11. An Integrated Hydro-Economic Modelling Framework to Evaluate Water Allocation Strategies I: Model Development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, B.; Malano, H.; Davidson, B.; Hellegers, P.; Bharati, L.; Sylvain, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper an integrated modelling framework for water resources planning and management that can be used to carry out an analysis of alternative policy scenarios for water allocation and use is described. The modelling approach is based on integrating a network allocation model (REALM) and a soc

  12. An integration scheme for stiff solid-gas reactor models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjarne A. Foss

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Many dynamic models encounter numerical integration problems because of a large span in the dynamic modes. In this paper we develop a numerical integration scheme for systems that include a gas phase, and solid and liquid phases, such as a gas-solid reactor. The method is based on neglecting fast dynamic modes and exploiting the structure of the algebraic equations. The integration method is suitable for a large class of industrially relevant systems. The methodology has proven remarkably efficient. It has in practice performed excellent and been a key factor for the success of the industrial simulator for electrochemical furnaces for ferro-alloy production.

  13. Nonzero solutions of nonlinear integral equations modeling infectious disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.R. (Indiana Univ., South Bend); Leggett, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    Sufficient conditions to insure the existence of periodic solutions to the nonlinear integral equation, x(t) = ..integral../sup t//sub t-tau/f(s,x(s))ds, are given in terms of simple product and product integral inequalities. The equation can be interpreted as a model for the spread of infectious diseases (e.g., gonorrhea or any of the rhinovirus viruses) if x(t) is the proportion of infectives at time t and f(t,x(t)) is the proportion of new infectives per unit time.

  14. Super Gelfand-Dickey Algebra And Integrable Models

    CERN Document Server

    Boukili, A El; Zemate, A

    2007-01-01

    The main task of this work concerns integrable models and supersymmetric extensions of the Gelfand-Dickey algebra of pseudo differential operators. The consistent and systematic study that we perform consists in describing in detail the relation existing between the algebra of (local and nonlocal) super differential operators on the ring of superfields $u_{\\frac{s}{2}}(z, \\theta), s\\in Z$ and the higher and lower spin extensions of the conformal algebra. In relation to integrable systems, the supersymmetric GD bracket play a pioneering role as it gives in some sense a guarantee of integrability of the associated non linear supersymmetric systems.

  15. The integration of brain dissection within the medical neuroscience laboratory enhances learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Guenevere; Cork, R John; Karpinski, Aryn C; Swartz, William J

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a one-hour brain dissection protocol for a medical neuroscience course and evaluate the short and long-term effects of its implementation on medical students. First-year medical students (n = 166) participated in a brain dissection activity that included dissection of the basal nuclei and associated deep brain structures. Short-term retention was assessed by administering identical pre- and post-activity tests involving identification of brain structures. Following the brain dissection, the students' posttest scores were significantly higher (68.8% ± 17.8%; mean percent score ± SD) than their pretest scores (35.8% ± 20.0%) (P ≤ 0.0001). Long-term retention was evaluated by conducting an identical assessment five months after completion of the course. Students who participated in the dissection activity (n = 80) had significantly higher scores (46.6% ± 23.8%) than the students who did not participate in the dissection activity (n = 85) (38.1% ± 23.9%) (P ≤ 0.05). In addition to the long-term retention assessment, the NBME(®) Subject Examination scores of students who participated in the dissection activity were significantly higher than the students who did not participate in the dissection activity (P ≤ 0.01). Results suggest that this succinct brain dissection activity may be a practical addition to an undergraduate medical neuroscience course for increasing the effectiveness of neuroanatomy training. This effect may have long-term benefits on knowledge retention and may be correlated with higher performance levels on standardized subject examinations. Anat Sci Educ 9: 565-574. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. MoGIRE: A Model for Integrated Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, A.; Leenhardt, D.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change and growing water needs have resulted in many parts of the world in water scarcity problems that must by managed by public authorities. Hence, policy-makers are more and more often asked to define and to implement water allocation rules between competitive users. This requires to develop new tools aiming at designing those rules for various scenarios of context (climatic, agronomic, economic). If models have been developed for each type of water use however, very few integrated frameworks link these different uses, while such an integrated approach is a relevant stake for designing regional water and land policies. The lack of such integrated models can be explained by the difficulty of integrating models developed by very different disciplines and by the problem of scale change (collecting data on large area, arbitrate between the computational tractability of models and their level of aggregation). However, modelers are more and more asked to deal with large basin scales while analyzing some policy impacts at very high detailed levels. These contradicting objectives require to develop new modeling tools. The CALVIN economically-driven optimization model developed for managing water in California is a good example of this type of framework, Draper et al. (2003). Recent reviews of the literature on integrated water management at the basin level include Letcher et al. (2007) or Cai (2008). We present here an original framework for integrated water management at the river basin scale called MoGIRE ("Modèle pour la Gestion Intégrée de la Ressource en Eau"). It is intended to optimize water use at the river basin level and to evaluate scenarios (agronomic, climatic or economic) for a better planning of agricultural and non-agricultural water use. MoGIRE includes a nodal representation of the water network. Agricultural, urban and environmental water uses are also represented using mathematical programming and econometric approaches. The model then

  17. Development of the Ball integrated telescope model (ITM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Michael D.

    2002-07-01

    As the complexity of telescope systems have increased, system engineering trades related to cost and performance issues have become correspondingly complex. The traditional methodology for end-to-end system modeling depends upon focused analysis and data handoff between disciplines - aptly termed the "bucket brigade" approach. For the last 7 years, Ball Aerospace has supported development of an integrated modeling environment for telescope performance modeling and analysis. The Integrated Telescope Model (ITM), a realization of this effort, has been used on several current large telescope programs such as the VLT, NGST, TPF and MAXIM. It permits the user to do both time simulations and analytical work in the spatial/temporal frequency domains. The individual discipline models in structural dynamics, optics, controls, signal processing, detector physics and disturbance modeling are seamlessly integrated into one cohesive model to efficiently support system level trades and analysis. The core of the model is formed by the optical toolbox implemented in MATLAB and realized in object-oriented Simulink environment. Both geometric and physical optical models can be constructed and interfaced to disturbances and detection models. The geometric approach includes ray tracing for exact modeling or sensitivity matrices for rapid execution. Spectral, transmission and polarization information is carried with each ray. The physical optics modules do wavefront propagation for analyzing diffraction effects under either with coherent or incoherent conditions. Coupling of the static offset models, quasi-static thermal deformations and structural dynamics with an optical model allows one to view the full range of disturbance effects on the resulting PSF. This paper addresses the overall model architecture, considerations and issues related to model execution speed, complexity and model resolution/validity. Example of a recent use of the model is reviewed.

  18. DIVA: an iterative method for building modular integrated models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, J.

    2005-08-01

    Integrated modelling of global environmental change impacts faces the challenge that knowledge from the domains of Natural and Social Science must be integrated. This is complicated by often incompatible terminology and the fact that the interactions between subsystems are usually not fully understood at the start of the project. While a modular modelling approach is necessary to address these challenges, it is not sufficient. The remaining question is how the modelled system shall be cut down into modules. While no generic answer can be given to this question, communication tools can be provided to support the process of modularisation and integration. Along those lines of thought a method for building modular integrated models was developed within the EU project DINAS-COAST and applied to construct a first model, which assesses the vulnerability of the world's coasts to climate change and sea-level-rise. The method focuses on the development of a common language and offers domain experts an intuitive interface to code their knowledge in form of modules. However, instead of rigorously defining interfaces between the subsystems at the project's beginning, an iterative model development process is defined and tools to facilitate communication and collaboration are provided. This flexible approach has the advantage that increased understanding about subsystem interactions, gained during the project's lifetime, can immediately be reflected in the model.

  19. Biochemical Markers of Brain Injury: An Integrated Proteomics-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    cortex (ipsilateral cortex) with a 5-mm-diameter aluminum impactor tip (housed in a pneumatic cylin- der) at a velocity of 3.5 m/sec with a 1.6-mm com...over the cortex. Brain trauma was produced by impacting the right cortex (ipsilateral cortex) with a 5-mm diameter aluminum impactor tip (housed in a...gene expression in the brain as a function of the clinical progression of Alzheimer disease. Arch. Neurol. 60, 369–376. Raff M. C., Barres B. A., Burne

  20. Improving of local ozone forecasting by integrated models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradišar, Dejan; Grašič, Boštjan; Božnar, Marija Zlata; Mlakar, Primož; Kocijan, Juš

    2016-09-01

    This paper discuss the problem of forecasting the maximum ozone concentrations in urban microlocations, where reliable alerting of the local population when thresholds have been surpassed is necessary. To improve the forecast, the methodology of integrated models is proposed. The model is based on multilayer perceptron neural networks that use as inputs all available information from QualeAria air-quality model, WRF numerical weather prediction model and onsite measurements of meteorology and air pollution. While air-quality and meteorological models cover large geographical 3-dimensional space, their local resolution is often not satisfactory. On the other hand, empirical methods have the advantage of good local forecasts. In this paper, integrated models are used for improved 1-day-ahead forecasting of the maximum hourly value of ozone within each day for representative locations in Slovenia. The WRF meteorological model is used for forecasting meteorological variables and the QualeAria air-quality model for gas concentrations. Their predictions, together with measurements from ground stations, are used as inputs to a neural network. The model validation results show that integrated models noticeably improve ozone forecasts and provide better alert systems.