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Sample records for brain injury chronic

  1. Hypoaminoacidemia Characterizes Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, William J; Foreman, Jack P; Randolph, Kathleen M; Danesi, Christopher P; Spratt, Heidi; Masel, Brian D; Summons, Jennifer R; Singh, Charan K; Morrison, Melissa; Robles, Claudia; Wolfram, Cindy; Kreber, Lisa A; Urban, Randall J; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Masel, Brent E

    2017-01-15

    Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at increased risk for a number of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. However, mediators of the long-term morbidity are uncertain. We conducted a multi-site, prospective trial in chronic TBI patients (∼18 years post-TBI) living in long-term 24-h care environments and local controls without a history of head injury. Inability to give informed consent was exclusionary for participation. A total of 41 individuals (17 moderate-severe TBI, 24 controls) were studied before and after consumption of a standardized breakfast to determine if concentrations of amino acids, cytokines, C-reactive protein, and insulin are potential mediators of long-term TBI morbidity. Analyte concentrations were measured in serum drawn before (fasting) and 1 h after meal consumption. Mean ages were 44 ± 15 and 49 ± 11 years for controls and chronic TBI patients, respectively. Chronic TBI patients had significantly lower circulating concentrations of numerous individual amino acids, as well as essential amino acids (p = 0.03) and large neutral amino acids (p = 0.003) considered as groups, and displayed fundamentally altered cytokine-amino acid relationships. Many years after injury, TBI patients exhibit abnormal metabolic responses and altered relationships between circulating amino acids, cytokines, and hormones. This pattern is consistent with TBI, inducing a chronic disease state in patients. Understanding the mechanisms causing the chronic disease state could lead to new treatments for its prevention.

  2. Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury in Amateur Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahmati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & objective: Despite of young and adolescence intent to the boxing sport, because of dominant aggression and direct blows contact to head, face and central nervous system, it is continuously criticize by different groups. The groups of sporting and physician conventions are distinguished boxing with physical and neuropsychological disorders and some groups believe that side effects of this sport are not more than other sports. For this base the aim of this study was to determine the chronic traumatic brain injury in a group amateur boxers.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, three groups of sport men were considered, each group contained 20 randomly selected cases. The first group were amateur boxers with 4 years minimal activity(directly has been presented to the head blows, second group were amateur soccer players with 4 years minimal activity(has been presented to the not very severe head blows, third group were non athlete subjects .The groups were matched in weight, height, age and education .To understand brain disorder interview by medicine method has been used, then Wiskancin, Bonardele, Bender geshtalt, Kim karad visual memory, Benton and wechler memory (Alef type tests has been performed and EEG has got in the same hour and condition.Results: The homogeneity of between group variances was gained by the statistical method. Also between structural–visual abilities neuropsychological aspect in groups, significant difference has been gained (p= 0.000. In Kim karad visual memory test at the mild and long term visual memory deficit, significant differences between three groups was observed (P= 0.000, P=0.009 that least score has been belonged to the boxers. Also in boxers 6 abnormal EEGs is observed.Conclusion: It can be said that of four years amateur boxing can affect on boxers visual and memory perception and their spatial orientation. Additionally our study have showed that amateur boxing has a significant

  3. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  4. Chronic issues related to traumatic brain injury : traumatic brain injury is not an incident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwmeijer, Erik; van der Naalt, Joukje; ribbers, gerard

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increased awareness of the long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury, health care professionals often consider traumatic brain injury as an incident. However, patients with traumatic brain injury may experience long-term neurological, cognitive and behavioural problems. Due to the

  5. A prospective study to evaluate a new residential community reintegration programme for severe chronic brain injury: the Brain Integration Programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Martina, J.D.; Heugten, C.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the effectiveness of a residential community reintegration programme for participants with chronic sequelae of severe acquired brain injury that hamper community functioning. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SUBJECTS: Twenty-four participants with acquired brain injury (traumatic

  6. The characteristics of chronic central pain after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Hadas; Defrin, Ruth

    2007-10-01

    Central pain following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been studied in depth. Our purpose was to conduct a systematic study of patients with TBI suffering from chronic central pain, and to describe the characteristics of the central pain. Groups were TBI patients with (TBIP) and without central pain (TBINP) and healthy controls. TBI patients with other pain mechanisms were excluded from the study. Participants underwent quantitative somatosensory testing in the painful and pain-free body regions. Thresholds for warmth, cold, heat-pain, touch and graphesthesia were measured and pathologically evoked pain (allodynia, hyperpathia and wind-up pain) evaluated. Chronic pain was mapped and characterized. Chronic pain developed at a relatively late onset (6.6+/-9 months) was almost exclusively unilateral and reported as pricking, throbbing and burning. Although both TBIP and TBINP exhibited a significant reduction in thermal and tactile sensations compared to controls, thermal sensations in the painful regions of TBIP were significantly more impaired than pain-free regions in the same patients (p<0.01) and in TBINP (p<0.01). Painful regions also exhibited very high rates of allodynia, hyperpathia and exaggerated wind-up. The characteristics of the chronic pain resembled those of other central pain patients although TBIP displayed several unique features. The sensory profile indicated that damage to the pain and temperature systems is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the development of chronic central pain following TBI. Neuronal hyperexcitability may be a contributing factor to the chronic pain.

  7. Neurotherapy for chronic headache following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David V Nelson; Mary Lee Esty

    2015-01-01

    Background:Chronic headache following traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained in military service, while common, is highly challenging to treat with existing pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions, and it may be complicated by co-morbid posttraumatic stress. Recently, a novel form of brainwave-based intervention known as the Flexyx Neurotherapy System (FNS), which involves minute pulses of electromagnetic energy stimulation of brainwave activity, has been suggested as a means to address symptoms of TBI. This study reports on a clinical series of patients with chronic headache following service-connected TBI treated with FNS. Methods: Nine veterans of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq with moderate to severe chronic headaches following service-connected TBI complicated by posttraumatic stress symptoms were treated in 20 individual FNS sessions at the Brain Wellness and Biofeedback Center of Washington (in Bethesda, Maryland, USA). They periodically completed measures including the Brief Pain Inventory-Headache (BPI-HA), previous week worst and average pain ratings, the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Military version (PCL-M), and an individual treatment session numerical rating scale (NRS) for the degree of cognitive dysfunction. Data analyses included beginning-to-end of treatmentt-test comparisons for the BPI-HA, PCL-M, and cognitive dysfunction NRS. Results: All beginning-to-end of treatmentt-test comparisons for the BPI-HA, PCL-M, and cognitive dysfunction NRS indicated statistically significant decreases. All but one participant experienced a reduction in headaches along with reductions in posttraumatic stress and perceived cognitive dysfunction, with a subset experiencing the virtual elimination of headaches. One participant obtained modest headache relief but no improvements in posttraumatic stress or cognitive dysfunction. Conclusions: FNS may be a potentially efficacious treatment for chronic posttraumatic headache sustained in military

  8. Telephone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-2-0109 TITLE: Telephone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury...2014-29 Sept 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Telephone-Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-2-0109...study is to evaluate the efficacy of a telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment (T-CBT) in Veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury

  9. Family needs in the chronic phase after severe brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doser, Karoline; Norup, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This preliminary study aimed at investigating (1) changes in the status of family members between time of injury and follow-up in the chronic phase and (2) the most important needs within the family in the chronic phase and whether the needs were perceived as met. Participants......: The sample comprised 42 relatives (76% female, mean age = 53 years) of patients with severe brain injury, who had received intensive sub-acute rehabilitation. The relatives were contacted in the chronic phase after brain injury. Outcome measure: A set of questions about demographics and time spent caregiving...... for the patient was completed. The relatives completed the revised version of the Family Needs Questionnaire, a questionnaire consisting of 37 items related to different needs following brain injury. Results: Significant changes in status were found in employment (z = -3.464, p = 0.001) and co-habitation (z = -3...

  10. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  11. The Relation of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury to Chronic Lapses of Attention

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    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Broglio, Steven P.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Johnson, Chris R.; O'Connor, Phillip M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the extent to which failures in sustained attention were associated with chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) deficits in cognitive control among college-age young adults with and without a history of sport-related concussion. Participants completed the ImPACT computer-based assessment and a modified flanker task. Results…

  12. Treatment of Oppositional Behavior in Children of Parents with Brain Injury and Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Joseph M.; Davidson, Amy; Rushford, Nancy

    2002-01-01

    This case study evaluated effects of errorless compliance training on cooperation of sons of two fathers with brain injury and chronic pain. Following treatment, children displayed high levels of compliance to parent requests as well as generalization and maintenance of treatment gains. Errorless compliance training is recommended to foster…

  13. Investigation of Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    to those in other chronic pain states such as migraine and fibromyalgia when controlled for co-morbid insomnia, depression and PTSD. The study groups...to be compared for this work include patients with chronic migraine, fibromyalgia , post-traumatic pain post mTBI, asymptomatic individuals post mTBI...migraine, fibromyalgia , post-traumatic pain post mTBI, asymptomatic individuals post mTBI, and normal controls. The understanding of the

  14. Facial Affect Recognition Training Through Telepractice: Two Case Studies of Individuals with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    John Williamson; Emi Isaki

    2015-01-01

    The use of a modified Facial Affect Recognition (FAR) training to identify emotions was investigated with two case studies of adults with moderate to severe chronic (> five years) traumatic brain injury (TBI).  The modified FAR training was administered via telepractice to target social communication skills.  Therapy consisted of identifying emotions through static facial expressions, personally reflecting on those emotions, and identifying sarcasm and emotions within social stories and ro...

  15. Facial Affect Recognition Training Through Telepractice: Two Case Studies of Individuals with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, John; ISAKI, EMI

    2015-01-01

    The use of a modified Facial Affect Recognition (FAR) training to identify emotions was investigated with two case studies of adults with moderate to severe chronic (> five years) traumatic brain injury (TBI). The modified FAR training was administered via telepractice to target social communication skills. Therapy consisted of identifying emotions through static facial expressions, personally reflecting on those emotions, and identifying sarcasm and emotions within social stories and role-pl...

  16. Three-year follow-up results of a residential community reintegration program for patients with chronic acquired brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Heugten, C.M. van; Martina, J.D.; Rietveld, A.C.; Meijer, R.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate outcomes of a residential community reintegration program 3 years after treatment on independent living, societal participation, emotional well-being, and quality of life in patients with chronic acquired brain injury and psychosocial problems hampering societal participation.

  17. Facial Affect Recognition Training Through Telepractice: Two Case Studies of Individuals with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, John; Isaki, Emi

    2015-01-01

    The use of a modified Facial Affect Recognition (FAR) training to identify emotions was investigated with two case studies of adults with moderate to severe chronic (> five years) traumatic brain injury (TBI). The modified FAR training was administered via telepractice to target social communication skills. Therapy consisted of identifying emotions through static facial expressions, personally reflecting on those emotions, and identifying sarcasm and emotions within social stories and role-play. Pre- and post-therapy measures included static facial photos to identify emotion and the Prutting and Kirchner Pragmatic Protocol for social communication. Both participants with chronic TBI showed gains on identifying facial emotions on the static photos.

  18. Facial Affect Recognition Training Through Telepractice: Two Case Studies of Individuals with Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Williamson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of a modified Facial Affect Recognition (FAR training to identify emotions was investigated with two case studies of adults with moderate to severe chronic (> five years traumatic brain injury (TBI.  The modified FAR training was administered via telepractice to target social communication skills.  Therapy consisted of identifying emotions through static facial expressions, personally reflecting on those emotions, and identifying sarcasm and emotions within social stories and role-play.  Pre- and post-therapy measures included static facial photos to identify emotion and the Prutting and Kirchner Pragmatic Protocol for social communication.  Both participants with chronic TBI showed gains on identifying facial emotions on the static photos.               

  19. Brain injury - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and caregivers. Biausa.org. www.biausa.org/brain-injury-family-caregivers.htm#Manage the Home . Accessed December 8, 2016. ... Caregiver Alliance; National Center on Caregiving. Traumatic brain injury. ... www.caregiver.org/traumatic-brain-injury . Accessed ...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  1. Gonadectomy affects brain derived neurotrophic factor in rats after chronic constriction nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin ZHAO; Xin WANG; Shu-yun ZHENG; Jian-guo XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of gonadectomy on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in neuropathic pain. METHODS: Using chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, we detected BDNF mRNA in dorsal root ganglion and protein content in spinal cord by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively. The time point we chose was post CCI operation d 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21.RESULTS: After CCI surgery, BDNF mRNA in ipsilateral DRGs was upregulated and reached its maximum on post operation d 7. BDNF protein level in ipsilateral spinal cord was also increased and reached its maximum on post operation d 14. The magnitude of this increase in gonadectomy (GDX) rats was significantly smaller than the GDX-sham rats at each time point. CONCLUSION: Gonadectomy reduced the BDNF increment after CCI surgery.Estrogen may affect nociceptive processing by its effect on BDNF.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Chronic Dysarthric Speech after Childhood Brain Injury: Reliance on a Left-Hemisphere Compensatory Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Angela T.; Masterton, Richard; Pigdon, Lauren; Connelly, Alan; Liegeois, Frederique J.

    2013-01-01

    Severe and persistent speech disorder, dysarthria, may be present for life after brain injury in childhood, yet the neural correlates of this chronic disorder remain elusive. Although abundant literature is available on language reorganization after lesions in childhood, little is known about the capacity of motor speech networks to reorganize…

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for painful chronic neurogenic heterotopic ossification after traumatic brain injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Min; Hong, Seok Hyun; Lee, Chang Hyun; Kang, Jin Ho; Oh, Ju Sun

    2015-04-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) is a process of benign bone formation and growth in soft tissues surrounding major synovial joints and is associated with central nervous system (CNS) injuries. It is a common complication in major CNS injuries, such as traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and stroke. Here, we report the case of a 72-year-old male, who experienced a traumatic brain injury and painful chronic NHO around the left hip joint. Three applications of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) were administered to the area of NHO, which resulted in pain relief and an improvement in the loss of motion in the left hip joint. Improvements were also noted in walking performance and activities of daily living, although the size of NHO remained unchanged. Therapeutic effects of ESWT lasted for 12 weeks.

  4. Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: two case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2010-02-01

    Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle accident (MVA) without loss of consciousness and normal MRI, but unable to return to work as development specialist in internet marketing, due to cognitive dysfunction. At 7 years post-MVA, she began transcranial LED treatments with cluster heads (2.1" diameter with 61 diodes each - 9x633nm, 52x870nm; 12-15mW per diode; total power, 500mW; 22.2 mW/cm2) on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital and midline sagittal areas (13.3 J/cm2 at scalp, estimated 0.4 J/cm2 to brain cortex per area). Prior to transcranial LED, focused time on computer was 20 minutes. After 2 months of weekly, transcranial LED treatments, increased to 3 hours on computer. Performs nightly home treatments (now, 5 years, age 72); if stops treating >2 weeks, regresses. P2 (age 52F) had history of closed-head injuries related to sports/military training and recent fall. MRI shows fronto-parietal cortical atrophy. Pre-LED, was not able to work for 6 months and scored below average on attention, memory and executive function. Performed nightly transcranial LED treatments at home (9 months) with similar LED device, on frontal and parietal areas. After 4 months of LED treatments, returned to work as executive consultant, international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing (post- 9 months of transcranial LED) showed significant improvement in memory and executive functioning (range, +1 to +2 SD improvement). Case 2 reported reduction in PTSD symptoms.

  5. Effects of six weeks of chronic ethanol administration on the behavioral outcome of rats after lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Maki, A; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Clerici, W J; Hicks, R; Kraemer, P J; Butcher, J; Prasad, R M

    1999-03-01

    This study examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on the behavioral outcome in rats after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. Rats were given either an ethanol liquid diet (ethanol diet-groups) or a pair-fed isocaloric sucrose control diet (control diet groups) for 6 weeks. After 6 weeks, the ethanol diet was discontinued for the ethanol diet rats and they were then given the control sucrose diet for 2 days. During those 2 days, the rats were trained to perform a beam-walking task and subjected to either lateral FP brain injury of low to moderate severity (1.8 atm) or to sham operation. In both the control diet and the ethanol diet groups, lateral FP brain injury caused beam-walking impairment on days 1 and 2 and spatial learning disability on days 7 and 8 after brain injury. There were no significant differences in beam-walking performance and spatial learning disability between brain injured animals from the control and ethanol diet groups. However, a trend towards greater behavioral deficits was observed in brain injured animals in the ethanol diet group. Histologic analysis of both diet groups after behavioral assessment revealed comparable ipsilateral cortical damage and observable CA3 neuronal loss in the ipsilateral hippocampus. These results only suggest that chronic ethanol administration, longer than six weeks of administration, may worsen behavioral outcome following lateral FP brain injury. For more significant behavioral and/or morphological change to occur, we would suggest that the duration of chronic ethanol administration must be increased.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging detects chronic microstructural changes in white and grey matter after traumatic brain injury in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu eLaitinen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of disability and death in people of all ages worldwide. An initial brain injury caused by external mechanical forces triggers a cascade of tissue changes that lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms and disabilities, such as cognitive deficits, mood or anxiety disorders, motor impairments, chronic pain, and epilepsy. We investigated the detectability of secondary injury at a chronic time-point using ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI in a rat model of TBI, lateral fluid percussion injury. Our analysis of ex vivo DTI data revealed persistent microstructural tissue changes in white matter tracts, such as the splenium of the corpus callosum, angular bundle, and internal capsule. Histologic examination revealed mainly loss of myelinated axons and/or iron accumulation. Grey matter areas in the thalamus exhibited an increase in fractional anisotropy associated with neurodegeneration, myelinated fiber loss, and/or calcifications at the chronic phase. In addition, we examined whether these changes could also be detected with in vivo settings at the same chronic time-point. Our results provide insight into DTI detection of microstructural changes in the chronic phase of TBI, and elucidate how these changes correlate with cellular level alterations. These findings suggest that DTI could be a useful tool for detecting potential imaging biomarkers after TBI as indicators of progressive damage or recovery

  7. Cognitive Gains from Gist Reasoning Training in Adolescents with Chronic-Stage Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori G. Cook

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI typically demonstrate good recovery of previously acquired skills. However, higher-order and later emergent cognitive functions are often impaired and linked to poor outcomes in academic and social/behavioral domains. Few control trials exist that test cognitive treatment effectiveness at chronic recovery stages. The current pilot study compared the effects of two forms of cognitive training, gist reasoning (top-down versus rote memory learning (bottom-up, on ability to abstract meanings, recall facts, and utilize core executive functions (i.e., working memory, inhibition in 20 adolescents (ages 12-20 who were six months or longer post-TBI. Participants completed eight 45-minute sessions over one month. After training, the gist reasoning group (n = 10 exhibited significant improvement in ability to abstract meanings and increased fact recall. This group also showed significant generalizations to untrained executive functions of working memory and inhibition. The memory training group (n = 10 failed to show significant gains in ability to abstract meaning or on other untrained specialized executive functions, although improved fact recall approached significance. These preliminary results suggest that relatively short-term training (6 hours utilizing a top-down reasoning approach is more effective than a bottom-up rote learning approach in achieving gains in higher-order cognitive abilities in adolescents at chronic stages of TBI. These findings need to be replicated in a larger study; nonetheless, the preliminary data suggest that traditional cognitive intervention schedules need to extend to later-stage training opportunities. Chronic-stage, higher-order cognitive trainings may serve to elevate levels of cognitive performance in adolescents with TBI.

  8. Three months of chronic ethanol administration and the behavioral outcome of rats after lateral fluid percussion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, J; Billings, B; Dhillon, H S; Mace, D; Hicks, R; Barron, S; Kraemer, P J; Dendle, P; Prasad, R M

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the effects of 3 months of chronic ethanol administration (CEAn) on the behavioral outcome in rats after lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. Rats were given either an ethanol liquid diet (ethanol diet groups) or a pair-fed isocaloric sucrose control diet (control diet groups) for 3 months. Then, rats from both diet groups were subjected to either lateral FP brain injury of moderate severity (1.8 atm) or to sham operation. Postinjury behavioral measurements revealed that brain injury caused significant spatial learning disability in both diet groups. There were no significant differences in spatial learning ability in the sham or brain-injured animals between the control and ethanol diets. However, a trend towards cognitive impairment in the sham animals and a trend towards reduced deficits in the brain-injured animals were observed in the ethanol diet group. Histologic analysis of injured animals from both diet groups revealed similar extents of ipsilateral cortical and hippocampal CA3 damage. These results, in general, suggest that 3 months of CEAn does not significantly alter the behavioral and morphologic outcome of experimental brain injury.

  9. Filling in the gaps: Anticipatory control of eye movements in chronic mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Diwakar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A barrier in the diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI stems from the lack of measures that are adequately sensitive in detecting mild head injuries. MRI and CT are typically negative in mTBI patients with persistent symptoms of post-concussive syndrome (PCS, and characteristic difficulties in sustaining attention often go undetected on neuropsychological testing, which can be insensitive to momentary lapses in concentration. Conversely, visual tracking strongly depends on sustained attention over time and is impaired in chronic mTBI patients, especially when tracking an occluded target. This finding suggests deficient internal anticipatory control in mTBI, the neural underpinnings of which are poorly understood. The present study investigated the neuronal bases for deficient anticipatory control during visual tracking in 25 chronic mTBI patients with persistent PCS symptoms and 25 healthy control subjects. The task was performed while undergoing magnetoencephalography (MEG, which allowed us to examine whether neural dysfunction associated with anticipatory control deficits was due to altered alpha, beta, and/or gamma activity. Neuropsychological examinations characterized cognition in both groups. During MEG recordings, subjects tracked a predictably moving target that was either continuously visible or randomly occluded (gap condition. MEG source-imaging analyses tested for group differences in alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. The results showed executive functioning, information processing speed, and verbal memory deficits in the mTBI group. Visual tracking was impaired in the mTBI group only in the gap condition. Patients showed greater error than controls before and during target occlusion, and were slower to resynchronize with the target when it reappeared. Impaired tracking concurred with abnormal beta activity, which was suppressed in the parietal cortex, especially the right hemisphere, and enhanced in left caudate and

  10. The role of Tc-99m HMPAO brain perfusion SPECT in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young [Nuclear Medicne, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Wook; Lee, Sun Woo; Ghi, Lek Sung; Song, Chang June [College of Medicine, Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-01

    We studied whether brain perfusion SPECT is useful in the psychiatric disability evaluation of patients with chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-nine patients (M:F=58:11, age 39 {+-} 14 years) who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT, brain MRI and neuropsychological (NP) tests during hospitalization in psychiatric wards for the psychiatric disability evaluation were included; the severity of injury was mild in 31, moderate in 17 and severe in 21. SPECT, MRI, NP tests were performed 6 {approx} 61 months (mean 23 months) post-injury. Diagnostic accuracy of SPECT and MRI to show hypoperfusion or abnormal signal intensity in patients with cognitive impairment represented by NP test results were compared. Forty-two patients were considered to have cognitive impairment on NP tests and 27 not. Brain SPECT showed 71% sensitivity and 85% specificity, while brain MRI showed 62% sensitivity and 93% specificity (p>0.05, McNemar test). SPECT found more cortical lesions and MRI was superior in detecting white matter lesions. sensitivity and specificity of 31 mild TBI patients were 45%, 90% for SPECT and 27%, 100% for MRI (p>0.05, McNemar test). Among 41 patients with normal brain MRI, SEPCT showed 63% sensitivity (50% for mild TBI) and 88% specificity (85% for malingerers). Brain SPECT has a supplementary role to neuropsychological tests in the psychiatric disability evaluation of chronic TBI patients by detecting more cortical lesions than MRI.

  11. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Mild-Moderate Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury PCS and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0962 TITLE: Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Mild-Moderate Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury...Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0962 Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy in...post- hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Four additional subjects have been screened in October 2015 and nine are awaiting first appointment for

  12. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos mild Traumatic Brain Injury 94447 reads Please Log in You must be logged in to access ... Brain Injury (DCoE) to promote the processes of building resilience, facilitating recovery and supporting reintegration of returning ...

  13. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury : Acute versus chronic disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M.; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2014-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully unde

  14. Long-Term Use and Perceived Benefits of Goal-Oriented Attentional Self-Regulation Training in Chronic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic-Agopian, Tatjana; Binder, Deborah; Rossi, Annemarie; Rome, Scott; Murphy, Michelle; Chen, Anthony J.-W.

    2017-01-01

    Primary Objective. To investigate the long-term use and perceived benefit(s) of strategies included in Goal-Oriented Attentional Self-Regulation (GOALS) training (Novakovic-Agopian et al., 2011) by individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) and chronic executive dysfunction. Research Design. Longitudinal follow-up of training. Methods and Procedures. Sixteen participants with chronic ABI participated in structured telephone interviews 20 months (range 11 to 31 months) following completion of GOALS training. Participants responded to questions regarding the range of strategies they continued to utilize, perceived benefit(s) of strategy use, situations in which strategy use was found helpful, and functional changes attributed to training. Results. Nearly all participants (94%) reported continued use of at least one trained strategy in their daily lives, with 75% of participants also reporting improved functioning resulting from training. However, there was considerable variability with respect to the specific strategies individuals found helpful as well as the perceived impact of training on overall functioning. Conclusions. GOALS training shows promising long-term benefits for individuals in the chronic phase of brain injury. Identifying individual- and injury-level factors that account for variability in continued strategy use and the perceived long-term benefits of training will help with ongoing intervention development.

  15. Effects of chronic ethanol administration on expression of BDNF and trkB mRNAs in rat hippocampus after experimental brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Barron, S; Hicks1, R R; Prasad, R M; Seroogy, K B

    2000-06-23

    Previous evidence indicates that both chronic alcohol treatment and traumatic brain injury modulate expression of certain neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors in cortical tissue. However, the combined effects of chronic alcohol and brain trauma on expression of neurotrophins and their receptors have not been investigated. In the present study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration on lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury-induced alterations in expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor, trkB, in rat hippocampus. In both the control- (pair-fed isocaloric sucrose) diet and the chronic ethanol-diet groups, unilateral FP brain injury induced a bilateral increase in levels of both BDNF and trkB mRNAs in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, and of BDNF mRNA in hippocampal region CA3. However, no significant differences in expression were found between the control-diet and ethanol-diet groups, in either the sham-injured or FP-injured animals. These findings suggest that 6 weeks of chronic ethanol administration does not alter the plasticity of hippocampal BDNF/trkB expression in response to experimental brain injury.

  16. Chronic alcoholism-mediated impairment in the medulla oblongata: a mechanism of alcohol-related mortality in traumatic brain injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao-ping; Yu, Xiao-jun; Qian, Hong; Wei, Lai; Lv, Jun-yao; Xu, Xiao-hu

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common condition in medical and forensic practice, and results in high prehospital mortality. We investigated the mechanism of chronic alcoholism-related mortality by examining the effects of alcohol on the synapses of the medulla oblongata in a rat model of TBI. Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either ethanol (EtOH) group, EtOH-TBI group, or control groups (water group, water-TBI group). To establish chronic alcoholism model, rats in the EtOH group were given EtOH twice daily (4 g/kg for 2 weeks and 6 g/kg for another 2 weeks). The rats also received a minor strike on the occipital tuberosity with an iron pendulum. Histopathologic and ultrastructure changes and the numerical density of the synapses in the medulla oblongata were examined. Expression of postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) in the medulla oblongata was measured by ELISA. Compared with rats in the control group, rats in the chronic alcoholism group showed: (1) minor axonal degeneration; (2) a significant decrease in the numerical density of synapses (p alcoholism induces significant synapse loss and axonal impairment in the medulla oblongata and renders the brain more susceptible to TBI. The combined effects of chronic alcoholism and TBI induce significant synapse and axon impairment and result in high mortality.

  17. Concussion/mild traumatic brain injury-related chronic pain in males and females: A diagnostic modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Cassidy, J. David; Shapiro, Colin M.; Mollayeva, Shirin; Colantonio, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pain is an unpleasant, complex, and perceived experience that places a significant burden on patients and clinicians. Its severity may be mediated by emotion, attitude, and environmental influences, and pain may be expressed differently in males and females. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently associated with chronic pain. This diagnostic modeling study examined sex differences in the construct of chronic pain in patients with delayed recovery from concussion/mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Data were collected from standardized questionnaires, neuroimaging records, and comprehensive clinical assessments. Bivariate associations were calculated using the Spearman correlation coefficient or analysis of variance. We established sex-specific stepwise multivariate linear regression models of factors associated with pain. Of the 94 participants diagnosed with mTBI (the mean age was 45.20 ± 9.94 years; 61.2% were males; the median time since injury was 197 days [interquartile range 139–416]), head/neck, and bodily pain were reported by 93% and 64%, respectively. No sex differences were identified in pain frequencies or severity. Pain was significantly associated with certain socio-demographic, injury-related, behavioral, and clinical variables. In the multivariable regression analysis, several determinants explained 60% of the pain variance in males and 46% in females. Pain is common in patients with delayed recovery from mTBI and is significantly associated with potentially modifiable clinical and nonclinical variables. Examining the multidimensional construct of pain in concussion/mTBI through a sex lens garners new directions for future longitudinal research on the pain mechanisms involved in postconcussion syndrome. PMID:28207508

  18. White Matter Abnormalities are Associated with Chronic Postconcussion Symptoms in Blast-Related Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle R.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury among Iraq and Afghanistan military veterans due to the frequent use of improvised explosive devices. A significant minority of individuals with mTBI report chronic postconcussion symptoms (PCS), which include physical, emotional, and cognitive complaints. However, chronic PCS are non-specific and are also associated with mental health disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Identifying the mechanisms that contribute to chronic PCS is particularly challenging in blast-related mTBI, where the incidence of co-morbid PTSD is high. In this study, we examined whether blast-related mTBI is associated with diffuse white matter changes, and whether these neural changes are associated with chronic PCS. Ninety Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans were assigned to one of three groups including a blast-exposed no-TBI group, a blast-related mTBI without loss of consciousness (LOC) group (mTBI−LOC), and a blast-related mTBI with LOC group (mTBI+LOC). PCS were measured with the Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire. Results showed that participants in the mTBI+LOC group had more spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities than those in the no-TBI group. These white matter abnormalities were significantly associated with physical PCS severity even after accounting for PTSD symptoms, but not with cognitive or emotional PCS severity. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI+LOC significantly influenced physical PCS severity through its effect on white matter integrity. These results suggest that white matter abnormalities are associated with chronic PCS independent of PTSD symptom severity and that these abnormalities are an important mechanism explaining the relationship between mTBI and chronic physical PCS. PMID:26497829

  19. White matter abnormalities are associated with chronic postconcussion symptoms in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle R; Hayes, Jasmeet P; Lafleche, Ginette; Salat, David H; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a common injury among Iraq and Afghanistan military veterans due to the frequent use of improvised explosive devices. A significant minority of individuals with mTBI report chronic postconcussion symptoms (PCS), which include physical, emotional, and cognitive complaints. However, chronic PCS are nonspecific and are also associated with mental health disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Identifying the mechanisms that contribute to chronic PCS is particularly challenging in blast-related mTBI, where the incidence of comorbid PTSD is high. In this study, we examined whether blast-related mTBI is associated with diffuse white matter changes, and whether these neural changes are associated with chronic PCS. Ninety Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans were assigned to one of three groups including a blast-exposed no--TBI group, a blast-related mTBI without loss of consciousness (LOC) group (mTBI--LOC), and a blast-related mTBI with LOC group (mTBI + LOC). PCS were measured with the Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire. Results showed that participants in the mTBI + LOC group had more spatially heterogeneous white matter abnormalities than those in the no--TBI group. These white matter abnormalities were significantly associated with physical PCS severity even after accounting for PTSD symptoms, but not with cognitive or emotional PCS severity. A mediation analysis revealed that mTBI + LOC significantly influenced physical PCS severity through its effect on white matter integrity. These results suggest that white matter abnormalities are associated with chronic PCS independent of PTSD symptom severity and that these abnormalities are an important mechanism explaining the relationship between mTBI and chronic physical PCS.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of reasoning training in military and civilian chronic traumatic brain injury patients: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals who sustain traumatic brain injuries (TBIs often continue to experience significant impairment of cognitive functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex well into chronic stages of recovery. Traditional brain training programs that focus on improving specific skills fall short of addressing integrative functions that draw upon multiple higher-order processes critical for social and vocational integration. In the current study, we compare the effects of two short-term, intensive, group-based cognitive rehabilitation programs for individuals with chronic TBI. One program emphasizes learning about brain functions and influences on cognition, while the other program adopts a top-down approach to improve abstract reasoning abilities that are largely reliant on the prefrontal cortex. These treatment programs are evaluated in civilian and military veteran TBI populations. Methods/design One hundred individuals are being enrolled in this double-blinded clinical trial (all measures and data analyses will be conducted by blinded raters and analysts. Each individual is randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions, with each condition run in groups of five to seven individuals. The primary anticipated outcomes are improvement in abstract reasoning and everyday life functioning, measured through behavioral tasks and questionnaires, and attention modulation, as measured by functional neuroimaging. Secondary expected outcomes include improvements in the cognitive processes of working memory, attention, and inhibitory control. Discussion Results of this trial will determine whether cognitive rehabilitation aimed at teaching TBI-relevant information about the brain and cognition versus training in TBI-affected thinking abilities (e.g., memory, attention, and executive functioning can improve outcomes in chronic military and civilian TBI patient populations. It should shed light on the nature of improvements and the

  1. Theory of mind mediates the prospective relationship between abnormal social brain network morphology and chronic behavior problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Beare, Richard; Silk, Timothy J; Crossley, Louise; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith Owen; Anderson, Vicki A

    2016-04-01

    Childhood and adolescence coincide with rapid maturation and synaptic reorganization of distributed neural networks that underlie complex cognitive-affective behaviors. These regions, referred to collectively as the 'social brain network' (SBN) are commonly vulnerable to disruption from pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the mechanisms that link morphological changes in the SBN to behavior problems in this population remain unclear. In 98 children and adolescents with mild to severe TBI, we acquired 3D T1-weighted MRIs at 2-8 weeks post-injury. For comparison, 33 typically developing controls of similar age, sex and education were scanned. All participants were assessed on measures of Theory of Mind (ToM) at 6 months post-injury and parents provided ratings of behavior problems at 24-months post-injury. Severe TBI was associated with volumetric reductions in the overall SBN package, as well as regional gray matter structural change in multiple component regions of the SBN. When compared with TD controls and children with milder injuries, the severe TBI group had significantly poorer ToM, which was associated with more frequent behavior problems and abnormal SBN morphology. Mediation analysis indicated that impaired theory of mind mediated the prospective relationship between abnormal SBN morphology and more frequent chronic behavior problems. Our findings suggest that sub-acute alterations in SBN morphology indirectly contribute to long-term behavior problems via their influence on ToM. Volumetric change in the SBN and its putative hub regions may represent useful imaging biomarkers for prediction of post-acute social cognitive impairment, which may in turn elevate risk for chronic behavior problems.

  2. Clinical Management of a Patient with Chronic Recurrent Vertigo Following a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Ultimately, the patient was successfully managed by performing two canalith repositioning maneuvers during a single clinical session. The patient reported 100% resolution of symptoms upon reexamination the following day, and the Hallpike-Dix test was negative. Continued symptom resolution was subjectively reported 10 days postintervention via telephone consultation. This case report supports previous publications concerning the presence of BPPV following TBI and the need for inclusion of vestibular system examination during medical consultation.

  3. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W. Wilkinson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least one year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI, an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least one year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and

  4. Overexpression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protects against Brain Injury Induced by Chronic Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Hardik; Codipilly, Champa; Marambaud, Philippe; Dewey, Stephen; Frattini, Stephen; Huerta, Patricio T.; Nasim, Mansoor; Miller, Edmund J.; Ahmed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1%) for 10 days (H-KI) and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI), wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT). Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET) showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation. PMID:25268361

  5. Overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase protects against brain injury induced by chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Zaghloul

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1% for 10 days (H-KI and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI, wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT. Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation.

  6. Rehabilitation needs and participation restriction in patients with cognitive disorder in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashika, Hironobu; Takada, Kaoruko; Kikuchi, Naohisa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to clarify psychosocial factors/problems, social participation, quality of life (QOL), and rehabilitation needs in chronic-phase traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with cognitive disorder discharged from the level-1 trauma center (L1-TC), and to inspect the effects of rehabilitation intervention to these subjects. A mixed-method research (cross-sectional and qualitative study) was conducted at an outpatient rehabilitation department. Inclusion criteria of subjects were transfer to the L1-TC due to TBI; acute-stage rehabilitation treatment received in the L1-TC from November 2006 to October 2011; age of ≥18 and social participation, QOL, psychosocial factors/problems, rehabilitation needs, and chronic-phase rehabilitation outcomes were evaluated using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Third Edition, the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, Version 2, and the Short Form 36, Version 2, qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews, etc. Participants were classified into achieved-social-participation (n = 11; employed: 8), difficult-social-participation (n = 12; unemployed: 8), and no-cognitive-dysfunction groups (n = 8; no social participation restriction). Relative to the achieved-social-participation group, the difficult-social-participation group showed greater injury and cognitive dysfunction and lower Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale and Short Form 36 role/social component summary scores (64.9/49.1 vs 44.3/30.4, respectively, P social participation status was greatly affected by the later cognitive disorders and psychosocial factors/problems not by the severity of TBI. No changes were observed in these scores following chronic-phase rehabilitation intervention. Chronic-phase TBI with cognitive disorder led to rehabilitation needs, and improvement of subjects’ psychosocial problems and QOL was difficult. PMID

  7. Pilot study: Computer-based virtual anatomical interactivity for rehabilitation of individuals with chronic acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, C Douglas; Arthanat, Sajay; Macri, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    Deficiencies in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning can compromise an affected individual's ability to complete everyday activities. Impaired motor and executive functioning therefore pose a risk to increasing numbers of veterans who have been diagnosed with acquired brain injury. This article reports on changes in upper-limb motor function and executive functioning of 12 adult participants with chronic acquired brain injury using a novel, computer-based, motor and cognitive rehabilitation program called PreMotor Exercise Games (PEGs). Manual muscle, goniometric range of motion, and dynamometer assessments were used to determine motor functioning while the Executive Function Performance Test measured cognitive functioning. A three-level repeated measures design was conducted to determine changes pre- and postintervention. Participants demonstrated significant improvement in shoulder (p = 0.01) and wrist (p = 0.01) range of motion and clinically relevant improvement for elbow range of motion. Participants demonstrated clinically relevant improvement in shoulder, elbow, and wrist strength. Finally, participants demonstrated significant improvement in executive functioning (p rehabilitation and warrants further study.

  8. Protection of Effective Component Group from Xiaoshuan Tongluo on Brain Injury after Chronic Hypoperfusion in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Chu-bing; WANG Hong-qing; TIAN Shuo; GAO Mei; XU Wei-ren; CHEN Ruo-yun; DU Guan-hua

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of purified effective component group in extract from Xiaoshuan Tongluo(CGXT)formula on chronic brain ischemia in rats.Methods CGXT 75,150,and 300 mg/kg or vehicle were ig administered daily for four weeks to rats with bilateral common carotid arteries ligation(BCCAL).From the day 24 to 28 after BCCAL,Morris water maze was performed to assess the learning and memory impairment of rats.Four weeks after BCCAL,brain gray and white matter damage were assessed.Results In Morris test,the mean escape latency of rats in the CGXT(150 and 300 mg/kg)groups was significantly shorter than that in the vehicle group.CGXT also attenuated the neuronal damage in hippocampus and cortex and reduced the pathological damage in the optic tract and corpus callosum.Conclusion CGXT could improve learning and memory impairment resulted from BCCAL in rats.These results provide the experimental basis for the clinical use of CGXT in stroke treatment and may help in investigation of multimodal therapy strategies in ischemic cerebrovascular diseases including stroke.

  9. Prospective study of a community reintegration programme for patients with acquired chronic brain injury: effects on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurtsen, G.J.; Heugten, C.M. van; Meijer, R.; Martina, J.D.; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of a residential community reintegration programme for patients with psychosocial problems due to acquired chronic brain injury on caregivers' emotional burden and family functioning. Design: A prospective cohort study with waiting list control and 1-year follow-up.

  10. Disruption of caudate working memory activation in chronic blast-related traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Newsome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI due to blast exposure is frequently diagnosed in veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, it is unclear whether neural damage resulting from blast TBI differs from that found in TBI due to blunt-force trauma (e.g., falls and motor vehicle crashes. Little is also known about the effects of blast TBI on neural networks, particularly over the long term. Because impairment in working memory has been linked to blunt-force TBI, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study sought to investigate whether brain activation in response to a working memory task would discriminate blunt-force from blast TBI. Twenty-five veterans (mean age = 29.8 years, standard deviation = 6.01 years, 1 female who incurred TBI due to blast an average of 4.2 years prior to enrollment and 25 civilians (mean age = 27.4 years, standard deviation = 6.68 years, 4 females with TBI due to blunt-force trauma performed the Sternberg Item Recognition Task while undergoing fMRI. The task involved encoding 1, 3, or 5 items in working memory. A group of 25 veterans (mean age = 29.9 years, standard deviation = 5.53 years, 0 females and a group of 25 civilians (mean age = 27.3 years, standard deviation = 5.81 years, 0 females without history of TBI underwent identical imaging procedures and served as controls. Results indicated that the civilian TBI group and both control groups demonstrated a monotonic relationship between working memory set size and activation in the right caudate during encoding, whereas the blast TBI group did not (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons using False Discovery Rate. Blast TBI was also associated with worse performance on the Sternberg Item Recognition Task relative to the other groups, although no other group differences were found on neuropsychological measures of episodic memory, inhibition, and general processing speed. These results

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen in chronic traumatic brain injury: oxygen, pressure, and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harch, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a treatment for wounds in any location and of any duration that has been misunderstood for 353 years. Since 2008 it has been applied to the persistent post-concussion syndrome of mild traumatic brain injury by civilian and later military researchers with apparent conflicting results. The civilian studies are positive and the military-funded studies are a mixture of misinterpreted positive data, indeterminate data, and negative data. This has confused the medical, academic, and lay communities. The source of the confusion is a fundamental misunderstanding of the definition, principles, and mechanisms of action of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This article argues that the traditional definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is arbitrary. The article establishes a scientific definition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as a wound-healing therapy of combined increased atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen over ambient atmospheric pressure and pressure of oxygen whose main mechanisms of action are gene-mediated. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exerts its wound-healing effects by expression and suppression of thousands of genes. The dominant gene actions are upregulation of trophic and anti-inflammatory genes and down-regulation of pro-inflammatory and apoptotic genes. The combination of genes affected depends on the different combinations of total pressure and pressure of oxygen. Understanding that hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a pressure and oxygen dose-dependent gene therapy allows for reconciliation of the conflicting TBI study results as outcomes of different doses of pressure and oxygen.

  12. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induced by enriched environment enhances angiogenesis and motor function in chronic hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hwa Seo

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched environment (EE on promoting angiogenesis and neurobehavioral function in an animal model of chronic hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury. HI brain damage was induced in seven day-old CD-1® mice by unilateral carotid artery ligation and exposure to hypoxia (8% O2 for 90 min. At six weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to either EE or standard cages (SC for two months. Rotarod, forelimb-use asymmetry, and grip strength tests were performed to evaluate neurobehavioral function. In order to identify angiogenic growth factors regulated by EE, an array-based multiplex ELISA assay was used to measure the expression in frontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum. Among the growth factors, the expression of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 was confirmed using western blotting. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA were also evaluated using immunohistochemistry. As a result, mice exposed to EE showed significant improvements in rotarod and ladder walking performances compared to SC controls. The level of FGF-2 was significantly higher in the frontal cortex of EE mice at 8 weeks after treatment in multiplex ELISA and western blot. On the other hand, FGF-2 in the striatum significantly increased at 2 weeks after exposure to EE earlier than in the frontal cortex. Expression of activin A was similarly upregulated as FGF-2 expression pattern. Particularly, all animals treated with FGF-2 neutralizing antibody abolished the beneficial effect of EE on motor performance relative to mice not given anti-FGF-2. Immunohistochemistry showed that densities of α-SMA(+ and PECAM-1(+ cells in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were significantly increased following EE, suggesting the histological findings exhibit a similar pattern to the upregulation of FGF-2 in the brain. In conclusion, EE enhances endogenous angiogenesis and neurobehavioral functions

  13. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response...reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including...chronic neuronal cell loss, glial activation, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) measure of β-amyloid and hyper-phosphorylated tau protein

  14. Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents Children ... body, may have a concussion or more serious brain injury. Concussion Signs Observed Can't recall events prior ...

  15. Brain Injury Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Only) 1-800-444-6443 Welcome to the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) Brain injury is not an event or an outcome. ... misunderstood, under-funded neurological disease. People who sustain brain injuries must have timely access to expert trauma ...

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of chronic tinnitus after traumatic brain injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Peter Michael; Landgrebe, Michael; Frank, Elmar; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is a frequent symptom of traumatic brain injury, which is difficult to treat. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has shown beneficial effects in some forms of tinnitus. However, traumatic brain injury in the past has been considered as a relative contraindication for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation because of the increased risk of seizures. Here we present the case of a 53-year-old male patient suffering from severe tinnitus after traumatic brain injury with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse, who received 5 treatment series of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (1 Hz stimulation protocol over left primary auditory cortex, 10 sessions of 2000 stimuli each, stimulation intensity 110% resting motor threshold). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was tolerated without any side effects and tinnitus complaints (measured by a validated tinnitus questionnaire and numeric rating scales) were improved in a replicable way throughout 5 courses of transcranial magnetic stimulation up to now.

  17. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Radouil Tzekov; Clint Dawson; Megan Orlando; Benoit Mouzon; Jon Reed; James Evans; Gogce Crynen; Michael Mullan; Fiona Crawford

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue w...

  18. Chronic avulsive injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, L.F.; Helms, C.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Bisset, G.S. III [Dept. of Radiology, Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)]|[Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Squire, D.L. [Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-03-01

    Children and adolescents are prone to avulsive injuries related to a combination of their propensity for great strength, ability to sustain extreme levels of activity, and immature growing apophyses. Appropriate interpretation of imaging studies showing chronic avulsive injuries is essential so that the irregularity and periostitis that can be associated with chronic avulsions is not misinterpreted as probable malignancy. This article reviews the chronic avulsive injuries of childhood. (orig.) With 12 figs., 8 refs.

  19. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Brain Tumors Brain Disorders AVMs Radiosurgery Gamma Knife Linac Radiotherapy Overview Childhood Brain Tumors IMRT Radiation Therapy Radiation Injury Treatment Day Making a Decision Centers of Excellence Publications Definitions Q & ...

  20. Assessing the Impact of Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms on Resting State Function Networks in a Military Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Dominic E; Bellgowan, Julie F; French, Louis M; Wolf, Jonathan P; Oakes, Terry; Mielke, Jeannine B; Sham, Elyssa B; Liu, Wei; Riedy, Gerard

    2017-03-19

    The relationship between post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and chronic symptoms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is difficult to discern and poorly understood. An accurate differential diagnosis, assessment and treatment of mTBI and PTSD is challenging due to significant symptom overlap and the absence of clearly established biomarkers. The objective of this work is to examine how post traumatic stress influences task-free brain networks in chronic mTBI subjects. Control subjects (N=44) were compared with chronic mTBI subjects with low (N=58, PCLC totalpost traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS). The results indicate significant differences in Brodmann area 10 for all mTBI subject groups, indicating potential mTBI related disruptions with regulation of emotions and decision-making. The effects of PTSS were observed in the anterior cingulate, and parahippocampus suggesting possible disruptions pertaining to memory regulation, encoding and retrieval. The overall results indicate the presence of aberrant connectivity patterns between controls and chronic mTBI subjects with low, medium and high PTSS. Furthermore, the findings suggest a disruption in attention relating to a network of brain regions involved with emotional regulation and memory coding, rather than a fear related response. Taken together, the results suggest these regions form a network that could be a target for future research pertaining to PTSD and chronic mTBI. Furthermore, the use of clinical measures, task based imaging studies or multimodal imaging could help further elucidate specific neural correlates of PTSS and mTBI.

  1. PERSONALITY CHANGES IN BRAIN INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Patricia Gracia; Mielke, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Paul; Bergey, Alyssa; Rao, Vani

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by alterations in mood and behaviour and changes in personality. We report mild personality changes post-TBI as a possible indicator of traumatic brain injury, but not of injury severity or psychiatric complications.

  2. Examining the Effectiveness of Mindfulness Meditation for Chronic Pain Management in Combat Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    that carry nociceptive information about potential tissue damage to the brain, pain is the subjective perception that results from interpreting this... nociception , pain , distress, and disability may be perpetuated. Although sensory mechanisms of pain have been historically given the most attention...accompanying nociception (Solberg, 2009). Prolonged mindful observation and awareness of chronic pain sensations could lead to desensitization, leading to

  3. Evaluation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M.; Halper, James; Pines, Hayley; Cancro, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    It is important to determine if a traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred when an individual is assessed in a hospital emergency room after a car accident, fall, or other injury that affects the head. This determination influences decisions about treatment. It is essential to screen for the injury, because the sooner they begin appropriate…

  4. Sports-related brain injuries: connecting pathology to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D; Dangelmajer, Sean; Kintzing, James; Ho, Allen L; Grant, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Brain injuries are becoming increasingly common in athletes and represent an important diagnostic challenge. Early detection and management of brain injuries in sports are of utmost importance in preventing chronic neurological and psychiatric decline. These types of injuries incurred during sports are referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries, which represent a heterogeneous spectrum of disease. The most dramatic manifestation of chronic mild traumatic brain injuries is termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is associated with profound neuropsychiatric deficits. Because chronic traumatic encephalopathy can only be diagnosed by postmortem examination, new diagnostic methodologies are needed for early detection and amelioration of disease burden. This review examines the pathology driving changes in athletes participating in high-impact sports and how this understanding can lead to innovations in neuroimaging and biomarker discovery.

  5. Discriminating military and civilian traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Matthew W; Velez, Carmen S

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs at higher rates among service members than civilians. Explosions from improvised explosive devices and mines are the leading cause of TBI in the military. As such, TBI is frequently accompanied by other injuries, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. In addition to postconcussion symptoms, those who sustain a TBI commonly report chronic pain and posttraumatic stress symptoms. This combination of symptoms is so typical they have been referred to as the "polytrauma clinical triad" among injured service members. We explore whether these symptoms discriminate civilian occurrences of TBI from those of service members, as well as the possibility that repeated blast exposure contributes to the development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  6. Brain Injury: A Manual For Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Karen; Dettmer, Judy; Dise-lewis, Jeanne E.; Murphy, Mary; Santistevan, Barbette; Seckinger, Barbara

    This manual provides Colorado educators with guidelines for serving students with brain injuries. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 provides basic information on the brain including definitions of brain injury and its severity, incidence of brain injury, and characteristics of students with brain injury. Chapter 3 considers…

  7. Comparison of acute and chronic traumatic brain injury using semi-automatic multimodal segmentation of MR volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Alger, Jeffry R; Filippou, Maria; Prastawa, Marcel W; Wang, Bo; Hovda, David A; Gerig, Guido; Toga, Arthur W; Kikinis, Ron; Vespa, Paul M; Van Horn, John D

    2011-11-01

    Although neuroimaging is essential for prompt and proper management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), there is a regrettable and acute lack of robust methods for the visualization and assessment of TBI pathophysiology, especially for of the purpose of improving clinical outcome metrics. Until now, the application of automatic segmentation algorithms to TBI in a clinical setting has remained an elusive goal because existing methods have, for the most part, been insufficiently robust to faithfully capture TBI-related changes in brain anatomy. This article introduces and illustrates the combined use of multimodal TBI segmentation and time point comparison using 3D Slicer, a widely-used software environment whose TBI data processing solutions are openly available. For three representative TBI cases, semi-automatic tissue classification and 3D model generation are performed to perform intra-patient time point comparison of TBI using multimodal volumetrics and clinical atrophy measures. Identification and quantitative assessment of extra- and intra-cortical bleeding, lesions, edema, and diffuse axonal injury are demonstrated. The proposed tools allow cross-correlation of multimodal metrics from structural imaging (e.g., structural volume, atrophy measurements) with clinical outcome variables and other potential factors predictive of recovery. In addition, the workflows described are suitable for TBI clinical practice and patient monitoring, particularly for assessing damage extent and for the measurement of neuroanatomical change over time. With knowledge of general location, extent, and degree of change, such metrics can be associated with clinical measures and subsequently used to suggest viable treatment options.

  8. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-01-01

    Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1) the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2) how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3) how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  9. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D. Bigler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1 the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2 how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3 how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  10. The ameliorative effects of exercise on cognitive impairment and white matter injury from blood-brain barrier disruption induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Min; Park, Jong-Min; Song, Min Kyung; Oh, Yoo Joung; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Youn-Jung

    2017-01-18

    Vascular dementia is the progressive change in blood vessels that leads to neuronal injuries in vulnerable areas induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH). CCH induces disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB), and this BBB disruption can initiate the cognitive impairment and white matter injury. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of treadmill exercise on the cognitive impairment, white matter injury, and BBB disruption induced by CCH. Vascular dementia was induced by permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAO) in rats. The rats in the exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30min once a day for 14 weeks, starting 4 weeks after birth. Our results revealed that treadmill exercise group was alleviated the cognitive impairment and myelin degradation induced by CCH. The disruption of BBB after CCH indicates degradation of occludin, zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1), and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Treadmill exercise may provide protective effects on BBB disruption from degradation of occludin, ZO-1, and overexpression of MMP-9 after CCH. These findings suggest that treadmill exercise ameliorates cognitive impairment and white matter injury from BBB disruption induced by CCH in rats. The present study will be valuable for means of prophylactic and therapeutic intervention for patients with CCH.

  11. Cytokines and perinatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, F S; Barks, J D; Hagan, P; Liu, X H; Ivacko, J; Szaflarski, J

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly expanding body of data provides support for the hypothesis that pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are expressed acutely in injured brain and contribute to progressive neuronal damage. Little is known about the pathogenetic role of these cytokines in perinatal brain injury. Recent experimental studies have incorporated two closely related in vivo perinatal rodent brain injury models to evaluate the role(s) of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the progression of neuronal injury: a perinatal stroke model, elicited by unilateral carotid artery ligation and subsequent timed exposure to 8% oxygen in 7-day-old rats, and a model of excitotoxic injury, elicited by stereotactic intra-cerebral injection of the selective excitatory amino acid agonist NMDA. Each of these lesioning methods results in reproducible, quantifiable focal forebrain injury at this developmental stage. Acute brain injury, evoked by cerebral hypoxia-ischemia or excitotoxin lesioning, results in transient marked increases in expression of IL-1 beta, and TNF-alpha mRNA in brain regions susceptible to irreversible injury, and there is evidence that pharmacological antagonism of IL-1 receptors can attenuate injury in both models. Recent studies also suggest that complementary strategies, based on pharmacological antagonism of platelet activating factor and on neutrophil depletion can also limit the extent of irreversible injury. In summary, current data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the progression of perinatal brain injury, and that these mediators are important targets for neuroprotective interventions in the acute post-injury period.

  12. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    rats induces structural changes in brain regions associated with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and...to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine pretreatment. A

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  14. Brainstem white matter integrity is related to loss of consciousness and postconcussive symptomatology in veterans with chronic mild to moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano-Wood, L; Bangen, K J; Sorg, S F; Clark, A L; Schiehser, D M; Luc, N; Bondi, M W; Werhane, M; Kim, R T; Bigler, E D

    2015-09-01

    We investigated associations between DTI indices of three brainstem white matter tracts, traumatic brain injury (TBI) injury characteristics, and postconcussive symptomatology (PCS) in a well-characterized sample of veterans with history of mild to moderate TBI (mTBI). 58 military veterans (mTBI: n = 38, mean age = 33.2, mean time since injury = 90.9 months; military controls [MC]; n = 20; mean age = 29.4) were administered 3T DTI scans as well as a comprehensive neuropsychiatric evaluation including evaluation of TBI injury characteristics and PCS symptoms (e.g., negative mood, dizziness, balance and coordination difficulties). Tractography was employed by seeding ROIs along 3 brainstem white matter tracts (i.e., medial lemniscus-central tegmentum tract [ML-CTT]; corticospinal tracts [CST], and pontine tegmentum [PT]), and mean DTI values were derived from fractional anisotropic (FA) maps. Results showed that there were no significant difference in FA between the MC and TBI groups across the 3 regions of interest; however, among the TBI group, CST FA was significantly negatively associated with LOC duration. Additionally, lower FA of certain tracts-most especially the PT-was significantly associated with increased PCS symptoms (i.e., more severe vestibular symptoms, poorer physical functioning, and greater levels of fatigue), even after adjusting for PTSD symptoms. Our findings show that, in our sample of veterans with mTBI, tractography-based DTI indices of brainstem white matter tracts of interest are related to the presence and severity of PCS symptoms. Findings are promising as they show linkages between brainstem white matter integrity and injury severity (LOC), and they raise the possibility that the pontine tegmentum in particular may be a useful marker of PCS symptoms. Collectively, these data point to important neurobiological substrates of the chronic and complex constellation of symptoms following the 'signature injury' of our

  15. A systematic review of the risk of dementia and chronic cognitive impairment after mild traumatic brain injury. Results of the International Collaboration on MTBI Prognosis (ICoMP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godbolt, Allison; Cancelliere, Carol; Hincapié, Cesar A

    2014-01-01

    -defined criteria. Peer-reviewed reports in six languages were considered. Study selection: Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohorts and case-control studies, with a minimum of 30 MTBI cases in subjects of any age, assessing the risk of dementia or CCI after MTBI were selected...... synthesis: Evidence from accepted studies was synthesized qualitatively according to modified SIGN criteria and prognostic information was prioritized as exploratory or confirmatory, according to design. Of 77 914 records screened, 304 articles were eligible and reviewed. Methodological quality......Objective: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the risk of dementia and chronic cognitive impairment (CCI), following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Data sources: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001–2012), using a previously published search strategy and pre...

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury, Microglia, and Beta Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Rebekah C.; Whalen, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TBI and AD share many pathologic features including chronic inflammation and the accumulation of beta amyloid (A\\(\\beta\\)). Data from both AD and TBI studies suggest that microglia play a central role in A\\(\\beta\\) accumulation after TBI. This paper focuses on the current research on the role of microglia response to A\\(\\beta\\) after TBI.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Brian; Schrer, Marcia J.; Gaeta, Raphael; Elias, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can cause multiple medical and functional problems. As the brain is involved in regulating nearly every bodily function, a TBI can affect any part of the body and aspect of cognitive, behavioral, and physical functioning. However, TBI affects each individual differently. Optimal management requires understanding the…

  18. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radouil Tzekov

    Full Text Available Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL, tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A, microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B, collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3 and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1, APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC, including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the

  19. Sub-Chronic Neuropathological and Biochemical Changes in Mouse Visual System after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzekov, Radouil; Dawson, Clint; Orlando, Megan; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon; Evans, James; Crynen, Gogce; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) results in neuropathological and biochemical consequences in the human visual system. Using a recently developed mouse model of r-mTBI, with control mice receiving repetitive anesthesia alone (r-sham) we assessed the effects on the retina and optic nerve using histology, immunohistochemistry, proteomic and lipidomic analyses at 3 weeks post injury. Retina tissue was used to determine retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, while optic nerve tissue was examined for cellularity, myelin content, protein and lipid changes. Increased cellularity and areas of demyelination were clearly detectable in optic nerves in r-mTBI, but not in r-sham. These changes were accompanied by a ~25% decrease in the total number of Brn3a-positive RGCs. Proteomic analysis of the optic nerves demonstrated various changes consistent with a negative effect of r-mTBI on major cellular processes like depolymerization of microtubules, disassembly of filaments and loss of neurons, manifested by decrease of several proteins, including neurofilaments (NEFH, NEFM, NEFL), tubulin (TUBB2A, TUBA4A), microtubule-associated proteins (MAP1A, MAP1B), collagen (COL6A1, COL6A3) and increased expression of other proteins, including heat shock proteins (HSP90B1, HSPB1), APOE and cathepsin D. Lipidomic analysis showed quantitative changes in a number of phospholipid species, including a significant increase in the total amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), including the molecular species 16:0, a known demyelinating agent. The overall amount of some ether phospholipids, like ether LPC, ether phosphatidylcholine and ether lysophosphatidylethanolamine were also increased, while the majority of individual molecular species of ester phospholipids, like phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, were decreased. Results from the biochemical analysis correlate well with changes detected by histological and immunohistochemical methods and indicate the involvement of

  20. Neuroprotective Strategies after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    performance in the HBOT groups improved sig- nificantly and was highly correlated with increased ipsilat- eral hippocampal blood volume ( cerebrovascular ...Oxygen Therapy Induces Cerebrovascular Changes and Improves Complex Learning/Memory in a Rat Open Head Bonk Chronic Brain Contusion Model. Undersea...injury. Dynamic brain trauma includes direct injury where trauma is directly imposed on the brain (e.g., non- accidental trauma, contact sports, falls

  1. Detecting malingering in traumatic brain injury and chronic pain with an abbreviated version of the Meyers Index for the MMPI-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguerrevere, Luis E; Greve, Kevin W; Bianchini, Kevin J; Meyers, John E

    2008-01-01

    Meyers, Millis, and Volkert [Meyers, J. E., Millis, S. R., & Volkert, K. (2002). A validity index for the MMPI-2. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 17, 157-169] developed a method to detect malingering in chronic pain patients using seven scales from the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). This method may be impractical because two of the scales (Obvious minus Subtle and Dissimulation-revised) are not reported by the commercially available Pearson computerized scoring system. The current study recalculated the Meyers Index using the five Pearson-provided scales in the chronic pain data sets of Meyers et al. [Meyers, J. E., Millis, S. R., & Volkert, K. (2002). A validity index for the MMPI-2. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 17, 157-169] and Bianchini, Etherton, Greve, Heinly, and Meyers [Bianchini, K. J., Etherton, J. L., Greve, K. W., Heinly, M. T., & Meyers, J. E. (in press). Classification accuracy of MMPI-2 validity scales in the detection of pain-related malingering: A known-groups approach. Assessment], and the traumatic brain injury data of Greve, Bianchini, Love, Brennan, and Heinly [Greve, K. W., Bianchini, K. J., Love, J. M., Brennan, A., & Heinly, M. T. (2006). Sensitivity and specificity of MMPI-2 validity scales and indicators to malingered neurocognitive dysfunction in traumatic brain injury. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 20, 491-512]. Classification accuracy of the abbreviated Meyers Index was comparable to the original. These findings demonstrate that the abbreviated Meyers Index can be used as a substitute of the original Meyers Index without decrements in classification accuracy.

  2. Diffusion tensor tractography-based analysis of the cingulum: clinical utility and findings in traumatic brain injury with chronic sequels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurki, Timo [Turku University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Turku (Finland); MRI Unit, Terveystalo Pulssi Medical Centre, Turku (Finland); Himanen, Leena; Vuorinen, Elina; Myllyniemi, Anna; Saarenketo, Anna-Riitta [NeuTera Neuropsychologist Centre, Turku (Finland); Kauko, Tommi [University of Turku, Department of Biostatistics, Turku (Finland); Brandstack, Nina [Turku University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Turku (Finland); Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland); Tenovuo, Olli [Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Department of Rehabilitation and Brain Trauma, Turku (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    To evaluate the clinical utility of quantitative diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and tractography-based core analysis (TBCA) of the cingulum by defining the reproducibility, normal values, and findings in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Eighty patients with TBI and normal routine MRI and 78 controls underwent MRI at 3T. To determine reproducibility, 12 subjects were scanned twice. Superior (SC) and inferior (IC) cingulum were analyzed separately by DTT (fractional anisotropy (FA) thresholds 0.15 and 0.30). TBCA was performed from volumes defined by tractography with gradually changed FA thresholds. FA values were correlated with clinical and neuropsychological data. The lowest coefficient of variation was obtained at DTT threshold 0.30 (2.0 and 2.4 % for SC and IC, respectively), but in proportion to standard deviations of normal controls, the reproducibility of TBCA was better in SC and similar to that of DTT in IC. In patients with TBI, volume reduction with loss of peripheral fibers was relatively common; mean FA was mostly normal in these tractograms. The frequency of FA reductions (>2 SD) was in DTT smaller than in TBCA, in which FA decrease was present in 42 (13.1 %) of the 320 measurements. Central FA values in SC predicted visuoperceptual ability, and those in left IC predicted cognitive speed, language, and communication ability (p < 0.05). Tractography-based measurements have sufficient reproducibility for demonstration of severe abnormalities of the cingulum. TBCA is preferential for clinical FA analysis, because it measures corresponding areas in patients and controls without inaccuracies due to trauma-induced structural changes. (orig.)

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury: FDA Research and Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Control—Traumatic Brain Injury Public Workshop: Advancing the Development of Biomarkers in Traumatic Brain Injury, March 3, 2016 ... Health Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics ...

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Basic Information Get the Facts Signs and ...

  5. Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Brain Injury Safety Tips and Prevention Recommend on Facebook ... not grass or dirt. More HEADS UP Video: Brain Injury Safety and Prevention frame support disabled and/ ...

  6. The neuroethics and neurolaw of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Ford, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Neuroethics and neurolaw are fields of study that involve the interface of neuroscience with clinical and legal decision-making. The past two decades have seen increasing attention being paid to both fields, in large part because of the advances in neuroimaging techniques and improved ability to visualize and measure brain structure and function. Traumatic brain injury (TBI), along with its acute and chronic sequelae, has emerged as a focus of neuroethical issues, such as informed consent for treatment and research, diagnostic and prognostic uncertainties, and the subjectivity of interpretation of data. The law has also more frequently considered TBI in criminal settings for exculpation, mitigation and sentencing purposes and in tort and administrative law for personal injury, disability and worker's compensation cases. This article provides an overview of these topics with an emphasis on the current challenges that the neuroscience of TBI faces in the medicolegal arena.

  7. MRI of perinatal brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Allsop, Joanna [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Perinatal Imaging, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Martinez Biarge, Miriam [La Paz University Hospital, Dept of Neonatology, Madrid (Spain); Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Neonatal Medicine, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Dept of Paediatrics, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    MRI is invaluable in assessing the neonatal brain following suspected perinatal injury. Good quality imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults or older children. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and should be available to aid interpretation of the imaging findings. Perinatal lesions, the pattern of which can predict neurodevelopmental outcome, are at their most obvious on conventional imaging between 1 and 2 weeks from birth. Very early imaging during the first week may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates but brain abnormalities may still be subtle using conventional sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is very useful for the early identification of ischaemic tissue in the neonatal brain but may underestimate the final extent of injury, particularly basal ganglia and thalamic lesions. MR imaging is an excellent predictor of outcome following perinatal brain injury and can therefore be used as a biomarker in interventional trials designed to reduce injury and improve neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  8. Imaging of Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zagorchev, L.; McAllister, T.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents an enormous public health challenge and is often associated with life long neurobehavioral sequelae in survivors. Several factors including higher percentages of individuals surviving TBI, as well as increasing concern about potential long term sequelae of ev

  9. Traumatic brain injury : from impact to rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, J.; Absalom, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in our society, particularly among the young. This review discusses the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury, and current management from the acute phase through to rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury patient.

  10. Assessment of Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of brain injuries, as well as their impact on individuals who sustain them, has received growing attention from American media in recent years. This attention is likely the result of high profile individuals suffering brain injuries. Greater public awareness of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) has also been promoted by sources such as…

  11. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  12. Traumatic brain injury and reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Stern, Yaakov

    2015-01-01

    The potential role of brain and cognitive reserve in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is reviewed. Brain reserve capacity (BRC) refers to preinjury quantitative measures such as brain size that relate to outcome. Higher BRC implies threshold differences when clinical deficits will become apparent after injury, where those individuals with higher BRC require more pathology to reach that threshold. Cognitive reserve (CR) refers to how flexibly and efficiently the individual makes use of available brain resources. The CR model suggests the brain actively attempts to cope with brain damage by using pre-existing cognitive processing approaches or by enlisting compensatory approaches. Standard proxies for CR include education and IQ although this has expanded to include literacy, occupational attainment, engagement in leisure activities, and the integrity of social networks. Most research on BRC and CR has taken place in aging and degenerative disease but these concepts likely apply to the effects of TBI, especially with regards to recovery. Since high rates of TBI occur in those under age 35, both CR and BRC factors likely relate to how the individual copes with TBI over the lifespan. These factors may be particularly relevant to the relationship of developing dementia in the individual who has sustained a TBI earlier in life.

  13. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka [Nagoya City Rehabilitation and Sports Center (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with {sup 15}O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO{sub 2} between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO{sub 2} of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO{sub 2} of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the

  14. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  15. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI in Brazil. Objective: We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Methods: Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Results: Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Conclusion: Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  16. Severe cerebral vasospasm after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehnel, Corey R; Wendell, Linda C; Potter, N Stevenson; Klinge, Petra; Thompson, Bradford B

    2014-07-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury is associated with both acute and delayed neuro- logical injury. Cerebral vasospasm is commonly associated with delayed neurological decline in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients. However, the role played by vasospasm in traumatic brain injury is less clear. Vasospasm occurs earlier, for a shorter duration, and often without significant neurological consequence among traumatic brain injury patients. Detection and management strategies for vasospasm in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are not easily transferrable to traumatic brain injury patients. We present a patient with a severe traumatic brain injury who had dramatic improvement following emergent decompressive hemicraniectomy. Two weeks after initial presentation he suffered a precipitous decline despite intensive surveillance. This case illustrates the distinct challenges of diagnosing cerebral vasospasm in the setting of severe traumatic brain injury.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid enzymes in acute brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I.R. Maas (Andrew)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractSevere brain injury is a major cause of death, especially in young men. In 1972, over 20% of all deaths occurring in England and Wales in men aged 15-25 years were due to head injury (Field, 1976). The mortality rate after severe brain injuries is higb. Jennett et al. (1977) reporting on

  18. Stress and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Behavioral, Proteomics, and Histological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) can both result in lasting neurobehavioral abnormalities. Post- traumatic stress disorder and blast...factor on the battlefield INTRODUCTION Traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) is one of the leading causes of death and chronic disability worldwide (Bruns and...ulcer devel- opment. Brain Res. Bull. 25, 691–695. Jaffee, M. S., and Meyer, K. S. (2009). A brief overview of traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) and

  19. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  20. Traumatic brain injury among Indiana state prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Bradley; Sapp, Dona; Kincaid, Ashley

    2014-09-01

    Research on traumatic brain injury among inmates has focused on comparing the rate of traumatic brain injury among offenders to the general population, but also how best to screen for traumatic brain injury among this population. This study administered the short version of the Ohio State University Traumatic Brain Injury Identification Method to all male inmates admitted into Indiana state prisons were screened for a month (N = 831). Results indicate that 35.7% of the inmates reported experiencing a traumatic brain injury during their lifetime and that these inmates were more likely to have a psychiatric disorder and a prior period of incarceration than those without. Logistic regression analysis finds that a traumatic brain injury predicts the likelihood of prior incarceration net of age, race, education, and psychiatric disorder. This study suggests that brief instruments can be successfully implemented into prison screenings to help divert inmates into needed treatment.

  1. Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-21

    REPORT Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have met all of the milestones outlined in this...COVERED (From - To) 18-Sep-2006 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 17-Mar-2008 Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury Report...Manassero*, Justin Kim*, Maureen St Georges*, Nicole Esclamado* and Elizabeth Orwin. “Development of a Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury Using

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury: Same or Different

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY : SAME OR DIFFERENT Kimberly Meyer, ACNP-BC, CNRN Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Traumatic Brain Injury : Same or Different 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...official policy of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or U.S. Government. DISCLOSURES Nothing to disclose TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Mild

  3. [Mild brain injuries in emergency medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Niskakangas, Tero; Ohman, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostics and correct classification of mild brain injuries is challenging. Problems caused by insufficient documentation at the acute phase become more obvious in situations in which legal insurance issues are to be considered. A small proportion of patients with mild brain injury suffer from prolonged symptoms. Medical recording and classification of the brain injury at the initial phase should therefore be carried out in a structured manner. The review deals with the diagnostic problems of mild brain injuries and presents a treatment protocol for adult patients at the acute phase, aiming at avoiding prolonged problems.

  4. Hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Eva; Bernabeu, Ignacio; Castro, Ana I; Casanueva, Felipe F

    2015-03-01

    The prevalence of hypopituitarism after traumatic brain (TBI) injury is widely variable in the literature; a meta-analysis determined a pooled prevalence of anterior hypopituitarism of 27.5%. Growth hormone deficiency is the most prevalent hormone insufficiency after TBI; however, the prevalence of each type of pituitary deficiency is influenced by the assays used for diagnosis, severity of head trauma, and time of evaluation. Recent studies have demonstrated improvement in cognitive function and cognitive quality of life with substitution therapy in GH-deficient patients after TBI.

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or ...

  6. Quality of Life Following Brain Injury: Perspectives from Brain Injury Association of America State Affiliates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Tucker, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to examine the perspectives of brain injury professionals concerning family members' feelings about the quality of life experienced by individuals with brain injuries. Participants: participating in the study were 28 individuals in leadership positions with the state affiliates of the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA). Methods:…

  7. Brain Temperature: Physiology and Pathophysiology after Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ségolène Mrozek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of brain temperature is largely dependent on the metabolic activity of brain tissue and remains complex. In intensive care clinical practice, the continuous monitoring of core temperature in patients with brain injury is currently highly recommended. After major brain injury, brain temperature is often higher than and can vary independently of systemic temperature. It has been shown that in cases of brain injury, the brain is extremely sensitive and vulnerable to small variations in temperature. The prevention of fever has been proposed as a therapeutic tool to limit neuronal injury. However, temperature control after traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or stroke can be challenging. Furthermore, fever may also have beneficial effects, especially in cases involving infections. While therapeutic hypothermia has shown beneficial effects in animal models, its use is still debated in clinical practice. This paper aims to describe the physiology and pathophysiology of changes in brain temperature after brain injury and to study the effects of controlling brain temperature after such injury.

  8. 5-lipoxygenase expression in a brain damage model induced by chronic oral administration of aluminum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongquan Pan; Peng Zhang; Junqing Yang; Qiang Su

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has found that the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, caffeic acid, has a marked protective effect on acute brain injury induced by intracerebroventricular microinjection of aluminum.In this experiment, chronic brain injury and neuronal degeneration model was established in rats by chronic oral administration of aluminum, and then intervened using caffeic acid. Results showed that caffeic acid can downregulate chronic aluminum overload-induced 5-lipoxygenase mRNA and protein expression, and repair the aluminum overload-induced hippocampal neuronal damage andspatial orientation impairment. It is suggested that direct intervention of 5-lipoxygenase expression has a neuroprotective role in the degeneration induced by chronic aluminum overload brain injury model.

  9. The clinical spectrum of sport-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Barry D

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a substantial public health concern. Various types of acute TBI can occur in sport, but detection and management of cerebral concussion is of greatest importance as mismanagement of this syndrome can lead to persistent or chronic postconcussion syndrome (CPCS) or diffuse cerebral swelling. Chronic TBI encompasses a spectrum of disorders that are associated with long-term consequences of brain injury, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), dementia pugilistica, post-traumatic parkinsonism, post-traumatic dementia and CPCS. CTE is the prototype of chronic TBI, but can only be definitively diagnosed at autopsy as no reliable biomarkers of this disorder are available. Whether CTE shares neuropathological features with CPCS is unknown. Evidence suggests that participation in contact-collision sports may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease, but the data are conflicting. In this Review, the spectrum of acute and chronic sport-related TBI is discussed, highlighting how examination of athletes involved in high-impact sports has advanced our understanding of pathology of brain injury and enabled improvements in detection and diagnosis of sport-related TBI.

  10. Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Peeters (Wouter); R. van den Brande (Ruben); S. Polinder (Suzanne); A. Brazinova (Alexandra); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a critical public health and socio-economic problem throughout the world, making epidemiological monitoring of incidence, prevalence and outcome of TBI necessary. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of traumatic brain injury in Europe and to

  11. Treatment of very severe brain injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨振九; 杨佳勇; 冯承宣; 宋伟健; 孙强

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the experience in treating very severe traumatic brain injuries.Methods: Retrospective analysis of 68 patients with very severe traumatic brain injuries treated in our hospital from 1997 to 2002 was done.Results: Forty-one (60%) patients died. In the 50 patients treated surgically 27 (40%) survived, 8 recovered well, 9 had moderate disability and 10 had sever deficits. The 18 patients treated non-operatively all died.Conclusions: Much attention should be given to the observation of the changes of severe brain injuries with cranial base injury. Timely operative decompression, basic life support, keeping effective brain blood perfusion and effective oxygen supply, improving cerebral microcirculation and preventing or controlling complications are the main methods to raise the successful rate of treating very severe brain injuries and the life quality of the patients.

  12. Mechanisms of chronic pain from whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Charles G

    2013-02-01

    This article is to provide insights into the mechanisms underlying chronic pain from whiplash injury. Studies show that injury produces plasticity changes of different neuronal structures that are responsible for amplification of nociception and exaggerated pain responses. There is consistent evidence for hypersensitivity of the central nervous system to sensory stimulation in chronic pain after whiplash injury. Tissue damage, detected or not by the available diagnostic methods, is probably the main determinant of central hypersensitivity. Different mechanisms underlie and co-exist in the chronic whiplash condition. Spinal cord hyperexcitability in patients with chronic pain after whiplash injury can cause exaggerated pain following low intensity nociceptive or innocuous peripheral stimulation. Spinal hypersensitivity may explain pain in the absence of detectable tissue damage. Whiplash is a heterogeneous condition with some individuals showing features suggestive of neuropathic pain. A predominantly neuropathic pain component is related to a higher pain/disability level.

  13. Anesthesia for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Bishwajit; Maung, Adrian A

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a wide spectrum of disease and disease severity. Because the primary brain injury occurs before the patient enters the health care system, medical interventions seek principally to prevent secondary injury. Anesthesia teams that provide care for patients with TBI both in and out of the operating room should be aware of the specific therapies and needs of this unique and complex patient population.

  14. Effect of AVP on brain edema following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao; SU Wei; HUANG Wei-dong; LU Yuan-qiang; XU Qiu-ping; CHEN Zhao-jun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) level in patients with traumatic brain injury and investigate the role of AVP in the process of brain edema. Methods: A total of 30 patients with traumatic brain injury were involved in our study. They were divided into two groups by Glasgow Coma Scale: severe traumatic brain injury group (STBI, GCS≤ 8) and moderate traumatic brain injury group (MTBI, GCS>8).Samples of venous blood were collected in the morning at rest from 15 healthy volunteers (control group)and within 24 h after traumatic brain injury from these patients for AVP determinations by radioimmunoassay. The severity and duration of the brain edema were estimated by head CT scan.Results: plasma AVP levels (ng/L) were (mean±SD): control, 3.06±1.49; MTBI, 38.12±7.25; and STBI, 66.61±17.10.The plasma level of AVP was significantly increased within 24 h after traumatic brain injury and followed by the reduction of GCS, suggesting the deterioration of cerebral injury (P<0.01). And the AVP level was correlated with the severity (STBI r=0.919, P<0.01; MTBI r=0.724, P<0.01) and the duration of brain edema (STBI r=0.790, P<0.01; MTBI r=0.712, P<0.01). Conclusions: The plasma AVP level is closely associated with the severity of traumatic brain injury. AVP may play an important role in pathogenesis of brain edema after traumatic brain injury.

  15. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (less than 32 weeks' gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI. We demonstrated previously that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has an important role in oligodendrocyte development. Here we examine whether enhanced EGFR signalling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioural recovery in the developing brain. Using an established mouse model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin-binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioural deficits on white-matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signalling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and potentially applicable to the treatment of premature children with white matter injury.

  16. Family needs after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Perrin, Paul B; Cuberos-Urbano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore differences by country in the importance of family needs after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as well as differences in met/unmet needs. METHOD: Two hundred and seventy-one family members of an individual with TBI in Mexico, Colombia, Spain......, Denmark, and Norway completed the Family Needs Questionnaire. RESULTS: Eight of the ten needs rated as most important globally were from the Health Information subscale. Importance ratings on the Health Information, Professional Support, and Involvement With Care subscales were similar across countries......, but Mexican family members rated Instrumental Support needs as less important than Colombian, Spanish, and Danish family members, and also rated their Community Support needs as less important than Danish and Spanish family members. Mexican family member's rated emotional support needs as less important than...

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Kinyanjui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kenya has a disproportionately high rate of road traffic accidents each year, many of them resulting in traumatic brain injuries (TBIs. A review of articles written on issues pertaining to the medical treatment of people with TBI in the past 15 years in Kenya indicates a significantly high incidence of TBIs and a high mortality rate. This article reviews the available literature as a first step in exploring the status of rehabilitation of Kenyans with cognitive impairments and other disabilities resulting from TBIs. From this preliminary review, it is apparent that despite TBI being a pervasive public health problem in Kenya, it has not received due attention in the public and private sectors as evidenced by a serious lack of post-acute rehabilitation services for people with TBIs. Implications for this lack of services are discussed and recommendations are made for potential approaches to this problem.

  18. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...... the high incidence of TBI with more than 100 pr. 100,000 inhabitants, TBI would be by far the most common cause of hypopituitarism if the recently reported prevalence rates hold true. The disproportion between this proposed incidence and the occasional cases of post-TBI hypopituitarism in clinical practice...... justifies reflection as to whether hypopituitarism has been unrecognized in TBI patients or whether diagnostic testing designed for high risk populations such as patients with obvious pituitary pathology has overestimated the true risk and thereby the disease burden of hypopituitarism in TBI. The findings...

  19. Neurological consequences of traumatic brain injuries in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Helen; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in boxing and other contact sports. The long term irreversible and progressive aftermath of TBI in boxers depicted as punch drunk syndrome was described almost a century ago and is now widely referred as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The short term sequelae of acute brain injury including subdural haematoma and catastrophic brain injury may lead to death, whereas mild TBI, or concussion, causes functional disturbance and axonal injury rather than gross structural brain damage. Following concussion, symptoms such as dizziness, nausea, reduced attention, amnesia and headache tend to develop acutely but usually resolve within a week or two. Severe concussion can also lead to loss of consciousness. Despite the transient nature of the clinical symptoms, functional neuroimaging, electrophysiological, neuropsychological and neurochemical assessments indicate that the disturbance of concussion takes over a month to return to baseline and neuropathological evaluation shows that concussion-induced axonopathy may persist for years. The developing brains in children and adolescents are more susceptible to concussion than adult brain. The mechanism by which acute TBI may lead to the neurodegenerative process of CTE associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and the development of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) remains speculative. Focal tau-positive NFTs and neurites in close proximity to focal axonal injury and foci of microhaemorrhage and the predilection of CTE-tau pathology for perivascular and subcortical regions suggest that acute TBI-related axonal injury, loss of microvascular integrity, breach of the blood brain barrier, resulting inflammatory cascade and microglia and astrocyte activation are likely to be the basis of the mechanistic link of TBI and CTE. This article provides an overview of the acute and long-term neurological consequences of TBI in sports. Clinical, neuropathological and the possible pathophysiological

  20. Changes in T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulu Miao; Mingxia Zhang; Yulin Nie; Wan Zhao; Bin Huang; Zhengming Jiang; Shaoxiong Yu; Zhibin Huang; Hongjin Fu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides local changes of cranial parenchymal cells, hemorrhage, etc., severe traumatic brain injuries also cause the changes of total body fluid and various functions, and the changes of lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets should be paid more attention to.OBJECTIVE: To reveal the changing laws of T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury, and compare with mild to moderate brain injury.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City;Central Laboratory of Shenzhen Hospital of Prevention and Cure for Chronic Disease.PARTICIPANTS: All the subjects were selected from the Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City from August 2002 to August 2005. Thirty patients with severe brain injury, whose Glasgow coma score (GCS) was ≤ 8 points, were taken as the experimental group, including 21 males and 9 females, aging 16 - 62 years. Meanwhile, 30 patients with mild traumatic brain injury were taken as the control group (GCS ranged 14 - 15 points), including 18 males and 12 females, aging 15 - 58 years. All the subjects were in admission at 6 hours after injury, without disease of major organs before injury.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients or their relatives.conditions of pulmonaryinfections were observed at 4 days after injury. The differences of measurement data were compared with the t test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of T lymphocytes subsets at 1 - 14 days after severe and mild or moderate traumatic injury.RESULTS: Finally, 28 and 25 patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury, whereas 25 and 21 patients with severe traumatic brain injury were analyzed at 7 and 14 days respectively, and the missed ones CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8 began to decrease, whereas CD8 increased in the experimental group, which were very significantly different from those in the control group (t =2.77 - 3.26, P < 0

  1. Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Robinson, Meghan E

    2014-06-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Increasing evidence suggests that a single traumatic brain injury can produce long-term gray and white matter atrophy, precipitate or accelerate age-related neurodegeneration, and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. In addition, repetitive mTBIs can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We found early changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in four young veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict who were exposed to explosive blast and in another young veteran who was repetitively concussed. Four of the five veterans with early-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy were also diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder. Advanced chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found in veterans who experienced repetitive neurotrauma while in service and in others who were accomplished athletes. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus; septal abnormalities; and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has clinical and

  2. Attenuated traumatic axonal injury and improved functional outcome after traumatic brain injury in mice lacking Sarm1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Nils; Bouley, James; Sikoglu, Elif M; An, Jiyan; Moore, Constance M; King, Jean A; Bowser, Robert; Freeman, Marc R; Brown, Robert H

    2016-04-01

    Axonal degeneration is a critical, early event in many acute and chronic neurological disorders. It has been consistently observed after traumatic brain injury, but whether axon degeneration is a driver of traumatic brain injury remains unclear. Molecular pathways underlying the pathology of traumatic brain injury have not been defined, and there is no efficacious treatment for traumatic brain injury. Here we show that mice lacking the mouse Toll receptor adaptor Sarm1 (sterile α/Armadillo/Toll-Interleukin receptor homology domain protein) gene, a key mediator of Wallerian degeneration, demonstrate multiple improved traumatic brain injury-associated phenotypes after injury in a closed-head mild traumatic brain injury model. Sarm1(-/-) mice developed fewer β-amyloid precursor protein aggregates in axons of the corpus callosum after traumatic brain injury as compared to Sarm1(+/+) mice. Furthermore, mice lacking Sarm1 had reduced plasma concentrations of the phophorylated axonal neurofilament subunit H, indicating that axonal integrity is maintained after traumatic brain injury. Strikingly, whereas wild-type mice exibited a number of behavioural deficits after traumatic brain injury, we observed a strong, early preservation of neurological function in Sarm1(-/-) animals. Finally, using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy we found tissue signatures consistent with substantially preserved neuronal energy metabolism in Sarm1(-/-) mice compared to controls immediately following traumatic brain injury. Our results indicate that the SARM1-mediated prodegenerative pathway promotes pathogenesis in traumatic brain injury and suggest that anti-SARM1 therapeutics are a viable approach for preserving neurological function after traumatic brain injury.

  3. Clinimetric measurement in traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opara, J A; Małecka, E; Szczygiel, J

    2014-06-15

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Every year, about 1.5 million affected people die and several millions receive emergency treatment. Most of the burden (90%) is in low and middle-income countries. The costs of care depend on the level of disability. The burden of care after traumatic brain injury is caused by disability as well as by psychosocial and emotional sequelae of injury. The final consequence of brain injury is the reduction of quality of life. It is very difficult to predict the outcome after traumatic brain injury. The basic clinical model included four predictors: age, score in Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. These are the neuroradiological markers of recovery after TBI (CT, MRI and PET) and biomarkers: genetic markers of ApoE Gene, ectoenzyme CD 38 (cluster of differentiation 38), serum S100B, myelin basic protein (MBP), neuron specific endolase (NSE), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GPAP). These are many clinimetric scales which are helpful in prognosing after head injury. In this review paper, the most commonly used scales evaluating the level of consciousness after traumatic brain injury have been presented.

  4. Effects of a rapid-resisted elliptical training program on motor, cognitive and neurobehavioral functioning in adults with chronic traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Diane L; Zampieri, Cristiane; Ge, Jie; Acevedo, Ana; Dsurney, John

    2016-08-01

    This small clinical trial utilized a novel rehabilitation strategy, rapid-resisted elliptical training, in an effort to increase motor, and thereby cognitive, processing speed in ambulatory individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). As an initial step, multimodal functional abilities were quantified and compared in 12 ambulatory adults with and 12 without TBI. After the baseline assessment, the group with TBI participated in an intensive 8-week daily exercise program using an elliptical trainer and was reassessed after completion and at an 8-week follow-up. The focus of training was on achieving a fast movement speed, and once the target was reached, resistance to motion was increased in small increments to increase intensity of muscle activation. Primary outcomes were: High-Level Mobility Assessment Tool (HiMAT), instrumented balance tests, dual-task (DT) performance and neurobehavioral questionnaires. The group with TBI had poorer movement excursion during balance tests and poorer dual-task (DT) performance. After training, balance reaction times improved and were correlated with gains in the HiMAT and DT. Sleep quality also improved and was correlated with improved depression and learning. This study illustrates how brain injury can affect multiple linked aspects of functioning and provides preliminary evidence that intensive rapid-resisted training has specific positive effects on dynamic balance and more generalized effects on sleep quality in TBI.

  5. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. 1308... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.16 Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. A child is classified as having traumatic brain injury whose brain injuries are caused by an...

  6. Cognitive impairments in patients with brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vladimirovich Zakharov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data of Russian and foreign authors and the results of this paper authors’ investigation of higher cerebral functions in patients who have sustained brain injury (BI. It shows their high prevalence, the predominance of cognitive impairments (CI over neurological disorders in patients with mild and moderate injury, presents their quantitative and qualitative features (a preponderance of focal symptoms in severe injury and neurodynamic disorders in mild injury, describes the predictors of their course and prognosis (the degree of injury is one of the most important predictors, and discusses current trends in the medical correction of detected abnormalities.

  7. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria wer...

  8. [Biochemical and immunohistochemical markers of brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajtr, D; Průsa, R; Houst'ava, L; Sámal, F; Kukacka, J; Pachl, J

    2006-07-01

    Proteins released to circulation from affected tissues during primary or secondary trauma brain injury might be used as serum markers of glial or ganglial cells damage (neuron specific enolasis and S100 B protein). Other markers of trauma can be proved as relatively specific of diffuse axonal injury by immunohistochemical detectoin (amyloid prekurzor protein, neuron specific enolasis, glial fibrilar acidic protein and superficial antigen receptor CD 68). Some markers are associated with blood brain barrier damage (matrix metaloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and synthase of nitric oxide (iNOS)). We aimed in our short communication on biomechanics of developed of trauma, primary or secondary kinds of trauma brain injury and use of trauma brain injury markers for clinical diagnostics and management of patients.

  9. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    persons, and leaves 99,000 persons permanently disabled [1]. The total cost for treatment and rehabilitation of patients with brain injuries is...registry based or retrospective or include only secondary insults that occur in the intensive care unit ( ICU ) setting. Most prior investigations have...in the surgical and neurosurgical ICU diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury requiring a diagnostic procedure were eligible for the study. The study

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cells for traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pischiutta,

    2014-01-01

    The multiple pathological cascades activated after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their extended nature offer the possibility for therapeutic interventions possibly affecting multiple injury mechanisms simultaneously. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy matches this need, being a bioreactor of a variety of molecules able to interact and modify the injured brain microenvironment. Compared to autologous MSCs, bank stored GMP-graded allogenic MSCs appear to be a realistic choice for TBI ...

  11. Traumatic brain injuries: Forensic and expertise aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Vuleković Petar; Simić Milan; Mišić-Pavkov Gordana; Cigić Tomislav; Kojadinović Željko; Đilvesi Đula

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Traumatic brain injuries have major socio-economic importance due to their frequency, high mortality and serious consequences. According to their nature the consequences of these injuries may be classified as neurological, psychiatric and esthetic. Various lesions of brain structures cause neurological consequences such as disturbance of motor functions, sensibility, coordination or involuntary movements, speech disturbances and other deviations, as well as epilepsy. Psychiatric...

  12. Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M.; Scherer, Marcia J.; Elias, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    This article is the first of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Historically, TBI has received very limited national public policy attention and support. However since it has become the signature injury of the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, TBI has gained the attention of elected officials, military leaders,…

  13. Perioperative management of traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, Parichat; Viernes, Darwin; Sharma, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem and the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Despite the modern diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis for patients with TBI remains poor. While severity of primary injury is the major factor determining the outcomes, the secondary injury caused by physiological insults such as hypotension, hypoxemia, hypercarbia, hypocarbia, hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, etc. that develop over time after the onset of the initial inju...

  14. Occupational Therapy and Community Reintegration of Persons with Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Occupational Therapy and Community Reintegration of Persons With Brain Injury Brain injuries can affect motor, sensory, cognitive, and behavioral functioning. A person who has sustained a brain ...

  15. Traumatic brain injuries: Forensic and expertise aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuleković Petar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Traumatic brain injuries have major socio-economic importance due to their frequency, high mortality and serious consequences. According to their nature the consequences of these injuries may be classified as neurological, psychiatric and esthetic. Various lesions of brain structures cause neurological consequences such as disturbance of motor functions, sensibility, coordination or involuntary movements, speech disturbances and other deviations, as well as epilepsy. Psychiatric consequences include cognitive deficit, emotional disturbances and behavior disturbances. Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries and litigation. Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries expertise understands the qualification of these injuries as mild, serious and qualified serious body injuries as well as the expertise about the mechanisms of their occurrence. Litigation expertise includes the estimation of pain, fear, diminished, i.e. lost vital activity and disability, esthetic marring, and psychological suffer based on the diminished general vital activity and esthetic marring. Competence and timing of expertise. Evaluation of consequences of traumatic brain injuries should be performed only when it can be positively confirmed that they are permanent, i.e. at least one year after the injury. Expertise of these injuries is interdisciplinary. Among clinical doctors the most competent medical expert is the one who is in charge for diagnostics and injury treatment, with the recommendation to avoid, if possible, the doctor who conducted treatment. For the estimation of general vital activity, the neurological consequences, pain and esthetic marring expertise, the most competent doctors are neurosurgeon and neurologist. Psychological psychiatric consequences and fear expertise have to be performed by the psychiatrist. Specialists of forensic medicine contribute with knowledge of criminal low and legal expertise.

  16. Modeling Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    02139 D. Moore Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (WRAMC) 6900 Georgia Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20307 L. Noels University of Liege Chemin des...chevreuils 1, B4000 Liege , Belgium ABSTRACT Recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have highlighted the wartime effect of traumatic brain in

  17. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques.

  18. [Differentiated treatment of acute diffuse brain injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedachenko, E G; Dziak, L A; Sirko, A G

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment results of 57 patients with acute diffuse brain injury have been analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups: first study period 2000-2005; second study period 2006-2010. The main differences between the first and the second study periods were in health condition and brain functions monitoring parameters, therapy approaches and goals. Increasing of axial and lateral dislocation symptoms during progression from the first type of diffuse injury to the fourth one is related to intracranial hypertension (ICH) occurrence rate and significance it's significance. During the second study period, ICH was found in 25% patients with the second type of injury, 57% patients with the third type of injury, and 80%, with the fourth type of injury. Mean ICP in the group of patients with the second type of diffuse injury comprised 14.4 +/- 6.6 mmHg; with the third type of injury, 30 +/- 20.6 mmHg; with the fourth type of injuty, 37.6 +/- 14.1 mmHg. Introduction of differentiated approach to conservative or surgical treatment method application to acute diffuse brain injuries patients based on ICP monitoring data led to 13.8% reduction in mortality in the second study period compared with the first study period.

  19. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY CHILDREN: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denismar Borges de Miranda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the scientific literature on head injury in children. Method: this study is an integrative review of published articles in the database SciELO the period 2000-2010. Results: 10 articles were analyzed, from which emerged four categories: causes of traumatic brain child infant prognosis of traumatic brain child, treating children victims of child head injury and complications of therapy used for child victims of traumatic brain injury in children. Conclusions: there is consensus among the authors investigated the factors associated with better prognosis of traumatic brain child, remain vague and uncertain. They add that the success of this customer service related to the control of complications arising from cerebral trauma and mostly are treatable and / or preventable.

  20. Recovery after Brain Injury: Mechanisms and Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randolph J. Nudo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The past 20 years have represented an important period in the development of principles underlying neuroplasticity, especially as they apply to recovery from neurological injury. It is now generally accepted that acquired brain injuries, such as occur in stroke or trauma, initiate a cascade of regenerative events that last for at least several weeks, if not months. Many investigators have pointed out striking parallels between post-injury plasticity and the molecular and cellular events that take place during normal brain development. As evidence for the principles and mechanisms underlying post-injury neuroplasticity has been gleaned from both animal models and human populations, novel approaches to therapeutic intervention have been proposed. One important theme has persisted as the sophistication of clinicians and scientists in their knowledge of neuroplasticity mechanisms has grown: Behavioral experience is the most potent modulator of brain plasticity. While there is substantial evidence for this principle in normal, healthy brains, the injured brain is particularly malleable. Based on the quantity and quality of motor experience, the brain can be reshaped after injury in either adaptive or maladaptive ways. This paper reviews selected studies that have demonstrated the neurophysiological and neuroanatomical changes that are triggered by motor experience, by injury, and the interaction of these processes. In addition, recent studies using new and elegant techniques are providing novel perspectives on the events that take place in the injured brain, providing a real-time window into post-injury plasticity. These new approaches are likely to accelerate the pace of basic research, and provide a wealth of opportunities to translate basic principles into therapeutic methodologies.

  1. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter O; Mehta, Mitul A; Sharp, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person's catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain 'networks' that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner.

  2. [Neuroendocrine dysfunctions and their consequences following traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirják, Sándor; Rácz, Károly; Góth, Miklós

    2012-06-17

    Posttraumatic hypopituitarism is of major public health importance because it is more prevalent than previously thought. The prevalence of hypopituitarism in children with traumatic brain injury is unknown. Most cases of posttraumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated in the clinical practice, and it may contribute to the severe morbidity seen in patients with traumatic brain injury. In the acute phase of brain injury, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency should not be missed. Determination of morning serum cortisol concentration is mandatory, because adrenal insufficiency can be life threatening. Morning serum cortisol lower than 200 nmol/L strongly suggests adrenal insufficiency. A complete hormonal investigation should be performed after one year of the trauma. Isolated growth hormone deficiency is the most common deficiency after traumatic brain injury. Sports-related chronic repetitive head trauma (because of boxing, kickboxing, football and ice hockey) may also result in hypopituitarism. Close co-operation between neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, rehabilitation physicians and representatives of other disciplines is important to provide better care for these patients.

  3. Traumatic brain injury: Changing concepts and approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew Maas

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a huge global medical and public health problem across all ages and in all populations.In this review,we discussed the changing concepts and approaches.Globally,the incidence is increasing and in high income countries epidemiologic patterns are changing with consequences for prevention campaigns.TBI should not be viewed as an event,but as a progressive and chronic disease with lifetime consequences.In the clinical field,precision approaches to treatment are being developed,which require more accurate disease phenotyping.Recent advances in genomics,neuroimaging and biomarker development offer great opportunities to develop improved phenotyping and better disease characterization.In clinical research,randomized controlled clinical trials are being complemented by large data collections in broad TBI populations in comparative effectiveness designs.Global collaborations are being developed among funding agencies,research organizations and researchers.Only by combining efforts and collaboration will we be able to advance the field by providing long-needed evidence to support practice recommendations and to improve treatment.

  4. Hyperthermia and fever control in brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjatia, Neeraj

    2009-07-01

    Fever in the neurocritical care setting is common and has a negative impact on outcome of all disease types. Meta-analyses have demonstrated that fever at onset and in the acute setting after ischemic brain injury, intracerebral hemorrhage, and cardiac arrest has a negative impact on morbidity and mortality. Data support that the impact of fever is sustained for longer durations after subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. Recent advances have made eliminating fever and maintaining normothermia feasible. However, there are no prospective randomized trials demonstrating the benefit of fever control in these patient populations, and important questions regarding indications and timing remain. The purpose of this review is to analyze the data surrounding the impact of fever across a range of neurologic injuries to better understand the optimal timing and duration of fever control. Prospective randomized trials are needed to determine whether the beneficial impact of secondary injury prevention is outweighed by the potential risks of prolonged fever control.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal/neonatal brain injury is an important cause of neurological disability. Hypoxia-ischemia and excitotoxicity are considered important insults, and, in spite of their acute nature, brain injury develops over a protracted time period during the primary, secondary, and tertiary phases. The concept that most of the injury develops with a delay after the insult makes it possible to provide effective neuroprotective treatment after the insult. Indeed, hypothermia applied within 6 hours after birth in neonatal encephalopathy reduces neurological disability in clinical trials. In order to develop the next generation of treatment, we need to know more about the pathophysiological mechanism during the secondary and tertiary phases of injury. We review some of the critical molecular events related to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis during the secondary phase and report some recent evidence that intervention may be feasible also days-weeks after the insult.

  6. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin;

    2013-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: The review will summarize the current knowledge in the field with the aim of increasing understanding and guiding future research on the associations between fatigue and clinically important factors, as well as the consequences of fatigue in traumatic brain injury. PROSPERO registry number: CRD......BACKGROUND: Despite strong indications that fatigue is the most common and debilitating symptom after traumatic brain injury, little is known about its frequency, natural history, or relation to other factors. The current protocol outlines a strategy for a systematic review that will identify......, assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...

  7. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  8. Functional Recovery After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, Tessa; Kozlowski, Allan; Whyte, John

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine person, injury, and treatment characteristics associated with recovery trajectories of people with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) during inpatient rehabilitation. DESIGN: Observational prospective longitudinal study. SETTING: Two specialized inpatient TBI rehabilitation...... functional levels received more treatment and more treatment was associated with slower recovery, presumably because treatment was allocated according to need. Thus, effects of treatment on outcome could not be disentangled from effects of case mix factors. CONCLUSIONS: FIM gain during inpatient recovery...

  9. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A mild traumatic brain injury or a concussion represents the majority of all traumatic brain injuries. The consequences show on physical, cognitive, and emotional functioning and even though the injury classifies as mild, it can have a significant effect on a patient, patient’s family and their quality of life. Defects are often overlooked as objective clinical methods are lacking. Neuropsychological evaluation can aid in appraisal of the defect magnitude and determine factors that influence the outcome of the injured. The following case report addresses the importance of neuropsychological evaluation in treating cognitive defects along with the Cognitive Behavioral therapy approach toward emotional and behavioral disorders treatment in mild traumatic brain injury. It has been shown how important it is to find possible causes for slow recovery. The annuity tendencies have been noted as an important factor for prolongation of the post-concussion syndrome. We can detect the symptom simulation with appropriate psychological instruments. Described is a case of 38-year-old man who suffered a mild traumatic brain injury.

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Max; Gazmuri, Jose Tomás; Marín, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Rovegno, Maximiliano

    2015-06-05

    Therapeutic hypothermia, recently termed target temperature management (TTM), is the cornerstone of neuroprotective strategy. Dating to the pioneer works of Fay, nearly 75 years of basic and clinical evidence support its therapeutic value. Although hypothermia decreases the metabolic rate to restore the supply and demand of O₂, it has other tissue-specific effects, such as decreasing excitotoxicity, limiting inflammation, preventing ATP depletion, reducing free radical production and also intracellular calcium overload to avoid apoptosis. Currently, mild hypothermia (33°C) has become a standard in post-resuscitative care and perinatal asphyxia. However, evidence indicates that hypothermia could be useful in neurologic injuries, such as stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. In this review, we discuss the basic and clinical evidence supporting the use of TTM in critical care for acute brain injury that extends beyond care after cardiac arrest, such as for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury. We review the historical perspectives of TTM, provide an overview of the techniques and protocols and the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothermia. In addition, we include our experience of managing patients with acute brain injuries treated using endovascular hypothermia.

  11. Neuropsychiatric aspects of severe brain injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Zaitsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The state-of-the-art of Russian neuropsychiatry and priority developments in different psychopathological syndromes in severe brain injuries are assessed. Many cognitive and emotional impairments are explained in terms of the idea on the organization of psychic activity over time. It is emphasized that to achieve the premorbid levels of an interhemispheric interaction and functional asymmetry of the cerebral hemispheres affords psychic activity recovery. The experience in investigating, classifying, and treating various mental disorders occurring after severe brain injuries is generalized. The basic principles of psychopharmacotherapy and rehabilitation of victims are stated.

  12. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: Mass lesions from traumatic brain injury (TBI) often require surgical evacuation as a life-saving measure and to improve outcomes, but optimal timing and surgical technique, including decompressive craniectomy, have not been fully defined. The authors compared neurosurgical approaches...... enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent electrocorticographic...

  13. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Harvey S.; Robertson, Claudia S.

    2013-01-01

    This Introduction to a Special Issue on Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) highlights the methodological challenges in outcome studies and clinical trials involving patients who sustain mTBI. Recent advances in brain imaging and portable, computerized cognitive tasks have contributed to protocols that are sensitive to the effects of mTBI and efficient in time for completion. Investigation of civilian mTBI has been extended to single and repeated injuries in athletes and blast-related mTBI in ...

  14. Anger self-management in chronic traumatic brain injury: protocol for a psycho-educational treatment with a structurally equivalent control and an evaluation of treatment enactment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R; Maiuro, Roland D; Vaccaro, Monica J

    2015-01-01

    Anger and irritability are important and persistent clinical problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Treatment options include medications, behavioral modification, and psychotherapies, but some are impractical and none have proven efficacy with this population. We describe a randomized multi-center clinical trial testing a novel, one-on-one, 8-session psychoeducational treatment program, Anger Self-Management Training (ASMT), designed specifically for people with TBI who have significant cognitive impairment. The trial is notable for its use of a structurally equivalent comparison treatment, called Personal Readjustment and Education (PRE), which was created for the study and is intended to maximize equipoise for both participants and treaters. Fidelity assessment is conducted in real time and used in therapist supervision sessions. The primary outcome is change in self-reported anger on validated measures from pre-treatment to 1 week after the final session. Secondary outcomes include participant anger as reported by a significant other; emotional distress in domains other than anger/irritability; behavioral functioning; and quality of life. An interim assessment after the 4th session will allow examination of the trajectory of any observed treatment effects, and a follow-up assessment 2 months after the end of intervention will allow examination of persistence of effects. A treatment enactment phase, in which participants are interviewed several months after the last therapy session, is designed to provide qualitative data on whether and to what extent the principles and techniques learned in treatment are still carried out in daily life.

  15. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  16. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  17. Clinical Value of Chronic Subdural Effusion and CT Follow up in Elderly Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury%老年人脑外伤后慢性硬膜下积液与CT随访的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊继新; 张晓磷

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the elderly chronic subdural effusion after traumatic brain injury and follow-up CT value. Methods A retrospective analysis of our hospital from January 2009 to January 2009, 1235 cases of elderly patients with craniocerebral trauma of skull CT performance, for the elderly the onset of chronic subdural effusion after traumatic brain injury with CT follow-up results were summarized in this paper. Results After 1~2 years follow-up, check out the 87 cases of chronic subdural effusion, incidence of 7.04%. In unilateral or bilateral temporal top 45 cases, accounted for 51.7%, other parts accounted for 48.3%. Subdural effusion time:48 cases within 3 months, 55.2%;3~6 months, 21 cases (24.1%);13 cases of 6~12 months, 14.9%;More than 12 months in 5 cases, accounting for 5.7%. In patients with skull and intracranial lesions in 172 cases, 48 cases of chronic subdural effusion, accounting for 27.9%.9 cases in the later evolution for chronic subdural hematoma, accounting for 10.3%. Conclusion Because of the particularity of its anatomy and physiology, the elderly are prone to chronic subdural effusion after brain trauma, and is likely to evolve into chronic subdural hematoma, and late CT follow-up has important clinical significance.%目的:探讨老年人脑外伤后慢性硬膜下积液与CT随访价值。方法回顾性分析我院2009年1月~2013年1月1235例老年颅脑外伤患者的头颅CT表现,对老年人脑外伤后慢性硬膜下积液的发病情况与CT随访结果进行总结。结果经1~2年随访,检出慢性硬膜下积液87例,发病率为7.04%。发生于单侧或双侧颞顶部45例,占51.7%,其他部位占48.3%。出现硬膜下积液的时间:3个月内48例,占55.2%;3~6个月21例,占24.1%;6~12个月13例,占14.9%;12个月以上5例,占5.7%。172例存在颅骨与颅内损伤患者中,发生慢性硬膜下积液48例,占27.9%。9例在后期演变为慢性硬膜下血肿,占10.3%。

  18. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Katie N; Parry-Jones, Adrian R; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection) have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL)-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  19. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie N Murray

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  20. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE.

  1. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegall, Mark D; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury.

  2. Recovery of resting brain connectivity ensuing mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Dawn Bharath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brains reveal amplified plasticity as they recover from an injury. We aimed to define time dependent plasticity changes in patients recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. 25 subjects with mild head injury were longitudinally evaluated within 36 hours, 3 and 6 months using resting state functional connectivity (RSFC. Region of interest (ROI based connectivity differences over time within the patient group and in comparison with a healthy control group were analyzed at p<0.005. We found 33 distinct ROI pairs that revealed significant changes in their connectivity strength with time. Within three months, the majority of the ROI pairs had decreased connectivity in mTBI population, which increased and became comparable to healthy controls at 6 months. Initial imaging within 36 hours of injury revealed hyper connectivity predominantly involving the salience network and default mode network, which reduced at 3 months when lingual, inferior frontal and fronto-parietal networks revealed hyper connectivity. At six months all the evaluated networks revealed hyper connectivity and became comparable to the healthy controls. Our findings in a fairly homogenous group of patients with mTBI evaluated during the 6 month window of recovery defines time varying brain connectivity changes as the brain recovers from an injury. A majority of these changes were seen in the frontal and parietal lobes between 3-6 months after injury. Hyper connectivity of several networks supported normal recovery in the first six months and it remains to be seen in future studies whether this can predict an early and efficient recovery of brain function.

  3. Future directions in brain injury research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential future directions that are important for brain injury research, especially with regard to concussion. The avenues of proposed research are categorized according to current concepts of concussion, types of concussion, and a global schema for globally reducing the burden of concussion.

  4. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...

  5. School Reentry Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deidrick, Kathleen K. M.; Farmer, Janet E.

    2005-01-01

    Successful school reentry following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is critical to recovery. Physical, cognitive, behavioral, academic, and social problems can affect a child's school performance after a TBI. However, early intervention has the potential to improve child academic outcomes and promote effective coping with any persistent changes in…

  6. Working with Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    The participation of a student with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in general physical education can often be challenging and rewarding for the student and physical education teacher. This article addresses common characteristics of students with TBI and presents basic solutions to improve the education of students with TBI in the general physical…

  7. Executive Functioning after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF, a caregiver-report questionnaire, was used to measure changes in executive function in the first year after traumatic brain injury (TBI in a study of children, aged 5 to 15 years, at University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

  8. Biophysical mechanisms of traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lee Ann; Rule, Gregory T; Bocchieri, Robert T; Burns, Jennie M

    2015-02-01

    Despite years of effort to prevent traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), the occurrence of TBI in the United States alone has reached epidemic proportions. When an external force is applied to the head, it is converted into stresses that must be absorbed into the brain or redirected by a helmet or other protective equipment. Complex interactions of the head, neck, and jaw kinematics result in strains in the brain. Even relatively mild mechanical trauma to these tissues can initiate a neurochemical cascade that leads to TBI. Civilians and warfighters can experience head injuries in both combat and noncombat situations from a variety of threats, including ballistic and blunt impact, acceleration, and blast. It is critical to understand the physics created by these threats to develop meaningful improvements to clinical care, injury prevention, and mitigation. Here the authors review the current state of understanding of the complex loading conditions that lead to TBI and characterize how these loads are transmitted through soft tissue, the skull and into the brain, resulting in TBI. In addition, gaps in knowledge and injury thresholds are reviewed, as these must be addressed to better design strategies that reduce TBI incidence and severity.

  9. Brain Injury with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between brain injury and vasculopathy in 146 sickle cell (SCD patients with hemoglobin SS, the most serious form of SCD, was evaluated by MRI and MRA at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN.

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  11. Narrative Language in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Zampieri, Elisa; Vorano, Lorenza; Zettin, Marina; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often show impaired linguistic and/or narrative abilities. The present study aimed to document the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with TBI. 14 severe TBI non-aphasic speakers (GCS less than 8) in the phase of neurological stability and 14 neurologically intact participants…

  12. Perioperative Management of Adult Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Deepak; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) as relevant to the practicing anesthesiologist. Key concepts surrounding the pathophysiology, anesthetic principles are used to describe potential ways to reduce secondary insults and improve outcomes after TBI.

  13. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell...

  14. Chronic Treatment with a Water-Soluble Extract from the Culture Medium of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelia Prevents Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Injury of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been known to increase systemic oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia and visceral obesity and aggravate cerebral ischemic injury. On the basis of our previous study regarding a water-soluble extract from the culture medium of Ganoderma lucidum mycelia (designed as MAK, which exerts antioxidative and neuroprotective effects, the present study was conducted to evaluate the preventive effects of MAK on apoptosis and necroptosis (a programmed necrosis induced by hypoxia/ischemia (H/I in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. H/I was induced by a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation with hypoxia (8% O2 for 20 min and subsequent reoxygenation. Pretreatment with MAK (1 g/kg, p.o. for a week significantly reduced H/I-induced neurological deficits and brain infarction volume assessed at 24 h of reoxygenation. Histochemical analysis showed that MAK significantly suppressed superoxide production, neuronal cell death, and vacuolation in the ischemic penumbra, which was accompanied by a decrease in the numbers of TUNEL- or cleaved caspase-3-positive cells. Furthermore, MAK decreased the expression of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 mRNA and protein, a key molecule for necroptosis. These results suggest that MAK confers resistance to apoptotic and necroptotic cell death and relieves H/I-induced cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice.

  15. Relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Petersen, Janne; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate trajectories and predictors of trajectories of anxiety and depression in relatives of patients with a severe brain injury during the first year after injury. RESEARCH DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal study with four repeated measurements. SUBJECTS: Ninety...... relatives of patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: The relatives were assessed on the anxiety and depression scales from the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and latent variable growth curve models were used to model the trajectories. The effects of patient's age, patient's Glasgow Coma Score, level...... improvement. Higher initial level of symptoms of depression was seen in female relatives. Higher initial level of anxiety was associated with younger patient age, lower level of function and consciousness in the patient and the relative being female or the spouse. CONCLUSION: Future research and interventions...

  16. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  17. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge......OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients...

  18. Language Abilities Following Prematurity, Periventricular Brain Injury, and Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Heidi M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared language abilities in three groups of preschool children (total n=18) who were born prematurely: children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy associated with perinatal brain injury, with similar brain injury but no motor impairment, and with no brain injuries. No significant differences were observed among the groups on any…

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Studies at Grady Memorial Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    management of adult, blunt-mechanism traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) patients and assess the overall mortality of this cohort at Grady...this study is to determine the current compliance with widely accepted guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) patients...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0145 Study Title: Traumatic Brain Injury ( TBI

  20. Dual diagnosis: traumatic brain injury with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, David S; Alvarez, Gemayaret

    2014-08-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients should be assessed for a co-occurring traumatic brain injury (TBI) on admission to a rehabilitation program. Incidence of a dual diagnosis may approach 60% with certain risk factors. Diagnosis of mild-moderate severity TBIs may be missed during acute care hospitalizations of SCI. Neuropsychological symptoms of a missed TBI diagnosis may be perceived during rehabilitation as noncompliance, inability to learn, maladaptive reactions to SCI, and poor motivation. There are life-threatening and quality-of-life-threatening complications of TBI that also may be missed if a dual diagnosis is not made.

  1. Early endocrine alterations reflect prolonged stress and relate to one year functional outcome in patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, Djordje; Klose, Marianne; Nordenbo, Annette

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Severe brain injury poses a risk of developing acute and chronic hypopituitarism. Pituitary hormone alterations developed in the early recovery phase after brain injury may have implications for long-term functional recovery. The objective was to assess the pattern and prevalence...

  2. Postconcussion Symptoms in Patients with Injury-Related Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt Marie Stålnacke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Postconcussion symptoms (PCSs—such as fatigue, headache, irritability, dizziness, and impaired memory—are commonly reported in patients who have mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBIs. Evaluation of PCS after MTBI is proposed to have a diagnostic value although it is unclear whether PCS are specific to MTBI. After whiplash injuries, patients most often complain of headaches and neck pain; the other PCS are not as closely evaluated. In patients with chronic pain because of other injuries, the presence of PCS is unclear. This study aimed to describe the frequency of PCS in patients with injury-related pain and to examine the relationships between PCS, pain, and psychological factors. Methods. This study collected data using questionnaires addressing PCS (Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire, RPQ, pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, depression, anxiety (Hospital, Anxiety, and Depression Scale, and posttraumatic stress (Impact of Event Scale. Results. Fatigue (90.7%, sleep disturbance (84.9%, headache (73.5%, poor concentration (88.2%, and poor memory (67.1% were some of the most commonly reported PCS. Significant relationships were found between PCS and posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety. Conclusion. To optimize treatment, it is important to assess each patient’s PCS, the mechanism of injury, and factors such as posttraumatic stress and depression.

  3. Traumatic brain injury in the rat: characterization of a lateral fluid-percussion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, T K; Vink, R; Noble, L; Yamakami, I; Fernyak, S; Soares, H; Faden, A L

    1989-01-01

    Experimental fluid-percussion models produce brain injury by rapidly injecting saline into the closed cranium. In the present study we characterize the physiological, histopathological and neurological responses to mechanical brain injury in the rat produced by lateral fluid-percussion injury of graded severity. Physiological experiments (n = 105) demonstrated that all levels of injury produced an acute and transient systemic hypertension and bradycardia. Acute hypertension followed by significant hypotension occurred at higher magnitudes of injury. Post-injury suppression of electroencephalographic amplitude was related to the severity of injury. An increase in slow wave (delta/theta) electroencephalographic activity with a concomitant decrease in alpha/beta electroencephalographic activity were observed only at moderate and high magnitude of injury and were correlated with a worsened neurological outcome (r = 0.84; P less than 0.05) and increased mortality (r = 0.66; P less than 0.05). Alterations in brainstem auditory-evoked potentials were also observed only at the higher levels of injury. Histopathological analysis revealed that the extent of post-injury hemorrhage, cavitation and vascular disruption (as measured by extravasation of Evans Blue dye) was greater at the higher magnitudes of injury. Neurological scoring performed over a 4-week post-injury period demonstrated that lateral fluid-percussion brain injury produces a chronic neurological deficit that is directly related to the severity of injury. Survival was also significantly reduced at the higher magnitudes of injury. These data demonstrate that the lateral model of fluid-percussion injury in the rat reproduces many of the features of head injury observed in other models and species and may therefore be a useful experimental model for the study of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury.

  4. Combat Helmets and Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Wallace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and the prominence of traumatic brain injury (TBI, mostly from improvised explosive devices, have focused attention on the effectiveness of combat helmets. Purpose: This paper examines the importance of TBI, the role and history of the development of combat helmets, current helmet designs and effectiveness, helmet design methodology, helmet sensors, future research and recommendations. Method: A literature review was conducted using search terms – combat helmets, traumatic brain injury, concussion, Iraq, Afghanistan and helmet sensors, searching PubMed, MEDLINE, ProQuest and Google Scholar. Conclusions: At present, no existing helmet is able to fully protect against all threats faced on the battlefield. The prominence of traumatic brain injury from improvised explosive devices in the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has highlighted the limitations in knowledge about blast and how to provide protection from it. As a result, considerable research is currently occurring in how to protect the head from blast over-pressure. Helmet sensors may provide valuable data. Some new combat helmets may be able to protect against rifle rounds, but may result in injuries occurring behind body armour. Optimal combat helmet design requires a balance between the need for protection from trauma and the comfort and practicality of the helmet for the user to ensure the best outcomes.

  5. Peripheral nerve injury induces adult brain neurogenesis and remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanescu, Gabriel; Mao, Jianren

    2017-02-01

    Unilateral peripheral nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) has been widely used as a research model of human neuropathic pain. Recently, CCI has been shown to induce spinal cord adult neurogenesis, which may contribute to the chronic increase in nociceptive sensitivity. Here, we show that CCI also induces rapid and profound asymmetrical anatomical rearrangements in the adult rodent cerebellum and pons. This remodelling occurs throughout the hindbrain, and in addition to regions involved in pain processing, also affects other sensory modalities. We demonstrate that these anatomical changes, partially reversible in the long term, result from adult neurogenesis. Neurogenic markers Mash1, Ngn2, doublecortin and Notch3 are widely expressed in the rodent cerebellum and pons, both under normal and injured conditions. CCI-induced hindbrain structural plasticity is absent in Notch3 knockout mice, a strain with impaired neuronal differentiation, demonstrating its dependence on adult neurogenesis. Grey matter and white matter structural changes in human brain, as a result of pain, injury or learned behaviours have been previously detected using non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Because neurogenesis-mediated structural plasticity is thought to be restricted to the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, such anatomical rearrangements in other parts of the brain have been thought to result from neuronal plasticity or glial hypertrophy. Our findings suggest the presence of extensive neurogenesis-based structural plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, which may maintain a memory of basal sensory levels, and act as an adaptive mechanism to changes in sensory inputs.

  6. Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-08-2-0017 TITLE: " Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER “ Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology...traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is largely undefined. Along with reducing mortality, in preliminary experiments Kevlar vests significantly protected

  7. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  8. Apelin-13 as a novel target for intervention in secondary injury after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-jun Bao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipocytokine, apelin-13, is an abundantly expressed peptide in the nervous system. Apelin-13 protects the brain against ischemia/reperfusion injury and attenuates traumatic brain injury by suppressing autophagy. However, secondary apelin-13 effects on traumatic brain injury-induced neural cell death and blood-brain barrier integrity are still not clear. Here, we found that apelin-13 significantly decreases cerebral water content, mitigates blood-brain barrier destruction, reduces aquaporin-4 expression, diminishes caspase-3 and Bax expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and reduces apoptosis. These results show that apelin-13 attenuates secondary injury after traumatic brain injury and exerts a neuroprotective effect

  9. Glyburide - Novel Prophylaxis and Effective Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ABSTRACT The overall subject of this project is blast- traumatic brain injury (blast- TBI ) and the role of the SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel in blast- TBI ...project is blast- traumatic brain injury (blast- TBI ) and the role of the SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel in secondary injury following blast- TBI . The...effective treatment for traumatic brain injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: J. Marc Simard, M.D., Ph.D

  10. A Blast Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited Although blast-induced traumatic brain injury (BI- TBI ) is a significant cause of morbidity and behavioral...survival model of BI- TBI in swine. Traumatic Brain Injury , Swine, Blast, Model Development U U U 7 USAMRMC W81XWH-08-2-0082... Injury , TBI Scientific Advisor, Defense Center of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury ) and Dr. Tamara Crowder at the DoD

  11. Lateral Fluid Percussion: Model of Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes 1,2. Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement 3,4. ...

  12. Barbiturates for acute traumatic brain injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, I.; Sydenham, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Raised intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important complication of severe brain injury, and is associated with high mortality. Barbiturates are believed to reduce ICP by suppressing cerebral metabolism, thus reducing cerebral metabolic demands and cerebral blood volume. However, barbiturates also reduce blood pressure and may, therefore, adversely effect cerebral perfusion pressure. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of barbiturates in reducing mortality, disability and raised ICP ...

  13. Caregiver stress in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Holly

    2013-01-01

    Aims\\ud Many patients experience physical, behavioural, cognitive and emotional problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). They may require continuing care for many years, most of which is provided by informal caregivers, such as spouses, parents, or other family members. The caregiving role is associated with a range of adverse effects including anxiety, depression, poor physical health and lowered quality of life. This article explores issues around caregiver stress; highlighting inte...

  14. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    distinguished by aligning data from the data logger accelerometer against the simultaneous data streams of ICP, mean anerial pressure, and cerebral ... edema of central nervous system tissue within the closed confines of the cranial vault. The ability to estab- lish and maintain an appropriate...source of cerebral ischemia following severe brain injury in the Trau- matic Coma Data Bank . Acta Neurochir Suppl (Wien) 1993; 59: 121-5. II. Jeremitsky

  15. Cerebral Vasospasm in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Daniel R.; Winer, Jesse L.; B. A. Matthew Pease; Arun P. Amar; Mack, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vasospasm following traumatic brain injury (TBI) may dramatically affect the neurological and functional recovery of a vulnerable patient population. While the reported incidence of traumatic vasospasm ranges from 19%–68%, the true incidence remains unknown due to variability in protocols for its detection. Only 3.9%–16.6% of patients exhibit clinical deficits. Compared to vasospasm resulting from aneurysmal SAH (aSAH), the onset occurs earlier and the duration is shorter. Overall, the clinic...

  16. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  17. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eRobbins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (> 6 months to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses > 30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses > 60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain

  18. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse, and se

  19. On the Crucial Cerebellar Wound Healing-Related Pathways and Their Cross-Talks after Traumatic Brain Injury in Danio rerio

    OpenAIRE

    Chia-Chou Wu; Tsung-Han Tsai; Chieh Chang; Tian-Thai Lee; Che Lin; Irene Han-Juo Cheng; Mu-Chien Sun; Yung-Jen Chuang; Bor-Sen Chen

    2014-01-01

    Upon injury, the direct damage and the subsequent secondary injury in the brain often result in chronic neurological disorders. Due to multifactorial nature of secondary injury and subsequent complex cellular responses, much of the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study used an adult zebrafish cerebellum injury model to investigate the phenotypes and the secondary injury responses for recovery mechanisms of injured brain. Using the time course microarray analysis, a candidate protein-p...

  20. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  2. Multi-modal approach for investigating brain and behavior changes in an animal model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Meghan E; Huang, Wei; Sicard, Kenneth M; Bratane, Bernt T; Sikoglu, Elif M; Zhang, Nanyin; Fisher, Marc; King, Jean A

    2013-06-01

    Use of novel approaches in imaging modalities is needed for enhancing diagnostic and therapeutic outcomes of persons with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study explored the feasibility of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in conjunction with behavioral measures to target dynamic changes in specific neural circuitries in an animal model of TBI. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups (traumatic brain injury/sham operation). TBI rats were subjected to the closed head injury (CHI) model. Any observable motor deficits and cognitive deficits associated with the injury were measured using beam walk and Morris water maze tests, respectively. fMRI was performed to assess the underlying post-traumatic cerebral anatomy and function in acute (24 hours after the injury) and chronic (7 and 21 days after the injury) phases. Beam walk test results detected no significant differences in motor deficits between groups. The Morris water maze test indicated that cognitive deficits persisted for the first week after injury and, to a large extent, resolved thereafter. Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) analysis detected initially diminished connectivity between cortical areas involved in cognition for the TBI group; however, the connectivity patterns normalized at 1 week and remained so at the 3 weeks post-injury time point. Taken together, we have demonstrated an objective in vivo marker for mapping functional brain changes correlated with injury-associated cognitive behavior deficits and offer an animal model for testing potential therapeutic interventions options.

  3. [Community-based rehabilitation and outpatient care for patients with acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in Germany: continuing support for social participation and re-integration in the neurological care system?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, P; Hendrich, A; Kringler, W; Vespo, E

    2012-12-01

    In Germany a number of patients who are suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability are either undersupplied or exposed to inappropriate care in their social environment. The number of these patients is increasing due to the changes in the procedures of care and due to demographic factors. While acute medical care and early rehabilitative treatment is accessible throughout the German health care system the necessary multimodal and competent care is rare or absent in the social participative sites such as life and occupational environments of the patients. The complex impairment of the brain, the central organ for sensorial, executive and other cognitive functions of human beings, renders the affected patient an exception in the system of medical and social care - this has only inadequately been considered in the past. The authors explain the necessity to disclose the status of a "human-with acquired-brain damage (Mensch-mit-erworbener-Hirnschädigung, MeH)" explicitly as severely disabled. The paper recommends a number of structural and procedural elements that have proven to overcome the insufficient or inappropriate support in integrating the patients suffering from acquired brain injury and chronic neurological disability in their social environment as well as for a demand-focused support with sustainable rehabilitative and ambulant follow-up procedures. Comparisons with other developed health care systems and international guidelines show that with organizing of early-supported-discharge, community-ambulation, shared-care and community-based-rehabilitation these problems have long since been identified elsewhere. Community-based and resident-oriented concepts have already been systematically implemented. In order to achieve the necessary support for the individual patient, a nation-wide development is necessary in Germany to perform the principles of the German social code and the principles of the Convention on the Rights of

  4. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, KE 04.123.1, P.O. Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Groenendaal, Floris [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  5. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9 in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: Brain water content (BWC, tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, immunofluorescence (IF, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB was severely destroyed at six hours after the TBI. The worst brain ischemia occurred at 72 hours after TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus were detected by means of IHC and IF after TBI. The abundance of AQP9 and its mRNA increased after TBI and reached two peaks at 6 and 72 hours, respectively, after TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Increased AQP9 might contribute to clearance of excess water and lactate in the early stage of TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes might help lactate move into neurons and result in cellular brain edema in the later stage of TBI. AQP9-positive neurons suggest that AQP9 plays a role in energy balance after TBI.

  6. Cerebral perfusion changes in traumatic diffuse brain injury. IMP SPECT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Onuma, Takehide

    1997-05-01

    Diffuse brain injury (DBI) is characterized by axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which cause diffuse brain atrophy. We have investigated the time course of abnormalities in cerebral perfusion distribution in cases of DBI by using Iodine-123-IMP SPECT, and the relationship to the appearance of diffuse brain atrophy. SPECT scans were performed on eight patients with diffuse brain injury due to closed cranial trauma in acute and chronic stages. All patients showed abnormalities in cerebral perfusion with decreases in perfusion, even in non-depicted regions on MRI, and the affected areas varied throughout the period of observation. Diffuse brain atrophy appeared in all patients. In some patients, diffuse brain atrophy was observed at or just after the time when the maximum number of lesions on SPECT were seen. The abnormalities in cerebral perfusion in cases of DBI might therefore be related to axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which causes diffuse brain atrophy. (author)

  7. Cushing's ulcer in traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biteghe-bi-Nzeng Alain; WANG Yun-jie

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury(TBI)remains a complicated and urgent disease in our modernized cities. It becomes now a public health disease. We have got more and more patients in Neurosurgery Intensive Care Unit following motor vehicle accidents and others causes. TBI brings multiple disorders,from the primary injury to secondary injury. The body received the disturbances in the brain,in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical(HPA)axis,in the gastric mucosa,in the immune and neuroendocrine systems.The mortality of TBI is more than 50 000 deaths/year, the third of the mortality of all iniuries. Cushing ulcer is one of the severe complications of TBI and its mortality rate is more than 50%. Many studies have improved the management of TBI and the associated complications to give patients a better outcome. Furthers studies need to be done based on the similar methodology to clarify the different steps of the HPA axis and the neuroendocrine change associated. The aim of the present review is to assess the clinical and endocrinal features of hypopituitarism and stress ulcer following TBI.

  8. Brain activity patterns uniquely supporting visual feature integration after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali eRaja Beharelle

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI patients typically respond more slowly and with more variability than controls during tasks of attention requiring speeded reaction time. These behavioral changes are attributable, at least in part, to diffuse axonal injury (DAI, which affects integrated processing in distributed systems. Here we use a multivariate method sensitive to distributed neural activity to compare brain activity patterns of patients with chronic phase moderate-to-severe TBI to those of controls during performance on a visual feature-integration task assessing complex attentional processes that has previously shown sensitivity to TBI. The TBI patients were carefully screened to be free of large focal lesions that can affect performance and brain activation independently of DAI. The task required subjects to hold either one or three features of a target in mind while suppressing responses to distracting information. In controls, the multi-feature condition activated a distributed network including limbic, prefrontal, and medial temporal structures. TBI patients engaged this same network in the single-feature and baseline conditions. In multi-feature presentations, TBI patients alone activated additional frontal, parietal, and occipital regions. These results are consistent with neuroimaging studies using tasks assessing different cognitive domains, where increased spread of brain activity changes was associated with TBI. Our results also extend previous findings that brain activity for relatively moderate task demands in TBI patients is similar to that associated with of high task demands in controls.

  9. Astrocytes mediate the neuroprotective effects of Tibolone following brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, astrocytes have become a key central player in mediating important functions in the brain. These physiological processes include neurotransmitter recycling, energy management, metabolic shuttle, immune sensing, K+ buffer, antioxidant supply and release of neurotrophic factors and gliotransmitters. These astrocytic roles are somehow altered upon brain injury, therefore strategies aimed at better protecting astrocytes are an essential asset to maintain brain homeostasis. In this context, estrogenic compounds, such as Tibolone, have attracted attention for their beneficial effects in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Tibolone may act through binding to estrogen, androgen or progesterone receptors and exert protective effects by reducing astrocytes cell death and oxidative stress signaling mechanisms. Although Tibolone has a multifactorial effect in the brain, its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this work, we highlight the role of Tibolone in brain protection upon damage, how astrocytes might mediate part of its neuroprotective actions and discuss the effects of Tibolone in diminishing the harmful consequences of a metabolic insult and energy failure in the setting of a pathological event.

  10. Hypersexuality or altered sexual preference following brain injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, B.L.; Cummings, J L; McIntyre, H.; Ebers, G; Grode, M

    1986-01-01

    Eight patients are described in whom either hypersexuality (four cases) or change in sexual preference (four cases) occurred following brain injury. In this series disinhibition of sexual activity and hypersexuality followed medial basal-frontal or diencephalic injury. This contrasted with the patients demonstrating altered sexual preference whose injuries involved limbic system structures. In some patients altered sexual behaviour may be the presenting or dominant feature of brain injury.

  11. A case of hypoglycemic brain injuries with cortical laminar necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Wan; Jin, Eun Sun; Hwang, Hyung-Sik; Yoo, Hyung-Joon; Jeong, Je Hoon

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of 68-yr-old male who died from brain injuries following an episode of prolonged hypoglycemia. While exploring controversies surrounding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings indicating the bad prognosis in patients with hypoglycemia-induced brain injuries, we here discuss interesting diffusion-MRI of hypoglycemic brain injuries and their prognostic importance focusing on laminar necrosis of the cerebral cortex.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and b...

  13. Sports-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Shawn; Woessner, Derek

    2015-06-01

    Concussions have garnered more attention in the medical literature, media, and social media. As such, in the nomenclature according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the term concussion has been supplanted by the term mild traumatic brain injury. Current numbers indicate that 1.7 million TBIs are documented annually, with estimates around 3 million annually (173,285 sports- and recreation-related TBIs among children and adolescents). The Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool 3 and the NFL Sideline Concussion Assessment Tool are commonly used sideline tools.

  14. [Updates on severe traumatic brain injury management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alted López, Emilio; Aznárez, Susana Bermejo; Fernández, Mario Chico

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important reason of morbidity-mortality all over the world, affecting young males more and generating Public Health problem. Unfortunately, the advances in the pathophysiology knowledge have not followed a similar development in therapeutic options, there currently not being any contrasted neuroprotectants. In this article, we have reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic measures used in the management of patient with severe TBI. The general measures as well as those aimed at controlling intracranial hypertension, the role of the surgery and some more innovative therapeutic options currently under evaluation in these patients are analyzed.

  15. Critical care management of severe traumatic brain injury in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Haddad Samir H; Arabi Yaseen M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major medical and socio-economic problem, and is the leading cause of death in children and young adults. The critical care management of severe TBI is largely derived from the "Guidelines for the Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury" that have been published by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The main objectives are prevention and treatment of intracranial hypertension and secondary brain insults, preservation of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP...

  16. Neuroglobin expression in rats after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Lin; Min Li; Aijia Shang; Yazhuo Hu; Xiao Yang; Ling Ye; Suyan Bian; Zhongfeng Wang; Dingbiao Zhou

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used a rat model of severe closed traumatic brain injury to explore the relationship between neuroglobin, brain injury and neuronal apoptosis. Real-time PCR showed that neuroglobin mRNA expression rapidly increased in the rat cerebral cortex, and peaked at 30 minutes and 48 hours following traumatic brain injury. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that neuroglobin expression increased and remained high 2 hours to 5 days following injury. The rate of increase in the apoptosis-related Bax/Bcl-2 ratio greatly decreased between 30 minutes and 1 hour as well as between 48 and 72 hours post injury. Expression of neuroglobin and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 greatly increased, while that of the proapoptotic factor decreased, in the cerebral cortex post severe closed traumatic brain injury. It suggests that neuroglobin might protect neurons from apoptosis after traumatic injury by regulating Bax/Bcl-2 pathway.

  17. Robust whole-brain segmentation: application to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledig, Christian; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hammers, Alexander; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David K; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We propose a framework for the robust and fully-automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images called "Multi-Atlas Label Propagation with Expectation-Maximisation based refinement" (MALP-EM). The presented approach is based on a robust registration approach (MAPER), highly performant label fusion (joint label fusion) and intensity-based label refinement using EM. We further adapt this framework to be applicable for the segmentation of brain images with gross changes in anatomy. We propose to account for consistent registration errors by relaxing anatomical priors obtained by multi-atlas propagation and a weighting scheme to locally combine anatomical atlas priors and intensity-refined posterior probabilities. The method is evaluated on a benchmark dataset used in a recent MICCAI segmentation challenge. In this context we show that MALP-EM is competitive for the segmentation of MR brain scans of healthy adults when compared to state-of-the-art automatic labelling techniques. To demonstrate the versatility of the proposed approach, we employed MALP-EM to segment 125 MR brain images into 134 regions from subjects who had sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). We employ a protocol to assess segmentation quality if no manual reference labels are available. Based on this protocol, three independent, blinded raters confirmed on 13 MR brain scans with pathology that MALP-EM is superior to established label fusion techniques. We visually confirm the robustness of our segmentation approach on the full cohort and investigate the potential of derived symmetry-based imaging biomarkers that correlate with and predict clinically relevant variables in TBI such as the Marshall Classification (MC) or Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Specifically, we show that we are able to stratify TBI patients with favourable outcomes from non-favourable outcomes with 64.7% accuracy using acute-phase MR images and 66.8% accuracy using follow-up MR images. Furthermore, we are able to

  18. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Hua; YAO Hong-tian; ZHANG Wei-ping; ZHANG LEI; DING Wei; ZHANG Shi-hong; CHEN Zhong; WEI Er-qing

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), one of the aquaporins (AQPs), in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or brain tumors. Methods: Nineteen human brain specimens were obtained from the patients with traumatic brain injury, brain tumors, benign meningioma or early stage hemorrhagic stroke. MRI or CT imaging was used to assess brain edema. Hematoxylin and eosin staining were used to evaluate cell damage. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the AQP4 expression. Results: AQP4 expression was increased from 15h to at least 8 d after injury. AQP4immunoreactivity was strong around astrocytomas, ganglioglioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. However, AQP4 immunoreactivity was only found in the centers of astrocytomas and ganglioglioma, but not in metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from lung.Conclusion: AQP4 expression increases in human brains after traumatic brain injury, within brain-derived tumors, and around brain tumors.

  19. Dysfunction of brain pericytes in chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persidsky, Yuri; Hill, Jeremy; Zhang, Ming; Dykstra, Holly; Winfield, Malika; Reichenbach, Nancy L; Potula, Raghava; Mukherjee, Abir; Ramirez, Servio H; Rom, Slava

    2016-04-01

    Brain pericytes are uniquely positioned within the neurovascular unit to provide support to blood brain barrier (BBB) maintenance. Neurologic conditions, such as HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder, are associated with BBB compromise due to chronic inflammation. Little is known about pericyte dysfunction during HIV-1 infection. We found decreased expression of pericyte markers in human brains from HIV-1-infected patients (even those on antiretroviral therapy). Using primary human brain pericytes, we assessed expression of pericyte markers (α1-integrin, α-smooth muscle actin, platelet-derived growth factor-B receptor β, CX-43) and found their downregulation after treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) or interleukin-1 β (IL-1β). Pericyte exposure to virus or cytokines resulted in decreased secretion of factors promoting BBB formation (angiopoietin-1, transforming growth factor-β1) and mRNA for basement membrane components. TNFα and IL-1β enhanced expression of adhesion molecules in pericytes paralleling increased monocyte adhesion to pericytes. Monocyte migration across BBB models composed of human brain endothelial cells and pericytes demonstrated a diminished rate in baseline migration compared to constructs composed only of brain endothelial cells. However, exposure to the relevant chemokine, CCL2, enhanced the magnitude of monocyte migration when compared to BBB models composed of brain endothelial cells only. These data suggest an important role of pericytes in BBB regulation in neuroinflammation.

  20. Neuropsychological rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to discuss the basic forms of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. More broadly, we discussed cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT which constitutes a fundamental component in therapeutic interaction at many centres worldwide. Equally presented is a comprehensive model of rehabilitation, the fundamental component of which is CRT. It should be noted that the principles of this approach first arose in Poland in the 1970s, in other words, several decades before their appearance in other programmemes. Taken into consideration are four factors conditioning the effectiveness of such a process: comprehensiveness, earlier interaction, universality and its individualized character. A comprehensive programmeme of rehabilitation covers: cognitive rehabilitation, individual and group rehabilitation with the application of a therapeutic environment, specialist vocational rehabilitation, as well as family psychotherapy. These training programmemes are conducted within the scope of the ‘Academy of Life,’ which provides support for the patients in their efforts and shows them the means by which they can overcome existing difficulties. Equally emphasized is the close cooperation of the whole team of specialists, as well as the active participation of the family as an essential condition for the effectiveness of rehabilitation and, in effect, a return of the patient to a relatively normal life. Also presented are newly developing neurothechnologies and the neuromarkers of brain injuries. This enables a correct diagnosis to be made and, as a result, the selection of appropriate methods for neuropsychological rehabilitation, including neurotherapy.

  1. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  2. Impaired Pituitary Axes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Scranton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI is significant and rarely considered by clinicians. This topic has received much more attention in the last decade. The incidence of post TBI anterior pituitary dysfunction is around 30% acutely, and declines to around 20% by one year. Growth hormone and gonadotrophic hormones are the most common deficiencies seen after traumatic brain injury, but also the most likely to spontaneously recover. The majority of deficiencies present within the first year, but extreme delayed presentation has been reported. Information on posterior pituitary dysfunction is less reliable ranging from 3%–40% incidence but prospective data suggests a rate around 5%. The mechanism, risk factors, natural history, and long-term effect of treatment are poorly defined in the literature and limited by a lack of standardization. Post TBI pituitary dysfunction is an entity to recognize with significant clinical relevance. Secondary hypoadrenalism, hypothyroidism and central diabetes insipidus should be treated acutely while deficiencies in growth and gonadotrophic hormones should be initially observed.

  3. Altered calcium signaling following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Weber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI.

  4. The effects of chronic fluoxetine treatment following injury of medial frontal cortex in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Brendan B; Spanswick, Simon C; Patel, Payal P; Barneto, Alison A; Dyck, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    Injury of the brain is a leading cause of long-term disability. Recent evidence indicates that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug fluoxetine may be beneficial when administered following brain injury. However, its potential to promote recovery and the mechanisms by which it might do so require further characterization. In the present experiment, fluoxetine was administered to mice for 4 weeks following injury of medial frontal cortex (MFC). MFC injury altered behavior, reducing locomotion, decreasing swim speed in the Morris water task, and decreasing anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Fluoxetine treatment did not affect these behavioral alterations, but it did increase the social dominance of the injured mice, as assessed by the tube test. Fluoxetine treatment also hastened learning of a T-maze position discrimination task, independently of lesion condition. Anatomically, fluoxetine failed to decrease lesion size, increase the survival of cells born 1-week post injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, or reverse the reduction in spine density in layer II/III pyramidal neurons in cingulate cortex caused by the lesions. Fluoxetine did, however, increase the dendritic arborization of these cells, which was reduced in the mice with lesions. Thus, while not all the effects of MFC injury were ameliorated, the behavioral outcome of mice with MFC injuries was improved, and one of the neuroanatomical sequelae of the lesions counteracted, by chronic fluoxetine, further contributing to the evidence that fluoxetine could be a useful treatment following brain injury.

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury: Current Treatment Strategies and Future Endeavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Michael; Toshkezi, Gentian; Qiu, Xuecheng; Russell, Thomas; Chin, Lawrence; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2016-11-22

    Traumatic brain injury presents in various forms ranging from mild alterations of consciousness to an unrelenting comatose state and death. In the most severe form of traumatic brain injury, the entirety of the brain is affected by a diffuse type of injury and swelling. Treatment modalities vary extensively based on the severity of the injury and range from daily cognitive therapy sessions to radical surgery such as bilateral decompressive craniectomies. Guidelines have been set forth regarding the optimal management of traumatic brain injury, but they must be taken in context of the situation and cannot be used in every individual circumstance. In this review article, we have summarized the current status of treatment for traumatic brain injury in both clinical practice and basic research. We have put forth a brief overview of the various subtypes of traumatic injuries, optimal medical management, as well as both the non-invasive and invasive monitoring modalities, in addition to the surgical interventions necessary in particular instances. We have overviewed the main achievements in searching for therapeutic strategies of traumatic brain injury in basic science. We have also discussed the future direction for developing traumatic brain injury treatment from an experimental perspective.

  6. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Attenuates Brain Injury After Neonatal Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, Cindy T. J.; Sheldon, R. Ann; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Derugin, Nikita; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.; Maas, Mirjam; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Ferriero, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Brain injury caused by stroke is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to improve outcome after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury mainly by secretion of growth factors stimulati

  8. Pharmacological Neuroprotection after Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Xiyong; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is an important cause of neonatal brain injury. Recent progress in the search for neuroprotective compounds has provided us with several promising drugs to reduce perinatal HI-induced brain injury. In the early stage (first 6 hours after birth) therapies are concentra

  9. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in a diffuse brain injury and their pathological significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Yoshio; Miyakita, Yasuji; Matsuzawa, Motoshi; Sakakibara, Yohtaro; Takahara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Toshio [St. Marianna Univ. (Japan). Yokohama City Seibu Hospital

    1998-07-01

    In our study, FLAIR images and multishot echo planar imaging T2-weighted images (EPI T2-WI) were used in addition to conventional T1-weighted images, T2-weighted images and T2-weighted sagittal images. In this series we focused our attention on small parenchymatous lesions of a mild or moderate form of diffuse brain injury. These injuries are shown as high intensity areas on T2-weighted images (T2-high intensity lesions) but are not visualized in CT images. This series consisted of 29 patients who were diagnosed with diffuse brain injury and whose CT scans showed a Diffuse Injury I or II. Nineteen patients were studied in an acute or subacute stage. In all but 3 patients, small T2-high intensity lesions were found in the brain parenchyma. In the follow-up study brain edema was suggested because the lesions tended to be absent within 3 months in T2-weighted images and FLAIR. In 10 patients examined during a chronic stage. Small hemorrhages in patients with Diffuse Injury II were shown with variable intensities on the conventional T1- and T2-weighted images, but were visualized with low intensity in an EPI T2-WI. In diffuse brain injuries, small T2-high intensity lesions have been considered to be brain edema or ischemic insults. Our data however, suggested that microhemorrhages associated with brain edema were resent in most of the supratentorial lesions, and in more than a half of the lesions in the corpus callosum and the brain stem. These findings appear similar to contusions, which are defined as traumatic bruises of the neural parenchyma. The use of MRI has increased our understanding of in vivo pathological changes in mild or moderate forms of diffuse brain injury. (K.H.)

  10. Increased expression of aquaporin-4 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuaHu; Wei-PingZhang; LeiZhang; ZhongChen; Er-QingWei

    2004-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is one of the aquaporins (AQPs), a water channel family. In the brain, AQP4 is expressed in astroeyte foot processes, and plays an important role in water homeostasis and in the formation of brain edema. In our study, AQP4 expression in human brain specimens from patients with traumatic brain injury or different brain tumors was detected

  11. Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury : Epidemiology, impact and assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Scholten (Annemieke)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractInjuries are among the leading causes of death and disability in the world, often imposing great personal suffering and economic costs. An important severe injury that often affects young people is a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Over the past decades, the number of survivors of se

  12. Serious brain injury coexisting with multiple injuries caused by traffic accidents in 69 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张浚; 张鹤飞; 等

    1999-01-01

    Objective To explore the speciality,diagnosis,cure principle of serious brain injury coexisting with nultiple injuries caused by traffic accidents.Methods To analyze the clinic data of 69 cases of serious rain injury combined by oter parts of injuries caused by traffic accidents received from January 1998 to April 1999.Results This type of injury took up 11.5 percent of brain injuries in the same term and 33.6 percent of serious brain injuries.The specialities of the injury are that most of them were pedestrians crashed by vehicles.Coesisting injuries including chest injury and limb fractures accounted for a large part.The brain injury usally presented profound disturbance of consciousness,being dangerous and complicated,and a high ISS value.After treatment 13 cases died,9 cases was heavily crippled,11 cases lightly crippled,and 36 cases recovered.The death was usually caused by brain injury.Conclusions Road traffic accidents increased substantially every year.Most of them are related with violating drive rules and regulations.It is important to decrease the road traffic accidents by strengthening propaganda on traffic safety and traffic management.The main principles for salvage should emphasize the importance of pre-hospital emergency rescue and the accurate diagnosis rate,especially the distinction between coma and shock.The priority should be put on those injuries threatening to life.

  13. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    central sensitization to nociceptive stimuli culminates in profound debilitating pain that serves no adaptive purpose for the sufferer. It is now...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0806 TITLE: Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment...29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0806 Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time

  14. Genetic susceptibility to traumatic brain injury and apolipoprotein E gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-chuan; JIANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    @@ Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an injury caused by a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. It is a common emergency and severe case in neurosurgery field. Nowadays, there are more and more evidences showing that TBI, which is apparently similar in pathology and severity in the acute stage, may have different outcomes.

  15. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  16. The potential of neural transplantation for brain repair and regeneration following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major health problem worldwide. Currently, there is no effective treatment to improve neural structural repair and functional recovery of patients in the clinic. Cell transplantation is a potential strategy to repair and regenerate the injured brain. This review article summarized recent de-velopment in cell transplantation studies for post-traumatic brain injury brain repair with varying types of cell sources. It also discussed the potential of neural transplantation to repair/promote recovery of the injured brain following traumatic brain injury.

  17. Symptom Complaints Following Combat-Related Traumatic Brain Injury: Relationship to Traumatic Brain Injury Severity and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    being less competent (Sawchyn, Mateer, & Suffi eld, 2005 ). Mild TBI has also been associated with greater emotional distress ( Leininger , Kreutzer...brain injury . Brain Injury , 23 , 83 – 91 . Leininger , B.E. , Kreutzer , J.S. , & Hill , M.R . ( 1991 ). Comparison of minor and severe

  18. Delayed mGluR5 activation limits neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrnes Kimberly R

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury initiates biochemical processes that lead to secondary neurodegeneration. Imaging studies suggest that tissue loss may continue for months or years after traumatic brain injury in association with chronic microglial activation. Recently we found that metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 activation by (RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG decreases microglial activation and release of associated pro-inflammatory factors in vitro, which is mediated in part through inhibition of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase. Here we examined whether delayed CHPG administration reduces chronic neuroinflammation and associated neurodegeneration after experimental traumatic brain injury in mice. Methods One month after controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury, C57Bl/6 mice were randomly assigned to treatment with single dose intracerebroventricular CHPG, vehicle or CHPG plus a selective mGluR5 antagonist, 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolylethynylpyridine. Lesion volume, white matter tract integrity and neurological recovery were assessed over the following three months. Results Traumatic brain injury resulted in mGluR5 expression in reactive microglia of the cortex and hippocampus at one month post-injury. Delayed CHPG treatment reduced expression of reactive microglia expressing NADPH oxidase subunits; decreased hippocampal neuronal loss; limited lesion progression, as measured by repeated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (at one, two and three months and white matter loss, as measured by high field ex vivo diffusion tensor imaging at four months; and significantly improved motor and cognitive recovery in comparison to the other treatment groups. Conclusion Markedly delayed, single dose treatment with CHPG significantly improves functional recovery and limits lesion progression after experimental traumatic brain injury, likely in part through actions at mGluR5 receptors

  19. Metallic gold reduces TNFalpha expression, oxidative DNA damage and pro-apoptotic signals after experimental brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ostergaard; Larsen, Agnete; Pedersen, Dan Sonne;

    2009-01-01

    -45 microm in size or the vehicle (placebo) were implanted in the cortical tissue followed by a cortical freeze-lesioning. At 1-2 weeks post-injury, brains were analyzed by using immunohistochemistry and markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study shows that gold treatment......Brain injury represents a major health problem and may result in chronic inflammation and neurodegeneration. Due to antiinflammatory effects of gold, we have investigated the cerebral effects of metallic gold particles following a focal brain injury (freeze-lesion) in mice. Gold particles 20...

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion) are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kiraly, Michael A.; Kiraly, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzh...

  1. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  2. Cannabinoids: Well-Suited Candidates for the Treatment of Perinatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez-Orgado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain injury can be induced by a number of different damaging events occurring during or shortly after birth, including neonatal asphyxia, neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke-induced focal ischemia. Typical manifestations of these conditions are the presence of glutamate excitoxicity, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, the combination of which can potentially result in apoptotic-necrotic cell death, generation of brain lesions and long-lasting functional impairment. In spite of the high incidence of perinatal brain injury, the number of clinical interventions available for the treatment of the affected newborn babies is extremely limited. Hence, there is a dramatic need to develop new effective therapies aimed to prevent acute brain damage and enhance the endogenous mechanisms of long-term brain repair. The endocannabinoid system is an endogenous neuromodulatory system involved in the control of multiple central and peripheral functions. An early responder to neuronal injury, the endocannabinoid system has been described as an endogenous neuroprotective system that once activated can prevent glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium accumulation, activation of cell death pathways, microglia activation, neurovascular reactivity and infiltration of circulating leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier. The modulation of the endocannabinoid system has proven to be an effective neuroprotective strategy to prevent and reduce neonatal brain injury in different animal models and species. Also, the beneficial role of the endocannabinoid system on the control of the endogenous repairing responses (neurogenesis and white matter restoration to neonatal brain injury has been described in independent studies. This review addresses the particular effects of several drugs that modulate the activity of the endocannabinoid system on the progression of different manifestations of perinatal brain injury during both the acute and chronic

  3. Clinical neurorestorative progress in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Huiling Huang,1 Lin Chen,2,3 Hongyun Huang4–61Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin Neurosurgical Institute, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 3Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 4General Hospital of Chinese people's Armed Police Forces, 5Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 6Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability from trauma to the central nervous system. Besides the surgical interventions and symptomatic management, the conventional therapies for TBI and its sequelae are still limited. Recently emerging evidence suggests that some neurorestorative treatments appear to have a potential therapeutic role for TBI and improving the patient's quality of life. The current clinical neurorestorative strategies available in TBI include pharmacological treatments (recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, amantadine, lithium, and valproate, the neuromodulation treatments (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and low-level laser therapy, cell transplantation (bone marrow stromal cells and umbilical cord stromal cells, and combined neurorehabilitation. In this review, we summarize the recent clinical neurorestorative progress in the management of neurodegeneration as well as cognitive and motor deficits after TBI; indeed further clinical trials are required to provide more robust evidence.Keywords: brain trauma, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, clinical study

  4. Opioid Abuse After Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodet Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dependence development using both precipitated and spontaneous withdrawal. Key findings to date: • There was no difference in baseline nociception ( pain ...analgesia studies demonstrate that moderate brain injury does not result in an altered pain state or diminished response to oxycodone analgesia, the... pain medications. There is significant overlap in anatomical brain regions involved in reward pathways associated with addiction and the brain regions

  5. Microglia and Inflammation: Impact on Developmental Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Li-Jin; Takanohashi, Asako; Bell, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation during the perinatal period has become a recognized risk factor for developmental brain injuries over the past decade or more. To fully understand the relationship between inflammation and brain development, a comprehensive knowledge about the immune system within the brain is essential. Microglia are resident immune cells within the…

  6. Disability pensions in relation to traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2000-01-01

    From a Danish national register of hospitalizations, all patients were identified who had a discharge diagnosis of traumatic brain injury between the years 1979-1993 inclusive, at ages 18-66 years inclusive. These were classified as having suffered either a concussion (n = 74,398), a cranial...... award appeared to be independent of the injury itself. Rather, being awarded a disability pension appeared to be related to conditions which themselves are risk factors for a traumatic brain injury, e.g. chronic skeletomuscular disease and psychiatric disorders including alcoholism. Comparison...... with population statistics revealed that the relative risk of being assigned a low or intermediate disability pension is markedly elevated among the concussion group, especially at younger ages and among males. For the fracture and contusion groups, a clear post-injury elevation in rate was detectable, especially...

  7. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    to the head which disrupts normal brain functioning and leads to either transient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional , and/or...to either tran- sient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional , and/or behavioral functions. In the civil- ian population, TBI is...212-221. [6] Reeves TM, Lyeth BG, Povlishock JT (1995) Long-term potentiation deficits and excitability changes following trau- matic brain injury

  8. The far-reaching scope of neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Dennis W; McGeachy, Mandy J; Bayır, Hülya; Clark, Robert S B; Loane, David J; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2017-03-01

    The 'silent epidemic' of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been placed in the spotlight as a result of clinical investigations and popular press coverage of athletes and veterans with single or repetitive head injuries. Neuroinflammation can cause acute secondary injury after TBI, and has been linked to chronic neurodegenerative diseases; however, anti-inflammatory agents have failed to improve TBI outcomes in clinical trials. In this Review, we therefore propose a new framework of targeted immunomodulation after TBI for future exploration. Our framework incorporates factors such as the time from injury, mechanism of injury, and secondary insults in considering potential treatment options. Structuring our discussion around the dynamics of the immune response to TBI - from initial triggers to chronic neuroinflammation - we consider the ability of soluble and cellular inflammatory mediators to promote repair and regeneration versus secondary injury and neurodegeneration. We summarize both animal model and human studies, with clinical data explicitly defined throughout this Review. Recent advances in neuroimmunology and TBI-responsive neuroinflammation are incorporated, including concepts of inflammasomes, mechanisms of microglial polarization, and glymphatic clearance. Moreover, we highlight findings that could offer novel therapeutic targets for translational and clinical research, assimilate evidence from other brain injury models, and identify outstanding questions in the field.

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  10. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  11. Developmental traumatic brain injury decreased brain derived neurotrophic factor expression late after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Michelle Elena; Block, Benjamin; Requena, Daniela F; Hale, Merica A; Lane, Robert H

    2012-06-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of acquired cognitive dysfunction in children. Hippocampal Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is important for normal cognition. Little is known about the effects of TBI on BDNF levels in the developing hippocampus. We used controlled cortical impact (CCI) in the 17 day old rat pup to test the hypothesis that CCI would first increase rat hippocampal BDNF mRNA/protein levels relative to SHAM and Naïve rats by post injury day (PID) 2 and then decrease BDNF mRNA/protein by PID14. Relative to SHAM, CCI did not change BDNF mRNA/protein levels in the injured hippocampus in the first 2 days after injury but did decrease BDNF protein at PID14. Surprisingly, BDNF mRNA decreased at PID 1, 3, 7 and 14, and BDNF protein decreased at PID 2, in SHAM and CCI hippocampi relative to Naïve. In conclusion, TBI decreased BDNF protein in the injured rat pup hippocampus 14 days after injury. BDNF mRNA levels decreased in both CCI and SHAM hippocampi relative to Naïve, suggesting that certain aspects of the experimental paradigm (such as craniotomy, anesthesia, and/or maternal separation) may decrease the expression of BDNF in the developing hippocampus. While BDNF is important for normal cognition, no inferences can be made regarding the cognitive impact of any of these factors. Such findings, however, suggest that meticulous attention to the experimental paradigm, and possible inclusion of a Naïve group, is warranted in studies of BDNF expression in the developing brain after TBI.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Induces Lung Injury and Systemic Immune Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Aslami, Hamid; Fluiter, Kees; Roelofs, Joris J.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Van der Sluijs, Koen; van de Beek, Diederik; van Westerloo, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by acute lung injury, which is predictive for poor outcome. However, it is unclear whether lung injury develops independently or as a result of mechanical ventilation after TBI. Further, TBI is strongly associated with the development of pneumon

  13. Traumatic brain injury: Age at injury influences dementia risk after TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Victoria E.; Stewart, William

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for dementia. New data provide further support for this association and demonstrate the influence of age at injury and injury severity on dementia risk after TBI, revealing that even mild TBI increases dementia risk in those aged ≥65 years.

  14. Exercise to enhance neurocognitive function after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelman, David; Zafonte, Ross

    2012-11-01

    Vigorous exercise has long been associated with improved health in many domains. Results of clinical observation have suggested that neurocognitive performance also is improved by vigorous exercise. Data derived from animal model-based research have been emerging that show molecular and neuroanatomic mechanisms that may explain how exercise improves cognition, particularly after traumatic brain injury. This article will summarize the current state of the basic science and clinical literature regarding exercise as an intervention, both independently and in conjunction with other modalities, for brain injury rehabilitation. A key principle is the factor of timing of the initiation of exercise after mild traumatic brain injury, balancing potentially favorable and detrimental effects on recovery.

  15. The anatomy and biomechanics of acute and chronic whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Winkelstein, Beth A; Ivancic, Paul C; Svensson, Mats Y; Vasavada, Anita

    2009-04-01

    Whiplash injury is the most common motor vehicle injury, yet it is also one of the most poorly understood. Here we examine the evidence supporting an organic basis for acute and chronic whiplash injuries and review the anatomical sites within the neck that are potentially injured during these collisions. For each proposed anatomical site--facet joints, spinal ligaments, intervertebral discs, vertebral arteries, dorsal root ganglia, and neck muscles--we present the clinical evidence supporting that injury site, its relevant anatomy, the mechanism of and tolerance to injury, and the future research needed to determine whether that site is responsible for some whiplash injuries. This article serves as a snapshot of the current state of whiplash biomechanics research and provides a roadmap for future research to better understand and ultimately prevent whiplash injuries.

  16. BDNF Meditated trkB and Synapsin I Changes within the Hippocampus after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat:Reflections of Injury-induced Neuroplasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionTraumatic brain injury (TBI) can produce chronic cognitive learning/memory deficits that are thought to be mediated, in part, by impaired hippocampal function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its signal transduction receptor trkB and its downstream effector synapsin I are involved in this period. BDNF, trkB and the slope of field excitatory post-synaptic potential(fEPSP) were measured in the hippocampus of rat after fluid percussion brain injury (FPI). Isofluorane anaesthe- tizeed 50...

  17. Astrocyte-targeted expression of IL-6 protects the CNS against a focal brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Giralt, Mercedes; Lago, Natalia

    2003-01-01

    The effect of CNS-targeted IL-6 gene expression has been thoroughly investigated in the otherwise nonperturbed brain but not following brain injury. Here we examined the impact of astrocyte-targeted IL-6 production in a traumatic brain injury (cryolesion) model using GFAP-IL6 transgenic mice...... significantly increased up to but not including 20 dpl in the GFAP-IL6 mice. Oxidative stress as well as apoptotic cell death was significantly decreased throughout the time period studied in the GFAP-IL6 mice compared to controls. This could be linked to the altered inflammatory response as well...... as to the transgenic IL-6-induced increase of the antioxidant, neuroprotective proteins metallothionein-I + II. These results indicate that although in the brain the chronic astrocyte-targeted expression of IL-6 spontaneously induces an inflammatory response causing significant damage, during an acute...

  18. Overview of Traumatic Brain Injury: An Immunological Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamutdinov, Damir; Shapiro, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) afflicts people of all ages and genders, and the severity of injury ranges from concussion/mild TBI to severe TBI. Across all spectrums, TBI has wide-ranging, and variable symptomology and outcomes. Treatment options are lacking for the early neuropathology associated with TBIs and for the chronic neuropathological and neurobehavioral deficits. Inflammation and neuroinflammation appear to be major mediators of TBI outcomes. These systems are being intensively studies using animal models and human translational studies, in the hopes of understanding the mechanisms of TBI, and developing therapeutic strategies to improve the outcomes of the millions of people impacted by TBIs each year. This manuscript provides an overview of the epidemiology and outcomes of TBI, and presents data obtained from animal and human studies focusing on an inflammatory and immunological context. Such a context is timely, as recent studies blur the traditional understanding of an “immune-privileged” central nervous system. In presenting the evidence for specific, adaptive immune response after TBI, it is hoped that future studies will be interpreted using a broader perspective that includes the contributions of the peripheral immune system, to central nervous system disorders, notably TBI and post-traumatic syndromes. PMID:28124982

  19. Injury and repair in perinatal brain injury: Insights from non-invasive MR perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermark, Pia

    2015-03-01

    Injury to the developing brain remains an important complication in critically ill newborns, placing them at risk for future neurodevelopment impairments. Abnormal brain perfusion is often a key mechanism underlying neonatal brain injury. A better understanding of how alternations in brain perfusion can affect normal brain development will permit the development of therapeutic strategies that prevent and/or minimize brain injury and improve the neurodevelopmental outcome of these high-risk newborns. Recently, non-invasive MR perfusion imaging of the brain has been successfully applied to the neonatal brain, which is known to be smaller and have lower brain perfusion compared to older children and adults. This article will present an overview of the potential role of non-invasive perfusion imaging by MRI to study maturation, injury, and repair in perinatal brain injury and demonstrate why this perfusion sequence is an important addition to current neonatal imaging protocols, which already include different sequences to assess the anatomy and metabolism of the neonatal brain.

  20. P450 EICOSANOIDS AND ROS INTERPLAY IN BRAIN INJURY AND NEUROPROTECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehong; Davis, Catherine M; Alkayed, Nabil J

    2017-03-16

    Significance. Eicosanoids are endogenous lipid mediators that play important roles in brain function and disease. Acute brain injury such as that occurs in stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the formation of eicosanoids, which in return exacerbate or diminish injury. In chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), eicosanoid synthetic and metabolizing enzymes are altered, disrupting the balance between neuroprotective and neurotoxic eicosanoids. Recent Advances. Human and experimental studies have established the opposing roles of hydroxy- and epoxyeicosanoids and their potential utility as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in neural injury. Critical Issues. A gap in knowledge remains in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the neurovascular actions of specific eicosanoids, such as specific isomers of epoxyeicosatrienoic (EETs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Future Directions. EETs and HETEs exert their actions on brain cells by targeting multiple mechanisms, which include surface G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The identification of high-affinity receptors for EETs and HETEs and their cellular localization in brain will be a breakthrough in our understanding of these eicosanoids as mediators of cell-cell communications and contributors to brain development, function and disease.

  1. Imatinib treatment reduces brain injury in a murine model of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enming Joe Su

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for Traumatic brain injury (TBI focus on stabilizing individuals and on preventing further damage from the secondary consequences of TBI. A major complication of TBI is cerebral edema, which can be caused by the loss of blood brain barrier (BBB integrity. Recent studies in several CNS pathologies have shown that activation of latent platelet derived growth factor-CC (PDGF-CC within the brain can promote BBB permeability through PDGF receptor α (PDGFRα signaling, and that blocking this pathway improves outcomes. In this study we examine the efficacy for the treatment of TBI of an FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα, Imatinib. Using a murine model we show that Imatinib treatment, begun 45 minutes after TBI and given twice daily for 5 days, significantly reduces BBB dysfunction. This is associated with significantly reduced lesion size 24 hours, 7 days, and 21 days after TBI, reduced cerebral edema, determined from apparent diffusion co-efficient (ADC measurements, and with the preservation of cognitive function. Finally, analysis of CSF from human TBI patients suggests a possible correlation between high PDGF-CC levels and increased injury severity. Thus, our data suggests a novel strategy for the treatment of TBI with an existing FDA approved antagonist of the PDGFRα.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Deeb, George; Rahal, Rahaf; Atwi, Khairallah; Mondello, Stefania; Marei, Hany Elsayed; Gali, Amr; Sleiman, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a disruption in the normal function of the brain due to an injury following a trauma, which can potentially cause severe physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. The primary insult to the brain initiates secondary injury cascades consisting of multiple complex biochemical responses of the brain that significantly influence the overall severity of the brain damage and clinical sequelae. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers huge potential for application in the treatment of TBI. MSCs have immunosuppressive properties that reduce inflammation in injured tissue. As such, they could be used to modulate the secondary mechanisms of injury and halt the progression of the secondary insult in the brain after injury. Particularly, MSCs are capable of secreting growth factors that facilitate the regrowth of neurons in the brain. The relative abundance of harvest sources of MSCs also makes them particularly appealing. Recently, numerous studies have investigated the effects of infusion of MSCs into animal models of TBI. The results have shown significant improvement in the motor function of the damaged brain tissues. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI. The review starts with a brief introduction of the pathophysiology of TBI, followed by the biology of MSCs, and the application of MSCs in TBI treatment. The challenges associated with the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI and strategies to address those challenges in the future have also been discussed.

  3. Brain Networks Subserving Emotion Regulation and Adaptation after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Aleman, Andre; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    The majority of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustain a mild injury (mTBI). One out of 4 patients experiences persistent complaints, despite their often normal neuropsychological test results and the absence of structural brain damage on conventional neuroimaging. Susceptibility to deve

  4. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  5. Better Sleep May Signal Recovery from Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... useful tool for assessing their recovery after traumatic brain injury," said study author Nadia Gosselin. She's an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the University of Montreal. "We found that ...

  6. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  7. Neurogenic fever after traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, H; Pinto-Martin, J; Bullock, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of neurogenic fever (NF) in a population of patients in the acute phase following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); to identify factors associated with the development of NF following severe TBI in adults.

  8. Kids' Mild Brain Injury Can Have Long-Term Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Injury Can Have Long-Term Effects Early head trauma linked to psychiatric, financial issues as adults, study ... HealthDay News) -- Young people who suffer even mild head trauma are more likely to have serious issues later ...

  9. Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign up Search: Defense Centers of Excellence For Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury U.S. Department of Defense ... Reports Program Evaluation DoD/VA PH & TBI Registry Psychological Health About Psychological Health Psychological Health Resources About ...

  10. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.; Naismith, Laura M.; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1) and 8 weeks (Time 2) after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r = .31 to .44), number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r = .35 to .45), psychological distress (r = .57 to .67), and level of functionality (r = −.43 to −.29). Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2). Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms. PMID:27445604

  11. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Chaput

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1 and 8 weeks (Time 2 after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r=.31 to .44, number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r=.35 to .45, psychological distress (r=.57 to .67, and level of functionality (r=-.43 to -.29. Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2. Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms.

  12. GH and Pituitary Hormone Alterations After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Züleyha; Tanrıverdi, Fatih; Ünlühızarcı, Kürşad; Kelestimur, Fahrettin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a crucially important public health problem around the world, which gives rise to increased mortality and is the leading cause of physical and psychological disability in young adults, in particular. Pituitary dysfunction due to TBI was first described 95 years ago. However, until recently, only a few papers have been published in the literature and for this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been neglected for a long time. Recent studies have revealed that TBI is one of the leading causes of hypopituitarism. TBI which causes hypopituitarism may be characterized by a single head injury such as from a traffic accident or by chronic repetitive head trauma as seen in combative sports including boxing, kickboxing, and football. Vascular damage, hypoxic insult, direct trauma, genetic predisposition, autoimmunity, and neuroinflammatory changes may have a role in the development of hypopituitarism after TBI. Because of the exceptional structure of the hypothalamo-pituitary vasculature and the special anatomic location of anterior pituitary cells, GH is the most commonly lost hormone after TBI, and the frequency of isolated GHD is considerably high. TBI-induced pituitary dysfunction remains undiagnosed and therefore untreated in most patients because of the nonspecific and subtle clinical manifestations of hypopituitarism. Treatment of TBI-induced hypopituitarism depends on the deficient anterior pituitary hormones. GH replacement therapy has some beneficial effects on metabolic parameters and neurocognitive dysfunction. Patients with TBI without neuroendocrine changes and those with TBI-induced hypopituitarism share the same clinical manifestations, such as attention deficits, impulsion impairment, depression, sleep abnormalities, and cognitive disorders. For this reason, TBI-induced hypopituitarism may be neglected in TBI victims and it would be expected that underlying hypopituitarism would aggravate the clinical picture of TBI

  13. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick N. Tanguay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients’ difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik & Bialystok, 2006 as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task and the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003. Patients also prepared actual meals, and were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients’ Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

  14. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    incidence of post - traumatic stress disorder and suicide .112 Efforts to treat TBI in the field include avoiding hypotension and secondary brain injury...378-384. 19 Harhangi BS, Kompanje JO, Leebeek FWG, et al. Coagulation disorders after traumatic brain injury. Acta Neurochir. 2008;150;165-175...K, Xu X-M. MicroRNA in central nervous system trauma and degenerative disorders . Physiol Genomics. 2011;43:571-580. 37. Hoyt DB. Post hoc ergo

  15. Psychotherapy after acquired brain injury: Is less more?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudi Coetzer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the challenges and dilemmas facing psychotherapists working with neurological patients, and in particular those who work in the context of under-resourced brain injury rehabilitation healthcare systems. Through the subjective process of reflective practice integral to clinical supervision, the author attempts to identify five core aspects of psychotherapy intended to augment post-acute long- term rehabilitation programmes and interventions after acquired brain injury.

  16. Fluid-percussion–induced traumatic brain injury model in rats

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Various attempts have been made to replicate clinical TBI using animal models. The fluid-percussion model (FP) is one of the oldest and most commonly used models of experimentally induced TBI. Both central (CFP) and lateral (LFP) variations of the model have been used. Developed initially for use in larger species, the standard FP device was adapted more than 20 years ago to induce consistent degrees of brain injury in ...

  17. Neuroprotective efficacy of a proneurogenic compound after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Meghan O; Bramlett, Helen M; Naidoo, Jacinth; Pieper, Andrew A; Dietrich, W Dalton

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by histopathological damage and long-term sensorimotor and cognitive dysfunction. Recent studies have reported the discovery of the P7C3 class of aminopropyl carbazole agents with potent neuroprotective properties for both newborn neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus and mature neurons in other regions of the central nervous system. This study tested, for the first time, whether the highly active P7C3-A20 compound would be neuroprotective, promote hippocampal neurogenesis, and improve functional outcomes after experimental TBI. Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to moderate fluid percussion brain injury were evaluated for quantitative immunohistochemical and behavioral changes after trauma. P7C3-A20 (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was initiated intraperitoneally 30 min postsurgery and twice per day every day thereafter for 7 days. Administration of P7C3-A20 significantly reduced overall contusion volume, preserved vulnerable anti-neuronal nuclei (NeuN)-positive pericontusional cortical neurons, and improved sensorimotor function 1 week after trauma. P7C3-A20 treatment also significantly increased both bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)- and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells within the subgranular zone of the ipsilateral dentate gyrus 1 week after TBI. Five weeks after TBI, animals treated with P7C3-A20 showed significantly increased BrdU/NeuN double-labeled neurons and improved cognitive function in the Morris water maze, compared to TBI-control animals. These results suggest that P7C3-A20 is neuroprotective and promotes endogenous reparative strategies after TBI. We propose that the chemical scaffold represented by P7C3-A20 provides a basis for optimizing and advancing new pharmacological agents for protecting patients against the early and chronic consequences of TBI.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dura. Collectively, these three membranes form the meninges. brain death - an irreversible cessation of measurable brain function. Broca's ... Education Fact Sheets Hope Through Research Know Your Brain Preventing ... and Death of a Neuron Order Publications CONTACT US Contact ...

  19. A CD11d Monoclonal Antibody Treatment Reduces Tissue Injury and Improves Neurological Outcome after Fluid Percussion Brain Injury in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an international health concern often resulting in chronic neurological abnormalities, including cognitive deficits, emotional disturbances, and motor impairments. An anti-CD11d monoclonal antibody that blocks the CD11d/CD18 integrin and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 interaction following experimental spinal cord injury improves functional recovery, while reducing the intraspinal number of neutrophils and macrophages, oxidative activity, and tissue d...

  20. Retinochoroidal changes after severe brain impact injury in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retinochoroidal changes and establisheye damage model after brain impact injury.Methods: An eye damage model after brain impact injury was established by striking the frontoparietal zone in rabbits with BIM-Ⅱ bioimpact machine. Seventeen rabbits were killed at 4 different intervals after injury. The pathological characteristics of the retinal and choroid damages were observed.Results: All the rabbits had severe brain injury with subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain contusion. The eye damage occurred in all of the 17 rabbits. Hemorrhage in optic nerve sheaths was observed and retinal edema and bleeding was discovered with ophthalmoscope. Histopathologic study displayed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the retrobulbar portion of the retinal nerve, general choroid blood vessel dilatation, retinal nerve fibre swelling within 6 hours after injury, and flat retinal detachment with subretinal proteinoid exudation, and degeneration and disappearance of the outer segment of the optic cell over 6 hours after injury.Conclusions: The pathological characteristic of the eye damage at early stage following brain impact injury is local circulation disturbance. At late stage, it features in retinal detachment, and optic cellular degeneration and necrosis.

  1. Transcranial amelioration of inflammation and cell death after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Theodore L.; Nayak, Debasis; Atanasijevic, Tatjana; Koretsky, Alan P.; Latour, Lawrence L.; McGavern, Dorian B.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly appreciated to be highly prevalent and deleterious to neurological function. At present, no effective treatment options are available, and little is known about the complex cellular response to TBI during its acute phase. To gain insights into TBI pathogenesis, we developed a novel murine closed-skull brain injury model that mirrors some pathological features associated with mild TBI in humans and used long-term intravital microscopy to study the dynamics of the injury response from its inception. Here we demonstrate that acute brain injury induces vascular damage, meningeal cell death, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that ultimately breach the glial limitans and promote spread of the injury into the parenchyma. In response, the brain elicits a neuroprotective, purinergic-receptor-dependent inflammatory response characterized by meningeal neutrophil swarming and microglial reconstitution of the damaged glial limitans. We also show that the skull bone is permeable to small-molecular-weight compounds, and use this delivery route to modulate inflammation and therapeutically ameliorate brain injury through transcranial administration of the ROS scavenger, glutathione. Our results shed light on the acute cellular response to TBI and provide a means to locally deliver therapeutic compounds to the site of injury.

  2. Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Decompressive Craniectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The patient with head trauma is a challenge for the emergency physician and for the neurosurgeon. Currently traumatic brain injury constitutes a public health problem. Knowledge of the various supportive therapeutic strategies in the pre-hospital and pre-operative stages is essential for optimal care. The immediate rapid infusion of large volumes of crystalloids to restore blood volume and blood pressure is now the standard treatment of patients with combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS). The fluid in patients with brain trauma and especially in patients with brain injur y is a critical issue. In this context we present a review of the literature about the history, physiology of current fluid preparations, and a discussion regarding the use of fluid therapy in traumatic brain injury and decompressive craniectomy. PMID:27162857

  3. Intravenous Fluid Therapy in Traumatic Brain Injury and Decompressive Craniectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Raphael Alvis-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient with head trauma is a challenge for the emergency physician and for the neurosurgeon. Currently traumatic brain injury constitutes a public health problem. Knowledge of the various supportive therapeutic strategies in the pre-hospital and pre-operative stages is essential for optimal care. The immediate rapid infusion of large volumes of crystalloids to restore blood volume and blood pressure is now the standard treatment of patients with combined traumatic brain injury (TBI and hemorrhagic shock (HS. The fluid in patients with brain trauma and especially in patients with brain injur y is a critical issue. In this context we present a review of the literature about the history, physiology of current fluid preparations, and a discussion regarding the use of fluid therapy in traumatic brain injury and decompressive craniectomy.

  4. Development of an Ontology for Rehabilitation: Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) rehabilitation interventions are very heterogeneous due to injury characteristics and pathology, patient demographics, healthcare settings, caregiver variability, and individualized, multi-discipline treatment plans. Consequently, comparing and generalizing the effectiveness of interventions is limited largely due to…

  5. Ethical Issues in Neuroprognostication after Severe Pediatric Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschen, Matthew P; Walter, Jennifer K

    2015-09-01

    Neurologic outcome prediction, or neuroprognostication, after severe brain injury in children is a challenging task and has many ethical dimensions. Neurologists and intensivists are frequently asked by families to predict functional recovery after brain injury to help guide medical decision making despite limited outcome data. Using two clinical cases of children with severe brain injury from different mechanisms: hypoxic-ischemic injury secondary to cardiac arrest and traumatic brain injury, this article first addresses the importance of making a correct diagnosis in a child with a disorder of consciousness and then discusses some of the clinical challenges with deducing an accurate and timely outcome prediction. We further explore the ethical obligations of physicians when supporting parental decision making. We highlight the need to focus on how to elicit family values for a brain injured child, how to manage prognostic uncertainty, and how to effectively communicate with families in these challenging situations. We offer guidance for physicians when they have diverging views from families on aggressiveness of care or feel pressured to prognosticate with in a "window of opportunity" for limiting or withdrawing life sustaining therapies. We conclude with a discussion of the potential influence of emerging technologies, specifically advanced functional neuroimaging, on neurologic outcome prediction after severe brain injury.

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury Screening: Preliminary Findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    traumatic brain injury TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY ( TBI ) is often dis-cussed as a common injury of the war in... Traumatic Brain Injury Screening 17 TABLE 1 Screening results∗ Injury status Injured with TBI 907 (22.8) Injured without TBI 385 (9.7) Not injured 2681...remember the injury 335 (36.9) Total with TBI 907 (100) ∗Values represent n (%). TBI indicates traumatic brain

  7. The Role of Cytokines and Inflammatory Cells in Perinatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. McAdams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain injury frequently complicates preterm birth and leads to significant long-term morbidity. Cytokines and inflammatory cells are mediators in the common pathways associated with perinatal brain injury induced by a variety of insults, such as hypoxic-ischemic injury, reperfusion injury, toxin-mediated injury, and infection. This paper examines our current knowledge regarding cytokine-related perinatal brain injury and specifically discusses strategies for attenuating cytokine-mediated brain damage.

  8. Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    induced mTBI has increased in recent years. Intracranial pressure monitoring is not always available in clinical care settings, and protocols need to... intracranial pressure , shear stress concentration, and relative motion between the brain and skull do indeed cause surface contusion, concussion, diffuse axonal injury, as well as acute subdural hematoma. ...civilian hospital for mild head injury. Follow-up 1-month post-injury, allowed for PCS evaluation. The analyses (odds ratios) suggest that elevated

  9. [Guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury. Part 3. Surgical management of severe traumatic brain injury (Options)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A A; Krylov, V V; Gavrilov, A G; Kravchuk, A D; Likhterman, L B; Petrikov, S S; Talypov, A E; Zakharova, N E; Solodov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the main causes of mortality and severe disability in young and middle age patients. Patients with severe TBI, who are in coma, are of particular concern. Adequate diagnosis of primary brain injuries and timely prevention and treatment of secondary injury mechanisms markedly affect the possibility of reducing mortality and severe disability. The present guidelines are based on the authors' experience in developing international and national recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of mild TBI, penetrating gunshot wounds of the skull and brain, severe TBI, and severe consequences of brain injury, including a vegetative state. In addition, we used the materials of international and national guidelines for the diagnosis, intensive care, and surgical treatment of severe TBI, which were published in recent years. The proposed recommendations for surgical treatment of severe TBI in adults are addressed primarily to neurosurgeons, neurologists, neuroradiologists, anesthesiologists, and intensivists who are routinely involved in treating these patients.

  10. Minor Functional Deficits in Basic Response Patterns for Reinforcement after Frontal Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Winstanley, Catharine A

    2016-10-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major contributor to numerous psychiatric conditions and chronic behavioral dysfunction. Recent studies in experimental brain injury have begun to adopt operant methodologies to assess these deficits, all of which rely on the process of reinforcement. No studies have directly examined how reinforced behaviors are affected by TBI, however. The current study assessed performance under the four most common schedules of reinforcement (fixed ratio, variable ratio, fixed interval, variable interval) and one higher order schedule assessing motivation (progressive ratio) after bilateral, pre-frontal controlled cortical impact injury. TBI-induced differences on the basic schedules were minor, with the exception of the variable ratio, where increased efficacy (more reinforcers, higher response rates, lower interresponse times) at higher requirements was observed as a result of brain injury. Performance on the progressive ratio schedule showed some gross differences between the groups, in that sham rats became more efficient under this schedule while injured rats perseverated in lever pressing. Further, injured rats were specifically impaired at lower response requirements on the progressive ratio. Taken together, these findings indicate that simple reinforced behaviors are mostly unaffected after TBI, except in the case of variable ratio schedules, but the altered performance on the higher-order progressive ratio schedule suggests changes involving motivation or potentially perseveration. These findings validate operant measures of more complex behaviors for brain injury, all of which rely on reinforcement and can be taken into consideration when adapting and developing novel functional assessments.

  11. Statistical analysis plan for the Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury trial: a randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin versus placebo in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Presneill, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury (EPO-TBI) trial aims to determine whether the administration of erythropoietin to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes.

  12. Utility of the brain injury screening index in identifying female prisoners with a traumatic brain injury and associated cognitive impairment.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    An estimated 60.25% of offenders have a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). There is currently no established valid or reliable screening tool for identifying female prisoners with a TBI and associated cognitive impairment available in the UK. Using a cross-sectional design, this study aimed to investigate the retest reliability and construct validity of the Brain Injury Screening Index (BISI). Convergent validity was explored using self-report measures of mood and neurodisability, as we...

  13. Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Takashi; Misumi, Shuzoh; Shibasaki, Takashi; Tamura, Masaru; Kunimine, Hideo; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo; Miyazaki, Mizuho; Miyagi, Osamu.

    1988-03-01

    Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation is discussed. Six cases with delayed brain injury were treated with a combination of dexamethasone or betamethasone, with heparin, glycerol, dextran 40 and some vasodilators. Two cases with temporal lobe syndrome were treated in the early stages of brain injury for a period of over 12 months were almost completely cured, another two cases with chiasma syndrome were treated in the relatively late stages, showed a partial improvement. One case which was irradiated 120 GY during 13 years did not improve. The final case treated with steroids for a short period also resulted in failure and the patient underwent an operation for the removal of the necrotic mass three years after the radiotherapy. Steroid therapy started in the early stages of brain injury after irradiation for over the 12 months is thought to be effective. Heparin therapy was also effective in one out of three cases, but in one of the cases subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic aneurysm occurred during the therapy. In an acute phase, showing edematous change of the injured brain, the administration of glycerol is also thought to be useful. But the effectiveness of the other medicines containing some vasodilators was obscure or doubtful. We propose the following : (1) A meticulous observation is essential for the patients who received high doses of irradiation to diagnose brain injury in the early reversible stage. (2) Steroids should be given immediately in this reversible stage of brain injury before the irreversible ''necrosis'' occurs. (3) Steroids should be maintained for a long period over 12 months. (4) Heparin therapy is also thought to be effective, but careful precautions to avoid hemorrhagic complications before the therapy should be scheduled. This recommended plan may also be used for the treatment of brain injuries after cranial irradiation for other intracranial tumors.

  14. Trial of Oral Metoclopramide on Diurnal Bruxism of Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ho Sung; Seo, Mi Ri

    2013-01-01

    Bruxism is a diurnal or nocturnal parafunctional activity that includes tooth clenching, bracing, gnashing, and grinding. The dopaminergic system seems to be the key pathophysiology of bruxism and diminution of dopaminergic transmission at the prefrontal cortex seems to induce it. We report two patients with diurnal bruxism in whom a bilateral frontal lobe injury resulted from hemorrhagic stroke or traumatic brain injury. These patients' bruxism was refractory to bromocriptine but responded to low-dose metoclopramide therapy. We propose that administering low doses of metoclopramide is possibly a sound method for treating bruxism in a brain injury patient with frontal lobe hypoperfusion on positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:24466522

  15. [Penetrating head and brain injuries with nonmetal foreign bodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapov, A A; Okhlopkov, V A; Latyshev, Ya A; Serova, N K; Eolchiyan, S A

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are common in neurosurgical practice. Most of them are civil or war-time missile and blast injuries. This type of trauma is widely presented in neurosurgical publication, textbooks and clinical evidence-based guidelines. At the same time, PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies are very rare. All the data are limited to case reports and small series of cases. Moreover, there are no clinical consideration on diagnosis, treatment, complication, outcome and prognosis of PBI by non-metallic penetrating brain injuries. In this review all the data are summarized to provide recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of PBI by non-metallic foreign bodies.

  16. Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Bailes J, et al. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy in an Iraqi war veteran with posttraumatic stress disorder who committed suicide . Neurosurgical focus... post - mortem 1, 3, 6, 18-20. Tau pathology has also been observed after single more severe traumatic brain injuries 21-23. Currently, there are no...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0016 TITLE: Development of in Vivo Biomarkers for Progressive Tau Pathology after Traumatic

  17. Neuroblast Distribution After Cortical Impact is Influenced by White Matter Injury in the Immature Gyrencephalic Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Taylor

    2016-08-01

    neuroblasts that were born prior to PND 5. This platform may be useful to continue to study potential complications of white matter injury and alterations of postnatal population of brain regions, which may contribute to the chronic effects of TBI in children.

  18. Opioid Abuse after Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation Using Rodent Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    nociception ( pain threshold) between the sham controls and the brain-injured subjects in either the spinally or supra-spinally mediated measures of acute pain ...brain injury does not result in an altered pain state or diminished response to oxycodone analgesia and the dependence studies show withdrawal is not...of persons who are prescribed opioid pain medications. There is significant overlap in anatomical brain regions involved in reward pathways

  19. Biomarkers and acute brain injuries: interest and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek, Ségolène; Dumurgier, Julien; Citerio, Giuseppe; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2014-04-24

    For patients presenting with acute brain injury (such as traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid haemorrhage and stroke), the diagnosis and identification of intracerebral lesions and evaluation of the severity, prognosis and treatment efficacy can be challenging. The complexity and heterogeneity of lesions after brain injury are most probably responsible for this difficulty. Patients with apparently comparable brain lesions on imaging may have different neurological outcomes or responses to therapy. In recent years, plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have emerged as possible tools to distinguish between the different pathophysiological processes. This review aims to summarise the plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers evaluated in subarachnoid haemorrhage, traumatic brain injury and stroke, and to clarify their related interests and limits for diagnosis and prognosis. For subarachnoid haemorrhage, particular interest has been focused on the biomarkers used to predict vasospasm and cerebral ischaemia. The efficacy of biomarkers in predicting the severity and outcome of traumatic brain injury has been stressed. The very early diagnostic performance of biomarkers and their ability to discriminate ischaemic from haemorrhagic stroke were studied.

  20. Biomarkers of brain injury in the premature infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term encephalopathy of prematurity encompasses not only the acute brain injury (such as intraventricular hemorrhage but also complex disturbance on the infant’s subsequent brain development. In premature infants, the most frequent recognized source of brain injury is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH and periventricular leukomalacia (PVL. Furthermore 20-25% infants with birth weigh less than 1,500 g will have IVH and that proportion increases to 45% if the birth weight is less than 500-750 g. In addition, nearly 60% of very low birth weight newborns will have hypoxic-ischemic injury. Therefore permanent lifetime neurodevelopmental disabilities are frequent in premature infants. Innovative approach to prevent or decrease brain injury in preterm infants requires discovery of biomarkers able to discriminate infants at risk for injury, monitor the progression of the injury and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. In this article, we will review biomarkers studied in premature infants with IVH, Post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation (PHVD and PVL including: S100b, Activin A, erythropoietin, chemokine CCL 18, GFAP and NFL will also be examined. Some of the most promising biomarkers for IVH are S100β and Activin. The concentrations of TGF-β1, MMP-9 and PAI-1 in cerebrospinal fluid could be used to discriminate patients that will require shunt after post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation. Neonatal brain injury is frequent in premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care and we hope to contribute to the awareness and interest in clinical validation of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  1. Biomarkers of brain injury in the premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas-Escobar, Martha; Weiss, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    The term "encephalopathy of prematurity" encompasses not only the acute brain injury [such as intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH)] but also complex disturbance on the infant's subsequent brain development. In premature infants, the most frequent recognized source of brain injury is IVH and periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Furthermore 20-25% infants with birth weigh less than 1,500 g will have IVH and that proportion increases to 45% if the birth weight is less than 500-750 g. In addition, nearly 60% of very low birth weight newborns will have hypoxic-ischemic injury. Therefore permanent lifetime neurodevelopmental disabilities are frequent in premature infants. Innovative approach to prevent or decrease brain injury in preterm infants requires discovery of biomarkers able to discriminate infants at risk for injury, monitor the progression of the injury, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. In this article, we will review biomarkers studied in premature infants with IVH, Post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation (PHVD), and PVL including: S100b, Activin A, erythropoietin, chemokine CCL 18, GFAP, and NFL will also be examined. Some of the most promising biomarkers for IVH are S100β and Activin. The concentrations of TGF-β1, MMP-9, and PAI-1 in cerebrospinal fluid could be used to discriminate patients that will require shunt after PHVD. Neonatal brain injury is frequent in premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care and we hope to contribute to the awareness and interest in clinical validation of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  2. Therapeutic effect of nimodipine on experimental brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨树源; 王增光

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect of nimodipine on experimental brain injury.Methods: Experimental and control rabbits were subjected to a closed head injury. In one group nimodipine was given intravenously and the effect evaluated by electron microscopy, brain water content, calcium levels, transcranial Doppler, and intracranial pressure monitoring.Results: In rabbits treated with nimodipine the level of neuronal cytosolic free calcium was markedly decreased. There were less cellular damage and less spasm of the middle cerebral artery seen on electron microscopy. No difference regarding intracranial pressure changes between the two groups was noted. Conclusions: Nimodipine has a protective action on brain injury by blocking a series of pathological reactions induced by neuronal calcium overload, and by reducing the spasm of brain vessels and improving cerebral blood flow.

  3. Autophagy in acute brain injury: feast, famine, or folly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig M; Chen, Yaming; Sullivan, Mara L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B

    2011-07-01

    In the central nervous system, increased autophagy has now been reported after traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, cerebral ischemia, intracerebral hemorrhage, and seizures. This increase in autophagy could be physiologic, converting damaged or dysfunctional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles to their amino acid and fatty acid components for recycling. On the other hand, this increase in autophagy could be supraphysiologic, perhaps consuming and eliminating functional proteins, lipids, and/or organelles as well. Whether an increase in autophagy is beneficial (feast) or detrimental (famine) in brain likely depends on both the burden of intracellular substrate targeted for autophagy and the capacity of the cell's autophagic machinery. Of course, increased autophagy observed after brain injury could also simply be an epiphenomenon (folly). These divergent possibilities have clear ramifications for designing therapeutic strategies targeting autophagy after acute brain injury and are the subject of this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Autophagy and protein degradation in neurological diseases."

  4. Measuring and Inducing Brain Plasticity in Chronic Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia…

  5. Sport and nonsport etiologies of mild traumatic brain injury: similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Amanda R; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has recently gained appreciation as a significant public health problem, which has highlighted just how little is known about its proximal and long-term effects. A major challenge in the study of mTBI is the heterogeneity of the condition. Research on mTBI has historically separated sport and nonsport etiologies, and the extent to which research from one of these samples translates to the other is unclear. This review examines the literature on mTBI, with a focus on comparing sport and nonsport etiologies with regard to the latest research on biomechanics, pathophysiology, neurocognitive effects, and neuroimaging. Issues of particular relevance to sports injuries, such as exercise, repetitive injuries, subconcussive blows, and chronic injury effects, are also reviewed.

  6. Mechanical Loading of Neurons and Astrocytes with Application to Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ). Neurons and astrocytes are susceptible to damage mechanisms arising from various...further developments may be pursued to unravel the key mechanical pathways potentially involved in TBI . 1. INTRODUCTION Traumatic brain injury ... injury mechanisms at the cellular level. This is especially important when studying traumatic brain injury ( TBI ). Neurons and astrocytes

  7. Social competence at 2 years following child traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Beauchamp, Miriam Helen; Yeates, Keith Owen; Crossley, Louise; Ryan, Nicholas Peter; Hearps, Stephen J C; Catroppa, Cathy

    2017-02-08

    Children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk of social impairment, but research is yet to document the trajectory of these skills post-injury and factors that may predict social problems. The study addressed these gaps in knowledge, reporting on findings from a prospective, longitudinal follow-up study which investigated social outcomes post injury and explored factors contributing to these outcomes at 2 years post-injury. The sample included 113 children, 74 with TBI and 39 typically developing (TD) controls. TBI participants were recruited on presentation to hospital. Parents rated pre-injury function at that time and all children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Participants were followed up at 2 years post-injury. Outcomes were social adjustment, social participation, social relationships, and social cognition. Predictors of social outcomes examined included brain lesion characteristics, child cognition (6 months post-TBI) and behavior and environmental factors (pre-injury and 2 years). Reduced social adjustment (p=.011) and social participation (pchildren with TBI compared to TD controls. Poor social adjustment was predicted by externalizing behaviour problems and younger age at injury. Reduced social participation was linked to internalizing behavior problems. Greater lesion volume, lower socioeconomic status and family burden contributed to poorer social relationships, while age at injury predicted social cognition. Within the TBI group, 23% of children exhibited social impairment: younger age at injury, greater pre-injury and current behavior problems and family dysfunction, poorer IQ, processing speed, and empathy were linked to impairment. Further follow-up is required to track social recovery and the influences of cognition, brain, and environment over time.

  8. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  9. Peripheral nervous system involvement in chronic spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tankisi, Hatice; Pugdahl, Kirsten; Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Upper motor neuron disorders are believed to leave the peripheral nervous system (PNS) intact. In this study we examined whether there is evidence of PNS involvement in spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: Twelve subjects with chronic low cervical or thoracic SCI were included...

  10. Correlation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to cognitive impairment following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dezhi Kang; Zhang Guo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can promote survival and differentiation of cholinergic, dopaminergic and motor neurons, and axonal regeneration. BDNF has neuroprotective effects on the nervous system. OBJECTIVE: To explore changes in BDNF expression and cognitive function in rats after brain injury DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The neuropathology experiment was performed at the Second Research Room, Department of Neurosurgery, Fujian Medical University (China) from July 2007 to July 2008. MATERIALS: A total of 72 healthy, male, Sprague Dawley, rats were selected for this study. METHODS: Rat models of mild and moderate traumatic brain injury were created by percussion, according to Feeney's method (n = 24, each group). A bone window was made in rats from the sham operation group (n = 24), but no attack was conducted. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At days 1,2, 4 and 7 following injury, BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was examined by immunohistochemistry (streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method). Changes in rat cognitive function were assessed by the walking test, balance-beam test and memory function detection. RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was aggravated at day 2, and recovered to normal at days 3 and 7 in rats from the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain was increased at 1 day, decreased at day 2, and then gradually increased in the mild and moderate traumatic brain injury groups. BDNF expression was greater in rats from the moderate traumatic brain injury group than in the sham operation and mild traumatic brain injury groups (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: BDNF expression in the rat frontal lobe cortex, hippocampus and basal forebrain is correlated to cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury. BDNF has a protective effect on cognitive function in rats

  11. Blast and the Consequences on Traumatic Brain Injury-Multiscale Mechanical Modeling of Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    brain and spinal cord injury, is the largest contributor to a poor neurological outcome in survivors of brain and spinal cord trauma. Microscale...anatomical features of a 50th percentile male head, including the brain, falx and tentorium, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), duramater, piamater, facial...discretized finite elements. (b) Sections of the head model; the right half of the head model is shown with the brain, the meningeal layers (dura

  12. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  13. [Hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury: diagnostic and therapeutic issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoq, A-L; Chanson, P

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a well-known public health problem worldwide and is a leading cause of death and disability, particularly in young adults. Besides neurological and psychiatric issues, pituitary dysfunction can also occur after TBI, in the acute or chronic phase. The exact prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism is difficult to assess due to the wide heterogeneity of published studies and bias in interpretation of hormonal test results in this specific population. Predictive factors for hypopituitarism have been proposed and are helpful for the screening. The pathophysiology of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is not well understood but the vascular hypothesis is privileged. Activation of pituitary stem/progenitor cells is probably involved in the recovery of pituitary functions. Those cells also play a role in the induction of pituitary tumors, highlighting their crucial place in pituitary conditions. This review updates the current data related to anterior pituitary dysfunction after TBI and discusses the bias and difficulties encountered in its diagnosis.

  14. The Relationship between Mid-face Fractures and Brain Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalighi Sigaroudi A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Although advances in technology have led to improvements in man’s life in different aspects, statistics show that the incidence of fractures is increasing in different regions of the body. Recent studies show that midface fractures are strongly associated with patient's death. The exact relationship between different types of facial fractures and brain injuries is still controversial. Purpose: To evaluate individuals with midface fractures from different causes and determine if there is any relationship between various midface fractures and brain injuries. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional retrospective study, we assessed the hospital charts of all the patients with midface fractures at the trauma center of Poursina hospital. The complete medical record of each patient was reviewed. The etiologic and demographic data, the type of midface fracture and brain injury, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS were assessed. The data were analyzed by, the Chi-square, and the Fisher’s exact tests. The statistical package SPSS was used for all the analyses.Results: Of all the patients 47% had brain injury. The Important significant correlations were as follows: Le Fort III with Brain Contusion ( p =0.0001, nasal orbital ethmoid fractures with subdural hematoma ( p =0.0001, frontal fracture with subdural hematoma ( p =0.0001. Zygomatic complex fracture with Brain Contusion ( p =0.009. Nasal fracture correlated with Brain Contusion ( p =0.0001. The zygomatic complex fracture was the most prevalent fracture.Conclusion: Different midface fracture patterns have the risk of brain injury simultaneously. So midface fractures need more attention. According to the results, more attention is needed to be paid to driving rules specially the use of helmet and seat belt.

  15. Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale : A New Scale to Measure the Different Aspects of Fatigue After Acquired Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C.; Hogenkamp, Antoinette; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J.; Egberink, Iris J. L.; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To develop the Dutch Multifactor Fatigue Scale (DMFS), a new scale to assess the nature and impact of fatigue and coping with fatigue in the chronic phase after acquired brain injury (ABI) and to analyze the psychometric properties of this scale in a mixed group of patients with ABI. Des

  16. The role of free radicals in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and disability in both the civilian and the military populations. The primary impact causes initial tissue damage, which initiates biochemical cascades, known as secondary injury, that expand the damage. Free radicals are implicated as major contributors to the secondary injury. Our review of recent rodent and human research reveals the prominent role of the free radicals superoxide anion, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite in secondary brain injury. Much of our current knowledge is based on rodent studies, and the authors identified a gap in the translation of findings from rodent to human TBI. Rodent models are an effective method for elucidating specific mechanisms of free radical-induced injury at the cellular level in a well-controlled environment. However, human TBI does not occur in a vacuum, and variables controlled in the laboratory may affect the injury progression. Additionally, multiple experimental TBI models are accepted in rodent research, and no one model fully reproduces the heterogeneous injury seen in humans. Free radical levels are measured indirectly in human studies based on assumptions from the findings from rodent studies that use direct free radical measurements. Further study in humans should be directed toward large samples to validate the findings in rodent studies. Data obtained from these studies may lead to more targeted treatment to interrupt the secondary injury cascades.

  17. Increased leakage of brain antigens after traumatic brain injury and effect of immune tolerance induced by cells on traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hua; ZHANG Hong-wei; WU Qiao-li; ZHANG Guo-bin; LIU Kui; ZHI Da-shi; HU Zhen-bo; ZENG Xian-wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Although traumatic brain injury can lead to opening the blood-brain barrier and leaking of blood substances (including water) into brain tissue,few studies of brain antigens leaking into the blood and the pathways have been reported.Brain antigens result in damage to brain tissues by stimulating the immune system to produce anti-brain antibodies,but no treatment has been reported to reduce the production of anti-brain antibodies and protect the brain tissue.The aim of the study is to confirm the relationship between immune injury and arachnoid granulations following traumatic brain injury,and provide some new methods to inhibit the immune injury.Methods In part one,methylene blue was injected into the rabbits' cisterna magna after traumatic brain injury,and concentrations of methylene blue and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in blood were detected to determine the permeability of arachnoid granulations.In part two,umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and immature dendritic cells were injected into veins,and concentrations of interleukin 1 (IL-1),IL-10,interferon (IFN)-y,transforming growth factor (TGF)-β,anti-brain antibodies (ABAb),and IL-12 were measured by ELISA on days 1,3,7,14 and 21 after injury,and the numbers of leukocytes in the blood were counted.Twenty-one days after injury,expression of glutamate in brain tissue was determined by immunohistochemical staining,and neuronal degeneration was detected by H&E staining.Results In part one,blood concentrations of methylene blue and TNF-α in the traumatic brain injury group were higher than in the control group (P <0.05).Concentrations of methylene blue and TNF-α in the trauma cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)injected group were higher than in the control cerebrospinal fluid injected group (P <0.05).In part two,concentrations of IL-1,IFN-y,ABAb,IL-12,expression of glutamate (Glu),neuronal degeneration and number of peripheral blood leukocytes were lower in the group with cell treatment compared to the

  18. Low Level Laser Therapy for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    clinical outcome data. Our initial study design focused on patients admitted to MGH with a Glascow Coma Score (GCS) between 9-12, an injury within...to inflammation and microbleeding. In our chronic mouse model, the glass coverslip has been replaced by a flexible, biocompatible film . The injury is...regions. The window is sealed with a 7-mm custom-made stainless-steel ring glued with a thin, clear biocompatible polymer film that replaces the

  19. Brain injury markers (S100B and NSE in chronic cocaine dependents Marcadores de lesão cerebral (S100B e NSE em dependentes crônicos de cocaína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Henrique Paim Kessler

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies have shown signs of brain damage caused by different mechanisms in cocaine users. The serum neuron specific enolase and S100B protein are considered specific biochemical markers of neuronal and glial cell injury. This study aimed at comparing blood levels of S100B and NSE in chronic cocaine users and in volunteers who did not use cocaine or other illicit drugs. METHOD: Twenty subjects dependent on cocaine but not on alcohol or marijuana, and 20 non-substance using controls were recruited. Subjects were selected by consecutive and non-probabilistic sampling. Neuron specific enolase and S100B levels were determined by luminescence assay. RESULTS: Cocaine users had significantly higher scores than controls in all psychiatric dimensions of the SCL-90 and had cognitive deficits in the subtest cubes of WAIS and the word span. Mean serum S100B level was 0.09 ± 0.04 µg/l among cocaine users and 0.08 ± 0.04 µg/l among controls. Mean serum neuron specific enolase level was 9.7 ± 3.5 ng/l among cocaine users and 8.3 ± 2.6 ng/l among controls. CONCLUSIONS: In this first study using these specific brain damage markers in cocaine users, serum levels of S100B and neuron specific enolase were not statistically different between cocaine dependent subjects and controls.OBJETIVO: Estudos têm demonstrado sinais de lesão cerebral causadas por diferentes mecanismos em usuários de cocaína. A enolase sérica neurônio-específica e a proteína S100B são consideradas marcadores bioquímicos específicos de lesão neuronal e glial. Este estudo objetivou comparar os níveis sangüíneos de S100B e enolase sérica neurônio-específica em usuários crônicos de cocaína e em voluntários que não usam cocaína ou outras drogas ilícitas. MÉTODO: Vinte sujeitos dependentes de cocaína, mas não dependentes de álcool, maconha ou outra droga, e 20 sujeitos controles não usuários de drogas foram recrutados. Os sujeitos foram selecionados por

  20. Brain injury and severe eating difficulties at admission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgaard, Annette; Kaae Kristensen, Hanne

    Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to explore and interpret the way that individuals with acquired brain injury, admitted to inpatient neurorehabilitation with severe eating difficulties, experienced eating nine to fifteen months after discharge. Methods: Four individuals with acqui......-of-life. The preliminary findings provide knowledge regarding the patient perspective of adapting to and developing new strategies for activities related to eating, however, further prospective, longitudinal research in a larger scale and with repeated interviews is needed.......Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to explore and interpret the way that individuals with acquired brain injury, admitted to inpatient neurorehabilitation with severe eating difficulties, experienced eating nine to fifteen months after discharge. Methods: Four individuals...... with acquired brain injury were interviewed via qualitative semi-structured interviews. An explorative study was conducted to study eating difficulties. Qualitative content analysis was used. Results: Four main themes emerged from the analysis: personal values related to eating, swallowing difficulties, eating...

  1. Neuromodulation of the conscious state following severe brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Esteban A; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2014-12-01

    Disorders of consciousness (DOC) following severe structural brain injuries globally affect the conscious state and the expression of goal-directed behaviors. In some subjects, neuromodulation with medications or electrical stimulation can markedly improve the impaired conscious state present in DOC. We briefly review recent studies and provide an organizing framework for considering the apparently widely disparate collection of medications and approaches that may modulate the conscious state in subjects with DOC. We focus on neuromodulation of the anterior forebrain mesocircuit in DOC and briefly compare mechanisms supporting recovery from structural brain injuries to those underlying facilitated emergence from unconsciousness produced by anesthesia. We derive some general principles for approaching the problem of restoration of consciousness after severe structural brain injuries, and suggest directions for future research.

  2. Brain Injury Risk from Primary Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    injury has been studied extensively in air-containing organs such as the lungs , gastrointestinal tract, and ear due to their increased...veterans (Owens, 2008). Primary blast injury has been studied extensively in air-containing organs such as the lungs , gastrointestinal tract, and ear... contusions typically on or around the brainstem though there were no skull fractures for any blast intensity. Risk functions were developed that

  3. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  4. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimers Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional , and/or behavioral functions. In the civilian population, TBI is typically associated with...functioning, which leads to either tran- sient or chronic impairments in physical, cognitive, emotional , and/or behavioral functions. In the civil...expression of miRNA-21 and its targets in the hippocampus after traumatic brain injury. J Neurosci Res 89, 212-221. [6] Reeves TM, Lyeth BG, Povlishock

  5. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI.

  6. Glyburide - Novel Prophylaxis and Effective Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    hemorrhagic shock. 15. SUBJECT TERMS blast, traumatic brain injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, mortality, caspase-3, beta- amylase precursor... function and on pat hophysiological mani festations (IgG, caspase-3 and β-APP immunolabeling), ind ependent of transthoracic mechani sms of blast injury...Glendale Heights, IL). The tool was modified by removing the piston that normally drives the fastener, making the tool function like a firearm and

  7. Neuroendocrine Abnormalities in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    is common in head trauma. INJURY MECHANISMS Hypothalamic Injury The supraoptic nucleus (SON) is the most vulnerable area of the hypothalamus because...pothaIlimus. but portlif esscls to the antenorpituitat) ma) escape injur). (C) oss stalk transvecion ma% causect rupture of the A gportal sessels ssth...via the systemic circulation to the adrenal gland, where it stimulates secretion of cortisol and aldosterone . Thus, when the brain is traumatized

  8. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabish Amin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003. The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21–30 years (18.8%, followed by 11–20 years age group (17.8% and 31–40 years (14.3%. The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas. To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients

  9. The profile of head injuries and traumatic brain injury deaths in Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yattoo, Gh; Tabish, Amin

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted on patients of head injury admitted through Accident & Emergency Department of Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences during the year 2004 to determine the number of head injury patients, nature of head injuries, condition at presentation, treatment given in hospital and the outcome of intervention. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) deaths were also studied retrospectively for a period of eight years (1996 to 2003).The traumatic brain injury deaths showed a steady increase in number from year 1996 to 2003 except for 1999 that showed decline in TBI deaths. TBI deaths were highest in age group of 21-30 years (18.8%), followed by 11-20 years age group (17.8%) and 31-40 years (14.3%). The TBI death was more common in males. Maximum number of traumatic brain injury deaths was from rural areas as compared to urban areas.To minimize the morbidity and mortality resulting from head injury there is a need for better maintenance of roads, improvement of road visibility and lighting, proper mechanical maintenance of automobile and other vehicles, rigid enforcement of traffic rules, compulsory wearing of crash helmets by motor cyclist and scooterists and shoulder belt in cars and imparting compulsory road safety education to school children from primary education level. Moreover, appropriate medical care facilities (including trauma centres) need to be established at district level, sub-divisional and block levels to provide prompt and quality care to head injury patients.

  10. Blast-induced traumatic brain injury: a new trend of blast injury research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhao; Zheng-Guo Wang

    2015-01-01

    Blast injury has become the major life-and function-threatening injuries in recent warfares.There is increased research interest in the mental disorders caused by blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI),which has been proved as one of the "signature wounds" in modern battlefield.We reviewed the recent progresses in bTBl-related researches and concluded that the new era of blast injury research has shifted from the traditional physical impairments to cognitive dysfunctional/mental disorders that are proved to be more related to the outcome of combat casualty care.

  11. Brain MRI volumetry in a single patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David E; Castelvecchi, Cody; Ochs, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    This letter to the editor describes the case of a 42 year old man with mild traumatic brain injury and multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms which persisted for a few years after the injury. Initial CT scans and MRI scans of the brain showed no signs of atrophy. Brain volume was measured using NeuroQuant®, an FDA-approved, commercially available software method. Volumetric cross-sectional (one point in time) analysis also showed no atrophy. However, volumetric longitudinal (two points in time) analysis showed progressive atrophy in several brain regions. This case illustrated in a single patient the principle discovered in multiple previous group studies, namely that the longitudinal design is more powerful than the cross-sectional design for finding atrophy in patients with traumatic brain injury.

  12. Neuroinflammation in animal models of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chong-Chi; Liao, Yi-En; Yang, Ling-Yu; Wang, Jing-Ya; Tweedie, David; Karnati, Hanuma K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Neuroinflammation is prominent in the short and long-term consequences of neuronal injuries that occur after TBI. Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glia, including microglia and astrocytes, to release inflammatory mediators within the brain, and the subsequent recruitment of peripheral immune cells. Various animal models of TBI have been developed that have proved valuable to elucidate the pathophysiology of the disorder and to assess the safety and efficacy of novel therapies prior to clinical trials. These models provide an excellent platform to delineate key injury mechanisms that associate with types of injury (concussion, contusion, and penetration injuries) that occur clinically for the investigation of mild, moderate, and severe forms of TBI. Additionally, TBI modeling in genetically engineered mice, in particular, has aided the identification of key molecules and pathways for putative injury mechanisms, as targets for development of novel therapies for human TBI. This Review details the evidence showing that neuroinflammation, characterized by the activation of microglia and astrocytes and elevated production of inflammatory mediators, is a critical process occurring in various TBI animal models, provides a broad overview of commonly used animal models of TBI, and overviews representative techniques to quantify markers of the brain inflammatory process. A better understanding of neuroinflammation could open therapeutic avenues for abrogation of secondary cell death and behavioral symptoms that may mediate the progression of TBI. PMID:27382003

  13. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Head trauma is the cause the death for many young persons. The number of fatalities can be reduced through systematic management. Prevention of secondary brain injury combined with the fastest possible transport to a neurosurgical unit, have been shown to effectively reduce mortality and morbidity....... Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26...

  14. Early Bifrontal Brain Injury: Disturbances in Cognitive Function Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Bonnier

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe six psychomotor, language, and neuropsychological sequential developmental evaluations in a boy who sustained a severe bifrontal traumatic brain injury (TBI at 19 months of age. Visuospatial, drawing, and writing skills failed to develop normally. Gradually increasing difficulties were noted in language leading to reading and spontaneous speech difficulties. The last two evaluations showed executive deficits in inhibition, flexibility, and working memory. Those executive abnormalities seemed to be involved in the other impairments. In conclusion, early frontal brain injury disorganizes the development of cognitive functions, and interactions exist between executive function and other cognitive functions during development.

  15. Positive emotions and brain reward circuits in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratilova, Edita; Morimura, Kozo; Xie, Jennifer Y; Atcherley, Christopher W; Ossipov, Michael H; Porreca, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts the quality of life of affected individuals and exacts enormous socioeconomic costs. Chronic pain is often accompanied by comorbid emotional disorders including anxiety, depression, and possibly anhedonia. The neural circuits underlying the intersection of pain and pleasure are not well understood. We summarize recent human and animal investigations and demonstrate that aversive aspects of pain are encoded in brain regions overlapping with areas processing reward and motivation. We highlight findings revealing anatomical and functional alterations of reward/motivation circuits in chronic pain. Finally, we review supporting evidence for the concept that pain relief is rewarding and activates brain reward/motivation circuits. Adaptations in brain reward circuits may be fundamental to the pathology of chronic pain. Knowledge of brain reward processing in the context of pain could lead to the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of emotional aspects of pain and comorbid conditions.

  16. Misconceptions on neuropsychological rehabilitation and traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto García- Molina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries, their recovery and outcome; misconceptions that have their origin in a lack of information influenced by the image that the media show of the brain damage. Development. Based on clinical experience, the authors of this essay sets out his personal view on some of the most frequent misconceptions in the field of neuropsychological rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury: 1 All deficits are evident; 2 The recovery depends mainly on the involvement of the patient: more effort, more rapid recovery; 3 Two years after traumatic brain injury there is no possibility of improvement and recovery; and 4 The “miracle” of recovery will occur when is found the appropriate professional or treatment. These and other beliefs may influence directly or indirectly on the recovery process and the expectations placed on it by the families and patients. Conclusions. Provide accurate, clear and honest information, at the right time, helps patients and their families to better understand the deficits, the course of recovery and to adapt to the new reality resulting from a traumatic brain injury.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves cognitive functioning after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liu; Guangyu Shen; Shukun Deng; Xiubin Wang; Qinfeng Wu; Aisong Guo

    2013-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been widely applied and recognized in the treatment of brain injury;however, the correlation between the protective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and changes of metabolites in the brain remains unclear. To investigate the effect and potential mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cognitive functioning in rats, we established traumatic brain injury models using Feeney’s free fal ing method. We treated rat models with hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 0.2 MPa for 60 minutes per day. The Morris water maze test for spatial navigation showed that the average escape latency was significantly prolonged and cognitive function decreased in rats with brain injury. After treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for 1 and 2 weeks, the rats’ spatial learning and memory abilities were improved. Hydrogen proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis showed that the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio in the hippocampal CA3 region was sig-nificantly increased at 1 week, and the N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio was significantly increased at 2 weeks after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Nissl staining and immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of nerve cells and Nissl bodies in the hippocampal CA3 region was significantly increased, and glial fibril ary acidic protein positive cells were decreased after a 2-week hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy significantly im-proves cognitive functioning in rats with traumatic brain injury, and the potential mechanism is me-diated by metabolic changes and nerve cellrestoration in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  18. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improves cognitive functioning after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Shen, Guangyu; Deng, Shukun; Wang, Xiubin; Wu, Qinfeng; Guo, Aisong

    2013-12-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been widely applied and recognized in the treatment of brain injury; however, the correlation between the protective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and changes of metabolites in the brain remains unclear. To investigate the effect and potential mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cognitive functioning in rats, we established traumatic brain injury models using Feeney's free falling method. We treated rat models with hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 0.2 MPa for 60 minutes per day. The Morris water maze test for spatial navigation showed that the average escape latency was significantly prolonged and cognitive function decreased in rats with brain injury. After treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for 1 and 2 weeks, the rats' spatial learning and memory abilities were improved. Hydrogen proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis showed that the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio in the hippocampal CA3 region was significantly increased at 1 week, and the N-acetylaspartate/choline ratio was significantly increased at 2 weeks after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Nissl staining and immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of nerve cells and Nissl bodies in the hippocampal CA3 region was significantly increased, and glial fibrillary acidic protein positive cells were decreased after a 2-week hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment. Our findings indicate that hyperbaric oxygen therapy significantly improves cognitive functioning in rats with traumatic brain injury, and the potential mechanism is mediated by metabolic changes and nerve cell restoration in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  19. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  20. A mouse model of human repetitive mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J; Pérez, Mariana Angoa; Briggs, Denise I.; Viano, David C.; Kreipke, Christian W.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the study of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (rmTBI) that models the most common form of head injury in humans is presented. Existing animal models of TBI impart focal, severe damage unlike that seen in repeated and mild concussive injuries, and few are configured for repetitive application. Our model is a modification of the Marmarou weight drop method and allows repeated head impacts to lightly anesthetized mice. A key facet of this method is the delivery of an imp...

  1. Brain-computer interface after nervous system injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alexis; Adeli, Hojjat; Buford, John A

    2014-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has proven to be a useful tool for providing alternative communication and mobility to patients suffering from nervous system injury. BCI has been and will continue to be implemented into rehabilitation practices for more interactive and speedy neurological recovery. The most exciting BCI technology is evolving to provide therapeutic benefits by inducing cortical reorganization via neuronal plasticity. This article presents a state-of-the-art review of BCI technology used after nervous system injuries, specifically: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and disorders of consciousness. Also presented is transcending, innovative research involving new treatment of neurological disorders.

  2. Making waves in the brain: What are oscillations, and why modulating them makes sense for brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr ePevzner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can result in persistent cognitive, behavioral and emotional deficits. However, the vast majority of patients are not chronically hospitalized; rather they have to manage their disabilities once they are discharged to home. Promoting recovery to pre-injury level is important from a patient care as well as a societal perspective. Electrical neuromodulation is one approach that has shown promise in alleviating symptoms associated with neurological disorders such as in Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy. Consistent with this perspective, both animal and clinical studies have revealed that TBI alters physiological oscillatory rhythms. More recently several studies demonstrated that low frequency stimulation improves cognitive outcome in models of TBI. Specifically, stimulation of the septohippocampal circuit in the theta frequency entrained oscillations and improved spatial learning following traumatic brain injury. In order to evaluate the potential of electrical deep brain stimulation for clinical translation we review the basic neurophysiology of oscillations, their role in cognition and how they are changed post-TBI. Furthermore, we highlight several factors for future pre-clinical and clinical studies to consider, with the hope that it will promote a hypothesis driven approach to subsequent experimental designs and ultimately successful translation to improve outcome in patients with TBI.

  3. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  4. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression and autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Schwab, Jan M.; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2014-01-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the “immune privileged/specialized” milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of “SCI disease” ...

  5. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischaemia and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gang Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI damage white and grey matter. Loss of oligodendrocytes and their myelin, impairs axonal function. Remyelination involves oligodendrogenesis during which new myelinating oligodendrocytes are generated by differentiated oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. This article briefly reviews the processes of oligodendrogenesis in adult rodent brains, and promising experimental therapies targeting the neurovascular unit that reduce oligodendrocyte damage and amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis after stroke and TBI.

  6. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Thornton; Carina Mallard; Rajanikant Krishnamurthy; Syam Nair; Henrik Hagberg

    2013-01-01

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebr...

  7. Chronic hypertension aggravates heat stress-induced brain damage: possible neuroprotection by cerebrolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2010-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) aggravates brain edema formation and cell damage in chronic hypertensive rats compared with normotensive animals. In this investigation, we examined the influence of cerebrolysin on WBH-induced edema formation and brain pathology in hypertensive and normotensive rats. Rats subjected to 4 h WBH at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator showed breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), reduced cerebral blood flow (CBF), edema formation and cell injuries in several parts of the brain. These effects were further aggravated in chronic hypertensive rats (two-kidney one clip model (2K1C), for 4 weeks) subjected to WBH. Pretreatment with cerebrolysin (5 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) markedly attenuated the BBB dysfunction and brain pathology in normal animals. However, in hypertensive animals, a high dose of cerebrolysin (10 mL/kg, 24 h and 30 min before heat stress) was needed to attenuate WBH-induced BBB dysfunction and brain pathology. These observations indicate that heat stress could affect differently in normal and hypertensive conditions. Furthermore, our results suggest that patients suffering from various chronic cardiovascular diseases may respond differently to hyperthermia and to neuroprotective drugs, e.g., cerebrolysin not reported earlier.

  8. Diffusion-weighted imaging predicts cognition in pediatric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikian, Talin; Tong, Karen A; Galloway, Nicholas R; Freier-Randall, Mary-Catherin; Obenaus, André; Ashwal, Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted imaging predict gross neurologic outcome in adults with traumatic brain injury. Few studies in children have been reported, and none have used apparent diffusion coefficient maps to predict long-term (>1 year) neurocognitive outcomes. In this study, pooled regional and total brain diffusion coefficients were used to predict long-term outcomes in 17 pediatric brain injury patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient values were grouped into peripheral and deep gray and white matter, posterior fossa, and total brain. Regions of interest excluded areas that appeared abnormal on T(2)-weighted images. Apparent diffusion coefficient values from peripheral regions were inversely correlated with cognitive functioning. No significant correlations were apparent between the cognitive scores and apparent diffusion coefficient values for deep tissue or the posterior fossa. Regression analyses suggested that combined peripheral gray and white matter apparent diffusion coefficients explained 42% of the variance in the combined neurocognitive index. Peripheral gray diffusion coefficients alone explained an additional 20% of variance after accounting for clinical variables. These results suggest that obtaining apparent diffusion coefficient values, specifically from peripheral brain regions, may predict long-term outcome after pediatric brain injury. Discrepancies in the literature on this topic, as well as possible explanations, including sampling and clinical considerations, are discussed.

  9. What Can I Do to Help Feel Better After a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Help Feel Better After a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury? Although most people recover after a concussion, how ... Potential Effects Prevention Severe TBI HEADS UP to Brain Injury Awareness Get Email Updates To receive email updates ...

  10. Potential risk factors for developing heterotopic ossification in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, P.J. van; Martina, J.D.; Vos, P.E.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Hendricks, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current preliminary study is intended to provide additional data on the potential roles that brain injury severity, concomitant orthopaedic trauma, and specific intensive care complicating ev

  11. Abnormal whole-brain functional networks in homogeneous acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shumskaya, E.; Andriessen, T.; Norris, D.G.; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the whole-brain resting-state networks in a homogeneous group of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to identify alterations in functional connectivity induced by MTBI. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute MTBI and 35 healthy control subjects, mat

  12. MRI-DTI Tractography to Quantify Brain Connectivity in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    to Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer Disease ”, 5-th International Annual Symposium of the Brain Mapping and Intraoperative Surgical Planning... Alzheimer Disease , Proc Intl Soc Mag Reson Med 15: 343, 2007. 9. Singh M and Jeong J-W, “ICA based multi-fiber tractography” Proceedings, 17-th

  13. Abnormal whole-brain functional networks in homogeneous acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shumskaya, A.N.; Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Norris, D.G.; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the whole-brain resting-state networks in a homogeneous group of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to identify alterations in functional connectivity induced by MTBI. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with acute MTBI and 35 healthy control subjects, match

  14. Brain network dysregulation, emotion, and complaints after mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesTo assess the role of brain networks in emotion regulation and post-traumatic complaints in the sub-acute phase after non-complicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Experimental designFifty-four patients with mTBI (34 with and 20 without complaints) and 20 healthy controls (group-matc

  15. Is Goshinjo therapy effective in cognitive impairment after severe traumatic brain injury?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keiji Hashimoto; Kisho Kida

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 21-year-old man who had severe traumatic brain injury as a result of an accident at the age of 16 years. Two years and 4 months after the trauma, at the age of 19 years, he still had severe right hemiplegia and cognitive dysfunction including aphasia and attention and memory disturbance. Conventional rehabilitation programs could not resolve all of the neuropsychological problems. He started receiving Goshinjo therapy over a period of 22 months. Following the therapy, significant improvements in verbal intelligence quotient (assessed by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition) and attention and concentration function (using the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised), and remission of traumatic epilepsy were observed. Goshinjo therapy is suspected to be effective in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction in the chronic stage after severe traumatic brain injury.

  16. NINDS Traumatic Brain Injury Information Page

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occupational therapy, speech/language therapy, physiatry (physical medicine), psychology/psychiatry, and social ... brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and violently hits an object, or when an object pierces the skull and ...

  17. Tissue tears in the white matter after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in the rat: relevance to human brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D I; Raghupathi, R; Saatman, K E; Meaney, D; McIntosh, T K

    2000-02-01

    A characteristic feature of severe diffuse axonal injury in man is radiological evidence of the "shearing injury triad" represented by lesions, sometimes haemorrhagic, in the corpus callosum, deep white matter and the rostral brain stem. With the exception of studies carried out on the non-human primate, such lesions have not been replicated to date in the multiple and diverse rodent laboratory models of traumatic brain injury. The present report describes tissue tears in the white matter, particularly in the fimbria of Sprague-Dawley rats killed 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 days after lateral fluid percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.1-2.4 atm). The lesions were most easily seen at 24 h when they appeared as foci of tissue rarefaction in which there were a few polymorphonuclear leucocytes. At the margins of these lesions, large amounts of accumulated amyloid precursor protein (APP) were found in axonal swellings and bulbs. By 1 week post-injury, there was macrophage infiltration with marked astrocytosis and early scar formation. This lesion is considered to be due to severe deformation of white matter and this is the first time that it has been identified reproducibly in a rodent model of head injury under controlled conditions.

  18. Chronic pain and evoked responses in the brain: A magnetoencephalographic study in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I and II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuvenet, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I and II are chronic pain syndromes with comparable symptoms, only in CRPS II a peripheral nerve injury is present. No objective tests are currently available to differentiate the two types which hampers diagnosis and treatment. Non-invasive brain imaging t

  19. Altered Neuroinflammation and Behavior after Traumatic Brain Injury in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokiko-Cochran, Olga; Ransohoff, Lena; Veenstra, Mike; Lee, Sungho; Saber, Maha; Sikora, Matt; Teknipp, Ryan; Xu, Guixiang; Bemiller, Shane; Wilson, Gina; Crish, Samuel; Bhaskar, Kiran; Lee, Yu-Shang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has acute and chronic sequelae, including an increased risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TBI-associated neuroinflammation is characterized by activation of brain-resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes; however, recent studies have implicated beta-amyloid as a major manipulator of the inflammatory response. To examine neuroinflammation after TBI and development of AD-like features, these studies examined the effects of TBI in the presence and absence of beta-amyloid. The R1.40 mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis was used, with a focus on time points well before robust AD pathologies. Unexpectedly, in R1.40 mice, the acute neuroinflammatory response to TBI was strikingly muted, with reduced numbers of CNS myeloid cells acquiring a macrophage phenotype and decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines. At chronic time points, macrophage activation substantially declined in non-Tg TBI mice; however, it was relatively unchanged in R1.40 TBI mice. The persistent inflammatory response coincided with significant tissue loss between 3 and 120 days post-injury in R1.40 TBI mice, which was not observed in non-Tg TBI mice. Surprisingly, inflammatory cytokine expression was enhanced in R1.40 mice compared with non-Tg mice, regardless of injury group. Although R1.40 TBI mice demonstrated task-specific deficits in cognition, overall functional recovery was similar to non-Tg TBI mice. These findings suggest that accumulating beta-amyloid leads to an altered post-injury macrophage response at acute and chronic time points. Together, these studies emphasize the role of post-injury neuroinflammation in regulating long-term sequelae after TBI and also support recent studies implicating beta-amyloid as an immunomodulator.

  20. Pivotal role of anterior cingulate cortex in working memory after traumatic brain injury in youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne eCazalis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this fMRI study, the functions of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex were studied in a group of adolescents who had sustained a moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury. A spatial working memory task with varying working memory loads, representing experimental conditions of increasing difficulty, was administered.In a cross-sectional comparison between the patients and a matched control group, patients performed worse than Controls, showing longer reaction times and lower response accuracy on the spatial working memory task. Brain imaging findings suggest a possible double-dissociation: activity of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex in the Traumatic Brain Injury group, but not in the Control group, was associated with task difficulty; conversely, activity of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in the Control group, but not in the TBI group, was correlated with task difficulty.In addition to the main cross-sectional study, a longitudinal study of a group of adolescent patients with moderate to severe Traumatic Brain Injury was done using fMRI and the same spatial working memory task. The patient group was studied at two time points: one time point during the post-acute phase and one time point 12 months later, during the chronic phase. Results indicated that patients' behavioral performance improved over time, suggesting cognitive recovery. Brain imaging findings suggest that, over this 12 month period, patients recruited less of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex and more of the left Sensorimotor Cortex in response to increasing task difficulty.The role of Anterior Cingulate Cortex in executive functions following a moderate to severe brain injury in adolescence is discussed within the context of conflicting models of the Anterior Cingulate Cortex functions in the existing literature.

  1. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and can lead to a wide range of impairments. Brain imaging methods such as DTI (diffusion tensor imaging are uniquely sensitive to the white matter (WM damage that is common in TBI. However, higher-level analyses using tractography are complicated by the damage and decreased FA (fractional anisotropy characteristic of TBI, which can result in premature tract endings. We used the newly developed autoMATE (automated multi-atlas tract extraction method to identify differences in WM integrity. 63 pediatric patients aged 8–19 years with moderate/severe TBI were examined with cross sectional scanning at one or two time points after injury: a post-acute assessment 1–5 months post-injury and a chronic assessment 13–19 months post-injury. A battery of cognitive function tests was performed in the same time periods. 56 children were examined in the first phase, 28 TBI patients and 28 healthy controls. In the second phase 34 children were studied, 17 TBI patients and 17 controls (27 participants completed both post-acute and chronic phases. We did not find any significant group differences in the post-acute phase. Chronically, we found extensive group differences, mainly for mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD. In the chronic phase, we found higher MD and RD across a wide range of WM. Additionally, we found correlations between these WM integrity measures and cognitive deficits. This suggests a distributed pattern of WM disruption that continues over the first year following a TBI in children.

  2. Utilizing pharmacotherapy and mesenchymal stem cell therapy to reduce inlfammation following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherwin Mashkouri; Marci G. Crowley; Michael G. Liska; Sydney Corey; Cesar V. Borlongan

    2016-01-01

    The pathologic process of chronic phase traumatic brain injury is associated with spreading inlfamma-tion, cell death, and neural dysfunction. It is thought that sequestration of inlfammatory mediators can facilitate recovery and promote an environment that fosters cellular regeneration. Studies have targeted post-traumatic brain injury inlfammation with the use of pharmacotherapy and cell therapy. These thera-peutic options are aimed at reducing the edematous and neurodegenerative inlfammation that have been associated with compromising the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Although studies have yielded posi-tive results from anti-inlfammatory pharmacotherapy and cell therapy individually, emerging research has begun to target inlfammation using combination therapy. The joint use of anti-inlfammatory drugs along-side stem cell transplantation may provide better clinical outcomes for traumatic brain injury patients. Despite the promising results in this ifeld of research, it is important to note that most of the studies men-tioned in this review have completed their studies using animal models. Translation of this research into a clinical setting will require additional laboratory experiments and larger preclinical trials.

  3. Crash Simulator: Brain-and-Spine Injury Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the first author has proposed a new coupled loading-rate hypothesis as a unique cause of both brain and spinal injuries, which states that they are both caused by a Euclidean jolt, an impulsive loading that strikes head and spine (or, any other part of the human body)- in several coupled degrees-of-freedom simultaneously. Injury never happens in a single direction only, nor is it ever caused by a static force. It is always an impulsive translational plus rotational force. The Euclidean jolt causes two basic forms of brain, spine and other musculo-skeletal injuries: (i) localized translational dislocations; and (ii) localized rotational disclinations. In the present Chapter, we first review this unique mechanics of a general human mechanical injury, and then describe how it can be predicted and controlled by a crash simulator toolbox. This rigorous Matlab toolbox has been developed using an existing thirdparty toolbox DiffMan, for accurately solving differential equations on smooth manifolds and mechanical Lie groups. The present crash simulator toolbox performs prediction/control of brain and spinal injuries within the framework of the Euclidean group SE(3) of rigid motions in our natural 3-dimensional space.

  4. Baseline donor chronic renal injury confers the same transplant survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Salji, M; Bardsley, V; Chen, Y; Thiru, S; Griffiths, M H; Copley, H C; Saeb-Parsy, K; Bradley, J A; Torpey, N; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-03-01

    Histological assessment of baseline chronic kidney injury may discriminate kidneys that are suitable for transplantation, but has not been validated for appraisal of donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidneys. 'Time-zero' biopsies for 371 consecutive, solitary, deceased-donor kidneys transplanted at our center between 2006 and 2010 (65.5% DCD, 34.5% donation after brain death [DBD]) were reviewed and baseline chronic degenerative injury scored using Remuzzi's classification. High scores correlated with donor age and extended criteria donors (42% of donors), but the spectrum of scores was similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Transplant outcomes for kidneys scoring from 0 to 4 were comparable (1 and 3 year graft survival 95% and 92%), but were much poorer for kidneys scoring ≥5, with 1 year graft survival only 73%, and 12.5% suffering primary nonfunction. Critically, high Remuzzi scores conferred the same survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys. On multi-variable regression analysis, time-zero biopsy score was the only independent predictor for graft survival, whereas one-year graft estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) correlated with donor age and biopsy score. In conclusion, the relationship between severity of chronic kidney injury and transplant outcome is similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Kidneys with Remuzzi scores of ≤4 can be implanted singly with acceptable results.

  5. Blood Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Delayed Neurological Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Induced by Blast Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Shetty

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  6. Human plasma DNP level after severe brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yi-lu; XIN Hui-ning; FENG Yi; FAN Ji-wei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between DNP level after human severe brain injury and hyponatremia as well as isorrhea.Methods: The peripheral venous plasma as control was collected from 8 volunteers. The peripheral venous plasma from 14 severe brain injury patients were collected in the 1, 3, 7 days after injury. Radioimmunoassay was used to detect the DNP concentration. Meanwhile, daily plasma and urine electrolytes, osmotic pressure as well as 24 h liquid intake and output volume were detected.Results: The normal adult human plasma DNP level was 62. 46 pg/ml ± 27. 56 pg/ml. In the experimental group, the plasma DNP levels were higher from day 1 today 3 in 8 of the 14 patients than those in the control group (P1 =0.05, P3 =0.03). Negative fluid balance occurred in 8 patients and hyponatremia in 7 patients. The increase of plasma DNP level was significantly correlated with the development of a negative fluid balance (r=-0.69,P<0.01) and hyponatremia (x2 =4.38, P<0.05).Conclusions: The increase of plasma DNP level is accompanied by the enhancement of natriuretic and diuretic responses in severe brain-injured patients, which is associated with the development of a negative fluid balance and hyponatremia after brain injury.

  7. Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    haemorrhage, and 6 with subarach- noid hemorrhage from ruptured aneurysm . There were 4 cases of cerebral contusions and a single case of traumatic...B. Goldstein, 2003: Significance of Intracranial Pressure Pulse Morphology in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. IEEE, 2491-2494. Anile, C., H. D

  8. Injury Response of Resected Human Brain Tissue In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwer, Ronald W H; Sluiter, Arja A; Balesar, Rawien A; Baaijen, Johannes C; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Speijer, Dave; Li, Yichen; Swaab, Dick F

    2015-07-01

    Brain injury affects a significant number of people each year. Organotypic cultures from resected normal neocortical tissue provide unique opportunities to study the cellular and neuropathological consequences of severe injury of adult human brain tissue in vitro. The in vitro injuries caused by resection (interruption of the circulation) and aggravated by the preparation of slices (severed neuronal and glial processes and blood vessels) reflect the reaction of human brain tissue to severe injury. We investigated this process using immunocytochemical markers, reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Essential features were rapid shrinkage of neurons, loss of neuronal marker expression and proliferation of reactive cells that expressed Nestin and Vimentin. Also, microglia generally responded strongly, whereas the response of glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes appeared to be more variable. Importantly, some reactive cells also expressed both microglia and astrocytic markers, thus confounding their origin. Comparison with post-mortem human brain tissue obtained at rapid autopsies suggested that the reactive process is not a consequence of epilepsy.

  9. Intervention Strategies for Serving Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyos-Jurado, Elsa; Savage, Todd A.

    2008-01-01

    As school-age children are at the highest risk for sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI), educational professionals working in school settings will encounter students dealing with the after-effects of a TBI. These effects can influence students' ability to navigate the behavioral, social, and academic demands of the classroom. This article…

  10. Evaluation of a Health Education Programme about Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jane Mertz; Sellers, Debra M.; Hilgendorf, Amy E.; Burnett, Debra L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to evaluate a health education programme (TBIoptions: Promoting Knowledge) designed to increase public awareness and understanding about traumatic brain injury (TBI) through in-person (classroom) and computer-based (electronic) learning environments. Design: We used a pre-post survey design with randomization of participants…

  11. Clinimetrics and functional outcome one year after traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.M. van Baalen (Bianca)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is based on the findings of the FuPro-TBI (Functional Prognosis in Traumatic Brain Injury) study, which was part of the national FuPro research programme which investigated the functional prognosis of four neurological disorders: multiple sclerosis (MS), stroke, amyotrofic l

  12. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  13. School-Based Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), including concussions, can result in a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral symptoms that affect students' well-being and performance at school. Despite these effects, school personnel remain underprepared identify, educate, and assist this population of students. This article describes a…

  14. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP.

  15. Classroom Interventions for Students with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Julie M.

    2005-01-01

    Students who have sustained a traumatic brain injury (TBI) return to the school setting with a range of cognitive, psychosocial, and physical deficits that can significantly affect their academic functioning. Successful educational reintegration for students with TBI requires careful assessment of each child's unique needs and abilities and the…

  16. Assisting Students with a Traumatic Brain Injury in School Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Erin M.; Obrzut, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents can significantly affect their lives and educational needs. Deficits are often exhibited in areas such as attention, concentration, memory, executive function, emotional regulation, and behavioral functioning, but specific outcomes are not particular to any one child or adolescent with a…

  17. Decompressive Craniectomy and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial hypertension is the largest cause of death in young patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Decompressive craniectomy is part of the second level measures for the management of increased intracranial pressure refractory to medical management as moderate hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The literature lack of concepts is their indications. We present a review on the state of the art. PMID:27162826

  18. Death associated protein kinases: molecular structure and brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Syam; Hagberg, Henrik; Krishnamurthy, Rajanikant; Thornton, Claire; Mallard, Carina

    2013-07-04

    Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk) family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  19. Measuring and inducing brain plasticity in chronic aphasia

    OpenAIRE

    Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Brain plasticity associated with anomia recovery in aphasia is poorly understood. Here, I review four recent studies from my lab that focused on brain modulation associated with long-term anomia outcome, its behavioral treatment, and the use of transcranial brain stimulation to enhance anomia treatment success in individuals with chronic aphasia caused by left hemisphere stroke. In a study that included 15 participants with aphasia who were compared to a group of 10 normal control subjects, w...

  20. Hypofibrinogenemia in isolated traumatic brain injury in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra Gaurav

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation abnormalities are common in patients with head injuries. However, the effect of brain injury on fibrinogen levels has not been well studied prospectively to assess coagulation abnormalities in patients with moderate and severe head injuries and correlate these abnormalities with the neurologic outcome. Consecutive patients with moderate (Glasgow Comma Scale (GCS,9-12 and severe (GCS≤8 head injuries were the subjects of this pilot study, All patients had coagulation parameters, including plasma fibrinogen levels measured. Clinical and computed tomography (CT scan findings and immediate clinical outcome were analyzed. Of the 100 patients enrolled, only seven (7% patients had hypofibrinogenemia (fibrinogen ≤200 mg/dL. The head injury was moderate in two patients and severe in five patients. Fibrinogen levels showed a progressively increasing trend in four patients (three with severe head injuries and one with moderate head injury. CT scan revealed subdural hematoma in five patients; extradural hematoma in one; and subarachnoid hemorrhage in another patient. Of the seven patients, two patients died during hospital. Large-scale prospective studies are needed to assess the fibrinogen level in patients with head injury and its impact on outcome.

  1. Suicide after traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of suicide among patients who have had a traumatic brain injury. METHODS: From a Danish population register of admissions to hospital covering the years 1979-93 patients were selected who had had either a concussion (n=126 114), a cranial fracture (n=7560......), or a cerebral contusion or traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (n=11 766). All cases of deaths by the end of the study period were identified. RESULTS: In the three diagnostic groups there had been 750 (0.59%), 46 (0.61%), and 99 (0.84%) cases of suicide respectively. Standardised mortality ratios, stratified......). There was, however, no evidence of a specific risk period for suicide after injury. CONCLUSION: The increased risk of suicide among patients who had a mild traumatic brain injury may result from concomitant risk factors such as psychiatric conditions and psychosocial disadvantage. The greater risk among...

  2. Neuropathology of mild traumatic brain injury: relationship to neuroimaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Maxwell, William L

    2012-06-01

    Neuroimaging identified abnormalities associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are but gross indicators that reflect underlying trauma-induced neuropathology at the cellular level. This review examines how cellular pathology relates to neuroimaging findings with the objective of more closely relating how neuroimaging findings reveal underlying neuropathology. Throughout this review an attempt will be made to relate what is directly known from post-mortem microscopic and gross anatomical studies of TBI of all severity levels to the types of lesions and abnormalities observed in contemporary neuroimaging of TBI, with an emphasis on mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, it is impossible to discuss the neuropathology of mTBI without discussing what occurs with more severe injury and viewing pathological changes on some continuum from the mildest to the most severe. Historical milestones in understanding the neuropathology of mTBI are reviewed along with implications for future directions in the examination of neuroimaging and neuropathological correlates of TBI.

  3. Past, Present, and Future of Traumatic Brain Injury Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Bullock, M Ross

    2016-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the greatest cause of death and severe disability in young adults; its incidence is increasing in the elderly and in the developing world. Outcome from severe TBI has improved dramatically as a result of advancements in trauma systems and supportive critical care, however we remain without a therapeutic which acts directly to attenuate brain injury. Recognition of secondary injury and its molecular mediators has raised hopes for such targeted treatments. Unfortunately, over 30 late-phase clinical trials investigating promising agents have failed to translate a therapeutic for clinical use. Numerous explanations for this failure have been postulated and are reviewed here. With this historical context we review ongoing research and anticipated future trends which are armed with lessons from past trials, new scientific advances, as well as improved research infrastructure and funding. There is great hope that these new efforts will finally lead to an effective therapeutic for TBI as well as better clinical management strategies.

  4. 78 FR 9929 - Current Traumatic Brain Injury State Implementation Partnership Grantees; Non-Competitive One...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ...-Competitive One-Year Extension Funds for Current Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) State Implementation Partnership... Traumatic Brain Injury Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110- 206). Under this authority, the HRSA TBI Program is charged... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Current Traumatic Brain Injury......

  5. Postdeployment Symptom Changes and Traumatic Brain Injury and/or Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) and posttraumatic stress disorder...stress disorder, TBI = traumatic brain injury . *Address all correspondence to Hilary J. Aralis, MS; Naval Health Research Center, Warfighter...both diagnoses. See Figure 1 for sampling details. Figure 1. Flow diagram outlining selection of final blast traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) and no TBI

  6. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  7. Penetrating Brain Injury after Suicide Attempt with Speargun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ross Williams

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Penetrating cranial injury by mechanisms other than are exceedingly rare, and so strategies and guidelines for the management of PBI are largely informed by data from higher-velocity penetrating injuries. Here we present a case of penetrating brain injury by the low velocity mechanism of a harpoon from an underwater fishing speargun in an attempted suicide by a 56-year-old Caucasian male. The case raised a number of interesting points in management of lower-velocity penetrating brain injury (LVPBI, including benefit in delaying foreign body removal to allow for tamponade; the importance of history taking in establishing the social/legal significance of the events surrounding the injury; the use of cerebral angiogram in all cases of PBI; advantages of using DECT to reduce artifact when available; and antibiotic prophylaxis in the context of idiosyncratic histories of usage of penetrating objects before coming in contact with the intracranial environment. We present here the management of the case in full along with an extended discussion and review of existing literature regarding key points in management of LVPBI vs. higher velocity forms of intracranial injury.

  8. A rapid lateral fluid percussion injury rodent model of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mustafa Q; Goodrich, Grant S; Dhamne, Sameer C; Amandusson, Asa; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Mou, Danlei; Wang, Yingpeng; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2014-05-07

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of acquired epilepsy. Initially described in 1989, lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI) has since become the most extensively used and well-characterized rodent traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic epilepsy model. Universal findings, particularly seizures that reliably develop after an initial latent period, are evident across studies from multiple laboratories. However, the LFPI procedure is a two-stage process, requiring initial surgical attachment of a skull fluid cannula and then reanesthesia for delivery of the epidural fluid pressure wave. We now describe a modification of the original technique, termed 'rapid lateral fluid percussion injury' (rLFPI), which allows for a one-stage procedure and thus shorter operating time and reduced anesthesia exposure. Anesthetized male Long-Evans rats were subjected to rLFPI through a length of plastic tubing fitted with a pipette tip cannula with a 4-mm aperture. The cannula opening was positioned over a craniectomy of slightly smaller diameter and exposed dura such that the edges of the cannula fit tightly when pressed to the skull with a micromanipulator. Fluid percussion was then delivered immediately thereafter, in the same surgery session. rLFPI resulted in nonlethal focal cortical injury in all animals. We previously demonstrated that the rLFPI procedure resulted in post-traumatic seizures and regional gliosis, but had not examined other histopathologic elements. Now, we show apoptotic cell death confined to the perilesional cortex and chronic pathologic changes such as ipsilesional ventriculomegaly that are seen in the classic model. We conclude that the rLFPI method is a viable alternative to classic LFPI, and--being a one-stage procedure--has the advantage of shorter experiment turnaround and reduced exposure to anesthetics.

  9. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  10. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  11. Traumatic brain injury Nature and genetic influences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Jiang; Xiaochuan Sun

    2008-01-01

    At present,much evidence indicates that TBI is similar in pathology and severity during the acute stage,yet may result in varied outcomes.Known prognostic factors,such as age and severity of injury and treatments,only partially explain this variability.In addition,it has been demonstrated that genetic polymorphisms may play an important role in TBI susceptibility,as well as outcome following TBI.

  12. Relationship between Morphofunctional Changes in Open Traumatic Brain Injury and the Severity of Brain Damage in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakova, F M; Barskov, I V; Gulyaev, M V; Prokhorenko, S V; Romanova, G A; Grechko, A V

    2016-07-01

    A correlation between the severity of morphofunctional disturbances and the volume of brain tissue injury determined by MRT was demonstrated on the model of open traumatic brain injury in rats. A relationship between the studied parameters (limb placing and beam walking tests and histological changes) and impact force (the height of load fell onto exposed brain surface) was revealed.

  13. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  14. Emergent Endotracheal Intubation and Mortality in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fine, Philip R

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between emergent intubation (emergency department and field intubation cases combined and mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI while controlling for injury severity.Methods: Retrospective observational study of 981 (35.2% intubated, 64.8% not intubated patients with TBI evaluating the association between intubation status and mortality. Logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Injury severity measures included Head/Neck Abbreviated Injury Scale (H-AIS, systolic blood pressure, type of head injury (blunt vs. penetrating, and a propensity score combining the effects of several other potential confounding variables. Age was also included in the model.Results: The simple association of emergent endotracheal intubation with death had an odds ratio (OR of 14.3 (95% CI = 9.4 – 21.9. The logistic regression model including relevant covariates and a propensity score that adjusted for injury severity and age yielded an OR of 5.9 (95% CI = 3.2 – 10.9.Conclusions: This study indicates that emergent intubation is associated with increased risk of death after controlling for a number of injury severity indicators. We discuss the need for optimal paramedic training, and an understanding of the factors that guide patient selection and the decision to intubate in the field. [WestJEM.2008;9:184-189

  15. Reorganization of Functional Connectivity as a Correlate of Cognitive Recovery in Acquired Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Nazareth P.; Paul, Nuria; Ordonez, Victoria E.; Demuynck, Olivier; Bajo, Ricardo; Campo, Pablo; Bilbao, Alvaro; Ortiz, Tomas; del-Pozo, Francisco; Maestu, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive processes require a functional interaction between specialized multiple, local and remote brain regions. Although these interactions can be strongly altered by an acquired brain injury, brain plasticity allows network reorganization to be principally responsible for recovery. The present work evaluates the impact of brain injury on…

  16. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Pocket Guide (CONUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    without direct external trauma to the head `` Foreign body penetrating the brain `` Forces generated from events such as blast or explosion, or... Methylphenidate 5mg Q 0800 and Q 1300. Increase total daily dose by 5mg Q 2 weeks to maximum dose of 20mg BID `– Modafanil 100mg QAM. Increase by...prerequisite for basic and complex behaviors involving memory, judgment, social perception and executive skills `` Interventions should be based on a

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Severity Affects Neurogenesis in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Gao, Xiang; Michalski, Stephanie; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Jinhui

    2016-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been proven to enhance neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, various groups have reported contradictory results on whether TBI increases neurogenesis, partially due to a wide range in the severities of injuries seen with different TBI models. To address whether the severity of TBI affects neurogenesis in the injured brain, we assessed neurogenesis in mouse brains receiving different severities of controlled cortical impact (CCI) with the same injury device. The mice were subjected to mild, moderate, or severe TBI by a CCI device. The effects of TBI severity on neurogenesis were evaluated at three stages: NSC proliferation, immature neurons, and newly-generated mature neurons. The results showed that mild TBI did not affect neurogenesis at any of the three stages. Moderate TBI promoted NSC proliferation without increasing neurogenesis. Severe TBI increased neurogenesis at all three stages. Our data suggest that the severity of injury affects adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and thus it may partially explain the inconsistent results of different groups regarding neurogenesis following TBI. Further understanding the mechanism of TBI-induced neurogenesis may provide a potential approach for using endogenous NSCs to protect against neuronal loss after trauma.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of estrogen after chronic spinal cord injury in ovariectomized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At present, there is still lack of effective drugs for chronic spinal cord injury, whereas it is found recently that estrogen has a neuroprotective effect on brain and spinal cord injuries.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of estrogen on the apoptosis of nerve cells after gradual chronic spinal cord injury in ovariectomized rats.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal trial.SETTING: Institute of Orthopaedics, the Second Hospital of Lanzhou University.MATERIALS: Sixty-five female Wistar rats of common degree, weighing 220 - 250 g, were provided by the experimental animal center of Lanzhou University. The rats were randomly divided into sham-operated group (n =5), estrogen-treated group (n =30) and saline control group (n =30), and the latter two groups were observed at 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 60 days respectively, and 5 rats for each time point.METHODS: All the rats were treated with bilateral oophorectomy 2 weeks before the experiment. T10 vertebral lamina was revolved into using plastic screw. The spinal canal impingement was not induced initially. After that, the original incision was opened to expose the screw every 7 - 10 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The apoptosis and Caspase-3 positive cells in the damaged spinal cord were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidal transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method and Caspase-3 immunohistochemical staining at 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 60 days after chronic spinal cord injury respectively.RESULTS: Totally 65 rats were used, and the deleted ones during the experiment were supplemented by others. Changes of Caspase-3 expression after spinal cord injury: In the sham-operated group, only a small amount of Caspase-3 proteins were observed in the rat spinal cord, mainly located in motor neurons of spinal cord anterior horn. In the estrogen-treated group and saline control group, positive cells expressed occasionally at 1 day postoperatively, began to increase obviously at 7 days after injury, strongly

  19. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira;

    2016-01-01

    acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography...... mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P ....1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury....

  20. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  1. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caron AM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aimee M Caron, Richard Stephenson Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs (and concussion occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours total sleep deprivation (TSD and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons, and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%. Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%, and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%. Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. Keywords: sleep deprivation, concussion, traumatic brain injury, dark neuron, neurodegeneration, rat cortex

  2. MICROGLIA ACTIVATION AS A BIOMARKER FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana G Hernadez-Ontiveros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has become the signature wound of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Injury may result from a mechanical force, a rapid acceleration-deceleration movement, or a blast wave. A cascade of secondary cell death events ensues after the initial injury. In particular, multiple inflammatory responses accompany TBI. A series of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines spreads to normal brain areas juxtaposed to the core impacted tissue. Among the repertoire of immune cells involved, microglia is a key player in propagating inflammation to tissues neighboring the core site of injury. Neuroprotective drug trials in TBI have failed, likely due to their sole focus on abrogating neuronal cell death and ignoring the microglia response despite these inflammatory cells’ detrimental effects on the brain. Another relevant point to consider is the veracity of results of animal experiments due to deficiencies in experimental design, such as incomplete or inadequate method description, data misinterpretation and reporting may introduce bias and give false-positive results. Thus, scientific publications should follow strict guidelines that include randomization, blinding, sample-size estimation and accurate handling of all data (Landis et al., 2012. A prolonged state of inflammation after brain injury may linger for years and predispose patients to develop other neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. TBI patients display progressive and long-lasting impairments in their physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social performance. Here, we discuss inflammatory mechanisms that accompany TBI in an effort to increase our understanding of the dynamic pathological condition as the disease evolves over time and begin to translate these findings for defining new and existing inflammation-based biomarkers and treatments for TBI.

  3. Integrated undergraduate research experience for the study of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Clifford L; Sierra, Michelle; Delay, Eugene R

    2003-01-01

    We developed a series of hands-on laboratory exercises on "Brain Injury" designed around several pedagogical goals that included the development of: 1) knowledge of the scientific method, 2) student problem solving skills by testing cause and effect relationships, 3) student analytical and critical thinking skills by evaluating and interpreting data, identifying alternative explanations for data, and identifying confounding variables, and 4) student writing skills by reporting their findings in manuscript form. Students, facilitated by the instructor, developed a testable hypothesis on short-term effects of brain injury by analyzing lesion size and astrocytic activity. Four sequential laboratory exercises were used to present and practice ablation techniques, histological processing, microscopic visualization and image-capture, and computer aided image analysis. This exercise culminated in a laboratory report that mimicked a research article. The effectiveness of the laboratory sequence was assessed by measuring the acquisition of 1) content on anatomical, physiological, and cellular responses of the brain to traumatic brain injury, and 2) laboratory skills and methods of data-collection and analysis using surgical procedures, histology, microscopy, and image analysis. Post-course test scores, significantly greater than pre-course test scores and greater than scores from a similar but unstructured laboratory class, indicated that this hands-on approach to teaching an undergraduate research laboratory was successful. Potential variations in the integrated laboratory exercise, including multidisciplinary collaborations, are also noted.

  4. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic brain injury; MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dong Woo; Seo, Chang Hye [Inje University Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-09-15

    To characterize the MR findings of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and to assess the value of the MR imaging. SE T1-, T2-weighted, and IR brain MR images of 44 infants and children with the past history of perinatal hypoxic insults were reviewed. Abnormal brain MR findings of 8 patients with birth history of prematurity and 36 patients with birth history of full-term/posterm including 7 with severe anoxic insult history, were compared in regard to the location and the character of the lesions. MRI demonstrated the followings; (1)abnormal signal intensity lesions of subcortical and/or deep cerebral white matter, cortex, and deep gray matter, (2)atrophy of the cerebral white matter, cortex and corpus callosum, with/without ventriculomegaly, and (3)delay in myelination. Periventricular and deep white matter lesions were demonstrated in the prematurity, the deep white matter lesions and/ or subcortical white matter lesions in the term/post-term, and deep gray matter lesions in the 7 patients with severe anoxic insults history. MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and the white and gray matter lesions were correlated with the time of the injury and the severity of hypoxic insult.

  5. Neurobehavioral Effects of Levetiracetam in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared F Benge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the leading causes of acquired epilepsy. Prophylaxis for seizures is the standard of care for individuals with moderate to severe injuries at risk for developing seizures, though relatively limited comparative data is available to guide clinicians in their choice of agents. There have however been experimental studies which demonstrate potential neuroprotective qualities of levetiracetam after TBI, and in turn there is hope that eventually such agents may improve neurobehavioral outcomes post-TBI. This mini-review summarizes the available studies and suggests areas for future studies.

  6. The impact of previous traumatic brain injury on health and functioning: a TRACK-TBI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Spielman, Lisa; Singh, Ayushi; Gordon, Wayne A; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Manley, Geoffrey T; Mukherjee, Pratik; Okonkwo, David O; Puccio, Ava M; Schnyer, David M; Valadka, Alex B; Yue, John K; Yuh, Esther L

    2013-12-15

    The idea that multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have a cumulative detrimental effect on functioning is widely accepted. Most research supporting this idea comes from athlete samples, and it is not known whether remote history of previous TBI affects functioning after subsequent TBI in community-based samples. This study investigates whether a previous history of TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) is associated with worse health and functioning in a sample of individuals who require emergency department care for current TBI. Twenty-three percent of the 586 individuals with current TBI in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury study reported having sustained a previous TBI with LOC. Individuals with previous TBI were more likely to be unemployed (χ(2)=17.86; p=0.000), report a variety of chronic medical and psychiatric conditions (4.75≤χ(2)≥24.16; pTBI history. Those with a previous TBI had less-severe acute injuries, but experienced worse outcomes at 6-month follow-up. Results of a series of regression analyses controlling for demographics and acute injury severity indicated that individuals with previous TBI reported more mood symptoms, more postconcussive symptoms, lower life satisfaction, and had slower processing speed and poorer verbal learning, compared to those with no previous TBI history. These findings suggest that history of TBI with LOC may have important implications for health and psychological functioning after TBI in community-based samples.

  7. Multicenter trial of early hypothermia in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Guy L; Drever, Pamala; Valadka, Alex; Zygun, David; Okonkwo, David

    2009-03-01

    The North American Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia IIR (NABIS:H IIR) is a randomized clinical trial designed to enroll 240 patients with severe brain injury between the ages of 16 and 45 years. The primary outcome measure is the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at 6 months after injury. The study has the power to detect a 17.5% absolute difference in the percentage of patients with a good outcome with a power of 80%. All patients are randomized by waiver of consent unless family is immediately available. Enrollment is within 2.5 h of injury. Patients may be enrolled in the field by emergency medical services personnel affiliated with the study or by study personnel when the patient arrives at the emergency department. Patients who do not follow commands and have no exclusion criteria and who are enrolled in the hypothermia arm of the study are cooled to 35 degrees C as rapidly as possible by intravenous administration of up to 2 liters of chilled crystalloid. Those patients who meet the criteria for the second phase of the protocol (primarily a post-resuscitation GCS 3-8 without hypotension and without severe associated injuries) are cooled to 33 degrees C. Patients enrolled in the normothermia arm receive standard management at normothermia. As of December 2007, 74 patients had been randomized into phase II of the protocol. Patients in the hypothermia arm reached 35 degrees C in 2.7 +/- 1.1 (SD) h after injury and reached 33 degrees C at 4.4 +/- 1.5 h after injury.

  8. [The effects of dancing on the brain and possibilities as a form of rehabilitation in severe brain injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg-Turtiainen, Marjo

    2013-01-01

    Very little research has been done on the effect of dancing on the rehabilitation of patients having a severe brain injury. In addition to motor problems, the symptom picture of the sequelae of severe brain injuries often involves strong fatigability, reduced physiological arousal, disturbances of coordination of attention, difficulties of emotional control and impairment of memory. This review deals with the neural foundation of dancing and the possibilities of dancing in the rehabilitation of severe brain injuries.

  9. Modulation of the cAMP signaling pathway after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Oliva, Anthony A.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Pearse, Damien D.; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in both focal and diffuse brain pathologies that are exacerbated by the inflammatory response and progress from hours to days after the initial injury. Using a clinically relevant model of TBI, the parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI) model, we found injury-induced impairments in the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway. Levels of cAMP were depressed in the ipsilateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, as well as activation of its downstream targ...

  10. Facilitated assessment of tissue loss following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eHånell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available All experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI result in a progressive loss of brain tissue. The extent of tissue loss reflects the injury severity and can be measured to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of experimental treatments. Quantitation of tissue volumes is commonly performed using evenly spaced brain sections stained using routine histochemical methods and digitally captured. The brain tissue areas are then measured and the corresponding volumes are calculated using the distance between the sections. Measurements of areas are usually performed using a general purpose image analysis software and the results are then transferred to another program for volume calculations. To facilitate the measurement of brain tissue loss we developed novel algorithms which automatically separate the areas of brain tissue from the surrounding image background and identify the ventricles. We implemented these new algorithms by creating a new computer program (SectionToVolume which also has functions for image organization, image adjustments and volume calculations. We analyzed brain sections from mice subjected to severe focal TBI using both SectionToVolume and ImageJ, a commonly used image analysis program. The volume measurements made by the two programs were highly correlated and analysis using SectionToVolume required considerably less time. The inter-rater reliability was high. Given the extensive use of brain tissue loss measurements in TBI research, SectionToVolume will likely be a useful tool for TBI research. We therefore provide both the source code and the program as attachments to this article.

  11. Risk factors and treatment strategy of patients with chronic hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly after trau-matic brain injury%颅脑损伤后慢性脑积水和脑室扩张的危险因素及治疗策略

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车彦军; 夏智源; 骆杰民; 周珂; 齐心; 陈兴

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors and treatment strategy of patients with chronic hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods Two hundred and eighty-eight patients with TBI from January 2013 to December 2013 in our hospital were selected.There were 27 patients with chronic PTH and PTV and 54 patients with non-chronic PTH and PTV among the above patients.The risk factors and treatment strategy of two groups were analyzed and compared.Results The Glasgow Coma Scale ,traumaticsubarachnoid hemorrhage ,subdural effusion and decompressive crani-ectomy could promote the occurrence of chronic PTH and PTV ,and the GCS≤8 and decompressive craniectomy were inde-pendent risk factors of chronic PTH and PTV after TBI.Conclusion The GCS≤8 and decompressive craniectomy are inde-pendent risk factors of chronic PTH and PTV after TBI ,and V-P shunt is an important measure treating chronic PTH.%目的:探讨颅脑损伤(TBI)后引起慢性外伤性脑积水(PTH)或外伤后脑室扩张(PTV)的危险因素及治疗对策。方法选择2013-01-2013-12住院的符合入选标准的288例TBI病人,观察发生慢性PTH和PTV的27例患者,同时按1∶2随机抽取的非慢性PTH或PTV的TBI患者54例作为对照。对2组病人的危险因素及治疗对策进行对比。结果格拉斯哥昏迷评分(GCS)、外伤性蛛网膜下腔出血(tSAH)、硬膜下积液和去骨瓣减压等4项对慢性PTH和PTV的发生有明显影响;GCS≤8分和去骨瓣减压是发生慢性PTH或PTV的独立危险因素。结论 GCS≤8分和去骨瓣减压是TBI后引起慢性PT H或PT V的危险因素,V-P分流是治疗慢性PT H的主要措施。

  12. Relationship between changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activity and brain edema after brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the changes of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and brain edema after injury in rats.   Methods: The brain injury models were made by using a free-falling body. The treatment model was induced by means of injecting AP5 into lateral ventricle before brain injury; water contents in brain cortex were measured with dry-wet method; and NMDA receptor activity was detected with a radio ligand binding assay.   Results: The water contents began to increase at 30 minutes and reached the peak at 6 hours after brain injury. The maximal binding (Bmax) of NMDA receptor increased significantly at 15 minutes and reached the peak at 30 minutes, then decreased gradually and had the lowest value 6 hours after brain injury. Followed the treatment with AP5, NMDA receptor activity in the injured brain showed a normal value; and the water contents were lower than that of AP5-free injury group 24 hours after brain injury.   Conclusions: It suggests that excessive activation of NMDA receptor may be one of the most important factors to induce the secondary cerebral impairments, and AP5 may protect the brain from edema after brain injury.

  13. Imipramine treatment improves cognitive outcome associated with enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaodi; Tong, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Farahvar, Arash; Wang, Ernest; Yang, Jiankai; Samadani, Uzma; Smith, Douglas H; Huang, Jason H

    2011-06-01

    Previous animal and human studies have demonstrated that chronic treatment with several different antidepressants can stimulate neurogenesis, neural remodeling, and synaptic plasticity in the normal hippocampus. Imipramine is a commonly used tricyclic antidepressant (TCA). We employed a controlled cortical impact (CCI) mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) to assess the effect of imipramine on neurogenesis and cognitive and motor function recovery after TBI. Mice were given daily imipramine injections for either 2 or 4 weeks after injury. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered 3-7 days post-brain injury to label the cells that proliferated as a result of the injury. We assessed the effects of imipramine on post-traumatic motor function using a beam-walk test and an assessment of cognitive function: the novel object recognition test (NOR). Histological analyses were performed at 2 and 4 weeks after CCI. Brain-injured mice treated with imipramine showed significantly improved cognitive function compared to a saline-treated group (pimipramine-treated and saline-treated mice. Histological examination revealed increased preservation of proliferation of Ki-67- and BrdU-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) at 2 and 4 weeks after TBI. Immunofluorescence double-labeling with BrdU and neuron-specific markers at 4 weeks after injury showed that most progenitors became neurons in the DG and astrocytes in the hilus. Notably, treatment with imipramine increased preservation of the total number of newly-generated neurons. Our findings provide direct evidence that imipramine treatment contributes to cognitive improvement after TBI, perhaps by enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis.

  14. Mental fatigue after mild traumatic brain injury: a 3D-ASL perfusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Li, Bo; Qian, Shaowen; Jiang, Qingjun; Li, Li; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Gaiyun; Sun, Yajuan; Sun, Gang

    2016-09-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate mental fatigue associated with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and investigate the underlying neurological mechanisms. We used a 20-min psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) related ASL-fMRI to evaluate mental fatigue in 25 MTBI patients in acute phase, 21 MTBI patients in chronic phase, and 20 healthy subjects. Mental fatigue in patients in acute phase was more severe than in chronic phase patients and healthy controls. The first 5-min-PVT increased CBF of patients in acute phase in "bottom-up" and "top-down" attention areas, and decreased CBF in default mode network (DMN) areas. Twenty-min-PVT results showed that sustained attention of patients was more fragile than in healthy subjects, while sustained attention in the acute phase was less stable than that in the chronic phase. CBF results showed that in patients in the acute phase, the second, third, and last 5-min-PVT decreased CBF in DMN areas, increased CBF of "bottom-up" and "top-down" areas; in the chronic phase, the third and last 5-min-PVT increased CBF of "bottom-up" and "top-down" cortex, while the second 5-min-PVT only increased CBF of the "top-down" cortex. Mental fatigue of MTBI patients persists for more than 12 months, and can be mitigated partly within the first year after injury. The "bottom-up" and "top-down" deficits result in mental fatigue of MTBI patients.

  15. Neuroimaging biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-09-01

    Reviewed herein are contemporary neuroimaging methods that detect abnormalities associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite advances in demonstrating underlying neuropathology in a subset of individuals who sustain mTBI, considerable disagreement persists in neuropsychology about mTBI outcome and metrics for evaluation. This review outlines a thesis for the select use of sensitive neuroimaging methods as potential biomarkers of brain injury recognizing that the majority of individuals who sustain an mTBI recover without neuroimaging signs or neuropsychological sequelae detected with methods currently applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several measures that could serve as mTBI biomarkers including the detection of hemosiderin and white matter abnormalities, assessment of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative measures that directly assess neuroanatomy. Improved prediction of neuropsychological outcomes in mTBI may be achieved with the use of targeted neuroimaging markers.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox, ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  17. Sigma-1 Receptor Modulates Neuroinflammation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Ma, Yunfu; Ren, Zengxi; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Yunhe; Chen, Jing; Yang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a significant clinical problem and contributes to one-third of all injury-related deaths. Activated microglia-mediated inflammatory response is a distinct characteristic underlying pathophysiology of TBI. Here, we evaluated the effect and possible mechanisms of the selective Sigma-1 receptor agonist 2-(4-morpholinethyl)-1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084) in mice TBI model. A single intraperitoneal injection 10 μg/g PRE-084, given 15 min after TBI significantly reduced lesion volume, lessened brain edema, attenuated modified neurological severity score, increased the latency time in wire hang test, and accelerated body weight recovery. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis with Iba1 staining showed that PRE-084 lessened microglia activation. Meanwhile, PRE-084 reduced nitrosative and oxidative stress to proteins. Thus, Sigma-1 receptors play a major role in inflammatory response after TBI and may serve as useful target for TBI treatment in the future.

  18. Minding and Caring about Ethics in Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, Grant

    2016-05-01

    Joseph Fins's book Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness (Cambridge UP, 2015) is a considerable addition to the literature on disorders of consciousness and the murky area of minimally conscious states. Fins brings to this fraught area of clinical practice and neuroethical analysis a series of stories and reflections resulting in a pressing and sustained ethical challenge both to clinicians and to health care systems. The challenge is multifaceted, with diagnostic and therapeutic demands to be met by clinicians and a mix of moral, scientific-economic, and political resonances for health care analysts. Everything in the book resonates with my own clinical experience and the often messy and emotionally wrenching business of providing ongoing care for patients with severe brain injuries and disorders, people who frequently resist the categorizations that well-organized health care systems prefer and that can dictate terms of patient management.

  19. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  20. Traumatic brain injury neuropsychology in Cali, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quijano María Cristina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetive: comparative analysis between control group and patients with TBI to determine whetherthere neuropsychological differences at 6 months of evolution, to guide timely interventioncommensurate with the needs of this population. Materials and methods: a total of 79 patientswith a history of TBI with a minimum of 6 months of evolution and 79 control subjects were evaluated.Both groups with a mean age of 34 and without previous neurological or psychiatric disorders and an average schooling of 11 years for the control group and 9 years for the TBI group.The Glasgow Coma Scale in the TBI group was classified as moderate with 11 points. The BriefNeuropsychological Evaluation in Spanish Neuropsi was applied to both groups. Results: significantdifferences (p≤0.05 in the tasks of orientation, attention, memory, language, reading andwriting were found. Conclusions: TBI generates significant neuropsychological changes, even sixmonths after discharge from the health service. It suggests that patients with head injury requiretreatment after overcoming the initial stage.

  1. A social identity approach to acquired brain injury (ABI)

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed The central argument put forward in this thesis is that, in the context of acquired brain injury (ABI) social identity matters. The first article is a theoretical paper which reviews an emerging literature that is trying to draw together social psychology and neuropsychology in the study of ABI. This article argues that the social identity approach is an appropriate vehicle for such integration and introduces the concept of identity sub-types based on belonging and based on p...

  2. Comment: importance of cognitive reserve in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2014-05-01

    The expectation for moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is permanent damage and lasting deficits. However, in a multicenter investigation, Schneider et al.(1) show that by 1 year postinjury, one-fourth of patients with TBI achieve disability-free recovery (DFR), defined as a score of zero on the Disability Rating Scale. Of importance, cognitive reserve (CR) in the form of educational attainment was related to DFR.

  3. Adolescents’ experience of a parental traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Harris

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the experiences of four adolescents, each living with a parent who has sustained a traumatic brain injury, against the theoretical backdrop of existential-phenomenological psychology. Opsomming Hierdie navorsing verken die belewenisse van vier adolessente wat saam met ‘n ouer wat ‘n traumatiese breinbesering opgedoen het, leef. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  4. Brain Injury Following Repetitive Apnea in Newborn Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schears, Gregory; Creed, Jennifer; Antoni, Diego; Zaitseva, Tatiana; Greeley, William; Wilson, David F.; Pastuszko, Anna

    Repetitive apnea is associated with a significant increase in extracellular dopamine, generation of free radicals as determined by o-tyrosine formation and increase in Fluoro-Jade staining of degenerating neurons. This increase in extracellular dopamine and of hydroxyl radicals in striatum of newborn brain is likely to be at least partly responsible for the neuronal injury and neurological side effects of repetitive apnea.

  5. Cognitive rehabilitation in children with acquired brain injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hagberg-van't Hooft, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Deficits in attention, memory and executive functions are the most common cognitive dysfunctions after acquired brain injuries (ABI) and may have a major negative influence on academic and social adjustment. Neuropsychological measures can assess these dysfunctions and shortcomings in academic and social life, but there is a great need for new efficacious cognitive treatment programmes. The main aims of this thesis were to evaluate the direct and maintained effects of a ...

  6. Novel Treatment for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    craniectomy for urgent evacuation of intracranial hemorrhage improves intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures and overrides benefits of vasopressors in...for the management of CPP (cerebral perfusion pressure ) after TBI (traumatic brain injury) and support the continued investigation and use of AVP...and 12 patients received vasopressin (AVP). Those in the "no vasopressor" group were the least severely injured and had the best outcomes. Those in the

  7. Personalized Medicine in Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    prepared a manuscript entitled “Select non-coding RNA in blood components provide novel clinically accessible biological surrogates for improved...Dooley C, Abbi B, Lange G. (2012). Select non-coding RNA in blood components provide novel clinically accessible biological surrogates for improved...in blood components provide novel clinically accessible biological surrogates for improved identification of traumatic brain injury in OEF/OIF

  8. The Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Battlefield

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Kara E.; Frank C Tortella

    2012-01-01

    The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed an increased awareness on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Various publications have estimated the incidence of TBI for our deployed servicemen, however all have been based on extrapolations of data sets or subjective evaluations due to our current method of diagnosing a TBI. Therefore it has been difficult to get an accurate rate and severity of deployment related TBIs, or the incidence of multiple TBIs our service members are experiencing. As s...

  9. Is management of acute traumatic brain injury effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Jin; Gao, Guo-Yi; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】 Objective: To evaluate all the possible therapeutic measures concerning the acute management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) mentioned in Cochrane System-atic Reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Sys-tematic Reviews (CDSR). Methods: An exhausted literature search for all pub-lished Cochrane Systematic Reviews discussing therapeu-tic rather than prevention or rehabilitative interventions of TBI was conducted. We retrieved such databases as CDSR and Coch...

  10. PTSD and traumatic brain injury: folklore and fact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nigel S

    2008-01-01

    A number of controversies and debates have arisen over the years surrounding the dual diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Many of these have centred around the around the degree of protection provided by TBI against developing the disorder. The following is brief review of the literature in this area to help resolve some of these issues and to address a number of specific challenges which arise when working with this patient group.

  11. Effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许民辉; 代文光; 邓洵鼎

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of magnesium sulfate on brain mitochondrial respiratory function in rats after experimental traumatic brain injury and the possible mechanism.Methods: The middle degree brain injury in rats was made by BIM-III multi-function impacting machine. The brain mitochondrial respiratory function was measured with oxygen electrode and the ultra-structural changes were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM).Results: 1. The brain mitochondrial respiratory stage III and respiration control rate reduced significantly in the untreated groups within 24 and 72 hours. But treated Group A showed certain degree of recovery of respiratory function; treated Group B showed further improvement. 2. Untreated Group, treated Groups A and B had different degrees of mitochondrial ultra-structural damage respectively, which could be attenuated after the treatment with magnesium sulfate.Conclusions: The mitochondrial respiratory function decreases significantly after traumatic brain injury. But it can be apparently improved after magnesium sulfate management along with the attenuated damage of mitochondria discovered by TEM. The longer course of treatment can obtain a better improvement of mitochondrial respiratory function.

  12. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body.

  13. Exosome platform for diagnosis and monitoring of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas D; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2014-09-26

    We have previously demonstrated the release of membranous structures by cells into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. With activation, injury, stress, transformation or infection, cells express proteins and RNAs associated with the cellular responses to these events. The exosomes released by these cells can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids linked to these physiologic events. This review focuses on exosomes associated with traumatic brain injury, which may be both diagnostic and a causative factor in the progression of the injury. Based on current data, exosomes play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with development, progression and therapeutic failures and cellular stress in a variety of pathologic conditions. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodelling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, immunologic activation and genetic exchange. These circulating exosomes not only represent a central mediator of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment linked with secondary brain injury, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and monitoring of neurodegenerative progression.

  14. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  15. Neuroimaging and traumatic brain injury: State of the field and voids in translational knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Erica D; Konda, Sneha; Dean, Dana D; Wang, Ernest W; Huang, Jason H; Little, Deborah M

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in every developed country in the world and is believed to be a risk factor in the later development of depression, anxiety disorders and neurodegenerative diseases including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Parkinson's Disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). One challenge faced by those who conduct research into TBI is the lack of a verified and validated biomarker that can be used to diagnose TBI or for use as a prognostic variable which can identify those at risk for poor recovery following injury or at risk for neurodegeneration later in life. Neuroimaging continues to hold promise as a TBI biomarker but is limited by a lack of clear relationship between the neuropathology of injury/recovery and the quantitative and image based data that is obtained. Specifically lacking is the data on biochemical and biologic changes that lead to alterations in neuroimaging markers. There are multiple routes towards developing the knowledge required to more definitively link pathology to imaging but the most efficient approach is expanded leveraging of in vivo human blood, serum, and imaging biomarkers with both in vivo and ex vivo animal findings. This review describes the current use and limitations of imaging in TBI including a discussion of currently used animal injury models and the available animal imaging data and extracted markers that hold the greatest promise for helping translate alterations in imaging back to injury pathology. Further, it reviews both the human and animal TBI literature supporting current standards, identifies the remaining voids in the literature, and briefly highlights recent advances in molecular imaging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  16. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy for ICU patients with severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Dongyuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To sum up our experience in percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT in ICU patient with severe brain injury. Methods: Between November 2011 and April 2014, PDTs were performed on 32 severe brain injury patients in ICU by a team of physicians and intensivists. The success rate, effi cacy, safety, and complications including stomal infection and bleeding, paratracheal insertion, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, tracheal laceration, as well as clinically significant tracheal stenosis were carefully monitored and recorded respectively. Results: The operations took 4-15 minutes (mean 9.1 minutes±4.2 minutes. Totally 4 cases suffered from complications in the operations: 3 cases of stomal bleeding, and 1 case of intratracheal bloody secretion, but none required intervention. Paratracheal insertion, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, tracheal laceration, or clinically signifi cant tracheal stenosis were not found in PDT patients. There was no procedure-related death occurring during or after PDT. Conclusion: Our study demonstrats that PDT is a safe, highly effective, and minimally invasive procedure. The appropriate sedation and airway management perioperatively help to reduce complication rates. PDT should be performed or supervised by a team of physicians with extensive experience in this procedure, and also an intensivist with experience in diffi cult airway management. Key words: Brain injuries; Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy; ICU

  17. Brain injury impairs working memory and prefrontal circuit function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin James Smith

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available More than 2.5 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year. Even mild to moderate traumatic brain injury causes long-lasting neurological effects. Despite its prevalence, no therapy currently exists to treat the underlying cause of cognitive impairment suffered by TBI patients. Following lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI, the most widely used experimental model of TBI, we investigated alterations in working memory and excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the prefrontal cortex. LFPI impaired working memory as assessed with a T-maze behavioral task. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials recorded in the prefrontal cortex were reduced in slices derived from brain-injured mice. Spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were more frequent in slices derived from LFPI mice while inhibitory currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were smaller after LFPI. Additionally, an increase in action potential threshold and concomitant decrease in firing rate was observed in layer 2/3 neurons in slices from injured animals. Conversely, no differences in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic transmission onto layer 5 neurons were observed; however, layer 5 neurons demonstrated a decrease in input resistance and action potential duration after LFPI. These results demonstrate synaptic and intrinsic alterations in prefrontal circuitry that may underlie working memory impairment caused by TBI.

  18. Emerging potential of exosomes for treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide. No effective treatment has been identified from clinical trials. Compelling evidence exists that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exerts a substantial therapeutic effect after experimental brain injury. In addition to their soluble factors, therapeutic effects of MSCs may be attributed to their generation and release of exosomes. Exosomes are endosomal origin small-membrane nano-sized vesicles generated by almost all cell types. Exosomes play a pivotal role in intercellular communication. Intravenous delivery of MSC-derived exosomes improves functional recovery and promotes neuroplasticity in rats after TBI. Therapeutic effects of exosomes derive from the exosome content, especially microRNAs (miRNAs. miRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs and play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation of genes. Compared with their parent cells, exosomes are more stable and can cross the blood-brain barrier. They have reduced the safety risks inherent in administering viable cells such as the risk of occlusion in microvasculature or unregulated growth of transplanted cells. Developing a cell-free exosome-based therapy may open up a novel approach to enhancing multifaceted aspects of neuroplasticity and to amplifying neurological recovery, potentially for a variety of neural injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the most recent knowledge of exosome therapies for TBI, their associated challenges and opportunities.

  19. Emerging potential of exosomes for treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ye; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the major causes of death and disability worldwide. No effective treatment has been identified from clinical trials. Compelling evidence exists that treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exerts a substantial therapeutic effect after experimental brain injury. In addition to their soluble factors, therapeutic effects of MSCs may be attributed to their generation and release of exosomes. Exosomes are endosomal origin small-membrane nano-sized vesicles generated by almost all cell types. Exosomes play a pivotal role in intercellular communication. Intravenous delivery of MSC-derived exosomes improves functional recovery and promotes neuroplasticity in rats after TBI. Therapeutic effects of exosomes derive from the exosome content, especially microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs are small non-coding regulatory RNAs and play an important role in posttranscriptional regulation of genes. Compared with their parent cells, exosomes are more stable and can cross the blood-brain barrier. They have reduced the safety risks inherent in administering viable cells such as the risk of occlusion in microvasculature or unregulated growth of transplanted cells. Developing a cell-free exosome-based therapy may open up a novel approach to enhancing multifaceted aspects of neuroplasticity and to amplifying neurological recovery, potentially for a variety of neural injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. This review discusses the most recent knowledge of exosome therapies for TBI, their associated challenges and opportunities.

  20. Thrombocytopenia after therapeutic hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Wu-si; WANG Wei-min; DU Hong-ying; LIU Wei-guo; SHEN Hong; SHEN Lei-fen; ZHU Ming-lan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical characteristics and significance of thrombocytopenia after therapeutic hypothermia in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: Ninety-six inpatients with severe brain injury were randomized into three groups: SBC (selective brain cooling ) group (n =24), MSH ( mild systemic hypothermia ) group ( n = 30), and control (normothermia) group ( n = 42). The platelet counts and prognosis were retrospectively analyzed.Results: Thrombocytopenia was present in 18 (75 % ), 23 (77 % ) and 15 (36 % ) patients in SBC group,MSH group and control group, respectively (P <0.01 ).Thrombocytopenia, in which the minimum platelet count was seen 3 days after hypothermia, showed no significant difference between SBC and MSH group (P > 0.05). Most platelet counts (37 cases, 90% ) in hypothermia group were returned to normal level after 1 to 2 days of natural rewarming. The platelet count in SBC group reduced by 16%, 27% and 29% at day 1, 3 and 5 respectively compared with the baseline value. Good recovery (GOS score 4-5) rate of thrombocytopenia 1 year after injury for hypothermia group ( 17 cases, 37 % ) was significantly lower than that of control group (P <0.01).Conclusions: Therapeutic hypothermia increases the incidence of thrombocytopenia in severe TBI, and patients with thrombocytopenia after therapeutic hypothermia are associated with unfavorable neurological prognosis.

  1. Chronic post-traumatic headache after mild head injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard, Dorte; Forchhammer, Hysse; Teasdale, Tom

    2014-01-01

    to or above the cut-off score for having post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the HTQ. In terms of demographics and headache, the groups were comparable except the CPTH group were more often without affiliation to the labour market ( P ...BACKGROUND: The aetiology behind chronic post-traumatic headache (CPTH) after mild head injury is unclear and management is complicated. In order to optimize treatment strategies we aimed to characterize a CPTH population. METHODS: Ninety patients with CPTH and 45 patients with chronic primary...... headaches were enrolled from the Danish Headache Center. All patients were interviewed about demographic and headache data. They completed the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ), Rivermead Post Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire, SF-36 and a headache diary. RESULTS: The CPTH group experienced more cognitive...

  2. Bcl-2 gene therapy for apoptosis following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-feng; ZHENG Xue-sheng; LIU Wei-guo; FENG Jun-feng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effect of Bcl- 2 fusion protein on apoptosis in brain following traumatic brain injury.Methods: Bcl-2 gene was cloned by RT-PCR. Bcl-2 and EGFP genes were linked together and inserted into pAdeno-X vector. This recombinant vector was packaged into infectious adenovirus in HEK293 cells. Ninety Wistar rats were assigned randomly into experimental group(n=45) and control group (n=45). All rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury. Then recombinant adenovirus (for experimental group) or saline (for control group) was injected into the traumatic brain. The expression of Bcl-2 fusion protein was investigated by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy. Apoptosis in the injured brain was studied by TUNEL. Animals' behavior capacity was evaluated by tiltboard test.Results: In the experimental group, many fluorescent cells were found around the traumatic locus,which were also proven to be Bcl-2-positive by immunohistochemistry. On the contrary, few Bcl-2-positive cells and no fluorescent cell were detected in the control group. Bcl-2 expression of experimental group was much higher than that of control group, which was illustrated by Western blotting. The apoptosis index of experimental group was 0.027 ± 0.005, and that of control group was 0.141±0.025 (P<0.01). Two weeks after injury, animals of the experimental group behaved better than those of the control group.Conclusions: A recombinant adenovirus vector expressing Bcl-2 fusion protein has been constructed. Bcl-2 fusion protein can suppress apoptosis and promote cell survival. Moreover, the behavior recovery of the injured animal is promoted. Bcl-2 fusion protein provides a way to track the target cells in vivo.

  3. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  4. Incidence and predictors of chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, M; Nebel, K; Riegel, A; Thiemann, D; Yoon, M-S; Keidel, M; Stude, P; Diener, Hc; Katsarava, Z

    2010-05-01

    We identified clinical, demographic and psychological predictive factors that may contribute to the development of chronic headache associated with mild to moderate whiplash injury [Quebec Task Force (QTF) ≤ II] and determined the incidence of this chronic pain state. Patients were recruited prospectively from six participating accident and emergency departments. While 4.6% of patients developed chronic headache attributed to whiplash injury according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edn criteria, 15.2% of patients complained about headache lasting > 42 days (QTF criteria). Predictive factors were pre-existing facial pain [odds ratio (OR) 9.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1, 10.4; P = 0.017], lack of confidence to recover completely (OR 5.5, 95% CI 2.0, 13.2; P = 0.005), sore throat (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.5, 8.9; P = 0.013), medication overuse (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.4, 12.3; P = 0.009), high Neck Disability Index (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3, 12.6; P = 0.019), hopelessness/anxiety (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.3, 8.7; P = 0.024), and depression (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.2, 9.4; P = 0.024). The lack of a control group limits the conclusions that can be drawn from this study. Identified predictors closely resemble those found in chronic primary headache disorders.

  5. Modeling community integration in workers with delayed recovery from mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, T.; Shapiro, C. M.; Mollayeva, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delayed recovery in persons after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is poorly understood. Community integration (CI) is endorsed by persons with neurological disorders as an important outcome. We aimed to describe CI and its associated factors in insured Ontario workers with delayed...... recovery following mTBI. Methods: A cross-sectional study of insured workers in the chronic phase following mTBI was performed at a rehabilitation hospital in Ontario, Canada. Sociodemographic, occupational, injury-related, clinical, and claim-related data were collected from self-reports, medical...... assessments, and insurers' referral files. Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) scores were compared using analysis of variance or Spearman's correlation tests. Stepwise multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate the associations with CI. Results: Ninety-four workers with mTBI (45...

  6. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  7. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  8. Pharmacologically induced hypothermia attenuates traumatic brain injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaohuan; Wei, Zheng Zachory; Espinera, Alyssa; Lee, Jin Hwan; Ji, Xiaoya; Wei, Ling; Dix, Thomas A; Yu, Shan Ping

    2015-05-01

    Neonatal brain trauma is linked to higher risks of mortality and neurological disability. The use of mild to moderate hypothermia has shown promising potential against brain injuries induced by stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) in various experimental models and in clinical trials. Conventional methods of physical cooling, however, are difficult to use in acute treatments and in induction of regulated hypothermia. In addition, general anesthesia is usually required to mitigate the negative effects of shivering during physical cooling. Our recent investigations demonstrate the potential therapeutic benefits of pharmacologically induced hypothermia (PIH) using the neurotensin receptor (NTR) agonist HPI201 (formerly known as ABS201) in stroke and TBI models of adult rodents. The present investigation explored the brain protective effects of HPI201 in a P14 rat pediatric model of TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. When administered via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection, HPI201 induced dose-dependent reduction of body and brain temperature. A 6-h hypothermic treatment, providing an overall 2-3°C reduction of brain and body temperature, showed significant effect of attenuating the contusion volume versus TBI controls. Attenuation occurs whether hypothermia is initiated 15min or 2h after TBI. No shivering response was seen in HPI201-treated animals. HPI201 treatment also reduced TUNEL-positive and TUNEL/NeuN-colabeled cells in the contusion area and peri-injury regions. TBI-induced blood-brain barrier damage was attenuated by HPI201 treatment, evaluated using the Evans Blue assay. HPI201 significantly decreased MMP-9 levels and caspase-3 activation, both of which are pro-apototic, while it increased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene expression in the peri-contusion region. In addition, HPI201 prevented the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6. In sensorimotor activity assessments, rats in the HPI201

  9. Application of Ultrasonic Techniques for Brain Injury Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasili, P.M.; Mobley, J.; Norton, S.J.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-19

    In this work, we evaluate methods for detecting brain injury using ultrasound. We have used simulations of ultrasonic fields in the head to model the phase distortion of the skull. In addition we present experimental data from the crania of large animals. The experimental data help us understand and evaluate the performance of different transducers in acquiring the backscatter data from the brain through the skull. Both the simulations and acquired data illustrate the superiority of lower-frequency (<= 1 MHz) ultrasonic fields for transcranial acquisition of signals from inside the brain. Additionally, the experimental work shows that the higher-frequency (5 MHz) ultrasound can also be useful in acquiring clean nearfield data to help detect the position of the inner boundary of the skull.

  10. Resuscitation speed affects brain injury in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Johansson, Pär I

    2014-01-01

    infusion speed increment NS (n¿=¿7). Hemodynamic variables over a 6-hour observation phase were recorded. Following euthanasia, brains were harvested and lesion size as well as brain swelling was measured.ResultsBolus FFP resuscitation resulted in greater brain swelling (22.36¿±¿1.03% vs. 15.58¿±¿2.52%, p...

  11. Plasticity in the Neonatal Brain following Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eridan Rocha-Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischaemic damage to the developing brain is a leading cause of child death, with high mortality and morbidity, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive disabilities. The developmental stage of the brain and the severity of the insult influence the selective regional vulnerability and the subsequent clinical manifestations. The increased susceptibility to hypoxia-ischaemia (HI of periventricular white matter in preterm infants predisposes the immature brain to motor, cognitive, and sensory deficits, with cognitive impairment associated with earlier gestational age. In term infants HI causes selective damage to sensorimotor cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem. Even though the immature brain is more malleable to external stimuli compared to the adult one, a hypoxic-ischaemic event to the neonate interrupts the shaping of central motor pathways and can affect normal developmental plasticity through altering neurotransmission, changes in cellular signalling, neural connectivity and function, wrong targeted innervation, and interruption of developmental apoptosis. Models of neonatal HI demonstrate three morphologically different types of cell death, that is, apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy, which crosstalk and can exist as a continuum in the same cell. In the present review we discuss the mechanisms of HI injury to the immature brain and the way they affect plasticity.

  12. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Rainer; Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D.; Pastuovic, Zeljko

    2013-07-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca+2 cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma.

  13. Investigation of elemental changes in brain tissues following excitotoxic injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, Rainer, E-mail: rns@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Howell, Nicholas R.; Callaghan, Paul D. [Life Sciences, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Pastuovic, Zeljko [Institute for Environmental Research, ANSTO, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Recently the ANSTO heavy ion microprobe has been used for elemental mapping of thin brain tissue sections. The fact that a very small portion of the proton energy is used for X-ray excitation combined with small variations of the major element concentrations makes μ-PIXE imaging and GeoPIXE analysis a challenging task. Excitotoxic brain injury underlies the pathology of stroke and various neurodegenerative disorders. Large fluxes in Ca{sup +2} cytosolic concentrations are a key feature of the initiation of this pathophysiological process. In order to understand if these modifications are associated with changes in the elemental composition, several brain sections have been mapped with μ-PIXE. Increases in Ca{sup +2} cytosolic concentrations were indicative of the pathophysiological process continuing 1 week after an initiating neural insult. We were able to measure significant variations in K and Ca concentration distribution across investigated brain tissue. These variations correlate very well with physiological changes visible in the brain tissue. Moreover, the obtained μ-PIXE results clearly demonstrate that the elemental composition changes significantly correlate with brain drauma.

  14. Repeated Closed Head Injury in Mice Results in Sustained Motor and Memory Deficits and Chronic Cellular Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda N Bolton Hall

    Full Text Available Millions of mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs occur every year in the United States, with many people subject to multiple head injuries that can lead to chronic behavioral dysfunction. We previously reported that mild TBI induced using closed head injuries (CHI repeated at 24h intervals produced more acute neuron death and glial reactivity than a single CHI, and increasing the length of time between injuries to 48h reduced the cumulative acute effects of repeated CHI. To determine whether repeated CHI is associated with behavioral dysfunction or persistent cellular damage, mice receiving either five CHI at 24h intervals, five CHI at 48h intervals, or five sham injuries at 24h intervals were evaluated across a 10 week period after injury. Animals with repeated CHI exhibited motor coordination and memory deficits, but not gait abnormalities when compared to sham animals. At 10wks post-injury, no notable neuron loss or glial reactivity was observed in the cortex, hippocampus, or corpus callosum. Argyrophilic axons were found in the pyramidal tract of some injured animals, but neither silver stain accumulation nor inflammatory responses in the injury groups were statistically different from the sham group in this region. However, argyrophilic axons, microgliosis and astrogliosis were significantly increased within the optic tract of injured animals. Repeated mild CHI also resulted in microgliosis and a loss of neurofilament protein 200 in the optic nerve. Lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h did not effectively reduce these behavioral or cellular responses. These results suggest that repeated mild CHI results in persistent behavioral dysfunction and chronic pathological changes within the visual system, neither of which was significantly attenuated by lengthening the inter-injury interval from 24h to 48h.

  15. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Olive leaf extract inhibits lead poisoning-induced brain injury**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Shengqing Wang; Wenhui Cui; Jiujun He; Zhenfu Wang; Xiaolu Yang

    2013-01-01

    Olive leaves have an antioxidant capacity, and olive leaf extract can protect the blood, spleen and hippocampus in lead-poisoned mice. However, little is known about the effects of olive leaf extract on lead-induced brain injury. This study was designed to determine whether olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury, and whether this effect is associated with antioxidant capacity. First, we established a mouse model of lead poisoning by continuous intragastric administration of lead acetate for 30 days. Two hours after successful model establishment, lead-poisoned mice were given olive leaf extract at doses of 250, 500 or 1 000 mg/kg daily by intragastric administration for 50 days. Under the transmission electron microscope, olive leaf extract attenuated neuronal and capil ary injury and reduced damage to organel es and the matrix around the capil aries in the frontal lobe of the cerebral cortex in the lead-poisoned mice. Olive leaf extract at a dose of 1 000 mg/kg had the greatest protective effect. Spectrophotometry showed that olive leaf extract significantly in-creased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phospha-tase, while it reduced malondialdehyde content, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, im-munohistochemical staining revealed that olive leaf extract dose-dependently decreased Bax pro-tein expression in the cerebral cortex of lead-poisoned mice. Our findings indicate that olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury by increasing antioxidant capacity and reducing apop-tosis.

  17. Injury severity measures for predicting return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ding-Kuo; Hwang, Hei-Fen; Lin, Mau-Roung

    2017-01-01

    This study compared the ability of five injury severity measures, namely the Abbreviated Injury Scale to the Head (AIS-H), Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), and Injury Severity Score (ISS), to predict return-to-work after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Furthermore, factors potentially associated with return-to-work were investigated. In total, 207 individuals aged ≤65 years newly diagnosed with a TBI and employed at the time of injury were recruited and followed-up for 1year by telephone every 3 months. A bivariate proportional hazards model analysis revealed that all five injury severity measures were significantly associated with return-to-work after a TBI. The AIS-H and non-head ISS explained 23.8% of the variation in the duration of returning to work from discharge after hospitalization for a TBI; similarly, the GCS, GOS, GOSE, and ISS respectively accounted for 4.7%, 21.4%, 12.9%, and 48.4% of the variation. A multivariable analysis revealed that individuals with higher injury severity as measured by the ISS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.97), a lack of autonomy in transportation (HR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.23-5.32), cognitive impairment (HR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.79), and depression (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.99) were significantly less likely to be employed after a TBI. In conclusion, of the five injury severity measures, the ISS may be the most capable measure of predicting return-to-work after a TBI. In addition to injury severity, autonomy in transportation, cognitive function, and the depressive status may also influence the employment status during the first year after a TBI.

  18. Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Brain Death-Induced Renal Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H. R.; Ploeg, R. J.; Schuurs, T. A.

    2009-01-01

    Kidneys derived from brain death organ donors show an inferior survival when compared to kidneys derived from living donors. Brain death is known to induce organ injury by evoking an inflammatory response in the donor. Neuronal injury triggers an inflammatory response in the brain, leading to endoth

  19. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  20. Effects of NOS inhibitor on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury in the adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunLi-Sha; XuJiang-ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury (DBI) in the adult rat brain. Methods Adult male SD rats were subjected to diffuse brain injury (DBI) model. By using systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells, we compared the proliferation rate of

  1. The Relation of Focal Lesions to Cortical Thickness in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Zielinski, Brandon A; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi; Black, Garrett M; Huff, B S Trevor; Christiansen, Zachary; Wood, Dawn-Marie; Abildskov, Tracy J; Dennis, Maureen; Taylor, H Gerry; Rubin, Kenneth; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Stancin, Terry; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2016-10-01

    In a sample of children with traumatic brain injury, this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based investigation examined whether presence of a focal lesion uniquely influenced cortical thickness in any brain region. Specifically, the study explored the relation of cortical thickness to injury severity as measured by Glasgow Coma Scale score and length of stay, along with presence of encephalomalacia, focal white matter lesions or presence of hemosiderin deposition as a marker of shear injury. For comparison, a group of children without head injury but with orthopedic injury of similar age and sex were also examined. Both traumatic brain injury and orthopedic injury children had normally reduced cortical thickness with age, assumed to reflect neuronal pruning. However, the reductions observed within the traumatic brain injury sample were similar to those in the orthopedic injury group, suggesting that in this sample traumatic brain injury, per se, did not uniquely alter cortical thickness in any brain region at the group level. Injury severity in terms of Glasgow Coma Scale or longer length of stay was associated with greater reductions in frontal and occipitoparietal cortical thickness. However, presence of focal lesions were not related to unique changes in cortical thickness despite having a prominent distribution of lesions within frontotemporal regions among children with traumatic brain injury. Because focal lesions were highly heterogeneous, their association with cortical thickness and development appeared to be idiosyncratic, and not associated with group level effects.

  2. Are boys and girls that different? An analysis of traumatic brain injury in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Niamh C

    2013-08-01

    The Phillips Report on traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Ireland found that injury was more frequent in men and that gender differences were present in childhood. This study determined when gender differences emerge and examined the effect of gender on the mechanism of injury, injury type and severity and outcome.

  3. Delayed increases in microvascular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury are associated with prolonged inflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and progressive white matter damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushakova, Olena Y; Johnson, Danny; Hayes, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral microbleeds, focal inflammation, and white matter damage are associated with many neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including CTE, AD, PD, vascular dementia, stroke, and TBI. This study evaluates microvascular abnormalities observed at acute and chronic stages following TBI in rats, and examines pathological processes associated with these abnormalities. TBI in adult rats was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) of two magnitudes. Brain pathology was assessed in white matter of the corpus callosum for 24 h to 3 months following injury using immunohistochemistry (IHC). TBI resulted in focal microbleeds that were related to the magnitude of injury. At the lower magnitude of injury, microbleeds gradually increased over the 3 month duration of the study. IHC revealed TBI-induced focal abnormalities including blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage (IgG), endothelial damage (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]), activation of reactive microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) and macrophage-mediated inflammation (cluster of differentiation 68 [CD68]), all showing different temporal profiles. At chronic stages (up to 3 months), apparent myelin loss (Luxol fast blue) and scattered deposition of microbleeds were observed. Microbleeds were surrounded by glial scars and co-localized with CD68 and IgG puncta stainings, suggesting that localized BBB breakdown and inflammation were associated with vascular damage. Our results indicate that evolving white matter degeneration following experimental TBI is associated with significantly delayed microvascular damage and focal microbleeds that are temporally and regionally associated with development of punctate BBB breakdown and progressive inflammatory responses. Increased

  4. Brain viscoelasticity alteration in chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Viscoelastic properties indicate structural alterations in biological tissues at multiple scales with high sensitivity. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE is a novel technique that directly visualizes and quantitatively measures biomechanical tissue properties in vivo. MRE recently revealed that early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with a global decrease of the cerebral mechanical integrity. This study addresses MRE and MR volumetry in chronic-progressive disease courses of MS. METHODS: We determined viscoelastic parameters of the brain parenchyma in 23 MS patients with primary or secondary chronic progressive disease course in comparison to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals by multifrequency MRE, and correlated the results with clinical data, T2 lesion load and brain volume. Two viscoelastic parameters, the shear elasticity μ and the powerlaw exponent α, were deduced according to the springpot model and compared to literature values of relapsing-remitting MS. RESULTS: In chronic-progressive MS patients, μ and α were reduced by 20.5% and 6.1%, respectively, compared to healthy controls. MR volumetry yielded a weaker correlation: Total brain volume loss in MS patients was in the range of 7.5% and 1.7% considering the brain parenchymal fraction. All findings were significant (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic-progressive MS disease courses show a pronounced reduction of the cerebral shear elasticity compared to early relapsing-remitting disease. The powerlaw exponent α decreased only in the chronic-progressive stage of MS, suggesting an alteration in the geometry of the cerebral mechanical network due to chronic neuroinflammation.

  5. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Wade, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    This article provides an overview of hypothalamic and pituitary alterations in brain trauma, including the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary damage, injury mechanisms, features of the hypothalamic-pituitary defects, and major hypothalamic-pituitary disturbances in brain trauma. While hypothalamic-pituitary lesions have been commonly described at postmortem examination, only a limited number of clinical cases of traumatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction have been reported, probably because head injury of sufficient severity to cause hypothalamic and pituitary damage usually leads to early death. With the improvement in rescue measures, an increasing number of severely head-injured patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction will survive to be seen by clinicians. Patterns of endocrine abnormalities following brain trauma vary depending on whether the injury site is in the hypothalamus, the anterior or posterior pituitary, or the upper or lower portion of the pituitary stalk. Injury predominantly to the hypothalamus can produce dissociated ACTH-cortisol levels with no response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a limited or failed metopirone test, hypothyroxinemia with a preserved thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone, low gonadotropin levels with a normal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a variable growth hormone (GH) level with a paradoxical rise in GH after glucose loading, hyperprolactinemia, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), temporary or permanent diabetes insipidus (DI), disturbed glucose metabolism, and loss of body temperature control. Severe damage to the lower pituitary stalk or anterior lobe can cause low basal levels of all anterior pituitary hormones and eliminate responses to their releasing factors. Only a few cases showed typical features of hypothalamic or pituitary dysfunction. Most severe injuries are sufficient to damage both structures and produce a mixed endocrine picture

  6. Acetazolamide Mitigates Astrocyte Cellular Edema Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdivant, Nasya M.; Smith, Sean G.; Ali, Syed F.; Wolchok, Jeffrey C.; Balachandran, Kartik

    2016-09-01

    Non-penetrating or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is commonly experienced in accidents, the battlefield and in full-contact sports. Astrocyte cellular edema is one of the major factors that leads to high morbidity post-mTBI. Various studies have reported an upregulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel protein, following brain injury. AZA is an antiepileptic drug that has been shown to inhibit AQP4 expression and in this study we investigate the drug as a therapeutic to mitigate the extent of mTBI induced cellular edema. We hypothesized that mTBI-mediated astrocyte dysfunction, initiated by increased intracellular volume, could be reduced when treated with AZA. We tested our hypothesis in a three-dimensional in vitro astrocyte model of mTBI. Samples were subject to no stretch (control) or one high-speed stretch (mTBI) injury. AQP4 expression was significantly increased 24 hours after mTBI. mTBI resulted in a significant increase in the cell swelling within 30 min of mTBI, which was significantly reduced in the presence of AZA. Cell death and expression of S100B was significantly reduced when AZA was added shortly before mTBI stretch. Overall, our data point to occurrence of astrocyte swelling immediately following mTBI, and AZA as a promising treatment to mitigate downstream cellular mortality.

  7. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren, E-mail: warren.reed@sydney.edu.au [Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  8. Fatal Hyperammonemic Brain Injury from Valproic Acid Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Bega

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperammonemia is known to cause neuronal injury, and can result from valproic acid exposure. Prompt reduction of elevated ammonia levels may prevent permanent neurological injury. We report a case of fatal hyperammonemic brain injury in a woman exposed to valproic acid. Case: A 38-year-old woman with schizoaffective disorder and recent increase in valproic acid dosage presented with somnolence and confusion and rapidly progressed to obtundation. Brain MRI showed diffuse bilateral restricted diffusion in nearly the entire cerebral cortex. She had normal liver function tests but serum ammonia level was severely elevated at 288 µmol/l. Genetic testing showed no mutation in urea cycle enzymes. Despite successful elimination of ammonia with hemodialysis she developed fatal cerebral edema. Conclusion: Cerebral edema secondary to hyperammonemia is potentially reversible if recognized early. Ammonia excretion can be facilitated by initiation of hemodialysis and administration of scavenging agents (sodium phenylacetate and sodium benzoate. Severe hyperammonemia can result from valproic acid exposure even in the absence of hepatotoxicity or inborn errors of metabolism. It is important to check serum ammonia in any patient with encephalopathy who has had recent valproic acid exposure.

  9. Epidemiology, Severity Classification, and Outcome of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M.J.C. Andriessen; J. Horn; G. Franschman; J. van der Naalt; I. Haitsma; B. Jacobs; E.W. Steyerberg; P.E. Vos

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the demographics, approach, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients require regular evaluation of epidemiological profiles, injury severity classification, and outcomes. This prospective multicenter study provides detailed information on TBI-related variables of 508 moderat

  10. Epidemiology, severity classification, and outcome of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Horn, J.; Franschman, G.; Naalt, J. van der; Haitsma, I.; Jacobs, B.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Vos, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the demographics, approach, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients require regular evaluation of epidemiological profiles, injury severity classification, and outcomes. This prospective multicenter study provides detailed information on TBI-related variables of 508 moderat

  11. Epidemiology, Severity Classification, and Outcome of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury : A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; van der Naalt, Joukje; Haitsma, Iain; Jacobs, Bram; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Vos, Pieter E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the demographics, approach, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients require regular evaluation of epidemiological profiles, injury severity classification, and outcomes. This prospective multicenter study provides detailed information on TBI-related variables of 508 moderat

  12. In vivo characterization of chronic traumatic encephalopathy using [F-18]FDDNP PET brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Jorge R; Small, Gary W; Wong, Koon-Pong; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Liu, Jie; Merrill, David A; Giza, Christopher C; Fitzsimmons, Robert P; Omalu, Bennet; Bailes, Julian; Kepe, Vladimir

    2015-04-21

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is an acquired primary tauopathy with a variety of cognitive, behavioral, and motor symptoms linked to cumulative brain damage sustained from single, episodic, or repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). No definitive clinical diagnosis for this condition exists. In this work, we used [F-18]FDDNP PET to detect brain patterns of neuropathology distribution in retired professional American football players with suspected CTE (n = 14) and compared results with those of cognitively intact controls (n = 28) and patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) (n = 24), a disease that has been cognitively associated with CTE. [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging results in the retired players suggested the presence of neuropathological patterns consistent with models of concussion wherein brainstem white matter tracts undergo early axonal damage and cumulative axonal injuries along subcortical, limbic, and cortical brain circuitries supporting mood, emotions, and behavior. This deposition pattern is distinctively different from the progressive pattern of neuropathology [paired helical filament (PHF)-tau and amyloid-β] in AD, which typically begins in the medial temporal lobe progressing along the cortical default mode network, with no or minimal involvement of subcortical structures. This particular [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging pattern in cases of suspected CTE also is primarily consistent with PHF-tau distribution observed at autopsy in subjects with a history of mild TBI and autopsy-confirmed diagnosis of CTE.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of increased cerebral vulnerability after repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Kamnaksh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of a mild traumatic brain injury can be especially severe if it is repeated within the period of increased cerebral vulnerability (ICV that follows the initial insult. To better understand the molecular mechanisms that contribute to ICV, we exposed rats to different levels of mild blast overpressure (5 exposures; total pressure range: 15.54–19.41 psi or 107.14–133.83 kPa at a rate of 1 per 30 min, monitored select physiological parameters, and assessed behavior. Two days post-injury or sham, we determined changes in protein biomarkers related to various pathologies in behaviorally relevant brain regions and in plasma. We found that oxygen saturation and heart rate were transiently depressed following mild blast exposure and that injured rats exhibited significantly increased anxiety- and depression-related behaviors. Proteomic analyses of the selected brain regions showed evidence of substantial oxidative stress and vascular changes, altered cell adhesion, and inflammation predominantly in the prefrontal cortex. Importantly, these pathological changes as well as indications of neuronal and glial cell loss/damage were also detected in the plasma of injured rats. Our findings illustrate some of the complex molecular changes that contribute to the period of ICV in repeated mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury. Further studies are needed to determine the functional and temporal relationship between the various pathomechanisms. The validation of these and other markers can help to diagnose individuals with ICV using a minimally invasive procedure and to develop evidence-based treatments for chronic neuropsychiatric conditions.

  14. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  15. Diffusion MRI: Pitfalls, literature review and future directions of research in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delouche, Aurélie; Attyé, Arnaud; Heck, Olivier; Grand, Sylvie; Kastler, Adrian; Lamalle, Laurent; Renard, Felix; Krainik, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of disability in adults, many of whom report a distressing combination of physical, emotional and cognitive symptoms, collectively known as post-concussion syndrome, that persist after the injury. Significant developments in magnetic resonance diffusion imaging, involving voxel-based quantitative analysis through the measurement of fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity, have enhanced our knowledge on the different stages of mTBI pathophysiology. Other diffusion imaging-derived techniques, including diffusion kurtosis imaging with multi-shell diffusion and high-order tractography models, have recently demonstrated their usefulness in mTBI. Our review starts by briefly outlining the physical basis of diffusion tensor imaging including the pitfalls for use in brain trauma, before discussing findings from diagnostic trials testing its usefulness in assessing brain structural changes in patients with mTBI. Use of different post-processing techniques for the diffusion imaging data, identified the corpus callosum as the most frequently injured structure in mTBI, particularly at sub-acute and chronic stages, and a crucial location for evaluating functional outcome. However, structural changes appear too subtle for identification using traditional diffusion biomarkers, thus disallowing expansion of these techniques into clinical practice. In this regard, more advanced diffusion techniques are promising in the assessment of this complex disease.

  16. Distribution of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 in human traumatic brain injury and brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua HU; Er-qing WEI; Gao CHEN; Jian-min ZHANG; Wei-ping ZHANG; Lei ZHANG; Qiu-fu GE; Hong-tian YAO; Wei DING; Zhong CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine the distribution of cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CysLT2),one of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptors, in human brains with traumatic injury and tumors. Methods: Brain specimens were obtained from patients who underwent brain surgery. CysLT2 in brain tissues was examined using immunohistochemical analysis. Results: CysLT2 was expressed in the smooth muscle cells (not in the endothelial cells) of arteries and veins. CysLT2 was also expressed in the granulocytes in both vessels and in the brain parenchyma. In addition, CysLT2 was detected in neuron- and glial-appearing cells in either the late stages of traumatic injury or in the area surrounding the tumors. Microvessels regenerated 8 d after trauma and CysLT2 expression was recorded in their endothelial cells.Conclusion: CysLT2 is distributed in vascular smooth muscle cells and granulocytes, and brain trauma and tumor can induce its expression in vascular endothelial cells and in a number of other cells.

  17. Regional brain morphometry predicts memory rehabilitation outcome after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Strangman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI commonly include difficulties with memory, attention, and executive dysfunction. These deficits are amenable to cognitive rehabilitation, but optimally selecting rehabilitation programs for individual patients remains a challenge. Recent methods for quantifying regional brain morphometry allow for automated quantification of tissue volumes in numerous distinct brain structures. We hypothesized that such quantitative structural information could help identify individuals more or less likely to benefit from memory rehabilitation. Fifty individuals with TBI of all severities who reported having memory difficulties first underwent structural MRI scanning. They then participated in a 12 session memory rehabilitation program emphasizing internal memory strategies (I-MEMS. Primary outcome measures (HVLT, RBMT were collected at the time of the MRI scan, immediately following therapy, and again at one month post-therapy. Regional brain volumes were used to predict outcome, adjusting for standard predictors (e.g., injury severity, age, education, pretest scores. We identified several brain regions that provided significant predictions of rehabilitation outcome, including the volume of the hippocampus, the lateral prefrontal cortex, the thalamus, and several subregions of the cingulate cortex. The prediction range of regional brain volumes were in some cases nearly equal in magnitude to prediction ranges provided by pretest scores on the outcome variable. We conclude that specific cerebral networks including these regions may contribute to learning during I-MEMS rehabilitation, and suggest that morphometric measures may provide substantial predictive value for rehabilitation outcome in other cognitive interventions as well.

  18. Contribution of psychological trauma to outcomes after traumatic brain injury: assaults versus sporting injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Jane L; Harman-Smith, Yasmin; Bowden, Stephen C; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Bigler, Erin D

    2014-04-01

    Clinical research into outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently combines injuries that have been sustained through different causes (e.g., car accidents, assaults, and falls), the effect of which is not well understood. This study examined the contribution of injury-related psychological trauma—which is more commonly associated with specific types of injuries—to outcomes after nonpenetrating TBI in order to determine whether it may be having a differential effect in samples containing mixed injuries. Data from three groups that were prospectively recruited for two larger studies were compared: one that sustained a TBI as a result of physical assaults (i.e., psychologically traumatizing) and another as a result of sporting injuries (i.e., nonpsychologically traumatizing), as well as an orthopedic control group (OC). Psychosocial and emotional (postconcussion symptoms, injury-related stress, and depression), cognitive (memory, abstract reasoning, problem solving, and verbal fluency), and functional (general outcome; resumption of home, social, and work roles) outcomes were all assessed. The TBI(assault) group reported significantly poorer psychosocial and emotional outcomes and higher rates of litigation (criminal rather than civil) than both the TBI(sport) and OC groups approximately 6 months postinjury, but there were no differences in the cognitive or functional outcomes of the three groups. The findings suggest that the cause of a TBI may assist in explaining some of the differences in outcomes of people who have seemingly comparable injuries. Involvement in litigation and the cause of an injury may also be confounded, which may lead to the erroneous conclusion that litigants have poorer outcomes.

  19. Experimental model for civilian ballistic brain injury biomechanics quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Guan, Yabo; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2007-01-01

    Biomechanical quantification of projectile penetration using experimental head models can enhance the understanding of civilian ballistic brain injury and advance treatment. Two of the most commonly used handgun projectiles (25-cal, 275 m/s and 9 mm, 395 m/s) were discharged to spherical head models with gelatin and Sylgard simulants. Four ballistic pressure transducers recorded temporal pressure distributions at 308kHz, and temporal cavity dynamics were captured at 20,000 frames/second (fps) using high-speed digital video images. Pressures ranged from 644.6 to -92.8 kPa. Entry pressures in gelatin models were higher than exit pressures, whereas in Sylgard models entry pressures were lower or equivalent to exit pressures. Gelatin responded with brittle-type failure, while Sylgard demonstrated a ductile pattern through formation of micro-bubbles along projectile path. Temporary cavities in Sylgard models were 1.5-2x larger than gelatin models. Pressures in Sylgard models were more sensitive to projectile velocity and diameter increase, indicating Sylgard was more rate sensitive than gelatin. Based on failure patterns and brain tissue rate-sensitive characteristics, Sylgard was found to be an appropriate simulant. Compared with spherical projectile data, full-metal jacket (FMJ) projectiles produced different temporary cavity and pressures, demonstrating shape effects. Models using Sylgard gel and FMJ projectiles are appropriate to enhance understanding and mechanisms of ballistic brain injury.

  20. Post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motzkin, Julian C; Koenigs, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Disentangling the effects of "organic" neurologic damage and psychological distress after a traumatic brain injury poses a significant challenge to researchers and clinicians. Establishing a link between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been particularly contentious, reflecting difficulties in establishing a unique diagnosis for conditions with overlapping and sometimes contradictory symptom profiles. However, each disorder is linked to a variety of adverse health outcomes, underscoring the need to better understand how neurologic and psychiatric risk factors interact following trauma. Here, we present data showing that individuals with a TBI are more likely to develop PTSD, and that individuals with PTSD are more likely to develop persistent cognitive sequelae related to TBI. Further, we describe neurobiological models of PTSD, highlighting how patterns of neurologic damage typical in TBI may promote or protect against the development of PTSD in brain-injured populations. These data highlight the unique course of PTSD following a TBI and have important diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment implications for individuals with a dual diagnosis.

  1. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...... by TNFR1 deficiency. Overall, these results suggest that TNFR1 is involved in the early establishment of the inflammatory response and that its deficiency causes a decreased inflammatory response and tissue damage following brain injury....

  2. A Danish national strategy for treatment and rehabilitation after acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase W

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the establishment of a Danish national strategy for treatment and rehabilitation of acquired brain injury, particularly traumatic brain injury, in 1997. The vision was to create a system of tax-financed continuous treatment, restoration of function, and outpatient...... rehabilitation. Recommendations and their fulfillment are described. Focus is on the establishment and function of early intensive interdisciplinary rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury, centralized as 2 units since the year 2000, each with half the country as uptake area, corresponding...

  3. Alteration and reorganization of functional networks: a new perspective in brain injury study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazareth P. Castellanos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity is the mechanism underlying brain’s potential capability to compensate injury. Recently several studies have shown that functional connections among brain areas are severely altered by brain injury and plasticity leading to a reorganization of the networks. This new approach studies the impact of brain injury by means of alteration of functional interactions. The concept of functional connectivity refers to the statistical interdependencies between physiological time series simultaneously recorded in various brain areas and it could be an essential tool for brain function studies, being its deviation from healthy reference an indicator for damage. In this article, we review studies investigating functional connectivity changes after brain injury and subsequent recovery, providing an accessible introduction to common mathematical methods to infer functional connectivity, exploring their capabilities, future perspectives and clinical uses in brain injury studies.

  4. Temporal and spatial characterization of neuronal injury following lateral fluid-percussion brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R; Soares, H; Smith, D; McIntosh, T

    1996-01-01

    The pattern of neuronal injury following lateral fluid-percussion (FP) brain injury in the rat was systematically characterized at sequential time points to identify selectively vulnerable regions and to determine the temporal contribution of primary and delayed neuropathological events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 28) were killed 10 min, 2 h, 12 h, 24 h, 4 days, and 7 days following a lateral FP brain injury of moderate severity (2.2 atm), or 24 h after a sham injury. Brain sections were stained and analyzed using Nissl, acid fuchsin, and silver staining methods to identify regions with injured neurons or with visible lesions. Extensive numbers of acid fuchsin or silver-stained neurons were observed as early as 10 min after the FP brain injury in regions extending from the caudate/putamen to the pons. The frequency of injured neurons was greatest in the ipsilateral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus, and a visible loss of Nissl-stained neurons was observed in these regions beginning at 12 h after the FP brain injury. Acid fuchsin-stained neurons were restricted to the same brain regions for all of the survival periods and gradually decreased in numbers between 24 h and 7 days after injury. These findings suggest that lateral FP brain injury in the rat produces a combination of focal cortical contusion and diffuse subcortical neuronal injury, which is present within minutes of the impact, progresses to a loss of neurons by 12 h, and does not markedly expand into other brain regions with survival periods up to 7 days. Furthermore, the acute onset and rapid evolution of the neuronal injury process may have important implications when considering a window of opportunity for pharmacological intervention.

  5. Head motions while riding roller coasters: implications for brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Bryan J; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H

    2009-12-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI between daily activities and roller coaster riding. Three-dimensional head motions were measured during 3 different roller coaster rides, a pillow fight, and car crash simulations. Data was analyzed and compared with published data, using similar analyses of head motions. An 8.05 m/s car crash lead to the largest head injury criterion measure of 28.1 and head impact power of 3.41, over 6 times larger than the roller coaster rides of 4.1 and 0.36. Notably, the linear and rotational components of head acceleration during roller coaster rides were milder than those induced by many common activities. As such, there appears to be an extremely low risk of TBI due to the head motions induced by roller coaster rides.

  6. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kimberly A

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Severe TBIs account for 15,000 admissions annually and a mortality rate of 24% in children in the United States. The purpose of this article is to explore pathophysiologic events, examine monitoring techniques, and explain current treatment modalities and nursing care related to caring for children with severe TBI. The primary injury of a TBI is because of direct trauma from an external force, a penetrating object, blast waves, or a jolt to the head. Secondary injury occurs because of alterations in cerebral blood flow, and the development of cerebral edema leads to necrotic and apoptotic cellular death after TBI. Monitoring focuses on intracranial pressure, cerebral oxygenation, cerebral edema, and cerebrovascular injuries. If abnormalities are identified, treatments are available to manage the negative effects caused to the cerebral tissue. The mainstay treatments are hyperosmolar therapy; temperature control; cerebrospinal fluid drainage; barbiturate therapy; decompressive craniectomy; analgesia, sedation, and neuromuscular blockade; and antiseizure prophylaxis.

  7. Traumatic brain injury impairs synaptic plasticity in hippocampus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bao-liang; CHEN Xin; TAN Tao; YANG Zhuo; CARLOS Dayao; JIANG Rong-cai; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBl) often causes cognitive deficits and remote symptomatic epilepsy.Hippocampal regional excitability is associated with the cognitive function. However, little is known about injury-induced neuronal loss and subsequent alterations of hippocampal regional excitability. The present study was designed to determine whether TBl may impair the cellular circuit in the hippocampus.Methods Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into control (n=20) and TBl groups (n=20). Long-term potentiation,extracellular input/output curves, and hippocampal parvalbumin-immunoreactive and cholecystokinin-immunoreactive interneurons were compared between the two groups.Results TBI resulted in a significantly increased excitability in the dentate gyrus (DG), but a significantly decreased excitability in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area. Using design-based stereological injury procedures, we induced interneuronal loss in the DG and CA3 subregions in the hippocampus, but not in the CA1 area.Conclusions TBl leads to the impairment of hippocampus synaptic plasticity due to the changing of interneuronal interaction. The injury-induced disruption of synaptic efficacy within the hippocampal circuit may underlie the observed cognitive deficits and symptomatic epilepsy.

  8. Role of Lipids in Brain Injury and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, J F

    2007-08-01

    Lipid metabolism is of particular interest due to its high concentration in CNS. The importance of lipids in cell signaling and tissue physiology is demonstrated by many CNS disorders and injuries that involve deregulated metabolism. The long suffering lipid field is gaining reputation and respect as evidenced through the Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Lipidomics and Pathobiology (COBRE), Lipid MAPS (Metabolites And Pathways Strategy) Consortium sponsored by NIH, European initiatives for decoding the lipids through genomic approaches, and Genomics of Lipid-associated Disorder (GOLD) project initiated by Austrian government. This review attempts to provide an overview of the lipid imbalances associated with neurological disorders (Alzheimer's, Parkinson's; Niemann-Pick; Multiple sclerosis, Huntington, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders and epilepsy) and CNS injury (Stroke, traumatic brain injury; and spinal cord injury) and a few provocative thoughts. Lipidomic analyses along with RNA silencing will provide new insights into the role of lipid intermediates in cell signaling and hopefully open new avenues for prevention or treatment options.

  9. Dynamic pituitary hormones change after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in traumatic brain injury (TBI and to correlate the severity and neurological outcome. Patients and Methods: Dynamic changes in the pituitary hormones were evaluated in 164 patients with TBI on day-1, day-7, day-14, day-21, and day-28 post injury. Admission TBI severity and long-term outcome were assessed with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score. The pituitary hormonal changes were correlated with TBI severity and outcome. Results: Of the 164 patients included in the study, pituitary dysfunction was found in 84 patients and in the remaining 80 patients pituitary function was normal. Most of the pituitary hormone deficiencies observed resolved over time; however, a significant proportion of patients had pituitary dysfunction at one month post injury. The hormones associated with poor outcome included growth hormone, thyrotropic hormone, and gonadotropic hormone. Conclusion: Dynamic changes of pituitary hormones in patients with TBI may reflect the severity of injury and also determine the outcome. Deficiency of growth hormone, gonadotropic hormone, and thyrotropic hormone can adversely affect neurological outcome.

  10. Chronic pain: the role of learning and brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A R; Farmer, M A; Baliki, M N; Apkarian, A Vania

    2014-01-01

    Based on theoretical considerations and recent observations, we argue that continued suffering of chronic pain is critically dependent on the state of motivational and emotional mesolimbic-prefrontal circuitry of the brain. The plastic changes that occur within this circuitry in relation to nociceptive inputs dictate the transition to chronic pain, rendering the pain less somatic and more affective in nature. This theoretical construct is a strong departure from the traditional scientific view of pain, which has focused on encoding and representation of nociceptive signals. We argue that the definition of chronic pain can be recast, within the associative learning and valuation concept, as an inability to extinguish the associated memory trace, implying that supraspinal/cortical manipulations may be a more fruitful venue for adequately modulating suffering and related behavior for chronic pain. We briefly review the evidence generated to date for the proposed model and emphasize that the details of underlying mechanisms remain to be expounded.

  11. Sport-related structural brain injury associated with arachnoid cysts: a systematic review and quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Prather, Colin T; Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K; Bonfield, Christopher M

    2016-04-01

    a cystoperitoneal shunt. Four cases reported medical management only without any surgical intervention. No significant predictors were found for neurological deficit or open craniotomy. In the univariate model predicting the need for a cystoperitoneal shunt, the odds of receiving a shunt decreased as age increased (p = 0.004, OR 0.62 [95% CI 0.45-0.86]) and with male sex (p = 0.036, OR 0.15 [95% CI 0.03-0.88]). CONCLUSIONS This systematic review yielded 65 cases of sport-related structural brain injury associated with ACs. The majority of patients presented with chronic symptoms, and recovery was reported generally to be good. Although the review is subject to publication bias, the authors do not find at present that there is contraindication for patients with an AC to participate in sports, although parents and children should be counseled appropriately. Further studies are necessary to better evaluate AC characteristics that could pose a higher risk of adverse events after trauma.

  12. Structural Neuroimaging Findings in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J; Black, Garrett; Christensen, Zachary P; Huff, Trevor; Wood, Dawn-Marie G; Hesselink, John R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Max, Jeffrey E

    2016-09-01

    Common neuroimaging findings in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), including sport-related concussion (SRC), are reviewed based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Common abnormalities radiologically identified on the day of injury, typically a computed tomographic scan, are in the form of contusions, small subarachnoid or intraparenchymal hemorrhages as well as subdural and epidural collections, edema, and skull fractures. Common follow-up neuroimaging findings with MRI include white matter hyperintensities, hypointense signal abnormalities that reflect prior hemorrhage, focal encephalomalacia, presence of atrophy and/or dilated Virchow-Robins perivascular space. The MRI findings from a large pediatric mTBI study show low frequency of positive MRI findings at 6 months postinjury. The review concludes with an examination of some of the advanced MRI-based image analysis methods that can be performed in the patient who has sustained an mTBI.

  13. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: Characteristic Features, Diagnosis, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARAKI, Takashi; YOKOTA, Hiroyuki; MORITA, Akio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. Pediatric TBI is associated with several distinctive characteristics that differ from adults and are attributable to age-related anatomical and physiological differences, pattern of injuries based on the physical ability of the child, and difficulty in neurological evaluation in children. Evidence suggests that children exhibit a specific pathological response to TBI with distinct accompanying neurological symptoms, and considerable efforts have been made to elucidate their pathophysiology. In addition, recent technical advances in diagnostic imaging of pediatric TBI has facilitated accurate diagnosis, appropriate treatment, prevention of complications, and helped predict long-term outcomes. Here a review of recent studies relevant to important issues in pediatric TBI is presented, and recent specific topics are also discussed. This review provides important updates on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and age-appropriate acute management of pediatric TBI. PMID:28111406

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance imaging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging and cell-based neurorestorative therapy after brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Restorative cell-based therapies for experimental brain injury, such as stroke and traumatic brain injury, substantially improve functional outcome. We discuss and review state of the art magnetic resonance im-aging methodologies and their applications related to cell-based treatment after brain injury. We focus on the potential of magnetic resonance imaging technique and its associated challenges to obtain useful new information related to cell migration, distribution, and quantitation, as well as vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to cell-based therapy after brain injury. The noninvasive nature of imaging might more readily help with translation of cell-based therapy from the laboratory to the clinic.

  16. Coagulopathy as prognostic marker in acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Coagulopathy frequently occurs following traumatic brain injury (TBI and usually occurs 6-72 hour post-trauma. The incidence and the probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and poor outcome following TBI are largely unknown and vary considerably. Aims: To assess the incidence and probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and to identify the risk factors for poor outcome in terms of median survival time following TBI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study over two years, patients of isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (GCS≤12 admitted to trauma center had coagulation profile (PT, APTT, thrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer, arterial lactate and ABG analysis done on day of admission and on day three. Coagulopathy was defined as prothrombin time (PT or/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT more than 1.5 times the normal control. Incidence of in-hospital mortality was assessed in all cases. Statistical Analysis: A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for coagulopathy and mortality in these patients. Results: A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 32 ± 12 years and mean GCS was 7.1 ± 2.8. Coagulopathy was present in 46% ( n = 96 of patients. Risk factors for development of coagulopathy were found out to be severity of head injury (OR: 2.81, elevated D-dimer (OR: 3.43, low hemoglobin (OR: 3.13, and effaced cisterns in the CT scan (OR: 2.72. Presence of coagulopathy (OR: 2.97 and severity of head injury (OR: 5.70 strongly predicted poor outcome, and were associated with a decreased median survival time. Conclusions: There is a high incidence of coagulopathy following TBI. The presence of coagulopathy as well as of severity of TBI are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in these patients.

  17. Correlation of cell apoptosis with brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure in traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-feng; LIU Wei-guo; SHEN Hong; GONG Jiang-biao; YU Jun; HU Wei-wei; L(U) Shi-ting; ZHENG Xiu-jue; FU Wei-ming

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between brain edema, elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) and cell apoptosis in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: In this study, totally 42 rabbits in 7 groups were studied. Six of the animals were identified as a control group, and the remaining 36 animals were equally divided into 6 TBI groups. TBI models were produced by the modified method of Feeney. After the impact, ICP of each subject was recorded continuously by an ICP monitor until the animal was sacrificed at scheduled time. The apoptotic brain cells were detected by an terminal deoxynucleotide-transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cerebral water content (CWC) was measured with a drying method and calculated according to the Elliott formula. Then, an analysis was conducted to determine the correlation between the count of apoptotic cells and the clinical pathological changes of the brain. Results: Apoptotic cell count began to increase 2 h after the impact, and reached its maximum about 3 days after the impact. The peak value of CWC and ICP appeared 1 day and 3 days after the impact, respectively. Apoptotic cell count had a positive correlation with CWC and ICP. Conclusions: In TBI, occurrence of brain edema and ICP increase might lead to apoptosis of brain cells. Any therapy which can relieve brain edema and/or decrease ICP would be able to reduce neuron apoptosis, thereby to attenuate the secondary brain damage.

  18. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (Pbrain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE.

  19. Alteration in synaptic junction proteins following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lucia; Cimino, Francesco; Angileri, Filippo Flavio; La Torre, Domenico; Conti, Alfredo; Cardali, Salvatore Massimiliano; Saija, Antonella; Germanò, Antonino

    2014-08-15

    Extensive research and scientific efforts have been focused on the elucidation of the pathobiology of cellular and axonal damage following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Conversely, few studies have specifically addressed the issue of synaptic dysfunction. Synaptic junction proteins may be involved in post-TBI alterations, leading to synaptic loss or disrupted plasticity. A Synapse Protein Database on synapse ontology identified 109 domains implicated in synaptic activities and over 5000 proteins, but few of these demonstrated to play a role in the synaptic dysfunction after TBI. These proteins are involved in neuroplasticity and neuromodulation and, most importantly, may be used as novel neuronal markers of TBI for specific intervention.

  20. Development of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    properties of human blood at 1.5 Tesla : magnetic susceptibility, T(1), T(2), T*(2), and non-Lorentzian signal behavior. Magn Reson Med 2001;45:533–542. 32...Reichenbach, J.R., Rombouts, S.A., Haacke, E.M., 1999. Sub-millimeter fMRI at 1.5 Tesla : correlation of high resolution with low resolution measurements...noninvasively following severe traumatic brain injury. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 152(6):965–972 Catherine R, Sophie L, Nicolas B, Bernard V (2007) Transcranial