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Sample records for brain ii co-localisation

  1. Neuroglobin in the rat brain (II): co-localisation with neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Kelsen, Jesper; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2008-01-01

    In an accompanying article, we found that neuroglobin (Ngb) was expressed in a few well-defined nuclei in the rat brain. Here, we show by use of immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation (ISH) that Ngb co-localise with several specific neurotransmitters. Ngb co-localise consistently with tyr...

  2. Co-Localisation of Abnormal Brain Structure and Function in Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Barry, Johanna G.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between brain structure and function in 10 individuals with specific language impairment (SLI), compared to six unaffected siblings, and 16 unrelated control participants with typical language. Voxel-based morphometry indicated that grey matter in the SLI group, relative to controls, was increased in the left inferior…

  3. Breast lesion co-localisation between X-ray and MR images using finite element modelling.

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    Lee, Angela W C; Rajagopal, Vijayaraghavan; Babarenda Gamage, Thiranja P; Doyle, Anthony J; Nielsen, Poul M F; Nash, Martyn P

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel X-ray and MR image registration technique based on individual-specific biomechanical finite element (FE) models of the breasts. Information from 3D magnetic resonance (MR) images was registered to X-ray mammographic images using non-linear FE models subject to contact mechanics constraints to simulate the large compressive deformations between the two imaging modalities. A physics-based perspective ray-casting algorithm was used to generate 2D pseudo-X-ray projections of the FE-warped 3D MR images. Unknown input parameters to the FE models, such as the location and orientation of the compression plates, were optimised to provide the best match between the pseudo and clinical X-ray images. The methods were validated using images taken before and during compression of a breast-shaped phantom, for which 12 inclusions were tracked between imaging modalities. These methods were then applied to X-ray and MR images from six breast cancer patients. Error measures (such as centroid and surface distances) of segmented tumours in simulated and actual X-ray mammograms were used to assess the accuracy of the methods. Sensitivity analysis of the lesion co-localisation accuracy to rotation about the anterior-posterior axis was then performed. For 10 of the 12 X-ray mammograms, lesion localisation accuracies of 14 mm and less were achieved. This analysis on the rotation about the anterior-posterior axis indicated that, in cases where the lesion lies in the plane parallel to the mammographic compression plates, that cuts through the nipple, such rotations have relatively minor effects.This has important implications for clinical applicability of this multi-modality lesion registration technique, which will aid in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Angiotensin II: multitasking in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Juan M; Benicky, Julius; Zhou, Jin

    2006-03-01

    In addition to controlling systemic blood pressure, angiotensin II (Ang II) has several roles in the brain, including the regulation of cerebrovascular flow and the reaction to stress. In order to clarify the central effects of Ang II and its type 1 (AT1) receptors, we reviewed the literature reporting recent research on the effects of pretreatment with the AT1-receptor blocker, candesartan, on experimental ischemia, cerebrovascular remodeling, and inflammation in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), and the responses to stress induced by isolation and by cold-restraint. Angiotensin II regulates the brain circulation through stimulation of AT1-receptors located in the cerebrovascular endothelium and central pathways. SHRs express greater numbers of endothelial AT1-receptors and a central sympathetic overdrive, resulting in pathological cerebrovascular growth, inflammation, decreased cerebrovascular compliance, and enhanced vulnerability to brain ischemia. Sustained central AT1-receptor antagonism reverses these effects. Sustained reduction of AT1-receptor stimulation before stress prevents the hormonal and sympathoadrenal stress responses during isolation and prevents the gastric ulceration stress response to cold-restraint, indicating that increased AT1-receptor stimulation is essential to enhance the central sympathetic response and the formation and release of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin that occur during stress. AT1-receptor blocking agents reverse the cortical alterations in CRF1 and benzodiazepine receptors characteristic of isolation stress, effects probably related to their anti-anxiety effect in rodents. Sustained reduction of Ang II tone by AT1-receptor antagonism could be considered as a preventive and therapeutic approach for brain ischemia and stress-related and mood disorders. Additional preclinical studies and controlled clinical trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of this novel therapeutic approach.

  5. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in the SHR brain

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    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1986-11-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate brain angiotensin II is associated with the elevation of blood pressure seen in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). These include an increased pressor response to intracerebroventricularly administered angiotensin II and a reduction of blood pressure in response to centrally administered angiotensin II receptor antagonists. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography, we have detected greater angiotensin II receptor binding in a number of discrete brain nuclei of the 6-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched Wistar-Kyoto controls. Tissue sections from various brain regions were labeled with (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II according to a previously described method. Autoradiograms were generated by apposing the labeled tissue sections to LKB Ultrofilm along with brain paste standards which contained known amounts of (/sup 125/I). Quantitation of the binding, utilizing computer-assisted microdensitometry, indicated greater (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding in several brain areas implicated in cardiovascular control including the subfornical organ, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, locus coeruleus, supraoptic nucleus and the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis. Scatchard analysis of the binding in the nucleus of the solitary tract indicated an increased receptor number (Bmax) was responsible for the change while binding in two forebrain structures, the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus, showed alterations in receptor number and affinity (Kd). Several other brain regions, unrelated to cardiovascular control, exhibited no change in (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding.

  6. Angiotensin II-like material extracted from the rat brain is distinct from authentic angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, M; Carayon, A; Cesselin, F; Hamon, M

    1988-11-01

    Specific radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay for angiotensin II (A II) were used for the possible identification of this peptide in the rat brain. An A II-like material (A II-LM) was detected with both assays applied to acidic extracts of various brain structures. The regional distribution of A II-LM was uneven, but absolute levels (in A II equivalents) could not be accurately determined, as they were highly dependent on the assay used. Partial purification of A II-LM by Sep-Pak C 18 chromatography and affinity chromatography using anti-A II antibodies bound to Ultrogel gave a compound coeluting with authentic A II in reverse-phase HPLC. However, gel filtration through Sephadex G-25 and TSK Spherogel 3000 SW as well as anion exchange HPLC demonstrated that A II-LM did not correspond to authentic A II. Partial characterization of A II-LM indicated that this compound was probably a peptide with an apparent molecular weight of 5,000-7,000 (instead of 1,046 for A II) and more polar but less positively charged than A II. Whether A II-LM is, in fact, the endogenous ligand of A II binding sites in brain remains an interesting hypothesis for further investigations.

  7. ANKS3 Co-Localises with ANKS6 in Mouse Renal Cilia and Is Associated with Vasopressin Signaling and Apoptosis In Vivo in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delestré, Laure; Bakey, Zeineb; Prado, Cécilia; Hoffmann, Sigrid; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Lelongt, Brigitte; Gauguier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 6 (ANKS6) play a causative role in renal cyst formation in the PKD/Mhm(cy/+) rat model of polycystic kidney disease and in nephronophthisis in humans. A network of protein partners of ANKS6 is emerging and their functional characterization provides important clues to understand the role of ANKS6 in renal biology and in mechanisms involved in the formation of renal cysts. Following experimental confirmation of interaction between ANKS6and ANKS3 using a Yeast two hybrid system, we demonstrated that binding between the two proteins occurs through their sterile alpha motif (SAM) and that the amino acid 823 in rat ANSK6 is key for this interaction. We further showed their interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and showed in vivo in mice that ANKS3 is present in renal cilia. Downregulated expression of Anks3 in vivo in mice by Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) modified antisense oligonucleotides was associated with increased transcription of vasopressin-induced genes, suggesting changes in renal water permeability, and altered transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in cilium structure, apoptosis and cell proliferation. These data provide experimental evidence of ANKS3-ANKS6 direct interaction through their SAM domain and co-localisation in mouse renal cilia, and shed light on molecular mechanisms indirectly mediated by ANKS6 in the mouse kidney, that may be affected by altered ANKS3-ANKS6 interaction. Our results contribute to improved knowledge of the structure and function of the network of proteins interacting with ANKS6, which may represent therapeutic targets in cystic diseases.

  8. ANKS3 Co-Localises with ANKS6 in Mouse Renal Cilia and Is Associated with Vasopressin Signaling and Apoptosis In Vivo in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Delestré

    Full Text Available Mutations in Ankyrin repeat and sterile alpha motif domain containing 6 (ANKS6 play a causative role in renal cyst formation in the PKD/Mhm(cy/+ rat model of polycystic kidney disease and in nephronophthisis in humans. A network of protein partners of ANKS6 is emerging and their functional characterization provides important clues to understand the role of ANKS6 in renal biology and in mechanisms involved in the formation of renal cysts. Following experimental confirmation of interaction between ANKS6and ANKS3 using a Yeast two hybrid system, we demonstrated that binding between the two proteins occurs through their sterile alpha motif (SAM and that the amino acid 823 in rat ANSK6 is key for this interaction. We further showed their interaction by co-immunoprecipitation and showed in vivo in mice that ANKS3 is present in renal cilia. Downregulated expression of Anks3 in vivo in mice by Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA modified antisense oligonucleotides was associated with increased transcription of vasopressin-induced genes, suggesting changes in renal water permeability, and altered transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in cilium structure, apoptosis and cell proliferation. These data provide experimental evidence of ANKS3-ANKS6 direct interaction through their SAM domain and co-localisation in mouse renal cilia, and shed light on molecular mechanisms indirectly mediated by ANKS6 in the mouse kidney, that may be affected by altered ANKS3-ANKS6 interaction. Our results contribute to improved knowledge of the structure and function of the network of proteins interacting with ANKS6, which may represent therapeutic targets in cystic diseases.

  9. Casein kinase II activity in the brain of an insect, Acheta domesticus: characterization and hormonal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrelle, F; Renucci, M; Charpin, P; Tirard, A

    1997-01-01

    This study documented casein kinase II (CK II) activity in Acheta domesticus brain using specific antibodies and its regulation by polyamines. In control animals a transient decrease in CK II activity at day 3 after imaginal moult was observed in the brain but not in the fat body. If deprived of ecdysone by ovariectomy a different pattern was observed, with CK II activity being significantly higher on days 3 and 4 after emergence. After ecdysone injection in ovariectomized females, CK II activity decreased to levels similar to those in controls. The implications of ecdysone regulation of brain CK II activity are discussed.

  10. TENIPOSIDE FOR BRAIN METASTASES OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER - A PHASE-II STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF; HAAXMAREICHE, H; VANZANDWIJK, N; ARDIZZONI, A; QUOIX, E; KIRKPATRICK, A; SAHMOUD, T; GIACCONE, G

    Purpose: Here we report the results of a phase II study of teniposide, one of the most active drugs against small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), in patients with brain metastases. Patients and Methods: Patients with SCLC who presented with brain metastases at diagnosis (n = 11) or during follow-up

  11. [Expression of CaMK II delta in cerebral cortex following traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hong; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Dong-Dong; Gu, Zhen-Yong; Tao, Lu-Yang; Zhang, Ming-Yang

    2014-06-01

    To observe the time-course expression of calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II delta (CaMK II delta) in cerebral cortex after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The TBI rat model was established. The expression of CaMK II delta in cerebral cortex around injured area was tested by Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. Western blotting revealed expression of CaMK II delta in normal rat brain cortex. It gradually increased after TBI, peaked after 3 days, and then returned to normal level. The result of immunohistochemical staining was consistent with that of Western blotting. The expression of CaMK II delta around injured area after TBI increased initially and then decreased. It could be used as a new indicator for wound age determination following TBI.

  12. Quantitative autoradiography of angiotensin II receptors in brain and kidney: focus on cardiovascular implications

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    Gehlert, D.R.; Speth, R.C.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative techniques of receptor autoradiography have been applied to localize (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in brain and kidney. High densities of autoradiographic grains, indicating the presence of angiotensin II receptors, have been localized to several rat brain nuclei including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, nucleus of the solitary tract, anterior pituitary, locus coeruleus and several hypothalamic nuclei. Cat thoracic spinal cord exhibited a high density of sites over the intermedio-lateral cell column. In sections of rat kidney, angiotensin II receptors were detected in the glomerulus, vasa recta and ureter. The cardiovascular implications of these results are apparent and relate angiotensin II to hypertensive mechanisms. Thus, angiotensin II represents an endocoid which is involved in control of blood pressure through its effects on peripheral organs as well as the central nervous system.

  13. Quantitative distribution of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain by autoradiography

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    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Plunkett, L.M.; Kurihara, M.; Shigematsu, K.; Correa, F.M.

    1986-07-01

    Angiotensin II binding sites were localized and quantified in individual brain nuclei from single rats by incubation of tissue sections with 1 nM /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II, (/sup 3/H)-Ultrofilm autoradiography, computerized microdensitometry and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. High angiotensin II binding was present in the circumventricular organs (organon vasculosum laminae terminalis, organon subfornicalis and area postrema), in selected hypothalamic nuclei (nuclei suprachiasmatis, periventricularis and paraventricularis) and in the nucleus tractus olfactorii lateralis, the nucleus preopticus medianus, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus tractus solitarii. High affinity (KA from 0.3 to 1.5 X 10(9) M-1) angiotensin II binding sites were demonstrated in the organon subfornicalis, the nucleus tractus solitarii and the area postrema after incubation of consecutive sections from single rat brains with /sup 125/I-(Sar1)-angiotensin II in concentrations from 100 pM to 5 nM. These results demonstrate and characterize brain binding sites for angiotensin II of variable high affinity binding both inside and outside the blood-brain barrier.

  14. Mapping the brain in type II diabetes: Voxel-based morphometry using DARTEL

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    Chen, Zhiye [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Lin [Department of Geriatric Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Sun, Jie [Department of Endocrinology, PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Ma, Lin, E-mail: cjr.malin@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the pattern of brain volume changes of the brain in patients with type II diabetes mellitus using voxel-based morphometry. Material and methods: Institutional ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. VBM based on the high resolution three-dimensional T1-weighted fast spoiled gradient recalled echo MRI images was obtained from 16 type II diabetes patients (mean age 61.2 years) and 16 normal controls (mean age 59.6 years). All images were spatially preprocessed using Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration using Exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) algorithm, and the DARTEL templates were made from 100 normal subjects. Statistical parametric mapping was generated using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: An atrophy pattern of gray matter was seen in type II diabetes patients compared with controls that involved the right superior, middle, and inferior temporal gyri, right precentral gyrus, and left rolandic operculum region. The loss of white matter volume in type II diabetes mellitus was observed in right temporal lobe and left inferior frontal triangle region. ROI analysis revealed that the gray and white matter volume of right temporal lobe were significant lower in type II diabetes mellitus than that in controls (P < 0.05). Conclusion: This work demonstrated that type II diabetes mellitus patients mainly exhibited gray and white matter atrophy in right temporal lobe, and this finding supported that type II diabetes mellitus could lead to subtle diabetic brain structural changes in patients without dementia or macrovascular complications.

  15. Griffonia simplicifolia II lectin labels a population of radial glial cells in the embryonic rat brain.

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    Hurley, S D; Streit, W J

    1995-01-01

    Staining with the Griffonia simplicifolia II lectin (GSL II), a marker for adult rat oligodendrocytes, was studied in rat brain at embryonic (E) days E14, E16, E18, and E20. At E14, only two regions of the CNS showed labeling--the hippocampal primordium and the ventromedial floor of the mesencephalic aqueduct and fourth ventricle. Labeling in these areas was confined to cells with bipolar processes which spanned from the ventricular lumen to the pial surface. At E16, GSL II+ radial glia were present in the hippocampus, septal area, cerebral peduncle, thalamus, tegmentum, and throughout much of the midbrain. At E16, E18, and E20, GSL II strongly labeled two midline radial glial raphes--dorsal to the mesencephalic aqueduct and ventral to the mesencephalic aqueduct and fourth ventricle. Comparison of GSL II lectin labeling with nestin immunostaining, using Rat-401, showed that GSL II labeled a distinct population of radial cells different from nestin-positive radial glia. GSL II also labeled a group of neurons at E16 and E18 in the hypothalamus and basal striatum. We suggest that GSL II+ radial glia represent a population of oligodendroglial precursors present in the embryonic brain, and that GSL II reactivity could serve as a differentiation marker for cells committed to the oligodendroglial lineage. This work supports the possibility that some oligodendroglia, like astrocytes, are derived from radial glial precursors.

  16. [Music and brain (II): evidence of musical training in the brain].

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    Soria-Urios, Gema; Duque, Pablo; García-Moreno, José M

    2011-12-16

    Music is a very powerful multimodal stimulus that transmits visual, auditory and motor information to our brain, which in turn has a specific network for processing it, consisting in the frontotemporoparietal regions. This activation can be very beneficial in the treatment of several syndromes and diseases, either by rehabilitating or by stimulating altered neuronal connections. We also review the peculiarities of the musician's brain and we look at how the brain adapts according to the needs that must be met in order to improve musical performance.

  17. Metallothionein (MT -I and MT-II expression are induced and cause zinc sequestration in the liver after brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Pankhurst

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Experiments with transgenic over-expressing, and null mutant mice have determined that metallothionein-I and -II (MT-I/II are protective after brain injury. MT-I/II is primarily a zinc-binding protein and it is not known how it provides neuroprotection to the injured brain or where MT-I/II acts to have its effects. MT-I/II is often expressed in the liver under stressful conditions but to date, measurement of MT-I/II expression after brain injury has focused primarily on the injured brain itself. In the present study we measured MT-I/II expression in the liver of mice after cryolesion brain injury by quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with the UC1MT antibody. Displacement curves constructed using MT-I/II knockout (MT-I/II(-/- mouse tissues were used to validate the ELISA. Hepatic MT-I and MT-II mRNA levels were significantly increased within 24 hours of brain injury but hepatic MT-I/II protein levels were not significantly increased until 3 days post injury (DPI and were maximal at the end of the experimental period, 7 DPI. Hepatic zinc content was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and was found to decrease at 1 and 3 DPI but returned to normal by 7DPI. Zinc in the livers of MT-I/II(-/- mice did not show a return to normal at 7 DPI which suggests that after brain injury, MT-I/II is responsible for sequestering elevated levels of zinc to the liver. CONCLUSION: MT-I/II is up-regulated in the liver after brain injury and modulates the amount of zinc that is sequestered to the liver.

  18. Brain-Targeted (Pro)Renin Receptor Knockdown attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wencheng; Peng, Hua; Cao, Theresa; Sato, Ryosuke; McDaniels, Sarah. J.; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Navar, L. Gabriel; Feng, Yumei

    2012-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor is a newly discovered member of the brain renin-angiotensin system. To investigate the role of brain (pro)renin receptor in hypertension, adeno-associated virus-mediated (pro)renin receptor shRNA was used to knockdown (pro)renin receptor expression in the brain of non-transgenic normotensive and human renin-angiotensinogen double transgenic hypertensive mice. Blood pressure was monitored using implanted telemetric probes in conscious animals. Real-time PCR and immunostaining were performed to determine (pro)renin receptor, angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin mRNA levels. Plasma vasopressin levels were determined by Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay. Double transgenic mice exhibited higher blood pressure, elevated cardiac and vascular sympathetic tone, and impaired spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. Intracerebroventricular delivery of (pro)renin receptor shRNA significantly reduced blood pressure, cardiac and vasomotor sympathetic tone, and improved baroreflex sensitivity compared to the control virus treatment in double transgenic mice. (Pro)renin receptor knockdown significantly reduced angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels in double transgenic mice. These data indicate that (pro)renin receptor knockdown in the brain attenuates angiotensin II-dependent hypertension and is associated with a decrease insympathetic tone and an improvement of the baroreflex sensitivity. In addition, brain-targeted (pro)renin receptor knockdown is associated with down-regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor and vasopressin levels. We conclude that central (pro)renin receptor contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension in human renin-angiotensinogen transgenic mice. PMID:22526255

  19. A phase II study of thalidomide in patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestermark, Lene; Larsen, Susanne; Lindeløv, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Brain metastases develop in nearly half of the patients with advanced melanoma and in 15 to 20% of these patients CNS is the first site of relapse. Overall median survival is short, ranging from 2 to 4 months. Thalidomide has antiangiogenic and immunomodulatory effects. Results...... obtained in prior trials indicate that Thalidomide acts as a cytostatic agent in metastatic melanoma. We evaluated single agent antitumour activity and toxicity of Thalidomide in a phase II setting in patients with brain metastases associated with metastatic melanoma. Material and methods. Patients...

  20. Circulating angiotensin II gains access to the hypothalamus and brain stem during hypertension via breakdown of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Son, Sook Jin; Ahmadi, Sahra; Filosa, Jessica A; Stern, Javier E

    2014-03-01

    Angiotensin II-mediated vascular brain inflammation emerged as a novel pathophysiological mechanism in neurogenic hypertension. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and functional consequences in relation to blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and central angiotensin II actions mediating neurohumoral activation in hypertension are poorly understood. Here, we aimed to determine whether BBB permeability within critical hypothalamic and brain stem regions involved in neurohumoral regulation was altered during hypertension. Using digital imaging quantification after intravascularly injected fluorescent dyes and immunohistochemistry, we found increased BBB permeability, along with altered key BBB protein constituents, in spontaneously hypertensive rats within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla, all critical brain regions known to contribute to neurohumoral activation during hypertension. BBB disruption, including increased permeability and downregulation of constituent proteins, was prevented in spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, but not with hydralazine, a direct vasodilator. Importantly, we found circulating angiotensin II to extravasate into these brain regions, colocalizing with neurons and microglial cells. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel angiotensin II-mediated feed-forward mechanism during hypertension, by which circulating angiotensin II evokes increased BBB permeability, facilitating in turn its access to critical brain regions known to participate in blood pressure regulation.

  1. Co-localisation of the Kir6.2/SUR1 channel complex with glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide expression in human ileal cells and implications for glycaemic control in new onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lotte B; Ploug, Kenneth B; Swift, Peter

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ATP-dependent K+-channel (K(ATP)) is critical for glucose sensing and normal glucagon and insulin secretion from pancreatic endocrine alpha- and beta-cells. Gastrointestinal endocrine L- and K-cells are also glucose-sensing cells secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose...... on glucose-sensing tissues in vivo that may affect the overall glycaemic control in children with new-onset type 1 diabetes. DESIGN AND METHODS: Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed for expression and co-localisation studies. Meal-stimulated C-peptide test was carried out in 257...

  2. Phase I/II trial of simultaneous whole-brain irradiation and dose-escalating topotecan for brain metastases

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    Kocher, M.; Eich, H.T.; Semrau, R.; Guener, S.A.; Mueller, R.P. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: topotecan penetrates the blood-brain barrier and sensitizes tumor cells against radiation. A phase I/II dose-escalating trial of repetitive daily i.v. topotecan application simultaneously with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) was conducted to estimate toxicity, maximum tolerated dose and survival in patients with inoperable brain metastases. Patients and methods: in 47 patients suffering from previously untreated brain metastases, topotecan was applied on a daily i.v. schedule simultaneously with WBRT (36 Gy/3-Gy fractions). The infusion schedule started at the beginning of WBRT and was discontinued during weekends. Each infusion was completed within 1-2 h before irradiation. In a dose-finding study, topotecan was escalated from 5 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 8 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}, 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} to 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: altogether, 38/47 patients (81%) completed the prescribed schedule. Leukopenia and thrombocytopenia were dose-limiting. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity occurred in 5/32 chemonaive patients (16%) and 7/15 patients (47%) with previous chemotherapy. At 12 x 0.6 mg/m{sup 2}, 2/4 patients experienced grade 4 leukopenia/thrombopenia. Nonhematologic toxicities were generally mild to moderate and unrelated to topotecan. Response evaluation was possible in 26/47 patients, overall response rate was 58% (CR [complete remission] 5/26, PR [partial remission] 10/26, NC [no change] 8/26). Median survival amounted to 5.1 months. In 15/42 patients (36%), brain metastases were the dominant cause of death. Conclusion: for a daily topotecan schedule simultaneous to WBRT, the maximum tolerated dose is 12 x 0.5 mg/m{sup 2} in chemonaive patients. For chemo-pretreated patients, daily doses should be reduced to 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}. A phase III trial has now been started to find out whether WBRT + topotecan increases survival compared to WBRT alone. (orig.)

  3. Chronic pain and evoked responses in the brain: A magnetoencephalographic study in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome I and II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theuvenet, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) type I and II are chronic pain syndromes with comparable symptoms, only in CRPS II a peripheral nerve injury is present. No objective tests are currently available to differentiate the two types which hampers diagnosis and treatment. Non-invasive brain imaging

  4. Insulin-like growth factor II receptors in human brain and their absence in astrogliotic plaques in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, N; De Bleser, P; Luiten, P; Geerts, A; Teelken, A; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptors were studied in human adult brain by using autoradiography with [(125)I]IGF-II. Receptors were found to be widely distributed throughout all neuronal regions. The highest densities were found in plexus choroideus, granular layer of the cerebellar cortex,

  5. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial: A TITE-CRM Phase I/II Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Michelle M; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S; Lao, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Brain-only metastases of small cell lung cancer; efficacy of whole brain radiotherapy. An EORTC phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, PE; Haaxma-Reiche, H; Gregor, A; Groen, HJM; Lewinski, T; Scolard, T; Kirkpatrick, A; Curran, D; Sahmoud, T; Giaccone, G

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of WBRT as a single treatment modality in patients with brain metastases of small cell lung cancer. Patients and methods: The patients had brain metastases of small cell lung cancer without any sign of tumour outside the brain and were treated with 10

  7. Early biomarkers of brain injury and cerebral hypo- and hyperoxia in the SafeBoosC II trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Anne M; Alderliesten, Thomas; Austin, Topun

    2017-01-01

    , and the biomarkers of brain injury from birth till term equivalent age that was collected as secondary and explorative outcomes in the SafeBoosC II trial. METHODS: Cerebral oxygenation was continuously monitored during the first 72h of life in 166 extremely preterm infants. Cranial ultrasound was performed at day 1......,4,7,14, and 35 and at term. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded at 64h. Blood-samples taken at 6 and 64 hours were analysed for the brain injury biomarkers; S100beta, brain-fatty-acid-binding-protein, and neuroketal. All analyses were conducted post hoc. RESULTS: Significantly more infants with a cerebral...

  8. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  9. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET/CT in healthy human volunteers and patients with brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chunjing; Mi, Baoming; Wan, Weixing [Affiliated Hospital of Jiangnan University (Wuxi No. 4 People' s Hospital), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Pan, Donghui; Xu, Yuping; Yang, Min [Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi (China); Lang, Lixin; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We report the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of an integrin α{sub v}β{sub 3} specific PET tracer {sup 18}F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG{sub 4}-c(RGDfk)]{sub 2} (denoted as {sup 18}F-Alfatide II). We also assessed the value of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II in patients with brain metastases. A series of torso (from the skull to the thigh) static images were acquired in five healthy volunteers (3 M, 2 F) at 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II (257 ± 48 MBq). Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn manually, and the time-activity curves (TACs) were obtained for major organs. Nine patients with brain metastases were examined by static PET imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG (5.55 MBq/kg) and {sup 18}F-Alfatide II. Injection of {sup 18}F-Alfatide II was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no serious tracer-related adverse events found. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II showed rapid clearance from the blood pool and kidneys. The total effective dose equivalent (EDE) and effective dose (ED) were 0.0277 ± 0.003 mSv/MBq and 0.0198 ± 0.002 mSv/MBq, respectively. The organs with the highest absorbed dose were the kidneys and the spleen. Nine patients with 20 brain metastatic lesions identified by MRI and/or CT were enrolled in this study. All 20 brain lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-Alfatide II PET, while only ten lesions were visualized by {sup 18}F-FDG, and 13 by CT. F-Alfatide II is a safe PET tracer with a favorable dosimetry profile. The observed ED suggests that {sup 18}F-Alfatide II is feasible for human studies. {sup 18}F-Alfatide II has potential value in finding brain metastases of different cancers as a biomarker of angiogenesis. (orig.)

  10. A phase II trial with bevacizumab and irinotecan for patients with primary brain tumors and progression after standard therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Grunnet, Kirsten; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2012-01-01

    The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab has shown efficacy in the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A prospective, phase II study of 85 patients with various recurrent brain tumors was carried out. Primary endpoints were progression free survival (PFS) and response rate....

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Kynurenine Aminotransferase II in the Adult Rat Brain Reveals High Expression in Proliferative Zones and Corpus Callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chang; Clark, Sarah M; Vaughn, Chloe N; Nicholson, James D; Murphy, Kelley J; Mou, Ta-Chung M; Schwarcz, Robert; Hoffman, Gloria E; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2018-01-15

    Kynurenic acid, a metabolite of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation, acts as an endogenous antagonist of alpha7 nicotinic and NMDA receptors and is implicated in a number of neurophysiological and neuropathological processes including cognition and neurodegenerative events. Therefore, kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II/AADAT), the enzyme responsible for the formation of the majority of neuroactive kynurenic acid in the brain, has prompted significant interest. Using immunohistochemistry, this enzyme was localized primarily in astrocytes throughout the adult rat brain, but detailed neuroanatomical studies are lacking. Here, we employed quantitative in situ hybridization to analyze the relative expression of KAT II mRNA in the brain of rats under normal conditions and 6 h after the administration of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs). Specific hybridization signals for KAT II were detected, with the highest expression in the subventricular zone (SVZ), the rostral migratory stream and the floor of the third ventricle followed by the corpus callosum and the hippocampus. This pattern of mRNA expression was paralleled by differential protein expression, determined by serial dilutions of antibodies (up to 1:1 million), and was confirmed to be primarily astrocytic in nature. The mRNA signal in the SVZ and the hippocampus was substantially increased by the LPS treatment without detectable changes elsewhere. These results demonstrate that KAT II is expressed in the rat brain in a region-specific manner and that gene expression is sensitive to inflammatory processes. This suggests an unrecognized role for kynurenic acid in the brain's germinal zones. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockade abolishes brain microvascular inflammation and heat shock protein responses in hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Ando, Hiromichi; Macova, Miroslava; Dou, Jingtao; Saavedra, Juan M

    2005-07-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation enhance vulnerability to hypertensive brain damage. To explore the participation of Angiotensin II (Ang II) in the mechanism of vulnerability to cerebral ischemia during hypertension, we examined the expression of inflammatory factors and the heat shock protein (HSP) response in cerebral microvessels from spontaneously hypertensive rats and their normotensive controls, Wistar Kyoto rats. We treated animals with vehicle or the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist candesartan, 0.3 mg/kg/day, via subcutaneously implanted osmotic minipumps for 4 weeks. Spontaneously hypertensive rats expressed higher Angiotensin II AT(1) receptor protein and mRNA than normotensive controls. Candesartan decreased the macrophage infiltration and reversed the enhanced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta mRNA and nuclear factor-kappaB in microvessels in hypertensive rats. The transcription of many HSP family genes, including HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90, and heat shock factor-1 was higher in hypertensive rats and was downregulated by AT(1) receptor blockade. Our results suggest a proinflammatory action of Ang II through AT(1) receptor stimulation in cerebral microvessels during hypertension, and very potent antiinflammatory effects of the Ang II AT(1) receptor antagonist. These compounds might be considered as potential therapeutic agents against ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain.

  13. Novel roles for metallothionein-I + II (MT-I + II) in defense responses, neurogenesis, and tissue restoration after traumatic brain injury: insights from global gene expression profiling in wild-type and MT-I + II knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Cáceres, Mario; Borup, Rehannah

    2006-01-01

    . A genomic approach, such as the use of microarrays, provides much insight in this regard, especially if combined with the use of gene-targeted animals. We report here the results of one of these studies comparing wild-type and metallothionein-I + II knockout mice subjected to a cryolesion...... times consistent with the processes involved in the initial tissue injury and later regeneration of the parenchyma, as well as a prominent effect of MT-I + II deficiency. The results thoroughly confirmed the importance of the antioxidant proteins MT-I + II in the response of the brain to injury...

  14. Concurrent calpain and caspase-3 mediated proteolysis of alpha II-spectrin and tau in rat brain after methamphetamine exposure: a similar profile to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Matthew W; Kobeissy, Firas H; Liu, Ming Cheng; Hayes, Ronald L; Gold, Mark S; Wang, Kevin K W

    2005-12-05

    Neurotoxicity in rat cortex and hippocampus following acute methamphetamine administration was characterized and compared to changes following traumatic brain injury. Doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg of methamphetamine produced significant increases in calpain- and caspase-cleaved alpha II-spectrin and tau protein fragments, suggesting cell injury or death. Changes in proteolytic products were significantly increased over vehicle controls. Use of fragment specific biomarkers detected prominent calpain-mediated protein fragments in the cortex and hippocampus while caspase-mediated protein fragments were also detected in the hippocampus. Remarkably, proteolytic product increases at the 40 mg/kg dose after 24 h were as high as those observed in experimental traumatic brain injury. Use of calpain and caspase proteolytic inhibitors may be useful in preventing methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

  15. Predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury: development of prognostic scores based on the IMPACT and the APACHE II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rahul; Siironen, Jari; Kivisaari, Riku; Hernesniemi, Juha; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2014-10-15

    Prediction models are important tools for heterogeneity adjustment in clinical trials and for the evaluation of quality of delivered care to patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We sought to improve the predictive performance of the IMPACT (International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials) prognostic model by combining it with the APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II) for 6-month outcome prediction in patients with TBI treated in the intensive care unit. A total of 890 patients with TBI admitted to a large urban level 1 trauma center in 2009-2012 comprised the study population. The IMPACT and the APACHE II scores were combined using binary logistic regression. A randomized, split-sample technique with secondary bootstrapping was used for model development and internal validation. Model performance was assessed by discrimination (by area under the curve [AUC]), calibration, precision, and net reclassification improvement (NRI). Overall 6-month mortality was 22% and unfavorable neurological outcome 47%. The predictive power of the new combined IMPACT-APACHE II models was significantly superior, compared to the original IMPACT models (AUC, 0.81-0.82 vs. 0.84-0.85; p0.05). However, NRI showed a significant improvement in risk stratification of patients with unfavorable outcome by the IMPACT-APACHE II models, compared to the original models (NRI, 5.4-23.2%; pAPACHE II with the IMPACT, improved 6-month outcome predictive performance is achieved. This may be applicable for heterogeneity adjustment in forthcoming TBI studies.

  16. Gadobutrol Versus Gadopentetate Dimeglumine or Gadobenate Dimeglumine Before DCE-MRI in Diagnosing Patients With Multiple Sclerosis, Grade II-IV Glioma, or Brain Metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-22

    Adult Anaplastic (Malignant) Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Neoplasm; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Primary Melanocytic Lesion of Meninges; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Malignant Adult Intracranial Hemangiopericytoma; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Multiple Sclerosis; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm

  17. Distribution of non-AT1, non-AT2 binding of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 angiotensin II in neurolysin knockout mouse brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Speth

    Full Text Available The recent identification of a novel binding site for angiotensin (Ang II as the peptidase neurolysin (E.C. 3.4.24.16 has implications for the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. This report describes the distribution of specific binding of 125I-Sarcosine1, Isoleucine8 Ang II (125I-SI Ang II in neurolysin knockout mouse brains compared to wild-type mouse brains using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the presence of p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (PCMB, which unmasks the novel binding site, widespread distribution of specific (3 µM Ang II displaceable 125I-SI Ang II binding in 32 mouse brain regions was observed. Highest levels of binding >700 fmol/g initial wet weight were seen in hypothalamic, thalamic and septal regions, while the lowest level of binding <300 fmol/g initial wet weight was in the mediolateral medulla. 125I-SI Ang II binding was substantially higher by an average of 85% in wild-type mouse brains compared to neurolysin knockout brains, suggesting the presence of an additional non-AT1, non-AT2, non-neurolysin Ang II binding site in the mouse brain. Binding of 125I-SI Ang II to neurolysin in the presence of PCMB was highest in hypothalamic and ventral cortical brain regions, but broadly distributed across all regions surveyed. Non-AT1, non-AT2, non-neurolysin binding was also highest in the hypothalamus but had a different distribution than neurolysin. There was a significant reduction in AT2 receptor binding in the neurolysin knockout brain and a trend towards decreased AT1 receptor binding. In the neurolysin knockout brains, the size of the lateral ventricles was increased by 56% and the size of the mid forebrain (-2.72 to +1.48 relative to Bregma was increased by 12%. These results confirm the identity of neurolysin as a novel Ang II binding site, suggesting that neurolysin may play a significant role in opposing the pathophysiological actions of the brain RAS and influencing brain morphology.

  18. Control of Drosophila Type I and Type II central brain neuroblast proliferation by bantam microRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports proliferat......Post-transcriptional regulation of stem cell self-renewal by microRNAs is emerging as an important mechanism controlling tissue homeostasis. Here, we provide evidence that bantam microRNA controls neuroblast number and proliferation in the Drosophila central brain. Bantam also supports...... proliferation of transit-amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells in type II neuroblast lineages. The stem cell factors brat and prospero are identified as bantam targets acting on different aspects of these processes. Thus, bantam appears to act in multiple regulatory steps in the maintenance...

  19. Protective Effects of Angiotensin II AT1 Receptors Blockade against Brain Injury in Experimental Model of Stroke in Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdollah Panahpour

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Ischemic stroke remains the third leading cause of invalidism and death in industrialized countries. It is suggested that renin–angiotensin system (RAS may contribute in stroke related pathogenic mechanisms and involve in the ischemic brain damage. This study designed to investigate the role of angiotensin II (Ang II in conjunction with AT1 receptors in treatment of the brain injuries following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.   Methods: Forty eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in four groups. Sham group, ischemic control group and two ischemic groups that received candesartan (0.1mg/kg, or 0.5mg/kg at the beginning of reperfusion period. Transient focal cerebral ischemia was induced by 60 minutes occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, followed by 24 hours reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, neurological deficit score (NDS was performed. Total cortical and striatal infarct volumes were determined using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining technique.   Results: Animals in sham operated group had normal motor function and no ischemic lesions were observed in cortical or striatal regions. Occurring ischemia in ischemic control group that received vehicle produced considerable infarction in cortex (253±15mm3 and striatum (92±7mm3, as well as these animals had sever impaired motor dysfunctions. Blocking of AT1 receptors with candesartan (0.1mg/kg or 0.5mg/kg improved neurological outcome and significantly lowered cortical and striatal infarct volumes relative to ischemic control group.   Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that stimulation of AT1 receptors by Ang II involved in ischemia/reperfusion injuries and blocking of AT1 receptors can decrease ischemic brain injury and improve neurological outcome.

  20. [Effect of noradrenaline and angiotensin II on the brain and kidney blood supply with changes in systemic arterial pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beketov, A I; Korneliuk, I K

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen clearance was used in experiments on anesthetized cats to demonstrate that intravenous infusions of noradrenaline induced an increase in cerebral blood supply and reduction of renal blood flow both in anesthetized animals and in the presence of hypotension. In these conditions, angiotensin II lowered the cerebral and renal blood flow. Hypotension enhanced the reactions of the cerebral and renal blood flow to the action of vasopressor agents. The intensity of the reactions was consistent with the degree of vascular autocontrol preservation in the brain and kidneys.

  1. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  2. Picroside II Inhibits Neuronal Apoptosis and Improves the Morphology and Structure of Brain Tissue following Cerebral Ischemic Injury in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Wang

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to explore the protective effects of picroside II against the neuronal apoptosis and changes in morphology and structure that follow cerebral ischemic injury in rats. A focal cerebral ischemic model was established by inserting a monofilament thread to achieve middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in 60 Wistar rats, and intraperitoneal injections of picroside II (20 mg/kg were administered. The neurobehavioral functions were evaluated with the modified neurological severity score (mNSS test. The cerebral infarct volumes were measured with tetrazolium chloride (TTC staining. The morphology and ultrastructure of the cortical brain tissues were observed with hematoxylin-eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The apoptotic cells were counted with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling and flow cytometry, and pERK1/2 expression was determined by immunohistochemical assay and Western blot. The results indicated that neurological behavioral malfunctions and cerebral infarcts were present in the MCAO rats. In the model group, the damage to the structures of the neurons and the blood brain barrier (BBB in the cortex was more severe, and the numbers of apoptotic cells, the early apoptotic ratio (EAR and pERK1/2 expression were significantly increased in this group compared to the control group (P<0.05. In the treatment group, the neurological behavioral function and the morphology and ultrastructure of the neurons and the BBB were improved including the number of Mi increased and relative area of condensed chromosome and basement (BM thickness descreased, and the cerebral infarct volume, the number of apoptotic cells, the EAR and pERK1/2 expression were significantly decreased compared to the model group (P<0.05. These results suggest that picroside II reduced apoptosis and improved the morphology and ultrastructure of the neurons and the BBB and that these effects resulted in the

  3. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II : Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Wim M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure

  4. Neuropsychology of humor: an introduction. Part II. Humor and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesné, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Impairment of the perception or comprehension of humor is observed in patients with focal brain lesions in both hemispheres, but mainly in the right frontal lobe. Studies by functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy subjects show that humor is associated with activation of two main neural systems in both hemispheres. The detection and resolution of incongruity, cognitive groundings of humor, are associated with activation of the medial prefrontal and temporoparietal cortex, and the humor appreciation with activation of the orbito-frontal and insular cortex, amygdala and the brain reward system. However, activation of these areas is not humor-specific and can be observed in various cognitive or emotional processes. Event-related potential studies confirm the involvement of both hemispheres in humor processing, and suggest that left prefrontal area is associated with joke comprehension and right prefrontal area with the resolution stage. Humor thus appears to be a complex and dynamic functional process involving, on one hand, two specialized but not specific neural systems linked to humor apprehension and appreciation, and, on the other hand, multiple interconnected functional brain networks including neural patterns underlying the moral framework and belief system, acquired by conditioning or imitation during the cognitive development and social interactions of the individual, and more distributed systems associated with the analysis of the current context of humor occurrence. Disturbances of the sense of humor could then result from focal brain alterations localized in one or two of the specialized areas underlying the comprehension or appreciation of humor, or from perturbations of the network interconnectivity in non-focal brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia.

  5. Quantitative autoradiography of 125I-(Sar1, Ile8)-angiotensin II binding in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, B.H.; Harding, J.W.; Liu, D.K.; Hibbard, L.S.; Wieczorek, C.M.; Wu, J.Y.

    1986-01-01

    The brain contains its own angiotensin II (AII) system. To better understand the role of central AII in cardiovascular regulation, we used 125I-(Sar1, Ile8)-AII (125I-SI-AII), radioactive AII antagonist, to autoradiographically localize putative AII receptor binding in many parts of the central nervous system of the spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. With 125I-SI-AII binding on brain membrane preparations. Scatchard analysis indicated that Kd values were from 0.10 +/- 0.04 nM to 0.13 +/- 0.05 nM, whereas Bmax values (femtomol/mg protein) were found to be from 6.95 +/- 1.60 to 15.52 +/- 4.99 among brain regions studied. Various SI-AII receptor binding activities among brain regions revealed in this study were therefore most likely due to differences in AII receptor density with high affinity binding of 125I-AII. Using 125I-SI-AII, specific binding for SI-AII was found in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN), subfornical organ (SFO), suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), area postrema, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMX), and the nucleus of spinal tract of the trigeminal system (NSV). With quantitative receptor autoradiography in conjunction with radioactive standards, we have observed that the NTS possesses the highest SI-AII binding, followed by the PVN, SFO, NTS, DMX, and NSV. No significant differences were observed between the SHR and WKY rats in the SI-AII binding within the SFO, PVN and NTS. However, SHR at early hypertensive (7 weeks) and established hypertensive (16 weeks) stages contained significantly higher SI-AII bindings in the NSV, as compared to age-matched WKY rats.

  6. Brain Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi Young; Khan, Nayaab S; Liao, Francesca-Fang; Wang, Bin; Shin, Ji Soo; Bonventre, Joseph V; Malik, Kafait U

    2018-01-12

    Recently we reported that angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertension is mediated by group IV cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) via production of pro-hypertensive eicosanoids. Since Ang II increases blood pressure via its action in the subfornical organ (SFO), it led us to investigate the expression and possible contribution of cPLA2α to oxidative stress and development of hypertension in this brain area. Adenovirus (Ad)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) cPLA2α short hairpin (sh) RNA (Ad-cPLA2α shRNA) and its control Ad-scrambled shRNA (Ad-Scr shRNA) or Ad-enhanced cyan fluorescence protein cPLA2α DNA (Ad-cPLA2α DNA) and its control Ad-GFP DNA were transduced into SFO of cPLA2α+/+ and cPLA2α-/- male mice, respectively. Ang II (700 ng/kg/min) was infused for 14 days in these mice, and blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff and radio telemetry. cPLA2 activity, reactive oxygen species production, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were measured in the SFO. Transduction of SFO with Ad-cPLA2α shRNA, but not Ad-Scr shRNA in cPLA2α+/+ mice, minimized expression of cPLA2α Ang II-induced cPLA2α activity and oxidative stress in the SFO, blood pressure, and cardiac and renal fibrosis. In contrast, Ad-cPLA2α DNA, but not its control Ad-GFP DNA in cPLA2α-/- mice, restored the expression of cPLA2α, and Ang II-induced increase in cPLA2 activity and oxidative stress in the SFO, blood pressure, cardiac and renal fibrosis. These data suggest that cPLA2α in the SFO is crucial in mediating Ang II-induced hypertension and associated pathogenesis. Therefore, development of selective cPLA2α inhibitors could be useful in treating hypertension and its pathogenesis.

  7. Nonclassical Mechanisms of Progesterone Action in the Brain: II. Role of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Progesterone-Mediated Signaling in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Bhuvana; Portillo, Wendy; Reyna, Andrea; Chen, Jian Zhong; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Mani, Shaila K.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activation of classical progestin receptor-dependent genomic pathway, progesterone (P) can activate nonclassical, membrane-initiated signaling pathways in the brain. We recently demonstrated rapid P activation of second-messenger kinases, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN) and preoptic area (POA) of rat brain. To determine whether P can activate yet another Ca+2dependent kinase, we examined the rapid P modulation of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the VMN and POA in female rats. A rapid P-initiated activation of CaMKII basal activity was observed in the VMN but not the POA at 30 min. Estradiol benzoate (EB) priming enhanced this CaMKII basal activity in both the VMN and POA. CaMKII protein levels and phosphorylation of Thr-286 moiety on CaMKII, however, remained unchanged with EB and/or P treatments, suggesting that the changes in the CaMKII kinase activity are due to rapid P modulation of the kinase activity and not its synthesis or autoactivation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a CaMKII-specific inhibitor, KN-93, 30 min prior to the P infusion, in EB-primed, ovariectomized female rats inhibited CaMKII activation but not protein kinase A and protein kinase C activities. Interestingly, icv administration of KN-93 30 min prior to P infusion (icv) resulted in a reduction but not total inhibition of P-facilitated lordosis response in EB-primed female rats. These observations suggest a redundancy or, alternately, a hierarchy in the P-regulated activation of kinase signaling cascades in female reproductive behavior. PMID:18617607

  8. STUDY OF COPPER(II) COMPLEXES CONTAINING AMINO ACIDS OF INTEREST FOR BRAIN CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    LUCIANA DORNELAS PINTO

    2010-01-01

    Foram sintetizados 16 complexos de cobre(II) coordenados com seis aminoácidos presentes na placa b-amilóide, que está associada à Doença de Alzheimer - ácido aspártico, ácido glutâmico, metionina, glicina, serina e arginina, outros dois aminoácidos também encontrados no cérebro - cisteína e homocisteína, além da L-carnitina e acetil-L-carnitina que vêm sendo utilizados como suplemento alimentar em pacientes com doenças neurodegenerativas. Nosso objetivo foi verificar a afinidade do cobre(II) ...

  9. Structural and functional brain alterations in a murine model of Angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Anja; Minnerup, Jens; Soria, Guadalupe; Planas, Anna M

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for the development of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) - a major contributor to stroke and the most common cause of vascular dementia. Despite the increasing socioeconomic importance arising from cSVD, currently only a few specific treatment strategies with proven efficacy are known. Fundamental to the lack of specific treatments is poor understanding of the disease pathogenesis and a lack of appropriate animal models resembling all symptoms of the human disease. However, chronic hypertensive rat models have been shown to bear similarities to most key features of cSVD. Despite a significantly larger toolbox available for genotypic and phenotypic modifications compared to rats, mouse models of hypertension are unusual when modeling cSVD and associated cognitive impairment experimentally. In the present study, we therefore characterized hypertension-mediated cerebrovascular alterations and accompanying structural and functional consequences by simultaneously treating adult wild-type mice (C57BL/6N) with Angiotensin II (AngII) and the nitric oxide synthases inhibitor L-NAME for 4 weeks. Hypertension associated to cerebral alterations reminiscent of early-onset cSVD and vascular cognitive impairment when combined with additional AngII bolus injections. Most importantly, preventing the elevation of blood pressure (BP) protected from the development of cSVD symptoms and associated cognitive decline. Our data strongly support the suitability of this particular mouse model of AngII-induced hypertension as an appropriate animal model for early-onset cSVD and hence, vascular cognitive impairment, pathologies commonly preceding vascular dementia. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. [Loss of brain stem auditory evoked potential waves I and II during controlled hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, G; Lang, M; Link, J; Schäfer, M; Schaffartzik, W; Eyrich, K; Bornfeld, N; Foerster, M H

    1995-11-01

    For surgical removal of a malignant choroid melanoma, it is necessary to reduce systolic blood pressure to around 50-60 mmHg in order to prevent choroidal haemorrhages. However, blood pressure reduction is associated with the risk of cerebral ischaemia. We report a patient with a malignant choroid melanoma in whom waves I and II of the brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) disappeared during surgery under controlled arterial hypotension and hypothermia (31.1 degrees C). The waves could be recorded again immediately after the mean arterial pressure was increased from 48 to 77 mmHg. The oesophageal temperature had dropped by 0.3 degrees C at this time. The 2-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) showed no irregularities during this time period. A bilateral, reversible, apparently blood-pressure-dependent loss of waves I and II during arterial hypotension despite a normal EEG has to our knowledge not been previously described in the literature. The isolated loss of waves I and II with maintenance of waves III, IV, and V is unusual. The literature contains reports of acoustic neurinoma patients in whom only wave V could be recorded. This is regarded as an indication of continued impulse conduction despite the loss of waves I to IV. Others have observed a patient with temporary and reversible loss of BAEP wave I due to vasospasm of the internal auditory artery that apparently occurred during or shortly after manipulation of the internal auditory meatus. Assuming anatomic peculiarities in the blood supply to the generators of the BAEP waves, a stenosis of the basilar artery could be considered as the cause of the bilateral reversible loss of waves I and II. Another potential source could be induced hypothermia, but this does not seem very likely because the patient's temperature was 0.3 degrees C lower at the return of the waves than at their loss.

  11. Genetic silencing of Nox2 and Nox4 reveals differential roles of these NADPH oxidase homologues in the vasopressor and dipsogenic effects of brain angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey R; Burmeister, Melissa A; Tian, Xin; Zhou, Yi; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R; Stupinski, John A; Sharma, Ram V; Davisson, Robin L

    2009-11-01

    The renin-angiotensin system exerts a tremendous influence over fluid balance and arterial pressure. Angiotensin II (Ang-II), the effector peptide of the renin-angiotensin system, acts in the central nervous system to regulate neurohumoral outflow and thirst. Dysregulation of Ang-II signaling in the central nervous system is implicated in cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently we established that NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived superoxide acting in the forebrain subfornical organ is critical in the physiological responses to central Ang-II. In addition, we have found that Nox2 and Nox4 are the most abundantly expressed Nox homologues within Ang-II-sensitive sites in the forebrain. To dissect out the functional importance and unique roles of these Nox enzymes in the pressor and dipsogenic effects of central Ang-II, we developed adenoviral vectors expressing small interfering RNA to selectively silence Nox2 or Nox4 expression in the subfornical organ. Our results demonstrate that both Nox2 and Nox4 are required for the full vasopressor effects of brain Ang-II but that only Nox2 is coupled to the Ang-II-induced water intake response. These studies establish the importance of both Nox2- and Nox4-containing NADPH oxidases in the actions of Ang-II in the central nervous system and are the first to reveal differential involvement of these Nox enzymes in the various physiological effects of central Ang-II.

  12. Genetic silencing of Nox2 and Nox4 reveals differential roles of these NADPH oxidase homologues in the vasopressor and dipsogenic effects of brain angiotensin-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Burmeister, Melissa A.; Tian, Xin; Zhou, Yi; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R.; Stupinski, John A.; Sharma, Ram V.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) exerts a tremendous influence over fluid balance and arterial pressure. Angiotensin II (Ang-II), the effector peptide of the RAS, acts in the CNS to regulate neurohumoral outflow and thirst. Dysregulation of Ang-II signaling in the CNS is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, however the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently we established that NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived superoxide acting in the forebrain subfornical organ (SFO) is critical in the physiologic responses to central Ang-II. In addition, we have found that Nox2 and Nox4 are the most abundantly expressed Nox homologues within Ang-II-sensitive sites in the forebrain. To dissect out the functional importance and unique roles of these Nox enzymes in the pressor and dipsogenic effects of central Ang-II, we developed adenoviral vectors expressing siRNA to selectively silence Nox2 or Nox4 expression in the SFO. Our results demonstrate that both Nox2 and Nox4 are required for the full vasopressor effects of brain Ang-II, but that only Nox2 is coupled to the Ang-II-induced water intake response. These studies establish the importance of both Nox2- and Nox4-containing NADPH oxidases in the actions of Ang-II in the CNS, and are the first to reveal differential involvement of these Nox enzymes in the various physiologic effects of central Ang-II. PMID:19805637

  13. La Neurociencia Computacional hoy: II. El Proyecto Blue Brain, un ejemplo muy representativo en el campo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cortés

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La Neurociencia Computacional es un campo reciente, pero bien establecido dentro de las Neurociencias. En un primer artículo (Cortés, 2009, http://www.cienciacognitiva.org/?p=55, “Qué es y por qué es difícil su estudio”, explico su principal paradigma: todo proceso mental que tiene lugar en nuestro cerebro tiene un circuito o cableado físico que lo sustenta. En este artículo comento un ejemplo muy representativo en el campo: el macro-proyecto de simulación a gran escala y en tiempo real de procesos en la corteza cerebral, el famoso Blue Brain Project.

  14. Long-Term Survival After Traumatic Brain Injury Part II: Life Expectancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jordan C; Shavelle, Robert M; Strauss, David J; Hammond, Flora M; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia L

    2015-06-01

    To compute the life expectancy of persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) based on validated prognostic models from 2 cohorts, to compare mortality and life expectancy of persons with TBI with those of the U.S. general population, and to investigate trends toward improved survival over the last 2 decades. Survival analysis. Postdischarge from rehabilitation units and long-term follow-up at regional centers. Two cohorts of long-term survivors of TBI (N=12,481): the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) cohort comprised 7365 persons who were admitted to a TBIMS facility with moderate to severe TBI and were assessed at ≥1 years postinjury, and the California Department of Developmental Services (CDDS) cohort comprised 5116 persons who sustained a TBI and received long-term services from the CDDS. Not applicable. Life expectancy. The estimates of age-, sex-, and disability-specific life expectancy of persons with TBI derived from the CDDS and TBIMS were similar. The estimates of age- and sex-specific life expectancy were lower than those of the U.S. general population. Mortality rates of persons with TBI were higher than those of the U.S. general population. Mortality rates did not improve and the standardized mortality ratio increased over the study period from 1988 to 2010. Life expectancy of persons with TBI is lower than that of the general population and depends on age, sex, and severity of disability. When compared, the survival outcomes in the TBIMS and CDDS cohorts are remarkably similar. Because there have been no marked trends in the last 20 years, the life expectancies presented in this article may remain valid in the future. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A placebo-controlled, randomized phase II study of maintenance enzastaurin following whole brain radiation therapy in the treatment of brain metastases from lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Fløtten, Øystein

    2012-01-01

    Enzastaurin is a protein kinase C inhibitor with anti-tumor activity. This study was designed to determine if maintenance enzastaurin improved the outcome of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in lung cancer (LC) patients with brain metastases (BMs)....

  16. Neurochemical and structural markers in the brain predicting best choice-of-treatment in patients with schizophrenia - The Pan European Collaboration on Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia II (PECANS II) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Kasper; Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Sigvard, Anne Mette

    the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions seen in many patients. Aim of PECANS II: To test if persistently high levels of glutamate and loss of brain tissue and social functions characterize a subgroup of patients with poor treatment response, while dopaminergic disturbances characterize another...... as markers for best-choice-of-treatment. Further, the results can pave the way for the development of new antipsychotic medication modulating glutamatergic disturbances and lead to better prevention strategies for the progressive loss of brain tissue and social functions in a treatment resistant subgroup...... disturbances with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning, and loss of brain tissue with analysis of a structural MR-scanning revealing loss of cortical thickness and surface area. Neurochemical and structural disturbances are compared with treatment response and level of function as measured by various...

  17. Angiotensin II-dependent hypertension requires cyclooxygenase 1-derived prostaglandin E2 and EP1 receptor signaling in the subfornical organ of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Peterson, Jeffrey R; Wang, Gang; Anrather, Josef; Young, Colin N; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R; Burmeister, Melissa A; Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L

    2012-04-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids have long been implicated in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Recently prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and its receptor EP(1) (EP(1)R) have emerged as key players in angiotensin II (Ang II)-dependent hypertension (HTN) and related end-organ damage. However, the enzymatic source of PGE(2,) that is, COX-1 or COX-2, and its site(s) of action are not known. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a key forebrain region that mediates systemic Ang II-dependent HTN via reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the hypothesis that cross-talk between PGE(2)/EP(1)R and ROS signaling in the SFO is required for Ang II HTN. Radiotelemetric assessment of blood pressure revealed that HTN induced by infusion of systemic "slow-pressor" doses of Ang II was abolished in mice with null mutations in EP(1)R or COX-1 but not COX-2. Slow-pressor Ang II-evoked HTN and ROS formation in the SFO were prevented when the EP(1)R antagonist SC-51089 was infused directly into brains of wild-type mice, and Ang-II-induced ROS production was blunted in cells dissociated from SFO of EP(1)R(-/-) and COX-1(-/-) but not COX-2(-/-) mice. In addition, slow-pressor Ang II infusion caused a ≈3-fold increase in PGE(2) levels in the SFO but not in other brain regions. Finally, genetic reconstitution of EP(1)R selectively in the SFO of EP(1)R-null mice was sufficient to rescue slow-pressor Ang II-elicited HTN and ROS formation in the SFO of this model. Thus, COX 1-derived PGE(2) signaling through EP(1)R in the SFO is required for the ROS-mediated HTN induced by systemic infusion of Ang II and suggests that EP(1)R in the SFO may provide a novel target for antihypertensive therapy.

  18. Immunohistochemical study of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila brain using a specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Kishimoto, Yasuko; Ohsako, Shunji

    2003-06-06

    To analyze the distribution of Drosophila calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (dCaMKII) in the adult brain, we generated monoclonal antibodies against the bacterially expressed 490-amino acid (a.a.) form of dCaMKII. One of those, named #18 antibody, was used for this study. Western blot analysis of the adult head extracts showed that the antibody specifically detects multiple bands between 55 and 60 kDa corresponding to the molecular weights of the splicing isoforms of dCaMKII. Epitope mapping revealed that it was in the region between 199 and 283 a.a. of dCaMKII. Preferential dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the embryonic nervous system, adult thoracic ganglion and gut, and larval neuro-muscular junction (NMJ) was consistent with previous observations by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with a polyclonal antibody at the NMJ, indicating that the antibody is applicable to immunohistochemistry. Although dCaMKII immunoreactive signal was low in the retina, it was found at regular intervals in the outer margin of the compound eye. These signals were most likely to be interommatidial bristle mechanosensory neurons. dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the brain was observed in almost all regions and relatively higher staining was found in the neuropilar region than in the cortex. Higher dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the mushroom body (MB) was found in the entire gamma lobe including the heel, and dorsal tips of the alpha and alpha' lobes, while cores of alpha and beta lobes were stained light. Finding abundant dCaMKII accumulation in the gamma lobe suggested that this lobe might especially require high levels of dCaMKII expression to function properly among MB lobes.

  19. Metallothionein (MT)-III: generation of polyclonal antibodies, comparison with MT-I+II in the freeze lesioned rat brain and in a bioassay with astrocytes, and analysis of Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A; Penkowa, M; Moos, T; Hidalgo, J

    1999-11-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize the putative differences between the rat brain MT isoforms, namely MT-I+II and MT-III, in the freeze lesion model of brain damage, and for developing an ELISA for MT-III suitable for brain samples. In the normal rat brain, MT-III was mostly present primarily in astrocytes. However, lectin staining indicated that MT-III immunoreactivity was also present in microglia, monocytes and/or macrophages in the leptomeninges and lying adjacent to major vessels. In freeze lesioned rats, both MT-I+II and MT-III immunoreactivities increased in the ipsilateral cortex. The pattern of MT-III immunoreactivity significantly differed from that of MT-I+II, since the latter was evident in both the vicinity of the lesioned tissue and deeper cortical layers, whereas that of the former was located only in the deeper cortical layers. This suggests different roles for these MT isoforms, and indeed in a new bioassay measuring astrocyte migration in vitro, rMT-III promoted migration to a higher extent than MT-I+II. Thus, MT-III could not only affect neuronal sprouting as previously suggested, but also

  20. Manganese-enhanced MRI of rat brain based on slow cerebral delivery of manganese(II) with silica-encapsulated Mn x Fe(1-x) O nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Lu, Fang; Chen, Chiao-Chi V; Mo, Kuan-Chi; Hung, Yann; Guo, Zhi-Xuan; Lin, Chia-Hui; Lin, Ming-Huang; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Chen; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we report a monodisperse bifunctional nanoparticle system, MIO@SiO2 -RITC, as an MRI contrast agent [core, manganese iron oxide (MIO); shell, amorphous silica conjugated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC)]. It was prepared by thermal decomposition and modified microemulsion methods. The nanoparticles with varying iron to manganese ratios displayed different saturated magnetizations and relaxivities. In vivo MRI of rats injected intravenously with MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles exhibited enhancement of the T1 contrast in brain tissue, in particular a time-delayed enhancement in the hippocampus, pituitary gland, striatum and cerebellum. This is attributable to the gradual degradation of MIO@SiO2-RITC nanoparticles in the liver, resulting in the slow release of manganese(II) [Mn(II)] into the blood pool and, subsequently, accumulation in the brain tissue. Thus, T1-weighted contrast enhancement was clearly detected in the anatomic structure of the brain as time progressed. In addition, T2*-weighted images of the liver showed a gradual darkening effect. Here, we demonstrate the concept of the slow release of Mn(II) for neuroimaging. This new nanoparticle-based manganese contrast agent allows one simple intravenous injection (rather than multiple infusions) of Mn(II) precursor, and results in delineation of the detailed anatomic neuroarchitecture in MRI; hence, this provides the advantage of the long-term study of neural function. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Angiotensin II, hypertension and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesmann, M.; Roelofs, M.; Lugt, R. Van Der; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.

    2017-01-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced

  2. Clinical phase II study with Gd-DTPA (dimeglumine gadopentetate, SHL 451 A) in brain tumor and cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kohki; Aoki, Shigeki; Machida, Tohru and others

    1988-06-01

    A clinical phase II study with Gd-DTPA, the first contrast medium for MRI, was performed in 109 cases, a total of 114 studies mainly with brain tumor. In this study, one of the three concentrations of Gd-DTPA, 0.05 mmol/kg, 0.10 mmol/kg or 0.15 mmol/kg was used in each patient. It was elucidated that especially 0.10 and 0.15 Gd-DTPA were useful in detecting disruption or abscence of BBB and distinguishing tumor from edema. The side-effect observed was only a slight urticaria which was seen with 0.15 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA. Accordingly, it was estimated that the standard concentration of Gd-DTPA would be 0.10 mmol/kg. As this contrast medium was safe, and clinically useful in detecting diseases of the central nervous system, it was concluded that the shift to the clinical phase III trial is possible.

  3. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  4. Brain protein metabolism and the acquisition of new behaviors. II. Immunological studies of the alpha, beta and gamma proteins of goldfish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E

    1977-02-11

    In a previous study, the labeling pattern of three proteins (alpha, beta and gamma) in goldfish brain was found to change after the animals successfully acquired a new pattern of behavior. In the present study, these proteins were isolated from the brain cytoplasmic fraction, purified by successive gel electrophoresis and used as antigent to immunize rabbits. Antisera containing antibodies to two of the proteins (beta and gamma) were obtained. These gave single precipitin bands when plated against the antigens and a mixture of the total cytoplasmic proteins. The distribution of beta and gamma in brain subcellular fractions and in a variety of goldfish tissues was determined by immunodiffusion methods. gamma was specific to brain. The beta protein cross-reacted but was not identical to a widely distributed substance in plasma, liver and kidney. Both beta and gamma appear to be species specific in that no cross-reactivity was obtained with mouse, chick or rat brain proteins. Immunological methods, in combination with double labeling experiments were used to establish that the beta and gamma antigens were proteins which were normally present in goldfish brain. Both the beta and gamma antisera were equally capable of specifically precipitating the proteins which were differentially labeled after training as well as purified proteins of the same molecular weight present in the brains of control animals. These results suggest that the acquisition of a new pattern of behavior can increase the demand for the synthesis of specific proteins (beta and gamma) normally present in goldfish brain.

  5. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Premer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors.

  6. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premer, Courtney; Lamondin, Courtney; Mitzey, Ann; Speth, Robert C.; Brownfield, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors. PMID:23573410

  7. Chromatographic and immunological evidence for mammalian GnRH and chicken GnRH II in eel (Anguilla anguilla) brain and pituitary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Dufour, S; Fontaine, Y A; Millar, R P

    1990-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) peptides in the brain and pituitary of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) were investigated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and radioimmunoassay with region-specific antisera. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in brain and pituitary extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2 and COOH termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Salmon GnRH and chicken GnRH I were not detected. The occurrence of mammalian GnRH in teleost fish suggests that this molecular form is more ancient than was previously suspected and arose earlier than in primitive tetrapods, or that it has arisen in the eel through random mutation of salmon GnRH. The lack of salmon GnRH in the eel brain indicates that this molecular form is not common to all teleost species. The finding in eel brain of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been described in species of Mammalia, Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  8. Angiotensin-II-dependent Hypertension Requires Cyclooxygenase 1-derived Prostaglandin E2 and EP1 Receptor Signaling in the Subfornical Organ of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Wang, Gang; Anrather, Josef; Young, Colin N.; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R.; Burmeister, Melissa A.; Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-derived prostanoids have long been implicated in blood pressure (BP) regulation. Recently prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and its receptor EP1R have emerged as key players in angiotensin II (Ang-II)-dependent hypertension (HTN) and related end-organ damage. However, the enzymatic source of PGE2, ie COX-1 or COX-2, and its site(s) of action are not known. The subfornical organ (SFO) is a key forebrain region that mediates systemic Ang-II-dependent HTN via reactive oxygen species (ROS). We tested the hypothesis that cross-talk between PGE2/EP1R and ROS signaling in the SFO is required for Ang-II HTN. Radiotelemetric assessment of BP revealed that HTN induced by infusion of systemic “slow-pressor” doses of Ang-II was abolished in mice with null mutations in EP1R or COX-1 but not COX-2. Slow-pressor Ang-II-evoked HTN and ROS formation in the SFO were prevented when the EP1R antagonist SC-51089 was infused directly into brains of wild-type mice, and Ang-II-induced ROS production was blunted in cells dissociated from SFO of EP1R−/− and COX-1−/− but not COX-2−/− mice. In addition, slow-pressor Ang-II infusion caused a ~3-fold increase in PGE2 levels in the SFO but not in other brain regions. Finally, genetic reconstitution of EP1R selectively in the SFO of EP1R-null mice was sufficient to rescue slow-pressor AngII-elicited HTN and ROS formation in the SFO of this model. Thus, COX-1-derived PGE2 signaling through EP1R in the SFO is required for the ROS-mediated HTN induced by systemic infusion of Ang-II, and suggests that EP1R in the SFO may provide a novel target for antihypertensive therapy. PMID:22371360

  9. Angiotensin II, hypertension and angiotensin II receptor antagonism: Roles in the behavioural and brain pathology of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Roelofs, Monica; van der Lugt, Robert; Heerschap, Arend; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen Ahr

    2017-07-01

    Elevated angiotensin II causes hypertension and contributes to Alzheimer's disease by affecting cerebral blood flow. Angiotensin II receptor blockers may provide candidates to reduce (vascular) risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. We studied effects of two months of angiotensin II-induced hypertension on systolic blood pressure, and treatment with the angiotensin II receptor blockers, eprosartan mesylate, after one month of induced hypertension in wild-type C57bl/6j and AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 (AβPP/PS1/Alzheimer's disease) mice. AβPP/PS1 showed higher systolic blood pressure than wild-type. Subsequent eprosartan mesylate treatment restored this elevated systolic blood pressure in all mice. Functional connectivity was decreased in angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease and wild-type mice, and only 12 months of Alzheimer's disease mice showed impaired cerebral blood flow. Only angiotensin II-infused Alzheimer's disease mice exhibited decreased spatial learning in the Morris water maze. Altogether, angiotensin II-induced hypertension not only exacerbated Alzheimer's disease-like pathological changes such as impairment of cerebral blood flow, functional connectivity, and cognition only in Alzheimer's disease model mice, but it also induced decreased functional connectivity in wild-type mice. However, we could not detect hypertension-induced overexpression of Aβ nor increased neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest a link between midlife hypertension, decreased cerebral hemodynamics and connectivity in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Eprosartan mesylate treatment restored and beneficially affected cerebral blood flow and connectivity. This model could be used to investigate prevention/treatment strategies in early Alzheimer's disease.

  10. [Study on interference effect of Sijunzi decoction on brain-gut CaM/CaMK II of spleen Qi deficiency syndrome rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Rong; Gong, Zi-han; Yang, Xiao-yi; Zhu, Li-ming; Duan, Yong-qiang; Cheng, Ying-xia; Du, Juan; Wang, Yan

    2015-10-01

    To observe the dynamic time-phase expressions of key genes of brain-gut CaM signal pathway of spleen Qi deficiency rats and the intervention effect of Sijunzi decoction. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the normal control group, model 14 d, 21 d, 28 d groups, and Sijunzi decoction 14 d, 21 d, 28 d groups. Except for the normal control group, the remaining groups were included into the spleen Qi deficiency model with the bitter cold breaking Qi method (ig 7.5 g · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹ of Rheum officinale, Fructus aurantii immaturus, Magnolia officinalis preparation) and the exhaustive swimming method. On the 7th day after the modeling, the Sijunzi decoction groups were orally administered with Sijunzi decoction 20 g · kg⁻¹ · d⁻¹. The expressions of key genes CaM/CaMK II of CaM signaling pathway in hippocampus and intestine at different time points by immunohistochemical method and Western blot. At the same time, the intervention effect of Sijunzi decoction on spleen Qi deficiency rats and its mechanism were analyzed. Spleen Qi deficiency rats showed higher intestinal CaM/CaMK II expression and lower hippocampus CaM/CaMK II expression than normal rats (P CaMK II expression and increase in hippocampus CaM/CaMK II expression (P CaMK II in small intestine tissues and its low expression in hippocampus tissues. Sijunzi decoction may achieve the therapeutic effect in spleen Qi deficiency syndrome by reducing the CaM/CaMK II expression in intestinal tissues and increasing it in hippocampus tissues.

  11. Candesartan, an angiotensin II AT₁-receptor blocker and PPAR-γ agonist, reduces lesion volume and improves motor and memory function after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villapol, Sonia; Yaszemski, Alexandra K; Logan, Trevor T; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in complex pathological reactions, the initial lesion worsened by secondary inflammation and edema. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is produced in the brain and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT₁R) overstimulation produces vasoconstriction and inflammation. Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs) are neuroprotective in models of stroke but little is known of their effect when administered in TBI models. We therefore performed controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on mice to investigate whether the ARB candesartan would mitigate any effects of TBI. We administered candesartan or vehicle to mice 5 h before CCI injury. Candesartan treatment reduced the lesion volume after CCI injury by approximately 50%, decreased the number of dying neurons, lessened the number of activated microglial cells, protected cerebral blood flow (CBF), and reduced the expression of the cytokine TGFβ1 while increasing expression of TGFβ3. Candesartan-treated mice also showed better motor skills on the rotarod 3 days after injury, and improved performance in the Morris water maze 4 weeks after injury. These results indicate that candesartan is neuroprotective, reducing neuronal injury, decreasing lesion volume and microglial activation, protecting CBF and improving functional behavior in a mouse model of TBI. Co-treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) antagonist significantly reduced some of the beneficial effects of candesartan after CCI, suggesting that PPARγ activation may contribute to part or to all of the neuroprotective effect of candesartan. Overall, our data suggest that ARBs with dual AT₁R-blocking and PPARγ activation properties may have therapeutic value in treating TBI.

  12. Candesartan, an Angiotensin II AT1-Receptor Blocker and PPAR-γ Agonist, Reduces Lesion Volume and Improves Motor and Memory Function After Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villapol, Sonia; Yaszemski, Alexandra K; Logan, Trevor T; Sánchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M; Symes, Aviva J

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in complex pathological reactions, the initial lesion worsened by secondary inflammation and edema. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is produced in the brain and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1R) overstimulation produces vasoconstriction and inflammation. Ang II receptor blockers (ARBs) are neuroprotective in models of stroke but little is known of their effect when administered in TBI models. We therefore performed controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury on mice to investigate whether the ARB candesartan would mitigate any effects of TBI. We administered candesartan or vehicle to mice 5 h before CCI injury. Candesartan treatment reduced the lesion volume after CCI injury by approximately 50%, decreased the number of dying neurons, lessened the number of activated microglial cells, protected cerebral blood flow (CBF), and reduced the expression of the cytokine TGFβ1 while increasing expression of TGFβ3. Candesartan-treated mice also showed better motor skills on the rotarod 3 days after injury, and improved performance in the Morris water maze 4 weeks after injury. These results indicate that candesartan is neuroprotective, reducing neuronal injury, decreasing lesion volume and microglial activation, protecting CBF and improving functional behavior in a mouse model of TBI. Co-treatment with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) antagonist significantly reduced some of the beneficial effects of candesartan after CCI, suggesting that PPARγ activation may contribute to part or to all of the neuroprotective effect of candesartan. Overall, our data suggest that ARBs with dual AT1R-blocking and PPARγ activation properties may have therapeutic value in treating TBI. PMID:22892395

  13. Preservation of memory with conformal avoidance of the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases (RTOG 0933): a phase II multi-institutional trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondi, Vinai; Pugh, Stephanie L; Tome, Wolfgang A; Caine, Chip; Corn, Ben; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Shah, Sunjay; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa; Mehta, Minesh P

    2014-12-01

    Hippocampal neural stem-cell injury during whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) may play a role in memory decline. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can be used to avoid conformally the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during WBRT (HA-WBRT). RTOG 0933 was a single-arm phase II study of HA-WBRT for brain metastases with prespecified comparison with a historical control of patients treated with WBRT without hippocampal avoidance. Eligible adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Standardized cognitive function and quality-of-life (QOL) assessments were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 months. The primary end point was the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 4 months. The historical control demonstrated a 30% mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months. To detect a mean relative decline ≤ 15% in HVLT-R DR after HA-WBRT, 51 analyzable patients were required to ensure 80% statistical power with α = 0.05. Of 113 patients accrued from March 2011 through November 2012, 42 patients were analyzable at 4 months. Mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months was 7.0% (95% CI, -4.7% to 18.7%), significantly lower in comparison with the historical control (P memory and QOL as compared with historical series. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  14. Subchronic, Low-Level Intraperitoneal Injections of Manganese (IV) Oxide and Manganese (II) Chloride Affect Rat Brain Neurochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian S.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Ladefoged, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic and can induce manganism, a Parkinson-like disease categorized as being a serious central nervous system irreversible neurodegenerative disease. An increased risk of developing symptoms of Parkinson disease has been linked to work-related exposure, for example......Cl2)/kg bw/day for 7 d/wk for 8 or 12 weeks. This dosing regimen adds relevant new knowledge about Mn neurotoxicity as a consequence of low-dose subchronic Mn dosing. Manganese concentrations increased in the striatum, the rest of the brain, and in plasma, and regional brain neurotransmitter...

  15. Brain mediators of cardiovascular responses to social threat, part II: Prefrontal-subcortical pathways and relationship with anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wager, T.D.; Ast, V.A. van; Hughes, B.L.; Davidson, M.L.; Lindquist, M.A.; Ochsner, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    Social evaluative threat (SET) is a potent stressor in humans that causes autonomic changes, endocrine responses, and multiple health problems. Neuroimaging has recently begun to elucidate the brain correlates of SET, but as yet little is known about the mediating cortical-brainstem pathways in

  16. Dynamics of RNA Polymerase II Pausing and Bivalent Histone H3 Methylation during Neuronal Differentiation in Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiancheng Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During cellular differentiation, genes important for differentiation are expected to be silent in stem/progenitor cells yet can be readily activated. RNA polymerase II (Pol II pausing and bivalent chromatin marks are two paradigms suited for establishing such a poised state of gene expression; however, their specific contributions in development are not well understood. Here we characterized Pol II pausing and H3K4me3/H3K27me3 marks in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and their daughter neurons purified from the developing mouse cortex. We show that genes paused in NPCs or neurons are characteristic of respective cellular functions important for each cell type, although pausing and pause release were not correlated with gene activation. Bivalent chromatin marks poised the marked genes in NPCs for activation in neurons. Interestingly, we observed a positive correlation between H3K27me3 and paused Pol II. This study thus reveals cell type-specific Pol II pausing and gene activation-associated bivalency during mammalian neuronal differentiation.

  17. A phase II multi-institutional study assessing simultaneous in-field boost helical tomotherapy for 1-3 brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues George

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our research group has previously published a dosimetric planning study that demonstrated that a 60 Gy/10 fractions intralesional boost with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT to 30 Gy/10 fractions was biologically equivalent with a stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS boost of 18 Gy/1 fraction with 30 Gy/10 fractions WBRT. Helical tomotherapy (HT was found to be dosimetrically equivalent to SRS in terms of target coverage and superior to SRS in terms of normal tissue tolerance. A phase I trial has been now completed at our institution with a total of 60 enrolled patients and 48 evaluable patients. The phase II dose has been determined to be the final phase I cohort dose of 60 Gy/10 fractions. Methods/Design The objective of this clinical trial is to subject the final phase I cohort dose to a phase II assessment of the endpoints of overall survival, intracranial control (ICC and intralesional control (ILC. We hypothesize HT would be considered unsuitable for further study if the median OS for patients treated with the HT SIB technique is degraded by 2 months, or the intracranial progression-free rates (ICC and ILC are inferior by 10% or greater compared to the expected results with treatment by whole brain plus SRS as defined by the RTOG randomized trial. A sample size of 93 patients was calculated based on these parameters as well as the statistical assumptions of alpha = 0.025 and beta = 0.1 due to multiple statistical testing. Secondary assessments of toxicity, health-related quality-of-life, cognitive changes, and tumor response are also integrated into this research protocol. Discussion To summarize, the purpose of this phase II trial is to assess this non-invasive alternative to SRS in terms of central nervous system (CNS control when compared to SRS historical controls. A follow-up phase III trial may be required depending on the results of this trial in order to definitively assess non-inferiority/superiority of this approach

  18. Surgery-induced hippocampal angiotensin II elevation causes blood-brain barrier disruption via MMP/TIMP in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqian eLi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reversible BBB disruption has been uniformly reported in several animal models of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism underlying this occurrence remains unclear. Using an aged rat model of POCD, we investigated the dynamic changes in expression of molecules involved in BBB disintegration, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and -9 (MMP-9, as well as three of their endogenous tissue inhibitors (TIMP-1, -2, -3, and tried to establish the correlation between MMP/TIMP balance and surgery-induced hippocampal BBB disruption. We validated the increased hippocampal expression of angiotensin II (Ang II and Ang II receptor type 1 (AT1 after surgery. We also found MMP/TIMP imbalance as early as 6 h after surgery, together with increased BBB permeability and decreased expression of Occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1, as well as increased basal lamina protein laminin at 24 h postsurgery. The AT1 antagonist candesartan restored MMP/TIMP equilibrium and modulated expression of Occludin and laminin, but not ZO-1, thereby improving BBB permeability. These events were accompanied by suppression of the surgery-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation cascade. Nevertheless, AT1 antagonism did not affect nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression. Collectively, these findings suggest that surgery-induced Ang II release impairs BBB integrity by activating NF-κB signaling and disrupting downstream MMP/TIMP balance via AT1 receptor.

  19. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  20. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  1. Metallothionein-II Inhibits Lipid Peroxidation and Improves Functional Recovery after Transient Brain Ischemia and Reperfusion in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Diaz-Ruiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R, damaging mechanisms, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, lead to irreversible neurological deficits. The induction of metallothionein-II (MT-II protein is an endogenous mechanism after I/R. Our aim was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of MT-II after I/R in rats. Male Wistar rats were transiently occluded at the middle cerebral artery for 2 h, followed by reperfusion. Rats received either MT (10 μg per rat i.p. or vehicle after ischemia. Lipid peroxidation (LP was measured 22 h after reperfusion in frontal cortex and hippocampus; also, neurological deficit was evaluated after ischemia, using the Longa scoring scale. Infarction area was analyzed 72 hours after ischemia. Results showed increased LP in frontal cortex (30.7% and hippocampus (26.4%, as compared to control group; this effect was fully reversed by MT treatment. Likewise, we also observed a diminished neurological deficit assessed by the Longa scale in those animals treated with MT compared to control group values. The MT-treated group showed a significant (P<0.05 reduction of 39.9% in the infarction area, only at the level of hippocampus, as compared to control group. Results suggest that MT-II may be a novel neuroprotective treatment to prevent ischemia injury.

  2. Daily variations in type II iodothyronine deiodinase activity in the rat brain as controlled by the biological clock.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, A.; Buijs, R.M.; Schaik, R. van; Kaptein, E.; Visser, T.J.; Doulabi, B.Z.; Fliers, E.

    2005-01-01

    Type II deiodinase (D2) plays a key role in regulating thyroid hormone-dependent processes in, among others, the central nervous system (CNS) by accelerating the intracellular conversion of T4 into active T3. Just like the well-known daily rhythm of the hormones of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid

  3. Daily variations in type II iodothyronine deiodinase activity in the rat brain as controlled by the biological clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Buijs, Ruud M.; van Schaik, Rosalinde; Kaptein, Ellen; Visser, Theo J.; Doulabi, Behrouz Zandieh; Fliers, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Type II deiodinase (D2) plays a key role in regulating thyroid hormone-dependent processes in, among others, the central nervous system (CNS) by accelerating the intracellular conversion of T-4 into active T-3. Just like the well-known daily rhythm of the hormones of the

  4. Brain endogenous angiotensin II receptor type 2 (AT2-R) protects against DOCA/salt-induced hypertension in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shu-Yan; Peng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Li, Jian-Dong; Shen, Ying; Sun, Xiao-Fei

    2015-03-08

    Recent studies demonstrate that there are sex differences in the expression of angiotensin receptor type 2 (AT2-R) in the kidney and that AT2-R plays an enhanced role in regulating blood pressure (BP) in females. Also, brain AT2-R activation has been reported to negatively modulate BP and sympathetic outflow. The present study investigated whether the central blockade of endogenous AT2-R augments deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-induced hypertension in both male and female rats. All rats were subcutaneously infused with DOCA combined with 1% NaCl solution as the sole drinking fluid. BP and heart rate (HR) were recorded by telemetric transmitters. To determine the effect of central AT2-R on DOCA/salt-induced hypertension, male and female rats were intracerebroventricularly (icv) infused with AT2-R antagonist, PD123,319, during DOCA/salt treatment. Subsequently, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, a key cardiovascular regulatory region of the brain, was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. DOCA/salt treatment elicited a greater increase in BP in male rats than that in females. Icv infusions of the AT2-R antagonist significantly augmented DOCA/salt pressor effects in females. However, this same treatment had no enhanced effect on DOCA/salt-induced increase in the BP in males. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis of the female brain revealed that DOCA/salt treatment enhanced the mRNA and protein expression for both antihypertensive components including AT2-R, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-2, and interleukin (IL)-10 and hypertensive components including angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1-R), ACE-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and IL-1β, but decreased mRNA expression of renin in the PVN. The central blockade of AT2-R reversed the changes in mRNA and protein expressions of ACE-2, IL-10, and renin, further increased the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β, and kept higher the expressions of AT1-R, ACE-1, and AT2-R

  5. Gender differences in neurological emergencies part II: a consensus summary and research agenda on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Espinoza, Tamara R; Merck, Lisa H; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Backster, Anika; Stein, Donald G

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. There is strong evidence that gender and sex play an important role across the spectrum of TBI, from pathophysiology to clinical care. In May 2014, Academic Emergency Medicine held a consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes." A TBI working group was formed to explore what was known about the influence of sex and gender on TBI and to identify gaps for future research. The findings resulted in four major recommendations to guide the TBI research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. Neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury: III. Criterion-related validity and sensitivity to change in the NABIS hypothermia-II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Moretti, Paolo; Macleod, Marianne C; Pedroza, Claudia; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Frisby, Melisa L; Beers, Sue R; Scott, James N; Hunter, Jill V; Traipe, Elfrides; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Zygun, David A; Puccio, Ava M; Clifton, Guy L

    2013-09-01

    The neurological outcome scale for traumatic brain injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure assessing neurological functioning in patients with TBI. We hypothesized that the NOS-TBI would exhibit adequate concurrent and predictive validity and demonstrate more sensitivity to change, compared with other well-established outcome measures. We analyzed data from the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia-II clinical trial. Participants were 16-45 years of age with severe TBI assessed at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. For analysis of criterion-related validity (concurrent and predictive), Spearman's rank-order correlations were calculated between the NOS-TBI and the glasgow outcome scale (GOS), GOS-extended (GOS-E), disability rating scale (DRS), and neurobehavioral rating scale-revised (NRS-R). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through significant correlations between the NOS-TBI and GOS, GOS-E, DRS, and NRS-R measured contemporaneously at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury (all pvalidity as well as sensitivity to change, compared with gold-standard outcome measures. The NOS-TBI may enhance prediction of outcome in clinical practice and measurement of outcome in TBI research.

  7. Pressure Autoregulation Measurement Techniques in Adult Traumatic Brain Injury, Part II: A Scoping Review of Continuous Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Donnelly, Joseph; Calviello, Leanne; Smielewski, Peter; Menon, David K; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-12-01

    A scoping review of the literature was performed systematically on commonly described continuous autoregulation measurement techniques in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) to provide an overview of methodology and comprehensive reference library of the available literature for each technique. Five separate small systematic reviews were conducted for each of the continuous techniques: pressure reactivity index (PRx), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) techniques, brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO 2 ), and thermal diffusion (TD) techniques. Articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to December 2016), and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. A two-tier filter of references was conducted. The literature base identified from the individual searches was limited, except for PRx. The total number of articles using each of the five searched techniques for continuous autoregulation in adult TBI were: PRx (28), LDF (4), NIRS (9), PbtO 2 (10), and TD (8). All continuous techniques described in adult TBI are based on moving correlation coefficients. The premise behind the calculation of these moving correlation coefficients focuses on the impact of slow fluctuations in either mean arterial pressure (MAP) or cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) on some indirect measure of cerebral blood flow (CBF), such as: intracranial pressure (ICP), LDF, NIRS signals, PbtO 2 , or TD CBF. The thought is the correlation between a hemodynamic driving factor, such as MAP or CPP, and a surrogate for CBF or cerebral perfusion sheds insight on the state of cerebral autoregulation. Both PRx and NIRS indices were validated experimentally against the "gold standard" static autoregulatory curve (Lassen curve) at least around the lower threshold of autoregulation. The PRx has the largest literature base supporting the association with patient outcome. Various methods of continuous autoregulation assessment are

  8. A phase II trial of thymidine and carboplatin for recurrent malignant glioma: a North American Brain Tumor Consortium Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, H. Ian; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Yung, W. K. Alfred; Hess, Kenneth; Schiff, David; Greenberg, Harry; Fink, Karen; Nicolas, Kelly; Kuhn, John G.; Cloughesy, Timothy; Junck, Larry; Mehta, Minesh

    2002-01-01

    This phase II study in recurrent high-grade glioma evaluated the response rate, toxicities, and time to treatment failure of high-dose carboplatin modulated by a 24-h infusion of thymidine (75 g/m(2)). The trial was based on preclinical data and a prior phase I study ( J. Clin. Oncol. 17, 2922-2931, 1999); a phase II recurrent high-grade glioma study was initiated in July of 1998. Thymidine was given over 24 h; carboplatin was given over 20 min at hour 20 of the thymidine infusion. The starting dose of carboplatin had a value of 7 for the area under the curve (AUC), with allowance for dose escalation of 1 AUC unit per cycle if grade 2 toxicity was observed. Treatment cycles were repeated every 4 weeks. Accrual as of September 1999 was 45 patients [4 were unevaluable]: 76% with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), 20% with anaplastic oligodendroglioma, 2% with mixed type, and 2% with anaplastic astrocytoma. Most patients had prior chemotherapy (78%). As observed in the earlier phase I study (in which carboplatin pharmacokinetics were unaltered by thymidine or antiseizure medications), thymidine was myeloprotective, resulting in a minimal need for dose reduction for patients having a >2 grade toxicity (in only 4% of the courses of treatment). Of 101 total courses, the number of courses (at the AUCs) was 3 (5), 4 (6), 58 (7), 20 (8), 11 (9), and 5 (10). Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities included headache (4%), altered consciousness (3%), fatigue (1%), and nausea (3%). Responses included 2 partial (1 oligodendroglioma, 1 GBM; 5%); 3 minor (1 anaplastic astrocytoma, 2 GBM; 7.3%); 6 stable disease (14.6%); and 30 progressive disease (73.2%). For GBM patients, median survival was 23 weeks (with a 95% confidence interval of 20 to 50 weeks), and progression-free survival was 8 weeks (with a 95% confidence interval of 7-16 weeks). These results in GBM were comparable to other phase II GBM trials and thus do not represent a therapeutic advance in the treatment of GBM. Taken

  9. The fitness for the Ageing Brain Study II (FABS II: protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial evaluating the effect of physical activity on cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ames David

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have documented a potential protective effect of physical exercise in older adults who are at risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The Fitness for the Ageing Brain II (FABS II study is a multicentre randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT aiming to determine whether physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline among individuals with Alzheimer's disease. This paper describes the background, objectives of the study, and an overview of the protocol including design, organization and data collection methods. Methods/Design The study will recruit 230 community-dwelling participants diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Participants will be randomly allocated to two treatment groups: usual care group or 24-week home-based program consisting of 150 minutes per week of tailored moderate physical activity. The primary outcome measure of the study is cognitive decline as measured by the change from baseline in the total score on the Alzheimer's disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive section. Secondary outcomes of interest include behavioral and psychological symptoms, quality of life, functional level, carer burden and physical function (strength, balance, endurance, physical activity. Primary endpoints will be measured at six and twelve months following the baseline assessment. Discussion This RCT will contribute evidence regarding the potential benefits of a systematic program of physical activity as an affordable and safe intervention for people with Alzheimer's disease. Further, if successful, physical activity in combination with usual care has the potential to alleviate the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease and improve its management and the quality of life of patients and their carers. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000755235

  10. Decreased mTOR signalling reduces mitochondrial ROS in brain via accumulation of the telomerase protein TERT within mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Satomi; Czapiewski, Rafal; Wan, Tengfei; Bell, Amy; Hill, Kirsten N; von Zglinicki, Thomas; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-10-22

    Telomerase in its canonical function maintains telomeres in dividing cells. In addition, the telomerase protein TERT has non-telomeric functions such as shuttling to mitochondria resulting in a decreased oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. TERT protein persists in adult neurons and can co-localise to mitochondria under various stress conditions. We show here that TERT expression decreased in mouse brain during aging while release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased. Dietary restriction (DR) caused accumulation of TERT protein in mouse brain mitochondria correlating to decreased ROS release and improved learning and spatial short-term memory. Decreased mTOR signalling is a mediator of DR. Accordingly, feeding mice with rapamycin increased brain mitochondrial TERT and reduced ROS release. Importantly, the beneficial effects of rapamycin on mitochondrial function were absent in brains and fibroblasts from first generation TERT -/- mice, and when TERT shuttling was inhibited by the Src kinase inhibitor bosutinib. Taken together, our data suggests that the mTOR signalling pathway impinges on the mitochondrial localisation of TERT protein, which might in turn contribute to the protection of the brain by DR or rapamycin against age-associated mitochondrial ROS increase and cognitive decline.

  11. Caspase-6 Activation in Familial Alzheimer Disease Brains Carrying Amyloid Precursor Protein, Presenilin I or Presenilin II Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Steffen; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Ghetti, Bernardino; Winblad, Bengt; LeBlanc, Andréa C.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the activation of Caspase-6 in the hippocampus and cortex in cases of mild, moderate, severe and very severe Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether Caspase-6 is also activated in familial AD, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis of active Caspase-6 and Tau cleaved by Caspase-6 in temporal cortex and hippocampal tissue sections from cases of familial AD. The cases included 5 carrying the amyloid precursor protein K670N, M671L Swedish mutation, 1 carrying the amyloid precursor protein E693G Arctic mutation, 2 each carrying the Presenilin I M146V, F105L, A431E, V261F, Y115C mutations, and 1 with the Presenilin II N141I mutation. Active Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was found in all cases. Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was observed in neuritic plaques or cotton wool plaques in some cases, neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles. These results indicate that Caspase-6 is activated in familial forms of AD, as previously observed in sporadic forms. Since sporadic and familial AD cases have similar pathological features, these results support a fundamental role of Caspase-6 in the pathophysiology of both familial and sporadic AD. PMID:19915487

  12. Distinct mechanisms underlie the regulation of body fluid balance by neurokinin B and angiotensin II in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Rie; Ono, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Osamu; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2011-04-06

    Although central injections of either neurokinin B (NKB) or angiotensin II (ANGII) induce a pressor response, they show different involvements in fluid intake behaviors. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which these two peptides regulate body fluid balance in rats. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular injections of NKB (1nmol) and ANGII (0.1nmol) both induce pressor responses. However, only ANGII induced significant water intake and increased sodium preference. Co-injection of NKB suppressed the ANGII-induced sodium preference but did not affect the ANGII-induced water intake. Immunohistochemistry for c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, revealed that both NKB and ANGII increased neuronal activation in the circumventricular organs and the hypothalamic paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. In contrast, only ANGII significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, the central amygdala (CeA) and the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTvl). Co-injection of NKB suppressed the ANGII-induced c-Fos expression in the CeA and BSTvl. These results suggest that centrally injected NKB and ANGII lead to common cardiovascular responses by neuronal pathways through the circumventricular organs and hypothalamus but that they regulate fluid intake behaviors through different pathways. It is likely that the opposing effects of these two peptides on sodium preference can be explained by their differential actions in the CeA and BSTvl, both of which are inhibited by NKB and activated by ANGII. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of the group II mGlu receptor agonist 2R,4R-APDC on dentate gyrus cell proliferation in the adult rat brain after diffuse brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ya-Bo; Yao, Hong; Man, Xiao; Chi, Ling-Yi; Chi, Zhao-Fu

    2011-05-01

    Diffuse brain injury (DBI) has been shown to increase the proliferation of granule cell precursors in the adult dentate gyrus (DG). However, the mechanism by which DBI-induced cell proliferation in the DG may enhance seizure susceptibility remains largely unknown. Using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry, we examined the effects of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist, 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC), on cell proliferation in the DG after DBI. It has been found that 2R,4R-APDC significantly blocked DBI-induced increase in the number of BrdU-positive cells in the DG, especially in hilus. In addition, double-label immunofluorescence staining showed that treatment with APDC did not affect the differentiation of newborn cells into neurons or astrocytes. Taken together, our findings indicate that the activation of mGluR system may inhibit the DBI-induced cell proliferation in the DG, but not the differentiation of newborn cells. It is suggested that 2R,4R-APDC has potential neuroprotection via inhibiting the aberrant neurogenesis induced by DBI, which is an important pathological basis of seizure or other abnormalities following DBI.

  14. Protease-activated receptor-2 regulates trypsin expression in the brain and protects against seizures and epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Rink-Jan; O'Brien, Terence J; Cocks, Thomas M

    2008-04-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)), primarily involved in inflammation, is highly expressed in limbic regions of the brain such as the hippocampus. Although extracellular proteolysis is involved in normal and stress-related neuronal plasticity associated with learning, memory and inflammatory disease states, little is known about the role of PAR(2) and its physiological agonist, trypsin, in the brain. We show immunohistochemically that trypsin co-localises with tissue plasminogen activator within granular-like structures in PAR(2)-positive pyramidal neurons of the rat hippocampus. Central administration of the PAR(2) peptide agonist, SLIGRL, inhibited electrical amygdala kindling-induced epileptogenesis and abolished kindling-induced over-expression of trypsin in the hippocampus. SLIGRL similarly attenuated kindling when administered subcutaneously. Non-enzymatic activation of neuronal PAR(2) using SLIGRL may thus activate feedback mechanisms to inhibit the over-production of trypsin and possibly other proteases during brain insults and thereby attenuate pathogenesis. Prophylactic systemic administration of non-proteolytic PAR(2) agonists may therefore represent a novel approach to protect against epileptogenic brain insults.

  15. A quantitative brain map of experimental cerebral malaria pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangward, Patrick; Haley, Michael J; Shaw, Tovah N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Greig, Rachel; Mironov, Aleksandr; de Souza, J Brian; Cruickshank, Sheena M; Craig, Alister G; Milner, Danny A; Allan, Stuart M; Couper, Kevin N

    2017-03-01

    The murine model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) has been utilised extensively in recent years to study the pathogenesis of human cerebral malaria (HCM). However, it has been proposed that the aetiologies of ECM and HCM are distinct, and, consequently, no useful mechanistic insights into the pathogenesis of HCM can be obtained from studying the ECM model. Therefore, in order to determine the similarities and differences in the pathology of ECM and HCM, we have performed the first spatial and quantitative histopathological assessment of the ECM syndrome. We demonstrate that the accumulation of parasitised red blood cells (pRBCs) in brain capillaries is a specific feature of ECM that is not observed during mild murine malaria infections. Critically, we show that individual pRBCs appear to occlude murine brain capillaries during ECM. As pRBC-mediated congestion of brain microvessels is a hallmark of HCM, this suggests that the impact of parasite accumulation on cerebral blood flow may ultimately be similar in mice and humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate that cerebrovascular CD8+ T-cells appear to co-localise with accumulated pRBCs, an event that corresponds with development of widespread vascular leakage. As in HCM, we show that vascular leakage is not dependent on extensive vascular destruction. Instead, we show that vascular leakage is associated with alterations in transcellular and paracellular transport mechanisms. Finally, as in HCM, we observed axonal injury and demyelination in ECM adjacent to diverse vasculopathies. Collectively, our data therefore shows that, despite very different presentation, and apparently distinct mechanisms, of parasite accumulation, there appear to be a number of comparable features of cerebral pathology in mice and in humans during ECM and HCM, respectively. Thus, when used appropriately, the ECM model may be useful for studying specific pathological features of HCM.

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain ... called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life— ...

  17. Brain-Wise Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carole; Ozturgut, Osman; French, Joan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to help leaders do their jobs more effectively by examining the components of brain-wise leadership. The article is divided into five parts: Part I is a general overview, defining brain-wise leadership, its traits, attributes and some of the styles of effective leadership. Part II begins with the strategies for…

  18. Transcriptional up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase II by nuclear factor-κB at rostral ventrolateral medulla in a rat mevinphos intoxication model of brain stem death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Julie Y H; Wu, Carol H Y; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Cheng, Hsiao-Lei; Dai, Kuang-Yu; Chan, Samuel H H; Chang, Alice Y W

    2007-01-01

    As the origin of a ‘life-and-death’ signal that reflects central cardiovascular regulatory failure during brain stem death, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this vital phenomenon. Using a clinically relevant animal model that employed the organophosphate pesticide mevinphos (Mev) as the experimental insult, we evaluated the hypothesis that transcriptional up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase I or II (NOS I or II) gene expression by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) on activation of muscarinic receptors in the RVLM underlies brain stem death. In Sprague-Dawley rats maintained under propofol anaesthesia, co-microinjection of muscarinic M2R (methoctramine) or M4R (tropicamide), but not M1R (pirenzepine) or M3R (4-diphenylacetoxy-N-dimethylpiperidinium) antagonist significantly reduced the enhanced NOS I–protein kinase G signalling (‘pro-life’ phase) or augmented NOS II–peroxynitrite cascade (‘pro-death’ phase) in ventrolateral medulla, blunted the biphasic increase and decrease in baroreceptor reflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that reflect the transition from life to death, and diminished the elevated DNA binding activity or nucleus-bound translocation of NF-κB in RVLM neurons induced by microinjection of Mev into the bilateral RVLM. However, NF-κB inhibitors (diethyldithiocarbamate or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) or double-stranded κB decoy DNA preferentially antagonized the augmented NOS II–peroxynitrite cascade and the associated cardiovascular depression exhibited during the ‘pro-death’ phase. We conclude that transcriptional up-regulation of NOS II gene expression by activation of NF-κB on selective stimulation of muscarinic M2 or M4 subtype receptors in the RVLM underlies the elicited cardiovascular depression during the ‘pro-death’ phase in our Mev intoxication model of brain stem death. PMID:17395621

  19. Studies on the mechanism of the epileptiform activity induced by U18666A. II. concentration, half-life and distribution of radiolabeled U18666A in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Sarkar, C.P.; Towns, L.

    1982-06-01

    The concentration, half-life, and distribution in brain of U18666A, a drug that can drastically alter cerebral lipids and induce a chronic epileptiform state, was determined following both acute and chronic drug administration. U18666A specifically labeled with tritium was prepared by custom synthesis. Brain levels of 1 x 10(-6)M and higher were reached soon after giving an acute 10-mg/kg dose (i.p. or s.c.) of U18666A containing 7-/sup 3/H-U18666A of known specific activity. A steady state concentration of 1 to 2 x 10(-6)M was reached with chronic injection of 10 mg/kg every 4th day, a treatment schedule that results in altered brain lipids and induction of epilepsy if begun soon after birth. The disappearance of U18666A from both brain and serum was described by two similar biexponential processes, a brief rapid clearance (t1/2 . 10 h) and a sustained and much slower one (t1/2 . 65 h). Brain levels of the drug were about 10 times higher than serum at all times examined. Few differences were seen in the regional distribution of radiolabeled drug in brain as determined by both direct analysis and by autoradiographic examination; but the drug did concentrate in lipid-rich subcellular fractions. For example, the synaptosome and myelin fractions each contained about 25-35% of both the total /sup 3/H-labeled drug and total lipid in whole brain. The lipid composition of these fractions was drastically altered in treated animals. In conclusion, the chronic epileptiform state induced by U18666A does not appear to involve localization of the drug in a specific brain region or particular cell type. Rather, the condition could involve localization of the drug in lipid-rich membranes and marked changes in the composition of these membranes.

  20. A second form of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with chicken GnRH II-like properties, occurs together with mammalian GnRH in marsupial brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J A; Mehl, A E; Tyndale-Biscoe, C H; Hinds, L; Millar, R P

    1989-11-01

    GnRH peptides in the hypothalami of marsupials (tammar wallaby, short-nosed bandicoot, and eastern quoll) and a monotreme (echidna) were investigated by reverse phase HPLC and RIA with region-specific antisera. In the wallaby hypothalamic extract, a single form of GnRH was present, which eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was recognized by antibodies directed against the NH2- and COOH-termini of mammalian GnRH as well as by antibodies to the middle region. Two GnRH molecular forms were demonstrated in the bandicoot and quoll hypothalamic extracts. One form eluted in the same position as synthetic mammalian GnRH on HPLC and was quantified equally by two mammalian GnRH antisera. The second form eluted in the same position as synthetic chicken GnRH II and was recognized by specific antibodies to this molecule. Quantification of this immunoreactive peak with two chicken GnRH II antisera was not equal, suggesting that the peptide has similar properties to, but may not be identical to, chicken GnRH II. Immunoreactive GnRH was also detected in the echidna hypothalamic extract. These findings demonstrate that in some mammals more than one form of GnRH is present in the brain of a single species, as has previously been found in species from all nonmammalian vertebrate classes. The finding in marsupial brain of a peptide with properties of chicken GnRH II, which has previously been reported in species of Aves, Reptilia, Amphibia, Osteichthyes, and Chondrichthyes, supports our hypothesis that this widespread structural variant may represent an early early evolved and conserved form of GnRH.

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  5. Metallothioneins are multipurpose neuroprotectants during brain pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena

    2006-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) constitute a family of cysteine-rich metalloproteins involved in cytoprotection during pathology. In mammals there are four isoforms (MT-I - IV), of which MT-I and -II (MT-I + II) are the best characterized MT proteins in the brain. Accumulating studies have demonstrated MT......-I overexpression demonstrated the importance of MT-I + II for coping with brain pathology. In addition, exogenous MT-I or MT-II injected intraperitoneally is able to promote similar effects as those of endogenous MT-I + II, which indicates that MT-I + II have both extra- and intracellular actions. In injured brain...

  6. Spatiotemporal Psychopathology II: How does a psychopathology of the brain's resting state look like? Spatiotemporal approach and the history of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-15

    Psychopathology as the investigation and classification of experience, behavior and symptoms in psychiatric patients is an old discipline that ranges back to the end of the 19th century. Since then different approaches to psychopathology have been suggested. Recent investigations showing abnormalities in the brain on different levels raise the question how the gap between brain and psyche, between neural abnormalities and alteration in experience and behavior can be bridged. Historical approaches like descriptive (Jaspers) and structural (Minkoswki) psychopathology as well as the more current phenomenological psychopathology (Paarnas, Fuchs, Sass, Stanghellini) remain on the side of the psyche giving detailed description of the phenomenal level of experience while leaving open the link to the brain. In contrast, the recently introduced Research Domain Classification (RDoC) aims at explicitly linking brain and psyche by starting from so-called 'neuro-behavioral constructs'. How does Spatiotemporal Psychopathology, as demonstrated in the first paper on depression, stand in relation to these approaches? In a nutshell, Spatiotemporal Psychopathology aims to bridge the gap between brain and psyche. Specifically, as demonstrated in depression in the first paper, the focus is on the spatiotemporal features of the brain's intrinsic activity and how they are transformed into corresponding spatiotemporal features in experience on the phenomenal level and behavioral changes, which can well account for the symptoms in these patients. This second paper focuses on some of the theoretical background assumptions in Spatiotemporal Psychopathology by directly comparing it to descriptive, structural, and phenomenological psychopathology as well as to RDoC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. IL-6 deficiency leads to reduced metallothionein-I+II expression and increased oxidative stress in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) deficiency on brain inflammation and the accompanying bone marrow (BM) leukopoiesis and spleen immune reaction after systemic administration of a niacin antagonist, 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN), which causes both astroglial degeneration/cell death in ...

  8. Evaluating the impact of hippocampal sparing during whole brain radiotherapy on neurocognitive functions: A preliminary report of a prospective phase II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shinn-Yn; Yang, Chi-Cheng; Wu, Yi-Ming; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chu, Yi-Chuan; Hsieh, Hsiang-Yao; Wu, Tung-Ho; Pai, Ping-Ching; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the treatment of choice for patients with brain metastases. However, neurocognitive functions (NCFs) decline due to impaired hippocampal neurogenesis might occur thereafter. It is hypothesized that conformal hippocampal avoidance during the course of WBRT (HA-WBRT) might provide meaningful NCF preservation. Our study aims to demonstrate the impact of delivering HA-WBRT on NCF changes in patients receiving WBRT. Twenty-five patients who were referred for prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or treating oligometastatic brain disease were enrolled in the study. Before the HA-WBRT course, all participants should receive baseline neurocognitive assessment, including memory, executive functions, and psychomotor speed. The primary endpoint was delayed recall, as determined by the change/decline in verbal memory [Wechsler Memory Scale - 3rd edition (WMS III)- Word List score] from the baseline assessment to 4 months after the start of HA-WBRT. Only three patients belonged to the clinical setting of PCI; the remaining 22 patients had oligometastatic brain disease. Regarding neurocognitive outcomes, no statistically significant differences were found between various NCF scores obtained at baseline and at post-radiotherapy intervals, in immediate verbal memory and non-verbal memory, except for delayed recall memory on Word List (F = 5.727, p = 0.048). Functional preservation by hippocampal sparing during WBRT could largely be achieved in this study, which also suggests that HA-WBRT should be a feasible technique preserving neurocognitive functions while maintaining intracranial control.

  9. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  10. Part II: Strain- and sex-specific effects of adolescent exposure to THC on adult brain and behaviour: Variants of learning, anxiety and volumetric estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R J; Trow, J; Bye, C; McDonald, R J

    2015-07-15

    Marijuana is one of the most highly used psychoactive substances in the world, and its use typically begins during adolescence, a period of substantial brain development. Females across species appear to be more susceptible to the long-term consequences of marijuana use. Despite the identification of inherent differences between rat strains including measures of anatomy, genetics and behaviour, no studies to our knowledge have examined the long-term consequences of adolescent exposure to marijuana or its main psychoactive component, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), in males and females of two widely used rat strains: Long-Evans hooded (LER) and Wistar (WR) rats. THC was administered for 14 consecutive days following puberty onset, and once they reached adulthood, changes in behaviour and in the volume of associated brain areas were quantified. Rats were assessed in behavioural tests of motor, spatial and contextual learning, and anxiety. Some tasks showed effects of injection, since handled and vehicle groups were included as controls. Performance on all tasks, except motor learning, and the volume of associated brain areas were altered with injection or THC administration, although these effects varied by strain and sex group. Finally, analysis revealed treatment-specific correlations between performance and brain volumes. This study is the first of its kind to directly compare males and females of two rat strains for the long-term consequences of adolescent THC exposure. It highlights the importance of considering strain and identifies certain rat strains as susceptible or resilient to the effects of THC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist LY379268 reduces toluene-induced enhancement of brain-stimulation reward and behavioral disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ming-Huan; Tsai, Yi-Ling; Lee, Mei-Yi; Stoker, Astrid K; Markou, Athina; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2015-09-01

    Toluene, a widely abused solvent with demonstrated addictive potential in humans, hasbeen reported to negatively modulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and alter glutamatergicneurotransmission. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist LY379268 has beenshown to regulate glutamate release transmission and NMDAR function and block toluene-induced locomotorhyperactivity. However, remaining unknown is whether group II mGluRs are involved in the toluene-induced reward-facilitating effect and other behavioral manifestations. The present study evaluated the effects of LY379268 on toluene-induced reward enhancement, motor incoordination, recognition memory impairment, and social interaction deficits. Our data demonstrated that LY379268 significantly reversed the toluene-induced lowering of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) thresholds and impairments in novel object recognition, rotarod performance, and social interaction with different potencies. These results indicate a negative modulatory role of group II mGluRs in acute toluene-induced reward-facilitating and behavioral effects and suggest that group II mGluR agonists may have therapeutic potential for toluene addiction and the prevention of toluene intoxication caused by occupational or intentional exposure.

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies ... medication. This information may someday make it possible to predict who ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ...

  15. Brain Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Brain lesions By Mayo Clinic Staff A brain lesion is an abnormality seen on a brain-imaging test, such as ... tomography (CT). On CT or MRI scans, brain lesions appear as dark or light spots that don' ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) ...

  18. Cloning and characterization of PAK5, a novel member of mammalian p21-activated kinase-II subfamily that is predominantly expressed in brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Dan, I.; Kristiansen, T.Z.

    2002-01-01

    cloned a novel human PAK family kinase that has been designated as PAK5. PAK5 contains a CDC42/Rac1 interactive binding (CRIB) motif at the N-terminus and a Ste20-like kinase domain at the C-terminus. PAK5 is structurally most related to PAK4 and PAK6 to make up the PAK-II subfamily. We have shown...

  19. Cancer 'survivor-care': II. Disruption of prefrontal brain activation top-down control of working memory capacity as possible mechanism for chemo-fog/brain (chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, R B

    2013-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairments (termed 'chemo-fog' or 'chemo-brain'), particularly in memory, have been self-reported or identified in cancer survivors previously treated with chemotherapy. Although a variety of deficits have been detected, a consistent theme is a detriment in visuospatial working memory. The parietal cortex, a major site of storage of such memory, is implicated in chemotherapy-induced damage. However, if the findings of two recent publications are combined, the (pre)frontal cortex might be an equally viable target. Two recent studies, one postulating a mechanism for 'top-down control' of working memory capacity and another visualizing chemotherapy-induced alterations in brain activation during working memory processing, are reviewed and integrated. A computational model and the proposal that the prefrontal cortex plays a role in working memory via top-down control of parietal working memory capacity is consistent with a recent demonstration of decreased frontal hyperactivation following chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-associated impairment of visuospatial working memory might include the (pre)frontal cortex in addition to the parietal cortex. This provides new opportunity for basic science and clinical investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. In vitro brain slice studies of the rat's dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. II. Physiological properties of biocytin-labeled neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S H; Kelly, J B

    1995-02-01

    1. We made intracellular recordings from neurons in rat dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL), determined intrinsic and synaptic physiological properties, and labeled the cells by intracellular injection of biocytin. Biocytin-labeled neurons were reconstructed and classified according to their somatic and dendritic morphology. 2. We identified a diversity of morphological cell types in DNLL. Five main groups of neurons were recognized: multipolar; elongate I, II, and III; and round. The multipolar cells were characterized by several large dendrites with multiple branches that spread over large areas within the DNLL. The dendrites radiated equally in all directions. 3. Elongate cells were characterized by extended cell bodies with polar dendrites. In the case of elongate I and II cells, the dendrites were preferentially oriented in the horizontal plane and the dendritic branches extended across most of the cytoarchitectonic breadth of DNLL from the medial to lateral borders. The classification of elongate II was reserved for a single neuron with profuse dendritic branching that fanned out dorsoventrally along the margins of DNLL. This neuron was unique in our sample and was distinguished from the more common elongate I cells, which had less profuse dorsoventral dendritic branching. Elongate III cells had extended cell bodies, but their dendrites did not extend across the DNLL and showed no preferential orientation. 4. Round neurons had relatively small, round cell bodies and radial dendrites that extended over large areas within DNLL. These cells were quite common in our sample and are almost certainly not the same as the infrequently encountered small round cells found in Nissl-stained sections. Some biocytin-labeled neurons were difficult to classify as either multipolar, elongate I, II, or III, or round. These neurons had properties that most closely resembled elongate III cells, but they were treated separately here to minimize heterogeneity within

  1. Seizures induced in immature rats by homocysteic acid and the associated brain damage are prevented by group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava; Druga, Rastislav; Otáhal, Jakub; Haugvicová, Renata; Mares, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    2005-04-01

    The present study has examined the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effect of group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (2R,4R-APDC) in the model of seizures induced in immature 12-day-old rats by bilateral intracerebroventricular infusion of dl-homocysteic acid (DL-HCA, 600 nmol/side). For biochemical analyses, rat pups were sacrificed during generalized clonic-tonic seizures, approximately 45-50 min after infusion. Comparable time intervals were used for sacrificing the pups which had received 2R,4R-APDC. Low doses of 2R,4R-APDC (0.05 nmol/side) provided a pronounced anticonvulsant effect which was abolished by pretreatment with a selective group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. Generalized clonic-tonic seizures were completely suppressed and cortical energy metabolite changes which normally accompany these seizures were either normalized (decrease of glucose and glycogen) or markedly reduced (an accumulation of lactate). EEG recordings support the marked anticonvulsant effect of 2R,4R-APDC, nevertheless, this was only partial. In spite of the absence of obvious motor phenomena, isolated spikes or even short periods of partial ictal activity could be observed. Isolated spikes could also be seen in some animals after application of 2R,4R-APDC alone, reflecting most likely subclinical proconvulsant activity of this agonist. The neuroprotective effect of 2R,4R-APDC was evaluated after 24 h and 6 days of survival following DL-HCA-induced seizures. Massive neuronal degeneration, as revealed by Fluoro-Jade B staining, was observed in a number of brain regions following infusion of DL-HCA alone (seizure group), whereas 2R,4R-APDC pretreatment provided substantial neuroprotection. The present findings support the possibility that group II mGluRs are a promising target for a novel approach to treating epilepsy.

  2. Absolute metabolite quantification by in vivo NMR spectroscopy: II. A multicentre trial of protocols for in vivo localised proton studies of human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keevil, S F; Barbiroli, B; Brooks, J C; Cady, E B; Canese, R; Carlier, P; Collins, D J; Gilligan, P; Gobbi, G; Hennig, J; Kügel, H; Leach, M O; Metzler, D; Mlynárik, V; Moser, E; Newbold, M C; Payne, G S; Ring, P; Roberts, J N; Rowland, I J; Thiel, T; Tkác, I; Topp, S; Wittsack, H J; Podo, F

    1998-11-01

    We have performed a multicentre trial to assess the performance of three techniques for absolute quantification of cerebral metabolites using in vivo proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The techniques included were 1) an internal water standard method, 2) an external standard method based on phantom replacement, and 3) a more sophisticated method incorporating elements of both the internal and external standard approaches, together with compartmental analysis of brain water. Only the internal water standard technique could be readily implemented at all participating sites and gave acceptable precision and interlaboratory reproducibility. This method was insensitive to many of the experimental factors affecting the performance of the alternative techniques, including effects related to loading, standing waves and B1 inhomogeneities; and practical issues of phantom positioning, user expertise and examination duration. However, the internal water standard method assumes a value for the concentration of NMR-visible water within the spectroscopic volume of interest. In general, it is necessary to modify this assumed concentration on the basis of the grey matter, white matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content of the volume, and the NMR-visible water content of the grey and white matter fractions. Combining data from 11 sites, the concentrations of the principal NMR-visible metabolites in the brains of healthy subjects (age range 20-35 years) determined using the internal water standard method were (mean+/-SD): [NAA]=10.0+/-3.4 mM (n=53), [tCho]=1.9+/-1.0 mM (n=51), [Cr + PCr]=6.5+/-3.7 mM (n=51). Evidence of system instability and other sources of error at some participating sites reinforces the need for rigorous quality assurance in quantitative spectroscopy.

  3. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video Welcome. Brain Basics ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: ... of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  6. M-CSF deficiency leads to reduced metallothioneins I and II expression and increased tissue damage in the brain stem after 6-aminonicotinamide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Poulsen, Christian; Carrasco, Javier

    2002-01-01

    6-Aminonicotinamide (6-AN) is a niacin antagonist, which leads to degeneration of gray-matter astrocytes followed by a vigorous inflammatory response. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) is important during inflammation, and in order to further clarify the roles for M-CSF in neurodegener......6-Aminonicotinamide (6-AN) is a niacin antagonist, which leads to degeneration of gray-matter astrocytes followed by a vigorous inflammatory response. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) is important during inflammation, and in order to further clarify the roles for M......-CSF is an important growth factor for coping with 6-AN-induced central nervous system damage and suggest that MT-I+II are likely to have a significant role....

  7. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) elicits increased VEGF and decreased IL-6 production in type II lung epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Hanna; Nagel, Christian; Weiss, Christel

    2015-01-01

    between VEGF and IL-6 levels to DMBT1 expression in the lungs of preterm and term infants and in lung epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: We examined by ELISA VEGF levels in 120 tracheal aspirates of 57 preterm and term infants and tested for correlation with different perinatal factors as well...... as with DMBT1 levels. To examine the effect of DMBT1 on VEGF and IL-6 expression we compared type II lung epithelial A549 cells stably transfected with a DMBT1 expression plasmid (DMBT1+ cells) to A549 cells stably transfected with an empty expression plasmid (DMBT1- cells). The concentrations of VEGF and IL-6...... that DMBT1 promotes VEGF and suppresses IL-6 production in alveolar tissues, which could point to DMBT1 having a possible role in the transition from inflammation to regeneration and being a potentially useful clinical marker....

  8. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  9. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain ... imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ... chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Outreach Home Stakeholder Engagement Outreach Partnership Program Alliance for Research Progress Coalition ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits ... tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on ...

  3. Motor cortex stimulation(MCS) for intractable complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type II: PSM analysis of Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. A.; Son, B. C.; Yoo, I. R.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, E. N.; Park, Y. H.; Lee, S. Y.; Sohn, H. S.; Chung, S. K. [College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    We had experienced a patient with intractable CRPS in whom statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of cerebral perfusion explained the mechanism of pain control by MCS. A 43-year-old man presented spontaneous severe burning pain in his left hand and forearm and allodynia over the left arm and left hemibody. After the electrodes for neuromodulation therapy were inserted in the central sulcus, the baseline and stimulation brain perfusion SPECT using Tc-99m ECD were obtained within two days. The differences between the baseline and stimulation SPECT images, estimated at every voxel using t-statistics using SPM-99 software, were considered significant at a threshold of uncorrected P values less than 0.01. Among several areas significantly activated following pain relief with MCS, ipsilateral pyramidal tract in the cerebral peduncle might be related to the mechanism of pain control with MCS through efferent motor pathway. The result suggested that corticospinal neurons themselves or motor cortex efferent pathway maintained by the presence of intact corticospinal neurons could play an important role in producing pain control after MCS. This study would helpful in understanding of neurophysiology.

  4. A preliminary investigation on the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy as a treatment for neurogenic heterotopic ossification following traumatic brain injury. Part II: Effects on function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, J E; Biros, E; Sacher, Y; Kibrik, O; Milanese, S; Gordon, S; Galea, M P

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) occurs as a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Management of clinically significant NHO remains variable. Complications of mature NHO include limitation of mobility. The effect of the extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on range of motion at hip and knee, and function in patients with TBI with chronic NHO was investigated. A series of single-case studies applying ESWT to chronic NHO at the hip or knee of 11 patients with TBI were undertaken at a rehabilitation hospital. Participants received four applications of high-energy EWST delivered to the affected hip or knee over a period of 8 weeks. Two-weekly follow- up assessments were carried out; final assessments were made 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Range of motion (ROM) and Functional Reach (FR) or Modified Functional Reach (MFR) were measured. Application of high-energy ESWT was associated with significant improvement in ROM (flexion) of the NHO-affected knee (Tau = 0.833, 95% CI 0.391-1.276, p = 0.002) and significant improvement of FR (Overall Tau 0.486, 95% CI 0.141-0.832, p = 0.006); no significant improvement in hip ROM or MFR. ESWT may improve mobility and balance of patients with TBI who have chronic NHO.

  5. Current and future strategies in radiotherapy of childhood low-grade glioma of the brain. Part II. Treatment-related late toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortmann, R.D.; Timmermann, B.; Plasswilm, L.; Paulsen, F.; Jeremic, B.; Kay, S.; Bamberg, M. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Taylor, R.E. [Radiotherapy Dept., Cookridge Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarzello, G. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Padua General Hospital (Italy); Gnekow, A.K. [Children' s Hospital Augsburg (Germany); Dieckmann, K. [Dept. of Radiooncology, General Hospital Vienna (Austria)

    2003-09-01

    Material and Methods: Studies on the use of radiation therapy in children with low-grade glioma were systematically reviewed for data on radiotherapy-induced side effects on brain parenchyma, endocrine dysfunction, growth retardation, neurocognitive dysfunction, vasculopathy, and secondary neoplasms. Results: Data on late effects are scarce and heterogeneous. Past reports included only retrospective series from the 1930s to present days, a time during which treatment policies and radiation techniques widely varied and considerably changed in recent years. Often, considerable uncertainty existed regarding pretreatment health status and radiotherapy-related factors (e.g., total dose, dose per fraction, treatment fields). In spite of these shortcomings and often conflicting observations, it appears that especially younger children and children with neurofibromatosis (NF) are at risk of endocrinopathies in terms of growth retardation and developmental abnormalities, as well as neurocognitive dysfunction expressed as problems in the psychosocial environment such as in education and occupation. However, both observations may be attributed to the higher proportion of NF in the very young who frequently develop large tumors spreading along the entire supratentorial midline. The risk of radiation-induced disturbances in visual function is low (no case reported). Young children with NF appear to have an increased risk of vasculopathies. 33 cases of moyamoya disease were found (preferably in the very young), 18 of whom were NF-positive. Other cerebrovascular accidents (24 cases, of whom 14 were NF-positive) and secondary neoplasms (15 cases, of whom only five occurred in field - four were high-grade astrocytomas) are a rare condition. The latter cannot be distinguished from late relapses with malignant transformation. Modern treatment techniques appear to reduce the risk of radiation-induced late effects. Conclusions: More studies and clear definitions of clinical endpoints

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental ... the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading ... the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain ...

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    Full Text Available ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. ... specialized brain systems. We have many specialized brain systems that work ... research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which ...

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News New BRAIN Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Careers at NIMH Staff Directories Getting to NIMH Transforming the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses. Search ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) ...

  14. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain. Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a ...

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    Full Text Available ... Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can ...

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    Full Text Available ... front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences may have made it ...

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

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    Full Text Available ... The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each ... of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes the nucleus, cytoplasm, and ...

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    Full Text Available ... Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research Training Labs at NIMH Labs ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in ... communication signal sent between neurons by which neurons communicate with each other. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mdash; ...

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... Grants BRAIN Cell Census Launched How DNA Shapes Human Gene Expression More General Health Information from NIH ...

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

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    Full Text Available ... disorder and to tailor the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This ...

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    Full Text Available ... the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain ... the normal brain's structure develops and matures helps scientists understand what goes wrong in mental illnesses. Scientists ...

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

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    Full Text Available ... The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the brain is wired and ... for mental disorders. This could greatly help in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... the body's response to stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons by which neurons communicate ...

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... in her life. She began to think of suicide because she felt like things weren't going ...

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    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

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    Full Text Available ... as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... leaves the cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance ...

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    Full Text Available ... and her husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early- ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... and her husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early- ...

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    Full Text Available ... and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought ... and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," ...

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    Full Text Available ... or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role ... depression helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are ...

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    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

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    Full Text Available ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... it increases the chance that the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells ... This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

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    Full Text Available ... depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of ... of contact for receiving impulses on a neuron, branching off from the cell body. dopamine —A neurotransmitter ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Publications Help for Mental Illnesses Clinical Trials Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News & Events About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

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    Full Text Available ... a major mood circuit called the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain ... in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body circuit which plays ...

  7. Brain Aneurysm

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    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic- ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ...

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent from one neuron to ... of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ...

  13. Brain Aneurysm

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    ... inside of the brain (ventricles) or surrounding your brain and spinal cord to drain the excess fluid into an external bag. Sometimes it may then be necessary to introduce a shunt system — which consists of a ... brain and ending in your abdominal cavity. Rehabilitative therapy. ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow there are differences in ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  16. The role of metallothionein II in neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Metallothionein I and II (MT-I+II) are antioxidant and tissue protective factors. We have previously shown that MT-I+II prevent oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death and are of therapeutic value in brain inflammation. However, MT-I+II are expressed in glia and it remains to be elucidated if M...

  17. The rehabilitation of attention in patients with mild cognitive impairment and brain subcortical vascular changes using the Attention Process Training-II. The RehAtt Study: rationale, design and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Emilia; Poggesi, Anna; Valenti, Raffaella; Della Rocca, Eleonora; Diciotti, Stefano; Mascalchi, Mario; Inzitari, Domenico; Pantoni, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) may cause attentional and executive cognitive deficits. No drug is currently available to improve cognitive performance or to prevent dementia in SVD patients, and cognitive rehabilitation could be a promising approach. We aimed to investigate: (1) the effectiveness of the Attention Process Training-II program in the rehabilitation of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and SVD; (2) the impact of the induced cognitive improvement on functionality and quality of life; (3) the effect of training on brain activity at rest and the possibility of a training-induced plasticity effect. The RehAtt study is designed as a 3-year prospective, single-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Inclusion criteria were: (1) MCI defined according to Winblad et al. criteria; (2) evidence of impairment across attention neuropsychological tests; (3) evidence on MRI of moderate/severe white matter hyperintensities. All enrolled patients are evaluated at baseline, and after 6 and 12 months, according to an extensive clinical, functional, MRI and neuropsychological protocol. The baseline RehAtt cohort includes 44 patients (66 % males, mean ± SD age and years of education 75.3 ± 6.8 and 8.3 ± 4.3, respectively). After baseline assessment, patients have been randomly assigned to 'attention training' or 'standard care'. Treatments and follow-up visits at 6 months are completed, while follow-up visits at 12 months are ongoing. This study is the first attempt to reduce attention deficits in patients affected by MCI with SVD. The results of this pilot experience will represent an essential background for designing larger multicenter, prospective, double-blinded, randomized and controlled clinical trials. NCT02033850 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier).

  18. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  19. (II) complexes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of Schiff base tin (II) complexes. Neelofar1 ... Conclusion: All synthesized Schiff bases and their Tin (II) complexes showed high antimicrobial and ...... Singh HL. Synthesis and characterization of tin (II) complexes of fluorinated Schiff bases derived from amino acids. Spectrochim Acta Part A: Molec Biomolec.

  20. Co-localisation, heterophilic interactions and regulated expression of IgLON family proteins in the chick nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, A P; Howard, M R; McNamee, C J; Moss, D J

    2000-10-20

    The chick glycoprotein GP55 has been shown to inhibit the growth and adhesion of DRG and forebrain neurons. GP55 consists of several members of the IgLON family, a group of glycoproteins including LAMP, OBCAM, CEPU-1 (chick)/neurotrimin (rat) and neurotractin (chick)/kilon (rat) thought to play a role in the guidance of growing axons. IgLONs belong to the Ig superfamily and have three C2 domains and a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor which tethers them to the neuronal plasma membrane. We have now completed the deduced amino acid sequence for two isoforms of chicken OBCAM and used recombinant LAMP, OBCAM and CEPU-1 to raise antisera specific to these three IgLONs. LAMP and CEPU-1 are co-expressed on DRG and sympathetic neurons, while both overlapping and distinct expression patterns for LAMP, OBCAM and CEPU-1 are observed in retina. Analysis of IgLON mRNA expression reveals that alternatively spliced forms of LAMP and CEPU-1 are developmentally regulated. In an attempt to understand how the IgLONs function, we have begun to characterise their molecular interactions. LAMP and CEPU-1 have already been shown to interact homophilically. We now confirm that OBCAM will bind homophilically and also that LAMP, OBCAM and CEPU-1 will interact heterophilically with each other. We propose that IgLON activity will depend on the complement of IgLONs expressed by each neuron.

  1. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  2. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, H R

    1999-05-01

    Current law in the United States authorizes physicians to diagnose brain death by applying generally accepted neurologic criteria for determining loss of function of the entire brain. This article offers a medical-legal perspective on problems that may arise with respect to the determination of brain death. These include the possibility of diagnostic error, conceptual disagreements that may constrain the use of neurologic criteria to diagnose death, and the conflation of brain death and loss of consciousness. This article also addresses legal aspects of the debate over whether to expand the definition of brain death to include permanent unconsciousness. Although existing laws draw a clear distinction between brain death and the persistent vegetative state, many courts have authorized removal of life support from individuals whose unconsciousness is believed to be permanent on proof that removal accords with preferences expressed before sentience was lost.

  3. Bleomycin treatment of brain tumors: an evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnert, Mette; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Bleomycin has been used in the treatment of brain tumors for over 30 years. Currently, we are evaluating electrochemotherapy (the use of electric pulses to enhance uptake of bleomycin) for patients with secondary brain tumors. We, therefore, reviewed the literature with specific reference...... to the tolerability and toxicity of bleomycin. Using the keywords 'brain' and 'bleomycin', a database search without date restriction was performed and over 500 articles were found. Twenty-five articles were used for this study based on relevance determined by: (i) clinical studies, (ii) use of bleomycin, and (iii......) direct injection into brain tissue or cysts. There were two main indications for the use of bleomycin directly into the brain: (i) cystic tumors in the form of craniopharyngiomas and (ii) solid brain tumors such as glioblastomas and astrocytomas. The most frequent adverse effects reported were transient...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting in ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape from a dangerous ... The brain's "fear hub," which helps activate the fight-or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... MSC 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in ... Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. ... Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ... the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain ... had problems getting to sleep and generally felt tired, listless, and had no ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare that with brain development in ... Other medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or ... gets "the blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ... imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation — ...

  4. Copper (II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: A Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of 2 - amino - 3 – methylbutanoic acid and 2, 4 - pentanedione. The reaction of the prepared Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride formed diaquo bis( N – 2 – amino – 3 - methylbutyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) complex. The Schiff base is ...

  5. [Brain concussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pälvimäki, Esa-Pekka; Siironen, Jari; Pohjola, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Brain concussion is a common disturbance caused by external forces or acceleration affecting the head. It may be accompanied by transient loss of consciousness and amnesia. Typical symptoms include headache, nausea and dizziness; these may remain for a week or two. Some patients may experience transient loss of inability to create new memories or other brief impairment of mental functioning. Treatment is symptomatic. Some patients may suffer from prolonged symptoms, the connection of which with brain concession is difficult to show. Almost invariably the prognosis of brain concussion is good.

  6. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  7. Brain radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation - brain - discharge; Cancer-brain radiation; Lymphoma - brain radiation; Leukemia - brain radiation ... Decadron) while you are getting radiation to the brain. It may make you hungrier, cause leg swelling ...

  8. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  9. Anatomy of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Structure Neuron Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with ... our original set of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medicine, the term environment includes not only our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at NIMH ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ... The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and certain abilities, such as a good singing voice. A gene is a segment of DNA that ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause severe disability. ... disorders are brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Criteria (RDoC) Funding Funding Home Opportunities & Announcements Funding Strategy for Grants Application Process Managing Grants Clinical Research ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ...

  2. Brain abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including those with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Patient ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ... 9663 Bethesda, MD 20892-9663 Follow Us Facebook Twitter YouTube Google Plus NIMH Newsletter NIMH RSS Feed ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... medicine, the term environment includes not only our physical surroundings but also factors that can affect our ...

  7. Brain Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that combining good nutrition with mental, social and physical activities may have a greater benefit in maintaining or improving brain health than any single activity. At the Alzheimer’s Association ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ... of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression (when genes ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the effects of medications. ... feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder ... and her husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early- ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's ... as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone or together in complex ways, to change ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues maturing well into ... factors that can affect our bodies, such as sleep, diet, or stress. These factors may act alone ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... that contains codes to make proteins and other important body chemicals. DNA also includes information to control ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... to produce a specific protein. Scientists believe epigenetics play a major role in mental disorders and the ... thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the ... how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... studied in mental health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural " ... confront or escape from a dangerous situation. The amygdala also appears to be involved in learning to ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... This area of the brain also helps to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. Anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) — the ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic Plan Offices and Divisions Budget Careers at ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many others. ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy people and are working to compare ... listless, and had no appetite most of the time. Weeks later, Sarah realized she was having trouble ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, ... studies suggest that having too little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with ... axon, most neurons release a chemical message (a neurotransmitter) which crosses the synapse and binds to receptors ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Using MEG, some scientists have found a specific pattern of brain activity that may help predict who ... people with depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Some people who develop a mental illness may recover completely; others may have repeated episodes of illness ... in early detection, more tailored treatments, and possibly prevention of such illnesses. The Working Brain Neurotransmitters Everything ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... from one neuron to another. Share Science News Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. ... and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... each other How changes in the brain can lead to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing ... understanding of genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... glutamate —The most common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of cells in the body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common neurotransmitter, glutamate has ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the ... reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the most common ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... genes that appear to increase risk or provide protection from various mental disorders. Other genes may change ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and information that the cell needs for growth, metabolism, and repair. Cytoplasm is the substance that fills ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... doctor that she had experienced long periods of deep sadness throughout her teenage years, but had never ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that ... increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... taking SSRIs and has joined an online support group. Sharing her experiences with others also dealing with depression helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of ... other. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) mdash;An imaging technique that uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... cells required for normal function and plays an important role during early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause ... normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... health research are listed below. Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a hot stove, ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ... or-flight response and is also involved in emotions and memory. anterior cingulate cortex —Is involved in ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... genes and epigenetics may one day lead to genetic testing for people at risk for mental disorders. ... brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron's point of contact for receiving chemical and electrical signals called impulses from neighboring neurons. Axon which ... from one neuron to another as chemical or electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, and responds ... via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify unknown ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on ... peak early. And as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Neurotransmitters Everything we do relies on neurons communicating with one another. Electrical impulses and chemical signals ... depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in mental illnesses. Scientists have already begun to chart how the brain develops over time in healthy ... our original set of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Labs at NIMH Home Research Areas Principal Investigators Administrative Oversight & Support Collaborations & Partnerships Join A Study News & ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... some point. Such disorders include depression , anxiety disorders , bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) , and many ... differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science Education : Resources for science educators Pillbox: How to identify ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain and nervous system. Glutamate is an excitatory transmitter: when it is released it increases the chance ... at www.nimh.nih.gov . Glossary action potential —Transmission of signal from the cell body to the ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her husband ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. Different parts of the ... a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... people with depression often have lower than normal levels of serotonin. The types of medications most commonly ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that ... fast-acting antidepressant medications. Currently available antidepressants usually take four to six weeks to reach their full ...

  13. Brain death and organ donation of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ramiz Coşkun; Şahin, Şanlıay; Uysal-Yazıcı, Mutlu; Ayar, Ganime; Yakut, Halil İbrahim; Akman, Alkım Öden; Hirfanoğlu, İbrahim Murat; Kalkan, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to define the demographic characteristics, clinical features and outcome of patients with brain death, and to emphasize the importance of organ donation from children. Data for the period from September 2009 to October 2012 were collected retrospectively. Twenty children who were diagnosed as brain death were included. Data including demographics, major cause leading to brain death, duration of brain death evaluation, ancillary tests used to confirm brain death, complications and outcome, duration of hospitalization and organ donation were collected for statistical evaluation. The mean age was 6.2 years, and the male/female ratio 1.85. The major cause leading to brain death was most often traumatic brain injury, seen in 11 patients (55%). The mean duration of brain death evaluation was 6.7 and 1.7 days in Centers I and II respectively. The mean duration of hospitalization was 12.5 days. Electroencephalography (EEG) was used in 18 patients (90%). Complications included hyperglycemia in 13 cases and diabetes incipitus in 7 cases (65% and 35%, respectively). Mean duration of survival was 9.8 days. In Center I, one of the patients' parents gave consent to organ donation, while four parents in Center II agreed to organ donation. The study demonstrated that the duration of brain death evaluation was longer in Center I than in Center II (porgan donation, survival after diagnosis of brain death and length of stay in the PICU (p>0.05). Early diagnosis of brain death and prompt evaluation of patients by ICU physicians once the diagnosis is taken into consideration will probably yield better organs and reduce costs. Training PICU physicians, nurses and organ donation coordinators, and increasing children's awareness of the need for organ donation via means of public communication may increase families' rate of agreement to organ donation in the future.

  14. Brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of brain death should be based on a simple premise. If every possible confounder has been excluded and all possible treatments have been tried or considered, irreversible loss of brain function is clinically recognized as the absence of brainstem reflexes, verified apnea, loss of vascular tone, invariant heart rate, and, eventually, cardiac standstill. This condition cannot be reversed - not even partly - by medical or surgical intervention, and thus is final. Many countries in the world have introduced laws that acknowledge that a patient can be declared brain-dead by neurologic standards. The U.S. law differs substantially from all other brain death legislation in the world because the U.S. law does not spell out details of the neurologic examination. Evidence-based practice guidelines serve as a standard. In this chapter, I discuss the history of development of the criteria, the current clinical examination, and some of the ethical and legal issues that have emerged. Generally, the concept of brain death has been accepted by all major religions. But patients' families may have different ideas and are mostly influenced by cultural attitudes, traditional customs, and personal beliefs. Suggestions are offered to support these families. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metallothionein in Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Juárez-Rebollar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallothioneins are a family of proteins which are able to bind metals intracellularly, so their main function is to regulate the cellular metabolism of essential metals. There are 4 major isoforms of MTs (I–IV, three of which have been localized in the central nervous system. MT-I and MT-II have been localized in the spinal cord and brain, mainly in astrocytes, whereas MT-III has been found mainly in neurons. MT-I and MT-II have been considered polyvalent proteins whose main function is to maintain cellular homeostasis of essential metals such as zinc and copper, but other functions have also been considered: detoxification of heavy metals, regulation of gene expression, processes of inflammation, and protection against free radicals generated by oxidative stress. On the other hand, the MT-III has been related in events of pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer. Likewise, the participation of MTs in other neurological disorders has also been reported. This review shows recent evidence about the role of MT in the central nervous system and its possible role in neurodegenerative diseases as well as in brain disorders.

  16. Ni(II), Mn(II), Zn(II)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Neutral tetradentate N2O2 type complexes of Cu(II), Ni(II), Mn(II),. Zn(II) and VO(II) have been synthesised using a Schiff base formed by the condensation of o-phenylenediamine with acetoacetanilide in alcohol medium. All the complexes were characterised on the basis of their microanalytical data, molar.

  17. Miniaturization and its effects on cranial morphology in plethodontid salamanders, genus Thorius (Amphibia, Plethodontidae): II. The fate of the brain and sense organs and their role in skull morphogenesis and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, J

    1983-09-01

    Relative size and arrangement of the brain and paired sense organs are examined in three species of Thorius, a genus of minute, terrestrial salamanders that are among the smallest extant tailed tetrapods. Analogous measurements of representative species of three related genera of larger tropical (Pseudoeurycea, Chiropterotriton) and temperate (Plethodon) salamanders are used to identify changes in gross morphology of the brain and sense organs that have accompanied the evolution of decreased head size in Thorius and their relation to associated changes in skull morphology. In adult Thorius, relative size (area measured in frontal plane, and length) of the eyes, otic capsules, and brain each is greater than in adults of all of the larger genera; relative size of the nasal capsules is unchanged or slightly smaller. Interspecific scaling phenomena--negative allometry of otic capsule, eye and brain size, isometry or slight positive allometry of nasal capsule size, all with respect to skull length--also are characteristic of intraspecific (ontogenetic) comparisons in both T. narisovalis and Pseudoeurycea goebeli. Predominance of the brain and eyes in Thorius results in greater contact and overlap among these structures and the nasal capsules in the anterior portion of the head. This is associated with anterior displacement of both the eyes and nasal capsules, which now protrude anterior to the skull proper; a change in eye shape; and medial deformation of anterior braincase walls. Posteriorly, predominance of the otic capsules has effected a reorientation of the jaw suspensorium to a fully vertical position that is correlated with the novel presence of a posteriorly directed squamosal process and shift in origin of the quadropectoralis muscle. Many of these changes in cranial morphology may be explained simply as results of mechanical (physical) interactions among the skeletal, nervous, and sensory components during head development at reduced size. This provides

  18. Pb II

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    used was oven-dried till constant weight and were ground to fine powder in a pestle and mortar. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Screening for lead sorption. 15 fungal isolates were screened for Pb(II) biosorption potential at initial pH value of 4.5 and temperature 30°C by incubating freshly harvested wet biomass corres-.

  19. Getting into the brain: approaches to enhance brain drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayur M; Goyal, Bhoomika R; Bhadada, Shraddha V; Bhatt, Jay S; Amin, Avani F

    2009-01-01

    Being the most delicate organ of the body, the brain is protected against potentially toxic substances by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts the entry of most pharmaceuticals into the brain. The developmental process for new drugs for the treatment of CNS disorders has not kept pace with progress in molecular neurosciences because most of the new drugs discovered are unable to cross the BBB. The clinical failure of CNS drug delivery may be attributed largely to a lack of appropriate drug delivery systems. Localized and controlled delivery of drugs at their desired site of action is preferred because it reduces toxicity and increases treatment efficiency. The present review provides an insight into some of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery.The various strategies that have been explored to increase drug delivery into the brain include (i) chemical delivery systems, such as lipid-mediated transport, the prodrug approach and the lock-in system; (ii) biological delivery systems, in which pharmaceuticals are re-engineered to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium; (iii) disruption of the BBB, for example by modification of tight junctions, which causes a controlled and transient increase in the permeability of brain capillaries; (iv) the use of molecular Trojan horses, such as peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies to transport large molecules (e.g. antibodies, recombinant proteins, nonviral gene medicines or RNA interference drugs) across the BBB; and (v) particulate drug carrier systems. Receptor-mediated transport systems exist for certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin and transferrin, enabling these molecules to cross the BBB in vivo.The use of polymers for local drug delivery has greatly expanded the spectrum of drugs available for the treatment of brain diseases, such as malignant tumours and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, various drug delivery systems (e

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the cell body ... to their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... to control the amygdala during stressful events. Some research shows that people who ... social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah and her ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by neurons that carries ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ... identify unknown pills from the National Library of Medicine Contact Us The National Institute of Mental Health ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also has several follow-up visits scheduled with the psychiatrist to check how she's responding to the treatment. She also begins regular talk therapy sessions with her psychiatrist. In these sessions, she ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter that regulates many functions, including ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Top

  8. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest in her job. She had ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences may have made it harder for Sarah ... front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic ... factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation Brain’s Alertness ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... different roles, from controlling blood pressure and heart rate to responding when we sense a mistake, helping us feel motivated and stay focused on a task, and managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such ... for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News NIMH Director Gordon Elected AAAS Fellow NIMH Launches Director Twitter Account Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government agencies ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the release of various hormones, and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some behavioral traits. epigenetics —The study of ...

  18. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neuron to bind onto, leading to more normal mood functioning. Dopamine —mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... a cell that contains DNA and information the cell needs for growing, staying alive, and making new neurons. prefrontal cortex —A highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... are sent from one neuron to another. Share Science News Brain’s Alertness Circuitry Revealed New BRAIN Grants ... human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists to make important ... that regulates many functions, including mood, appetite, and sleep. synapse —The tiny gap between neurons, where nerve impulses are sent ... More General Health Information from NIH MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... common neurotransmitter in a person's body, which increases neuronal activity, is involved in early brain development, and ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Join A Study News & Events News & Events Home Science News Events Multimedia Social Media Press Resources Newsletters NIMH News Feeds About Us About Us Home About the Director Advisory Boards and Groups Strategic ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... is damaged, a person can't create new memories, but can still remember past events and learned skills, and carry on a conversation, all which rely on different parts of the brain. The hippocampus may be involved in mood disorders through its control of a major mood circuit ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... memories of fear and safety may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . ... possible to predict who will develop a mental disorder and to tailor the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the understanding of how the brain grows and works and the effects of genes and environment on mental health. This knowledge is allowing scientists ... inside contents of a cell from its surrounding environment. cytoplasm ... the cell to work properly. dendrite —The point of contact for receiving ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of information to the front of the brain. DNA —The "recipe of life," containing inherited genetic information that helps to define physical and some behavioral traits. epigenetics —The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care ...

  10. Specificity and divergence in the neurobiologic effects of different metallothioneins after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Tio, Laura; Giralt, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Brain injury and neuroinflammation are pathophysiologic contributors to acute and chronic neurologic disorders, which are progressive diseases not fully understood. Mammalian metallothioneins I and II (MT-I&II) have significant neuroprotective functions, but the precise mechanisms underlying thes...

  11. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  12. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  13. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  14. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Diagnosis Newly Diagnosed Neurological Exam ...

  15. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Adult Guidelines For brain tumor information and support Call: 800-886-ABTA (2282) or Complete our contact form Brain Tumor Information Brain Anatomy Brain Tumor Symptoms Headaches Seizures Memory Depression Mood ...

  16. Brain Basics: Know Your Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frontal lobes. Whether you appreciate symphonies or rock music, your brain responds through the activity of these lobes. At the top of each temporal lobe is an area responsible for receiving ... those associated with music. Other parts of this lobe seem to integrate ...

  17. The Creative Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Ned

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the differences between left-brain and right-brain functioning and between left-brain and right-brain dominant individuals, and concludes that creativity uses both halves of the brain. Discusses how both students and curriculum can become more "whole-brained." (Author/JM)

  18. Silicon Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefflinger, Bernd

    Beyond the digital neural networks of Chap. 16, the more radical mapping of brain-like structures and processes into VLSI substrates has been pioneered by Carver Mead more than 30 years ago [1]. The basic idea was to exploit the massive parallelism of such circuits and to create low-power and fault-tolerant information-processing systems. Neuromorphic engineering has recently seen a revival with the availability of deep-submicron CMOS technology, which allows for the construction of very-large-scale mixed-signal systems combining local analog processing in neuronal cells with binary signalling via action potentials. Modern implementations are able to reach the complexity-scale of large functional units of the human brain, and they feature the ability to learn by plasticity mechanisms found in neuroscience. Combined with high-performance programmable logic and elaborate software tools, such systems are currently evolving into user-configurable non-von-Neumann computing systems, which can be used to implement and test novel computational paradigms. The chapter introduces basic properties of biological brains with up to 200 Billion neurons and their 1014 synapses, where action on a synapse takes ˜10 ms and involves an energy of ˜10 fJ. We outline 10x programs on neuromorphic electronic systems in Europe and the USA, which are intended to integrate 108 neurons and 1012 synapses, the level of a cat's brain, in a volume of 1 L and with a power dissipation intelligence, we references Hawkins' view to first perceive the task and then design an intelligent technical response.

  19. Animating Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borck, Cornelius

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper famously accused the rising field of social neuroscience of using faulty statistics under the catchy title ‘Voodoo Correlations in Social Neuroscience’. This Special Issue invites us to take this claim as the starting point for a cross-cultural analysis: in which meaningful ways can recent research in the burgeoning field of functional imaging be described as, contrasted with, or simply compared to animistic practices? And what light does such a reading shed on the dynamics and effectiveness of a century of brain research into higher mental functions? Reviewing the heated debate from 2009 around recent trends in neuroimaging as a possible candidate for current instances of ‘soul catching’, the paper will then compare these forms of primarily image-based brain research with older regimes, revolving around the deciphering of the brain’s electrical activity. How has the move from a decoding paradigm to a representational regime affected the conceptualisation of self, psyche, mind and soul (if there still is such an entity)? And in what ways does modern technoscience provide new tools for animating brains? PMID:27292322

  20. Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical speciation of citric acid complexes of Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) was investigated pH-metrically in 0.0-2.5% anionic, cationic and neutral micellar media. The primary alkalimetric data were pruned with SCPHD program. The existence of different binary species was established from modeling studies using the ...

  1. Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    2010-06-15

    Jun 15, 2010 ... physico-chemical techniques. A square planar geometry was suggested for Cu(II) and octahedral geometry proposed for Co(II),. Ni(II) and Zn(II). TG curves indicated that the complexes decompose in three to four steps. The presence of coordinated water in metal complexes was confirmed by thermal and ...

  2. Norepinephrine metabolism in neuronal cultures is increased by angiotensin II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumners, C.; Shalit, S.L.; Kalberg, C.J.; Raizada, M.K.

    1987-06-01

    In this study the authors have examined the actions of angiotensin II (ANG II) on catecholamine metabolism in neuronal brain cell cultures prepared from the hypothalamus and brain stem. Neuronal cultures prepared from the brains of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit specific neuronal uptake mechanisms for both norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), and also monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity. Separate neuronal uptake sites for NE and DA were identified by using specific neuronal uptake inhibitors for each amine. In previous studies, they determined that ANG II (10 nM-1 ..mu..M) stimulates increased neuronal (/sup 3/H)NE uptake by acting as specific receptors. They have confirmed these results here and in addition have shown that ANG II has not significant effects on neuronal (/sup 3/H)DA uptake. These results suggest that the actions of ANG II are restricted to the NE transporter in neuronal cultures. It is possible that ANG II stimulates the intraneuronal metabolism of at least part of the NE that is taken up, because the peptide stimulates MAO activity, an effect mediated by specific ANG II receptors. ANG II had no effect on COMT activity in neuronal cultures. Therefore, the use of neuronal cultures of hypothalamus and brain stem they have determined that ANG II can specifically alter NE metabolism in these areas, while apparently not altering DA metabolism.

  3. Energetic and nutritional constraints on infant brain development: implications for brain expansion during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Crawford, Michael A

    2014-12-01

    The human brain confronts two major challenges during its development: (i) meeting a very high energy requirement, and (ii) reliably accessing an adequate dietary source of specific brain selective nutrients needed for its structure and function. Implicitly, these energetic and nutritional constraints to normal brain development today would also have been constraints on human brain evolution. The energetic constraint was solved in large measure by the evolution in hominins of a unique and significant layer of body fat on the fetus starting during the third trimester of gestation. By providing fatty acids for ketone production that are needed as brain fuel, this fat layer supports the brain's high energy needs well into childhood. This fat layer also contains an important reserve of the brain selective omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), not available in other primates. Foremost amongst the brain selective minerals are iodine and iron, with zinc, copper and selenium also being important. A shore-based diet, i.e., fish, molluscs, crustaceans, frogs, bird's eggs and aquatic plants, provides the richest known dietary sources of brain selective nutrients. Regular access to these foods by the early hominin lineage that evolved into humans would therefore have helped free the nutritional constraint on primate brain development and function. Inadequate dietary supply of brain selective nutrients still has a deleterious impact on human brain development on a global scale today, demonstrating the brain's ongoing vulnerability. The core of the shore-based paradigm of human brain evolution proposes that sustained access by certain groups of early Homo to freshwater and marine food resources would have helped surmount both the nutritional as well as the energetic constraints on mammalian brain development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. New molecule in the etiology of schizophrenia: urotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbul, Feridun; Alpak, Gokay; Unal, Ahmet; Copoglu, Umit Sertan; Orkmez, Mustafa; Virit, Osman; Tarkcıoglu, Mehmet; Savas, Haluk A

    2014-02-01

    Urotensin II (U-II) is a cyclic peptide that was first isolated from the caudal neurosecretory system of goby fish. U-II receptors were detected in the vascular endothelium, brain and kidney cortex. Urotensin is by far the most powerful vasoconstrictor identified. U-II molecules were previously isolated from the brain of rats and were shown to have an impact on rat behavior. The aim of the present study was to measure the level of U-II molecule in schizophrenia patients and to investigate whether the U-II level is associated with the etiology of schizophrenia. Forty schizophrenia patients who were followed at Gaziantep University Faculty of Medicine Department of Psychiatry Psychotic Disorders Unit and 40 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein after 12-h fasting. U-II level was measured on ELISA. The U-II level in schizophrenia patients was significantly higher than in the control group. U-II level was not different with regard to gender in either group. U-II level was not different between subgroups of schizophrenia. No significant correlation was found between U-II level, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale scores. U-II level was higher in schizophrenia patients, indicating that U-II level may be related to the etiology of the disease. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Interactions of anti-Parkinson drug benserazide with Zn(II), Cu(II), Fe(II) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyrwiel, Lukasz; Pap, József S; Malinka, Wieslaw; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Kotynia, Aleksandra; Brasun, Justyna

    2013-03-25

    One of the treatments of Parkinson disease is based on increasing the brain dopamine level by L-DOPA (LD) applications. To prevent the peripheral degradation of levodopa, another drug, benserazide is applied. On the other hand, during this neurodegenerative disease changes in the homeostasis of metals are observed and the increasing brain zinc levels are postulated to have therapeutic effects. Here we present studies on interactions of Zn(II), Cu(II), Fe(II) ions with benserazide and with benserazide/levodopa in ternary system. By applying mass spectrometry and UV-vis methods we describe the interactions between selected metal ions and the drug additives in the investigated systems. The results show forming of equimolar complexes in the binary and ternary systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  8. That's Using Your Brain!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Dana R.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses new adult learning theories, including those of Roger Sperry (left brain/right brain), Paul McLean (triune brain), and Howard Gardner (multiple intelligences). Relates adult learning theory to training. (JOW)

  9. Brain-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ruth Palombo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses brain research and how new imaging technologies allow scientists to explore how human brains process memory, emotion, attention, patterning, motivation, and context. Explains how brain research is being used to revise learning theories. (JOW)

  10. Brain tumor (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  11. How the Public Engages With Brain Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Cliodhna

    2015-01-01

    In the burgeoning debate about neuroscience’s role in contemporary society, the issue of brain optimization, or the application of neuroscientific knowledge and technologies to augment neurocognitive function, has taken center stage. Previous research has characterized media discourse on brain optimization as individualistic in ethos, pressuring individuals to expend calculated effort in cultivating culturally desirable forms of selves and bodies. However, little research has investigated whether the themes that characterize media dialogue are shared by lay populations. This article considers the relationship between the representations of brain optimization that surfaced in (i) a study of British press coverage between 2000 and 2012 and (ii) interviews with forty-eight London residents. Both data sets represented the brain as a resource that could be manipulated by the individual, with optimal brain function contingent on applying self-control in one’s lifestyle choices. However, these ideas emerged more sharply in the media than in the interviews: while most interviewees were aware of brain optimization practices, few were committed to carrying them out. The two data sets diverged in several ways: the media’s intense preoccupation with optimizing children’s brains was not apparent in lay dialogue, while interviewees elaborated beliefs about the underuse of brain tissue that showed no presence in the media. This article considers these continuities and discontinuities in light of their wider cultural significance and their implications for the media–mind relationship in public engagement with neuroscience. PMID:26336326

  12. Impaired inflammatory response to glial cell death in genetically metallothionein-I- and -II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Giralt, M; Moos, T

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein I+II (MT-I+II) are acute-phase proteins which are upregulated during pathological conditions in the brain. To elucidate the neuropathological importance of MT-I+II, we have examined MT-I+II-deficient mice following ip injection with 6-aminonicotinamide (6-AN). 6-AN is antimetaboli...

  13. Left brain, right brain: facts and fantasies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness and brain asymmetry are widely regarded as unique to humans, and associated with complementary functions such as a left-brain specialization for language and logic and a right-brain specialization for creativity and intuition. In fact, asymmetries are widespread among animals, and support the gradual evolution of asymmetrical functions such as language and tool use. Handedness and brain asymmetry are inborn and under partial genetic control, although the gene or genes responsible are not well established. Cognitive and emotional difficulties are sometimes associated with departures from the "norm" of right-handedness and left-brain language dominance, more often with the absence of these asymmetries than their reversal.

  14. (ii) and ni (ii) complexes with n

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    II) complexes with a. Schiff base derived from. 4-dimetylamino benzaldehyde and primary amines. The chemical analysis data showed the formation of (1:1) metal - ligand ratio and a square planar geometry was suggested for Co(II) and Ni(II) ...

  15. manganese(II) and uranyl(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paper electrophoresis is used for the study of equilibria in binary complex systems in solution. The stability constants of ML and ML2 complex species of some metal ions copper(II), manganese(II) and uranyl(II) with a-aminobutenoic acid and hydroxyproline were determined at an ionic strength of 0.1 M and 35 ºC.

  16. Imaging brain development: the adolescent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2012-06-01

    The past 15 years have seen a rapid expansion in the number of studies using neuroimaging techniques to investigate maturational changes in the human brain. In this paper, I review MRI studies on structural changes in the developing brain, and fMRI studies on functional changes in the social brain during adolescence. Both MRI and fMRI studies point to adolescence as a period of continued neural development. In the final section, I discuss a number of areas of research that are just beginning and may be the subject of developmental neuroimaging in the next twenty years. Future studies might focus on complex questions including the development of functional connectivity; how gender and puberty influence adolescent brain development; the effects of genes, environment and culture on the adolescent brain; development of the atypical adolescent brain; and implications for policy of the study of the adolescent brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elizabeth II uus kunstigalerii

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Tähistamaks oma troonile asumise 50. aastapäeva, avab Elizabeth II 6. II 2002 Buckinghami palees uue kunstigalerii, mis ehitatakse palee tiibhoonena. Arhitekt John Simpson. Elizabeth II kunstikogust

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Insulin-like Growth Factor-II on 1- Methyl-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    II) on 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP)-induced oxidative damage in adult cortical neuronal cultures. ... development. However, in adults, there is a decrease in its synthesis, although IGF-II remains the most abundant insulin-like peptide in the adult brain, primarily expressed in ..... doses of IGF-II in aging rats, J. Transl.

  19. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left side; when you're listening to music, you're using the right side. It's believed that some people are more "right-brained" or "left-brained" while others are more "whole-brained," meaning they use both halves of their brain to the same degree. The outer layer of ...

  20. Relation between plasma and brain lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellington, Cheryl L; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    and cerebrospinal fluid apolipoproteins. Whether plasma levels of apolipoprotein E, or any other apolipoprotein with possible central nervous system and/or blood-brain barrier functions (apolipoproteins J, A-I, A-II, A-IV, D, C-I, and C-III) may become accessible biomarker components that improve risk prediction...... for dementia together with genetic risk variants and cardiovascular risk factors remains to be determined. SUMMARY: Apolipoproteins with well established functions in peripheral lipid metabolism may play important roles for brain vascular health and Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. Experimental work...

  1. and ni(ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    with nickel(II) and cobalt(II) chloride in 2:1 mole ratio yielded Ni(II) and Co(II) complexes respectively. The synthesized compounds were characterized based on melting point/decomposition temperature, solubility, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility and infrared spectral analyses. The complexes have low molar ...

  2. Preparation and Antimicrobial Screeningof Cu (II, Ni (II, Zn (II Cd (II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Desai

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The metal complexes of Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II Cd(II with organic ligands viz Hydrazine hydrate, 1,2-N,N'-Bisammonium thiocarbamoyl ethane and 1,4-N,N'-Bisammonium thiocarbamoyl benzene have been prepared. These ligands and metal complexes of dithiocarbamates were screened for their antimicrobial activity against various microbs.

  3. Copper (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and zinc (II) complexes of Schiff ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. New Schiff base chelates of Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) derived from benzil-2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone with aniline have been synthesised. Microanalytical data, molar conductance, and magnetic susceptibility values have been obtained, and IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV-Vis, CV and EPR spectral studies have ...

  4. FROM BRAIN DRAIN TO BRAIN NETWORKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina BONCEA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific networking is the most accessible way a country can turn the brain drain into brain gain. Diaspora’s members offer valuable information, advice or financial support from the destination country, without being necessary to return. This article aims to investigate Romania’s potential of turning brain drain into brain networking, using evidence from the medical sector. The main factors influencing the collaboration with the country of origin are investigated. The conclusions suggest that Romania could benefit from the diaspora option, through an active implication at institutional level and the implementation of a strategy in this area.

  5. Interoperable atlases of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunts, K; Hawrylycz, M J; Van Essen, D C; Van Horn, J D; Harel, N; Poline, J-B; De Martino, F; Bjaalie, J G; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Dehaene, S; Valdes-Sosa, P; Thirion, B; Zilles, K; Hill, S L; Abrams, M B; Tass, P A; Vanduffel, W; Evans, A C; Eickhoff, S B

    2014-10-01

    The last two decades have seen an unprecedented development of human brain mapping approaches at various spatial and temporal scales. Together, these have provided a large fundus of information on many different aspects of the human brain including micro- and macrostructural segregation, regional specialization of function, connectivity, and temporal dynamics. Atlases are central in order to integrate such diverse information in a topographically meaningful way. It is noteworthy, that the brain mapping field has been developed along several major lines such as structure vs. function, postmortem vs. in vivo, individual features of the brain vs. population-based aspects, or slow vs. fast dynamics. In order to understand human brain organization, however, it seems inevitable that these different lines are integrated and combined into a multimodal human brain model. To this aim, we held a workshop to determine the constraints of a multi-modal human brain model that are needed to enable (i) an integration of different spatial and temporal scales and data modalities into a common reference system, and (ii) efficient data exchange and analysis. As detailed in this report, to arrive at fully interoperable atlases of the human brain will still require much work at the frontiers of data acquisition, analysis, and representation. Among them, the latter may provide the most challenging task, in particular when it comes to representing features of vastly different scales of space, time and abstraction. The potential benefits of such endeavor, however, clearly outweigh the problems, as only such kind of multi-modal human brain atlas may provide a starting point from which the complex relationships between structure, function, and connectivity may be explored. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of cytosolic Phospholipase A2 prevents prion peptide-induced neuronal damage and co-localisation with Beta III Tubulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Victoria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 and the subsequent metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA to prostaglandins have been shown to play an important role in neuronal death in neurodegenerative disease. Here we report the effects of the prion peptide fragment HuPrP106-126 on the PLA2 cascade in primary cortical neurons and translocation of cPLA2 to neurites. Results Exposure of primary cortical neurons to HuPrP106-126 increased the levels of phosphorylated cPLA2 and caused phosphorylated cPLA2 to relocate from the cell body to the cellular neurite in a PrP-dependent manner, a previously unreported observation. HuPrP106-126 also induced significant AA release, an indicator of cPLA2 activation; this preceded synapse damage and subsequent cellular death. The novel translocation of p-cPLA2 postulated the potential for exposure to HuPrP106-126 to result in a re-arrangement of the cellular cytoskeleton. However p-cPLA2 did not colocalise significantly with F-actin, intermediate filaments, or microtubule-associated proteins. Conversely, p-cPLA2 did significantly colocalise with the cytoskeletal protein beta III tubulin. Pre-treatment with the PLA2 inhibitor, palmitoyl trifluoromethyl ketone (PACOCF3 reduced cPLA2 activation, AA release and damage to the neuronal synapse. Furthermore, PACOCF3 reduced expression of p-cPLA2 in neurites and inhibited colocalisation with beta III tubulin, resulting in protection against PrP-induced cell death. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest that cPLA2 plays a vital role in the action of HuPrP106-126 and that the colocalisation of p-cPLA2 with beta III tubulin could be central to the progress of neurodegeneration caused by prion peptides. Further work is needed to define exactly how PLA2 inhibitors protect neurons from peptide-induced toxicity and how this relates to intracellular structural changes occurring in neurodegeneration.

  7. Osteoarthritic Cartilage is more Homogeneous than Healthy Cartilage – Identification of a Superior ROI Co-localised with a Major Risk Factor for Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qazi, Arish Asif; Dam, Erik B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    , and the knees were categorized by the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) Index. Next, based on a gradient descent optimization technique, the cartilage region that contributed to the maximum statistical significance of homogeneity in separating healthy subjects from the diseased was partitioned. The generalizability...... the automatic gradient descent technique, the partitioned region was toward the peripheral part of the cartilage sheet. Using this region, the P values for separating the different groups based on homogeneity were 5 × 10-9 (KL 0 versus KL 1) and 1 × 10-15 (KL 0 versus KL >0). The precision of homogeneity...

  8. Co-localisation of CCG repeats and chromosome deletion breakpoints in Jacobsen syndrome: evidence for a common mechanism of chromosome breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C; Müllenbach, R; Grossfeld, P; Auer, R; Favier, R; Chien, K; James, M; Tunnacliffe, A; Cotter, F

    2000-05-01

    Folate-sensitive fragile sites are associated with the expansion and hypermethylation of CCG-repeats. The fragile site in 11q23.3, FRA11B, has been shown to cause chromosome deletions in vivo, its expression being associated with Jacobsen (11q-) syndrome. However, the majority of Jacobsen deletions are distal to FRA11B and are not related to its expression. To test the hypothesis that other unidentified fragile sites might be located in 11q23.3-24 and may cause these deletions, we have identified and characterised CCG-trinucleotide repeats within a 40 Mb YAC contig spanning distal chromosome 11q. Only eight CCG-repeats were identified within the entire YAC contig (not including FRA11B ), six of which map to the region of 11q23.3-24 that includes Jacobsen deletions. We have previously collated the deletion mapping data of 24 Jacobsen patients with the physical map of chromosome 11q, and accurately localised six breakpoints to short intervals corresponding to individual YAC clones. We now show that in each of these cases, YAC clones found to contain a deletion breakpoint also contain a CCG-repeat. The improved analysis of one of these deletions, together with those of several new Jacobsen cases, further strengthens this association by localising five breakpoints to individual PAC clones containing CCG-repeats. These data provide strong evidence for the non-random clustering of chromosome deletion breakpoints with CCG-repeats, and suggests that they may play an important role in a common mechanism of chromosome breakage.

  9. From Brain Drain to Brain Circulation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ademu

    problematic for developing nations, where it is widespread. In these countries, higher education and professional certification are often viewed as the surest path to escape from a troubled economy or difficult political situation. Brain drain can be described as “soft brain drain” which is the non-availability of research results ...

  10. Left Brain, Right Brain: Who's on First?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Terence

    1985-01-01

    The author states that none of the left-brain/right brain "mythology" is supported by the actual research on the differences between the left and right human cerebral hemispheres. In fact, he states, the research literature flatly contradicts most of the mythology. (CT)

  11. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  12. Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education Brain Basics: Preventing Stroke Table of Contents Introduction What ... Americans are protecting their most important asset—their brain. Are you? Stroke ranks as the fourth leading ...

  13. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  14. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  15. Biomechanics of the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Karol

    2011-01-01

    With contributions from scientists at major institutions, this book presents an introduction to brain anatomy for engineers and scientists. It provides, for the first time, a comprehensive resource in the field of brain biomechanics.

  16. Aneurysm in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/001414.htm Aneurysm in the brain To use the sharing features on this page, ... aneurysm occurs in a blood vessel of the brain, it is called a cerebral, or intracranial, aneurysm. ...

  17. Brain injury - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000163.htm Brain injury - discharge To use the sharing features on ... know was in the hospital for a serious brain injury. At home, it will take time for ...

  18. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  19. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  20. Brain Tumor Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor surgery include: Seizures Weakness Balance/coordination difficulties Memory or cognitive problems Spinal fluid leakage Meningitis Brain swelling Stroke Excess fluid in the brain Coma Death Recovery Time Recovery time depends on: The procedure performed. ...

  1. Metastatic brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. A metastatic brain tumor is cancer that started in another part of the body ... of cancer rarely spread to the brain, such as colon cancer and prostate cancer. In other rare cases, a tumor can ...

  2. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  3. Brain cancer spreads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perryman, Lara; Erler, Janine Terra

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue).......The discovery that ~20% of patients with brain cancer have circulating tumor cells breaks the dogma that these cells are confined to the brain and has important clinical implications (Müller et al., this issue)....

  4. Our Amazing Brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Howard

    2005-01-01

    This article begins a regular series on how brain research can help us understand young people and ourselves as well. The intent is to alert the reader to important information from recent research on the brain. This initial installment explores the concept of the triune brain, a term coined by neuroscientist Paul MacLean. This refers to three…

  5. Brain AVM (Arteriovenous Malformation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk factors Anyone can be born with a brain AVM, but these factors may be a risk: Being male. AVMs are more common in males. Having a family history. Cases of AVMs in families have been reported, but it's unclear if ... of a brain AVM include: Bleeding in the brain (hemorrhage). An ...

  6. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  7. Development of the Young Brain

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Events (3 items) Institute Announcements (24 items) Development of the Young Brain May 2, 2011 For more than ... evolving childhood brain. Share More Video and Audio about Brain Anatomy and Physiology Children and Adolescents Brain ...

  8. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  9. ER stress in the brain subfornical organ mediates angiotensin-dependent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin N; Cao, Xian; Guruju, Mallikarjuna R; Pierce, Joseph P; Morgan, Donald A; Wang, Gang; Iadecola, Costantino; Mark, Allyn L; Davisson, Robin L

    2012-11-01

    Although endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a pathologic mechanism in a variety of chronic diseases, it is unclear what role it plays in chronic hypertension (HTN). Dysregulation of brain mechanisms controlling arterial pressure is strongly implicated in HTN, particularly in models involving angiotensin II (Ang II). We tested the hypothesis that ER stress in the brain is causally linked to Ang II-dependent HTN. Chronic systemic infusion of low-dose Ang II in C57BL/6 mice induced slowly developing HTN, which was abolished by co-infusion of the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) into the lateral cerebroventricle. Investigations of the brain regions involved revealed robust increases in ER stress biomarkers and profound ER morphological abnormalities in the circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO), a region outside the blood-brain barrier and replete with Ang II receptors. Ang II-induced HTN could be prevented in this model by selective genetic supplementation of the ER chaperone 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) in the SFO. These data demonstrate that Ang II-dependent HTN is mediated by ER stress in the brain, particularly the SFO. To our knowledge, this is the first report that ER stress, notably brain ER stress, plays a key role in chronic HTN. Taken together, these findings may have broad implications for the pathophysiology of this disease.

  10. Instant BrainShark

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. ""Instant BrainShark"" is a step-by-step guide to creating online presentations using BrainShark. The book covers digital marketing best practices alongside tips for sales conversions. The book is written in an easy-to-read style for anybody to easily pick up and get started with BrainShark.Instant BrainShark is for anyone who wants to use BrainShark to create presentations online and share them around the community. The book is also useful for developers who are looking to explore

  11. The Blue Collar Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eVan Orden

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Much effort has gone into elucidating control of the body by the brain, less so the role of the body in controlling the brain. This essay develops the idea that the brain does a great deal of work in the service of behavior that is controlled by the body, a blue collar role compared to the white collar control exercised by the body. The argument that supports a blue collar role for the brain is also consistent with recent discoveries clarifying the white collar role of synergies across the body's tensegrity structure, and the evidence of critical phenomena in brain and behavior.

  12. and Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    thereby enhancing higher affinity for the metal ions when compared to the monodentate ligands. Stability constant values of various metal ion complexes involving chelating ligands such as. Ni(II) – famotidine C8H15N7O2S3 complex, Cu-. Dapsone complex, Co(II), and Ni(II) – mixed ligand complexes of amino acids and ...

  13. Endothelial cell marker PAL-E reactivity in brain tumor, developing brain, and brain disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenstra, S.; Troost, D.; Das, P. K.; Claessen, N.; Becker, A. E.; Bosch, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The endothelial cell marker PAL-E is not reactive to vessels in the normal brain. The present study concerns the PAL-E reactivity in brain tumors in contrast to normal brain and nonneoplastic brain disease. A total of 122 specimens were examined: brain tumors (n = 94), nonneoplastic brain disease (n

  14. IS MALE BRAIN DIFFERENT FROM FEMALE BRAIN?

    OpenAIRE

    Majdic, Gregor

    2009-01-01

    In 1959, exactly 50 years ago, was published a paper by Phoenix, Goy, Gerall and Young entitled “Organizing action of prenatally administered testosterone propionate on the tissues mediating mating behavior in the female guinea pig”. Before the publication of this paper, it was widely accepted that hormones do act upon brain. However, the general thought was that hormones, especially sex steroid hormones, directly activate certain brain areas when needed, i.e. at the time of mating, parental ...

  15. Handbook of Brain Connectivity

    CERN Document Server

    Jirsa, Viktor K

    2007-01-01

    Our contemporary understanding of brain function is deeply rooted in the ideas of the nonlinear dynamics of distributed networks. Cognition and motor coordination seem to arise from the interactions of local neuronal networks, which themselves are connected in large scales across the entire brain. The spatial architectures between various scales inevitably influence the dynamics of the brain and thereby its function. But how can we integrate brain connectivity amongst these structural and functional domains? Our Handbook provides an account of the current knowledge on the measurement, analysis and theory of the anatomical and functional connectivity of the brain. All contributors are leading experts in various fields concerning structural and functional brain connectivity. In the first part of the Handbook, the chapters focus on an introduction and discussion of the principles underlying connected neural systems. The second part introduces the currently available non-invasive technologies for measuring struct...

  16. Molecular imaging of the brain. Using multi-quantum coherence and diagnostics of brain disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaila, M.M. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Kaila, Rakhi [Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia). School of Medicine

    2013-11-01

    Explains the basics of the MRI and its use in the diagnostics and the treatment of the human brain disorders. Examines multi-quantum magnetic resonance imaging methods and the diagnostics of brain disorders. Covers how in a non-invasive manner one can diagnose diseases of the brain. This book examines multi-quantum magnetic resonance imaging methods and the diagnostics of brain disorders. It consists of two Parts. The part I is initially devoted towards the basic concepts of the conventional single quantum MRI techniques. It is supplemented by the basic knowledge required to understand multi-quantum MRI. Practical illustrations are included both on recent developments in conventional MRI and the MQ-MRI. This is to illustrate the connection between theoretical concepts and their scope in the clinical applications. The Part II initially sets out the basic details about quadrupole charge distribution present in certain nuclei and their importance about the functions they perform in our brain. Some simplified final mathematical expressions are included to illustrate facts about the basic concepts of the quantum level interactions between magnetic dipole and the electric quadrupole behavior of useful nuclei present in the brain. Selected practical illustrations, from research and clinical practices are included to illustrate the newly emerging ideas and techniques. The reader should note that the two parts of the book are written with no interdependence. One can read them quite independently.

  17. Spectrophotometric study of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes with isatin- β-thiosemicarbazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDRA S. KONSTANTINOVIC

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition and stability of the complexes of isatin-b-thiosemicarba­zone with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II have been investigated us­ing spectrophotometric method at 30 °C and constant ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm-3 (KNO3 in 70 % ethanol. Experimental results indicate the formation of MeL and MeL2 complexes for Ni(II and Co(II, and MeL for Cu(II, Zn(II, Pd(II and Hg(II complexes, whose stability constants, bn, have been calculated using a com­puteri­zed iterative method of successive approximation.

  18. Consciousness, brain, neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Jacques Marcel Askenasy

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Subjectivity, intentionality, self-awareness and will are major components of consciousness in human beings. Changes in consciousness and its content following different brain processes and malfunction have long been studied. Cognitive sciences assume that brain activities have an infrastructure, but there is also evidence that consciousness itself may change this infrastructure. The two-way influence between brain and consciousness has been at the center of philosophy and less so, of science. This so-called bottom-up and top-down interrelationship is controversial and is the subject of our article. We would like to ask: how does it happen that consciousness may provoke structural changes in the brain?The living brain means continuous changes at the synaptic level with every new experience, with every new process of learning, memorizing or mastering new and existing skills. Synapses are generated and dissolved, while others are preserved, in an ever-changing process of so-called neuroplasticity. Ongoing processes of synaptic reinforcements and decay occur during wakefulness when consciousness is present, but also during sleep when it is mostly absent.We suggest that consciousness influences brain neuroplasticity both during wakefulness as well as sleep in a top-down way. This means that consciousness really activates synaptic flow and changes brain structures and functional organization. The dynamic impact of consciousness on brain never stops despite the relative stationary structure of the brain. Such a process can be a target for medical intervention e.g. by cognitive training.

  19. [Higher Brain Dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    The technical term "higher brain dysfunction" is used widely in Japan. However, it is not always clear what "higher" means. The author thinks that the term "higher" is understood as being associated with a meaning. In this article, the differences between higher brain dysfunctions and elementary brain dysfunctions are discussed from the point of view of lesion localization and the consistency of symptoms. The psychiatric approach is indispensable for the assessment of higher brain dysfunction. A simple test for mild Alzheimer-type dementia is also introduced.

  20. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  1. Consciousness, brain, neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, Jean; Lehmann, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Subjectivity, intentionality, self-awareness and will are major components of consciousness in human beings. Changes in consciousness and its content following different brain processes and malfunction have long been studied. Cognitive sciences assume that brain activities have an infrastructure, but there is also evidence that consciousness itself may change this infrastructure. The two-way influence between brain and consciousness has been at the center of philosophy and less so, of science. This so-called bottom-up and top-down interrelationship is controversial and is the subject of our article. We would like to ask: how does it happen that consciousness may provoke structural changes in the brain? The living brain means continuous changes at the synaptic level with every new experience, with every new process of learning, memorizing or mastering new and existing skills. Synapses are generated and dissolved, while others are preserved, in an ever-changing process of so-called neuroplasticity. Ongoing processes of synaptic reinforcements and decay occur during wakefulness when consciousness is present, but also during sleep when it is mostly absent. We suggest that consciousness influences brain neuroplasticity both during wakefulness as well as sleep in a top-down way. This means that consciousness really activates synaptic flow and changes brain structures and functional organization. The dynamic impact of consciousness on brain never stops despite the relative stationary structure of the brain. Such a process can be a target for medical intervention, e.g., by cognitive training. PMID:23847580

  2. Do the Brain Networks of Scientists Account for Their Superiority in Hypothesis-Generating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ki

    2012-01-01

    Where do scientists' superior abilities originate from when generating a creative idea? What different brain functions are activated between scientists and i) general academic high school students and ii) science high school students when generating a biological hypothesis? To reveal brain level explanations for these questions, this paper…

  3. Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

  4. IS MALE BRAIN DIFFERENT FROM FEMALE BRAIN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdic, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Summary In 1959, exactly 50 years ago, was published a paper by Phoenix, Goy, Gerall and Young entitled “Organizing action of prenatally administered testosterone propionate on the tissues mediating mating behavior in the female guinea pig”. Before the publication of this paper, it was widely accepted that hormones do act upon brain. However, the general thought was that hormones, especially sex steroid hormones, directly activate certain brain areas when needed, i.e. at the time of mating, parental care etc. In contrast to this thought, Phoenix and colleagues for the very first time proposed that hormone action in neonatal period could also permanently alter brain structure, and thus influence differences in behavior long after exposure to sex steroid hormones. The study of Phoenix and colleagues was therefore revolutionary, and as such, had many opponents at that time. Even the authors themselves were very cautious in their phrasing, never directly claiming that hormones could alter brain structure but rather even in the title used the words “tissues mediating mating behavior” instead of brain or central nervous system. Furthermore, as with many such revolutionary studies, study by Phoenix and colleagues left more questions unanswered than it did answer. The authors did and could not know at that time exactly where and how do steroid hormones act in the brain, they did not know whether observed effects in their study arose from the direct action of testosterone or perhaps from some testosterone metabolite. In half of the century since the publication of this seminal study, hundreds of papers have been published, confirming initial finding of Phoenix and colleagues, and these papers have provided answers to many questions raised by the authors. Today we know that at least in rodents, it is testosterone metabolite estradiol that masculinizes the brain. We know that brain structure could be altered by hormones in different periods including puberty and

  5. Banking brain tissue for research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klioueva, Natasja; Bovenberg, Jasper; Huitinga, I.

    2017-01-01

    Well-characterized human brain tissue is crucial for scientific breakthroughs in research of the human brain and brain diseases. However, the collection, characterization, management, and accessibility of brain human tissue are rather complex. Well-characterized human brain tissue is often provided

  6. Evaluation of Dacryodes edulis (native pear) seed biomass for Pb (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    reproductive system, the liver and the brain (Ozer, ..... Fig. 3.: The effect of contact time on Pb(II) uptake onto Dacryodes edulis seed biomass [Conditions : 25 cm3 of ..... Ozer, A. (2007): Removal of Pb (II) ions from aqueous solutions by sulphuric acid – treated wheat bran. Journal of Hazardous Materials. Vol. 141 (3). Pp. 753.

  7. Cloning and expression of a novel human profilin variant, profilin II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Madsen, Peder; Andersen, A H

    1993-01-01

    We have isolated a 1.7 kbp cDNA encoding a 140 amino acid protein (15.1 kDa, pI 5.91) with a high sequence similarity (62%) to human profilin (profilin I). We have termed this variant profilin II. Northern blot analysis showed that profilin II is highly expressed in brain, skeletal muscle...

  8. Interobserver reliability and diagnostic performance of Chiari II malformation measures in MR imaging-part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, Niels; van der Vliet, Ton; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Feuth, Ton; Roeleveld, Nel; Mullaart, Reinier A.

    Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of MR images of the malformation is not always straightforward. Morphometric analyses of the extent of Chiari II malformation may improve

  9. Interobserver reliability and diagnostic performance of Chiari II malformation measures in MR imaging--part 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerdink, N.; Vliet, T. van der; Rotteveel, J.J.; Feuth, T.; Roeleveld, N.; Mullaart, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Brain MR imaging is essential in the assessment of Chiari II malformation in clinical and research settings concerning spina bifida. However, the interpretation of MR images of the malformation is not always straightforward. Morphometric analyses of the extent of Chiari II malformation may

  10. Quininium tetrachloridozinc(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Zhuang Chen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound {systematic name: 2-[hydroxy(6-methoxyquinolin-1-ium-4-ylmethyl]-8-vinylquinuclidin-1-ium tetrachloridozinc(II}, (C20H26N2O2[ZnCl4], consists of a double protonated quininium cation and a tetrachloridozinc(II anion. The ZnII ion is in a slightly distorted tetrahedral coordination environment. The crystal structure is stabilized by intermolecular N—H...Cl and O—H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  11. Molecular Imaging of the Brain Using Multi-Quantum Coherence and Diagnostics of Brain Disorders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaila, M M

    2013-01-01

    This book examines multi-quantum magnetic resonance imaging methods and the diagnostics of brain disorders. It consists of two Parts. The part I is initially devoted towards the basic concepts of the conventional single quantum MRI techniques. It is supplemented by the basic knowledge required to understand multi-quantum MRI. Practical illustrations are included both on recent developments in conventional MRI and the MQ-MRI. This is to illustrate the connection between theoretical concepts and their scope in the clinical applications. The Part II initially sets out the basic details about quadrupole charge distribution present in certain nuclei and their importance about the functions they perform in our brain. Some simplified final mathematical expressions are included to illustrate facts about the basic concepts of the quantum level interactions between magnetic dipole and the electric quadrupole behavior of useful nuclei present in the brain. Selected practical illustrations, from research and clinical pra...

  12. Burkina Faso - BRIGHT II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Millennium Challenge Corporation hired Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an independent evaluation of the BRIGHT II program. The three main research questions...

  13. Type II universal spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervik, S.; Málek, T.; Pravda, V.; Pravdová, A.

    2015-12-01

    We study type II universal metrics of the Lorentzian signature. These metrics simultaneously solve vacuum field equations of all theories of gravitation with the Lagrangian being a polynomial curvature invariant constructed from the metric, the Riemann tensor and its covariant derivatives of an arbitrary order. We provide examples of type II universal metrics for all composite number dimensions. On the other hand, we have no examples for prime number dimensions and we prove the non-existence of type II universal spacetimes in five dimensions. We also present type II vacuum solutions of selected classes of gravitational theories, such as Lovelock, quadratic and L({{Riemann}}) gravities.

  14. CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF Pb(II), Cd(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical speciation of Pb(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes of L-methionine in 0.0-60 % v/v 1,2-propanediol-water mixtures maintaining an ionic strength of 0.16 M at 303 K has been studied pH metrically. The active forms of ligand are LH2+, LH and L-. The predominant species detected are ML, ...

  15. Brain PET scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have false results on a PET scan. Blood sugar or insulin levels may affect the test results in people with diabetes . PET scans may be done along with a CT scan. This combination scan is called a PET/CT. Alternative Names Brain positron emission tomography; PET scan - brain References Chernecky ...

  16. Brain, body and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertz, Armin W.

    2010-01-01

    This essay sketches out a biocultural theory of religion which is based on an expanded view of cognition that is anchored in brain and body (embrained and embodied), deeply dependent on culture (enculturated) and extended and distributed beyond the borders of individual brains. Such an approach...

  17. Complement in the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerhuis, R.; Nielsen, J.M.; Tenner, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The brain is considered to be an immune privileged site, because the blood-brain barrier limits entry of blood borne cells and proteins into the central nervous system (CNS). As a result, the detection and clearance of invading microorganisms and senescent cells as well as surplus neurotransmitters,

  18. The Resilient Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Longhurst, James E.

    2005-01-01

    Brain research opens new frontiers in working with children and youth experiencing conflict in school and community. Blending this knowledge with resilience science offers a roadmap for reclaiming those identified as "at risk." This article applies findings from resilience research and recent brain research to identify strategies for reaching…

  19. BRAIN ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR ADEYINKA

    Brain Arteriovenous Malformation (BAVM) is a form of congenital vascular malformation that are present at birth, and may be evident clinically, and usually will grow commensurately with the child. We report an adult ,a 40-year-old woman with brain arteriovenous malformation presenting with headache and epileptic.

  20. Inside the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Stacy S.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Jay Giedd says that the main alterations in the adolescent brain are the inverted U-shaped developmental trajectories with late childhood/early teen peaks for gray matter volume among others. Giedd adds that the adolescent brain is vulnerable to substances that artificially modulate dopamine levels since its reward system is in a state of flux.

  1. Demystifying the Adolescent Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nature of brain development in adolescence helps explain why adolescents can vacillate so often between mature and immature behavior. Early and middle adolescence, in particular, are times of heightened vulnerability to risky and reckless behavior because the brain's reward center is easily aroused, but the systems that control…

  2. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Team. Brain and Addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens website. https://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/brain-and-addiction. . Accessed press ctrl+c to copy Listen Drug Facts Alcohol Anabolic Steroids Bath Salts Cocaine Cough and Cold Medicine (DXM ...

  3. Gut-brain axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, Johannes A.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Havekes, Louis M.; Pijl, Hanno

    2008-01-01

    To summarize recent studies on the regulation and the functions of the gut-brain axis. Visual cues of food and food intake interact with the gut-brain axis at the level of the hypothalamus. However, the hypothalamic response to glucose intake is considerably altered in patients with type 2 diabetes

  4. Crazy-Quilt Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Julie Ann

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the common principles underlying the operation of the cortex in an effort to understand the human brain. Discusses the structure of the cortex, its specific areas, and its map-making abilities. Describes some of the recent discoveries about brain operation, development and functioning. (TW)

  5. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bàrbara Laviña

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases.

  6. Modeling Structural Brain Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø

    The human brain consists of a gigantic complex network of interconnected neurons. Together all these connections determine who we are, how we react and how we interpret the world. Knowledge about how the brain is connected can further our understanding of the brain’s structural organization, help...... improve diagnosis, and potentially allow better treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Tractography based on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is a unique tool to estimate this “structural connectivity” of the brain non-invasively and in vivo. During the last decade, brain connectivity...... has increasingly been analyzed using graph theoretic measures adopted from network science and this characterization of the brain’s structural connectivity has been shown to be useful for the classification of populations, such as healthy and diseased subjects. The structural connectivity of the brain...

  7. Coping changes the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Nechvatal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the earliest and most consistent findings in behavioral neuroscience research is that learning changes the brain. Here we consider how learning as an aspect of coping in the context of stress exposure induces neuroadaptations that enhance emotion regulation and resilience. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 brain imaging studies in which humans with specific phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder were randomized to stress exposure therapies that diminished subsequent indications of anxiety. Most of these studies focused on functional changes in the amygdala and anterior corticolimbic brain circuits that control cognitive, motivational, and emotional aspects of physiology and behavior. Corresponding structural brain changes and the timing, frequency, and duration of stress exposure required to modify brain functions remain to be elucidated in future research. These studies will advance our understanding of coping as a learning process and provide mechanistic insights for the development of new interventions that promote stress coping skills.

  8. Inside the Diabetic Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomova M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available CNS complications resulting from diabetes mellitus (DM are a problem gaining more acceptance and attention in the recent years. Both types 1 and 2 DM represent an significant risk factor for decreased cognitive functions, memory and learning deficits as well as development of Alzheimer’s disease. Chronic hyperglycemia through protein glycation and increased oxidative stress contributes to brain dysfunction, however increasing evidences suggest that the pathology of DM in the brain involves a progressive and coordinated disruption of insulin signaling, with profound consequences for brain function and plasticity. Since many of the CNS changes observed in diabetic patients and animal models of DM are reminiscent of the changes seen in aging, the theory of advanced brain aging in DM has been proposed. This review summarizes the findings of the literature regarding the effects of DM on the brain in the terms of diabetes-related metabolic derangements and intracellular signaling.

  9. Protecting the anaesthetised brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaesthetized brain is vulnerable to ischaemic insults, which could result in neurological deficits ranging from neuropsychological disturbances to stroke and even death. The risk of perioperative brain injury is relatively high in cardiac, neurosurgical and major vascular surgery, although it has also rarely been reported in noncardiac nonneurosurgical operations. Besides underlying risk factors such as cerebrovascular disease, advanced age, and cardiovascular disease, anaesthesia and surgery per se could also be a contributory factor. The anaesthesiologist plays a pivotal role in protecting the anaesthetized brain, both by taking preventive measures and instituting brain protection strategies. Despite advances and breakthroughs in pharmacological neuroprotection in the laboratory, currently there is no drug, anaesthetic or non-anaesthetic, which is available for clinical use. The anaesthesiologist has to rely on non-pharmacological modalities and neuromonitoring to prevent intraoperative brain injury

  10. Development of the Young Brain

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain involved in controlling our impulses, long range planning, judgment, decision making. Announcer: Imaging has shown by ... More Video and Audio about Brain Anatomy and Physiology Children and Adolescents Brain Anatomy and Physiology Institute ...

  11. Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statistics and Facts A- A A+ Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts An estimated 6 million people in ... Understanding the Brain Warning Signs/ Symptoms Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Risk Factors Aneurysm ...

  12. Small Diameter Bomb Increment II (SDB II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Related Operations and Maintenance ACAT - Acquisition Category ADM - Acquisition Decision Memorandum APB - Acquisition Program Baseline APPN...DoN) ACAT ID program, with the USAF as the lead service. SDB II provides the warfighter the capability to attack mobile targets from stand-off, through

  13. Copper (II) Complex

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CLEMENT O BEWAJI

    ABSTRACT: N – histidyl – 2, 4 – pentanedione Schiff base was prepared from the reaction of histidine and 2, 4 - pentandione. The reaction of methanolic solution of N – histidyl – 2, 4 – pentanedione Schiff base with ethanolic solution of copper (II) chloride gave diaquo bis( N – histidyl - 2, 4 - pentanedionato) copper (II) ...

  14. Synthesis and characterisation of Cu (II), Ni (II), Mn (II), Zn (II) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... are square-planar except the Mn(II) and VO(II) chelates, which are of octahedral and square pyramidal geometry respectively. The monomeric and neutral nature of the complexes was confirmed by their magnetic susceptibility data and low conductance values. The ESR spectra of copper and vanadyl complexes in DMSO ...

  15. Rom II-forordningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pii, Tine; Nielsen, Peter Arnt

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen redegør for de vigtigste regler i Europaparlamentets og Rådets forordning om lovvalgsregler for forpligtelser uden for kontraktforhold (Rom II) og sammenligner dem med dansk ret.......Artiklen redegør for de vigtigste regler i Europaparlamentets og Rådets forordning om lovvalgsregler for forpligtelser uden for kontraktforhold (Rom II) og sammenligner dem med dansk ret....

  16. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  17. Cannabinoids on the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Irving

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has a long history of consumption both for recreational and medicinal uses. Recently there have been significant advances in our understanding of how cannabis and related compounds (cannabinoids affect the brain and this review addresses the current state of knowledge of these effects. Cannabinoids act primarily via two types of receptor, CB1 and CB2, with CB1 receptors mediating most of the central actions of cannabinoids. The presence of a new type of brain cannabinoid receptor is also indicated. Important advances have been made in our understanding of cannabinoid receptor signaling pathways, their modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, the cellular targets of cannabinoids in different central nervous system (CNS regions and, in particular, the role of the endogenous brain cannabinoid (endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids have widespread actions in the brain: in the hippocampus they influence learning and memory; in the basal ganglia they modulate locomotor activity and reward pathways; in the hypothalamus they have a role in the control of appetite. Cannabinoids may also be protective against neurodegeneration and brain damage and exhibit anticonvulsant activity. Some of the analgesic effects of cannabinoids also appear to involve sites within the brain. These advances in our understanding of the actions of cannabinoids and the brain endocannabinoid system have led to important new insights into neuronal function which are likely to result in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of key CNS disorders.

  18. Lutein and Brain Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Erdman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lutein is one of the most prevalent carotenoids in nature and in the human diet. Together with zeaxanthin, it is highly concentrated as macular pigment in the foveal retina of primates, attenuating blue light exposure, providing protection from photo-oxidation and enhancing visual performance. Recently, interest in lutein has expanded beyond the retina to its possible contributions to brain development and function. Only primates accumulate lutein within the brain, but little is known about its distribution or physiological role. Our team has begun to utilize the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta model to study the uptake and bio-localization of lutein in the brain. Our overall goal has been to assess the association of lutein localization with brain function. In this review, we will first cover the evolution of the non-human primate model for lutein and brain studies, discuss prior association studies of lutein with retina and brain function, and review approaches that can be used to localize brain lutein. We also describe our approach to the biosynthesis of 13C-lutein, which will allow investigation of lutein flux, localization, metabolism and pharmacokinetics. Lastly, we describe potential future research opportunities.

  19. Brain perfusion in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Scolletta, Sabino; Franchi, Federico; Donadello, Katia; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Brain dysfunction is a frequent complication of sepsis, usually defined as "sepsis-associated encephalopathy" (SAE). Its pathophysiology is complex and related to numerous processes and pathways, while the exact mechanisms producing neurological impairment in septic patients remain incompletely elucidated. Alterations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) may represent a key component for the development of SAE. Reduction of CBF may be caused by cerebral vasoconstriction, either induced by inflammation or hypocapnia. Endothelial dysfunction associated with sepsis leads to impairment of microcirculation and cerebral metabolic uncoupling that may further reduce brain perfusion so that CBF becomes inadequate to satisfy brain cellular needs. The natural autoregulatory mechanisms that protect the brain from reduced/ inadequate CBF can be impaired in septic patients, especially in those with shock or delirium, and this further contributes to cerebral ischemia if blood pressure drops below critical thresholds. Sedative agents alter cerebro-vascular reactivity and may significantly reduce CBF. Although disorders of brain perfusion and alteration of CBF and cerebral autoregulation are frequently observed in humans with sepsis, their exact role in the pathogenesis of SAE remains unknown. Brain perfusion can further become inadequate due to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction, as evidenced in the experimental setting. Microvascular alterations can be implicated in the development of electrophysiological abnormalities observed during sepsis and contribute to neurological alterations in septic animals. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the pathophysiology of brain perfusion in sepsis, with a particular focus on human clinical investigation and novel tools for CBF monitoring in septic patients.

  20. Cannabinoids on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Andrew J; Rae, Mark G; Coutts, Angela A

    2002-03-09

    Cannabis has a long history of consumption both for recreational and medicinal uses. Recently there have been significant advances in our understanding of how cannabis and related compounds (cannabinoids) affect the brain and this review addresses the current state of knowledge of these effects. Cannabinoids act primarily via two types of receptor, CB1 and CB2, with CB1 receptors mediating most of the central actions of cannabinoids. The presence of a new type of brain cannabinoid receptor is also indicated. Important advances have been made in our understanding of cannabinoid receptor signaling pathways, their modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, the cellular targets of cannabinoids in different central nervous system (CNS) regions and, in particular, the role of the endogenous brain cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system. Cannabinoids have widespread actions in the brain: in the hippocampus they influence learning and memory; in the basal ganglia they modulate locomotor activity and reward pathways; in the hypothalamus they have a role in the control of appetite. Cannabinoids may also be protective against neurodegeneration and brain damage and exhibit anticonvulsant activity. Some of the analgesic effects of cannabinoids also appear to involve sites within the brain. These advances in our understanding of the actions of cannabinoids and the brain endocannabinoid system have led to important new insights into neuronal function which are likely to result in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of key CNS disorders.

  1. Rate of evolution in brain-expressed genes in humans and other primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurng-Yi Wang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-expressed genes are known to evolve slowly in mammals. Nevertheless, since brains of higher primates have evolved rapidly, one might expect acceleration in DNA sequence evolution in their brain-expressed genes. In this study, we carried out full-length cDNA sequencing on the brain transcriptome of an Old World monkey (OWM and then conducted three-way comparisons among (i mouse, OWM, and human, and (ii OWM, chimpanzee, and human. Although brain-expressed genes indeed appear to evolve more rapidly in species with more advanced brains (apes > OWM > mouse, a similar lineage effect is observable for most other genes. The broad inclusion of genes in the reference set to represent the genomic average is therefore critical to this type of analysis. Calibrated against the genomic average, the rate of evolution among brain-expressed genes is probably lower (or at most equal in humans than in chimpanzee and OWM. Interestingly, the trend of slow evolution in coding sequence is no less pronounced among brain-specific genes, vis-à-vis brain-expressed genes in general. The human brain may thus differ from those of our close relatives in two opposite directions: (i faster evolution in gene expression, and (ii a likely slowdown in the evolution of protein sequences. Possible explanations and hypotheses are discussed.

  2. Biologically active new Fe(II, Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. SPÎNU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II, cobalt(II, nickel (II, copper (II, zinc(II and cadmium(II complexes of the type ML2Cl2, where M is a metal and L is the Schiff base N-(2-thienylmethylenemethanamine (TNAM formed by the condensation of 2-thiophenecarboxaldehyde and methylamine, were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis as well as magnetic and spectroscopic measurements. The elemental analyses suggest the stoichiometry to be 1:2 (metal:ligand. Magnetic susceptibility data coupled with electronic, ESR and Mössbauer spectra suggest a distorted octahedral structure for the Fe(II, Co(II and Ni(II complexes, a square-planar geometry for the Cu(II compound and a tetrahedral geometry for the Zn(II and Cd(II complexes. The infrared and NMR spectra of the complexes agree with co-ordination to the central metal atom through nitrogen and sulphur atoms. Conductance measurements suggest the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes, except for the Cu(II, Zn(II and Cd(II complexes, which are 1:2 electrolytes. The Schiff base and its metal chelates were screened for their biological activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metal chelates were found to possess better antibacterial activity than that of the uncomplexed Schiff base.

  3. Brains on video games

    OpenAIRE

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C. Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Gentile, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games ‘damage the brain’ or ‘boost brain power’ do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affe...

  4. Anemia and brain oxygen after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Kumar, Monisha; Iglesias, Katia; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Le Roux, Peter D

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between hemoglobin (Hgb) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to examine its impact on outcome. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of severe TBI patients whose PbtO(2) was monitored. The relationship between Hgb-categorized into four quartiles (≤9; 9-10; 10.1-11; >11 g/dl)-and PbtO(2) was analyzed using mixed-effects models. Anemia with compromised PbtO(2) was defined as episodes of Hgb ≤ 9 g/dl with simultaneous PbtO(2) 11 g/dl as the reference level, and controlling for important physiologic covariates (CPP, PaO(2), PaCO(2)), Hgb ≤ 9 g/dl was the only Hgb level that was associated with lower PbtO(2) (coefficient -6.53 (95 % CI -9.13; -3.94), p < 0.001). Anemia with simultaneous PbtO(2) < 20 mmHg, but not anemia alone, increased the risk of unfavorable outcome (odds ratio 6.24 (95 % CI 1.61; 24.22), p = 0.008), controlling for age, GCS, Marshall CT grade, and APACHE II score. In this cohort of severe TBI patients whose PbtO(2) was monitored, a Hgb level no greater than 9 g/dl was associated with compromised PbtO(2). Anemia with simultaneous compromised PbtO(2), but not anemia alone, was a risk factor for unfavorable outcome, irrespective of injury severity.

  5. Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty. Poverty Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damron, Neil

    2015-01-01

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of…

  6. Brain Gym. Simple Activities for Whole Brain Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Paul E.; Dennison, Gail E.

    This booklet contains simple movements and activities that are used with students in Educational Kinesiology to enhance their experience of whole brain learning. Whole brain learning through movement repatterning and Brain Gym activities enable students to access those parts of the brain previously unavailable to them. These movements of body and…

  7. Imaging cerebral tryptophan metabolism in brain tumor-associated depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnyák, Edit; Kamson, David O; Behen, Michael E; Barger, Geoffrey R; Mittal, Sandeep; Juhász, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    Depression in patients with brain tumors is associated with impaired quality of life and shorter survival. Altered metabolism of tryptophan to serotonin and kynurenine metabolites may play a role in tumor-associated depression. Our recent studies with alpha[(11)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (AMT)-PET in brain tumor patients indicated abnormal tryptophan metabolism not only in the tumor mass but also in normal-appearing contralateral brain. In the present study, we explored if tryptophan metabolism in such brain regions is associated with depression. Twenty-one patients (mean age: 57 years) with a brain tumor (10 meningiomas, 8 gliomas, and 3 brain metastases) underwent AMT-PET scanning. MRI and AMT-PET images were co-registered, and AMT kinetic parameters, including volume of distribution (VD', an estimate of net tryptophan transport) and K (unidirectional uptake, related to tryptophan metabolism), were measured in the tumor mass and in unaffected cortical and subcortical regions contralateral to the tumor. Depression scores (based on the Beck Depression Inventory-II [BDI-II]) were correlated with tumor size, grade, type, and AMT-PET variables. The mean BDI-II score was 12 ± 10 (range: 2-33); clinical levels of depression were identified in seven patients (33 %). High BDI-II scores were most strongly associated with high thalamic AMT K values both in the whole group (Spearman's rho = 0.63, p = 0.004) and in the subgroup of 18 primary brain tumors (r = 0.68, p = 0.004). Frontal and striatal VD' values were higher in the depressed subgroup than in non-depressed patients (p Tumor size, grade, and tumor type were not related to depression scores. Abnormalities of tryptophan transport and metabolism in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal cortex, measured by PET, are associated with depression in patients with brain tumor. These changes may indicate an imbalance between the serotonin and kynurenine pathways and serve as a molecular imaging marker of

  8. Postnatal brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernigan, Terry L; Baaré, William F C; Stiles, Joan

    2011-01-01

    After birth, there is striking biological and functional development of the brain's fiber tracts as well as remodeling of cortical and subcortical structures. Behavioral development in children involves a complex and dynamic set of genetically guided processes by which neural structures interact...... constantly with the environment. This is a protracted process, beginning in the third week of gestation and continuing into early adulthood. Reviewed here are studies using structural imaging techniques, with a special focus on diffusion weighted imaging, describing age-related brain maturational changes...... in children and adolescents, as well as studies that link these changes to behavioral differences. Finally, we discuss evidence for effects on the brain of several factors that may play a role in mediating these brain-behavior associations in children, including genetic variation, behavioral interventions...

  9. Initial brain aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten; Yokota, Takashi; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by declining mitochondrial respiration. We hypothesized that mitochondrial morphology and dynamics would reflect this decline. Using hippocampus and frontal cortex of a segmental progeroid mouse model lacking Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSBm/m) and C57Bl/6 (WT) controls...... and comparing young (2–5 months) to middle-aged mice (13–14 months), we found that complex I-linked state 3 respiration (CI) was reduced at middle age in CSBm/m hippocampus, but not in CSBm/m cortex or WT brain. In hippocampus of both genotypes, mitochondrial size heterogeneity increased with age. Notably...... content was lower, and hypoxia-induced factor 1α mRNA was greater at both ages in CSBm/m compared to WT brain. Our findings show that decreased CI and increased mitochondrial size heterogeneity are highly associated and point to declining mitochondrial quality control as an initial event in brain aging....

  10. Osmotherapy in brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grände, Per-Olof; Romner, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been used since the 1960s in diseases associated with brain edema and has been investigated in >150 publications on head injury, very little has been published on the outcome of osmotherapy. We can only speculate whether osmotherapy improves outcome, has no effect......, osmotherapy can be negative for outcome, which may explain why we lack scientific support for its use. These drawbacks, and the fact that the most recent Cochrane meta-analyses of osmotherapy in brain edema and stroke could not find any beneficial effects on outcome, make routine use of osmotherapy in brain...... edema doubtful. Nevertheless, the use of osmotherapy as a temporary measure may be justified to acutely prevent brain stem compression until other measures, such as evacuation of space-occupying lesions or decompressive craniotomy, can be performed. This article is the Con part in a Pro-Con debate...

  11. Brain Tumors and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can help calm the mind. Meditation, guided imagery, music therapy, and yoga are just a few worth investigating. Home Donor and Privacy Policies Find Resources Disclaimer Donate Subscribe Login American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste ...

  12. Brain Facts: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and resources during times of stress and arousal. Synapse A physical gap between two neurons that functions ... Area A brain region responsible for comprehension of language and production of meaningful speech. White Matter The ...

  13. Brain versus Machine Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Octopus, the villain of the movie "Spiderman 2", is a fusion of man and machine. Neuroscientist Jose Carmena examines the facts behind this fictional account of a brain- machine interface

  14. Brain Aneurysm Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Megyn Kelly sits down with CNBC’s Senior Personal Finance Correspondent Sharon Epperson to discuss how she survived ... in Touch Stay current with the Brain Aneurysm Foundation. Sign up to receive our newsletter! Please leave ...

  15. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Post-Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Families & Friendships Military Sexual Trauma Depression mild Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & ... Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Anxiety Health & Wellness Military Sexual Trauma Tobacco Community About Depression Life Stress Alcohol & Drugs ...

  16. Brain Tumor Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professional Meetings Order Materials Clinical Trials Support Group Leader Training Adolescent and Young Adult Guidelines For brain ... nitrites), cigarette smoking, cell phone use, and residential power line exposure, for example—are true risk factors ...

  17. Modular Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporns, Olaf; Betzel, Richard F

    2016-01-01

    The development of new technologies for mapping structural and functional brain connectivity has led to the creation of comprehensive network maps of neuronal circuits and systems. The architecture of these brain networks can be examined and analyzed with a large variety of graph theory tools. Methods for detecting modules, or network communities, are of particular interest because they uncover major building blocks or subnetworks that are particularly densely connected, often corresponding to specialized functional components. A large number of methods for community detection have become available and are now widely applied in network neuroscience. This article first surveys a number of these methods, with an emphasis on their advantages and shortcomings; then it summarizes major findings on the existence of modules in both structural and functional brain networks and briefly considers their potential functional roles in brain evolution, wiring minimization, and the emergence of functional specialization and complex dynamics.

  18. Analysis of Brain Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frilot, Clifton; Kim, Paul Y.; Carrubba, Simona; McCarty, David E.; Chesson, Andrew L.; Marino, Andrew A.

    Analysis of Brain Recurrence (ABR) is a method for extracting physiologically significant information from the electroencephalogram (EEG), a non-stationary electrical output of the brain, the ultimate complex dynamical system. ABR permits quantification of temporal patterns in the EEG produced by the non-autonomous differential laws that govern brain metabolism. In the context of appropriate experimental and statistical designs, ABR is ideally suited to the task of interpreting the EEG. Present applications of ABR include discovery of a human magnetic sense, increased mechanistic understanding of neuronal membrane processes, diagnosis of degenerative neurological disease, detection of changes in brain metabolism caused by weak environmental electromagnetic fields, objective characterization of the quality of human sleep, and evaluation of sleep disorders. ABR has important beneficial implications for the development of clinical and experimental neuroscience.

  19. The Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Carla J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses neural activity and stimulation crucial in fetal brain development and the formation of the mind. Focuses on activity-dependent remodeling related to development of the visual system and retinal activity. (MCO)

  20. Brains on video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F; Merzenich, Michael M; Gentile, Douglas A

    2011-11-18

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games 'damage the brain' or 'boost brain power' do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affect cognition and behaviour, and explain how this knowledge can be harnessed for educational and rehabilitation purposes. As research in this area is still in its early days, the contributors of this Viewpoint also discuss several issues and challenges that should be addressed to move the field forward.