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Sample records for brain hemorrhage traumatic

  1. Terson syndrome in subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czorlich, Patrick; Skevas, Christos; Knospe, Volker; Vettorazzi, Eik; Richard, Gisbert; Wagenfeld, Lars; Westphal, Manfred; Regelsberger, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This prospective trial was designed to evaluate the incidence of Terson syndrome in patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, or traumatic brain injury and whether consequences necessarily derive from the intraocular hemorrhage itself. Two ophthalmologic examinations were performed to identify patients with Terson syndrome. Data on initial Glasgow Coma Scale, Hunt and Hess and Fisher grades, aneurysm site and diameter, and volume of hemorrhage in intracerebral hemorrhage patients were correlated to the location and course of Terson syndrome. Follow-up was performed after 3 months, including clinical and ophthalmologic investigations. The data showed that 16 of 83 subarachnoid hemorrhage patients (19.3%), 2 of 22 intracerebral hemorrhage patients (9.1%), and 1 of 32 traumatic brain injury patients (3.1%) suffered from Terson syndrome. Low Glasgow Coma Scale (p = 0.002), high Hunt and Hess grade (p Terson syndrome. The neurological outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients suffering from Terson syndrome was worse compared with that of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients without Terson syndrome (p = 0.005), and vitrectomy was performed in seven eyes of six patients due to poor visual acuity. Terson syndrome is underestimated in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and a rare pathology in intracerebral hemorrhage as well as in traumatic brain injury patients. Spontaneous regression of the intraocular hemorrhage may be seen, but in half of the patients, vitrectomy is necessary to prevent permanent visual deterioration.

  2. Pharmacologic resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock combined with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael; Imam, Ayesha

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, can improve survival after hemorrhagic shock (HS), protect neurons from hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and attenuate the inflammatory response. We have also shown that administration of 6% hetastarch (Hextend [...... [Hex]) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) decreases brain swelling, without affecting size of the lesion. This study was performed to determine whether addition of VPA to Hex would decrease the lesion size in a clinically relevant large animal model of TBI + HS....

  3. A Prospective Pilot Investigation of Brain Volume, White Matter Hyperintensities, and Hemorrhagic Lesions after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Michael eJarrett; Roger eTam; Enedino eHernández-Torres; Nancy eMartin; Warren ePerera; Yinshan eZhao; Elham eShahinfard; Shiroy eDadachanji; Jack eTaunton; David K B Li; Alexander eRauscher

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the most common neurological disorders. Hemorrhagic lesions and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) are radiological features associated with moderate and severe TBI. Brain volume reductions have also been observed during the months following injury. In concussion, no signs of injury are observed on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which may be a true feature of concussion or merely due to the limited sensitivity of imaging techniques used s...

  4. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  5. Normal saline influences coagulation and endothelial function after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. These insults disrupt coagulation and endothelial systems. This study investigated whether previously reported differences in lesion size and brain swelling during normal saline (NS......), colloids (Hextend [HEX]), and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation are associated with differential effects on coagulation and endothelial systems. METHODS: We subjected 15 Yorkshire swine to TBI and HS (40% blood volume), and kept in HS for 2 hours before resuscitation with NS, HEX, or FFP. Markers...... of endothelial activation (E-selectin, Intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1), coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2), and natural anticoagulation (activated protein C [aPC]) were determined in serum and brain whole cell lysates. RESULTS: Serum levels of aPC were greater in the NS group (203 ± 30...

  6. A New Ultra-Small Volume Fluid for Far-Forward, Non-Compressible Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    improve cardiac function, correct coagulopathy, blunt systemic inflammation and improve tissue oxygenation. In the second study, ALM treatment...resuscitation, hypotensive, non-compressible, truncal, hemorrhage, TBI, coagulopathy, inflammation , ALM, adenosine, lidocaine, magnesium, ROTEM, cardiac...traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death on the battlefield. Over 30 years ago, Col. Ronald Bellamy reported in his landmark article The

  7. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence...... treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves....... to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma...

  8. Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Correlates with Preinjury Brain Atrophy, but Not with Antithrombotic Agent Use: A Retrospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, C. Michael; Hoffman, David A.; Huang, Gregory S.; Omert, Laurel A.; Gemmel, David J.; Merrell, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of antithrombotic agents (warfarin, clopidogrel, ASA) on traumatic brain injury outcomes is highly controversial. Although cerebral atrophy is speculated as a risk for acute intracranial hemorrhage, there is no objective literature evidence. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective, consecutive investigation of patients with signs of external head trauma and age ≥60 years. Outcomes were correlated with antithrombotic-agent status, coagulation test results, admission...

  9. The Effect of Time to International Normalized Ratio Reversal on Intracranial Hemorrhage Evolution in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hans; Rittenhouse, Katelyn; Gross, Brian; Rogers, Frederick B

    The incidence of geriatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasing throughout the United States, with many of these patients taking anticoagulation (AC) medication. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of time to international normalized ratio (INR) reversal on intracranial hemorrhage evolution in TBI patients taking prehospital AC medication. We hypothesized that rapid reversal of INR improves outcomes of head-injured patients taking AC medication. Admissions to a Level II trauma center between February 2011 and December 2013 were reviewed. Patients presenting with an initial INR of 2.0 or more, computed tomographic scan positive for intracranial hemorrhage, and INR reversal to less than 1.5 in hospital were included. Patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage were excluded. Reversal of INR was achieved using some combination of fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrate, and vitamin K. A binary logistic regression model assessed the adjusted impact of rapid INR reversal on intracranial hemorrhage evolution. Significance was defined as p hr was not associated with intracranial hemorrhage evolution; however, reversal of less than 10 hr was found to be associated with a decreased odds ratio for intracranial hemorrhage evolution (p = .043). Rapid reversal of elevated INR levels (hr) may decrease intracranial hemorrhage evolution in TBI patients taking prehospital AC medication.

  10. Resuscitation with Valproic Acid Alters Inflammatory Genes in a Porcine Model of Combined Traumatic Brain Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock (TBI+HS) elicit a complex inflammatory response that contributes to secondary brain injury. There is currently no proven pharmacologic treatment for TBI+HS, but modulation of the epigenome has been shown to be a promising strategy. The aim of this study......), and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery) were used for pathway analysis. Key microarray findings were verified using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IPA analysis revealed that VPA significantly down-regulated the complement system (p 

  11. Early treatment with lyophilized plasma protects the brain in a large animal model of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Sillesen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well as the assoc......Combination of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) can result in significant morbidity and mortality. We have previously shown that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in a large animal model of TBI and HS reduces the size of the brain lesion as well...... as the associated edema. However, FFP is a perishable product that is not well suited for use in the austere prehospital settings. In this study, we tested whether a shelf-stable, low-volume, lyophilized plasma (LSP) product was as effective as FFP....

  12. Traumatic intracranial hemorrhage correlates with preinjury brain atrophy, but not with antithrombotic agent use: a retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Michael Dunham

    Full Text Available The impact of antithrombotic agents (warfarin, clopidogrel, ASA on traumatic brain injury outcomes is highly controversial. Although cerebral atrophy is speculated as a risk for acute intracranial hemorrhage, there is no objective literature evidence.This is a retrospective, consecutive investigation of patients with signs of external head trauma and age ≥60 years. Outcomes were correlated with antithrombotic-agent status, coagulation test results, admission neurologic function, and CT-based cerebral atrophy dimensions.Of 198 consecutive patients, 36% were antithrombotic-negative and 64% antithrombotic-positive. ASA patients had higher arachidonic acid inhibition (p = 0.04 and warfarin patients had higher INR (p<0.001, compared to antithrombotic-negative patients. Antithrombotic-positive intracranial hemorrhage rate (38.9% was similar to the antithrombotic-negative rate (31.9%; p = 0.3285. Coagulopathy was not present on the ten standard coagulation, thromboelastography, and platelet mapping tests with intracranial hemorrhage and results were similar to those without hemorrhage (p≥0.1354. Hemorrhagic-neurologic complication (intracranial hemorrhage progression, need for craniotomy, neurologic deterioration, or death rates were similar for antithrombotic-negative (6.9% and antithrombotic-positive (8.7%; p = 0.6574 patients. The hemorrhagic-neurologic complication rate was increased when admission major neurologic dysfunction was present (63.2% versus 2.2%; RR = 28.3; p<0.001. Age correlated inversely with brain parenchymal width (p<0.001 and positively with lateral ventricular width (p = 0.047 and cortical atrophy (p<0.001. Intracranial hemorrhage correlated with cortical atrophy (p<0.001 and ventricular width (p<0.001.Intracranial hemorrhage is not associated with antithrombotic agent use. Intracranial hemorrhage patients have no demonstrable coagulopathy. The association of preinjury brain atrophy with acute intracranial

  13. Traumatic intracranial hemorrhage correlates with preinjury brain atrophy, but not with antithrombotic agent use: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, C Michael; Hoffman, David A; Huang, Gregory S; Omert, Laurel A; Gemmel, David J; Merrell, Renee

    2014-01-01

    The impact of antithrombotic agents (warfarin, clopidogrel, ASA) on traumatic brain injury outcomes is highly controversial. Although cerebral atrophy is speculated as a risk for acute intracranial hemorrhage, there is no objective literature evidence. This is a retrospective, consecutive investigation of patients with signs of external head trauma and age ≥60 years. Outcomes were correlated with antithrombotic-agent status, coagulation test results, admission neurologic function, and CT-based cerebral atrophy dimensions. Of 198 consecutive patients, 36% were antithrombotic-negative and 64% antithrombotic-positive. ASA patients had higher arachidonic acid inhibition (p = 0.04) and warfarin patients had higher INR (p<0.001), compared to antithrombotic-negative patients. Antithrombotic-positive intracranial hemorrhage rate (38.9%) was similar to the antithrombotic-negative rate (31.9%; p = 0.3285). Coagulopathy was not present on the ten standard coagulation, thromboelastography, and platelet mapping tests with intracranial hemorrhage and results were similar to those without hemorrhage (p≥0.1354). Hemorrhagic-neurologic complication (intracranial hemorrhage progression, need for craniotomy, neurologic deterioration, or death) rates were similar for antithrombotic-negative (6.9%) and antithrombotic-positive (8.7%; p = 0.6574) patients. The hemorrhagic-neurologic complication rate was increased when admission major neurologic dysfunction was present (63.2% versus 2.2%; RR = 28.3; p<0.001). Age correlated inversely with brain parenchymal width (p<0.001) and positively with lateral ventricular width (p = 0.047) and cortical atrophy (p<0.001). Intracranial hemorrhage correlated with cortical atrophy (p<0.001) and ventricular width (p<0.001). Intracranial hemorrhage is not associated with antithrombotic agent use. Intracranial hemorrhage patients have no demonstrable coagulopathy. The association of preinjury brain atrophy with acute intracranial

  14. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Posttraumatic hypotension is believed to increase morbidity and mortality in traumatically brain-injured patients. Using a clinically relevant model of combined traumatic brain injury with superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension in rats, the present study evaluated whether a reduction in mean arterial blood pressure aggravates regional brain edema formation, regional cell death, and neurologic motor/cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Design Experimental prospective, randomized study in rodents. Setting Experimental laboratory at a university hospital. Subjects One hundred nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-385 g. Interventions Experimental traumatic brain injury of mild to moderate severity was induced using the lateral fluid percussion brain injury model in anesthetized rats (n = 89). Following traumatic brain injury, in surviving animals one group of animals was subjected to pressure-controlled hemorrhagic hypotension, maintaining the mean arterial blood pressure at 50-60 mm Hg for 30 mins (n = 47). The animals were subsequently either resuscitated with lactated Ringer’s solution (three times shed blood volume, n = 18) or left uncompensated (n = 29). Other groups of animals included those with isolated traumatic brain injury (n = 34), those with isolated hemorrhagic hypotension (n = 8), and sham-injured control animals receiving anesthesia and surgery alone (n = 22). Measurements and Main Results The withdrawal of 6-7 mL of arterial blood significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 50% without decreasing arterial oxygen saturation or Pao2. Brain injury induced significant cerebral edema (p hypotension. Brain injury-induced neurologic deficits persisted up to 20 wks after injury and were also not aggravated by the hemorrhagic hypotension. Cognitive dysfunction persisted for up to 16 wks postinjury. The superimposition of hemorrhagic hypotension significantly delayed the time course of cognitive recovery

  15. Improvement of Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Traumatic Brain Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock Following Treatment With Valproic Acid and Fresh Frozen Plasma.

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    Nikolian, Vahagn C; Dekker, Simone E; Bambakidis, Ted; Higgins, Gerald A; Dennahy, Isabel S; Georgoff, Patrick E; Williams, Aaron M; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Alam, Hasan B

    2018-01-01

    Combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock are highly lethal. Following injuries, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier can be impaired, contributing to secondary brain insults. The status of the blood-brain barrier represents a potential factor impacting long-term neurologic outcomes in combined injuries. Treatment strategies involving plasma-based resuscitation and valproic acid therapy have shown efficacy in this setting. We hypothesize that a component of this beneficial effect is related to blood-brain barrier preservation. Following controlled traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic shock, various resuscitation and treatment strategies were evaluated for their association with blood-brain barrier integrity. Analysis of gene expression profiles was performed using Porcine Gene ST 1.1 microarray. Pathway analysis was completed using network analysis tools (Gene Ontology, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, and Parametric Gene Set Enrichment Analysis). Female Yorkshire swine were subjected to controlled traumatic brain injury and 2 hours of hemorrhagic shock (40% blood volume, mean arterial pressure 30-35 mmHg). Subjects were resuscitated with 1) normal saline, 2) fresh frozen plasma, 3) hetastarch, 4) fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid, or 5) hetastarch + valproic acid (n = 5 per group). After 6 hours of observation, brains were harvested for evaluation. Immunofluoroscopic evaluation of the traumatic brain injury site revealed significantly increased expression of tight-junction associated proteins (zona occludin-1, claudin-5) following combination therapy (fresh frozen plasma + valproic acid and hetastarch + valproic acid). The extracellular matrix protein laminin was found to have significantly improved expression with combination therapies. Pathway analysis indicated that valproic acid significantly modulated pathways involved in endothelial barrier function and cell signaling. Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma results in improved expression of

  16. Synergistic effects of fresh frozen plasma and valproic acid treatment in a combined model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are major causes of trauma-related deaths and are especially lethal as a combined insult. Previously, we showed that early administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreased the size of the brain lesion and associated swelling in a swine ...

  17. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin; Hartings, Jed A; Graf, Rudolf; Strong, Anthony John

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) and depolarization waves are associated with dramatic failure of brain ion homeostasis, efflux of excitatory amino acids from nerve cells, increased energy metabolism and changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). There is strong clinical and experimental evidence to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma. The consequences of these intrinsic mechanisms are intimately linked to the composition of the brain extracellular microenvironment and to the level of brain perfusion and in consequence brain energy supply. This paper summarizes the evidence provided by novel invasive techniques, which implicates CSD as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves.

  18. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Francis J; Chapman, Michael P; Donahue, Deborah L; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E; Wohlauer, Max V; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction.

  19. Research into the Predictive Effect of TEG in the Changes of Coagulation Functions of the Patients with Traumatic Brain Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Huanqiu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the predictive effect of thrombelastogram (TEG in the changes of coagulation functions of patients with traumatic brain hemorrhage, as well as to provide a practice basis for clinical guidance. 54 cases were observed from Aug. 2013–Oct. 2014. All patients received a TEG test 1d, 3d and 7d after traumatic injury. According to the statistical analysis, the comparison among the aforementioned coagulation function parameters in each group of patients, K, α and Ma all had significant differences. In the comparison between different time points in the same group, there was still a significant difference. Compared to the patients, the changes of R and K reached the lowest at 1d and the highest at 3d, but there was no significant difference between two groups at 7d. The changes of α and Ma reached its highest at 1d and the lowest at 3d after traumatic injury, but there was no significant difference at 7d. There was some difference in changes of coagulation functions between all groups. The former was more serious and the changes of coagulation functions had certain regularity, i.e., after traumatic injury, 1d showed a hypercoagulable state; 3d showed a hypocoagulable state; the coagulation functions of 7d returned to normal.

  20. Pharmacologic modulation of cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity in a porcine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwabejire, John O; Jin, Guang; Imam, Ayesha M; Duggan, Michael; Sillesen, Martin; Deperalta, Danielle; Jepsen, Cecilie H; Lu, Jennifer; Li, Yongqing; deMoya, Marc A; Alam, Hasan B

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity play critical roles in the evolution of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We have shown previously that treatment with large doses of valproic acid (VPA) decreases the size of brain lesion. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether this effect was owing to metabolic modulation. Yorkshire swine (n = 9) underwent a protocol of computer-controlled TBI and 40% hemorrhage and were resuscitated randomly with either fresh frozen plasma equal to the volume of shed blood (FFP; n = 4) or VPA (300 mg/kg) and FFP (FFP+VPA; n = 5). Hemodynamics, brain oxygenation, and blood glucose were monitored continuously for 6 hours after resuscitation. Cerebral microdialysis was used to measure glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol levels at baseline, 1 and 2 hours post-shock, post-resuscitation (PR), and at 2, 4, and 6 hours PR. Brain samples from the injured side were then separated into mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions, and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) was measured using a dipstick assay kit. At baseline, there was no difference in brain lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, and glutamate concentrations between the groups. At all time points, there were no differences between the groups in brain oxygenation, cerebral perfusion pressure, or blood and brain glucose concentrations. After VPA infusion (PR time point), however, there was sustained decrease in lactate (0.91 ± 0.47 vs 2.54 ± 0.59 mmol/L; P glucose utilization for ATP production. There was also a decrease in concentrations of glutamate (6.64 ± 3.68 vs 42.25 ± 27.07 mmol/L; P = .02) and glycerol (19.20 ± 6.76 vs 69.75 ± 30.07 mmol/L; P = .01), in the FFP+VPA group, signifying lesser degree of excitotoxicity and brain damage, respectively. Brain PDH activity was greater in the mitochondrial fractions (5,984 ± 504 adjusted volume intensity [INT] × mm(2) vs 4,332 ± 1,055 INT × mm(2); P = .04) and lower in cytosolic fractions in the FFP

  1. Hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a preliminary report.

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    Kelly, D F; Gonzalo, I T; Cohan, P; Berman, N; Swerdloff, R; Wang, C

    2000-11-01

    Recognition of pituitary hormonal insufficiencies after head injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be important, especially given that hypopituitarism-related neurobehavioral problems are typically alleviated by hormone replacement. In this prospective study the authors sought to determine the rate and risk factors of pituitary dysfunction after head injury and SAH in patients at least 3 months after insult. Patients underwent dynamic anterior and posterior pituitary function testing. Results of the tests were compared with those of 18 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy volunteers. The 22 head-injured patients included 18 men and four women (mean age 28+/-10 years at the time of injury) with initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 3 to 15. Eight patients (36.4%) had a subnormal response in at least one hormonal axis. Four were growth hormone (GH) deficient. Five patients (four men, all with normal testosterone levels, and one woman with a low estradiol level) exhibited an inadequate gonadotroph response. One patient had both GH and thyrotroph deficiency and another had both GH deficiency and borderline cortisol deficiency. At the time of injury, all eight patients with pituitary dysfunction had an initial GCS score of 10 or less and, compared with the 14 patients without dysfunction, were more likely to have had diffuse swelling, seen on initial computerized tomography scans (p insult (p = 0.07). Of two patients with SAH who were studied (Hunt and Hess Grade IV) both had GH deficiency. From this preliminary study, some degree of hypopituitarism appears to occur in approximately 40% of patients with moderate or severe head injury, with GH and gonadotroph deficiencies being most common. A high degree of injury severity and secondary cerebral insults are likely risk factors for hypopituitarism. Pituitary dysfunction also occurs in patients with poor-grade aneurysms. Postacute pituitary function testing may be warranted in most

  2. Pharmacologic modulation of cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity in a porcine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Jin, Guang; Imam, Ayesha M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic derangement and excitotoxicity play critical roles in the evolution of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We have shown previously that treatment with large doses of valproic acid (VPA) decreases the size of brain lesion. The goal of this experiment was to determine whether this eff...

  3. The Development of Neuroendocrine Disturbances over Time: Longitudinal Findings in Patients after Traumatic Brain Injury and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kopczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports suggest that neuroendocrine disturbances in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH may still develop or resolve months or even years after the trauma. We investigated a cohort of n = 168 patients (81 patients after TBI and 87 patients after SAH in whom hormone levels had been determined at various time points to assess the course and pattern of hormonal insufficiencies. Data were analyzed using three different criteria: (1 patients with lowered basal laboratory values; (2 patients with lowered basal laboratory values or the need for hormone replacement therapy; (3 diagnosis of the treating physician. The first hormonal assessment after a median time of three months after the injury showed lowered hormone laboratory test results in 35% of cases. Lowered testosterone (23.1% of male patients, lowered estradiol (14.3% of female patients and lowered insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I values (12.1% were most common. Using Criterion 2, a higher prevalence rate of 55.6% of cases was determined, which correlated well with the prevalence rate of 54% of cases using the physicians’ diagnosis as the criterion. Intraindividual changes (new onset insufficiency or recovery were predominantly observed for the somatotropic axis (12.5%, the gonadotropic axis in women (11.1% and the corticotropic axis (10.6%. Patients after TBI showed more often lowered IGF-I values at first testing, but normal values at follow-up (p < 0.0004. In general, most patients remained stable. Stable hormone results at follow-up were obtained in 78% (free thyroxine (fT4 values to 94.6% (prolactin values.

  4. Predicting intracranial hemorrhage after traumatic brain injury in low and middle-income countries: A prognostic model based on a large, multi-center, international cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subaiya Saleena

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI affects approximately 10 million people annually, of which intracranial hemorrhage is a devastating sequelae, occurring in one-third to half of cases. Patients in low and middle-income countries (LMIC are twice as likely to die following TBI as compared to those in high-income countries. Diagnostic capabilities and treatment options for intracranial hemorrhage are limited in LMIC as there are fewer computed tomography (CT scanners and neurosurgeons per patient as in high-income countries. Methods The Medical Research Council CRASH-1 trial was utilized to build this model. The study cohort included all patients from LMIC who received a CT scan of the brain (n = 5669. Prognostic variables investigated included age, sex, time from injury to randomization, pupil reactivity, cause of injury, seizure and the presence of major extracranial injury. Results There were five predictors that were included in the final model; age, Glasgow Coma Scale, pupil reactivity, the presence of a major extracranial injury and time from injury to presentation. The model demonstrated good discrimination and excellent calibration (c-statistic 0.71. A simplified risk score was created for clinical settings to estimate the percentage risk of intracranial hemorrhage among TBI patients. Conclusion Simple prognostic models can be used in LMIC to estimate the risk of intracranial hemorrhage among TBI patients. Combined with clinical judgment this may facilitate risk stratification, rapid transfer to higher levels of care and treatment in resource-poor settings.

  5. Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Post-Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Families & Friendships Military Sexual Trauma Depression mild Traumatic Brain Injury Life Stress Health & ... Traumatic Stress Physical Injury Anxiety Health & Wellness Military Sexual Trauma Tobacco Community About Depression Life Stress Alcohol & Drugs ...

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  7. Differential effects of fresh frozen plasma and normal saline on secondary brain damage in a large animal model of polytrauma, hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwabejire, John O; Imam, Ayesha M; Jin, Guang

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in large animal models can be reduced with early infusion of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), but the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether resuscitation with FFP or normal saline differed in th...

  8. Predictors of outcome for non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Syed A; Khan, Abdul S; Akturk, Zekeriya

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the prognosis, neurologic outcome, and predictors of survival in patients with non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage. We evaluated prospectively a cohort of 96 Saudi adult males and females with stroke during the month of July 2005 at Arar Central Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Out of 103 patients, 96 patients, who were diagnosed as having intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) presenting to the emergency department for initial evaluation, were included, except those with recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage, arteriovenous malformation, subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, hemorrhagic infarctions, and patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. No patient underwent any neurosurgical procedure. The results of 96 patients were analyzed. The mean age at ICH was 67.2 (+/-14.7) years (range, 30-100 years), and mean Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score on admission was 8.42 (+/-1.73) and (range, 4-13). Mean ICH volume on initial CT scan was 10.61 (+/-14.01) ml3 (range, 1-63). Mean pulse pressure on hospital arrival was 81.9 (+/-22.8) mm Hg (range, 70-120 mm Hg). In uni-variate analysis, GCS score (p=0.0005), ICH volume (p=0.001), mass effect (p=0.001), and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p=0.0005) were all associated with 30-days mortality, while in multivariable analysis, the most significant independent predictors of 30-day mortality were, GCS score and the intraventricular extension of hemorrhage. This model may aid in making decisions quickly and easily regarding the appropriate level of care for such patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  9. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock with fractionated blood products versus fresh whole blood in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, Akiva; Brotfain, Evgeni; Koyfman, Leonid; Klein, Moti; Hess, Shmuel; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew

    2018-01-17

    Treatment of combined traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock, poses a particular challenge due to the possible conflicting consequences. While restoring diminished volume is the treatment goal for hypovolemia, maintaining adequate cerebral perfusion pressure and avoidance of secondary damage remains a treatment goal for the injured brain. Various treatment modalities have been proposed, but the optimal resuscitation fluid and goals have not yet been clearly defined. A growing body of evidence suggests that in hypovolemic shock, resuscitation with fresh whole blood (FWB) may be superior to component therapy without platelets (which are likely to be unavailable in the pre-hospital setting). Nevertheless, the effects of this approach have not been studied in the combined injury. Previously, in a rat model of combined injury we have found that mild resuscitation to MABP of 80 mmHg with FWB is superior to fluid resuscitation or aggressive resuscitation with FWB. In this study, we investigate the physiological and neurological outcomes in a rat model of combined traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hypovolemic shock, submitted to treatment with varying amounts of FWB, compared to similar resuscitation goals with fractionated blood products-red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma in a 1:1 ratio regimen. 40 male Lewis rats were divided into control and treatment groups. TBI was inflicted by a free-falling rod on the exposed cranium. Hypovolemia was induced by controlled hemorrhage of 30% blood volume. Treatment groups were treated either with fresh whole blood or with RBC + plasma in a 1:1 ratio, achieving a resuscitation goal of a mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of 80 mmHg at 15 min. MAP was assessed at 60 min, and neurological outcomes and mortality in the subsequent 24 h. At 60 min, hemodynamic parameters were improved compared to controls, but not significantly different between treatment groups. Survival rates at 48 h were 100% for both of the mildly

  11. Resuscitation with Pooled and Pathogen-Reduced Plasma Attenuates the Increase in Brain Water Content following Traumatic Brain Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Bentzer, Peter; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to investigate whether pooled and pathogen-reduced plasma (OctaplasLG(®) [OCTA]; Octapharma, Stockholm, Sweden) was comparable to FFP with regard to effects on brain water content, BBB permeability, and plasma biomarkers of endothelial glycocalyx shedding and cell damage. After fluid...... pressure, and biomarkers of systemic glycocalyx shedding (syndecan-1) and cell damage (histone-complexed DNA) were measured at 0 and 23 h. At 24 h, brain water content was 80.44 ± 0.39%, 80.82 ± 0.82%, and 81.15 ± 0.86% in the OCTA, FFP, and NS groups (lower in OCTA vs. NS; p = 0.026), with no difference......)-treated plasma attenuates the post-traumatic increase in brain water content, and that this effect may, in part, be explained by a high crystalloid and colloid osmotic pressure in SD-treated plasma....

  12. Assessment of Cerebral Hemodynamics in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    haemorrhage, and 6 with subarach- noid hemorrhage from ruptured aneurysm . There were 4 cases of cerebral contusions and a single case of traumatic...B. Goldstein, 2003: Significance of Intracranial Pressure Pulse Morphology in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury. IEEE, 2491-2494. Anile, C., H. D

  13. Benefits and risks of anticoagulation resumption following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Jennifer S; Liu, Xinggang; Baumgarten, Mona; Langenberg, Patricia; Rattinger, Gail B; Smith, Gordon S; Gambert, Steven R; Gottlieb, Stephen S; Zuckerman, Ilene H

    2014-08-01

    The increased risk of hemorrhage associated with anticoagulant therapy following traumatic brain injury creates a serious dilemma for medical management of older patients: Should anticoagulant therapy be resumed after traumatic brain injury, and if so, when? To estimate the risk of thrombotic and hemorrhagic events associated with warfarin therapy resumption following traumatic brain injury. Retrospective analysis of administrative claims data for Medicare beneficiaries aged at least 65 years hospitalized for traumatic brain injury during 2006 through 2009 who received warfarin in the month prior to injury (n = 10,782). Warfarin use in each 30-day period following discharge after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury. The primary outcomes were hemorrhagic and thrombotic events following discharge after hospitalization for traumatic brain injury. Hemorrhagic events were defined on inpatient claims using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and included hemorrhagic stroke, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, adrenal hemorrhage, and other hemorrhage. Thrombotic events included ischemic stroke, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, and myocardial infarction. A composite of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke was a secondary outcome. Medicare beneficiaries with traumatic brain injury were predominantly female (64%) and white (92%), with a mean (SD) age of 81.3 (7.3) years, and 82% had atrial fibrillation. Over the 12 months following hospital discharge, 55% received warfarin during 1 or more 30-day periods. We examined the lagged effect of warfarin use on outcomes in the following period. Warfarin use in the prior period was associated with decreased risk of thrombotic events (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [95% CI, 0.67-0.88]) and increased risk of hemorrhagic events (RR, 1.51 [95% CI, 1.29-1.78]). Warfarin use in the prior period was associated with decreased risk of hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke (RR, 0.83 [95% CI, 0

  14. Delayed Brainstem Hemorrhage Secondary to Mild Traumatic Head Injury: Report of Case with Good Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kun; Zhao, Jinchuan; Gao, Xianfeng; Zhu, Xiaobo; Li, Guichen

    2017-09-01

    In clinical practice, secondary traumatic brainstem hemorrhage often develops during descending transtentorial herniation due to raised intracranial pressure, which is known as Duret hemorrhage. Although usually considered a fatal and irreversible event, in rare circumstances, victims of Duret hemorrhage could gain favorable outcomes. To our knowledge, secondary brainstem hemorrhage due to mild traumatic head injury without descending transtentorial herniation has never been reported. In this report, we present a case of delayed brainstem hemorrhage secondary to a relatively mild traumatic brain injury that experienced a rapid and favorable recovery. A 48-year-old man was admitted for a motorcycle accident. Head computed tomography 2 hours after the accident revealed mild subarachnoid hemorrhage at the interpeduncular cistern. In the following in-hospital days, he experienced 2 episodes of mental state deterioration and increase of the SAH and hematoma extension to the brainstem. A digital subtraction angiography was performed with no positive finding of vascular anomaly and evident cerebral vasospasm. He experienced a rapid and favorable recovery. His Glasgow Outcome Scale score was 5 at 3 months' follow-up. We present a rare case of secondary traumatic brainstem hemorrhage that experienced a rapid and good recovery process. The mechanism is still obscure to us and needs to be further studied. Although traumatic brainstem hemorrhage usually means a fatal event to most of the patients, some patients may experience a favorable recovery. This rare circumstance should be stressed in prognosis consultation and clinical management of these kinds of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Concussion Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Past Issues / Summer 2015 ... have a concussion or more serious brain injury. Concussion Signs Observed Can't recall events prior to ...

  16. Traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Brody, David L; Kochanek, Patrick M; Levin, Harvey; McKee, Ann; Ribbers, Gerard M; Yaffe, Kristine; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-11-17

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are clinically grouped by severity: mild, moderate and severe. Mild TBI (the least severe form) is synonymous with concussion and is typically caused by blunt non-penetrating head trauma. The trauma causes stretching and tearing of axons, which leads to diffuse axonal injury - the best-studied pathogenetic mechanism of this disorder. However, mild TBI is defined on clinical grounds and no well-validated imaging or fluid biomarkers to determine the presence of neuronal damage in patients with mild TBI is available. Most patients with mild TBI will recover quickly, but others report persistent symptoms, called post-concussive syndrome, the underlying pathophysiology of which is largely unknown. Repeated concussive and subconcussive head injuries have been linked to the neurodegenerative condition chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which has been reported post-mortem in contact sports athletes and soldiers exposed to blasts. Insights from severe injuries and CTE plausibly shed light on the underlying cellular and molecular processes involved in mild TBI. MRI techniques and blood tests for axonal proteins to identify and grade axonal injury, in addition to PET for tau pathology, show promise as tools to explore CTE pathophysiology in longitudinal clinical studies, and might be developed into diagnostic tools for CTE. Given that CTE is attributed to repeated head trauma, prevention might be possible through rule changes by sports organizations and legislators.

  17. Cognitive retraining in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diya Nangia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is often associated with cognitive impairments. The psychological sequelae of cognitive deficits and emotional problems contribute significantly to the disability in the patient and to the distress of the family. The study aimed to develop a cognitive retraining programme to enhance cognitive functioning in TBI. 25 years old male presenting with history of left temporal hemorrhagic contusion with cerebral edema underwent 2 months of a cognitive retaining programme, addressing executive functions impairment. A single case experimental design with pre- and post-assessment was adopted to evaluate changes in the patient in response to the intervention. Improvements were found in cognitive functioning, and in symptom reduction and behaviour. The 2 months hospital based cognitive retraining programme was found to be efficacious in ameliorating symptoms and improving cognitive, social and occupational functioning post traumatic brain injury.

  18. Hemorrhage Control for Major Traumatic Vascular Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    and it is unclear if this contributed to the high (46%) mortality in OPEN patients with thoracic aortic injury. Intra- abdominal arterial hemorrhage...Endovascular therapy for overcoming challenges presented with blunt abdominal aortic injury. Vascular and endovascular surgery 2012;46:329-331. 23...systematically define the clinical and logistical issues surrounding traditional open vascular surgery and catheter-based hemorrhage control. The

  19. Post-traumatic contrast enhancing brain lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Jung; Kim, Hyun Sook; Jeong, Min Sun; Kim, Deok Ryeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Only a few studies have been reported on the MR contrast enhancement and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) findings of the post-traumatic lesion of the brain. We report a case of the venous ischemia in the left frontal lobe observed in the MRI obtained one day after the incidence of trauma. Considering the presented slight increase in the ADC, the vasogenic edema was thought to be the major mechanism of the venous ischemia and excitotoxic injury. In spite of a slight increase in the ADC, the hyperintensity in the diffusion weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced areas eventually changed into hemorrhagic lesions.

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  1. Sleep and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Christian R

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic sleep-wake disturbances are frequent and often chronic complications after traumatic brain injury. The most prevalent sleep-wake disturbances are insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and pleiosomnia, (i.e., increased sleep need). These disturbances are probably of multifactorial origin, but direct traumatic damage to key brain structures in sleep-wake regulation is likely to contribute. Diagnosis and treatment consist of standard approaches, but because of misperception of sleep-wake behavior in trauma patients, subjective testing alone may not always suffice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge of Traumatic Brain Injury among Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William J.; Gallo, Adrienne B.; Sellers, Amanda L.; Mulrine, Jessica; MacNamara, Luciana; Abrahamson, Allison; Kneavel, Meredith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine knowledge of traumatic brain injury among educators. Few studies have examined knowledge of traumatic brain injury in this population and fewer still have included a substantial proportion of general education teachers. Examining knowledge of traumatic brain injury in educators is important as the vast…

  3. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...

  4. Giant cell glioblastoma manifesting as traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, S Meltem; Aydin, Yunus; Turkmenoglu, Osman; Aydin, Faruk; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2002-12-01

    A 33-year-old male presented with intracerebral hemorrhage in the left temporoparietal region after a traffic accident. Ten months later, the traumatic hemorrhage was found to originate in an underlying giant cell glioblastoma. Our case indicates that non-traumatic underlying pathologies, such as vasculopathies, coagulopathies, or tumors, should be considered in the differential diagnoses of intracerebral hemorrhage occurring in unusual locations after traumatic accidents.

  5. Traumatic brain lesions in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nícollas Nunes Rabelo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The neonatal period is a highly vulnerable time for an infant. The high neonatal morbidity and mortality rates attest to the fragility of life during this period. The incidence of birth trauma is 0.8%, varying from 0.2-2 per 1,000 births. The aim of this study is to describe brain traumas, and their mechanism, anatomy considerations, and physiopathology of the newborn traumatic brain injury. Methods A literature review using the PubMed data base, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Direct, The Cochrane Database, Google Scholar, and clinical trials. Selected papers from 1922 to 2016 were studied. We selected 109 papers, through key-words, with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Discussion This paper discusses the risk factors for birth trauma, the anatomy of the occipito-anterior and vertex presentation, and traumatic brain lesions. Conclusion Birth-related traumatic brain injury may cause serious complications in newborn infants. Its successful management includes special training, teamwork, and an individual approach.

  6. Post-traumatic stress disorder vs traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bryant, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) often coexist because brain injuries are often sustained in traumatic experiences. This review outlines the significant overlap between PTSD and TBI by commencing with a critical outline of the overlapping symptoms and problems of differential diagnosis. The impact of TBI on PTSD is then described, with increasing evidence suggesting that mild TBI can increase risk for PTSD. Several explanations are offered for this enhanc...

  7. Guillain Barre Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Rare Case

    OpenAIRE

    Kirac Unal; Karaca Umay; Tombak; Gundogdu; Erdem Sultanoglu; Aytul Cakci

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an immune-mediated acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Infectious agents were usually accused of playing a role in the etiology of GBS. Guillain-Barre syndrome has rarely been reported following subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage after head trauma. Case Presentation We report on a 63-year-old male patient presenting GBS following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)...

  8. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E; Smith, Douglas H; Stewart, William

    2016-05-23

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of nonboxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article.

  9. Traumatic brain injury complicated by environmental hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermstad Erik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations after traumatic brain injury are common and devastating. This has been shown most clearly with hypothermia, but the complications associated with hyperthermia in the setting of traumatic brain injury can be just as problematic. We present the case of a soldier with traumatic brain injury exposed to environmental temperatures of 115-120° F with a core temperature of over 108° F. The complications of his conditions are discussed as well as potential treatments for the deadly combination of traumatic brain injury and environmental hyperthermia.

  10. Smart Brain Hemorrhage Diagnosis Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh H. Suryawanshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The fundamental motivation behind this study is to identify the brain hemorrhage and to give accurate treatment so that death rate because of brain hemorrhage can be reduced. This project investigates the possibility of diagnosing brain hemorrhage using an image segmentation of CT scan images using watershed method and feeding of the appropriate inputs extracted from the brain CT image to an artificial neural network for classification. The output generated as the type of brain hemorrhages can be used to verify expert diagnosis and also as learning tool for trainee radiologists to minimize errors in current methods.

  11. BPSD following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghinah, Renato; Freire, Fabio Rios; Coelho, Fernanda; Lacerda, Juliana Rhein; Schmidt, Magali Taino; Calado, Vanessa Tomé Gonçalves; Ianof, Jéssica Natuline; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Basile, Luis Fernando Hindi; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Amorim, Robson Luis

    2013-01-01

    Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Brazil. We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  12. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI in Brazil. Objective: We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Methods: Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Results: Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Conclusion: Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  13. A simple rat model of mild traumatic brain injury: a device to reproduce anatomical and neurological changes of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Jeong Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury typically involves temporary impairment of neurological function. Previous studies used water pressure or rotational injury for designing the device to make a rat a mild traumatic brain injury model. The objective of this study was to make a simple model of causing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. The device consisted of a free-fall impactor that was targeted onto the rat skull. The weight (175 g was freely dropped 30 cm to rat’s skull bregma. We installed a safety device made of acrylic panel. To confirm a mild traumatic brain injury in 36 Sprague-Dawley rats, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain within 24 h after injury. We evaluated behavior and chemical changes in rats before and after mild traumatic brain injury. The brain MRI did not show high or low signal intensity in 34 rats. The mobility on grid floor was decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. The absolute number of foot-fault and foot-fault ratio were decreased after mild traumatic brain injury. However, the difference of the ratio was a less than absolute number of foot-fault. These results show that the device is capable of reproducing mild traumatic brain injury in rats. Our device can reduce the potential to cause brain hemorrhage and reflect the mechanism of real mild traumatic brain injury compared with existing methods and behaviors. This model can be useful in exploring physiology and management of mild traumatic brain injury.

  14. Treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid, is associated with increased platelet activation in a large animal model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    left in shock for 2 h before resuscitation with either FFP or FFP + VPA (300 mg/kg). Serum levels of platelet activation markers transforming growth factor beta, CD40 L, P-selectin, and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) 1 were measured at baseline, postresuscitation, and after a 6-h......, immunohistochemistry data showed elevated P-selectin in the VPA treatment group (22.30 ± 10.39% versus 8.125 ± 3.94%, P ....05). Circulating transforming growth factor beta levels were elevated in the FFP + VPA group, but this did not reach statistical significance (11.20 ± 1.46 versus 8.09 ± 1.41 ng/mL; P = 0.17). Brain platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 levels were significantly lower in the FFP + VPA group compared...

  15. Whole blood: the future of traumatic hemorrhagic shock resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Alan D; Berséus, Olle; Hervig, Tor; Strandenes, Geir; Lunde, Turid Helen

    2014-05-01

    Toward the end of World War I and during World War II, whole-blood transfusions were the primary agent in the treatment of military traumatic hemorrhage. However, after World War II, the fractionation of whole blood into its components became widely accepted and replaced whole-blood transfusion to better accommodate specific blood deficiencies, logistics, and financial reasons. This transition occurred with very few clinical trials to determine which patient populations or scenarios would or would not benefit from the change. A smaller population of patients with trauma hemorrhage will require massive transfusion (>10 U packed red blood cells in 24 h) occurring in 3% to 5% of civilian and 10% of military traumas. Advocates for hemostatic resuscitation have turned toward a ratio-balanced component therapy using packed red blood cells-fresh frozen plasma-platelet concentration in a 1:1:1 ratio due to whole-blood limited availability. However, this "reconstituted" whole blood is associated with a significantly anemic, thrombocytopenic, and coagulopathic product compared with whole blood. In addition, several recent military studies suggest a survival advantage of early use of whole blood, but the safety concerns have limited is widespread civilian use. Based on extensive military experience as well as recent published literature, low-titer leukocyte reduced cold-store type O whole blood carries low adverse risks and maintains its hemostatic properties for up to 21 days. A prospective randomized trial comparing whole blood versus ratio balanced component therapy is proposed with rationale provided.

  16. Variability of ICU Use in Adult Patients With Minor Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Haukoos, Jason S.; Newgard, Craig D.; Staudenmayer, Kristan; White, Nathan; Slattery, David; Maxim, Preston C.; Gee, Christopher A.; Hsia, Renee Y.; Melnikow, Joy A.; Holmes, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Study objective Patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage are frequently admitted to the ICU, although many never require critical care interventions. To describe ICU resource use in minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, we assess (1) the variability of ICU use in a cohort of patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage across multiple trauma centers, and (2) the proportion of adult patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage who are admitted to the ICU and never receive a critical care intervention during hospitalization. In addition, we evaluate the association between ICU admission and key independent variables. Methods A structured, historical cohort study of adult patients (aged 18 years and older) with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage was conducted within a consortium of 8 Level I trauma centers in the western United States from January 2005 to June 2010. The study population included patients with minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, defined as an emergency department (ED) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 15 (normal mental status) and an Injury Severity Score less than 16 (no other major organ injury). The primary outcome measure was initial ICU admission. The secondary outcome measure was a critical care intervention during hospitalization. Critical care interventions included mechanical ventilation, neurosurgical intervention, transfusion of blood products, vasopressor or inotrope administration, and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. ED disposition and the proportion of ICU patients not receiving a critical care intervention were compared across sites with descriptive statistics. The association between ICU admission and predetermined independent variables was analyzed with multivariable regression. Results Among 11,240 adult patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage, 1,412 (13%) had minor traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and complete ED disposition data (mean age 48 years; SD 20 years). ICU use within this

  17. Effects of Early Altitude Exposure Following Traumatic Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    surgical treatment of injuries are proven beneficial in the civilian setting, the effects of exposing these patients with large, open abdominal wounds ...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2017-0020 Effects of Early Altitude Exposure Following Traumatic Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock Amy Makley, MD...February 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effects of Early Altitude Exposure Following Traumatic Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  18. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Neuropathological Legacy of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Jennifer; Johnson, Victoria E.; Smith, Douglas H.; Stewart, William

    2017-01-01

    Almost a century ago, the first clinical account of the punch-drunk syndrome emerged, describing chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae occurring in former boxers. Thereafter, throughout the twentieth century, further reports added to our understanding of the neuropathological consequences of a career in boxing, leading to descriptions of a distinct neurodegenerative pathology, termed dementia pugilistica. During the past decade, growing recognition of this pathology in autopsy studies of non-boxers who were exposed to repetitive, mild traumatic brain injury, or to a single, moderate or severe traumatic brain injury, has led to an awareness that it is exposure to traumatic brain injury that carries with it a risk of this neurodegenerative disease, not the sport or the circumstance in which the injury is sustained. Furthermore, the neuropathology of the neurodegeneration that occurs after traumatic brain injury, now termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is acknowledged as being a complex, mixed, but distinctive pathology, the detail of which is reviewed in this article. PMID:26772317

  19. Assessment of Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, David J.; Buckley, Valerie A.; Canto, Angela I.

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of brain injuries, as well as their impact on individuals who sustain them, has received growing attention from American media in recent years. This attention is likely the result of high profile individuals suffering brain injuries. Greater public awareness of traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) has also been promoted by sources such as…

  20. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  1. Neuropsychiatric Disturbances and Hypopituitarism After Traumatic Brain Injury in an Elderly Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cheng Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric or cognitive disturbances are common complications after traumatic brain injury. They are commonly regarded as irreversible sequelae of organic brain injuries. We report a case of hypopituitarism in a 77-year-old man who presented with long-term neuropsychiatric disturbances, including cognitive impairment, disturbed sleep patterns, personality change, loss of affect, and visual and auditory hallucinations after a traumatic subdural hemorrhage. The treatment response to hormone replacement therapy was nearly complete. Hypopituitarism is rarely considered in patients who sustain traumatic brain injury and the neuropsychiatric manifestations of posttraumatic hypopituitarism have rarely been reported. This case highlights the importance of hypopituitarism as a potential reversible cause of neuropsychiatric disturbances after traumatic brain injury.

  2. Effects of antiplatelet agents on outcomes for elderly patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohm, Christina; Mina, Alfred; Howells, Greg; Bair, Holly; Bendick, Phillip

    2005-03-01

    Recent literature on elderly patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage receiving preinjury antiplatelet agents shows a mortality rate of 47%. In a retrospective analysis, patients older than 50 years presenting to the hospital over the past 4 years with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and the use of aspirin, clopidogrel, or a combination were compared with a control group that had hemorrhage but no antiplatelet medications. Patient demographics, mechanism of injury, and injury scores were recorded. No significant differences were found between the 90 study patients and the 89 control subjects in terms of demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Score, or hospital length of stay. Patients receiving antiplatelet therapy had significantly more comorbid conditions (71% vs. 35%; p head injury involves intracranial hemorrhage.

  3. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: The review will summarize the current knowledge in the field with the aim of increasing understanding and guiding future research on the associations between fatigue and clinically important factors, as well as the consequences of fatigue in traumatic brain injury. PROSPERO registry number: CRD......BACKGROUND: Despite strong indications that fatigue is the most common and debilitating symptom after traumatic brain injury, little is known about its frequency, natural history, or relation to other factors. The current protocol outlines a strategy for a systematic review that will identify......, assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...

  4. Traumatic brain injury in intoxicated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Jeff Dror; Marcoux, Judith; Golan, Eyal; Schapiro, Robert; Johnston, Karen M; Maleki, Mahammed; Khetarpal, Suneel; Jacques, Line

    2007-08-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect alcohol intoxication may have had in nonsurgically treated patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The Montreal General Hospital Traumatic Brain Injury Registry was used to identify all adult patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score toxic blood alcohol levels (BAL > or =21.7 mmol/L), 24 were alcohol negative (BAL Coma Scale score < or =8. Intoxicated patients had a mean delay of 151 minutes more in the insertion time of an intracranial pressure monitoring device, compared with alcohol-negative patients. Alcohol was a confounding factor in the treatment of some of our patients.

  5. Perspective on Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury | Igun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is an important aspect of paediatric trauma because of its contribution to mortality ant post trauma seqeulae. Management of traumatic brain injury remains a challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries. This study aims to determine the pattern of traumatic brain injury among ...

  6. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    persons, and leaves 99,000 persons permanently disabled [1]. The total cost for treatment and rehabilitation of patients with brain injuries is...registry based or retrospective or include only secondary insults that occur in the intensive care unit ( ICU ) setting. Most prior investigations have...in the surgical and neurosurgical ICU diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury requiring a diagnostic procedure were eligible for the study. The study

  7. Paclitaxel improves outcome from traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, Donna J.; Garwin, Gregory G.; Cline, Marcella M.; Richards, Todd L.; Yarnykh, Vasily; Mourad, Pierre D.; Ho, Rodney J.Y.; Minoshima, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic interventions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) hold promise to improve outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine if the microtubule stabilizing therapeutic paclitaxel used for more than 20 years in chemotherapy would improve outcome after TBI. We assessed neurological outcome in mice that received direct application of paclitaxel to brain injury from controlled cortical impact (CCI). Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess injury-related morphological changes. Ca...

  8. Advanced monitoring in traumatic brain injury: microdialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, KLH; Young, AMH; Hutchinson, PJ

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: Here, we review the present state-of-the-art of microdialysis for monitoring patients with severe traumatic brain injury, highlighting the newest developments. Microdialysis has evolved in neurocritical care to become an established bedside monitoring modality that can reveal unique information on brain chemistry. Recent findings: A major advance is recent consensus guidelines for microdialysis use and interpretation. Other advances include insight obtained from microdi...

  9. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-23

    Dec 23, 2011 ... Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a public health problem and is associated with many complications. However little is known about the psychiatric sequelae of TBI in Nigeria. This study described the pattern and determinants of psychiatric sequelae among subjects with TBI. Materials and Methods: ...

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury and Personality Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marc; McCabe, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and lifelong disability in the United States for individuals below the age of 45. Current estimates from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicate that at least 1.4 million Americans sustain a TBI annually. TBI affects 475,000 children under age 14 each year in the United States alone.…

  12. Narrative Language in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Zampieri, Elisa; Vorano, Lorenza; Zettin, Marina; Carlomagno, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) often show impaired linguistic and/or narrative abilities. The present study aimed to document the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with TBI. 14 severe TBI non-aphasic speakers (GCS less than 8) in the phase of neurological stability and 14 neurologically intact participants…

  13. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter O; Mehta, Mitul A; Sharp, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person's catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain 'networks' that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  14. Guillain Barre Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirac Unal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Infectious agents were usually accused of playing a role in the etiology of GBS. Guillain-Barre syndrome has rarely been reported following subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage after head trauma. Case Presentation We report on a 63-year-old male patient presenting GBS following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Only five other similar cases are described in the literature. Conclusions Sudden onset of GBS symptoms following trauma may erroneously be assessed as secondary complications of the TBI and can lead to unnecessary procedures such as computerized tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for a definitive diagnosis and may be a waste of time.

  15. Triage Patterns of Traumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Is Referral to a Tertiary Care Center Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Marcus; Mallory, Grant; Planchard, Ryan; Nothdurft, Georgia; Graffeo, Christopher; Atkinson, John

    2017-04-01

    Isolated traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (iTSAH) in mild head injuries has more evidence that triage to a tertiary care facility, intensive care unit admission, and repeat imaging is not warranted. Certain factors were identified that predict radiographic and clinical progression in hopes of preventing avoidable cost, which occur with transfer and subsequent management. A retrospective analysis identified 67 patients transferred between January 2010 and December 2014 who met inclusion criteria. Primary outcomes assessing neurosurgical intervention, radiographic, and clinical progression were documented. Secondary outcomes included any operative intervention, length of stay, standardized hospital costs, disposition at discharge, and 30-day mortality. The mean age of the cohort was 67.7 ± 16.4 years, with most patients (82.1%) having a Glasgow coma score of 15. Warfarin was used in 10 patients (14.9%), although 55.2% were on an antiplatelet or anticoagulation agent. No patient required neurosurgical intervention. One patient, on clopidogrel (Plavix) and warfarin, neurologically declined with radiographic progression. Older age seem to correlate with radiographic progression (P = 0.05). Dementia (P = 0.05) as well as warfarin use (P = 0.06) correlated with clinical progression. Cost in patients without other injuries was associated with warfarin use (P = 0.0002), injury severity scores (P = 0.01), and initial Glasgow coma score (P = 0.0003) on multivariate analysis. In this series of patients with mild traumatic brain injury, the rate of neurological deterioration due to expansion of iTSAH in patients is low, regardless of the use of antiplatelets/anticoagulants. Triage to a tertiary care facility generally is not warranted and can prove costly to patients with iTSAH without other injures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Advanced monitoring in traumatic brain injury: microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Keri L H; Young, Adam M H; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    Here, we review the present state-of-the-art of microdialysis for monitoring patients with severe traumatic brain injury, highlighting the newest developments. Microdialysis has evolved in neurocritical care to become an established bedside monitoring modality that can reveal unique information on brain chemistry. A major advance is recent consensus guidelines for microdialysis use and interpretation. Other advances include insight obtained from microdialysis into the complex, interlinked traumatic brain injury disorders of electrophysiological changes, white matter injury, inflammation and metabolism. Microdialysis has matured into being a standard clinical monitoring modality that takes its place alongside intracranial pressure and brain tissue oxygen tension measurement in specialist neurocritical care centres, as well as being a research tool able to shed light on brain metabolism, inflammation, therapeutic approaches, blood-brain barrier transit and drug effects on downstream targets. Recent consensus on microdialysis monitoring is paving the way for improved neurocritical care protocols. Furthermore, there is scope for future improvements both in terms of the catheters and microdialysate analyser technology, which may further enhance its applicability.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), affecting 30–70% of individuals, many occurring after mild injuries. Insomnia, fatigue and sleepiness are the most frequent post-TBI sleep complaints with narcolepsy (with or without cataplexy), sleep apnea (obstructive and/or central), periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias occurring less commonly. In addition, depression, anxiety and pain are common TBI co-morbidities with substantial influence on sleep quality. T...

  18. Fatal deterioration of delayed acute subdural hematoma after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiwen; Xu, Chen; Yuan, Lutao; Tian, Hengli; Cao, Heli; Guo, Yan

    2014-04-01

    Both delayed posttraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and epidural hematoma have been well described in the neurosurgical literatures. However, delayed posttraumatic acute subdural hematoma which happens more than a week with a rapid progress after mild traumatic brain injury and causes death of patient is rarely reported. We show two such cases and briefly review the literature and discuss the probable pathogenesis of their rapid progress.

  19. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: Mass lesions from traumatic brain injury (TBI) often require surgical evacuation as a life-saving measure and to improve outcomes, but optimal timing and surgical technique, including decompressive craniectomy, have not been fully defined. The authors compared neurosurgical approaches...... enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent electrocorticographic...

  20. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  1. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  2. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... does not include children with brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative or caused by birth... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. 1308... DISABILITIES Health Services Performance Standards § 1308.16 Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury. A...

  3. Resuscitation and Transfusion Principles for Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    uth.tmc.edu a Associate Professor of Pediatrics , University of Connecticut, Pediatric Intensivist, Department of Pediatrics , Medical Director Surgical...traumatic injury, further study is appropriate in different patient populations, such as those massively bleeding from ruptured aortic aneurysms ,51...Author M anuscript N IH -PA Author M anuscript N IH -PA Author M anuscript to ruptured aortic aneurysms have improved survival with a 1:1 ratio of plasma

  4. Fatal deterioration of delayed acute subdural hematoma after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shiwen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Both delayed posttraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and epidural hematoma have been well described in the neurosurgical literatures. However, delayed posttraumatic acute subdural hematoma which happens more than a week with a rapid progress after mild traumatic brain injury and causes death of patient is rarely after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review reported. We show two such cases and briefly review the literature and discuss the probable pathogenesis of their rapid progress. Key words: Hematoma, subdural, acute; Brain injuries; Delayed diagnosis

  5. [Prognosis in pediatric traumatic brain injury. A dynamic cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Solís, María G; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Sánchez-Mosco, Dalia I; Vargas-Lares, José de Jesús; Plascencia-Fernández, Irma

    2013-01-01

    traumatic brain injury is a main cause of hospital admission and death in children. Our objective was to identify prognostic factors of pediatric traumatic brain injury. this was a dynamic cohort study of traumatic brain injury with 6 months follow-up. The exposition was: mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, searching for prognosis (morbidity-mortality and decreased Glasgow scale). Relative risk and logistic regression was estimated for prognostic factors. we evaluated 440 patients with mild traumatic brain injury and 98 with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Morbidity for mild traumatic brain injury was 1 %; for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, 5 %. There were no deaths. Prognostic factors for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury were associated injuries (RR = 133), fractures (RR = 60), street accidents (RR = 17), night time accidents (RR = 2.3) and weekend accidents (RR = 2). Decreased Glasgow scale was found in 9 %, having as prognostic factors: visible injuries (RR = 3), grown-up supervision (RR = 2.5) and time of progress (RR = 1.6). there should be a prognosis established based on kinetic energy of the injury and not only with Glasgow Scale.

  6. Traumatic brain injury: pathophysiology for neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    Severe cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) require neurocritical care, the goal being to stabilize hemodynamics and systemic oxygenation to prevent secondary brain injury. It is reported that approximately 45 % of dysoxygenation episodes during critical care have both extracranial and intracranial causes, such as intracranial hypertension and brain edema. For this reason, neurocritical care is incomplete if it only focuses on prevention of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) or decreased cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). Arterial hypotension is a major risk factor for secondary brain injury, but hypertension with a loss of autoregulation response or excess hyperventilation to reduce ICP can also result in a critical condition in the brain and is associated with a poor outcome after TBI. Moreover, brain injury itself stimulates systemic inflammation, leading to increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, exacerbated by secondary brain injury and resulting in increased ICP. Indeed, systemic inflammatory response syndrome after TBI reflects the extent of tissue damage at onset and predicts further tissue disruption, producing a worsening clinical condition and ultimately a poor outcome. Elevation of blood catecholamine levels after severe brain damage has been reported to contribute to the regulation of the cytokine network, but this phenomenon is a systemic protective response against systemic insults. Catecholamines are directly involved in the regulation of cytokines, and elevated levels appear to influence the immune system during stress. Medical complications are the leading cause of late morbidity and mortality in many types of brain damage. Neurocritical care after severe TBI has therefore been refined to focus not only on secondary brain injury but also on systemic organ damage after excitation of sympathetic nerves following a stress reaction.

  7. Forensic Pathology of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, J W

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury constitutes a significant proportion of cases requiring forensic examination, and it encompasses (1) blunt, nonmissile head injury, especially involving motor vehicle accidents, and (2) penetrating, missile injury produced by a range of high- and lower-velocity projectiles. This review examines the complex pathophysiology and biomechanics of both types of neurotrauma and assesses the macroscopic and histologic features of component lesions, which may be used to determine the cause and manner of death resulting from an intentional assault or accident. Estimation of the survival time postinjury by pathologic examination is also important where malicious head injury is suspected, in an attempt to ascertain a time at which the traumatic event might have been committed, thereby evaluating the authenticity of statements made by the alleged perpetrator. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Traumatic brain injury, neuroimaging, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin D. Bigler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Depending on severity, traumatic brain injury (TBI induces immediate neuropathological effects that in the mildest form may be transient but as severity increases results in neural damage and degeneration. The first phase of neural degeneration is explainable by the primary acute and secondary neuropathological effects initiated by the injury; however, neuroimaging studies demonstrate a prolonged period of pathological changes that progressively occur even during the chronic phase. This review examines how neuroimaging may be used in TBI to understand (1 the dynamic changes that occur in brain development relevant to understanding the effects of TBI and how these relate to developmental stage when the brain is injured, (2 how TBI interferes with age-typical brain development and the effects of aging thereafter, and (3 how TBI results in greater frontotemporolimbic damage, results in cerebral atrophy, and is more disruptive to white matter neural connectivity. Neuroimaging quantification in TBI demonstrates degenerative effects from brain injury over time. An adverse synergistic influence of TBI with aging may predispose the brain injured individual for the development of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders long after surviving the brain injury.

  9. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Ramalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents a significant public health problem in modern societies. It is primarily a consequence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Other recently recognized causes include sports injuries and indirect forces such as shock waves from battlefield explosions. TBI is an important cause of death and lifelong disability and represents the most well-established environmental risk factor for dementia. With the growing recognition that even mild head injury can lead to neurocognitive deficits, imaging of brain injury has assumed greater importance. However, there is no single imaging modality capable of characterizing TBI. Current advances, particularly in MR imaging, enable visualization and quantification of structural and functional brain changes not hitherto possible. In this review, we summarize data linking TBI with dementia, emphasizing the imaging techniques currently available in clinical practice along with some advances in medical knowledge.

  10. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Castillo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a significant public health problem in modern societies. It is primarily a consequence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Other recently recognized causes include sports injuries and indirect forces such as shock waves from battlefield explosions. TBI is an important cause of death and lifelong disability and represents the most well-established environmental risk factor for dementia. With the growing recognition that even mild head injury can lead to neurocognitive deficits, imaging of brain injury has assumed greater importance. However, there is no single imaging modality capable of characterizing TBI. Current advances, particularly in MR imaging, enable visualization and quantification of structural and functional brain changes not hitherto possible. In this review, we summarize data linking TBI with dementia, emphasizing the imaging techniques currently available in clinical practice along with some advances in medical knowledge.

  11. Chronic neurodegenerative consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Neelima B

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health concern and a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Each year, an estimated 1.7 million Americans sustain TBI of which ~52,000 people die, ~275,000 people are hospitalized and 1,365,000 people are treated as emergency outpatients. Currently there are ~5.3 million Americans living with TBI. TBI is more of a disease process than of an event that is associated with immediate and long-term sensomotor, psychological and cognitive impairments. TBI is the best known established epigenetic risk factor for later development of neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. People sustaining TBI are ~4 times more likely to develop dementia at a later stage than people without TBI. Single brain injury is linked to later development of symptoms resembling Alzheimer's disease while repetitive brain injuries are linked to later development of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or Dementia Pugilistica (DP). Furthermore, genetic background of ß-amyloid precursor protein (APP), Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), presenilin (PS) and neprilysin (NEP) genes is associated with exacerbation of neurodegenerative process after TBI. This review encompasses acute effects and chronic neurodegenerative consequences after TBI.

  12. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  13. Brain lactate metabolism in humans with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Carrera, Emmanuel; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2012-05-01

    Lactate is central for the regulation of brain metabolism and is an alternative substrate to glucose after injury. Brain lactate metabolism in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been fully elucidated. Thirty-one subarachnoid hemorrhage patients monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain oxygen (PbtO(2)) were studied. Samples with elevated CMD lactate (>4 mmol/L) were matched to PbtO(2) and CMD pyruvate and categorized as hypoxic (PbtO(2) 119 μmol/L) versus nonhyperglycolytic. Median per patient samples with elevated CMD lactate was 54% (interquartile range, 11%-80%). Lactate elevations were more often attributable to cerebral hyperglycolysis (78%; interquartile range, 5%-98%) than brain hypoxia (11%; interquartile range, 4%-75%). Mortality was associated with increased percentage of samples with elevated lactate and brain hypoxia (28% [interquartile range 9%-95%] in nonsurvivors versus 9% [interquartile range 3%-17%] in survivors; P=0.02) and lower percentage of elevated lactate and cerebral hyperglycolysis (13% [interquartile range, 1%-87%] versus 88% [interquartile range, 27%-99%]; P=0.07). Cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate production predicted good 6-month outcome (odds ratio for modified Rankin Scale score, 0-3 1.49; CI, 1.08-2.05; P=0.016), whereas increased lactate with brain hypoxia was associated with a reduced likelihood of good outcome (OR, 0.78; CI, 0.59-1.03; P=0.08). Brain lactate is frequently elevated in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients, predominantly because of hyperglycolysis rather than hypoxia. A pattern of increased cerebral hyperglycolytic lactate was associated with good long-term recovery. Our data suggest that lactate may be used as an aerobic substrate by the injured human brain.

  14. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  15. Psychiatric sequelae of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suprakash Chaudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost half of the people suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI may later be diagnosed with psychiatric disorders. The literature (PubMed, IndMed of past 30 years on psychiatric disturbances associated with TBI is reviewed. The authors highlight the close link between head injury and psychiatry and provide an overview of the epidemiology, risk-factors, and mechanisms of psychiatric sequelae including, cognitive deficits, substance abuse, psychoses, mood disorders, suicide, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, post-concussion syndrome, and personality changes following head injury. The various psychiatric sequelae are briefly discussed.

  16. Acute Management of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Michael A; Crandall, Marie L; Patel, Mayur B

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in patients with trauma. Management strategies must focus on preventing secondary injury by avoiding hypotension and hypoxia and maintaining appropriate cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is a surrogate for cerebral blood flow. CPP can be maintained by increasing mean arterial pressure, decreasing intracranial pressure, or both. The goal should be euvolemia and avoidance of hypotension. Other factors that deserve important consideration in the acute management of patients with TBI are venous thromboembolism, stress ulcer, and seizure prophylaxis, as well as nutritional and metabolic optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria were...... original, peer-reviewed research published in English and other languages. References were also identified from the bibliographies of eligible articles. STUDY SELECTION: Controlled trials and cohort and case-control studies were selected according to predefined criteria. Studies had to have a minimum of 30...

  18. Our traumatic neurosis and its brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A

    2001-12-01

    During the nineteenth century, physicians either discovered or invented a variety of clinical autobiography called "traumatic memory." Freud produced two versions of this memory, the final version in the 1920s. A revolutionary nosology (DSM-III), adopted in 1980, promised to extirpate Freud and the concept of neurosis from American psychiatry. However, it made a tacit exception for Freud's concept of traumatic neurosis, renaming it "postraumatic stress disorder." The following decades have been a period of intense clinical and scientific interest in this disorder. An influential research program has investigated traumatic neurosis and its brain through variations in cortisol excretion. I describe the history of this program, and examine its distinctive knowledge product. its running narrative of its achievements. The narrative's structure is analyzed and found to resemble a crossword puzzle constructed from heterogenous kinds of inference, recalling The Interpretation of Dreams. My conclusion is that, far from extirpating Freud's neurosis, biological research has secured a place for it in today's post-Freudian psychiatry.

  19. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  20. Is management of acute traumatic brain injury effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Jin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To evaluate all the possible therapeutic measures concerning the acute management of traumatic brain injury (TBI mentioned in Cochrane System-atic Reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Sys-tematic Reviews (CDSR. Methods: An exhausted literature search for all pub-lished Cochrane Systematic Reviews discussing therapeu-tic rather than prevention or rehabilitative interventions of TBI was conducted. We retrieved such databases as CDSR and Cochrane Injury Group, excluded the duplications, and eventually obtained 20 results, which stand for critical ap-praisal for as many as 20 different measures for TBI patients. The important data of each systematic review, including total population, intervention, outcome, etc, were collected and presented in a designed table. Besides, we also tried to find out the possible weakness of these clinical trials in-cluded in each review. Results: Analysis of these reviews yielded meanfuling observations: (1 The effectiveness of most ordinary treat-ments in TBI is inconclusive except that corticosteroids are likely to be ineffective or harmful, and tranexamic acid, nimodipine and progesterone show a promising effect in bleeding trauma, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, TBI or severe TBI. (2 A majority of the systematic reviews in-clude a small number of clinical trials and the modest num-bers of patients, largely due to the uncertainty of the effectiveness. (3 The quality of most trials reported in the systematic reviews is more or less questionable. (4 In addition, lots of other complex factors together may lead to the inconclusive results demonstrated in the Cochrane Sys-tematic Reviews. Conclusions: For clinical physicians, to translate these conclusions into practice with caution is essential. Basic medication and nursing care deserve additional attention as well and can be beneficial. For researchers, high quality trials with perfect design and comprehensive consideration of

  1. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  2. Survival in Out-of-hospital Rapid Sequence Intubation of Non-Traumatic Brain Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouche, Pieter Francsois; Jennings, Paul Andrew; Smith, Karen; Boyle, Malcolm; Blecher, Gabriel; Knott, Jonathan; Raji, Mani; Rosengarten, Pamela; Augello, Michael Roberto; Bernard, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is not only used in traumatic brain injuries in the out-of-hospital setting, but also for non-traumatic brain pathologies (NTBP) such as brain tumors, meningitis, encephalitis, hypoxic/anoxic brain injury, stroke, arteriovenous malformations, tumors, aneurysms, brain hemorrhage, as well as brain injury due to diabetes, seizures and toxicity, metabolic conditions, and alcohol and drug overdose. Previous research suggests that RSI is common in non-traumatic coma, but with an unknown prevalence of NTBP in those that receive RSI. If NTBP is common and if brain trauma RSI evidence is not valid for NTBP then a sizable proportion of NTBP receive this treatment without evidence of benefit. This study calculated the out-of-hospital NTBP prevalence in patients that had received RSI and explored factors that predicted survival. A retrospective cohort study based on data collected from an ambulance service and seven hospitals based in Melbourne, Australia. Non-traumatic brain pathologies were defined using ICD10-AM codes for the calculation of NTBP prevalence. Logistic regression modelled out-of-hospital predictors of survival to hospital discharge after adjustment for comorbidities. The seven participating hospitals treated 2,277 patients that received paramedic RSI for all illnesses and indications from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2015, with survival data available for 1,940 (85%). Of the 1,940, 1,125 (58%) patients had at least one hospital-diagnosed NTBP. Sixty-nine percent all of NTBP survived to hospital discharge, compared to 65% for traumatic intracranial injury. Strokes were the most common and had poor survival to discharge (37%) compared to the second most common NTBP toxicity/toxic encephalopathy that had very high survival (98%). No out-of-hospital clinical intervention or prehospital time interval predicted survival. Factors that did predict survival include Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), duration of mechanical ventilation, age, ICU

  3. Impaired Pituitary Axes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Scranton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI is significant and rarely considered by clinicians. This topic has received much more attention in the last decade. The incidence of post TBI anterior pituitary dysfunction is around 30% acutely, and declines to around 20% by one year. Growth hormone and gonadotrophic hormones are the most common deficiencies seen after traumatic brain injury, but also the most likely to spontaneously recover. The majority of deficiencies present within the first year, but extreme delayed presentation has been reported. Information on posterior pituitary dysfunction is less reliable ranging from 3%–40% incidence but prospective data suggests a rate around 5%. The mechanism, risk factors, natural history, and long-term effect of treatment are poorly defined in the literature and limited by a lack of standardization. Post TBI pituitary dysfunction is an entity to recognize with significant clinical relevance. Secondary hypoadrenalism, hypothyroidism and central diabetes insipidus should be treated acutely while deficiencies in growth and gonadotrophic hormones should be initially observed.

  4. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  5. Visual Outcomes after Vitrectomy for Terson Syndrome Secondary to Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Raja; Taylor, Stanford C; Nayaka, Ashraya; Deshpande, Riddhima; St Aubin, Daniel; Hrisomalos, Frank N; Hu, Jonathan; Rajagopal, Rithwick; Tewari, Asheesh; Apte, Rajendra S

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate visual outcomes after vitrectomy for intraocular hemorrhages secondary to traumatic brain injury. Retrospective, observational case series. A total of 28 eyes in 20 patients undergoing vitrectomy for Terson syndrome secondary to traumatic brain injury between 1997 and 2015. We reviewed the records of patients undergoing a standard 20-gauge or 23-gauge pars plana vitrectomy for intraocular hemorrhages secondary to traumatic brain injury, and the timing of vitrectomy in relation to the inciting intracranial event was recorded. The primary outcome measure was the change in the preoperative visual acuity score at postoperative month 1 and at the last noted clinic appointment. A total of 28 eyes in 20 patients (all male) underwent pars plana vitrectomy for intraocular hemorrhages secondary to traumatic brain injury. The mean preoperative baseline logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) (Snellen) best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 1.81±0.56 (20/1290). At 1-month postoperative follow-up, the mean BCVA was 0.30±0.33 (20/40). At the date of the last follow-up, the mean BCVA was 0.15±0.24 (20/30) and the median BCVA was 0.00 (20/20). Although the difference between preoperative and postoperative BVCA was significantly different at 1 month and the final postoperative clinic visits (P < 0.001), there was not a correlation between preoperative visual acuity as a predictor of final postoperative visual acuity outcome (r=-0.32; P = 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.62 - 0.06). At the date of the last follow-up, the differences in visual outcomes between the individuals undergoing vitrectomy within 3 months of the inciting event, 0.08±0.15 (20/25), were not significantly different than those undergoing surgical intervention after 3 months, 0.18±0.27 (20/30) (P = 0.28). Three cases among those undergoing vitrectomy after 3 months were complicated by retinal detachment, none of which resulted in a BCVA worse than when the patient originally

  6. Cerebral Lactate Metabolism After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patet, Camille; Suys, Tamarah; Carteron, Laurent; Oddo, Mauro

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral energy dysfunction has emerged as an important determinant of prognosis following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A number of studies using cerebral microdialysis, positron emission tomography, and jugular bulb oximetry to explore cerebral metabolism in patients with TBI have demonstrated a critical decrease in the availability of the main energy substrate of brain cells (i.e., glucose). Energy dysfunction induces adaptations of cerebral metabolism that include the utilization of alternative energy resources that the brain constitutively has, such as lactate. Two decades of experimental and human investigations have convincingly shown that lactate stands as a major actor of cerebral metabolism. Glutamate-induced activation of glycolysis stimulates lactate production from glucose in astrocytes, with subsequent lactate transfer to neurons (astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle). Lactate is not only used as an extra energy substrate but also acts as a signaling molecule and regulator of systemic and brain glucose use in the cerebral circulation. In animal models of brain injury (e.g., TBI, stroke), supplementation with exogenous lactate exerts significant neuroprotection. Here, we summarize the main clinical studies showing the pivotal role of lactate and cerebral lactate metabolism after TBI. We also review pilot interventional studies that examined exogenous lactate supplementation in patients with TBI and found hypertonic lactate infusions had several beneficial properties on the injured brain, including decrease of brain edema, improvement of neuroenergetics via a "cerebral glucose-sparing effect," and increase of cerebral blood flow. Hypertonic lactate represents a promising area of therapeutic investigation; however, larger studies are needed to further examine mechanisms of action and impact on outcome.

  7. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  8. Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury in Amateur Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahmati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & objective: Despite of young and adolescence intent to the boxing sport, because of dominant aggression and direct blows contact to head, face and central nervous system, it is continuously criticize by different groups. The groups of sporting and physician conventions are distinguished boxing with physical and neuropsychological disorders and some groups believe that side effects of this sport are not more than other sports. For this base the aim of this study was to determine the chronic traumatic brain injury in a group amateur boxers.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, three groups of sport men were considered, each group contained 20 randomly selected cases. The first group were amateur boxers with 4 years minimal activity(directly has been presented to the head blows, second group were amateur soccer players with 4 years minimal activity(has been presented to the not very severe head blows, third group were non athlete subjects .The groups were matched in weight, height, age and education .To understand brain disorder interview by medicine method has been used, then Wiskancin, Bonardele, Bender geshtalt, Kim karad visual memory, Benton and wechler memory (Alef type tests has been performed and EEG has got in the same hour and condition.Results: The homogeneity of between group variances was gained by the statistical method. Also between structural–visual abilities neuropsychological aspect in groups, significant difference has been gained (p= 0.000. In Kim karad visual memory test at the mild and long term visual memory deficit, significant differences between three groups was observed (P= 0.000, P=0.009 that least score has been belonged to the boxers. Also in boxers 6 abnormal EEGs is observed.Conclusion: It can be said that of four years amateur boxing can affect on boxers visual and memory perception and their spatial orientation. Additionally our study have showed that amateur boxing has a significant

  9. Identifying patients with mild traumatic intracranial hemorrhage at low risk of decompensation who are safe for ED observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Peter; Penn, Joshua; Peak, David; Borczuk, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and mild traumatic brain injury (mTIH) receive broadly variable care which often includes transfer to a trauma center, neurosurgery consultation and ICU admission. However, there may be a low risk cohort of patients who can be managed without utilizing such significant resources. Describe mTIH patients who are at low risk of clinical or radiographic decompensation and can be safely managed in an ED observation unit (EDOU). Retrospective evaluation of patients age≥16, GCS≥13 with ICH on CT. Primary outcomes included clinical/neurologic deterioration, CT worsening or need for neurosurgery. 1185 consecutive patients were studied. 814 were admitted and 371 observed patients (OP) were monitored in the EDOU or discharged from the ED after a period of observation. None of the OP deteriorated clinically. 299 OP (81%) had a single lesion on CT; 72 had mixed lesions. 120 patients had isolated subarachnoid hemorrhage (iSAH) and they did uniformly well. Of the 119 OP who had subdural hematoma (SDH), 6 had worsening CT scans and 3 underwent burr hole drainage procedures as inpatients due to persistent SDH without new deficit. Of the 39 OP who had cerebral contusions, 3 had worsening CT scans and one required NSG admission. No patient returned to the ED with a complication. Follow-up was obtained on 81% of OP. 2 patients with SDH required burr hole procedure >2weeks after discharge. Patients with mTIH, particularly those with iSAH, have very low rates of clinical or radiographic deterioration and may be safe for monitoring in an emergency department observation unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: lessons from lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Armonda, R.; Tomita, H.; Sakuma, A.; Mugikura, S.; Takayama, K.; Kushimoto, S.; Tominaga, T.

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic injury caused by explosive or blast events is traditionally divided into four mechanisms: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. The mechanisms of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) are biomechanically distinct and can be modeled in both in vivo and in vitro systems. The primary bTBI injury mechanism is associated with the response of brain tissue to the initial blast wave. Among the four mechanisms of bTBI, there is a remarkable lack of information regarding the mechanism of primary bTBI. On the other hand, 30 years of research on the medical application of shock waves (SWs) has given us insight into the mechanisms of tissue and cellular damage in bTBI, including both air-mediated and underwater SW sources. From a basic physics perspective, the typical blast wave consists of a lead SW followed by shock-accelerated flow. The resultant tissue injury includes several features observed in primary bTBI, such as hemorrhage, edema, pseudo-aneurysm formation, vasoconstriction, and induction of apoptosis. These are well-described pathological findings within the SW literature. Acoustic impedance mismatch, penetration of tissue by shock/bubble interaction, geometry of the skull, shear stress, tensile stress, and subsequent cavitation formation are all important factors in determining the extent of SW-induced tissue and cellular injury. In addition, neuropsychiatric aspects of blast events need to be taken into account, as evidenced by reports of comorbidity and of some similar symptoms between physical injury resulting in bTBI and the psychiatric sequelae of post-traumatic stress. Research into blast injury biophysics is important to elucidate specific pathophysiologic mechanisms of blast injury, which enable accurate differential diagnosis, as well as development of effective treatments. Herein we describe the requirements for an adequate experimental setup when investigating blast-induced tissue and cellular injury; review SW physics

  11. Characteristics of Traumatic Brain Injury among Accident and Falling Down Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Aghakhani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicle and falling down are responsible for the most number of traumatic injuries. This study aimed to compare the characteristics of traumatic brain injury among accident and falling down cases. In this analytical cross- sectional study, data were collected from the records of cadavers who died due to accident or falling down and referred to Kahrizak dissection hall, Tehran forensic medicine organization during 2013. A total of 237 subjects (183 (77.2% accident and 54 (22.8% falling down with a mean age of 35.62 (SD=15.75 were evaluated. A number of 213 (89.9% were male. From accident group, scalp injury was seen in 146 (79.8%, scalp abrasion in 122 (66.7%, scalp laceration in 104 (56.8%, sub skull bruising in 176 (96.3%, skull fracture in 119 (65%, hemorrhage in 166 (90.7%, Subdural hemorrhage (SDH in 155 (84.7%, Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH in 161 (88%, Epidural hemorrhage (EDH in 41 (22.4%, contusion in 140 (76.5%, and skull base fracture in 140 (76.5% of cases. In falling down group scalp injury was seen in 42 (77.8% cadavers, scalp abrasion in 38 (70.4%, scalp laceration in 30 (55.6%, sub skull bruising in 49 (90.7%, skull fracture in 39 (72.2%, Hemorrhage in 49 (90.7%, SDH in 43 (79.6%, SAH in 47 (87%, EDH in 10 (18.5%, contusion in 33 (61.1%, and skull base fracture in 39 (72.2% of cases. There was no significant difference between these two groups (P Value> 0.05. Accident and falling down had no difference in terms of any injury or hemorrhage.

  12. Functional Recovery After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hart, Tessa; Kozlowski, Allan; Whyte, John

    2014-01-01

    functional levels received more treatment and more treatment was associated with slower recovery, presumably because treatment was allocated according to need. Thus, effects of treatment on outcome could not be disentangled from effects of case mix factors. CONCLUSIONS: FIM gain during inpatient recovery......OBJECTIVE: To examine person, injury, and treatment characteristics associated with recovery trajectories of people with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) during inpatient rehabilitation. DESIGN: Observational prospective longitudinal study. SETTING: Two specialized inpatient TBI rehabilitation...... recovery was best modeled with linear, cubic, and quadratic components: relatively steep recovery was followed by deceleration of improvement, which attenuated prior to discharge. Slower recovery was associated with older age, longer coma, and interruptions to rehabilitation. Patients admitted at lower...

  13. Sexual offenses and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, R

    2006-03-01

    A sample of 476 male sexual offenders, seen at a university psychiatric hospital for forensic assessment, was examined for the incidence of traumatic head injuries. A total of 49.3% had sustained head injuries that led to unconsciousness and of these 22.5% sustained significant neurological insults. A major causative factor was motor vehicle accidents, but lifestyle variables including alcohol and drug abuse and history of violence also contributed. The brain-injured group was convicted for a wide range of sexual offenses and was comparable to the non-injured group in this respect, but tended more often to offend against adults than against children and to show somewhat more exhibiting and polymorphous sexual behavior. In spite of the serious legal implications for these men and the additional distress to their families, psychologists, psychiatrists, and the professional literature have been relatively silent on the subject which calls for more attention to sexual behavior as part of assessments and treatment planning.

  14. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell...... Test were compared in terms of assessment time, cost and diagnosis. Parameters associated with olfactory loss such as injury severity, type of cerebral lesion and depressive data were considered. Forty-nine TBI patients admitted to an outpatient rehabilitation programme took part in this experiment....... RESULTS: The scores of the two smell tests were significantly correlated. Both tests indicated that patients with frontal lesion performed significantly worse than patients with other types of lesion. Mood and injury severity were not associated with olfactory impairment when age was taken into account...

  15. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9 in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: Brain water content (BWC, tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, immunofluorescence (IF, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB was severely destroyed at six hours after the TBI. The worst brain ischemia occurred at 72 hours after TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus were detected by means of IHC and IF after TBI. The abundance of AQP9 and its mRNA increased after TBI and reached two peaks at 6 and 72 hours, respectively, after TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Increased AQP9 might contribute to clearance of excess water and lactate in the early stage of TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes might help lactate move into neurons and result in cellular brain edema in the later stage of TBI. AQP9-positive neurons suggest that AQP9 plays a role in energy balance after TBI.

  16. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN PEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayagriva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children. The anatomical features, physiological response to injury, neuronal development, and low myelination in children cause different clinical features compared to the adult traumatic brain injury. Our aim is to study the incidence, predisposing factors, clinical presentations, and outcome in pediatric head injuries. The patients included in this retrospective study are under the age of 14 years admitted in the Neurosurgery Department of King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, which is a tertiary care centre. The study period is two years’ duration from 1.1.2013 to 31.12.2014. Data collected on the basis of history, physical examination, base line investigations, and the plain CT scan is all cases. The pediatric patients were 226 in total 1643 case of head injury cases. There were 64.6% (n=146 males and 35.4% (n=80 females. The age ranged from 12 days to 14 years. Fall from height was the commonest cause of head injury found in 48.6% (n=110 cases, road traffic accidents (RTA in 34.5% (n=78 and other causes 16.8% (n=38; 49 (21.68% patients had associated injuries. At 55.75% (n=126 cases mild head injury with GCS 13-15 was present and severe head injury with GCS less than 8 in 29 (12.8% patients. The 188 patients are treated conservatively, 38 patients underwent different neurosurgical procedures in which 5 patients died. CONCLUSION: Head injury in pediatric age group carries high risk of morbidity and mortality. Good outcome achieved by early diagnosis and referral from primary care centers to tertiary care centers.

  17. Dedicated retinal examination in children evaluated for physical abuse without radiographically identified traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Mary V; Berger, Rachel P; Thackeray, Jonathan D; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    To determine the rate of retinal hemorrhages in children evaluated for physical abuse without traumatic brain injury (TBI) by diagnostic imaging. This study was a prospectively planned, secondary analysis of the Examining Siblings to Recognize Abuse (ExSTRA) research network, and included only index children who presented with concerns for abuse. Subjects were eligible for the parent study if they were less than 10 years old and evaluated by a Child Abuse Physician for concerns of physical abuse. Child Abuse Physicians recorded results of all screening testing and determination of the likelihood of abuse in each case. For this analysis, we examined the results of dedicated retinal examinations for children with neuroimaging that showed no TBI. Isolated skull fractures were not considered to be TBI. The original ExSTRA sample included 2890 index children evaluated for physical abuse. Of this group, 1692 underwent neuroimaging and 1122 had no TBI. Of these 1122 children, 352 had a dedicated retinal examination. Retinal hemorrhages were identified in 2 (0.6%) children. In both cases, there were few (defined as 3-10) hemorrhages isolated to the posterior poles; neither was diagnosed with physical abuse. The presence of facial bruising, altered mental status, or complex skull fractures was neither sensitive nor specific for retinal hemorrhage identification. Forensically significant retinal hemorrhages are unlikely to be found in children evaluated for physical abuse without TBI on neuroimaging, and such children may not require routine dedicated retinal examination. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Brain alpha- and beta-globin expression after intracerebral hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yangdong; Hua, Ya; Lee, Jin-Yul; Liu, Wenquan; Keep, Richard F; Wang, Michael M.; Xi, Guohua

    2010-01-01

    Our recent study has demonstrated that hemoglobin (Hb) is present in cerebral neurons and neuronal Hb is inducible after cerebral ischemia. In the present study, we examined the effects of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) on the mRNA levels of the α-globin (HbA) and the β-globin (HbB) components of Hb and Hb protein in the brain in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, male Sprague-Dawley rats received either a needle insertion (sham) or an infusion of autologous whole blood into the basal ganglia and we...

  19. Post-traumatic amnesia predicts intelligence impairment following traumatic brain injury: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konigs, M.; de Kieviet, J.F.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Worldwide, millions of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffer from persistent and disabling intelligence impairment. Post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration is a promising predictor of intelligence following TBI. Objectives: To determine (1) the impact of TBI on intelligence

  20. Classroom Strategies for Teaching Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinski, Jennifer Blevins

    2012-01-01

    Postsecondary institutions currently face the largest influx of veteran students since World War II. As the number of veteran students who may experience learning problems caused by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and/or Traumatic Brain Injury continues to rise, the need for instructional strategies that address their needs increases. Educators may…

  1. Update in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Aragón, María Dolores; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José

    2017-08-10

    There has been concern for many years regarding the identification of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) at high risk of developing an intracranial lesion (IL) that would require neurosurgical intervention. The small percentage of patients with these characteristics and the exceptional mortality associated with mild TBI with IL have led to the high use of resources such as computerised tomography (CT) being reconsidered. The various protocols developed for the management of mild TBI are based on the identification of risk factors for IL, which ultimately allows more selective indication or discarding both the CT application and the hospital stay for neurological monitoring. Finally, progress in the study of brain injury biomarkers with prognostic utility in different clinical categories of TBI has recently been incorporated by several clinical practice guidelines, which has allowed, together with clinical assessment, a more accurate prognostic approach for these patients to be established. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical neurorestorative progress in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Huiling Huang,1 Lin Chen,2,3 Hongyun Huang4–61Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cerebral Vascular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital, Tianjin Neurosurgical Institute, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 2Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 3Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 4General Hospital of Chinese people's Armed Police Forces, 5Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 6Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability from trauma to the central nervous system. Besides the surgical interventions and symptomatic management, the conventional therapies for TBI and its sequelae are still limited. Recently emerging evidence suggests that some neurorestorative treatments appear to have a potential therapeutic role for TBI and improving the patient's quality of life. The current clinical neurorestorative strategies available in TBI include pharmacological treatments (recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, amantadine, lithium, and valproate, the neuromodulation treatments (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and low-level laser therapy, cell transplantation (bone marrow stromal cells and umbilical cord stromal cells, and combined neurorehabilitation. In this review, we summarize the recent clinical neurorestorative progress in the management of neurodegeneration as well as cognitive and motor deficits after TBI; indeed further clinical trials are required to provide more robust evidence.Keywords: brain trauma, neurorestorative treatment, cell transplantation, clinical study

  3. Neuropsychological rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to discuss the basic forms of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. More broadly, we discussed cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT which constitutes a fundamental component in therapeutic interaction at many centres worldwide. Equally presented is a comprehensive model of rehabilitation, the fundamental component of which is CRT. It should be noted that the principles of this approach first arose in Poland in the 1970s, in other words, several decades before their appearance in other programmemes. Taken into consideration are four factors conditioning the effectiveness of such a process: comprehensiveness, earlier interaction, universality and its individualized character. A comprehensive programmeme of rehabilitation covers: cognitive rehabilitation, individual and group rehabilitation with the application of a therapeutic environment, specialist vocational rehabilitation, as well as family psychotherapy. These training programmemes are conducted within the scope of the ‘Academy of Life,’ which provides support for the patients in their efforts and shows them the means by which they can overcome existing difficulties. Equally emphasized is the close cooperation of the whole team of specialists, as well as the active participation of the family as an essential condition for the effectiveness of rehabilitation and, in effect, a return of the patient to a relatively normal life. Also presented are newly developing neurothechnologies and the neuromarkers of brain injuries. This enables a correct diagnosis to be made and, as a result, the selection of appropriate methods for neuropsychological rehabilitation, including neurotherapy.

  4. [Treatment of traumatic brain injury in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickels, E; von Wild, K; Wenzlaff, P

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between severe, moderate and mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) as well as the course of treatment and quality management, were studied in a 1-year prospective study in regions of Hannover and Münster Germany. A total of 6,783 patients were documented at the initial examination (58.4% male, 28.1% children <16 years old) and 63.5% participated in the follow-up survey 1 year after the accident. Of these TBI patients 5,220 (73%) were admitted to hospital for clinical treatment but only 258 (<4%) received inpatient rehabilitation. The incidence of TBI was 332/100,000 inhabitants and according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) brain injury was mild in 90.9%, severe in 5.2% and moderate in 3.9%. The main cause of injury was a fall (52.5%) followed by a traffic accident (26.3%). In-hospital mortality was 1%. Only 56% of TBI patients were neurological examined and 63% were examined in hospital within the first hour after the accident. An immediate x-ray of the skull with a doubtful evidential value was made in 82%. Of the participants 35.9% were still receiving medical treatment 1 year after the accident although the majority only suffered mild TBI. An overabundance of severe socioeconomic consequences, e.g. loss of job, accommodation, family, were also found following only mild TBI.

  5. Cognitive rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Fabio Rios; Coelho, Fernanda; Lacerda, Juliana Rhein; da Silva, Marcio Fernando; Gonçalves, Vanessa Tome; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Basile, Luis Fernando Hindi; Oliveira, Arthur Maynart Pereira; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Kanda, Paulo Afonso Medeiros; Anghinah, Renato

    2011-01-01

    Annually, some 500,000 people are hospitalized with brain lesions acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Brazil. Between 75,000 and 100,000 individuals die within hours of the event and 70,000 to 90,000 evolve to irreversible loss of some neurological function. The principal causes of TBI include motor vehicle accidents (50%), falls (21%), assaults and robberies (12%) and accidents during leisure activities (10%). Within this context, cognitive rehabilitation, a clinical area encompassing interdisciplinary action aimed at recovery as well as compensation of cognitive functions altered as a result of cerebral injury, is extremely important for these individuals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the basic concepts related to TBI, including mechanisms of injury, severity levels of TBI, the most common findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors, and the most frequent cognitive impairments following TBI, and also to discuss the strategies used to handle patients post-TBI. The study results yielded relevant information on a structured cognitive rehabilitation service, representing an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI, enabling the generation of multiple research protocols.

  6. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  7. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    ... both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE...

  8. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  9. Military-related traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Robinson, Meghan E.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) includes concussion, subconcussion, and most exposures to explosive blast from improvised explosive devices. mTBI is the most common traumatic brain injury affecting military personnel; however, it is the most difficult to diagnose and the least well understood. It is also recognized that some mTBIs have persistent, and sometimes progressive, long-term debilitating effects. Increasing evidence suggests that a single traumatic brain injury can produce long-term gray and white matter atrophy, precipitate or accelerate age-related neurodegeneration, and increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. In addition, repetitive mTBIs can provoke the development of a tauopathy, chronic traumatic encephalopathy. We found early changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in four young veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflict who were exposed to explosive blast and in another young veteran who was repetitively concussed. Four of the five veterans with early-stage chronic traumatic encephalopathy were also diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder. Advanced chronic traumatic encephalopathy has been found in veterans who experienced repetitive neurotrauma while in service and in others who were accomplished athletes. Clinically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy is associated with behavioral changes, executive dysfunction, memory loss, and cognitive impairments that begin insidiously and progress slowly over decades. Pathologically, chronic traumatic encephalopathy produces atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes, thalamus, and hypothalamus; septal abnormalities; and abnormal deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles and disordered neurites throughout the brain. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently unknown. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy has clinical and

  10. Factors affecting blast traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnaksh, Alaa; Kovesdi, Erzsebet; Kwon, Sook-Kyung; Wingo, Daniel; Ahmed, Farid; Grunberg, Neil E; Long, Joseph; Agoston, Denes V

    2011-10-01

    The overlapping pathologies and functional outcomes of blast-induced TBI (bTBI) and stress-related neurobehavioral disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are significant military health issues. Soldiers are exposed to multiple stressors with or without suffering bTBI, making diagnosis and treatment as well as experimental modeling of bTBI a challenge. In this study we compared anxiety levels of Naïve rats to ones that were exposed to each of the following conditions daily for 4 consecutive days: C I: transportation alone; C II: transportation and anesthesia; C III: transportation, anesthesia, and blast sounds; Injured: all three variables plus mild blast overpressure. Following behavioral testing we analyzed sera and select brain regions for protein markers and cellular changes. C I, C II, and C III animals exhibited increased anxiety, but serum corticosterone levels were only significantly elevated in C III and Injured rats. C III and Injured animals also had elevated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in the amygdala (AD) and ventral hippocampus (VHC). Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels were only significantly elevated in the VHC, prefrontal cortex (PFC), and AD of Injured animals; they showed an apparent increase in ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule (Iba1) and GFAP immunoreactivity, as well as increased numbers of TUNEL-positive cells in the VHC. Our findings demonstrate that experimental conditions, particularly the exposure to blast acoustics, can increase anxiety and trigger specific behavioral and molecular changes without injury. These findings should be taken into consideration when designing bTBI studies, to better understand the role of stressors in the development of post-traumatic symptoms, and to establish a differential diagnosis for PTSD and bTBI.

  11. Non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage in young adults living in Guayaquil, Ecuador (South America): analysis of 151 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, O H; Sánchez, J; Campos, X; Santos, J; Mosquera, A

    1999-01-01

    We studied 151 patients aged 15 to 44 years with non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to a large public hospital over a 10-year period. Patients were evaluated for an association of death or severe disability after the stroke with the following variables: sex, age, location of the hemorrhage, and possible etiology. Lobar hemorrhages were found in 63 (41.7%) patients, putaminal hemorrhages in 39 (25.8%), posterior fossa hemorrhages in 24 (15.9%), and hemorrhages in other locations in 25 (16.6%). A possible etiology was determined in 109 (72.2%) patients. Hypertensive arteriolopathy accounted for 60 (39.7%) cases, rupture of a saccular aneurysm or a vascular malformation for 33 (21.9%), and other etiologies for 16 (10.6%). Thirty-four (22.5%) patients died after the acute event. The age of the patient, the location, and the etiology of the hemorrhage had no prognostic significance for mortality. In contrast, these factors predicted the degree of functional recovery in survivors. The best prognosis was noted in patients younger than 35 years with lobar hemorrhages of undetermined etiology, and the worst prognosis was noted in patients aged 35-44 years with putaminal or posterior fossa hemorrhages related to hypertensive arteriolopathy.

  12. Statistical analysis plan for the Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury trial: a randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin versus placebo in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Presneill, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury (EPO-TBI) trial aims to determine whether the administration of erythropoietin to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes.

  13. Preinjury warfarin, but not antiplatelet medications, increases mortality in elderly traumatic brain injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandhi, Ramesh; Harrison, Gillian; Voronovich, Zoya; Bauer, Joshua; Chen, Stephanie H; Nicholas, Dederia; Alarcon, Louis H; Okonkwo, David O

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies of traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcomes in elderly patients on oral antithrombotic (OAT) therapies have yielded conflicting results. Our objective was to examine the effect of premorbid OAT medications on outcomes among elderly TBI patients with intracranial hemorrhage. We performed a retrospective analysis of elderly TBI patients (≥65 years) with closed head injury and evidence of brain hemorrhage on computed tomography scan from 2006 to 2010. Patient demographics, injury severity, clinical course, hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, and disposition were collected. Comparison of patients stratified by premorbid OAT use was performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's exact tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare groups and identify predictors of primary outcomes, including mortality, neurosurgical intervention, hemorrhage progression, complications, and infection. A total of 1,552 patients were identified: 543 on aspirin only, 97 on clopidogrel only, 218 on warfarin only, 193 on clopidogrel and aspirin, and 501 on no antithrombotic agent. Blood products were administered to reverse coagulopathy in 77.3% of patients on antithrombotic medications. After adjusting for covariates, including medication reversal, OAT use was associated with increased mortality (p = 0.04). Warfarin use was identified as a key predictor (odds ratio, 2.27; p = 0.05), in contrast to the preinjury use of antiplatelet medications, which was not associated with increased risk of in-hospital death. Rates of neurosurgical intervention differed between groups, with patients on warfarin undergoing intervention more frequently. Survivor subset analysis demonstrated that hemorrhage progression was not associated with preinjury antithrombotic therapy, nor were rates of complication or infection, hospital and intensive care unit lengths of stay, or ventilator days. Preinjury use of warfarin, but not antiplatelet medications, influences

  14. Epidemiology of mild traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Raquel C.; Yaffe, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Every year an estimated 42 million people worldwide suffer a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or concussion. More severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a well-established risk factor for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Recently, large epidemiological studies have additionally identified MTBI as a risk factor for dementia. The role of MTBI in risk of PD or ALS is less well established. Repet...

  15. Predicting Mild Traumatic Brain Injury with Injury Risk Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    To assess the safety of various products, equipment, and vehicles during traumatic events injury risk curves have been developed correlate measurable parameters with risk of injury. The first risk curves to predict head injuries focused on severe head injuries such as skull fractures. These curves were generated by impacting cadaver heads. To understand the biomechanics of mild traumatic brain injuries, cadaver heads have also been used to monitor pressure and strain in the brain during impac...

  16. Novel Treatment for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    currently valid 0MB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 12. REPORT TYPE 30-0 6-201 6... hypotension independently increases morbidity and mortality after traumatic brain injury. The goal of all treatments is avoid hypotension and maintain cerebral...perfusion pressure management in· patients with severe traumatic brain injury: preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial. J Trauma Acute Care

  17. Update in the management of severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Esther Tejerina Alvarez

    2014-10-01

    Increased intracranial pressure is associated with mortality and with unfavorable functional outcomes is patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The main clinical practice guidelines recommend using a number of staggered therapeutic measures. However, although these measures seem to be efficient in reducing intracranial pressure, this effect is not often translated into clinical improvement. This review describes the essential principles of the management of patients with severe traumatic brain injury in intensive care units.

  18. Routine Repeat Head CT may not be Indicated in Patients on Anticoagulant/Antiplatelet Therapy Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Sadler, Charlotte; Guo, Yueyang; Ramaswamy, Raja S.; Farid, Nikdokht

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation recommendations for patients on anticoagulant and antiplatelet (ACAP) therapy that present after mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) are controversial. At our institution, an initial noncontrast head computed tomography (HCT) is performed, with a subsequent HCT performed six hours later to exclude delayed intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). This study was performed to evaluate the yield and advisability of this approach. Methods: We performed a retrospe...

  19. Mannitol Improves Brain Tissue Oxygenation in a Model of Diffuse Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilte, Clotilde; Bouzat, Pierre; Millet, Anne; Boucheix, Perrine; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Lemasson, Benjamin; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Payen, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Based on evidence supporting a potential relation between posttraumatic brain hypoxia and microcirculatory derangements with cell edema, we investigated the effects of the antiedematous agent mannitol on brain tissue oxygenation in a model of diffuse traumatic brain injury. Experimental study. Neurosciences and physiology laboratories. Adult male Wistar rats. Thirty minutes after diffuse traumatic brain injury (impact-acceleration model), rats were IV administered with either a saline solution (traumatic brain injury-saline group) or 20% mannitol (1 g/kg) (traumatic brain injury-mannitol group). Sham-saline and sham-mannitol groups received no insult. Two series of experiments were conducted 2 hours after traumatic brain injury (or equivalent) to investigate 1) the effect of mannitol on brain edema and oxygenation, using a multiparametric magnetic resonance-based approach (n = 10 rats per group) to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient, tissue oxygen saturation, mean transit time, and blood volume fraction in the cortex and caudoputamen; 2) the effect of mannitol on brain tissue PO2 and on venous oxygen saturation of the superior sagittal sinus (n = 5 rats per group); and 3) the cortical ultrastructural changes after treatment (n = 1 per group, taken from the first experiment). Compared with the sham-saline group, the traumatic brain injury-saline group had significantly lower tissue oxygen saturation, brain tissue PO2, and venous oxygen saturation of the superior sagittal sinus values concomitant with diffuse brain edema. These effects were associated with microcirculatory collapse due to astrocyte swelling. Treatment with mannitol after traumatic brain injury reversed all these effects. In the absence of traumatic brain injury, mannitol had no effect on brain oxygenation. Mean transit time and blood volume fraction were comparable between the four groups of rats. The development of posttraumatic brain edema can limit the oxygen utilization by brain tissue

  20. Glutamate Metabolism in Brain Structures in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jakovlev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study glutamate metabolism characteristics in phylogenetically different parts of the mammalian brain in experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock (HS in cats.Material and methods. Experiments were performed on 76 cats. HS was induced by intermittent bloodletting from femoral artery at a rate of 10ml/kg•10 minutes, with the average volume of 24±0.8 ml/kg. The bloodletting was discontinued after arterial pressure (BP drop to 60.0±1.5 mmHg. We studied ammonia, glutamate (Gt, and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG levels and glutaminase (GS and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDG activity in specimens harvested from phylogenetically different parts of the brain (cortex, limbic system, diencephalon, and medulla oblongata.Results. In intact animals, the peak GDG activity was found in the medulla oblongata (phylogenetically the oldest part of the brain and the peak GS activity was registered in the sensorimotor cortex (phylogenetically the youngest part of the brain; the glutaminase activity did not depend on the phylogenetic age of brain structures.In the case of HS, Gt metabolism changes began in the sensorimotor cortex manifested by decreased GS activity, which progresses by the 70th minute of the post%hemorrhagic period (PHP accompanied by delayed increase in the GDG and glutaminase activity, as well as Gt accumulation. In the limbic system and diencephalon the Gt metabolism was changing (impaired glutamine synthesis, stimuled Gt synthesis with glutamine desamidization and α%KG amination when developed by the 70th minute of the PHP. Similarly to sensorimotor cortex, changes were associated with Gt accumulation. During the agony, α%KG deficiency developed in all parts of the brain as a result of its increased contribution to Gt synthesis. At the same period of time, in the sensorimotor cortex, limbic system and diencephalon the Gt synthesis from glutamine was stimulated, however, the Gt contribution tothe formation of glutamine was decreased. The

  1. Relative risk of hemorrhage during pregnancy in patients with brain arteriovenous malformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beijnum, Janneke; Wilkinson, Tim; Whitaker, Heather J; van der Bom, Johanna G; Algra, Ale; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Berg, René; Brouwer, Patrick A; Rinkel, Gabriël J.E.; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Klijn, Catharina J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether the risk of bleeding from brain arteriovenous malformations is higher during pregnancy, delivery, or puerperium. We compared occurrence of brain arteriovenous malformation hemorrhage in women during this period with occurrence of hemorrhage outside this period during

  2. Delayed Traumatic Intracerebral Hemorrhage: For How Many Hours Should Patients with Mild Head Trauma be Observed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevdegul Karadas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma is a rare complication of head injury. The etiopatogenesis of DTIH is not precisely known. We herein report a case of delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma, with mild HT. This 25-year-old male fell down while playing in a footbal match. He had headache and vertigo. He was kept under observation for about 12 hours at the emergency department. At the 26th hour after the HT incident, he presented to our hospital again with the complaints of nausea, vomiting and headache. A control brain computed tomography was performed and a traumatic intracerebral hematoma was determined in the frontal region. As a result, DTIH may be fatal. Close observation and repeat CBT scanning may reduce complications and mortality.

  3. Clinical outcomes in traumatic brain injury patients on preinjury clopidogrel: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Pandit, Viraj; Aziz, Hassan; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Hashmi, Ammar; Tang, Andrew; O'Keeffe, Terence; Wynne, Julie; Vercruysse, Gary; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Patients receiving antiplatelet medications are considered to be at an increased risk for traumatic intracranial hemorrhage after blunt head trauma. However, most studies have categorized all antiplatelet drugs into one category. The aim of our study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the requirement of a repeat head computed tomography (RHCT) in patients on preinjury clopidogrel therapy. Patients with traumatic brain injury with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT were prospectively enrolled. Patients on preinjury clopidogrel were matched with patients exclusive of antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy using a propensity score in a 1:1 ratio for age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), head Abbreviated Injury Scale (h-AIS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), neurologic examination, and platelet transfusion. Outcome measures were progression on RHCT scan and need for neurosurgical intervention. A total of 142 patients with intracranial hemorrhage on initial head CT scan (clopidogrel, 71; no clopidogrel, 71) were enrolled. The mean (SD) age was 70.5 (15.1) years, 66% were male, median GCS score was 14 (range, 3-15), and median h-AIS (ISS) was 3 (range, 2-5). The mean (SD) platelet count was 210 (101), and 61% (n = 86) of the patients received platelet transfusion. Patients on preinjury clopidogrel were more likely to have progression on RHCT (odds ratio [OR], 5.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-7.1) and RHCT as a result of clinical deterioration (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.8-3.5). The overall rate of neurosurgical intervention was 4.2% (n = 6). Patients on clopidogrel therapy were more likely to require a neurosurgical intervention (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4-3.1). Preinjury clopidogrel therapy is associated with progression of initial insult on RHCT scan and need for neurosurgical intervention. Preinjury clopidogrel therapy as an independent variable should warrant the need for a routine RHCT scan in patients with traumatic brain injury. Prognostic study, level I; therapeutic

  4. A Prospective, Randomized Investigation of Plasma First Resuscitation for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma . PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ernest E. Moore, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Colorado Denver...Randomized Investigation of “Plasma First Resuscitation” for Traumatic Hemorrhage and Attenuation of Acute Coagulopathy of Trauma . 5b. GRANT NUMBER...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The COMBAT (Control of Major Bleeding After Trauma ) study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating the early administration of

  5. Persuasive discourse impairments in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayoumi, Zahra; Yadegari, Fariba; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Rasouli, Maryam

    2015-03-01

    Considering the cognitive and linguistic complexity of discourse production, it is expected that individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) should face difficulties in this task. Therefore, clinical examination of discourse has become a useful tool for studying and assessment of communication skills of people suffering from TBI. Among different genres of discourse, persuasive discourse is considered as a more cognitively demanding task. However, little is known about persuasive discourse in individuals suffering from TBI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of adults with TBI on a task of spoken persuasive discourse to determine the impaired linguistic measures. Thirteen TBI nonaphasic Persian speaking individuals, ranged between 19 to 40 years (Mean = 25.64 years; SD = 6.10) and 59 healthy adults matched by age, were asked to perform the persuasive discourse task. The task included asking the participants to express their opinion on a topic, and after the analysis of the produced discourse, the two groups were compared on the basis of their language productivity, sentential complexity, maze ratio and cohesion ratio. The TBI group produced discourses with less productivity, sentential complexity, cohesion ratio and more maze ratio compared the control group. As it is important to consider acquired communication disorders particularly discourse impairment of brain injured patients along with their other clinical impairments and regarding the fact that persuasive discourse is crucial in academic and social situations, the persuasive discourse task presented in this study could be a useful tool for speech therapists, intending to evaluate communication disorders in patients with TBI.

  6. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  7. Visual problems associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2018-02-28

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its associated concussion are major causes of disability and death. All ages can be affected but children, young adults and the elderly are particularly susceptible. A decline in mortality has resulted in many more individuals living with a disability caused by TBI including those affecting vision. This review describes: (1) the major clinical and pathological features of TBI; (2) the visual signs and symptoms associated with the disorder; and (3) discusses the assessment of quality of life and visual rehabilitation of the patient. Defects in primary vision such as visual acuity and visual fields, eye movement including vergence, saccadic and smooth pursuit movements, and in more complex aspects of vision involving visual perception, motion vision ('akinopsia'), and visuo-spatial function have all been reported in TBI. Eye movement dysfunction may be an early sign of TBI. Hence, TBI can result in a variety of visual problems, many patients exhibiting multiple visual defects in combination with a decline in overall health. Patients with chronic dysfunction following TBI may require occupational, vestibular, cognitive and other forms of physical therapy. Such patients may also benefit from visual rehabilitation, including reading-related oculomotor training and the prescribing of spectacles with a variety of tints and prism combinations. © 2018 Optometry Australia.

  8. Epidemiology of traumatic brain injury in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauritz, Walter; Brazinova, Alexandra; Majdan, Marek; Leitgeb, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important cause of preventable deaths. The goal of this study was to provide data on epidemiology of TBI in Austria. Data on all hospital discharges, outpatients, and extra- as well as in-hospital deaths due to TBI were collected from various sources for the years 2009-2011. Population data (number of male/female people per age-group, population of Austrian cities, towns, and villages) for 2009-2011 were collected from the national statistical office. Incidence, case fatality rate(s) (CFR), and mortality rate(s) (MR) were calculated for the whole population and for age groups. Incidence (303/100,000/year), CFR (3.6 %), and MR (11/100,000/year) of TBI in Austria are comparable with those from other European countries. We found a high rate of geriatric TBI. The ratio between male and female cases was 1.4:1 for all cases, and was 2.2:1 for fatal cases. The most common mechanism was falls; traffic accidents accounted for only 7 % of the cases. Males died more frequently from traffic accidents and suicides, and females died more frequently from falls. CFRs and MRs increased with increasing age. CFRs were higher in patients from less populated areas, and MRs were lower in cases who lived closer to hospitals that admitted TBI. The high rate of geriatric TBI warrants better prevention of falls in this age group.

  9. [Prolonged symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Mylius; Clemmensen, Dorte; Jensen, Steffen Skov

    2010-09-27

    Patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) do not undergo consistent follow-up in Denmark and the risk factors for long-term symptoms are not fully known. The purpose of this study was to look into symptom frequency, sick-leave frequency and to try to identify risk factors for long-term symptoms following MTBI. Patients were recruited from the emergency room at Viborg Hospital. Initial data were registered and telephone interviews were conducted one month and one year after trauma. 60% were asymptomatic within the first month; an additional 11% became asymptomatic within the next year, leaving 29% with residual symptoms one year after trauma. 70% reported a sick leave period one month and 2% > one year. The average trauma-to-emergency room contact reached 158 min (median 65 min). Gender, age, blood pressure (BP), pulse, Glasgow coma score (GCS), admission to hospital, unconsciousness, amnesia, alcohol intake, time or type of trauma were not associated with long term symptoms. Even patients with minor head trauma have a relatively high risk of long-term symptoms regardless of gender, age, BP, pulse, GCS, admission to hospital, unconsciousness, amnesia, alcohol intake, time or type of trauma. Nevertheless, the risk of long-term sick leave is relatively small.

  10. Targeting Dopamine in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, James W.; Kline, Anthony E.; Wagner, Amy K.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the initial mechanical damage, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a series of secondary insults, such as, but not limited to, excitotoxicity, metabolic disruption, and oxidative stress. Neuroprotective strategies after TBI have traditionally focused on cellular preservation as the measurable endpoint although multiple lines of evidence indicate that even with significant neuronal sparing deficits remain at both the cellular and behavioral level. As such, the development of therapies that can effectively confer both neuronal sparing and post-injury functional benefit is critical to providing the best treatment options for clinical TBI. Targeting dopaminergic signaling pathways is a novel approach in TBI that provides benefits to both neuronal survival and functional outcomes. Dopamine, like glutamate, can cause oxidative stress and significant cellular dysfunction when either depleted or over-expressed, and also plays an important role in central nervous system inflammation. The purpose of this review is to discuss dopamine in acute TBI and the role that dopaminergic therapies have as neuroprotective strategies. PMID:22308176

  11. Traumatic brain injury, boredom and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Yael; Danckert, James

    2013-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often presents with co-morbid depression and elevated levels of boredom. We explored the relationship between boredom and depression in a group of mild (n = 38), moderate-to-severe TBI patients (n = 14) and healthy controls (n = 88), who completed the Beck Depression Inventory and Boredom Proneness Scales as part of a larger study. Results showed that the relationship between boredom and depression was strongest in moderate-to-severe TBI patients. We explored two boredom proneness factors that index an individual's need for external or internal stimulation. Results indicated that the need for external stimulation was the critical driver in the relation between boredom and depression. Once again, this relationship was strongest in the moderate-to-severe TBI group. These results suggest that one common factor underlying boredom and depression is the need for stimulation from the external environment and, presumably, a failure to satisfy that need-a disconnection felt most strongly in moderate-to-severe TBI.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury, Boredom and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Danckert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI often presents with co-morbid depression and elevated levels of boredom. We explored the relationship between boredom and depression in a group of mild (n = 38, moderate-to-severe TBI patients (n = 14 and healthy controls (n = 88, who completed the Beck Depression Inventory and Boredom Proneness Scales as part of a larger study. Results showed that the relationship between boredom and depression was strongest in moderate-to-severe TBI patients. We explored two boredom proneness factors that index an individual’s need for external or internal stimulation. Results indicated that the need for external stimulation was the critical driver in the relation between boredom and depression. Once again, this relationship was strongest in the moderate-to-severe TBI group. These results suggest that one common factor underlying boredom and depression is the need for stimulation from the external environment and, presumably, a failure to satisfy that need—a disconnection felt most strongly in moderate-to-severe TBI.

  13. Autonomic Dysfunction after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterov, Dmitry; Greenwald, Brian D.

    2017-01-01

    A mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a complex pathophysiologic process that has a systemic effect on the body aside from solely an impairment in cognitive function. Dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has been found to induce abnormalities in organ systems throughout the body, and may contribute to cardiovascular dysregulation and increased mortality. Autonomic dysfunction, also known as dysautonomia, has been studied in moderate and severe TBI, and has emerged as a major contributing factor in the symptomatology in mTBI as well. Analysis of the ANS has been studied through changes in heart rate variability (HRV), pupillary dynamics, eye pressure, and arterial pulse wave in those with mild TBI. Graded exercise testing has been studied as both a method of diagnosis and as a means of recovery in those with mild TBI, especially in those with persistent symptoms. Given the studies showing persistence of autonomic dysfunction after symptomatic resolution of concussions, further research is needed to establish return to play protocols PMID:28800081

  14. Maxillofacial injuries and traumatic brain injury--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajandram, Rama Krsna; Syed Omar, Syed Nabil; Rashdi, Muhd Fazly Nizam; Abdul Jabar, Mohd Nazimi

    2014-04-01

    Maxillofacial injuries comprising hard tissue as well as soft tissue injuries can be associated with traumatic brain injuries due to the impact of forces transmitted through the head and neck. To date, the role of maxillofacial injury on brain injury has not been properly documented with some saying it has a protective function on the brain while others opposing this idea. This cross-sectional retrospective study evaluated all patients with maxillofacial injuries. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence and relationship of maxillofacial injuries with traumatic brain injuries. We retrospectively studied the hospital charts of all trauma patients seen at the accident and emergency department of UKM Medical Centre from November 2010 until November 2011. A detail analysis was then carried out on all patients who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 11294 patients were classified as trauma patients in which 176 patients had facial fractures and 292 did not have facial fractures. Middle face fractures was the most common pattern of facial fracture seen. Traumatic brain injury was present in 36.7% of maxillofacial cases. A significant association was found between facial fractures and traumatic brain injury (P maxillofacial injuries with or without facial fractures are at risk of acute or delayed traumatic brain injury. All patients should always have proper radiological investigations together with a proper observation and follow-up schedule. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Recovery of resting brain connectivity ensuing mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Dawn Bharath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brains reveal amplified plasticity as they recover from an injury. We aimed to define time dependent plasticity changes in patients recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. 25 subjects with mild head injury were longitudinally evaluated within 36 hours, 3 and 6 months using resting state functional connectivity (RSFC. Region of interest (ROI based connectivity differences over time within the patient group and in comparison with a healthy control group were analyzed at p<0.005. We found 33 distinct ROI pairs that revealed significant changes in their connectivity strength with time. Within three months, the majority of the ROI pairs had decreased connectivity in mTBI population, which increased and became comparable to healthy controls at 6 months. Initial imaging within 36 hours of injury revealed hyper connectivity predominantly involving the salience network and default mode network, which reduced at 3 months when lingual, inferior frontal and fronto-parietal networks revealed hyper connectivity. At six months all the evaluated networks revealed hyper connectivity and became comparable to the healthy controls. Our findings in a fairly homogenous group of patients with mTBI evaluated during the 6 month window of recovery defines time varying brain connectivity changes as the brain recovers from an injury. A majority of these changes were seen in the frontal and parietal lobes between 3-6 months after injury. Hyper connectivity of several networks supported normal recovery in the first six months and it remains to be seen in future studies whether this can predict an early and efficient recovery of brain function.

  16. Brain injury severity and autonomic dysregulation accurately predict heterotopic ossification in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricks, H.T.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Ginneken, B.C. van; Heeren, A.J.; Vos, P.E.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess brain injury severity, autonomic dysregulation and systemic infection as risk factors for the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. DESIGN: Historic cohort study. SETTING: Radboud University Medical Centre. SUBJECTS: All

  17. Analysis of Associated Spinal Fractures in Cases of Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage or Skull Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunoki M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH or skull fracture are typically admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery for fear of delayed neurological deterioration. Neurosurgeons, therefore, must be careful not to overlook a spinal fracture in these patients. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and risk factor of spinal fracture in patients with traumatic ICH or skull fracture. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the hospital records of 134 patients admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery at Kagawa Rosai Hospital for traumatic ICH or skull fracture. The etiology of trauma, level of consciousness, presence or absence of ICH, skull fracture, craniotomy and spinal surgery were investigated. Furthermore, in cases of spinal fracture, its type, neurological symptoms, treatment were investigated. Results: In an analysis of 134 patients, Ground level fall and traffic accident were the most frequent etiologies of trauma (47.0% and 23.9% respectively. Glasgow coma scale on admission was 15-13 for 106 patients (79.1%. Spinal fracture was identified in 10 of 134 patients (7.5%. Two patients had cervical, 8 had thoracolumbar fractures. In the analysis of risk factors, an accidental fall and skull fracture was observed significantly more in the spinal fracture cases. Conclusion: The majority of traumatic ICH or skull fracture cases treated in the Department of Neurosurgery were caused by minor head impacts. When treating these patients, it is necessary to investigate not only the cervical, but also the thoracolumbar spine, especially when the cause of injury is an accidental fall and a skull fracture is identified.

  18. Extraterrestrial Hemorrhage Control: Terrestrial Developments in Technique, Technology, and Philosophy with Applicability to Traumatic Hemorrhage in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew; Dawson, David; Campbell, Mark; Jones, Jeff; Ball, Chad G.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Dulchavsky, Scott; McBeth, Paul; Holcomb, John

    2004-01-01

    Managing injury and illness during long duration space flight limits efforts to explore beyond low earths orbit. Traumatic injury may be expected to occur in space and is a frequent cause of preventable deaths, often related to uncontrolled or ongoing hemorrhage (H). Such bleeding causes 40% of terrestrial injury mortality. Current guidelines emphasize early control of H compared to intravenous infusions. Recent advances in surgical and critical care may be applicable to trauma care in space, with appropriate considerations of the extreme logistical and personnel limitations. Methods: Recent developments in technique, resuscitation fluids, hemoglobin (Hb) substitutes, hemostatic agents, interventional angiography, damage control principles, and concepts related to suspended animation were reviewed. Results: H associated with instability frequently requires definitive intervention. Direct pressure should be applied to all compressible bleeding, but novel approaches are required for intracavitary noncompressible bleeding. Intravenous hemostatic agents such as recombinant Factor VII may facilitate hemostasis especially when combined with a controlled hypotension approach. Both open and laparoscopic techniques could be used in weightlessness, but require technical expertise not likely to be available. Specific rehearsed invasive techniques such as laparotomy with packing, or arterial catherterization with with robotic intravascular embolization might be considered . Hemodynamic support, thermal manipulation, or pharmacologic induction of a state of metabolic down regulation for whole body preservation may be appropriate. Hypertonic saline, with or without dextran, may temporize vascular support and decrease reperfusion injury, with less mass than other solutions. Hb substitutes have other theoretical advantages. Conclusions: Terrestrial developments suggest potential novel strategies to control H in space, but will required a coordinated program of evaluation and

  19. Brain network dysregulation, emotion, and complaints after mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Marsman, Jan-Bernard C.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    ObjectivesTo assess the role of brain networks in emotion regulation and post-traumatic complaints in the sub-acute phase after non-complicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Experimental designFifty-four patients with mTBI (34 with and 20 without complaints) and 20 healthy controls

  20. Internet and Social Media Use After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Sparr, Christina; Hart, Tessa; Bergquist, Thomas; Bogner, Jennifer; Dreer, Laura; Juengst, Shannon; Mellick, David; OʼNeil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Sander, Angelle M; Whiteneck, Gale G

    To characterize Internet and social media use among adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to compare demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with Internet use between those with and without TBI. Ten Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems centers. Persons with moderate to severe TBI (N = 337) enrolled in the TBI Model Systems National Database and eligible for follow-up from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015. Prospective cross-sectional observational cohort study. Internet usage survey. The proportion of Internet users with TBI was high (74%) but significantly lower than those in the general population (84%). Smartphones were the most prevalent means of Internet access for persons with TBI. The majority of Internet users with TBI had a profile account on a social networking site (79%), with more than half of the sample reporting multiplatform use of 2 or more social networking sites. Despite the prevalence of Internet use among persons with TBI, technological disparities remain in comparison with the general population. The extent of social media use among persons with TBI demonstrates the potential of these platforms for social engagement and other purposes. However, further research examining the quality of online activities and identifying potential risk factors of problematic use is recommended.

  1. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Clinical review. Level 4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Robust whole-brain segmentation: application to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledig, Christian; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hammers, Alexander; Lopez, Juan Carlos; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Makropoulos, Antonios; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Menon, David K; Rueckert, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    We propose a framework for the robust and fully-automatic segmentation of magnetic resonance (MR) brain images called "Multi-Atlas Label Propagation with Expectation-Maximisation based refinement" (MALP-EM). The presented approach is based on a robust registration approach (MAPER), highly performant label fusion (joint label fusion) and intensity-based label refinement using EM. We further adapt this framework to be applicable for the segmentation of brain images with gross changes in anatomy. We propose to account for consistent registration errors by relaxing anatomical priors obtained by multi-atlas propagation and a weighting scheme to locally combine anatomical atlas priors and intensity-refined posterior probabilities. The method is evaluated on a benchmark dataset used in a recent MICCAI segmentation challenge. In this context we show that MALP-EM is competitive for the segmentation of MR brain scans of healthy adults when compared to state-of-the-art automatic labelling techniques. To demonstrate the versatility of the proposed approach, we employed MALP-EM to segment 125 MR brain images into 134 regions from subjects who had sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI). We employ a protocol to assess segmentation quality if no manual reference labels are available. Based on this protocol, three independent, blinded raters confirmed on 13 MR brain scans with pathology that MALP-EM is superior to established label fusion techniques. We visually confirm the robustness of our segmentation approach on the full cohort and investigate the potential of derived symmetry-based imaging biomarkers that correlate with and predict clinically relevant variables in TBI such as the Marshall Classification (MC) or Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS). Specifically, we show that we are able to stratify TBI patients with favourable outcomes from non-favourable outcomes with 64.7% accuracy using acute-phase MR images and 66.8% accuracy using follow-up MR images. Furthermore, we are able to

  3. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse,

  4. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide, the most frequent cause of death and disability appears to be acquired brain injury.[1]. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a devastating condition that affects more than 10 million people a year worldwide.[2] In the United States (US), Faul et al.[3] estimate that TBIs affect 1.7 million people annually. According to the.

  5. White Matter Damage and Cognitive Impairment after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Kirsi Maria; Greenwood, Richard; Powell, Jane Hilary; Leech, Robert; Hawkins, Peter Charlie; Bonnelle, Valerie; Patel, Maneesh Chandrakant; Counsell, Serena Jane; Sharp, David James

    2011-01-01

    White matter disruption is an important determinant of cognitive impairment after brain injury, but conventional neuroimaging underestimates its extent. In contrast, diffusion tensor imaging provides a validated and sensitive way of identifying the impact of axonal injury. The relationship between cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury…

  6. Brain perihematoma genomic profile following spontaneous human intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH represents about 15% of all strokes and is associated with high mortality rates. Our aim was to identify the gene expression changes and biological pathways altered in the brain following ICH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twelve brain samples were obtained from four deceased patients who suffered an ICH including perihematomal tissue (PH and the corresponding contralateral white (CW and grey (CG matter. Affymetrix GeneChip platform for analysis of over 47,000 transcripts was conducted. Microarray Analysis Suite 5.0 was used to process array images and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis System was used to analyze biological mechanisms and functions of the genes. We identified 468 genes in the PH areas displaying a different expression pattern with a fold change between -3.74 and +5.16 when compared to the contralateral areas (291 overexpressed and 177 underexpressed. The top genes which appeared most significantly overexpressed in the PH areas codify for cytokines, chemokines, coagulation factors, cell growth and proliferation factors while the underexpressed codify for proteins involved in cell cycle or neurotrophins. Validation and replication studies at gene and protein level in brain samples confirmed microarray results. CONCLUSIONS: The genomic responses identified in this study provide valuable information about potential biomarkers and target molecules altered in the perihematomal regions.

  7. Vestibular rehabilitation following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, James M; Hujsak, Bryan D; Kelly, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are a symptom complex that is commonly found following concussion. Early metabolic changes following concussion may lead to worsening of the injury and symptoms in individuals not properly managed from the outset. When symptoms do not recover spontaneously, skilled vestibular rehabilitation can be an effective modality in an attempt to normalize the individual's vestibular responses. The purpose of this review is to appraise the current and accepted methods available to the skilled clinician in quantifying and treating vestibular dysfunction following concussion. Incidence and prognostic indicators will be reviewed along with common barriers to recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation following concussion utilizes similar tools and techniques employed when treating those solely with peripheral pathology. The clinician must not only have a solid understanding of when and why certain exercises are required, but also be willing to accept that less exercise may be indicated in this population. As injury to the system following mild traumatic brain injury can include both peripheral and central structures, the duration of therapy and the time to recovery may be prolonged. Co-morbidities including cognitive and behavioral issues, visual-perceptual dysfunction, metabolic dysfunction, and autonomic dysfunction may hamper the effectiveness of the traditional Vestibular Rehabilitation approach. As successful treatment does not occur in a vacuum, working closely with other disciplines well versed in treating these co-morbid issues will help the individual to obtain optimal recovery. Vestibular Rehabilitation is an effective modality for managing dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance following concussion. Careful consideration of the acuity of the injury, along with effective management of co-morbid conditions will optimize the result.

  8. Neurotherapy of Traumatic Brain Injury/Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Vietnam Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David V; Esty, Mary Lee

    2015-10-01

    Previous report suggested the beneficial effects of an adaptation of the Flexyx Neurotherapy System (FNS) for the amelioration of mixed traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress symptoms in veterans of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. As a novel variant of electroencephalograph biofeedback, FNS falls within the bioenergy domain of complementary and alternative medicine. Rather than learning voluntary control over the production/inhibition of brain wave patterns, FNS involves offsetting stimulation of brain wave activity by means of an external energy source, specifically, the conduction of electromagnetic energy stimulation via the connecting electroencephalograph cables. Essentially, these procedures subliminally induce strategic distortion of ongoing brain wave activity to presumably facilitate resetting of more adaptive patterns of activity. Reported herein are two cases of Vietnam veterans with mixed traumatic brain injury/post-traumatic stress symptoms, each treated with FNS for 25 sessions. Comparisons of pre- and post-treatment questionnaire assessments revealed notable decreases for all symptoms, suggesting improvements across the broad domains of cognition, pain, sleep, fatigue, and mood/emotion, including post-traumatic stress symptoms, as well as for overall activity levels. Findings suggest FNS treatment may be of potential benefit for the partial amelioration of symptoms, even in some individuals for whom symptoms have been present for decades. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, Matthew J.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Rhind, Shawn G.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J.; Dubick, Michael A.; Hoyt, David B.; Bulger, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  10. Chronic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury: Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or persistent neuroinflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Alan I; Loane, David J

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that prior traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the subsequent incidence of chronic neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Among these, the association with Alzheimer disease has the strongest support. There is also a long-recognized association between repeated concussive insults and progressive cognitive decline or other neuropsychiatric abnormalities. The latter was first described in boxers as dementia pugilistica, and has received widespread recent attention in contact sports such as professional American football. The term chronic traumatic encephalopathy was coined to attempt to define a "specific" entity marked by neurobehavioral changes and the extensive deposition of phosphorylated tau protein. Nearly lost in the discussions of post-traumatic neurodegeneration after traumatic brain injury has been the role of sustained neuroinflammation, even though this association has been well established pathologically since the 1950s, and is strongly supported by subsequent preclinical and clinical studies. Manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation, such chronic traumatic brain inflammation may be the most important cause of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Critically, emerging preclinical studies indicate that persistent neuroinflammation and associated neurodegeneration may be treatable long after the initiating insult(s).

  11. Impact of helmet use on traumatic brain injury from road traffic accidents in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saksham; Klaric, Katherine; Sam, Nang; Din, Vuthy; Juschkewitz, Tina; Iv, Vycheth; Shrime, Mark G; Park, Kee B

    2018-01-02

    Rapid urbanization and motorization without corresponding increases in helmet usage have made traumatic brain injury due to road traffic accidents a major public health crisis in Cambodia. This analysis was conducted to quantify the impact of helmets on severity of injury, neurosurgical indication, and functional outcomes at discharge for motorcycle operators who required hospitalization for a traumatic brain injury following a road traffic accident in Cambodia. The medical records of 491 motorcycle operators who presented to a major tertiary care center in Cambodia with traumatic brain injury were retrospectively analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. The most common injuries at presentation were contusions (47.0%), epidural hematomas (30.1%), subdural hematomas (27.9%), subarachnoid hemorrhages (12.4%), skull fractures (21.4%), and facial fractures (18.5%). Moderate-to-severe loss of consciousness was present in 36.3% of patients. Not wearing a helmet was associated with an odds ratio of 2.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-4.22) for presenting with moderate to severe loss of consciousness compared to helmeted patients. Craniotomy or craniectomy was indicated for evacuation of hematoma in 20.0% of cases, and nonhelmeted patients had 3.21-fold higher odds of requiring neurosurgical intervention (95% CI, 1.25-8.27). Furthermore, lack of helmet usage was associated with 2.72-fold higher odds of discharge with functional deficits (95% CI, 1.14-6.49). In total, 30.1% of patients were discharged with severe functional deficits. Helmets demonstrate a protective effect and may be an effective public health intervention to significantly reduce the burden of traumatic brain injury in Cambodia and other developing countries with increasing rates of motorization across the world.

  12. Resilience Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Bergquist, Thomas F; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R; Whiteneck, Gale G; Dreer, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    To examine resilience at 3 months after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cross-sectional analysis of an ongoing observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers, with 3-month follow-up conducted primarily by telephone. Persons with TBI (N=160) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model System study with 3-month follow-up completed. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Resilience scores were lower than those of the general population. A multivariable regression model, adjusting for other predictors, showed that higher education, absence of preinjury substance abuse, and less anxiety at follow-up were significantly related to greater resilience. Analysis suggests that lack of resilience may be an issue for some individuals after moderate to severe TBI. Identifying persons most likely at risk for low resilience may be useful in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of NuStatr, a Novel Nonimpregnated Hemostatic Dressing, Compared With Combat Gauze in Severe Traumatic Porcine Hemorrhage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, Genevieve R; Yi, Crystal J; Amrani, David L; Akers, Troy W; Schwartz, Richard; Wedmore, Ian; McManus, John G

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhage remains one of the most challenging problems facing emergency medical professionals and a leading cause of traumatic death in both battlefield and civilian environments. Survival is determined by the ability to rapidly control hemorrhage. Several commercially available topical adjunct agents have been shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage, and one, Combat Gauze (CG), is used regularly on the battlefield and for civilian applications. However, recent literature reviews have concluded that no ideal topical agent exists for all injuries and scenarios. The authors compared a novel nonimpregnated dressing composed of cellulose and silica, NuStat (NS), to CG in a lethal hemorrhagic groin injury. These dressings were selected for their commercial availability and design intended for control of massive hemorrhage. A complex penetrating femoral artery groin injury was made using a 5.5mm vascular punch followed by 45 seconds of uncontrolled hemorrhage in 15 swine. The hemostatic dressings were randomized using a random sequence generator and then assigned to the animals. Three minutes of manual pressure was applied with each agent after the free bleed. Hextend bolus (500 mL) was subsequently rapidly infused using a standard pressure bag along with the addition of maintenance fluids to maintain blood pressure. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded every 10 minutes and additionally at critical time points defined in the protocol. Primary end points included immediate hemostasis upon release of manual pressure (T0), hemostasis at 60 minutes, and rebleeding during the 60-minute observation period. NS was statistically superior to CG in a 5.5 mm traumatic hemorrhage model at T0 for immediate hemostasis (p=.0475), duration of application time (p=.0093), use of resuscitative fluids (p=.0042) and additional blood loss after application (p=.0385). NS and CG were statistically equivalent for hemostasis at 60 minutes, rebleeding during the study, and

  14. The Stress and Vascular Catastrophes in Newborn Rats: Mechanisms Preceding and Accompanying the Brain Hemorrhages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana; Borisova, Ekaterina; Abakumov, Maxim; Gorin, Dmitry; Avramov, Latchezar; Fedosov, Ivan; Namykin, Anton; Abdurashitov, Arkady; Serov, Alexander; Pavlov, Alexey; Zinchenko, Ekaterina; Lychagov, Vlad; Navolokin, Nikita; Shirokov, Alexander; Maslyakova, Galina; Zhu, Dan; Luo, Qingming; Chekhonin, Vladimir; Tuchin, Valery; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the time-depended scenario of stress response cascade preceding and accompanying brain hemorrhages in newborn rats using an interdisciplinary approach based on: a morphological analysis of brain tissues, coherent-domain optical technologies for visualization of the cerebral blood flow, monitoring of the cerebral oxygenation and the deformability of red blood cells (RBCs). Using a model of stress-induced brain hemorrhages (sound stress, 120 dB, 370 Hz), we studied changes in neonatal brain 2, 4, 6, 8 h after stress (the pre-hemorrhage, latent period) and 24 h after stress (the post-hemorrhage period). We found that latent period of brain hemorrhages is accompanied by gradual pathological changes in systemic, metabolic, and cellular levels of stress. The incidence of brain hemorrhages is characterized by a progression of these changes and the irreversible cell death in the brain areas involved in higher mental functions. These processes are realized via a time-depended reduction of cerebral venous blood flow and oxygenation that was accompanied by an increase in RBCs deformability. The significant depletion of the molecular layer of the prefrontal cortex and the pyramidal neurons, which are crucial for associative learning and attention, is developed as a consequence of homeostasis imbalance. Thus, stress-induced processes preceding and accompanying brain hemorrhages in neonatal period contribute to serious injuries of the brain blood circulation, cerebral metabolic activity and structural elements of cognitive function. These results are an informative platform for further studies of mechanisms underlying stress-induced brain hemorrhages during the first days of life that will improve the future generation's health.

  15. Medical treatment and neuroprotection in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, T; Bullock, R

    2001-10-01

    The goal of this article is to give an overview about the established current treatment concepts of traumatic brain injury, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in pharmacological neuroprotection. Modern medical treatment modalities of traumatic brain injury (TBI), including the preclinical management of severely head-injured patients, are reviewed. Since an increased intracranial pressure represents the most common complication of severe traumatic brain injury, frequently associated with the development of secondary brain damage, special emphasis was given to an updated treatment algorithm for this important condition. New insight into the pathophysiology of severe traumatic brain injury, especially the realization that brain damage develops sequentially, initiated several new treatment approaches aiming at the interruption of pathophysiological mechanisms leading to secondary brain injury. A high number of pharmacological substances have been tested for their ability to ameliorate secondary damage after TBI, or are currently under clinical trial. Although no drug has achieved this goal so far, the most promising of these therapeutical approaches, glutamate receptor antagonists, calcium channel antagonists, free radical scavengers, and cyclosporin A will be discussed in this review. Although a "magical bullet" for the treatment of traumatic brain injury has not been developed yet, several of the currently investigated neuroprotective strategies seem to be encouraging. A promising future approach might be to evaluate treatment strategies that combine several pharmacological agents, and possibly other treatment modalities, such as mild hypothermia, "tailored" according to the special pathology of patient subgroups, or even to every single patient in order to achieve an improvement in outcome after TBI.

  16. Post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Kyu Bo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyo Suk; Ha, Sung W. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Medical records of 81 patients who have been diagnosed of brain metastases from HCC and underwent surgery, radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) between January 2000 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Intracranial hemorrhage was present in 64 patients (79%) at the time of diagnosis. Median value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was 1,700 ng/mL. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status for 20 patients was greater than 2. Fifty-seven patients underwent WBRT and the others were treated with surgery and/or radiosurgery without WBRT. During follow-up, 12 events of intracranial hemorrhage after treatment were identified. Three-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate was 16.1%. Multivariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status, AFP, and WBRT were associated with post-treatment hemorrhage (p = 0.013, 0.013, and 0.003, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 3-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate of new lesion was higher in patients treated without WBRT, although statistical significance was not reached. (18.6% vs. 4.6%; p = 0.104). Ten of 12 patients with post-treatment hemorrhage died with neurologic cause. WBRT should be considered to prevent post-treatment hemorrhage in the treatment of brain metastases from HCC.

  17. Post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Yoon Jun; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Lee, Hyo-Suk; Ha, Sung W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of post-treatment intracranial hemorrhage of brain metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Medical records of 81 patients who have been diagnosed of brain metastases from HCC and underwent surgery, radiosurgery and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) between January 2000 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Intracranial hemorrhage was present in 64 patients (79%) at the time of diagnosis. Median value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level was 1,700 ng/mL. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status for 20 patients was greater than 2. Fifty-seven patients underwent WBRT and the others were treated with surgery and/or radiosurgery without WBRT. During follow-up, 12 events of intracranial hemorrhage after treatment were identified. Three-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate was 16.1%. Multivariate analyses revealed that ECOG performance status, AFP, and WBRT were associated with post-treatment hemorrhage (p = 0.013, 0.013, and 0.003, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that 3-month post-treatment hemorrhage rate of new lesion was higher in patients treated without WBRT, although statistical significance was not reached. (18.6% vs. 4.6%; p = 0.104). Ten of 12 patients with post-treatment hemorrhage died with neurologic cause. WBRT should be considered to prevent post-treatment hemorrhage in the treatment of brain metastases from HCC.

  18. Anemia and brain oxygen after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Levine, Joshua M; Kumar, Monisha; Iglesias, Katia; Frangos, Suzanne; Maloney-Wilensky, Eileen; Le Roux, Peter D

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the relationship between hemoglobin (Hgb) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to examine its impact on outcome. This was a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of severe TBI patients whose PbtO(2) was monitored. The relationship between Hgb-categorized into four quartiles (≤9; 9-10; 10.1-11; >11 g/dl)-and PbtO(2) was analyzed using mixed-effects models. Anemia with compromised PbtO(2) was defined as episodes of Hgb ≤ 9 g/dl with simultaneous PbtO(2) 11 g/dl as the reference level, and controlling for important physiologic covariates (CPP, PaO(2), PaCO(2)), Hgb ≤ 9 g/dl was the only Hgb level that was associated with lower PbtO(2) (coefficient -6.53 (95 % CI -9.13; -3.94), p < 0.001). Anemia with simultaneous PbtO(2) < 20 mmHg, but not anemia alone, increased the risk of unfavorable outcome (odds ratio 6.24 (95 % CI 1.61; 24.22), p = 0.008), controlling for age, GCS, Marshall CT grade, and APACHE II score. In this cohort of severe TBI patients whose PbtO(2) was monitored, a Hgb level no greater than 9 g/dl was associated with compromised PbtO(2). Anemia with simultaneous compromised PbtO(2), but not anemia alone, was a risk factor for unfavorable outcome, irrespective of injury severity.

  19. Misconceptions on neuropsychological rehabilitation and traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto García- Molina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are many misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries, their recovery and outcome; misconceptions that have their origin in a lack of information influenced by the image that the media show of the brain damage. Development. Based on clinical experience, the authors of this essay sets out his personal view on some of the most frequent misconceptions in the field of neuropsychological rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury: 1 All deficits are evident; 2 The recovery depends mainly on the involvement of the patient: more effort, more rapid recovery; 3 Two years after traumatic brain injury there is no possibility of improvement and recovery; and 4 The “miracle” of recovery will occur when is found the appropriate professional or treatment. These and other beliefs may influence directly or indirectly on the recovery process and the expectations placed on it by the families and patients. Conclusions. Provide accurate, clear and honest information, at the right time, helps patients and their families to better understand the deficits, the course of recovery and to adapt to the new reality resulting from a traumatic brain injury.

  20. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Concentrations After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Relationship with Hypovolemia and Hyponatremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Sanne M. Dorhout; Hoff, Reinier G.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale; van den Bergh, Walter M.

    2011-01-01

    Hyponatremia and hypovolemia occur often after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and are associated with poor outcome. The authors investigated whether brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to hypovolemia and hyponatremia after SAH and whether it can differentiate between hypovolemic and

  1. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate (1) the trajectory of resilience during the first year after a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) factors associated with resilience at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury; and (3) changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N=195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year postinjury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to nonminority status, absence of preinjury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  3. Case of traumatic MLF syndrome with a CT demonstration of a small hemorrhagic legion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, S.; Ogata, M.; Miyamoto, T.; Tabuchi, T. (Kobe Municipal Central Hospital (Japan))

    1981-12-01

    We report a case who developed internuclear ophthalmoplegia as a result of a closed head injury. A CT scan (Delta scan 50 FSII) demonstrated a small hemorrhage (9 x 12 mm. on actual measurement) in the dorsum of the upper pons. The patient is a 40-year-old male who fell backward while chasing a fly ball, striking the back of the head. He was rendered unconcious for some ten minutes. Upon admission, mild impairment of the adduction of both eye-balls was noted; 10 hours later this became more obvious, along with cerebellar ataxia, mild dysarthria, and paresthesia of the face. A CT scan obtained immediately after admission revealed an area of increased density compatible with a hemorrhage in the dorsum of the upper pons. A follow-up CT scan on the 12th hospital day revealed a complete resolution of the initially noted high-density in the upper pons, and 2 weeks following admission, the above-noted signs started to improve. Two and a half months following the injury he returned to work as a printer, although a detailed neuro-otological examination done 29 months after the injury still demonstrated evidence of bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia. To the author's knowledge, only 13 cases of traumatic 'MLF syndrome' have been reported so far, and our case is the first in which a CT scan indeed demonstrated the lesion. The details of the case are presented, along with the results of the neuro-otological evaluation.

  4. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    in the prospective study, six died, and 92 (1.27 per 100,000 population per year) survived after a post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) period of at least 28 days. All 19 patients with PTA 7-27 days and 48% of survivors with PTA at least 4 weeks were discharged directly home. The incidence of patients vegetative at 1 month...

  5. Severe traumatic brain injury managed with decompressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... had a residual left hemiparesis of grade 4/5. He is awaiting formal neuropsychological assessment. Discussion. Surgical decompression is an acceptable modality of treatment for traumatic malignant intracranial hypertension with or without associated haematoma. The benefit of this form of surgery in terms ...

  6. The Brain Tourniquet: Physiological Isolation of Brain Regions Damaged by Traumatic Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-19

    brain slices were treated after injury with either a nootropic agent (aniracetam, cyclothiazide, IDRA 21, or 1-BCP) or the antiepileptic drug...pharmacological approach. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, cell necrosis, neuroprotection, nootropics , epilepsy, long-term potentiation...render their use problematic in an effective brain tourniquet system. We chose to focus our investigations on the nootropic (cognition enhancing) drugs

  7. Central diabetes insipidus in pediatric severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharfi, Ibrahim M; Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Foster, Jennifer; Morrison, Gavin C; Fraser, Douglas D

    2013-02-01

    To determine the occurrence rate of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury and to describe the clinical, injury, biochemical, imaging, and intervention variables associated with mortality. Retrospective chart and imaging review. Children's Hospital, level 1 trauma center. Severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 12) pediatric trauma patients (>1 month and diabetes insipidus between January 2000 and December 2011. Of 818 severely injured trauma patients, 180 had severe traumatic brain injury with an overall mortality rate of 27.2%. Thirty-two of the severe traumatic brain injury patients developed acute central diabetes insipidus that responded to desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin and/or vasopressin infusion, providing an occurrence rate of 18%. At the time of central diabetes insipidus diagnosis, median urine output and serum sodium were 6.8 ml/kg/hr (interquartile range = 5-11) and 154 mmol/L (interquartile range = 149-159), respectively. The mortality rate of central diabetes insipidus patients was 87.5%, with 71.4% declared brain dead after central diabetes insipidus diagnosis. Early central diabetes insipidus onset, within the first 2 days of severe traumatic brain injury, was strongly associated with mortality (p diabetes insipidus were more likely to have intracranial pressure monitoring (p = 0.03), have thiopental administered to induce coma (p = 0.04) and have received a decompressive craniectomy for elevated intracranial pressure (p = 0.04). The incidence of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury is 18%. Mortality was associated with early central diabetes insipidus onset and cerebral edema on head computed tomography. Central diabetes insipidus nonsurvivors were less likely to have received intracranial pressure monitoring, thiopental coma and decompressive craniectomy.

  8. The Cost of Treating Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Vanderploeg, 2009). Belanger et al believe that in the OEF/OIF population, even poor performance on neuropsychological 26 tests may be more associated...and may increase the risk for Alzheimer‟s disease and Parkinson ‟s disease as the person ages (Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research, 2002

  9. Oligodendrogenesis after Cerebral Ischaemia and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gang Zhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI damage white and grey matter. Loss of oligodendrocytes and their myelin, impairs axonal function. Remyelination involves oligodendrogenesis during which new myelinating oligodendrocytes are generated by differentiated oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. This article briefly reviews the processes of oligodendrogenesis in adult rodent brains, and promising experimental therapies targeting the neurovascular unit that reduce oligodendrocyte damage and amplify endogenous oligodendrogenesis after stroke and TBI.

  10. Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage due to Brain Metastasis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Sartori Balbinot

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Although extrahepatic metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are present in only 5–15% of cases, they are certainly factors associated with poor prognosis. The main sites include lung, lymph nodes, bones, and adrenal glands, in descending order. Metastasis in the central nervous system is extremely rare, and the incidences vary from 0.6 to 1.7%. We report a case of a 54-year-old man previously diagnosed with alcohol-induced cirrhosis of the liver and HCC. The patient was admitted presenting progressive left hemiparesis and headache which started 2 days earlier, with no history of cranioencephalic trauma. After admission, cranial computed tomography revealed an intraparenchymal hemorrhage area with surrounding edema in the right frontal lobe. An angioresonance requested showed a large extra-axial mass lesion located in the right frontal region with well-defined contours and predominantly hypointense signal on T2 sequence. At first, the radiological findings suggested meningioma as the first diagnostic hypothesis. However, the patient underwent surgery. The tumor was completely removed, and the morphological and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with metastatic hepatocarcinoma associated with meningioma. In postoperative care, the patient did not recover from the left hemiparesis and manifested Broca’s aphasia. He had a survival time of 24 weeks, presenting acute liver failure as his cause of death. There is a lack of evidence supporting a specific management of patients with brain metastasis from HCC. Furthermore, there are no studies that evaluate different modalities of therapeutics in brain metastasis of HCC due to the rarity of this condition. Therefore, management must be individualized depending on probable prognostic factors in these patients.

  11. Rehabilitation of patients with traumatic brain injuries in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injuries. Convincing evidence has emerged that TBI patients with moderate or severe injuries will have their hospital stay reduced by approximately 30% and the re-acquisition of personal independence increased by the provision of a formal specialised inpatient rehabilitation programme. (3). •. Severe traumatic brain injury ...

  12. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To investigate the incidence and type of misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) harboured by university students. Method. A convenience sample of 705 university students were recruited and data were collected using an electronic survey. The link to the survey was sent via e-mail to all registered ...

  13. Oxidative stress following traumatic brain injury: enhancement of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of brain injury can pose enormous challenges to the health team. There are many studies aimed at discovering or developing pharmacotherapeutic agents targeted at improving outcome of head-injured patients. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress in neuronal loss following traumatic ...

  14. Secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Secondary insults of hypotension and hypoxia significantly impact on outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 4 hours' delay in evacuation of intracranial haematomas has been demonstrated to have an additional impact on outcome. The objective of this study was to document the ...

  15. [Scandinavian guidelines for prehospital management of severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollid, S.; Sundstrom, T.; Kock-Jensen, C.

    2008-01-01

    . Evidence-based guidelines already exist that focus on all steps in the process. In the present article members of the Scandinavian Neurotrauma Committee present recommendations on prehospital management of traumatic brain injury adapted to the infrastructure of the Nordic region Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/26...

  16. School-Based Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), including concussions, can result in a constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral symptoms that affect students' well-being and performance at school. Despite these effects, school personnel remain underprepared identify, educate, and assist this population of students. This article describes a…

  17. Recovery from mild traumatic brain injury: a focus on fatigue.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, M.; Werf, S.P. van der; Bleijenberg, G.; Biert, J.; Brauer, J.; Vos, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is one of the most frequently reported symptoms after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI). To date, systematic and comparative studies on fatigue after MTBI are scarce, and knowledge on causal mechanisms is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To determine the severity of fatigue six months after

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common health problem which is one of the main causes of chronic disability and it is associated with hormonal and metabolic disorders. This work was carried out to investigate the relationship between some stress hormones (i.e. prolactin and cortisol) and plasma glucose level in TBI.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Accident and Emergency Department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is a major public health problem in Nigeria, as it could be associated with long term and life long deficits. Unlike other parts of the world, in our country, motorcycles are possibly the main cause of this injury. Unfortunately, we do not have a national epidemiological data base yet. This study ...

  20. Quantifying the funding gap for management of traumatic brain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trauma is an eminently preventable disease. However, prevention programs divert resources away from other priorities. Costing trauma related diseases helps policy makers to make decisions on re-source allocation. We used data from a prospective digital trauma registry to cost Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) at ...

  1. Adolescents\\' experience of a parental traumatic brain injury | Harris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the experiences of four adolescents, each living with a parent who has sustained a traumatic brain injury, against the theoretical backdrop of existential-phenomenological psychology. In-depth interviews were conducted and analysed within the context of the existential phenomenology, in an attempt to ...

  2. secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - a prospective study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Secondary insults of hypotension and hypoxia significantly impact on outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 4 hours' delay in evacuation of intracranial haematomas has been demonstrated to have an additional impact on outcome. The objective of this study was to document the ...

  3. Aetiology and treatment outcome of severe traumatic brain injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major challenge to the patient, the relatives, the care givers, and the society in general. The primary and secondary injuries, and the high metabolism are formidable stages of the injury, each capable of taking the life of the patient. The objectives were to determine the ...

  4. Demographic profile of severe traumatic brain injury admissions to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 School of Child and Adolescent Health, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital,. Cape Town, South Africa. Corresponding author: L E Schrieff (leigh.schrieff@uct.ac.za). Background. Paediatric traumatic brain injury (PTBI) is a major public health problem. However ...

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury and Special Education: An Information Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Alice M.

    This resource guide of annotated references on traumatic brain injury (TBI) was created to help educators locate information from such disciplines as neurology, neuropsychology, rehabilitation, and pediatric medicine. Twenty-four resources published from 1990 to 1994 are listed, with annotations. The resources include research reports/reviews,…

  6. Headache in traumatic brain injuries from blunt head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Chelse, Ana B.; Epstein, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  7. Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Côté, Pierre; Rumney, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in children. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched (2001-2012). Inclusion criteria included published peer-reviewed reports...

  8. Assisting Students with a Traumatic Brain Injury in School Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Erin M.; Obrzut, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents can significantly affect their lives and educational needs. Deficits are often exhibited in areas such as attention, concentration, memory, executive function, emotional regulation, and behavioral functioning, but specific outcomes are not particular to any one child or adolescent with a…

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common health problem which is one of the main causes of chronic disability and it is associated with hormonal and metabolic disorders. This work was carried out to investigate the relationship between some stress hormones (i.e. prolactin and cortisol) and plasma glucose level in TBI ...

  10. Cognitive Task Demands and Discourse Performance after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byom, Lindsey; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social communication problems are common in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly problems in spoken discourse. Social communication problems are thought to reflect underlying cognitive impairments. Aims: To measure the contribution of two cognitive processes, executive functioning (EF) and theory of mind (ToM), to the…

  11. The spectrum and outcome of paediatric traumatic brain injury in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents and to compare it with previous audits from our local environment and from other developing world centres. All TBI patients admitted to hospital were included in this study. We reviewed the age, gender, outcomes, radiological findings and treatment of the patients.

  12. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TBIs relate to the use of seatbelts, the effects of unconsciousness, what individuals with TBIs are ... Objective. To investigate the incidence and type of misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) harboured by university students. Method. .... students from the psychology honours class to determine which. Table 1.

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  14. Big for small: Validating brain injury guidelines in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Asad; Jehan, Faisal S; Rhee, Peter; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Vercruysse, Gary; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Latifi, Rifat; Joseph, Bellal

    2017-12-01

    Brain injury guidelines (BIG) were developed to reduce overutilization of neurosurgical consultation (NC) as well as computed tomography (CT) imaging. Currently, BIG have been successfully applied to adult populations, but the value of implementing these guidelines among pediatric patients remains unassessed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the established BIG (BIG-1 category) for managing pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) without NC (no-NC). We prospectively implemented the BIG-1 category (normal neurologic examination, ICH ≤ 4 mm limited to one location, no skull fracture) to identify pediatric TBI patients (age, ≤ 21 years) that were to be managed no-NC. Propensity score matching was performed to match these no-NC patients to a similar cohort of patients managed with NC before the implementation of BIG in a 1:1 ratio for demographics, severity of injury, and type as well as size of ICH. Our primary outcome measure was need for neurosurgical intervention. A total of 405 pediatric TBI patients were enrolled, of which 160 (NC, 80; no-NC, 80) were propensity score matched. The mean age was 9.03 ± 7.47 years, 62.1% (n = 85) were male, the median Glasgow Coma Scale score was 15 (13-15), and the median head Abbreviated Injury Scale score was 2 (2-3). A subanalysis based on stratifying patients by age groups showed a decreased in the use of repeat head CT (p = 0.02) in the no-NC group, with no difference in progression (p = 0.34) and the need for neurosurgical intervention (p = 0.9) compared with the NC group. The BIG can be safely and effectively implemented in pediatric TBI patients. Reducing repeat head CT in pediatric patients has long-term sequelae. Likewise, adhering to the guidelines helps in reducing radiation exposure across all age groups. Therapeutic/care management, level III.

  15. Neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic-crush asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarraj, Safa; Laxton, Ross; Swift, Ben; Kolar, Alexander J; Chapman, Rob C; Fegan-Earl, Ashley W; Cary, Nat R B

    2017-11-01

    Traumatic (crush) asphyxia is a rare condition caused by severe compression of the chest and trunk leading to often extreme so-called asphyxial signs, including cyanosis in head and neck regions, multiple petechiae, and subconjunctival haemorrhage as well as neurological manifestations. To investigate the neuropathology and brain weight in traumatic asphyxia caused by different accidents such as industrial accidents and road traffic collision. Post mortem records of 20 cases of traumatic asphyxia (TA) resulting from different causes of which four brains are available for comprehensive neuropathological examination. The expected brain weights for given body height and associated 95% confidence range were calculated according to the following formula: baseline brain weight (BBW) + body height x rate (g/cm). The 95% confidence range was calculated by adding and subtracting the standard error (SE) x 1.96 (7-8). There was a trend for higher brain weight in the TA cohort but it was not significant (1494 g vs 1404 g, p = 0.1). The upper limits of the brain weight of 95% confidence was 1680 g vs 1660 g, p = 0.9. The neuropathological examination of four available brains from the TA cohort showed severe congestion of blood vessels, perivascular haemorrhages and occasional βAPP deposits consistent with early axonal disruption. Brain examination is informative as part of investigation of TA. Developing ischaemic changes and an increase in brain weight are the most likely indicators of a prolonged period of patient's survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  16. The clinical spectrum of sport-related traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Barry D

    2013-04-01

    Acute and chronic sports-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are a substantial public health concern. Various types of acute TBI can occur in sport, but detection and management of cerebral concussion is of greatest importance as mismanagement of this syndrome can lead to persistent or chronic postconcussion syndrome (CPCS) or diffuse cerebral swelling. Chronic TBI encompasses a spectrum of disorders that are associated with long-term consequences of brain injury, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), dementia pugilistica, post-traumatic parkinsonism, post-traumatic dementia and CPCS. CTE is the prototype of chronic TBI, but can only be definitively diagnosed at autopsy as no reliable biomarkers of this disorder are available. Whether CTE shares neuropathological features with CPCS is unknown. Evidence suggests that participation in contact-collision sports may increase the risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease, but the data are conflicting. In this Review, the spectrum of acute and chronic sport-related TBI is discussed, highlighting how examination of athletes involved in high-impact sports has advanced our understanding of pathology of brain injury and enabled improvements in detection and diagnosis of sport-related TBI.

  17. Computational modelling of traumatic brain injury predicts the location of chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghajari, Mazdak; Hellyer, Peter J; Sharp, David J

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury can lead to the neurodegenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy. This condition has a clear neuropathological definition but the relationship between the initial head impact and the pattern of progressive brain pathology is poorly understood. We test the hypothesis that mechanical strain and strain rate are greatest in sulci, where neuropathology is prominently seen in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and whether human neuroimaging observations converge with computational predictions. Three distinct types of injury were simulated. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy can occur after sporting injuries, so we studied a helmet-to-helmet impact in an American football game. In addition, we investigated an occipital head impact due to a fall from ground level and a helmeted head impact in a road traffic accident involving a motorcycle and a car. A high fidelity 3D computational model of brain injury biomechanics was developed and the contours of strain and strain rate at the grey matter-white matter boundary were mapped. Diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in a cohort of 97 traumatic brain injury patients were also mapped at the grey matter-white matter boundary. Fifty-one healthy subjects served as controls. The computational models predicted large strain most prominent at the depths of sulci. The volume fraction of sulcal regions exceeding brain injury thresholds were significantly larger than that of gyral regions. Strain and strain rates were highest for the road traffic accident and sporting injury. Strain was greater in the sulci for all injury types, but strain rate was greater only in the road traffic and sporting injuries. Diffusion tensor imaging showed converging imaging abnormalities within sulcal regions with a significant decrease in fractional anisotropy in the patient group compared to controls within the sulci. Our results show that brain tissue deformation induced by head impact loading is greatest in sulcal locations

  18. Cerebral Infarction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Dong-Hyeon; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2014-01-01

    Objective Post-traumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI) is one of the most severe secondary insults after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is known to be associated with poor outcome and high mortality rate. We assessed the practical incidence and risk factors for the development of PTCI. Methods We conducted retrospective study on 986 consecutive patients with TBI from the period May 2005 to November 2012 at our institution. The definition of PTCI was made on non-enhanced CT scan based on a wel...

  19. Prehospital Tranexamic Acid Use for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    brushing your teeth . Your care giver or family member may respond to these questions for you. You have the right to refuse to answer any of the questions...guidelines emphasize the importance of early and effective hemodynamic resuscitation following TBI and stress the deleterious effects of hemorrhagic shock...and development of cerebral edema The development of cerebral edema is another important type of secondary brain injury. It is clear that the

  20. Serum sodium disorders in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson Silva Paiva, Douglas Alexandre França Bezerra, Robson Luis Oliveira Amorim, Eberval Gadelha Figueiredo, Wagner Malago Tavares, Almir Ferreira De Andrade, Manoel Jacobsen TeixeiraIntensive Care Unit, Division of Neurosurgery, Hospital Das Clinicas, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Sodium disorders are the most common and most poorly understood electrolyte disorders in neurological patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of sodium disorders and its association with different traumatic brain injuries. This prospective study was conducted in 80 patients diagnosed with moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries. All patients underwent cerebral computed tomography. Incidence of sodium disorders, presence of injuries in the first computed tomography after traumatic brain injury, and level of consciousness were analyzed. Patients that presented other potential causes of sodium disorders and systemic trauma were excluded from the study. The incidence of sodium disturbances was 45%: 20 patients presented hypernatremia and 16 hyponatremia. Refers to all patients with sodium disturbances 53% were detected in the first sample. We recorded at least one measurement <125 mEq/L in 50% of the patients with hyponatremia. A greater incidence of sodium disorders was found in patients with subdural, intracerebral hematoma and with diffuse axonal injury. The incidence of sodium disorders among the patients with diffuse lesions was greater than in the group of patients with brain contusion (P = 0.022. The incidence of sodium disorders is higher in patients with diffuse traumatic brain injuries. No association was found between focal lesions and proportion of sodium disorders.Keywords: brain trauma, hypernatremia, hyponatremia

  1. Philosophy of mind: coming to terms with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzan, Randall D; Kupfer, Jeff; Eastridge, Dixie; Lema-Hincapie, Andres

    2014-01-01

    Patients and their families struggle with accepting changes in personality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). A neuroanatomic understanding may assist with this process. We briefly review the history of the Western conceptualization of the Self, and discuss how neuroscience and changes in personality wrought by brain injuries modify and enrich our understanding of our selves and our patients. The sense of self, while conflated with the concept of a "soul" in Western thinking, is more rationally considered a construct derived from neurophysiologic structures. The self or personality therefore often changes when the brain changes. A neuroanatomic perspective can help patients, families, and clinicians accept and cope with the sequellae of TBI.

  2. Functional and Structural Traumatic Brain Injury in Equestrian Sports: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Morgan, Clinton D; Burks, Stephen; Forbes, Jonathan A; Chambless, Lola B; Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen K

    2015-06-01

    Sports-related concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) represent a growing public health concern. We reviewed the literature regarding equestrian-related brain injury, ranging from concussion to severe TBI. A literature review was performed to address the epidemiology of sports-related concussion and TBI in equestrian-related sports. MEDLINE and PUBMED databases were searched to identify all studies pertaining to brain injury in equestrian-related sports. We included two broad types of brain injury using a distinction established in the literature: 1) TBI with functional impairment, including concussion, or mild TBI, with negative imaging findings; and 2) TBI with structural impairment, with positive imaging and at least one of the following pathologies identified: subdural hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intraparenchymal hemorrhage, cerebral contusions, and skull fractures. Our literature search yielded 199 results. We found 26 studies describing functional TBI and 25 mentioning structural TBI, and 8 including both. Of all modern sporting activities, equestrian sports were found to cause some of the highest rates of total bodily injury, severe brain injury, and mortality. Concussions comprise 9.7%-15% of all equestrian-related injuries brought to hospitals for evaluation. Structural TBI was rare, and documentation of these injuries was poor. Although demographic risk factors like age and sex are minimally discussed in the literature, two studies identified a protective effect of increasing rider experience on all forms of bodily injury. However, it remains unclear whether increasing rider experience protects specifically against head injury. Finally, rates of helmet use in horseback riding remain dismally low-ranging from 9%-25%, depending on the activity. These low rates have persisted over time, despite evidence in this literature that helmets lead to an absolute risk reduction for head injury of 40%-50% in equestrian sports

  3. Endovascular treatment of a post-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage in a pediatric patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Gun; Jung, Hyun Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Adrenal hemorrhage following blunt trauma is a rare occurrence. We report here the case of a 5-year-old child with adrenal hemorrhage, which developed as a result of an accidental fall. Embolization treatment of adrenal hemorrhage was successfully performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of adrenal hemorrhage occurring in a child which was treated with transcatheter embolization.

  4. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ha, Ji Wan; Kim, Hyun Young; Seo, You Sung

    2017-12-01

    Recovery of injured AF in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been reported. In this study, we report on a patient with TBI who recovered from an injury to Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere, diagnosed by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). A 28-year-old right-handed male patient suffered head trauma resulting from sliding while riding a motorcycle. He was diagnosed with a traumatic contusional hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and subdural hemorrhage in the left fronto-temporal lobe. He underwent craniectomy on the left fronto-temporal area, and hematoma removal for the subdural hemorrhage in the neurosurgery department of a university hospital. Two weeks after the injury, he was transferred to the rehabilitation department of another university hospital. He showed severe aphasia and brain MRI showed leukomalactic lesion in the left frontal lobe. The result WAB for the patient showed severe aphasia, with an aphasia quotient of 45.3 percentile. However, his aphasia improved rapidly by 9 months with an aphasia quotient at the 100.0 percentile. 2-week DTT detected discontinuity in the subcortical white matter at the branch to Broca's area of left AF. By contrast, on 9-month DTT, the discontinued portion of left AF was elongated to the left Broca's area. Recovery of injured Broca's portion of AF in the dominant hemisphere along with excellent improvement of aphasia was demonstrated in a patient with TBI. This study has important implications in brain rehabilitation because the mechanism of recovery from aphasia following TBI has not been elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tau and Beta-Amyloid Deposition, Microhemorrhage and Brain Function after Traumatic Brain Injury in War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: Studies suggest an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after traumatic...traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) as a result of traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained during military service. Greater understanding of the chronic ...brain injury (TBI). Greater understanding of the chronic effects of TBI may lead to new therapies. This proposal will add a TBI cohort, tau PET

  6. Increased risk of dementia in patients with mild traumatic brain injury: a nationwide cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Kung Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that the risk of dementia in patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI is higher. However, the relationship between mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and dementia has never been established. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the incidences of dementia among patients with mTBI in Taiwan to evaluate if there is higher risk compared with general population. METHODS: We utilized a sampled National Health Insurance (NHI claims data containing one million beneficiaries. We followed all adult beneficiaries from January 1, 2005 till December 31, 2009 to see if they had been diagnosed with dementia. We further identify patients with mTBI and compared their risk of dementia with the general population. RESULTS: We identified 28551 patients with mTBI and 692382 without. After controlled for age, gender, urbanization level, socioeconomic status, diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, history of alcohol intoxication, history of ischemic stroke, history of intracranial hemorrhage and Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, the adjusted hazard ratio is 3.26 (95% Confidence interval, 2.69-3.94. CONCLUSIONS: TBI is an independent significant risk factor of developing dementia even in the mild type.

  7. Are Antiplatelet and Anticoagulants Drugs A Risk Factor for Bleeding in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccella, Laura; Zoia, Cesare; Bongetta, Daniele; Gaetani, Paolo; Martig, Franz; Candrian, Christian; Rosso, Raffaele

    2017-11-10

    Facing mild traumatic brain injury, clinicians must decide whether to perform a computed tomography (CT) scan to detect a potential intracranial hemorrhage. Many useful guidelines have been developed for the general population, but there is no general consensus about the best practice to adopt when dealing with patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulation drugs. The relatively recent introduction of new anticoagulants and second-generation antiplatelet drugs poses new challenges in this field. There are no data in the literature about the relative risk of intracranial bleeding in such categories. We enrolled 2773 consecutive patients presenting at our emergency department with mild traumatic brain injury as chief complaint and evaluated the results of their head CT scans, stratifying their anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet drug regime. Of these patients, 1608 matched the criteria for head CT scan and had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 15; 517 were on antiplatelet drugs, whereas 213 were on anticoagulants. The risk of developing intracranial bleeding was significantly higher for patients on antiplatelet drugs, whereas the risk of anticoagulated patients overlapped with that of the general population. The trend for second-generation drugs was of higher risk of bleeding only for antiplatelets. Patients with a GCS score of 15 on long-term anticoagulation therapy seem to be at no higher risk for intracranial hemorrhage than are nonanticoagulated patients. On the contrary, patients with a GCS score of 15 on antiplatelet therapy seem to be more prone to developing intracranial bleeding than are the general population, with a trend to be more at risk when it comes to second-generation drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury service (TBI) Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This Service provides access to Tramatic Brain injury patient data consult notes. The service also provides one write service method writeNote. The Service supports...

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including cognition and communication problems, motor disorders, problems with impulse ... nerve cells in the brain causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior, or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, and ...

  10. Neurodegeneration after mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury: Chronic traumatic encepalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanescu Ioana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. Although research on the long-term effects of TBI is advancing quickly, the incidence and prevalence of post-traumatic neurodegeneration and CTE are unknown. The incidence and prevalence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the genetic risk factors critical to its development are currently under research. CTE can be diagnosed only by post mortem neuropathological examination of the brain. Great efforts are being made to better understand the clinical signs and symptoms of CTE, obtained in most cases retrospectively from families of affected persons.Patients with CTE are described as having behavioral, mood, cognitive and motor impairments, occurring after a long latency from the traumatic events. Recent pathogenetic studies have provided new insights to CTE mechanisms, offering important clues in understanding neurodegenerative process and relations between physical factors and pathologic protein deposition. Further research is needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE, as well as rehabilitation and treatment strategies.

  11. Circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor has diagnostic and prognostic value in traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Korley (Frederick K.); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); A.H.B. Wu (Alan H. B.); J.K. Yue (John); G. Manley (Geoffrey); H.I. Sair (Haris I.); J.E. van Eyk (Jennifer); A.D. Everett (Allen D.); D. Okonkwo (David); A.B. Valadka (Alex); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); E.L. Yuh (Esther); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.M. Puccio (Ava); D.M. Schnyer (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and regeneration. We investigated the diagnostic and prognostic values of serum BDNF in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined serum BDNF in two independent cohorts of TBI cases presenting to the emergency

  12. Abnormal whole-brain functional networks in homogeneous acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shumskaya, E.; Andriessen, T.; Norris, David Gordon; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the whole-brain resting-state networks in a homogeneous group of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to identify alterations in functional connectivity induced by MTBI. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute MTBI and 35 healthy control subjects,

  13. Comparison of brain perfusion SPECT abnormalities with anatomical imaging in mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asadi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries and also in Iran. Anatomical imaging (AI CT and MRI is helpful in the diagnosis of acute traumatic complications however it is not efficient in the diagnosis of disabling injury syndrome. In contrast, brain perfusion SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography can be more useful for evaluation of microvascular structure. This study was designed to compare these two diagnostic methods. Methods: A total of 50 patients who had been suffering from traumatic brain injury for more than 1 year, and were followed as mild traumatic brain injury group according to “the Brain Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the Ameri can Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine” criteria, were examined by brain perfusion SPECT and AI. The common anatomical classification of the lobes of brain was used. Results: The male to female ratio was 3:2. The mean age was 32.32±11.8 years and mean post-traumatic time was 1.48±0.65 years. The most common symptoms were headache (60%, agusia (36% and anosmia (32%. Among 400 examined brain lobes in this study, brain perfusion SPECT revealed remarkable abnormality in 76 lobes (19%, but AI determined abnormalities in 38 lobes (9.5% therefore, SPECT was twice sensitive than AI in mild traumatic brain injury (P<0.001. The correlation between SPECT and AI findings was 84%. SPECT was more sensitive than AI in demonstrating brain abnormalities in frontal lobe it was more obvious in the male group however, there was no significant difference between more and less than 30 years old groups. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, we recommend using brain perfusion SPECT for all patients with chronic complications of head trauma, particularly those who have signs and symptoms of hypofrontalism, even though with some abnormalities in AI.

  14. Consequences of traumatic brain injury for human vergence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Christopher W; Likova, Lora T; Mineff, Kristyo N; Elsaid, Anas M; Nicholas, Spero C

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury involving loss of consciousness has focal effects in the human brainstem, suggesting that it may have particular consequences for eye movement control. This hypothesis was investigated by measurements of vergence eye movement parameters. Disparity vergence eye movements were measured for a population of 123 normally sighted individuals, 26 of whom had suffered diffuse traumatic brain injury (dTBI) in the past, while the remainder served as controls. Vergence tracking responses were measured to sinusoidal disparity modulation of a random-dot field. Disparity vergence step responses were characterized in terms of their dynamic parameters separately for the convergence and divergence directions. The control group showed notable differences between convergence and divergence dynamics. The dTBI group showed significantly abnormal vergence behavior on many of the dynamic parameters. The results support the hypothesis that occult injury to the oculomotor control system is a common residual outcome of dTBI.

  15. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations.......To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  17. Baseline Establishment Using Virtual Environment Traumatic Brain Injury Screen (VETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    GCS Glasgow Coma Scale GUI graphic user interface HMMWV Highly Mobile Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle HSI Human Systems Integration ICU Intensive Care...It was originally designed to assess a patient’s level of consciousness in an Intensive Care Unit ( ICU ) setting though it is now widely used by...mild traumatic brain injury,” Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, vol. 43, pp. 113–125, 2004. [14] National Institute of Justice, “Ballistic

  18. Cognitive development after traumatic brain injury in young children

    OpenAIRE

    GERRARD-MORRIS, AIMEE; Taylor, H. Gerry; Yeates, Keith Owen; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff; Stancin, Terry; Minich, Nori; Wade, Shari L.

    2009-01-01

    The primary aims of this study were to examine post-injury cognitive development in young children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to investigate the role of the proximal family environment in predicting cognitive outcomes. Age at injury was 3–6 years, and TBI was classified as severe (n = 23), moderate (n = 21), and complicated mild (n = 43). A comparison group of children who sustained orthopedic injuries (OI, n = 117) was also recruited. Child cognitive assessments were administered ...

  19. Adolescents’ experience of a parental traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Harris

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the experiences of four adolescents, each living with a parent who has sustained a traumatic brain injury, against the theoretical backdrop of existential-phenomenological psychology. Opsomming Hierdie navorsing verken die belewenisse van vier adolessente wat saam met ‘n ouer wat ‘n traumatiese breinbesering opgedoen het, leef. *Please note: This is a reduced version of the abstract. Please refer to PDF for full text.

  20. Family burden after traumatic brain injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Mary E; McCarthy, Melissa L; Slomine, Beth S; Ding, Ru; Durbin, Dennis R; Jaffe, Kenneth M; Paidas, Charles N; Dorsch, Andrea M; Christensen, James R; Mackenzie, Ellen J

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury has a substantial impact on caregivers. This study describes the burden experienced by caregivers of children with traumatic brain injury and examines the relationship between child functioning and family burden during the first year after injury. Children aged 5 to 15 years hospitalized for traumatic brain injury at 4 participating trauma centers were eligible. Caregivers completed baseline and 3- and 12-month telephone interviews measuring the child's health-related quality of life using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. The emotional impact scale of the Child Health Questionnaire was used to identify caregivers with substantial distress, including general worry or interference with family routine. Caregiver perceptions of whether health care needs were met or unmet and days missed from work were also measured. A total of 330 subjects enrolled; follow-up was conducted with 312 at 3 months and 288 at 12 months. Most subjects were white (68%) and male (69%). Abnormal Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory subscores were related to substantial caregiver burden (either general worry or interference in routine). These abnormalities were reported by >75% of patients at 3 months and persisted to 1 year in some patients. Parental perception of unmet health care needs was strongly related to family burden outcomes, with up to 69% of this subset of parents reporting substantial worry, and nearly one quarter reporting interference with daily routine/concentration 1 year after injury. Child dysfunction predicted parental burden at 3 and 12 months. Burden was greater when health care need was unmet. Abnormalities on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory predicted the amount of work missed by parents, especially in the presence of unmet needs. Caregivers are more likely to report family burden problems when child functioning is poorer and health care needs are unmet. Improved identification and provision of services is a potentially modifiable

  1. Treatment of metaphor interpretation deficits subsequent to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Hiram; Lundgren, Kristine; Cayer-Meade, Carol; Milione, Janet; Katz, Douglas I; Kearns, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    To improve oral interpretation of metaphors by patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Both single subject experimental design and group analysis. Patients' homes. Eight adult patients with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury sustained 3 to 20 years before testing. The Metaphor Training Program consisted typically of 10 baseline sessions, 3 to 9 1-hour sessions of structured intervention, and 10 posttraining baseline sessions. Training used extensive practice with simple graphic displays to illustrate semantic associations. Quality of orally produced metaphor interpretation and accuracy of line orientation judgments served as dependent measures obtained during baseline, training, posttraining, and at a 3- to 4-month follow-up. Untrained line orientation judgments provided a control measure. Group data showed significant improvement in metaphor interpretation but not in line orientation. Six of 8 patients individually demonstrated significant improvement in metaphor interpretation. Gains persisted for 3 of the 6 patients at the 3- to 4-month follow-up. The Metaphor Training Program can improve cognitive-communication performance for individuals with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Results support the potential for treating patients' residual cognitive-linguistic deficits.

  2. Effects of deferoxamine on blood-brain barrier disruption after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Yanjiang Li; Heng Yang; Wei Ni; Yuxiang Gu

    2017-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption is a key mechanism of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced brain injury. This study examined the mechanism of iron-induced BBB disruption after SAH and investigated the potential therapeutic effect of iron chelation on SAH. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats had an endovascular perforation of left internal carotid artery bifurcation or sham operation. The rats were treated with deferoxamine (DFX) or vehicle (100mg/kg) for a maximum of 7 days. Brain edema, BBB...

  3. Electrical bioimpedance enabling prompt intervention in traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Fernando; Atefi, S. Reza

    2017-05-01

    Electrical Bioimpedance (EBI) is a well spread technology used in clinical practice across the world. Advancements in Textile material technology with conductive textile fabrics and textile-electronics integration have allowed exploring potential applications for Wearable Measurement Sensors and Systems exploiting. The sensing principle of electrical bioimpedance is based on the intrinsic passive dielectric properties of biological tissue. Using a pair of electrodes, tissue is electrically stimulated and the electrical response can be sensed with another pair of surface electrodes. EBI spectroscopy application for cerebral monitoring of neurological conditions such as stroke and perinatal asphyxia in newborns have been justified using animal studies and computational simulations. Such studies have shown proof of principle that neurological pathologies indeed modify the dielectric composition of the brain that is detectable via EBI. Similar to stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) also affects the dielectric properties of brain tissue that can be detected via EBI measurements. Considering the portable and noninvasive characteristics of EBI it is potentially useful for prehospital triage of TBI patients where. In the battlefield blast induced Traumatic Brain Injuries are very common. Brain damage must be assessed promptly to have a chance to prevent severe damage or eventually death. The relatively low-complexity of the sensing hardware required for EBI sensing and the already proven compatibility with textile electrodes suggest the EBI technology is indeed a candidate for developing a handheld device equipped with a sensorized textile cap to produce an examination in minutes for enabling medically-guided prompt intervention.

  4. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 24 Jun 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Journal...transport, intracranial pressure, monitoring, hypoxia, hypotension 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...of productivity8 Previous studies suggest that secondary insults such as hypoxia and hypotension may worsen a brain injury.9-’ 9 Recent recognition

  5. Postradiosurgery hemorrhage rates of arteriovenous malformations of the brain: influencing factors and evolution with time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhutik, Vera; Lago, Aida; Tembl, José Ignacio; Vázquez, Juan Francisco; Aparici, Fernando; Mainar, Esperanza; Vázquez, Víctor

    2012-05-01

    The long-term benefit of radiosurgery of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVM), especially nonhemorrhagic cases, is controversial. We calculated hemorrhage rates pre- and posttreatment and analyzed the risk factors for bleeding based on cases followed at our site. One hundred eight patients, age 36 ± 17 years, 56 men. The mean follow-up was 65 ± 44 months (median, 54; interquartile range, 33-94). Most AVMs were small (74.1% <3 cm in diameter); 48.1% were located in an eloquent area, 27.8% had deep drainage, and 39.8% presented with hemorrhage. The annual hemorrhage rate for any undiagnosed AVM was 1.2%, and 3.3% for AVMs with hemorrhagic presentation. Older patients, cortical or subcortical AVMs, and cases with multiple draining veins were less likely to present with bleeding. During the first 36 months postradiosurgery, hemorrhagic AVMs had a rebleeding rate of 2.1%, and a rate of 1.1% from 3 years onwards. Nonhemorrhagic AVMs had a hemorrhage rate of 1.4% during the first 3 years and 0.3% afterward. Arterial hypertension and nidus volume were independent predictors of bleeding after treatment. Mean nidus obliteration time was 37 ± 18 months (median, 32; interquartile range, 25-40), with hemorrhage rate of 1.3% before and 0.6% after obliteration, and 1.9% for AVMs that were not closed at the end of follow-up. Both hemorrhagic and nonhemorrhagic AVMs benefit from radiosurgical therapy, with gradual decrease in their bleeding rates over the years. Albeit small, the risk of hemorrhage persists during the entirety of follow-up, being higher for cases with hemorrhagic presentation and nonobliterated AVM.

  6. The postpartum period of pregnancy worsens brain injury and functional outcome after cerebellar hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekic, Tim; Ostrowski, Robert P; Suzuki, Hidenori; Manaenko, Anatol; Rolland, William; Fathali, Nancy; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2011-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most common causes of maternal deaths related to the postpartum period. This is a devastating form of stroke for which there is no available treatment. Although premenopausal females tend to have better outcomes after most forms of brain injury, the effects of pregnancy and child birth lead to wide maternal physiological changes that may predispose the mother to an increased risk for stroke and greater initial injury. Three different doses of collagenase were used to generate models of mild, moderate and severe cerebellar hemorrhage in postpartum female and male control rats. Brain water, blood-brain barrier rupture, hematoma size and neurological evaluations were performed 24 h later. Postpartum female rats had worsened brain water, blood-brain barrier rupture, hematoma size and neurological evaluations compared to their male counterparts. The postpartum state reverses the cytoprotective effects commonly associated with the hormonal neuroprotection of (premenopausal) female gender, and leads to greater initial injury and worsened neurological function after cerebellar hemorrhage. This experimental model can be used for the study of future treatment strategies after postpartum brain hemorrhage, to gain a better understanding of the mechanistic basis for stroke in this important patient subpopulation.

  7. BDNF polymorphism predicts general intelligence after penetrating traumatic brain injury.

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    Elham Rostami

    Full Text Available Neuronal plasticity is a fundamental factor in cognitive outcome following traumatic brain injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, plays an important role in this process. While there are many ways to measure cognitive outcome, general cognitive intelligence is a strong predictor of everyday decision-making, occupational attainment, social mobility and job performance. Thus it is an excellent measure of cognitive outcome following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Although the importance of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms polymorphism on cognitive function has been previously addressed, its role in recovery of general intelligence following TBI is unknown. We genotyped male Caucasian Vietnam combat veterans with focal penetrating TBI (pTBI (n = 109 and non-head injured controls (n = 38 for 7 BDNF single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Subjects were administrated the Armed Forces Qualification Test (AFQT at three different time periods: pre-injury on induction into the military, Phase II (10-15 years post-injury, and Phase III (30-35 years post-injury. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs7124442 and rs1519480, were significantly associated with post-injury recovery of general cognitive intelligence with the most pronounced effect at the Phase II time point, indicating lesion-induced plasticity. The genotypes accounted for 5% of the variance of the AFQT scores, independently of other significant predictors such as pre-injury intelligence and percentage of brain volume loss. These data indicate that genetic variations in BDNF play a significant role in lesion-induced recovery following pTBI. Identifying the underlying mechanism of this brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect could provide insight into an important aspect of post-traumatic cognitive recovery.

  8. Serum electrolyte derangements in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Mirza Faisal Ahmed; Ahmed, Noor; Khan, Adil Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Electrolyte derangements are common sequel of traumatic brain injury. Use of intravenous fluids, diuretics, syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion and cerebral salt washing are some of the factors responsible for this. Proper in time detection followed by appropriate treatment not only improves neurological status but also decrease morbidity and mortality. This study was conducted to know serum derangements of different electrolytes in patients with traumatic brain injury. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences. Islamabad, Pakistan from Feb 2009 to Feb 2010. All adult patients with traumatic brain injury who presented to Neurosurgical department with severe head injury (GCS < 8) and who need monitoring in high dependency unit, were included in this study. Initially twice daily serum electrolyte monitoring for one week then once daily for remaining period of hospital stay was carried out. All samples were sent to Pathology department of Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. Patients who need corrective measures for imbalance had repetition of sampling after giving appropriate therapy. Statistical analysis was performed on SPSS-16. Total 215 patients presented with severe head injury that were managed in high dependency unit. Out of which 127 (59.1%) were male and 88 (40.9%) were females. Most of them were adults between 21-40) years of age (21.4%; 24.7%). Sodium was the main electrolyte that underwent change & out of which hyper-natremia was major abnormality that occurred in 140 (65.1%) of patients. This is followed by hypo-kalemia that occurred in 79 (36.7%) of patients. Serum calcium & magnesium levels show little derangements. Electrolyte imbalance following traumatic head injury is an important cause to look for in patient monitoring. Sodium is the chief electrolytes of concern. Serum potassium and calcium levels also under goes notable changes.

  9. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  10. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma / Hemorrhage and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Inflammation is a ...

  11. Thrombolysis for non-traumatic intra-ventricular hemorrhage in adults: a critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starnoni, Daniele; Oddo, Mauro; Maduri, Rodolfo; Messerer, Mahmoud; Daniel, Roy T

    2017-09-01

    Intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a critical condition with high rate of morbidity and mortality due to acute hydrocephalus and secondary brain injury. Mechanisms underlying the clinical deterioration are not only related to the appearance of an acute hydrocephalus but also to blood-clot mass effect and the inflammatory effects of blood break-down products which impede local blood flow and exert a direct toxic effect on the peri-ventricular structures leading to chronic hydrocephalus. An effective treatment strategy should aim at IVH fast removal and reduction of blood-clot mass effect. Although external ventricular drainage placement is an intuitive treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus this treatment does not address in total the aforementioned pathophysiological mechanisms underlying secondary brain damage. Intra-ventricular fibrinolysis, with tissue plasminogen activator or urokinase, is a level of evidence B, class IIB treatment which has proved to be beneficial in lowering the mortality rates. Its effectiveness on functional outcome has been assessed on three large meta-analysis and a recent large randomized control trial (CLEAR III). Results from the CLEAR III multicenter trial suggest that a routine extra-ventricular drain, irrigation with alteplase reduced mortality but did not substantially improve functional outcomes compared with irrigation with saline. Protocol-based use of alteplase with extra-ventricular drain seemed safe, therefore such approach may be a potential option in individual cases. Currently no consensus has been reached and extrapolation of data from the literature does not permit to identify a uniform therapeutic approach but merely to outline some rational procedural modalities. Further research and studies are needed to compare the efficacy of the different fibrinolytic agents and protocols on functional outcome.

  12. Definition of Traumatic Brain Injury, Neurosurgery, Trauma Orthopedics, Neuroimaging, Psychology, and Psychiatry in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Mubashir; Kitagawa, Ryan S; Chang, Tiffany R

    2018-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupts the normal function of the brain. This condition can adversely affect a person's quality of life with cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and physical symptoms that limit interpersonal, social, and occupational functioning. Although many systems exist, the simplest classification includes mild, moderate, and severe TBI depending on the nature of injury and the impact on the patient's clinical status. Patients with TBI require prompt evaluation and multidisciplinary management. Aside from the type and severity of the TBI, recovery is influenced by individual patient characteristics, social and environmental factors, and access to medical and rehabilitation services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Epidemiology of Epilepsy and Traumatic Brain Injury: Severity, Mechanism, and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-2-0046 TITLE: The Epidemiology of Epilepsy and Traumatic Brain Injury: Severity, Mechanism, and Outcomes PRINCIPAL...COVERED 30 Sep 2016 – 29 SEP 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER The Epidemiology of Epilepsy and Traumatic Brain Injury: Severity...previous research has found that Post-9/11 Veterans with any kind of traumatic brain injury (TBI) were more likely to develop epilepsy than those without

  14. Active extravasation of contrast within the hemorrhage (spot sign: a multidetector computed tomography finding that predicts growth and a worse prognosis in non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage

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    Marcos Rosa Junior

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH causes high rates of disability and neurological sequelae Objective To evaluate spot signs as predictors of expansion and worse prognosis in non-traumatic ICH in a Brazilian cohort. Method We used multidetector computed tomography angiography to study 65 consecutive patients (40 men, 61.5%, with ages varying from 33 to 89 years (median age 55 years. Clinical and imaging findings were correlated with the findings based on the initial imaging. Results Of the individuals who presented a spot sign, 73.7% died (in-hospital mortality, whereas in the absence of a spot sign the mortality rate was 43.0%. Although expansion of ICH was detected in 75% of the patients with a spot sign, expansion was observed in only 9.0% of the patients who did not present a spot sign. Conclusions The spot sign strongly predicted expansion in non-traumatic ICH and an increased risk of in-hospital mortality.

  15. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries among South African university students

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    Chrisma Pretorius

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the incidence and type of misconceptions about traumatic brain injuries (TBIs harboured by university students.  Method. A convenience sample of 705 university students were recruited and data were collected using an electronic survey. The link to the survey was sent via e-mail to all registered students at Stellenbosch University. The participants had to complete the Common Misconceptions about Traumatic Brain Injury (CM-TBI questionnaire.  Results. The findings of this study suggest that the students subscribe to misconceptions from each of the 7 categories of misconceptions about TBIs. The mean percentages of misconceptions about TBIs were calculated and the amnesia (mean 49.7% and unconsciousness (mean 46.1% categories were identified as the categories about which the respondents had the most misconceptions, while the mean percentages of misconceptions were lower for the categories of recovery (mean 27.6%, rehabilitation (mean 26.56%, prevention (mean 20.8%, brain injury sequelae (mean 18.7% and brain damage (mean 8.4%.  Conclusion. Generally, these findings appear to be in keeping with previous literature, which suggests that misconceptions about TBIs are common among the general population. This study’s identification of these misconceptions could help create awareness, provide a focus for information provision, and contribute to the development of educational intervention programmes tailored for the South African context.

  16. Risk of traumatic intracranial hemorrhage in patients with head injury and preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Offerman, Steven R; Ballard, Dustin W; Vinson, David R; Chettipally, Uli K; Rauchwerger, Adina S; Reed, Mary E; Holmes, James F

    2013-02-01

    Appropriate use of cranial computed tomography (CT) scanning in patients with mild blunt head trauma and preinjury anticoagulant or antiplatelet use is unknown. The objectives of this study were: 1) to identify risk factors for immediate traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) in patients with mild head trauma and preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use and 2) to derive a clinical prediction rule to identify patients at low risk for immediate tICH. This was a prospective, observational study at two trauma centers and four community hospitals that enrolled adult emergency department (ED) patients with mild blunt head trauma (initial ED Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score 13 to 15) and preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use. The primary outcome measure was immediate tICH, defined as the presence of ICH or contusion on the initial cranial CT. Risk for immediate tICH was analyzed in 11 independent predictor variables. Clinical prediction rules were derived with both binary recursive partitioning and multivariable logistic regression. A total of 982 patients with a mean (± standard deviation [SD]) age of 75.4 (±12.6) years were included in the analysis. Sixty patients (6.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.7% to 7.8%) had immediate tICH. History of vomiting (relative risk [RR] = 3.53; 95% CI = 1.80 to 6.94), abnormal mental status (RR = 2.85; 95% CI = 1.65 to 4.92), clopidogrel use (RR = 2.52; 95% CI = 1.55 to 4.10), and headache (RR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.96) were associated with an increased risk for immediate tICH. Both binary recursive partitioning and multivariable logistic regression were unable to derive a clinical prediction model that identified a subset of patients at low risk for immediate tICH. While several risk factors for immediate tICH were identified, the authors were unable to identify a subset of patients with mild head trauma and preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use who are at low risk for immediate tICH. Thus, the recommendation is for urgent and

  17. Serial Serum Leukocyte Apoptosis Levels as Predictors of Outcome in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Hung-Chen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Apoptosis associates with secondary brain injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI. This study posits that serum leukocyte apoptosis levels in acute TBI are predictive of outcome. Methods. Two hundred and twenty-nine blood samples from 88 patients after acute TBI were obtained on admission and on Days 4 and 7. Serial apoptosis levels of different leukocyte subsets were examined in 88 TBI patients and 27 control subjects. Results. The leukocyte apoptosis was significantly higher in TBI patients than in controls. Brief unconsciousness (P=0.009, motor deficits (P≤0.001, GCS (P≤0.001, ISS (P=0.001, WBC count (P=0.015, late apoptosis in lymphocytes and monocytes on Day 1 (P=0.004 and P=0.022, resp., subdural hemorrhage on initial brain CT (P=0.002, neurosurgical intervention (P≤0.001, and acute posttraumatic seizure (P=0.046 were significant risk factors of outcome. Only motor deficits (P=0.033 and late apoptosis in monocytes on Day 1 (P=0.037 were independently associated with outcome. A cutoff value of 5.72% of late apoptosis in monocytes was associated with poor outcome in acute TBI patients. Conclusion. There are varying degrees of apoptosis in patients following TBI and in healthy individuals. Such differential expression suggests that apoptosis in different leukocyte subsets plays an important role in outcome following injury.

  18. Advances in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Its Significance in Managing Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Usmah Kawoos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial pressure (ICP measurements are essential in evaluation and treatment of neurological disorders such as subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, hydrocephalus, meningitis/encephalitis, and traumatic brain injury (TBI. The techniques of ICP monitoring have evolved from invasive to non-invasive—with both limitations and advantages. Some limitations of the invasive methods include short-term monitoring, risk of infection, restricted mobility of the subject, etc. The invasiveness of a method limits the frequency of ICP evaluation in neurological conditions like hydrocephalus, thus hampering the long-term care of patients with compromised ICP. Thus, there has been substantial interest in developing noninvasive techniques for assessment of ICP. Several approaches were reported, although none seem to provide a complete solution due to inaccuracy. ICP measurements are fundamental for immediate care of TBI patients in the acute stages of severe TBI injury. In severe TBI, elevated ICP is associated with mortality or poor clinical outcome. ICP monitoring in conjunction with other neurological monitoring can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of brain damage. This review article presents: (a the significance of ICP monitoring; (b ICP monitoring methods (invasive and non-invasive; and (c the role of ICP monitoring in the management of brain damage, especially TBI.

  19. Coagulopathy in the Setting of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Truths and Consequences

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    Joseph P. Herbert

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a common, although poorly-defined clinical entity. Despite its initially mild presentation, patients with mTBI can rapidly deteriorate, often due to significant expansion of intracranial hemorrhage. TBI-associated coagulopathy is the topic of significant clinical and basic science research. Unlike trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC, TBI-associated coagulopathy does not generally follow widespread injury or global hypoperfusion, suggesting a distinct pathogenesis. Although the fundamental mechanisms of TBI-associated coagulopathy are far from clearly elucidated, several candidate molecules (tissue plasminogen activator (tPA, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, tissue factor (TF, and brain-derived microparticles (BDMP have been proposed which might explain how even minor brain injury can induce local and systemic coagulopathy. Here, we review the incidence, proposed mechanisms, and common clinical tests relevant to mTBI-associated coagulopathy and briefly summarize our own institutional experience in addition to identifying areas for further research.

  20. Risk of unfavorable long-term outcome in older adults with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage and anticoagulant or antiplatelet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Daniel K; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Sarkar, Korak; Rudisill, Nancy; Holmes, James F

    2013-08-01

    The objective was to compare neurological outcomes at 6 months in older patients with preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use and mild traumatic intracranial hemorrhage with those without prior use of these medications. This was a retrospective study conducted at a Level 1 trauma center from April 2009 to July 2010. Patients older than 55 years with isolated mild head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score 13-15 and Abbreviated Injury Score injury database. The primary end point of unfavorable extended Glasgow Outcome Score at 6 months was compared between patients with and without preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use. Seventy-seven eligible patients were identified: 27 (35%) with preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use and 50 (65%) without. Baseline characteristics (sex, Glasgow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score, computed tomography score, and in-hospital mortality) were similar between cohorts, although the preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel cohort was older than the control group (P clopidogrel cohort were more likely to have an unfavorable outcome (16/27; 59.3%; 95% confidence interval, 40.7%-77.8%) as compared with those without (18/50; 36.0%; 95% confidence interval, 22.7%-49.3%) (P = .05). Older adults with preinjury warfarin or clopidogrel use and mild traumatic intracranial hemorrhage may be at an increased risk for unfavorable long-term neurological outcomes compared with similar patients without preinjury use of these medications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Apelin-13 as a novel target for intervention in secondary injury after traumatic brain injury

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    Hai-jun Bao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adipocytokine, apelin-13, is an abundantly expressed peptide in the nervous system. Apelin-13 protects the brain against ischemia/reperfusion injury and attenuates traumatic brain injury by suppressing autophagy. However, secondary apelin-13 effects on traumatic brain injury-induced neural cell death and blood-brain barrier integrity are still not clear. Here, we found that apelin-13 significantly decreases cerebral water content, mitigates blood-brain barrier destruction, reduces aquaporin-4 expression, diminishes caspase-3 and Bax expression in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and reduces apoptosis. These results show that apelin-13 attenuates secondary injury after traumatic brain injury and exerts a neuroprotective effect

  2. Problems of reconstructive cranioplasty after traumatic brain injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Paolo; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Massimi, Luca; Peraio, Simone; Caldarelli, Massimo; Di Rocco, Concezio

    2017-10-01

    Cranial repair after traumatic brain injury in children is still burdened by unsolved problems and controversial issues, mainly due to the high rate of resorption of autologous bone as well as the absence of valid alternative material to replace the autologous bone. Indeed, inert biomaterials are associated to satisfactory results in the short period but bear the continuous risk of complications related to the lack of osteointegration capacity. Biomimetic materials claiming osteoconductive properties that could balance their mechanical limits seem to allow good cranial bone reconstruction. However, these results should be confirmed in the long term and in larger series. Further complicating factors that may affect cranial reconstruction after head injury should be identified in the possible associated alterations of CSF dynamics and in difficulties to manage the traumatic skin lesion and the surgical wound, which also might impact on the cranioplasty outcome. All the abovementioned considerations should be taken into account when dealing with the cranial reconstruction after decompressive craniectomy in children.

  3. Suicide after traumatic brain injury: a population study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teasdale, T W; Engberg, A W

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of suicide among patients who have had a traumatic brain injury. METHODS: From a Danish population register of admissions to hospital covering the years 1979-93 patients were selected who had had either a concussion (n=126 114), a cranial fracture (n=7560......), or a cerebral contusion or traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (n=11 766). All cases of deaths by the end of the study period were identified. RESULTS: In the three diagnostic groups there had been 750 (0.59%), 46 (0.61%), and 99 (0.84%) cases of suicide respectively. Standardised mortality ratios, stratified...... by sex and age, showed that the incidence of suicide among the three diagnostic groups was increased relative to the general population (3.0, 2.7, and 4.1 respectively). In all diagnosis groups the ratios were higher for females than for males, and lower for patients injured before the age of 21 or after...

  4. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Atypical moral judgment following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Muresan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown an association between emotions, particularly social emotions, and moral judgments. Some studies suggested an association between blunted emotion and the utilitarian moral judgments observed in patients with prefrontal lesions. In order to investigate how prefrontal brain damage affects moral judgment, we asked a sample of 29 TBI patients (12 females and 17 males and 41 healthy participants (16 females and 25 males to judge 22 hypothetical dilemmas split into three different categories (non-moral, impersonal and personal moral. The TBI group presented a higher proportion of affirmative (utilitarian responses for personal moral dilemmas when compared to controls, suggesting an atypical pattern of utilitarian judgements. We also found a negative association between the performance on recognition of social emotions and the proportion of affirmative responses on personal moral dilemmas. These results suggested that the preference for utilitarian responses in this type of dilemmas is accompanied by difficulties in social emotion recognition. Overall, our findings suggest that deontological moral judgments are associated with normal social emotion processing and that frontal lobe plays an important role in both emotion and moral judgment.

  6. Angioarchitectural characteristics associated with initial hemorrhagic presentation in supratentorial brain arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianwei, E-mail: swordman_pan@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Feng, Lei, E-mail: lei_feng66@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Vinuela, Fernando, E-mail: fvinuela@mednet.ucla.edu [Interventional Neuroradiology Division, Department of Radiological Sciences, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); He, Hongwei, E-mail: ttyyhhw@126.com [Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Capital Medical University, 6 Tiantan Xili, Beijing 100050 (China); Wu, Zhongxue, E-mail: 252694812@qq.com [Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Beijing, Capital Medical University, 6 Tiantan Xili, Beijing 100050 (China); Zhan, Renya, E-mail: neurovasword@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: The difference in arterial supply, venous drainage, functional localization in supratentorial and infratentorial compartments may contribute to the conflicting results about risk factors for hemorrhage in published case series of brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM). Further investigation focused on an individual brain compartment is thus necessary. This retrospective study aims to identify angioarchitectural characteristics associated with the initial hemorrhagic event of supratentorial bAVMs. Materials and methods: The clinical and angiographic features of 152 consecutive patients with supratentorial bAVMs who presented to our hospital from 2005 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. All these patients had new diagnosis of bAVM. Univariate (χ{sup 2} test) and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the angiographic features in patients with and without initial hemorrhagic presentations. A probability value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant in each analysis. Results: In 152 patients with supratentorial AVMs, 70.6% of deep and 52.5% of superficial sbAVMs presented with hemorrhage. The deep location was correlated with initial hemorrhagic presentation in univariate analysis (χ{sup 2} = 3.499, p = 0.046) but not in the multivariate model (p = 0.144). There were 44 sbAVMs with perforating feeders, 39 (88.6%) of which bled at a significantly higher rate than those with terminal feeders (χ{sup 2} = 25.904, p = 0.000). 87.5% (21/24) of exclusive deep venous drainage presented with hemorrhage, a significantly higher rate than those of the other type of venous drainage (χ{sup 2} = 11.099, p = 0.004). All 10 patients with both perforating feeders and exclusive deep draining vein presented with initial hemorrhage. Hemorrhagic presentation was correlated with perforating feeders (p = 0.000) and exclusive deep draining vein (p = 0.007) in multivariate analysis as well. Conclusions: Supratentorial bAVMs with perforating feeders

  7. The Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Combined Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Returning Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Hannah L; Berry, David T R; Pape, Theresa; Babcock-Parziale, Judith; Smith, Bridget; Schleenbaker, Randal; Shandera-Ochsner, Anne; Harp, Jordan P; High, Walter M

    2015-07-01

    United States veterans of the Iraqi (Operation Iraqi Freedom [OIF]) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom [OEF]) conflicts have frequently returned from deployment after sustaining mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and enduring stressful events resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A large number of returning service members have been diagnosed with both a history of mTBI and current PTSD. Substantial literature exists on the neuropsychological factors associated with mTBI and PTSD occurring separately; far less research has explored the combined effects of PTSD and mTBI. The current study employed neuropsychological and psychological measures in a sample of 251 OIF/OEF veterans to determine whether participants with a history of mTBI and current PTSD (mTBI+PTSD) have poorer cognitive and psychological outcomes than participants with mTBI only (mTBI-o), PTSD only (PTSD-o), or veteran controls (VC), when groups are comparable on intelligence quotient, education, and age. The mTBI+PTSD group performed more poorly than VC, mTBI-o, and PTSD-o groups on several neuropsychological measures. Effect size comparisons suggest small deleterious effects for mTBI-o on measures of processing speed and visual attention and small effects for PTSD-o on measures of verbal memory, with moderate effects for mTBI+PTSD on the same variables. Additionally, the mTBI+PTSD group was significantly more psychologically distressed than the PTSD-o group, and PTSD-o group was more distressed than VC and mTBI-o groups. These findings suggest that veterans with mTBI+PTSD perform significantly lower on neuropsychological and psychiatric measures than veterans with mTBI-o or PTSD-o. The results also raise the possibility of mild but persisting cognitive changes following mTBI sustained during deployment.

  8. The military's approach to traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Grimes, Jamie; Ecklund, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are common conditions. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI became prominent among US service members but the vast majority of TBI was still due to typical causes such as falls and sporting events. PTS has long been a focus of the US military mental health providers. Combat Stress Teams have been integral to forward deployed units since the beginning of the Global War on Terror. Military medical management of disease and injury follows standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) established by civilian counterparts. However, when civilian CPGs do not exist or are not applicable to the military environment, new practice standards are created. Such is the case for mild TBI. In 2009, the VA-DoD CPG for management of mild TBI/concussion was published and a system-wide clinical care program for mild TBI/concussion was introduced. This was the first large scale effort on an entire medical care system to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. In 2010, the VA-DoD CPG for management of PTSD was published. Nevertheless, both TBI and PTS are still incompletely understood. Investment in terms of money and effort has been committed by the DoD to their study. The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury are prominent examples of this effort. These are just beginnings, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always striving to provide the very best care to its military beneficiaries.

  9. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy-integration of canonical traumatic brain injury secondary injury mechanisms with tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hall, Edward D

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a new neurodegenerative tauopathy labeled Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), has been identified that is believed to be primarily a sequela of repeated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as concussion, that occurs in athletes participating in contact sports (e.g. boxing, American football, Australian football, rugby, soccer, ice hockey) or in military combatants, especially after blast-induced injuries. Since the identification of CTE, and its neuropathological finding of deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, mechanistic attention has been on lumping the disorder together with various other non-traumatic neurodegenerative tauopathies. Indeed, brains from suspected CTE cases that have come to autopsy have been confirmed to have deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau in locations that make its anatomical distribution distinct for other tauopathies. The fact that these individuals experienced repetitive TBI episodes during their athletic or military careers suggests that the secondary injury mechanisms that have been extensively characterized in acute TBI preclinical models, and in TBI patients, including glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, free radical-induced oxidative damage and neuroinflammation, may contribute to the brain damage associated with CTE. Thus, the current review begins with an in depth analysis of what is known about the tau protein and its functions and dysfunctions followed by a discussion of the major TBI secondary injury mechanisms, and how the latter have been shown to contribute to tau pathology. The value of this review is that it might lead to improved neuroprotective strategies for either prophylactically attenuating the development of CTE or slowing its progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between eye position on brain scan and hospital mortality in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frusch, K.J.; Houben, R.; Schreuder, F.H.B.M.; Postma, A.A.; Staals, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Conjugate eye deviation (CED) and horizontal skew deviation are often seen in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but its prognostic significance is unclear. In this study, the association between brain scan assessed eye position and hospital mortality in patients

  11. Mycotic brain aneurysm and cerebral hemorrhagic stroke: a pediatric case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-de-Lima, Filipa; Lisboa, Lurdes; Sarmento, António; Almeida, Jorge; Mota, Teresa

    2013-09-01

    Endocarditis due to Abiotrophia spp. is rare and often associated with negative blood cultures, infection relapse, and high rates of treatment failure and mortality (Lainscak et al., J Heart Valve Dis 14(1):33-36, 2005). The authors describe a case of an adolescent with cerebral hemorrhagic stroke due to mycotic brain aneurysm rupture.

  12. Neurofeedback and traumatic brain injury: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Geoffrey; Benson, Randall; Balon, Richard; Boutros, Nash

    2013-11-01

    Neurofeedback is a form of biofeedback whereby a patient can learn to control measurements of brain activity such as those recorded by an electroencephalogram. It has been explored as a treatment for sequelae of traumatic brain injury, although the use of neurofeedback remains outside the realm of routine clinical practice. Google Scholar™ was used to find 22 examples of primary research. Measures of symptom improvement, neuropsychological testing, and changes in subjects' quantitative electroencephalogram were included in the analysis. A single reviewer classified each study according to a rubric devised by 2 societies dedicated to neurofeedback research. All studies demonstrated positive findings, in that neurofeedback led to improvement in measures of impairment, whether subjective, objective, or both. However, placebo-controlled studies were lacking, some reports omitted important details, and study designs differed to the point where effect size could not be calculated quantitatively. Neurofeedback is a promising treatment that warrants double-blind, placebo-controlled studies to determine its potential role in the treatment of traumatic brain injury. Clinicians can advise that some patients report improvement in a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms after undergoing neurofeedback, although the treatment remains experimental, with no standard methodology.

  13. Twitter and traumatic brain injury: A content and sentiment analysis of tweets pertaining to sport-related brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workewych, Adriana M; Ciuffetelli Muzzi, Madeline; Jing, Rowan; Zhang, Stanley; Topolovec-Vranic, Jane; Cusimano, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Sport-related traumatic brain injuries are a significant public health burden, with hundreds of thousands sustained annually in North America. While sports offer numerous physical and social health benefits, traumatic brain injuries such as concussion can seriously impact a player's life, athletic career, and sport enjoyment. The culture in many sports encourages winning at all costs, placing athletes at risk for traumatic brain injuries. As social media has become a central part of everyday life, the content of users' messages often reflects the prevailing culture related to a particular event or health issue. We hypothesized that Twitter data might be useful for understanding public perceptions and misperceptions of sport-related traumatic brain injuries. We performed a content and sentiment analysis of 7483 Twitter® tweets related to traumatic brain injuries in sports collected during June and July 2013. We identified five major themes. Users tweeted about personal traumatic brain injuries experiences, reported traumatic brain injuries in professional athletes, shared research about sport-related concussions, and discussed policy and safety in injury prevention, such as helmet use. We identified mixed perceptions of and sentiment toward traumatic brain injuries in sports: both an understanding that brain injuries are serious and disregard for activities that might reduce the public burden of traumatic brain injuries were prevalent in our Twitter analysis. While the scientific and medical community considers a concussion a form of traumatic brain injuries, our study demonstrates a misunderstanding of this fact among the public. In our current digital age, social media can provide useful insight into the culture around a health issue, facilitating implementation of prevention and treatment strategies.

  14. Involvement of tau phosphorylation in traumatic brain injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, W-J; Chen, W; Chen, L; Guo, Y-J; Zeng, J-S; Li, G-Y; Tong, W-S

    2017-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In TBI patients suffering cognitive, emotional, and behavioral deficits, the leading cause derives from the physical injury to the central nervous system (CNS) that impairs brain function. Here, we applied a targeted approach to understand the potential mechanisms of neuron damage after TBI. Tau protein phosphorylation was compared in the brain tissues collected from patients underwent brain surgery based on the assessment of brain injury extent by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The results indicated that the levels of phosphorylated tau were significantly higher in the severe and extremely severe TBI groups, compared to the moderate group of patients. Phosphorylated, but not the total tau protein was uniquely correlated with the GCS score (R2 =.7849, P<.01) in 142 TBI patients. Consistently, the activities of key players associated with tau hyperphosphorylation GSK-3β and PP2A showed parallel correlations with the severity of TBI as well. These data suggest that the enhanced tau protein phosphorylation occurs upon severe neuron injures and may contribute to the pathological structural changes of CNS leading to brain damage of TBI. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Brain Cholinergic Function and Response to Rivastigmine in Patients With Chronic Sequels of Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östberg, Anna; Virta, Jere; Rinne, Juha O

    2017-01-01

    subjects for more than 1 year after at least moderate traumatic brain injury. Ten of the subjects were respondents and 7 nonrespondents to cholinergic medication. DESIGN:: Cholinergic function was assessed with [methyl-C] N-methylpiperidyl-4-acetate-PET (C-MP4A-PET), which reflects the activity...

  16. Graph Analysis of Functional Brain Networks in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide. Posttraumatic complaints are frequently reported, interfering with outcome. However, a consistent neural substrate has not yet been found. We used graph analysis to further unravel the complex interactions

  17. Sports-related mild traumatic brain injury in female youths

    OpenAIRE

    Keightley, Michelle L.; Yule, Ashley; Garland, Kimberley; Reed, Nicholas; McAuliffe, Jim; Garton, Janice; Green, Stephanie; Taha, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in children who participate in organised sports. We describe two case studies involving 14-year-old girls who each sustained a mTBI during ice hockey competition. Neurocognitive functioning post-injury is compared to baseline pre-injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II) and the Attention Netw...

  18. Neurobehavioral Effects of Levetiracetam in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared F Benge

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the leading causes of acquired epilepsy. Prophylaxis for seizures is the standard of care for individuals with moderate to severe injuries at risk for developing seizures, though relatively limited comparative data is available to guide clinicians in their choice of agents. There have however been experimental studies which demonstrate potential neuroprotective qualities of levetiracetam after TBI, and in turn there is hope that eventually such agents may improve neurobehavioral outcomes post-TBI. This mini-review summarizes the available studies and suggests areas for future studies.

  19. Medical management of noncognitive sequelae of minor traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, G C

    1997-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) encompasses the postconcussion syndrome characterized by symptoms that include a variety of physical symptoms as well as cognitive and behavioral impairments. The focus of this discussion is on the medical management of posttraumatic headaches, posttraumatic seizures, dizziness, auditory impairments, anosmia, tremor, paraspinal pain, and visual symptoms. Adjustment disorders with disturbances of affect and emotion lability also may accompany mild TBI. All of these conditions may be approached with medications or a variety of therapy techniques or both. The approach to concussion in sports-related injuries is also reviewed.

  20. Development of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    of imaging may provide a means for monitor- ing longitudinal changes in iron content in dementia, multiple sclerosis , traumatic brain injury, and...criteria: Patients aged 18 or older with an initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3 13-15 in ED with any period of loss of consciousness less than 30...n=18), 61% 8 were men and 39% women, and the average patient age was 34.83±14.30 years. There 9 was no age difference between patient and controls

  1. Brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury: an exploratory study by repeated magnetic resonance examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannsjö, Marianne; Raininko, Raili; Bustamante, Mariana; von Seth, Charlotta; Borg, Jörgen

    2013-09-01

    To explore brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury by repeated magnetic resonance examination. A prospective follow-up study. Nineteen patients with mild traumatic brain injury presenting with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) 14-15. The patients were examined on day 2 or 3 and 3-7 months after the injury. The magnetic resonance protocol comprised conventional T1- and T2-weighted sequences including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), two susceptibility-weighted sequences to reveal haemorrhages, and diffusion-weighted sequences. Computer-aided volume comparison was performed. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire (RPQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE). At follow-up, 7 patients (37%) reported ≥  3 symptoms in RPQ, 5 reported some anxiety and 1 reported mild depression. Fifteen patients reported upper level of good recovery and 4 patients lower level of good recovery (GOSE 8 and 7, respectively). Magnetic resonance pathology was found in 1 patient at the first examination, but 4 patients (21%) showed volume loss at the second examination, at which 3 of them reported brain volume, demonstrated by computer-aided magnetic resonance imaging volumetry, may be a feasible marker of brain pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

  2. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a neurodegenerative consequence of repetitive traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Patrick T; Montenigro, Philip H; Solomon, Todd M; McKee, Ann C

    2015-02-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that develops as a result of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is characterized by a unique pattern of accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons and astrocytes. The tau abnormalities begin focally and perivascularly at the depths of the cerebral sulci, spread to the superficial layers of the adjacent cortex, and eventually become widespread throughout the medial temporal lobes, diencephalon, and brainstem. Abnormalities in 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are also found in most cases of CTE. To date, CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathological examination, although there are many ongoing research studies examining imaging techniques and biomarkers that might prove to have diagnostic utility. Currently, the incidence and prevalence of CTE are unknown, although great strides are being made to better understand the clinical symptoms and signs of CTE. Further research is critically needed to better identify the genetic and environmental risk factors for CTE as well as potential rehabilitation and therapeutic strategies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Potential risk factors for developing heterotopic ossification in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, P.J. van; Martina, J.D.; Vos, P.E.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Hendricks, H.T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The current preliminary study is intended to provide additional data on the potential roles that brain injury severity, concomitant orthopaedic trauma, and specific intensive care complicating

  4. Resilience Is Associated with Outcome from Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losoi, Heidi; Silverberg, Noah D; Wäljas, Minna; Turunen, Senni; Rosti-Otajärvi, Eija; Helminen, Mika; Luoto, Teemu Miikka Artturi; Julkunen, Juhani; Öhman, Juha; Iverson, Grant L

    2015-07-01

    Resilient individuals manifest adaptive behavior and are better able to recover from adversity. The association between resilience and outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is examined, and the reliability and validity of the Resilience Scale and its short form in mTBI research is evaluated. Patients with mTBI (n=74) and orthopedic controls (n=39) completed the Resilience Scale at one, six, and 12 months after injury. Additionally, self-reported post-concussion symptoms, fatigue, insomnia, pain, post-traumatic stress, and depression, as well as quality of life, were evaluated. The internal consistency of the Resilience Scale and the short form ranged from 0.91 to 0.93 for the mTBI group and from 0.86 to 0.95 for controls. The test-retest reliability ranged from 0.70 to 0.82. Patients with mTBI and moderate-to-high resilience reported significantly fewer post-concussion symptoms, less fatigue, insomnia, traumatic stress, and depressive symptoms, and better quality of life, than the patients with low resilience. No association between resilience and time to return to work was found. Resilience was associated with self-reported outcome from mTBI, and based on this preliminary study, can be reliably evaluated with Resilience Scale and its short form in those with mTBIs.

  5. The Relationship of Hematoma Size and Mortality in Non-Traumatic Intra-Cerebral Hemorrhages in Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ahmadi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Among all of the neurologic diseases in adult life, the cerebrovascular disease (CVD is the most common and important ones. Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH in basal ganglia (BG is one of the common and major types of CVD. The relations between clot size and mortality rate, in different parts of the brain, has been addressed by several researchers. It is unclear whether such a relationship is in BG. Therefore this study was designed to find a formula that predicts outcome of hemorrhage based on clot size in BG.Materials & Methods: This descriptive-comparative study that was carried out prospectively, conducted on all 63 patients who admitted to the hospital during one year, with definite diagnosis of ICH in BG. After urgent CT scanning, the size of hematoma was determined by scan images. Routine treatment was uniform for all patients. Focal signs and consciousness state were assessed in the first and last days of admission. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, frequency tables and chi-square and T- test. Results: 33% of patients died. Hematoma size in 70% of them was larger than 5cm and in other 30% smaller. None of the hematoma with less than 4cm size was fatal. In patients with clots of 5cm or larger, the mortality was 100%. Conclusion: The results indicated that, there was meaningful relationship between hematoma size and mortality, in BG hemorrhages. So the clot size can be used as a factor in predicting hemorrhage outcome in BG.

  6. Telephone Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-2-0109 TITLE: Telephone -Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain Following Traumatic Brain Injury...2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Telephone -Delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Following Traumatic...evaluate the efficacy of a telephone -delivered cognitive behavioral treatment (T-CBT) in Veterans with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) for the

  7. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-05

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury. Fact Sheet = Lesion Cerebral Traumatica (TBI). Hojas Informativas Sobre Discapacidades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This fact sheet, written in both English and Spanish, offers general information about traumatic brain injury. Information includes a definition, incidence, individual characteristics, and educational implications. The signs of traumatic brain injury are listed and include physical disabilities, difficulties with thinking, and social, behavioral,…

  9. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  10. Subacute posttraumatic complaints and psychological distress in trauma patients with or without mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, M.E.; Gareb, Barzi; El Moumni, M.; Scheenen, M. E.; van der Horn, H. J.; Timmerman, M. E.; Spikman, J. M.; van der Naalt, J.

    Objective: To identify the frequency, nature and profile of complaints for trauma patients with and without mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and to assess their relation to anxiety and depression. Methods: A prospective cohort study in a level-one trauma centre was conducted. Mild traumatic brain

  11. Placebo-controlled trial of amantadine for severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacino, Joseph T; Whyte, John; Bagiella, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Amantadine hydrochloride is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness after traumatic brain injury. Preliminary studies have suggested that amantadine may promote functional recovery.......Amantadine hydrochloride is one of the most commonly prescribed medications for patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness after traumatic brain injury. Preliminary studies have suggested that amantadine may promote functional recovery....

  12. Minocycline and N-acetylcysteine: A Synergistic Drug Combination to Treat Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    TBI (“Multidrug treatment of traumatic brain injury”, PT073028) from the Fiscal Year 2007 CDMRP program for Psychological Health/Traumatic Brain...ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20166806). Inman, C.F., et al., 2005. Validation of computer-assisted, pixel-based analysis of multiple- colour immunofluorescence

  13. Facilitated assessment of tissue loss following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders eHånell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available All experimental models of traumatic brain injury (TBI result in a progressive loss of brain tissue. The extent of tissue loss reflects the injury severity and can be measured to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of experimental treatments. Quantitation of tissue volumes is commonly performed using evenly spaced brain sections stained using routine histochemical methods and digitally captured. The brain tissue areas are then measured and the corresponding volumes are calculated using the distance between the sections. Measurements of areas are usually performed using a general purpose image analysis software and the results are then transferred to another program for volume calculations. To facilitate the measurement of brain tissue loss we developed novel algorithms which automatically separate the areas of brain tissue from the surrounding image background and identify the ventricles. We implemented these new algorithms by creating a new computer program (SectionToVolume which also has functions for image organization, image adjustments and volume calculations. We analyzed brain sections from mice subjected to severe focal TBI using both SectionToVolume and ImageJ, a commonly used image analysis program. The volume measurements made by the two programs were highly correlated and analysis using SectionToVolume required considerably less time. The inter-rater reliability was high. Given the extensive use of brain tissue loss measurements in TBI research, SectionToVolume will likely be a useful tool for TBI research. We therefore provide both the source code and the program as attachments to this article.

  14. Traumatic brain injury: a review of pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sande, Allison; West, Chad

    2010-04-01

    To review current information regarding the pathophysiology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to outline appropriate patient assessment, diagnostic, and therapeutic options. TBI in veterinary patients can occur subsequent to trauma induced by motor vehicle accidents, falls, and crush injuries. Primary brain injury occurs at the time of initial impact as a result of direct mechanical damage. Secondary brain injury occurs in the minutes to days following the trauma as a result of systemic extracranial events and intracranial changes. The initial diagnosis is often made based on history and physical examination. Assessment should focus on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems followed by a complete neurologic examination. Advanced imaging may be indicated in a patient that fails to respond to appropriate medical therapy. Primary brain injury is beyond the control of the veterinarian. Therefore, treatment should focus on minimizing the incidence or impact of secondary brain injury. Because of a lack of prospective or retrospective clinical data, treatment recommendations for veterinary TBI patients are primarily based on human and experimental studies and personal experience. Therapeutic guidelines have been developed that center on maintaining adequate cerebral perfusion. Severe head trauma is associated with high mortality in humans and animals. However, dogs and cats have a remarkable ability to compensate for loss of cerebral tissue. It is therefore important not to reach hasty prognostic conclusions based on initial appearance. Many pets go on to have a functional outcome and recover from injury.

  15. The significance of platelet count in traumatic brain injury patients on antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Pandit, Viraj; Meyer, David; Butvidas, Lynn; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Khalil, Mazhar; Tang, Andrew; Zangbar, Bardiya; O'Keeffe, Terence; Gries, Lynn; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Platelet dysfunction has been attributed to progression of initial intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) on repeat head computed tomographic (RHCT) scans in patients on prehospital antiplatelet therapy. However, there is little emphasis on the effect of platelet count and progression of ICH in patients with traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to determine the platelet count cutoff for progression on RHCT and neurosurgical intervention in patients on antiplatelet therapy. We performed a prospective cohort analysis of all traumatic brain injury patients with an ICH on prehospital antiplatelet therapy. Antiplatelet therapy was defined as aspirin, clopidogrel, or a combination of both. Admission platelet count was recorded and used for analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were plotted to identify the optimal platelet count for progression on RHCT scan and neurosurgical intervention in patients on antiplatelet therapy. A total of 264 patients were enrolled. Platelet count of 135,000/µL or less (area under the curve, 0.80) and platelet count of 95,000/µL or less (area under the curve, 0.92) were the optimal threshold points for progression on RHCT scan and neurosurgical intervention, respectively. Patients with platelet count of 135,000/µL or less were 12.4 times (95% confidence interval, 7.1-18.4) more likely to have progression on RHCT scan and patients with platelet count 95,000/µL or less were 31.5 times (95% confidence interval, 19.7-96.2) more likely to require neurosurgical intervention. A platelet count of less than 135,000/µL in patients on antiplatelet therapy is predictive of both radiographic and clinical worsening. This is a clinically relevant target intended to help tailor and improve management in patients on antiplatelet therapy. Therapeutic study, level III.

  16. Accuracy of brain multimodal monitoring to detect cerebral hypoperfusion after traumatic brain injury*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzat, Pierre; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Schoettker, Patrick; Bloch, Jocelyne; Daniel, Roy T; Levivier, Marc; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    To examine the accuracy of brain multimodal monitoring-consisting of intracranial pressure, brain tissue PO2, and cerebral microdialysis--in detecting cerebral hypoperfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Prospective single-center study. Patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Medico-surgical ICU, university hospital. Intracranial pressure, brain tissue PO2, and cerebral microdialysis monitoring (right frontal lobe, apparently normal tissue) combined with cerebral blood flow measurements using perfusion CT. Cerebral blood flow was measured using perfusion CT in tissue area around intracranial monitoring (regional cerebral blood flow) and in bilateral supra-ventricular brain areas (global cerebral blood flow) and was matched to cerebral physiologic variables. The accuracy of intracranial monitoring to predict cerebral hypoperfusion (defined as an oligemic regional cerebral blood flow < 35 mL/100 g/min) was examined using area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves. Thirty perfusion CT scans (median, 27 hr [interquartile range, 20-45] after traumatic brain injury) were performed on 27 patients (age, 39 yr [24-54 yr]; Glasgow Coma Scale, 7 [6-8]; 24/27 [89%] with diffuse injury). Regional cerebral blood flow correlated significantly with global cerebral blood flow (Pearson r = 0.70, p < 0.01). Compared with normal regional cerebral blood flow (n = 16), low regional cerebral blood flow (n = 14) measurements had a higher proportion of samples with intracranial pressure more than 20 mm Hg (13% vs 30%), brain tissue PO2 less than 20 mm Hg (9% vs 20%), cerebral microdialysis glucose less than 1 mmol/L (22% vs 57%), and lactate/pyruvate ratio more than 40 (4% vs 14%; all p < 0.05). Compared with intracranial pressure monitoring alone (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, 0.74 [95% CI, 0.61-0.87]), monitoring intracranial pressure + brain tissue PO2 (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, 0.84 [0

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and NADPH Oxidase: A Deep Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Angeloni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents one of the major causes of mortality and disability in the world. TBI is characterized by primary damage resulting from the mechanical forces applied to the head as a direct result of the trauma and by the subsequent secondary injury due to a complex cascade of biochemical events that eventually lead to neuronal cell death. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the genesis of the delayed harmful effects contributing to permanent damage. NADPH oxidases (Nox, ubiquitary membrane multisubunit enzymes whose unique function is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, have been shown to be a major source of ROS in the brain and to be involved in several neurological diseases. Emerging evidence demonstrates that Nox is upregulated after TBI, suggesting Nox critical role in the onset and development of this pathology. In this review, we summarize the current evidence about the role of Nox enzymes in the pathophysiology of TBI.

  18. Alterations in nitric oxide homeostasis during traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Andrey V; Bahrami, Soheyl; Redl, Heinz; Szabo, Csaba

    2017-10-01

    Changes in nitric oxide (NO) levels have been often associated with various forms of trauma, including secondary damage after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several studies demonstrate the upregulation of NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, and concomitant increases in brain NO levels, which contribute to the TBI-associated glutamate cytotoxicity, including the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction. TBI is also associated with elevated NO levels in remote organs, indicating that TBI can induce systemic changes in NO regulation, which can be either beneficial or detrimental. Here we review the possible mechanisms responsible for changes in NO metabolism during TBI. Better understanding of the changes in NO homeostasis in TBI will be necessary to design rational therapeutic approaches for TBI. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Immune and Metabolic Alterations in Trauma and Sepsis edited by Dr. Raghavan Raju. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Recognition of nonverbal communication of emotion after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Julie; Parente, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who have had a traumatic brain injury (TBI) often have difficulty processing nonverbal communication (Ekman, 1976) The published research in this area has focused on a TBI patient's ability to recognize facial expression, vocal intonation, and postural expression (Croker, 2005; Hopkins, Dywan & Segalowitz, 2002). This study compared the non-verbal processing skills of brain-injured patients versus non-injured controls in all three domains. The stimuli were photographs of facial and postural expressions and audio recordings of intonational expressions. The results indicated that persons with TBI have particular difficulty recognizing non-verbal communication resulting from vocal intonations. The TBI patients had difficulty processing tonality, therefore, it is reasonable to suggest that clinicians, friends, and family members should emphasize the explicit verbal content of spoken language when speaking to a person with TBI.

  20. Multimodal Imaging of Neurometabolic Pathology due to Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bhattrai, Avnish; Irimia, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    The impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves a combination of complex biochemical processes beginning with the initial insult and lasting for days, months and even years post-trauma. These changes range from neuronal integrity losses to neurotransmitter imbalance and metabolite dysregulation, leading to the release of pro- or anti-apoptotic factors which mediate cell survival or death. Such dynamic processes affecting the brain's neurochemistry can be monitored using a variety of neuroimaging techniques, whose combined use can be particularly useful for understanding patient-specific clinical trajectories. Here, we describe how TBI changes the metabolism of essential neurochemical compounds, summarize how neuroimaging approaches facilitate the study of such alterations, and highlight promising ways in which neuroimaging can be used to investigate post-TBI changes in neurometabolism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Peritumoral and intratumoral hemorrhage after stereotactic radiosurgery for renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchini, Nello; Godowicz, Tomasz Tadeusz; Cavazzani, Paolo; Severi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), provides in a single session, a high dose of radiation to a localized brain tumor volume. Acute adverse reactions after treatment are not uncommon, but are usually transient and generally are well controlled by medication. The authors wish to report this rare complication of intratumoral and peritumoral hemorrhage immediately after LINAC SRS treatment of single temporal lobe metastasis from renal cell carcinoma and discuss plausible causes for this case and its management. A review of the literature on acute intracranial hemorrhage after radiosurgery for metastatic lesions is provided. A 68-year-old man underwent SRS treatment for a single left temporal lobe metastasis. No complications were noticed during frame fixation, treatment itself, or frame removal. Thirty minutes after the end of treatment session the patient acutely became aphasic and right hemiplegic. An urgent CT-scan revealed peritumoral and intratumoral hemorrhage. Patient underwent urgent surgical treatment during which was performed gross total excision of the brain metastasis and total removal of the clot. The patient had a good recovery after surgery and he was discharged with moderate aphasia but able to walk with no other neurological deficits. Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain tumors should not be considered as a risk-free procedure, especially in cases of neoplasms with high propensity for intratumoral bleeding and, while extremely rare, hemorrhagic complications can occur after treatment. The possibility of acute complications and their consequences have to be discussed with the patient and his or her relatives before radiosurgical treatment. PMID:29296311

  2. Brain hemorrhages in Jacobsen syndrome: A retrospective review of six cases and clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossfeld, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Jacobsen syndrome is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by distal deletions in the long arm of chromosome 11. All patients with Jacobsen syndrome have Paris-Trousseau syndrome, a bleeding disorder that causes neonatal thrombocytopenia, and persistent platelet dysfunction. Despite that, to date there are no reported cases of hemorrhagic strokes occurring in patients with Jacobsen syndrome. In the last 6 years at least six cases of brain hemorrhages in patients with Jacobsen syndrome have occurred. In this report, we perform a retrospective review of these six cases. The analysis indicates that the etiology of brain hemorrhages in Jacobsen syndrome is likely multifactorial. A likely cause (or causes) was identified in three of the cases, and additional potential risk factors were identified. Based on these findings, clinical recommendations are provided that should aid in the identification of those individuals with Jacobsen syndrome that are at increased risk for brain hemorrhages, and will hopefully decrease the occurrence of this devastating complication in people with Jacobsen syndrome.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Persistent post-traumatic headache vs. migraine: an MRI study demonstrating differences in brain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Chong, Catherine D; Peplinski, Jacob; Ross, Katherine; Berisha, Visar

    2017-08-22

    The majority of individuals with post-traumatic headache have symptoms that are indistinguishable from migraine. The overlap in symptoms amongst these individuals raises the question as to whether post-traumatic headache has a unique pathophysiology or if head trauma triggers migraine. The objective of this study was to compare brain structure in individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache (i.e. headache lasting at least 3 months following a traumatic brain injury) attributed to mild traumatic brain injury to that of individuals with migraine. Twenty-eight individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury and 28 individuals with migraine underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging on a 3 T scanner. Regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and curvature measurements were calculated from T1-weighted sequences and compared between subject groups using ANCOVA. MRI data from 28 healthy control subjects were used to interpret the differences in brain structure between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache. Differences in regional volumes, cortical thickness, surface area and brain curvature were identified when comparing the group of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache to the group with migraine. Structure was different between groups for regions within the right lateral orbitofrontal lobe, left caudal middle frontal lobe, left superior frontal lobe, left precuneus and right supramarginal gyrus (p comparing the migraine cohort to healthy controls. In conclusion, persistent post-traumatic headache and migraine are associated with differences in brain structure, perhaps suggesting differences in their underlying pathophysiology. Additional studies are needed to further delineate similarities and differences in brain structure and function that are associated with post-traumatic headache and migraine and to determine their specificity for each of the headache types.

  4. Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury for Human Vergence Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Tyler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Traumatic brain injury involving loss of consciousness has focal effects in the human brainstem, suggesting that it may have particular consequences for eye movement control. This hypothesis was investigated by measurements of vergence eye movement parameters.Methods: Disparity vergence eye movements were measured for a population of 123 normally-sighted individuals, 26 of whom had suffered diffuse traumatic brain injury (dTBI in the past, while the remainder served as controls. Vergence tracking responses were measured to sinusoidal disparity modulation of a random-dot field. Disparity vergence step responses were characterized in terms of their dynamic parameters separately for the convergence and divergence directions.Results: The control group showed notable differences between convergence and divergence dynamics. The dTBI group showed significantly abnormal vergence behavior on many of the dynamic parameters.Conclusions: The support the hypothesis that occult injury to the oculomotor control system is a common residual outcome of dTBI.

  5. Traumatic brain injury: future assessment tools and treatment prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Flanagan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Steven R Flanagan1, Joshua B Cantor2, Teresa A Ashman21New York University School of Medicine, The Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is widespread and leads to death and disability in millions of individuals around the world each year. Overall incidence and prevalence of TBI are likely to increase in absolute terms in the future. Tackling the problem of treating TBI successfully will require improvements in the understanding of normal cerebral anatomy, physiology, and function throughout the lifespan, as well as the pathological and recuperative responses that result from trauma. New treatment approaches and combinations will need to be targeted to the heterogeneous needs of TBI populations. This article explores and evaluates the research evidence in areas that will likely lead to a reduction in TBI-related morbidity and improved outcomes. These include emerging assessment instruments and techniques in areas of structural/chemical and functional neuroimaging and neuropsychology, advances in the realms of cell-based therapies and genetics, promising cognitive rehabilitation techniques including cognitive remediation and the use of electronic technologies including assistive devices and virtual reality, and the emerging field of complementary and alternative medicine.Keywords: traumatic brain injury, assessments, treatments

  6. Brain volume loss contributes to arousal and empathy dysregulation following severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye; Fisher, Alana C; Kornfeld, Emma J; De Blasio, Frances M; Parks, Nicklas; Piguet, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) often leads to deficits in physiological arousal and empathy, which are thought to be linked. This study examined whether injury-related brain volume loss in key limbic system structures is associated with these deficits. Twenty-four adults with TBI and 24 matched Controls underwent MRI scans to establish grey matter volumes in the amygdala, thalamus, and hippocampus. EEG and skin conductance levels were recorded to index basal physiological arousal. Self-report emotional empathy levels were also assessed. The TBI group had reduced brain volumes, topographic alpha differences, and lower emotional empathy compared to Controls. Regional brain volumes were differentially correlated to arousal and self-report empathy. Importantly, lower volume in pertinent brain structures correlated with lower empathy, for participants with and without TBI. Overall we provide new insights into empathic processes after TBI and their relationship to brain volume loss.

  7. Brain volume loss contributes to arousal and empathy dysregulation following severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline A. Rushby

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI often leads to deficits in physiological arousal and empathy, which are thought to be linked. This study examined whether injury-related brain volume loss in key limbic system structures is associated with these deficits. Twenty-four adults with TBI and 24 matched Controls underwent MRI scans to establish grey matter volumes in the amygdala, thalamus, and hippocampus. EEG and skin conductance levels were recorded to index basal physiological arousal. Self-report emotional empathy levels were also assessed. The TBI group had reduced brain volumes, topographic alpha differences, and lower emotional empathy compared to Controls. Regional brain volumes were differentially correlated to arousal and self-report empathy. Importantly, lower volume in pertinent brain structures correlated with lower empathy, for participants with and without TBI. Overall we provide new insights into empathic processes after TBI and their relationship to brain volume loss.

  8. Brain stimulation: Neuromodulation as a potential treatment for motor recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, E; Kinley-Cooper, S K; Weber, R A; Adkins, D L

    2016-06-01

    There is growing evidence that electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function and motor learning following brain damage. Rodent and primate studies have strongly demonstrated that combining cortical stimulation (CS) with skilled motor rehabilitative training enhances functional motor recovery following stroke. Brain stimulation following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is less well studied, but early pre-clinical and human pilot studies suggest that it is a promising treatment for TBI-induced motor impairments as well. This review will first discuss the evidence supporting brain stimulation efficacy derived from the stroke research field as proof of principle and then will review the few studies exploring neuromodulation in experimental TBI studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. The Parkland Protocol's modified Berne-Norwood criteria predict two tiers of risk for traumatic brain injury progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorek, Rachel A; Cripps, Michael W; Bernstein, Ira H; Scott, William W; Madden, Christopher J; Rickert, Kim L; Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herb A

    2014-10-15

    As a basis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis after traumatic brain injury (TBI), we have previously published an algorithm known as the Parkland Protocol. Patients are classified by risk for spontaneous progression of hemorrhage with chemoprophylaxis regimens tailored to each tier. We sought to validate this schema. In our algorithm, patients with any of the following are classified "low risk" for spontaneous progression: subdural hemorrhage ≤8 mm thick; epidural hemorrhage ≤8 mm thick; contusions ≤20 mm in diameter; a single contusion per lobe; any amount of subarachnoid hemorrhage; or any amount of intraventricular hemorrhage. Patients with any injury exceeding these are "moderate risk" for progression, and any patient receiving a monitor or craniotomy is "high risk." From February 2010 to November 2012, TBI patients were entered into a dedicated database tracking injury types and sizes, risk category at presentation, and progression on subsequent computed tomgraphies (CTs). The cohort (n=414) was classified as low risk (n=200), moderate risk (n=75), or high risk (n=139) after first CT. After repeat CT scan, radiographic progression was noted in 27% of low-risk, 53% of moderate-risk, and 58% of high-risk subjects. Omnibus analysis of variance test for differences in progression rates was highly significant (p<0.0001). Tukey's post-hoc test showed the low-risk progression rate to be significantly different than both the moderate- and high-risk arms; no difference was noted between the moderate- and high-risk arms themselves. These criteria are a valid tool for classifying TBI patients into two categories of risk for spontaneous progression. This supports tailored chemoprophylaxis regimens for each arm.

  10. Hypertonic Saline Resuscitation Restores Inflammatory Cytokine Balance in Post-Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhind, Shawn G; Rizoli, Sandro B; Shek, Pang N; Inaba, Kenji; Filips, Dennis; Tien, Homer; Brenneman, Fred; Rotstein, Ori D

    2004-01-01

    .... Early monocyte dysregulation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are thought to play a key role in the development of post-traumatic multi-organ dysfunction in resuscitated trauma patients...

  11. ECONOMIC LOSSES CAUSED BY TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Valiulina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Currently, analyzing the economic losses caused by health problems in population is of particular importance since it stipulates calculations of the volumes invested in healthcare systems in order to improve population’s health. Objective: The aim of our study was to find out economic losses caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI in children. Methods: The given work has utilized governmental statistical reports for Russia, for federal regions as well as for individual subjects. Direct medical expenses (medical services and indirect expenses (losses due to a temporary disability of parents having a sick child were calculated both in general and per patient. Results: Among all the direct medical costs of treatment of children with TBI inpatient care costs account for 85%. In the Central and Volga Federal District accounted for half of nationwide spending in general, brain injury and to provide certain kinds of healthcare. The structure of Russian costs as a result of the incidence of TBI children Moscow accounts for 20%. In Moscow, the cost of treating cases of traumatic brain injury in children is 3.2 times higher than the average for Russia. The resulting calculations of the value of health care costs attributable to a case of child head injury, behind the cost of treatment of the case of a child with head trauma, calculated according to the standards of Russia and the territories. This difference in the whole RF is 23%. Conclusion: The obtained findings have shown that in 2010 in Russia the magnitude of losses caused by TBI incidence in children amounted to 3 billion roubles or 0.008% of the gross product 1.2 billion roubles of which were direct expenses. However, this figure is considerably lower of the real amount; it becomes evident after the analysis of direct medical expenses per one case of pediatric TBI. Our calculations have shown that in Russia and in its regions the amount of expenses per one TBI patient is a quarter less

  12. Low level laser therapy for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiuhe; Huang, Ying-Ying; Dhital, Saphala; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Whalen, Michael J.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) has been clinically applied for many indications in medicine that require the following processes: protection from cell and tissue death, stimulation of healing and repair of injuries, and reduction of pain, swelling and inflammation. One area that is attracting growing interest is the use of transcranial LLLT to treat stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). The fact that near-infrared light can penetrate into the brain would allow non-invasive treatment to be carried out with a low likelihood of treatment-related adverse events. LLLT may have beneficial effects in the acute treatment of brain damage injury by increasing respiration in the mitochondria, causing activation of transcription factors, reducing key inflammatory mediators, and inhibiting apoptosis. We tested LLLT in a mouse model of TBI produced by a controlled weight drop onto the skull. Mice received a single treatment with 660-nm, 810-nm or 980-nm laser (36 J/cm2) four hours post-injury and were followed up by neurological performance testing for 4 weeks. Mice with moderate to severe TBI treated with 660- nm and 810-nm laser had a significant improvement in neurological score over the course of the follow-up and histological examination of the brains at sacrifice revealed less lesion area compared to untreated controls. Further studies are underway.

  13. Traumatic brain injury: the lag between diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retsinas, J

    1993-01-01

    Ogburn described the "culture lag" between technology and attitudes, as people take time to assimilate new technologies, and new facts, into their worldviews. Traumatic brain injury is now a common diagnosis, thanks to neurosurgical expertise. Where thirty years ago mortality from head injuries was high, today mortality rates have improved dramatically; yet even while neurosurgeons spare thousands of people each year, our society struggles to develop appropriate rehabilitation protocols. To date, we are in the lag phase, between diagnosis and treatment. This paper discusses that lag, including reasons for the lack of an effective rehabilitation protocol (the paucity of funds for research, the nature of brain injuries per se), the reluctance of insurers to cover brain injury rehabilitation (the lengthy time involved in rehabilitation, the blurring between rehabilitation and long term care, the nature of experience-rated contracting to businesses for health care insurance, the burgeoning of proprietary brain injury rehabilitation centers), and the prospects for closing the gap in the near future. The paper concludes that preventive measures (seat belt laws, motorcycle helmet laws, laws for helmets in contact sports) allow policy-makers to confront the growing societal problem of the mounting census of head-injured, by avoiding that census and focusing instead on the prevention, or diminution, of future head injuries.

  14. Social dysfunction after pediatric traumatic brain injury: a translational perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P.; Catroppa, Cathy; Godfrey, Celia; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Shultz, Sandy R.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Anderson, Vicki; Semple, Bridgette D.

    2016-01-01

    Social dysfunction is common after traumatic brain injury (TBI), contributing to reduced quality of life for survivors. Factors which influence the emergence, development or persistence of social deficits after injury remain poorly understood, particularly in the context of ongoing brain maturation during childhood. Aberrant social interactions have recently been modeled in adult and juvenile rodents after experimental TBI, providing an opportunity to gain new insights into the underlying neurobiology of these behaviors. Here, we review our current understanding of social dysfunction in both humans and rodent models of TBI, with a focus on brain injuries acquired during early development. Modulators of social outcomes are discussed, including injury-related and environmental risk and resilience factors. Disruption of social brain network connectivity and aberrant neuroendocrine function are identified as potential mechanisms of social impairments after pediatric TBI. Throughout, we highlight the overlap and disparities between outcome measures and findings from clinical and experimental approaches, and explore the translational potential of future research to prevent or ameliorate social dysfunction after childhood TBI. PMID:26949224

  15. Hypothermia for neuroprotection in severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. There has been a constant search for therapeutic modalities in an attempt to reduce this burden, but till date, none of them have proved to have a significant clinical impact. The interest in whole-body hypothermia as a treatment modality for severe TBI arose from enthusiastic experiences with the patients having anoxic brain damage after cardiac arrest. However, despite numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs and systematic reviews, its role in improving the outcomes after TBI are still far from being certain to warrant its clinical usage. The concept that hypothermia may be beneficial in improving the outcomes after TBI evolved with the discovery that the final neuronal injury pattern after an ischemic event could be lessened by cooling the brain. Several subsequent animal studies and clinical trials have now been conducted, which have led the Brain Trauma Foundation to issue a Level III recommendation for the use of primary therapeutic hypothermia in the management of TBI. Induced hypothermia should logically be useful in improving the mortality and neurologic outcome after severe TBI. However, the beneficial, effect of hypothermia only exists in high-quality trials, and presently, there is no Level I or Level II evidence. The relative scarcity of high-quality data in this setting entails well-designed large multicentric RCT′s to prove any association if it exists.

  16. Sex, Gender, and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Angela

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this supplemental issue is to address major knowledge, research, and clinical practice gaps regarding the limited focus on brain injury in girls and women as well as limited analysis of the effect of sex and gender in research on acquired brain injury. Integrating sex and gender in research is recognized as leading to better science and, ultimately, to better clinical practice. A sex and gender analytical approach to rehabilitation research is crucial to understanding traumatic brain injury and improving quality of life outcomes for survivors. Put another way, the lack of focus on sex and gender reduces the rigor of research design, the generalizability of study findings, and the effectiveness of clinical implementation and knowledge dissemination practices. The articles in this supplement examine sex and gender using a variety of methodological approaches and research contexts. Recommendations for future research on acquired brain injury that consciously incorporates sex and gender are made throughout this issue. This supplement is a product of the Girls and Women with ABI Task Force of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional neuroimaging of traumatic brain injury: advances and clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irimia A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Irimia, John Darrell Van Horn USC Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Functional deficits due to traumatic brain injury (TBI can have significant and enduring consequences upon patients’ life quality and expectancy. Although functional neuroimaging is essential for understanding TBI pathophysiology, an insufficient amount of effort has been dedicated to the task of translating functional neuroimaging findings into information with clinical utility. The purpose of this review is to summarize the use of functional neuroimaging techniques – especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and electroencephalography – for advancing current knowledge of TBI-related brain dysfunction and for improving the rehabilitation of TBI patients. We focus on seven core areas of functional deficits, namely consciousness, motor function, attention, memory, higher cognition, personality, and affect, and, for each of these, we summarize recent findings from neuroimaging studies which have provided substantial insight into brain function changes due to TBI. Recommendations are also provided to aid in setting the direction of future neuroimaging research and for understanding brain function changes after TBI. Keywords: cognitive decline, personality change, magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging

  18. Peer relationships of children with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy; Dennis, Maureen; Rubin, Kenneth H; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn

    2013-05-01

    This study examined peer relationships in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) relative to children with orthopedic injuries (OI), and explored whether differences in peer relationships correlated with white matter volumes. Classroom procedures were used to elicit peer perceptions of social behavior, acceptance, and friendships for eighty-seven 8- to 13-year-old children, 15 with severe TBI, 40 with complicated mild/moderate TBI, and 32 with OI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) were used to investigate volumetric correlates of peer relationship measures. Children with severe TBI were rated higher in rejection-victimization than children with OI, and were less likely than children with OI to have a mutual friendship in their classroom (47% vs. 88%). Children with TBI without a mutual friend were rated lower than those with a mutual friend on sociability-popularity and prosocial behavior and higher on rejection-victimization, and had lower peer acceptance ratings. Mutual friendship ratings were related to white matter volumes in several posterior brain regions, but not to overall brain atrophy. Severe TBI in children is associated with detrimental peer relationships that are related to focal volumetric reductions in white matter within regions of the brain involved in social information-processing.

  19. Point-of-Care Ultrasound for the Detection of Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage in Infants: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Taylor; Chilstrom, Mikaela; Childs, Jeannine; McGarry, Ryan; Seif, Dina; Mailhot, Thomas; Perera, Phillips; Kang, Tarina; Claudius, Ilene

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography is the criterion standard imaging modality to detect intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in children and infants after closed head injury, but its use can be limited by patient instability, need for sedation, and risk of ionizing radiation exposure. Cranial ultrasound is used routinely to detect intraventricular hemorrhage in neonates. We sought to determine if point-of-care (POC) cranial ultrasound performed by emergency physicians can detect traumatic ICH in infants. Infants with ICH diagnosed by computed tomography were identified. For every infant with an ICH, 2 controls with symptoms and diagnoses unrelated to head trauma were identified. Point-of-care cranial ultrasound was performed by an emergency physician on all patients, and video clips were recorded. Two ultrasound fellowship-trained emergency physicians, blinded to the patients' diagnosis and clinical status, independently reviewed the ultrasound clips and determined the presence or absence of ICH. Twelve patients were included in the study, 4 with ICH and 8 controls. Observer 1 identified ICH with 100% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 40%-100%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 60%-100%). Observer 2 identified ICH with 50% sensitivity (95% CI, 9%-98%) and 87.5% specificity (95% CI, 47%-99%). Agreement between observers was 75%, κ = 0.4 (P = 0.079; 95% CI, 0-0.95). Traumatic ICH can be identified with POC cranial ultrasound by ultrasound fellowship-trained emergency physicians. Although variations between observers and wide confidence intervals preclude drawing meaningful conclusions about sensitivity and specificity from this sample, these results support the need for further investigation into the role of POC cranial ultrasound.

  20. [Autonomic dysfunction in children with traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, N; Febrer, A; Meléndez, M

    Autonomic dysfunction syndrome following traumatic brain injury is a situation involving adrenergic hyperactivity produced by the lack of control over the autonomous nervous system at a central level. The difficulties involved in its therapeutic management make it even more important. We report the cases of a boy and a girl aged 6 and 12 years, respectively, who had suffered a severe traumatic brain injury with important brain damage that included diencephalic and mesencephalic compromise and areas of diffuse axonal injury. From the acute phase onwards, they presented episodes of hypertension, tachycardia, excessive sweating and spasticity in the form of attacks that initially led to a differential diagnosis between sepsis, opiate and/or benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome and epilepsy. The length of time spent in coma was very long and the attacks went on throughout the awakening phase almost until the moment they were discharged from hospital, despite trying different treatments. In our cases, orally administered baclofen and midazolam seemed to be the most effective. Autonomic dysfunction is difficult to manage. There are no standardised treatments and speculation continues with regard to its true promoter. We might think that the central injury is the cause of the process and that the autonomic dysfunction increases the secondary lesion and contributes to the functional worsening. If we take into account that the survival rate of the children is high despite the severity of the injuries and although the dysautonomia can be self-limiting with time, we believe that its treatment is essential if the ultimate aim is to minimise the sequelae.

  1. Exacerbation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury by Circulating Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Isla; Yates, Abi; Dale, Ashley; Roodselaar, Jay; Akbar, Naveed; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Anthony, Daniel C; Couch, Yvonne

    2018-02-15

    Inflammatory lesions in the brain activate a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is dependent on the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the circulation. The resulting APR is responsible for regulating leukocyte mobilization and subsequent recruitment to the brain. Factors that either exacerbate or inhibit the APR will also exacerbate or inhibit central nervous system (CNS) inflammation as a consequence and have the potential to influence ongoing secondary damage. Here, we were interested to discover how the circulating EV population changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how manipulation of the circulating EV pool impacts on the outcome of TBI. We found the number of circulating EVs increased rapidly post-TBI, and this was accompanied by an increase in CNS and hepatic leukocyte recruitment. In an adoptive transfer study, we then evaluated the outcomes of TBI after administering EVs derived from either in vitro macrophage or endothelial cell lines stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or from murine plasma from an LPS challenge using the air-pouch model. By manipulating the circulating EV population, we were able to demonstrate that each population of transferred EVs increased the APR. However, the characteristics of the response were dependent on the nature of the EVs; specifically, it was significantly increased when animals were challenged with macrophage-derived EVs, suggesting that the cellular origins of EVs may determine their function. Selectively targeting EVs from macrophage/monocyte populations is likely to be of value in reducing the impact of the systemic inflammatory response on the outcome of traumatic CNS injury.

  2. Traumatic brain injury in mice and pentadecapeptide BPC 157 effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Mario; Jandric, Ivan; Marovic, Anton; Gjurasin, Miroslav; Perovic, Darko; Radic, Bozo; Blagaic, Alenka Boban; Kolenc, Danijela; Brcic, Luka; Zarkovic, Kamelija; Seiwerth, Sven; Sikiric, Predrag

    2010-02-25

    Gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, an anti-ulcer peptide, efficient in inflammatory bowel disease trials (PL 14736), no toxicity reported, improved muscle crush injury. After an induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in mice by a falling weight, BPC 157 regimens (10.0microg, 10.0ng/kgi.p.) demonstrated a marked attenuation of damage with an improved early outcome and a minimal postponed mortality throughout a 24h post-injury period. Ultimately, the traumatic lesions (subarachnoidal and intraventricular haemorrhage, brain laceration, haemorrhagic laceration) were less intense and consecutive brain edema had considerably improved. Given prophylactically (30 min before TBI) the improved conscious/unconscious/death ratio in TBI-mice was after force impulses of 0.068 Ns, 0.093 Ns, 0.113 Ns, 0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, and 0.159 Ns. Counteraction (with a reduction of unconsciousness, lower mortality) with both microg- and ng-regimens included the force impulses of 0.068-0.145 Ns. A higher regimen presented effectiveness also against the maximal force impulse (0.159 Ns). Furthermore, BPC 157 application immediately prior to injury was beneficial in mice subjected to force impulses of 0.093 Ns-TBI. For a more severe force impulse (0.130 Ns, 0.145 Ns, or 0159 Ns), the time-relation to improve the conscious/unconscious/death ratio was: 5 min (0.130 Ns-TBI), 20 min (0.145 Ns-TBI) or 30 min (0.159 Ns-TBI). Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigations of primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T. W.; Josey, T.; Wang, Y.; Villanueva, M.; Ritzel, D. V.; Nelson, P.; Lee, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    The development of an advanced blast simulator (ABS) has enabled the reproducible generation of single-pulse shock waves that simulate free-field blast with high fidelity. Studies with rodents in the ABS demonstrated the necessity of head restraint during head-only exposures. When the head was not restrained, violent global head motion was induced by pressures that would not produce similar movement of a target the size and mass of a human head. This scaling artefact produced changes in brain function that were reminiscent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to impact-acceleration effects. Restraint of the rodent head eliminated these, but still produced subtle changes in brain biochemistry, showing that blast-induced pressure waves do cause brain deficits. Further experiments were carried out with rat brain cell aggregate cultures that enabled the conduct of studies without the gross movement encountered when using rodents. The suspension nature of this model was also exploited to minimize the boundary effects that complicate the interpretation of primary blast studies using surface cultures. Using this system, brain tissue was found not only to be sensitive to pressure changes, but also able to discriminate between the highly defined single-pulse shock waves produced by underwater blast and the complex pressure history exposures experienced by aggregates encased within a sphere and subjected to simulated air blast. The nature of blast-induced primary TBI requires a multidisciplinary research approach that addresses the fidelity of the blast insult, its accurate measurement and characterization, as well as the limitations of the biological models used.

  4. Endophenotypes of Dementia Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury in Retired Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    chronic  traumatic  encephalopathy  (CTE), post‐traumatic  stress disorder (PTSD), aging  Overall Project Summary  Task 1: Screen retired military service...in individuals with TBI exists, which has relevance for future treatment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain injury (TBI), dementia, chronic traumatic... encephalopathy (CTE), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), aging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES

  5. Effects of Recombinant Activated Factor VII in Traumatic Nonsurgical Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    temporal subdural, subarachnoid, and in- traparenchymal hemorrhages without mass effect or hernia - tion (Fig. 4). A linear frontal bone fracture was...hospital course, which required placement of a Camino bolt after the ventriculostomy became dislodged and attempted lumbar drain placement. Recovery

  6. Pre-Hospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsen Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. J Trauma Acute Care Surg 72(6):1714Y1718, 2012. 6. Marx G, Schuerholz T: Fluid-induced coagulopathy: does the...bleeding. J Trauma 61(6):1350Y1358, 2006. 44. Engels PT, Rezende-Neto JB, Al Mahroos M, Scarpelini S, Rizoli SB, Tien HC: The natural history of trauma

  7. Dimethyl fumarate treatment after traumatic brain injury prevents depletion of antioxidative brain glutathione and confers neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Tobias; Grob, Theresa; Menzel, Lutz; Hirnet, Tobias; Griemert, Eva; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Thal, Serge C; Methner, Axel; Schaefer, Michael K E

    2017-12-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an immunomodulatory compound to treat multiple sclerosis and psoriasis with neuroprotective potential. Its mechanism of action involves activation of the antioxidant pathway regulator Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 thereby increasing synthesis of the cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). The objective of this study was to investigate whether post-traumatic DMF treatment is beneficial after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Adult C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to controlled cortical impact followed by oral administration of DMF (80 mg/kg body weight) or vehicle at 3, 24, 48, and 72 h after the inflicted TBI. At 4 days after lesion (dal), DMF-treated mice displayed less neurological deficits than vehicle-treated mice and reduced histopathological brain damage. At the same time, the TBI-evoked depletion of brain GSH was prevented by DMF treatment. However, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 target gene mRNA expression involved in antioxidant and detoxifying pathways was increased in both treatment groups at 4 dal. Blood brain barrier leakage, as assessed by immunoglobulin G extravasation, inflammatory marker mRNA expression, and CD45 + leukocyte infiltration into the perilesional brain tissue was induced by TBI but not significantly altered by DMF treatment. Collectively, our data demonstrate that post-traumatic DMF treatment improves neurological outcome and reduces brain tissue loss in a clinically relevant model of TBI. Our findings suggest that DMF treatment confers neuroprotection after TBI via preservation of brain GSH levels rather than by modulating neuroinflammation. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  9. Clinical features of repetitive traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenigro, Philip H; Bernick, Charles; Cantu, Robert C

    2015-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a distinct pattern of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau). Thought to be caused by repetitive concussive and subconcussive injuries, CTE is considered largely preventable. The majority of neuropathologically confirmed cases have occurred in professional contact sport athletes (eg, boxing, football). A recent post-mortem case series has magnified concerns for the public's health following its identification in six high school level athletes. CTE is diagnosed with certainty only following a post-mortem autopsy. Efforts to define the etiology and clinical progression during life are ongoing. The goal of this article is to characterize the clinical concepts associated with short- and long-term effects of repetitive traumatic brain injury, with a special emphasis on new clinical diagnostic criteria for CTE. Utilizing these new diagnostic criteria, two cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE, one in a professional football player and one in a professional boxer, are reported. Differences in cerebellar pathology in CTE confirmed cases in boxing and football are discussed. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  11. A review of glutamate's role in traumatic brain injury mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Cameron H.

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter used by the central nervous system (CNS) for synaptic communication, and its extracellular concentration is tightly regulated by glutamate transporters located on nearby astrocytes. Both animal models and human clinical studies have demonstrated elevated glutamate levels immediately following a traumatic brain event, with the duration and severity of the rise corresponding to prognosis. This rise in extracellular glutamate likely results from a combination of excessive neurotransmitter release from damaged neurons and down regulation of uptake mechanisms in local astrocytes. The immediate results of a traumatic event can lead to necrotic tissue in severely injured regions, while prolonged increases in excitatory transmission can cause secondary excitotoxic injury through activation of delayed apoptotic pathways. Initial TBI animal studies utilized a variety of broad glutamate receptor antagonists to successfully combat secondary injury mechanisms, but unfortunately this same strategy has proven inconclusive in subsequent human trials due to deleterious side effects and heterogeneity of injuries. More recent treatment strategies have utilized specific glutamate receptor subunit antagonists in an effort to minimize side effects and have shown promising results. Future challenges will be detecting the concentration and kinetics of the glutamate rise following injury, determining which patient populations could benefit from antagonist treatment based on their extracellular glutamate concentrations and when drugs should be administered to maximize efficacy.

  12. Second language acquisition after traumatic brain injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połczyńska-Fiszer, M; Mazaux, J M

    2008-01-01

    Post-traumatic language and memory impairment, as well as a subsequent recovery in monolinguals have been widely documented in the literature, yet little is known about learning the second language after a severe head trauma followed by coma, as well as the relationship of this process with cognitive recovery, psychological status and quality of life. The present study investigates the relationship of learning the second language (English) in the process of rehabilitation, with quality of life in a Polish female university student who, as a result of a car accident, suffered a major closed-head injury and was comatose for a month. The subject was enrolled in an English learning program nine months after the trauma. The experiment lasted six months and comprised monthly meetings. The patient improved the major components of the second language, including vocabulary. Within the 6 months, the subject was gradually capable of learning additional and more complex lexical items. Learning the second language after traumatic brain injury may positively influence emotional well-being, self-esteem, and, perhaps, recovery of quality of life. A long-term beneficial effect of learning L2 was a consequential improvement of the patient's memory.

  13. The chronic and evolving neurological consequences of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lindsay; Stewart, William; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Horton, Lindsay; Menon, David K; Polinder, Suzanne

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have lifelong and dynamic effects on health and wellbeing. Research on the long-term consequences emphasises that, for many patients, TBI should be conceptualised as a chronic health condition. Evidence suggests that functional outcomes after TBI can show improvement or deterioration up to two decades after injury, and rates of all-cause mortality remain elevated for many years. Furthermore, TBI represents a risk factor for a variety of neurological illnesses, including epilepsy, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. With respect to neurodegeneration after TBI, post-mortem studies on the long-term neuropathology after injury have identified complex persisting and evolving abnormalities best described as polypathology, which includes chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Despite growing awareness of the lifelong consequences of TBI, substantial gaps in research exist. Improvements are therefore needed in understanding chronic pathologies and their implications for survivors of TBI, which could inform long-term health management in this sizeable patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Current status of fluid biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R.; Geddes, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) affects millions of people annually and is difficult to diagnose. Mild injury is insensitive to conventional imaging techniques and diagnoses are often made using subjective criteria such as self-reported symptoms. Many people who sustain a mTBI develop persistent post-concussive symptoms. Athletes and military personnel are at great risk for repeat injury which can result in second impact syndrome or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. An objective and quantifiable measure, such as a serum biomarker, is needed to aid in mTBI diagnosis, prognosis, return to play/duty assessments, and would further elucidate mTBI pathophysiology. The majority of TBI biomarker research focuses on severe TBI with few studies specific to mild injury. Most studies use a hypothesis-driven approach, screening biofluids for markers known to be associated with TBI pathophysiology. This approach has yielded limited success in identifying markers that can be used clinically, additional candidate biomarkers are needed. Innovative and unbiased methods such as proteomics, microRNA arrays, urinary screens, autoantibody identification and phage display would complement more traditional approaches to aid in the discovery of novel mTBI biomarkers. PMID:25981889

  15. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The cellular sequela to repetitive brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vile, Alexander R; Atkinson, Leigh

    2017-07-01

    This review aims to integrate current literature on the pathogenic mechanisms of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) to create a multifactorial understanding of the disease. CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, classed as a tauopathy, although it appears the pathogenic mechanisms are more complex than this. It affects those with a history of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. Currently, there are no treatments for CTE and the disease can only be affirmatively diagnosed in post mortem. Understanding the pathogenesis of the disease will provide an avenue to explore possible treatment and diagnostic modalities. The pathological hallmarks of CTE have been well characterised and have been linked to the pathophysiologic mechanisms in this review. Human studies are limited due to ethical implications of exposing subjects to head trauma. Phosphorylation of tau, microglial activation, TAR DNA-binding protein 43 and diffuse axonal injury have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of CTE. The neuronal loss and axonal dysfunction mediated by these pathognomonic mechanisms lead to the broad psycho-cognitive symptoms seen in CTE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration. PMID:23847533

  17. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  18. Cerebral Infarction after Traumatic Brain Injury: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Dong-Hyeon; Choi, Kyu-Sun; Yi, Hyeong-Joong; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Bak, Koang Hum

    2014-10-01

    Post-traumatic cerebral infarction (PTCI) is one of the most severe secondary insults after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and is known to be associated with poor outcome and high mortality rate. We assessed the practical incidence and risk factors for the development of PTCI. We conducted retrospective study on 986 consecutive patients with TBI from the period May 2005 to November 2012 at our institution. The definition of PTCI was made on non-enhanced CT scan based on a well-demarcated or fairly discernible region of low attenuation following specific vascular territory with normal initial CT. Clinical and radiological findings that related to patients' outcome were reviewed and statistically compared. PTCI was observed in 21 (2.1%) patients. Of various parameters, age (p=0.037), initial Glasgow coma scale score (paccident and PTCI, patterns of TBI and vascular territory of PTCI were not specific. The mortality rates were significantly higher in patients with PTCI than without PTCI. The development of PTCI is rare after TBI, but it usually results in serious outcome and high mortality. Early recognition for risks and aggressive managements is mandatory to prevent PTCI.

  19. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Cognitive Dysfunction following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall Rae Walker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  1. [Hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury: diagnostic and therapeutic issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoq, A-L; Chanson, P

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a well-known public health problem worldwide and is a leading cause of death and disability, particularly in young adults. Besides neurological and psychiatric issues, pituitary dysfunction can also occur after TBI, in the acute or chronic phase. The exact prevalence of post-traumatic hypopituitarism is difficult to assess due to the wide heterogeneity of published studies and bias in interpretation of hormonal test results in this specific population. Predictive factors for hypopituitarism have been proposed and are helpful for the screening. The pathophysiology of pituitary dysfunction after TBI is not well understood but the vascular hypothesis is privileged. Activation of pituitary stem/progenitor cells is probably involved in the recovery of pituitary functions. Those cells also play a role in the induction of pituitary tumors, highlighting their crucial place in pituitary conditions. This review updates the current data related to anterior pituitary dysfunction after TBI and discusses the bias and difficulties encountered in its diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic central venous oxygen saturation is associated with clot strength during traumatic hemorrhagic shock: A preclinical observational model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brophy Donald F

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clot strength by Thrombelastography (TEG is associated with mortality during trauma and has been linked to severity of tissue hypoperfusion. However, the optimal method for monitoring this important relationship remains undefined. We hypothesize that oxygen transport measurements will be associated with clot strength during traumatic shock, and test this hypothesis using a swine model of controlled traumatic shock. Methods N = 33 swine were subjected to femur fracture and hemorrhagic shock by controlled arterial bleeding to a predetermined level of oxygen debt measured by continuous indirect calorimetry. Hemodynamics, oxygen consumption, systemic central venous oxygenation (ScvO2, base excess, lactate, and clot maximal amplitude by TEG (TEG-MA as clot strength were measured at baseline and again when oxygen debt = 80 ml/kg during shock. Oxygen transport and metabolic markers of tissue perfusion were then evaluated for significant associations with TEG-MA. Forward stepwise selection was then used to create regression models identifying the strongest associations between oxygen transport and TEG-MA independent of other known determinants of clot strength. Results Multiple markers of tissue perfusion, oxygen transport, and TEG-MA were all significantly altered during shock compared to baseline measurements (p 2 demonstrated a strong bivariate association with TEG-MA measured during shock (R = 0.7, p 2 measured during shock was also selected by forward stepwise selection as an important covariate in linear regression models of TEG-MA after adjusting for the covariates fibrinogen, pH, platelet count, and hematocrit (Whole model R2 = 0.99, p ≤ 0.032. Conclusions Among multiple measurements of oxygen transport, only ScvO2 was found to retain a significant association with TEG-MA during shock after adjusting for multiple covariates. ScvO2 should be further studied for its utility as a clinical marker of both tissue hypoxia and clot

  3. Intra-Arterial Administration of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes Functional Recovery of the Brain After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silachev, D N; Plotnikov, E Yu; Babenko, V A; Danilina, T I; Zorov, L D; Pevzner, I B; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-08-01

    We compared the efficiency of delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells into the brain after their intravenous and intra-arterial injection. Analysis of the therapeutic effects of cells after experimental traumatic brain injury revealed improvement of the neurological status and motor functions of the damaged hemisphere, the effect being more pronounced after intraarterial injection of cells. Intra-arterial administration was followed by rapid infiltration of the cells into the brain tissue and their number considerably surpassed that after intravenous infusion. Targeted delivery of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells into the brain after their injection into the carotid arteries substantially potentiated their neuroprotective effects in traumatic brain injury.

  4. Normobaric oxygen worsens outcome after a moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Manga, Venkata Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted injury and a leading cause of death in children, young adults, and increasingly in Veterans. However, there are no neuroprotective agents clinically available to counteract damage or promote repair after brain trauma. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of normobaric oxygen (NBO) after a controlled cortical impact in rats. The central hypothesis was that NBO treatment would reduce lesion volume and functional deficits compared with air-treated animals after TBI by increasing brain oxygenation thereby minimizing ischemic injury. In a randomized double-blinded design, animals received either NBO (n = 8) or normal air (n = 8) after TBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 0 to 3 hours, and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. Behavioral assessments were performed before injury induction and before MRI scans on days 2, 7, and 14. Nissl staining was performed on day 14 to corroborate the lesion volume detected from MRI. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found that NBO treatment increased lesion volume in a rat model of moderate TBI and had no positive effect on behavioral measures. Our results do not promote the acute use of NBO in patients with moderate TBI.

  5. [Non verbal communication abilities in severe traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, S; Barat, M; Campan, M; Dehail, P; Joseph, P A; Mazaux, J-M

    2004-05-01

    Discursive abilities of severe brain injured patient are always impaired: loss of flexibility, lack of cohesion and coherence, often more elliptic. We know few about nonverbal competencies during discourse. The objective is to verify nonverbal abilities of these patients by pragmatic analysis. Four men were examined more than 7 years after severe traumatic brain injury. Nonverbal Prutting and Kirchner Pragmatic Protocol (1987) were done allowing to a qualitative and quantitative measurement of paralinguistic behaviour: prosody and quality of speech, facial expression, posture, gaze, gesture. Two conditions were recorded: dual (descriptive discourse) and group (conversational discourse). Associated impairments such as cognitive and dysexecutive functioning were also investigated. Impoverishment (loss of ability) or impaired inadequacity was observed in all patients. Paralinguistic competences of conversational discourse was worse than descriptive one. Facial expression, gaze functioning, referential gesture were more often impaired. Maladjustment could be interpretated in reference with dysexecutive syndrome. In spite of the lack of information about the range of normal pragmatic behaviour, it seems that brain injured patients have shown poor nonverbal abilities during discourse. Rehabilitation training of communication skills would integrate this fact in order to improve interactivity and social relationship.

  6. Astrocyte Hypertrophy Contributes to Aberrant Neurogenesis after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a widespread epidemic with severe cognitive, affective, and behavioral consequences. TBIs typically result in a relatively rapid inflammatory and neuroinflammatory response. A major component of the neuroinflammatory response is astrocytes, a type of glial cell in the brain. Astrocytes are important in maintaining the integrity of neuronal functioning, and it is possible that astrocyte hypertrophy after TBIs might contribute to pathogenesis. The hippocampus is a unique brain region, because neurogenesis persists in adults. Accumulating evidence supports the functional importance of these newborn neurons and their associated astrocytes. Alterations to either of these cell types can influence neuronal functioning. To determine if hypertrophied astrocytes might negatively influence immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, astrocyte and newborn neurons were analyzed at 30 days following a TBI in mice. The results demonstrate a loss of radial glial-like processes extending through the granule cell layer after TBI, as well as ectopic growth and migration of immature dentate neurons. The results further show newborn neurons in close association with hypertrophied astrocytes, suggesting a role for the astrocytes in aberrant neurogenesis. Future studies are needed to determine the functional significance of these alterations to the astrocyte/immature neurons after TBI.

  7. Investigating the changes in Inhibitory Neurons following two different models of Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Carron, Simone Francina

    2017-01-01

    Different forms of Traumatic brain injury (TBI) disrupt brain excitation/inhibition balance. This thesis examined changes in brain inhibition following two different types of brain injury and its consequences on behaviour. A key finding of this thesis is that particular forms of inhibition are altered after trauma confirming that susceptibility of brain inhibitory cells to trauma is brain area specific, injury type and time dependent. These findings have important implicatio...

  8. Glycolysis and the significance of lactate in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Linda Carpenter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In traumatic brain injury (TBI patients, elevation of the brain extracellular lactate concentration and the lactate/pyruvate ratio are well recognised, and are associated statistically with unfavourable clinical outcome. Brain extracellular lactate was conventionally regarded as a waste product of glucose, when glucose is metabolised via glycolysis (Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway to pyruvate, followed by conversion to lactate by the action of lactate dehydrogenase, and export of lactate into the extracellular fluid. In TBI, glycolytic lactate is ascribed to hypoxia or mitochondrial dysfunction, although the precise nature of the latter is incompletely understood. Seemingly in contrast to lactate’s association with unfavourable outcome is a growing body of evidence that lactate can be beneficial. The idea that the brain can utilise lactate by feeding into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle of neurons, first published two decades ago, has become known as the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis. Direct evidence of brain utilisation of lactate was first obtained 5 years ago in a cerebral microdialysis study in TBI patients, where administration of 13C-labelled lactate via the microdialysis catheter and simultaneous collection of the emerging microdialysates, with 13C NMR analysis, revealed 13C labelling in glutamine consistent with lactate utilisation via the TCA cycle. This suggests that where neurons are too damaged to utilise the lactate produced from glucose by astrocytes, i.e. uncoupling of neuronal and glial metabolism, high extracellular levels of lactate would accumulate, explaining association between high lactate and poor outcome. An intravenous exogenous lactate supplementation study in TBI patients showed evidence for a beneficial effect judged by surrogate endpoints. Here we review current knowledge about glycolysis and lactate in TBI, how it can be measured in patients, and whether it can be modulated to achieve better

  9. [HYPOTHERMIA INFLUENCES ON OXYGEN TENSION IN THE BRAIN PARENCHYMA IN PATIENTS WITH ANEURYSMAL SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudeev, S A; Popugaev, K A; Kruglyakov, N M; Belousova, K A; Terekhov, D A; Leushin, K Yu; Aronov, M S; Karpova, O V; Zelenkov, A V; Kiselev, K V; Fedin, A B; Zabelin, M V; Samoylov, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage is a serious medical and social problem. The main physiological mechanisms that determine secondary brain damage in this patients are intracranial hypertension, cerebral vasospasm, dysfunction of autoregulation mechanisms, violation of liquorodynamics and delayed cerebral ischemia. The multimodal neuromonitoring for prevention and timely correction ofsecondary brain injury factors has become routine practice in neuroICU. Measurement of oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma is one of neuromonitoring options. During the years of intensive use of this method in clinical practice the reasons for reducing the oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma were revealed, as well as developed and clinically validated algorithms for correction of such conditions. However, there are clinical situations that are difficult to interpret and even more difficult to make the right tactical and therapeutic solutions. We present the clinical observation of the patient with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, who had dramatically reduced brain intraparenchymal oxygen pressure although prolonged hypothermia were used. Despite this, the outcome was favorable. The analysis allowed to assume that the reason for this decrease in oxygen tension in the brain parenchyma could be hypothermia itself

  10. Molecular mechanisms of traumatic brain injury in children. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Pavan; Jagannathan, Jay

    2008-10-01

    Despite advances in molecular biology and genetics, the precise pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children is unknown. In this paper the authors review what is currently known about intra- and extracellular responses to pediatric TBI and relate these factors to future investigations. Although hyperemia and vascular congestion have long been thought to be the hallmarks of pediatric TBI, on a cellular level, calcium influx as well as modulation of local neurotransmitters appears to play a major role in its onset. Recent genetic and proteomic research has identified specific neurotrophic factors as well as apoptotic and antiapoptotic genes that appear to control the progression of inflammation and neuronal damage. The search for a therapeutic target will ultimately require a thorough understanding of these factors and their interplay on a proteomic, genomic, and neuromic level.

  11. Sports-related mild traumatic brain injury in female youths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Yule, Ashley; Garland, Kimberley; Reed, Nicholas; McAuliffe, Jim; Garton, Janice; Green, Stephanie; Taha, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in children who participate in organised sports. We describe two case studies involving 14-year-old girls who each sustained a mTBI during ice hockey competition. Neurocognitive functioning post-injury is compared to baseline pre-injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conners' Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II) and the Attention Network Test (ANT) revealed decreased performance in attention, memory functioning and reaction time. Furthermore, some measures had not returned to baseline at midseason testing sessions approximately 30–40 days post-injury. The results are discussed with respect to the difference in recovery profiles and the need for thorough and ongoing evaluation following mTBI in the paediatric population, and for girls in particular. PMID:22791784

  12. Alterations of natural killer cells in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiao-Dong; Bai, Sheng; Chen, Xin; Wei, Hui-Jie; Jin, Wei-Na; Li, Min-Shu; Yan, Yaping; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between natural killer (NK) cells and traumatic brain injury (TBI), we tracked an established phenotype of circulating NK cells at several time points in patients with different grades of TBI. In serial peripheral blood samples, NK cells were prospectively measured by flow cytometry of CD3(-) CD56(+) lymphocytes. Compared to healthy controls, TBI patients had reductions in both the percentage and the absolute number of NK cells. Furthermore, the magnitude of NK cell reduction correlated with the degree of TBI severity at several time points. That is, NK cell population size was independently associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores. In addition, at some time points, a positive correlation was found between the NK cell counts and Glasgow Outcome Scale scores. Our results indicate that TBI induces a reduction in the number of NK cells, and the magnitude of the reduction appears to parallel the severity of TBI.

  13. Spreading depolarizations and late secondary insults after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Strong, Anthony J; Fabricius, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Here we investigated the incidence of cortical spreading depolarizations (spreading depression and peri-infarct depolarization) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and their relationship to systemic physiologic values during neurointensive care. Subdural electrode strips were placed on peri......-contusional cortex in 32 patients who underwent surgical treatment for TBI. Prospective electrocorticography was performed during neurointensive care with retrospective analysis of hourly nursing chart data. Recordings were 84 hr (median) per patient and 2,503 hr in total. In 17 patients (53%), 280 spreading...... depolarizations (spreading depressions and peri-infarct depolarizations) were observed. Depolarizations occurred in a bimodal pattern with peak incidence on days 1 and 7. The probability of a depolarization occurring increased significantly as a function of declining mean arterial pressure (MAP; R(2) = 0.78; p...

  14. Supporting the literacy skills of adolescents with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Miriam; Byom, Lindsey; Meulenbroek, Peter; Richards, Stephanie; O'Brien, Katy

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can affect developmental trajectories as well as language, attention, memory, executive functions, and other cognitive skills related to literacy. Literacy demands change through adolescence and into young adulthood, with academic literacy demands increasing and vocational literacy demands being introduced. Speech-language pathology services must evolve with the literacy needs of each client. This article discusses assessment and treatment approaches designed for adolescents with TBI and recommendations for adapting literacy interventions from the learning disabilities literature. Through proper assessment and intervention, speech-language pathologists can have a meaningful impact on the academic and vocational literacy needs of adolescents with TBI. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Resilience in Families With Adolescents Suffering From Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin-Lepage, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Hélène; Malo, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to coconstruct the building blocks for an intervention program to support family resilience in conjunction with families with an adolescent suffering from traumatic brain injury and rehabilitation professionals. This is a qualitative and inductive study, supported by a collaborative research approach. Based on the complex intervention design and validation model, the investigator follows a three-stage data collection process: (1) identifying the building blocks of the intervention program in the eyes of families and rehabilitation professionals, (2) prioritizing, and (3) validating the building blocks with the same participants. After analyzing the data, the investigator identifies five encompassing themes as the building blocks of the intervention program. This study offers promising avenues for practitioners and researchers in nursing and other fields with respect to the implementation of concrete strategies to support the resilience process of families facing particularly difficult times in their lives. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  16. Decompressive laparotomy for refractory intracranial hypertension after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Jon D; Burns, Joseph D; Green, Deborah M; DeFusco, Christina; Agarwal, Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Intracranial hypertension is a crucial modifiable risk factor for poor outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Limited evidence suggests that decompressive laparotomy may be an effective treatment for refractory ICH in patients who have elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Case report. We present a multi-trauma patient who sustained severe TBI in a motor vehicle collision. Intracranial pressure (ICP) was initially medically managed but became refractory to standard therapies. Emergent decompressive laparotomy performed in the surgical intensive care unit for abdominal compartment syndrome concomitantly improved the patient's ICP. Elevated intra-abdominal pressure can exacerbate intracranial hypertension in patients with TBI. Recognition of this condition and treatment with decompressive laparotomy may be useful in patients with intracranial hypertension refractory to optimal medical therapy.

  17. Facial Expression Recognition for Traumatic Brain Injured Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilyas, Chaudhary Muhammad Aqdus; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the issues associated with facial expression recognition of Traumatic Brain Insured (TBI) patients in a realistic scenario. These patients have restricted or limited muscle movements with reduced facial expressions along with non-cooperative behavior, impaired...... reasoning and inappropriate responses. All these factors make automatic understanding of their expressions more complex. While the existing facial expression recognition systems showed high accuracy by taking data from healthy subjects, their performance is yet to be proved for real TBI patient data...... by considering the aforementioned challenges. To deal with this, we devised scenarios for data collection from the real TBI patients, collected data which is very challenging to process, devised effective way of data preprocessing so that good quality faces can be extracted from the patients facial video...

  18. Acknowledging the Risk for Traumatic Brain Injury in Women Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Timothy; Iverson, Katherine M

    2017-04-01

    Since the Iraq and Afghanistan wars began, an unprecedented number of women have been engaging in combat operations. Likewise, the number of women using Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) services has doubled since 2001. Military service, and deployment to combat in particular, poses certain risks for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-for all service members. However, women may have additional military and nondeployment risk factors such as intimate partner violence (IPV). We briefly review the definition and classification issues related to TBI, as well as common acute and chronic health symptoms after TBI. Specific sex differences in prognosis after TBI, in particular the neurobehavioral symptoms, are also reviewed. We then focus on the emerging literature regarding TBI in women veterans including the etiologies, outcomes, and unique challenges this population faces. The article concludes with suggestions for enhanced screening by VA and non-VA providers alike, as well as directions for future research and clinical inquiry.

  19. Neuropsychology of Neuroendocrine Dysregulation after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Zihl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine dysfunction is a common effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI. In addition to affecting the regulation of important body functions, the disruption of endocrine physiology can significantly impair mental functions, such as attention, memory, executive function, and mood. This mini-review focuses on alterations in mental functioning that are associated with neuroendocrine disturbances in adults who suffered TBI. It summarizes the contribution of hormones to the regulation of mental functions, the consequences of TBI on mental health and neuroendocrine homeostasis, and the effects of hormone substitution on mental dysfunction caused by TBI. The available empirical evidence suggests that comprehensive assessment of mental functions should be standard in TBI subjects presenting with hormone deficiency and that hormone replacement therapy should be accompanied by pre- and post-assessments.

  20. Catecholamines and Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Ortega, Juan F; Baguley, Ian J; Gates, Thomas A; Garcia-Caballero, Manuel; Quesada-Garcia, Juan G; Prieto-Palomino, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) affects a significant minority of people in the intensive care unit after severe traumatic brain injury. Systematic research has yet to elucidate or quantify the extent of the role of the catecholamines or adrenocortical and thyroid axis hormonal influences in the condition. Data were prospectively collected on 80 consecutive patients, 18 of whom developed clinical signs of PSH (22.5%). Catecholamine and hormonal data were collected sequentially at 4-h intervals or during and between episodes of PSH. Evaluated variables showed 200-300% increases in catecholamines and, to a lesser extent, adrenocortical hormones during paroxysms. The majority of PSH episodes (72%) were noted to be in response to an observable triggering event. These changes were not observed in subjects without PSH. These data go some way to explain why PSH produces adverse consequences in survivors of TBI with the condition.

  1. Effects of severe traumatic brain injury on visual memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, D H; Harris, D; O'Gorman, J G

    2000-02-01

    The study aimed to clarify the effects of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) on visual memory. Three groups of participants (14 late-recovery and 14 early-recovery TBI individuals and 18 controls) were administered the following: The Shum Visual Learning Test (SVLT), a test that measures the ability to remember visual patterns, an electronic maze test, a test that measures the ability to remember spatial positions, and the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), a test of verbal memory and learning. The individuals with TBI (late- and early-recovery) were found to be impaired on the SVLT and the RAVLT but not on the electronic maze. Specifically, on the SVLT, they were found to learn at a slower rate and make more false-positive errors than the controls. The advantages of the SVLT over visual memory tests used in previous studies and the significance of findings of the present study were discussed.

  2. Effect of Preferred Music on Agitation After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soohyun; Williams, Reg Arthur; Lee, Donghyun

    2016-04-01

    Agitation is a common behavioral problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which threatens the safety of patients and caregivers and disrupts the rehabilitation process. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a preferred music intervention on the reduction of agitation in TBI patients and to compare the effects of preferred music with those of classical "relaxation" music. A single group, within-subjects, randomized crossover trial design was formed, consisting of 14 agitated patients with cognitive impairment after severe TBI. Patients listened to preferred music and classical "relaxation" music, with a wash-out period in between. Patients listening to the preferred music reported a significantly greater reduction in agitation compared with the effect seen during the classical "relaxation" music intervention (p = .046). These findings provide preliminary evidence that the preferred music intervention may be effective as an environmental therapeutic approach for reducing agitation after TBI. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Depression after traumatic brain injury: a biopsychosocial cultural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Durga; Jayaram, Geetha; Vassila, Alex; Keach, Shari; Rao, Vani

    2015-02-01

    There are several challenges in diagnosing and treating mental illness amongst South Asians. Often times, formulating a patient's case presentation cannot adequately be accomplished strictly using a biopsychosocial model. The cultural components play an imperative role in explaining certain psychiatric symptoms and can guide treatment. With the growing population of immigrants coming to the United States, many of which require treatment for mental illness, it is essential that clinicians be cognizant in incorporating cultural perspectives when treating such patients. The authors describe the case of a 24-year old South Asian male who suffered an exacerbation of a depressive syndrome after a traumatic brain injury. Using a biopsychosocial cultural approach, this case highlights how South Asian cultural values can contribute to and incite psychiatric symptoms while simultaneously providing protective drivers for treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among correctional health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhasz, James E

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the prevalence of misconceptions of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among a sample of correctional health care professionals. Prior research has identified a high prevalence of TBI among criminal offenders, and misconceptions about TBI exist among laypersons and nonexpert professionals. Participants (N = 155) completed a 25-item survey about the sequelae of TBI. Results were compared with previous studies. This sample performed significantly better than laypersons and commensurable to other nonexpert professionals. Misconceptions were higher on items related to loss of consciousness, memory, and recovery. Gender, prior familiarity to someone with a history of TBI, and prior training in TBI accounted for statistically fewer misconceptions. The findings support the need for continued training and increased awareness about TBI among inmates.

  5. The effect of concomitant peripheral injury on traumatic brain injury pathobiology and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Stuart J; Sun, Mujun; Agoston, Denes V; Shultz, Sandy R

    2016-04-26

    Traumatic injuries are physical insults to the body that are prevalent worldwide. Many individuals involved in accidents suffer injuries affecting a number of extremities and organs, otherwise known as multitrauma or polytrauma. Traumatic brain injury is one of the most serious forms of the trauma-induced injuries and is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. Despite over dozens of phase III clinical trials, there are currently no specific treatments known to improve traumatic brain injury outcomes. These failures are in part due to our still poor understanding of the heterogeneous and evolving pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury and how factors such as concomitant extracranial injuries can impact these processes. Here, we review the available clinical and pre-clinical studies that have investigated the possible impact of concomitant injuries on traumatic brain injury pathobiology and outcomes. We then list the pathophysiological processes that may interact and affect outcomes and discuss promising areas for future research. Taken together, many of the clinical multitrauma/polytrauma studies discussed in this review suggest that concomitant peripheral injuries may increase the risk of mortality and functional deficits following traumatic brain injury, particularly when severe extracranial injuries are combined with mild to moderate brain injury. In addition, recent animal studies have provided strong evidence that concomitant injuries may increase both peripheral and central inflammatory responses and that structural and functional deficits associated with traumatic brain injury may be exacerbated in multiply injured animals. The findings of this review suggest that concomitant extracranial injuries are capable of modifying the outcomes and pathobiology of traumatic brain injury, in particular neuroinflammation. Though additional studies are needed to further identify the factors and mechanisms involved in central and peripheral injury

  6. The association between adverse childhood experiences and adult traumatic brain injury/concussion: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zechen; Bayley, Mark T; Perrier, Laure; Dhir, Priya; Dépatie, Lana; Comper, Paul; Ruttan, Lesley; Lay, Christine; Munce, Sarah E P

    2018-01-12

    Adverse childhood experiences are significant risk factors for physical and mental illnesses in adulthood. Traumatic brain injury/concussion is a challenging condition where pre-injury factors may affect recovery. The association between childhood adversity and traumatic brain injury/concussion has not been previously reviewed. The research question addressed is: What is known from the existing literature about the association between adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury/concussion in adults? All original studies of any type published in English since 2007 on adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury/concussion outcomes were included. The literature search was conducted in multiple electronic databases. Arksey and O'Malley and Levac et al.'s scoping review frameworks were used. Two reviewers independently completed screening and data abstraction. The review yielded six observational studies. Included studies were limited to incarcerated or homeless samples, and individuals at high-risk of or with mental illnesses. Across studies, methods for childhood adversity and traumatic brain injury/concussion assessment were heterogeneous. A positive association between adverse childhood experiences and traumatic brain injury occurrence was identified. The review highlights the importance of screening and treatment of adverse childhood experiences. Future research should extend to the general population and implications on injury recovery. Implications for rehabilitation Exposure to adverse childhood experiences is associated with increased risk of traumatic brain injury. Specific types of adverse childhood experiences associated with risk of traumatic brain injury include childhood physical abuse, psychological abuse, household member incarceration, and household member drug abuse. Clinicians and researchers should inquire about adverse childhood experiences in all people with traumatic brain injury as pre-injury health conditions can

  7. What is the Relationship of Traumatic Brain Injury to Dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mario F

    2017-01-01

    There is a long history linking traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the development of dementia. Despite significant reservations, such as recall bias or concluding causality for TBI, a summary of recent research points to several conclusions on the TBI-dementia relationship. 1) Increasing severity of a single moderate-to-severe TBI increases the risk of subsequent Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common type of dementia. 2) Repetitive, often subconcussive, mild TBIs increases the risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative neuropathology. 3) TBI may be a risk factor for other neurodegenerative disorders that can be associated with dementia. 4) TBI appears to lower the age of onset of TBI-related neurocognitive syndromes, potentially adding "TBI cognitive-behavioral features". The literature further indicates several specific risk factors for TBI-associated dementia: 5) any blast or blunt physical force to the head as long as there is violent head displacement; 6) decreased cognitive and/or neuronal reserve and the related variable of older age at TBI; and 7) the presence of apolipoprotein E ɛ4 alleles, a genetic risk factor for AD. Finally, there are neuropathological features relating TBI with neurocognitive syndromes: 8) acute TBI results in amyloid pathology and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies; 9) CTE shares features with neurodegenerative dementias; and 10) TBI results in white matter tract and neural network disruptions. Although further research is needed, these ten findings suggest that dose-dependent effects of violent head displacement in vulnerable brains predispose to dementia; among several potential mechanisms is the propagation of abnormal proteins along damaged white matter networks.

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy pathology in a neurodegenerative disorders brain bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Kevin F; Ross, Owen A; Cormier, Kerry A; Walton, Ronald L; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Johnston, Amelia E; DeSaro, Pamela; Boylan, Kevin B; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Rademakers, Rosa; Boeve, Bradley F; McKee, Ann C; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-12-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) and characterized by deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau at the depths of sulci. We sought to determine the presence of CTE pathology in a brain bank for neurodegenerative disorders for individuals with and without a history of contact sports participation. Available medical records of 1721 men were reviewed for evidence of past history of injury or participation in contact sports. Subsequently, cerebral cortical samples were processed for tau immunohistochemistry in cases with a documented history of sports exposure as well as age- and disease-matched men and women without such exposure. For cases with available frozen tissue, genetic analysis was performed for variants in APOE, MAPT, and TMEM106B. Immunohistochemistry revealed 21 of 66 former athletes had cortical tau pathology consistent with CTE. CTE pathology was not detected in 198 individuals without exposure to contact sports, including 33 individuals with documented single-incident TBI sustained from falls, motor vehicle accidents, domestic violence, or assaults. Among those exposed to contact sports, those with CTE pathology did not differ from those without CTE pathology with respect to noted clinicopathologic features. There were no significant differences in genetic variants for those with CTE pathology, but we observed a slight increase in MAPT H1 haplotype, and there tended to be fewer homozygous carriers of the protective TMEM106B rs3173615 minor allele in those with sports exposure and CTE pathology compared to those without CTE pathology. In conclusion, this study has identified a small, yet significant, subset of individuals with neurodegenerative disorders and concomitant CTE pathology. CTE pathology was only detected in individuals with documented participation in contact sports. Exposure to contact sports was the greatest risk factor for CTE pathology. Future

  9. Coagulopathy as prognostic marker in acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Coagulopathy frequently occurs following traumatic brain injury (TBI and usually occurs 6-72 hour post-trauma. The incidence and the probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and poor outcome following TBI are largely unknown and vary considerably. Aims: To assess the incidence and probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and to identify the risk factors for poor outcome in terms of median survival time following TBI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study over two years, patients of isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (GCS≤12 admitted to trauma center had coagulation profile (PT, APTT, thrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer, arterial lactate and ABG analysis done on day of admission and on day three. Coagulopathy was defined as prothrombin time (PT or/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT more than 1.5 times the normal control. Incidence of in-hospital mortality was assessed in all cases. Statistical Analysis: A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for coagulopathy and mortality in these patients. Results: A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 32 ± 12 years and mean GCS was 7.1 ± 2.8. Coagulopathy was present in 46% ( n = 96 of patients. Risk factors for development of coagulopathy were found out to be severity of head injury (OR: 2.81, elevated D-dimer (OR: 3.43, low hemoglobin (OR: 3.13, and effaced cisterns in the CT scan (OR: 2.72. Presence of coagulopathy (OR: 2.97 and severity of head injury (OR: 5.70 strongly predicted poor outcome, and were associated with a decreased median survival time. Conclusions: There is a high incidence of coagulopathy following TBI. The presence of coagulopathy as well as of severity of TBI are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in these patients.

  10. Dietary fructose aggravates the pathobiology of traumatic brain injury by influencing energy homeostasis and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rahul; Noble, Emily; Vergnes, Laurent; Ying, Zhe; Reue, Karen; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fructose consumption has been on the rise for the last two decades and is starting to be recognized as being responsible for metabolic diseases. Metabolic disorders pose a particular threat for brain conditions characterized by energy dysfunction, such as traumatic brain injury. Traumatic brain injury patients experience sudden abnormalities in the control of brain metabolism and cognitive function, which may worsen the prospect of brain plasticity and function. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we report that fructose consumption disrupts hippocampal energy homeostasis as evidenced by a decline in functional mitochondria bioenergetics (oxygen consumption rate and cytochrome C oxidase activity) and an aggravation of the effects of traumatic brain injury on molecular systems engaged in cell energy homeostasis (sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha) and synaptic plasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B, cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding, synaptophysin signaling). Fructose also worsened the effects of traumatic brain injury on spatial memory, which disruption was associated with a decrease in hippocampal insulin receptor signaling. Additionally, fructose consumption and traumatic brain injury promoted plasma membrane lipid peroxidation, measured by elevated protein and phenotypic expression of 4-hydroxynonenal. These data imply that high fructose consumption exacerbates the pathology of brain trauma by further disrupting energy metabolism and brain plasticity, highlighting the impact of diet on the resilience to neurological disorders. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Development of a Nonhuman Primate (Rhesus Macaque) Model of Uncontrolled Traumatic Liver Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Forest R; Macko, Antoni; Fryer, Darren M; Ozuna, Kassandra M; Brown, Alexander K; Crossland, Randy F; Tadaki, Douglas K

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of potentially survivable trauma mortality, necessitating the development of improved therapeutic interventions. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a reproducible clinically translatable nonhuman primate model of uncontrolled severe hemorrhage. Such a model is required to facilitate the development and meaningful evaluation of human-derived therapeutics. In Rhesus macaques, a laparoscopic left-lobe hepatectomy of 25% (n = 2), 50% (n = 4), or 60% (n = 6) was performed at T = 0 min, with no attempt at hemorrhage control until T = 120 min. A constant-rate infusion of normal saline was administered between T = 15 and 120 min to a total volume of 20 mL/kg. At T = 120 min, a laparotomy was performed to gain surgical hemostasis and quantify blood loss. Physiological parameters were recorded, and blood samples were collected at defined intervals until termination of the study at T = 480 min. Statistical analyses used Student t tests, with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results are reported as mean ± SEM. The calculated percent blood loss for the 25% hepatectomy group was negligible (2.3% ± 0.2%), whereas the 50% and 60% hepatectomy groups exhibited 26.6% ± 7.1% and 24.9% ± 3.8% blood loss, respectively. At T = 5 min, blood pressure for the 25%, 50%, and 60% hepatectomy groups was reduced by 13.8%, 60.8%, and 63.2% from the respective baseline values (P < 0.05). In the 60% hepatectomy group, alterations in thromboelastometry parameters and systemic inflammatory markers were observed. The development of a translatable nonhuman primate model of uncontrolled hemorrhage is an ongoing process. This study demonstrates that 60% hepatectomy offers a significant reproducible injury applicable for the evaluation of human-derived therapeutics.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury in Qatar: Age Matters—Insights from a 4-Year Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamena El-Matbouly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Overall traumatic brain injury (TBI incidence and related death rates vary across different age groups. Objectives. To evaluate the incidence, causes, and outcome of TBI in adolescents and young adult population in Qatar. Method. This was a retrospective review of all TBIs admitted to the trauma center between January 2008 and December 2011. Demographics, mechanism of injury, morbidity, and mortality were analyzed in different age groups. Results. A total of 1665 patients with TBI were admitted; the majority were males (92% with a mean age of 28 ± 16 years. The common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crashes and falls from height (51% and 35%, resp.. TBI was incidentally higher in young adults (34% and middle age group (21%. The most frequent injuries were contusion (40%, subarachnoid (25%, subdural (24%, and epidural hemorrhage (18%. The mortality rate was 11% among TBI patients. Mortality rates were 8% and 12% among adolescents and young adults, respectively. The highest mortality rate was observed in elderly patients (35%. Head AIS, ISS, and age were independent predictors for mortality. Conclusion. Adolescents and adults sustain significant portions of TBI, whereas mortality is much higher in the older group. Public awareness and injury prevention campaigns should target young population.

  13. Quantitative MRI predicts long-term structural and functional outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Riikka J; Kharatishvili, Irina; Gröhn, Heidi; Pitkänen, Asla; Gröhn, Olli H J

    2009-03-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) the initial impact causes both immediate damage and also launches a cascade of slowly progressive secondary damage. The chronic outcome disabilities vary greatly and can occur several years later. The aim of this study was to find predictive factors for the long-term outcome using multiparametric, non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology and a clinically relevant rat model of fluid percussion induced TBI. Our results demonstrated that the multiparametric quantitative MRI (T(2), T(1rho), trace of the diffusion tensor D(av), the extent of hyperintense lesion and intracerebral hemorrhage) acquired during acute and sub acute phases 3 h, 3 days, 9 days and 23 days post-injury has potential to predict the functional and histopathological outcome 6 to 12 months later. The acute D(av) changes in the ipsilateral hippocampus correlated with the chronic spatial learning and memory impairment evaluated using the Morris water maze (phelp to predict the long-term outcome after experimental TBI.

  14. A patient-specific segmentation framework for longitudinal MR images of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Prastawa, Marcel; Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C.; Vespa, Paul M.; Van Horn, John D.; Gerig, Guido

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Robust, reproducible segmentations of MR images with TBI are crucial for quantitative analysis of recovery and treatment efficacy. However, this is a significant challenge due to severe anatomy changes caused by edema (swelling), bleeding, tissue deformation, skull fracture, and other effects related to head injury. In this paper, we introduce a multi-modal image segmentation framework for longitudinal TBI images. The framework is initialized through manual input of primary lesion sites at each time point, which are then refined by a joint approach composed of Bayesian segmentation and construction of a personalized atlas. The personalized atlas construction estimates the average of the posteriors of the Bayesian segmentation at each time point and warps the average back to each time point to provide the updated priors for Bayesian segmentation. The difference between our approach and segmenting longitudinal images independently is that we use the information from all time points to improve the segmentations. Given a manual initialization, our framework automatically segments healthy structures (white matter, grey matter, cerebrospinal fluid) as well as different lesions such as hemorrhagic lesions and edema. Our framework can handle different sets of modalities at each time point, which provides flexibility in analyzing clinical scans. We show results on three subjects with acute baseline scans and chronic follow-up scans. The results demonstrate that joint analysis of all the points yields improved segmentation compared to independent analysis of the two time points.

  15. Recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against CD18 (rhuMAb CD18) in traumatic hemorrhagic shock: results of a phase II clinical trial. Traumatic Shock Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, P; Morris, J; Durham, R; Hauser, C; Cipolle, M; Wilson, R; Luchette, F; McSwain, N; Miller, R

    2000-10-01

    Activated neutrophils have been shown to play a pivotal role in resuscitation injury after traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Blocking the adhesion of neutrophils with a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody against CD18 (rhuMAb CD18) may reduce resuscitation injury but increase the risk of infection. This was a dose-finding phase II study to determine safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical outcome parameters for additional studies. This was a prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized (3:1), double-blind phase II trial enrolling 116 blunt and penetrating trauma patients from 14 trauma centers over a 9-month period. Patients with hypotension (blood pressure history of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the trauma center. An independent Drug Safety and Monitoring Review Board periodically reviewed unblinded data for safety issues and to give approval for dose escalation. Minor and major infection rates in rhuMAb CD18 groups were comparable to placebo. There was no evidence of antibody formation against rhuMAb CD18. Linear PK was observed within the dose range studied. Duration of neutrophil binding was dose-dependent, with 2 mg/kg resulting in greater than 90% neutrophil CD18 receptor saturation for approximately 48 hours. The mortality was 6.7% (2 of 30) in the placebo group, 4.8% (1 of 21) in the 0.5-mg/kg group, 8.5% (4 of 47) in the 1-mg/kg group, and 0% (0 of 18) in the 2-mg/kg group. The study was not powered for efficacy, and none of the efficacy variables demonstrated statistical significance. Favorable trends were seen in the 2-mg/kg group as compared with placebo in median intensive care unit length of stay (5 vs. 9 days) and median time on ventilator (34 vs. 72 hours). A single 2-mg/kg dose of rhuMAb CD18 maintains greater than 90% saturation of neutrophil CD18 receptors for approximately 48 hours in patients with traumatic hemorrhagic shock undergoing resuscitation. There was no trend toward increased infection. A larger trial is needed to

  16. Misconceptions about traumatic brain injury among probation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Conall; Linden, Mark A; Lohan, Maria

    2017-02-23

    The prevalence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among offender populations is significantly higher than among the general population. Despite this, no study has yet assessed the knowledge of members of the probation service surrounding TBI. Knowledge was assessed among members of the Probation Board for Northern Ireland (PBNI) using a cross-sectional online version of the Common Misconceptions about TBI (CM-TBI) questionnaire. Mean total misconception scores, along with scores on four subdomains (recovery, sequelae, insight, and hidden injury) were calculated. Analysis of variance was used to explore differences in misconceptions based on the collected demographic information. The overall mean percentage of misconceptions for the group was 22.37%. The subdomain with the highest rate of misconceptions (38.21%) was insight into injury which covered misconceptions around offenders' self-awareness of injuries. Those who knew someone with a brain injury scored significantly higher in the CM-TBI total score, F(1,63) = 6.639, p = 0.012, the recovery subdomain, F(1,63) = 10.080, p = 0.002, and the insight subdomain, F(1,63) = 5.834, p = 0.019. Additionally, significant training deficits around TBI were observed among the probation service. This study is the first of its kind to examine the level of understanding around TBI within probation services. The findings reflect potential barriers to identification and rehabilitation of TBI for offenders coming into contact with the criminal justice system. A lack of identification coupled with misconceptions about TBI could lead to inaccurate court reporting with a subsequent impact on sentencing. Implications for Rehabilitation Despite being one of the first points of contact for offenders entering the criminal justice system, members of the probation service reported having no formal training on traumatic brain injury (TBI). The subdomain with the highest rate of misconceptions (insight into injury

  17. Regional mechanical properties of human brain tissue for computational models of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, John D; Sundaresh, Sowmya N; Elkin, Benjamin S; McKhann, Guy M; Morrison, Barclay

    2017-06-01

    To determine viscoelastic shear moduli, stress relaxation indentation tests were performed on samples of human brain tissue resected in the course of epilepsy surgery. Through the use of a 500µm diameter indenter, regional mechanical properties were measured in cortical grey and white matter and subregions of the hippocampus. All regions were highly viscoelastic. Cortical grey matter was significantly more compliant than the white matter or hippocampus which were similar in modulus. Although shear modulus was not correlated with the age of the donor, cortex from male donors was significantly stiffer than from female donors. The presented material properties will help to populate finite element models of the brain as they become more anatomically detailed. We present the first mechanical characterization of fresh, post-operative human brain tissue using an indentation loading mode. Indentation generates highly localized data, allowing structure-specific mechanical properties to be determined from small tissue samples resected during surgery. It also avoids pitfalls of cadaveric tissue and allows data to be collected before degenerative processes alter mechanical properties. To correctly predict traumatic brain injury, finite element models must calculate intracranial deformation during head impact. The functional consequences of injury depend on the anatomical structures injured. Therefore, morbidity depends on the distribution of deformation across structures. Accurate prediction of structure-specific deformation requires structure-specific mechanical properties. This data will facilitate deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms that lead to traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The undetected brain lesion in sports. Minor traumatic brain injury and its sequelae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasca, N; Lovell, M R; Collins, M W; Jordan, B D; Matser, E; Weber, J; Slemmer, J E; Piccininni, P; Maxwell, W; Agosti, R; Wirth, S; Schneider, T O

    2006-02-01

    The minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in sports is often looked at as a bagatelle. The treating physician underestimates the severity of the injury suspecting that a mTBI is a nonstructural lesion with an overall excellent prognosis in the majority of the cases. This paper shows that the minor traumatic brain injury may be a structural brain lesion with potentially life-threatening dangers. The therapy should follow exactly defined guidelines, e.g., stepwise protocol of the Concussion in Sports (CIS-) Group. Return to sports activities should happen only when all physical but also cognitive symptoms have subsided. All mTBIs that have been sustained prior to the actual injury have to be recorded properly because repeated mTBIs may cause chronic degenerative brain damage. Neuropsychological testing will aid in the correct diagnosis of a mTBI and is a useful parameter in the course of the injury. In the future biochemical markers may serve as indicators of the severity of the brain injury and may also aid in predicting the outcome after TBI. Today biochemical markers do not serve as a substitute for neuroimaging.

  19. Specificity of Cognitive and Behavioral Complaints in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Pineau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of cognitive and behavioral complaints is explored in Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI samples according to the severity of PTSD, depression and general anxiety conditions. Self-reported questionnaires on cognitive and behavioral changes are administered to PTSD, MTBI, MTBI/PTSD and control groups. Confounding variables are controlled. All groups report more complaints since the traumatic event. PTSD and MTBI/PTSD groups report more anxiety symptoms, depression and complaints compared to the MTBI group. Relatives of the PTSD group confirm most of the behavioral changes reported. Results suggest the utility of self-reported questionnaires to personalize cognitive and behavioral interventions in PTSD and MTBI to cope with the impacts of the traumatic event.

  20. Brain CD47 Expression in a Swine Model of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiang; Xie, Qing; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2014-01-01

    CD47 contributes to neuronal death, inflammation and angiogenesis after brain ischemia. The role of CD47 in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has not been investigated and the current study examined brain CD47 expression in a pig ICH model. Pigs received a blood injection or needle insertion into the right frontal lobe and were euthanized at different times to examine CD47 expression. Pigs were also treated with an iron chelator, deferoxamine, (50 mg/kg, i.m.) or vehicle and killed at day-3 to e...

  1. MICROGLIA ACTIVATION AS A BIOMARKER FOR TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana G Hernadez-Ontiveros

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has become the signature wound of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Injury may result from a mechanical force, a rapid acceleration-deceleration movement, or a blast wave. A cascade of secondary cell death events ensues after the initial injury. In particular, multiple inflammatory responses accompany TBI. A series of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines spreads to normal brain areas juxtaposed to the core impacted tissue. Among the repertoire of immune cells involved, microglia is a key player in propagating inflammation to tissues neighboring the core site of injury. Neuroprotective drug trials in TBI have failed, likely due to their sole focus on abrogating neuronal cell death and ignoring the microglia response despite these inflammatory cells’ detrimental effects on the brain. Another relevant point to consider is the veracity of results of animal experiments due to deficiencies in experimental design, such as incomplete or inadequate method description, data misinterpretation and reporting may introduce bias and give false-positive results. Thus, scientific publications should follow strict guidelines that include randomization, blinding, sample-size estimation and accurate handling of all data (Landis et al., 2012. A prolonged state of inflammation after brain injury may linger for years and predispose patients to develop other neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. TBI patients display progressive and long-lasting impairments in their physical, cognitive, behavioral, and social performance. Here, we discuss inflammatory mechanisms that accompany TBI in an effort to increase our understanding of the dynamic pathological condition as the disease evolves over time and begin to translate these findings for defining new and existing inflammation-based biomarkers and treatments for TBI.

  2. Cystatin C Has a Dual Role in Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez-Vargas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases involved in neuronal protein catabolism. This cathepsin is released after traumatic injury and increases neuronal death; however, release of cystatin C, a cathepsin inhibitor, appears to be a self-protective brain response. Here we describe the effect of cystatin C intracerebroventricular administration in rats prior to inducing a traumatic brain injury. We observed that cystatin C injection caused a dual response in post-traumatic brain injury recovery: higher doses (350 fmoles increased bleeding and mortality, whereas lower doses (3.5 to 35 fmoles decreased bleeding, neuronal damage and mortality. We also analyzed the expression of cathepsin B and cystatin C in the brains of control rats and of rats after a traumatic brain injury. Cathepsin B was detected in the brain stem, cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control rats. Cystatin C was localized to the choroid plexus, brain stem and cerebellum of control rats. Twenty-four hours after traumatic brain injury, we observed changes in both the expression and localization of both proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. An early increase and intralysosomal expression of cystatin C after brain injury was associated with reduced neuronal damage.

  3. Lack of mitochondrial ferritin aggravated neurological deficits via enhancing oxidative stress in a traumatic brain injury murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ligang; Wang, Libo; Dai, Zhibo; Wu, Pei; Shi, Huaizhang; Zhao, Shiguang

    2017-12-22

    Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Mitochondrial ferritin (Ftmt) is reported to be closely related to oxidative stress. However, whether Ftmt is involved in TBI-induced oxidative stress and neurological deficits remains unknown. In the present study, the controlled cortical impact model was established in wild-type and Ftmt knockout mice as a TBI model. The Ftmt expression, oxidative stress, neurological deficits, and brain injury were measured. We found that Ftmt expression was gradually decreased from 3 to 14 days post-TBI, while oxidative stress was gradually increased, as evidenced by reduced GSH and superoxide dismutase levels and elevated malondialdehyde and nitric oxide levels. Interestingly, the extent of reduced Ftmt expression in the brain was linearly correlated with oxidative stress. Knockout of Ftmt significantly exacerbated TBI-induced oxidative stress, intracerebral hemorrhage, brain infarction, edema, neurological severity score, memory impairment, and neurological deficits. However, all these effects in Ftmt knockout mice were markedly mitigated by pharmacological inhibition of oxidative stress using an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results reveal an important correlation between Ftmt and oxidative stress after TBI. Ftmt deficiency aggravates TBI-induced brain injuries and neurological deficits, which at least partially through increasing oxidative stress levels. Our data suggest that Ftmt may be a promising molecular target for the treatment of TBI. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Subacute intranasal administration of tissue plasminogen activator promotes neuroplasticity and improves functional recovery following traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Meng

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. To date, there are no effective pharmacological treatments for TBI. Recombinant human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA is the effective drug for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. In addition to its thrombolytic effect, tPA is also involved in neuroplasticity in the central nervous system. However, tPA has potential adverse side effects when administered intravenously including brain edema and hemorrhage. Here we report that tPA, administered by intranasal delivery during the subacute phase after TBI, provides therapeutic benefit. Animals with TBI were treated intranasally with saline or tPA initiated 7 days after TBI. Compared with saline treatment, subacute intranasal tPA treatment significantly 1 improved cognitive (Morris water maze test and sensorimotor (footfault and modified neurological severity score functional recovery in rats after TBI, 2 reduced the cortical stimulation threshold evoking ipsilateral forelimb movement, 3 enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and axonal sprouting of the corticospinal tract originating from the contralesional cortex into the denervated side of the cervical gray matter, and 4 increased the level of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our data suggest that subacute intranasal tPA treatment improves functional recovery and promotes brain neurogenesis and spinal cord axonal sprouting after TBI, which may be mediated, at least in part, by tPA/plasmin-dependent maturation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  5. Needs and Concerns of Male Combat Veterans with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    if I had a bad headache, I’ll just take a couple of aspirin or something like that to try and make it go away . . . . Sometimes I just have to...The assessment and treatment of individuals with history of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder: A systematic review of the

  6. Altered Wiring of the Human Structural Connectome in Adults with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm Jan; Kok, Jelmer G.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; Leemans, Alexander; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    In this study, structural connectivity after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) was examined from a network perspective, with a particular focus on post-traumatic complaints. Fifty-three patients with and without self-reported complaints at 2 weeks after uncomplicated mTBI were included, in addition

  7. The role of free radicals in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Karen M; Littleton-Kearney, Marguerite T

    2013-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of death and disability in both the civilian and the military populations. The primary impact causes initial tissue damage, which initiates biochemical cascades, known as secondary injury, that expand the damage. Free radicals are implicated as major contributors to the secondary injury. Our review of recent rodent and human research reveals the prominent role of the free radicals superoxide anion, nitric oxide, and peroxynitrite in secondary brain injury. Much of our current knowledge is based on rodent studies, and the authors identified a gap in the translation of findings from rodent to human TBI. Rodent models are an effective method for elucidating specific mechanisms of free radical-induced injury at the cellular level in a well-controlled environment. However, human TBI does not occur in a vacuum, and variables controlled in the laboratory may affect the injury progression. Additionally, multiple experimental TBI models are accepted in rodent research, and no one model fully reproduces the heterogeneous injury seen in humans. Free radical levels are measured indirectly in human studies based on assumptions from the findings from rodent studies that use direct free radical measurements. Further study in humans should be directed toward large samples to validate the findings in rodent studies. Data obtained from these studies may lead to more targeted treatment to interrupt the secondary injury cascades.

  8. Exosome platform for diagnosis and monitoring of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the release of membranous structures by cells into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. With activation, injury, stress, transformation or infection, cells express proteins and RNAs associated with the cellular responses to these events. The exosomes released by these cells can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids linked to these physiologic events. This review focuses on exosomes associated with traumatic brain injury, which may be both diagnostic and a causative factor in the progression of the injury. Based on current data, exosomes play essential roles as conveyers of intercellular communication and mediators of many of the pathological conditions associated with development, progression and therapeutic failures and cellular stress in a variety of pathologic conditions. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodelling, signal pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer, chemoresistance, immunologic activation and genetic exchange. These circulating exosomes not only represent a central mediator of the pro-inflammatory microenvironment linked with secondary brain injury, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and monitoring of neurodegenerative progression. PMID:25135964

  9. Sexual behavior and its correlates after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Daniel; Schöttle, Daniel; Krueger, Richard; Briken, Peer

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of permanent disability in young adults and is frequently accompanied by changes in sexual behaviors. Satisfying sexuality is an important factor for overall quality of life in people with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to review the studies evaluating the assessment, correlates and management of sexuality following TBI. The Brain Injury Questionnaire of Sexuality is the first validated questionnaire specifically developed for adults with TBI. A considerable amount of individuals with TBI show inappropriate sexual behaviors and sexual dysfunctions. Whereas inappropriate sexual behaviors are related to younger age, less social participation and more severe injuries, sexual dysfunctions show an association with higher fatigue, higher depression scores, less self-esteem and female sex. Healthcare professionals have suggested that because of discomfort at the individual or institutional level, sexual problems are often not sufficiently addressed and have suggested that a specialist should treat sexual problems. Although some important correlates of sexual problems could be identified, methodological differences across studies limit their comparability. Furthermore, there is an absence of evidence-based treatment strategies for addressing sexual problems. Therapeutic efforts should take into account the identified correlates of sexual problems following TBI.

  10. Nanobubbles, cavitation, shock waves and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Goliaei, Ardeshir; Berkowitz, Max L

    2016-12-07

    Collapse of bubbles, microscopic or nanoscopic, due to their interaction with the impinging pressure wave produces a jet of particles moving in the direction of the wave. If there is a surface nearby, the high-speed jet particles hit it, and as a result damage to the surface is produced. This cavitation effect is well known and intensely studied in case of microscopic sized bubbles. It can be quite damaging to materials, including biological tissues, but it can also be beneficial when controlled, like in case of sonoporation of biological membranes for the purpose of drug delivery. Here we consider recent simulation work performed to study collapse of nanobubbles exposed to shock waves, in order to understand the detailed mechanism of the cavitation induced damage to soft materials, such as biological membranes. We also discuss the connection of the cavitation effect with the traumatic brain injury caused by blasts. Specifically, we consider possible damage to model membranes containing lipid bilayers, bilayers with embedded ion channel proteins like the ones found in neural cells and also protein assemblies found in the tight junction of the blood brain barrier.

  11. [Brain hemorrhage in a patient with Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco Antonio; Rivas-Larrauri, Francisco; Alcántara-Salinas, Adriana; Hernández-Bautista, Victor; Rodríguez-Lozano, Ana Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting vasculitis of unknown origin, characterized by fever, palms and soles edema, cervical lymphadenopathy, strawberry tongue, and non-exudative conjunctivitis. It is a multisystemic vasculitis that affects predominantly infants and young children. The most feared complication is the development of coronary aneurysms that occurs up to 25% of untreated patients; however there are reports of extra coronary involvement. Herein we present the case of a 2 year-old girl who had a severe symptomatology and persistent fever despite intravenous gammaglobulin. Two years later she presented right hemiparesia and headache, with data from CAT and MRI suggestive of brain mass and deviation of the midline, secondary to left frontoparietal haemorrhage that was treated with a craniotomy. She was discharged on prednisone, ASA and rehabilitation.

  12. Cerebroprotection of flavanol (-)-epicatechin after traumatic brain injury via Nrf2-dependent and -independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tian; Wang, Wenzhu; Li, Qian; Han, Xiaoning; Xing, Jing; Qi, Cunfang; Lan, Xi; Wan, Jieru; Potts, Alexa; Guan, Fangxia; Wang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which leads to disability, dysfunction, and even death, is a prominent health problem worldwide with no effective treatment. A brain-permeable flavonoid named (-)-epicatechin (EC) modulates redox/oxidative stress and has been shown to be beneficial for vascular and cognitive function in humans and for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in rodents. Here we examined whether EC is able to protect the brain against TBI-induced brain injury in mice and if so, whether it exerts neuroprotection by modulating the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) pathway. We used the controlled cortical impact model to mimic TBI. EC was administered orally at 3h after TBI and then every 24h for either 3 or 7 days. We evaluated lesion volume, brain edema, white matter injury, neurologic deficits, cognitive performance and emotion-like behaviors, neutrophil infiltration, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and a variety of injury-related protein markers. Nrf2 knockout mice were used to determine the role of the Nrf2 signaling pathway after EC treatment. In wild-type mice, EC significantly reduced lesion volume, edema, and cell death and improved neurologic function on days 3 and 28; cognitive performance and depression-like behaviors were also improved with EC administration. In addition, EC reduced white matter injury, heme oxygenase-1 expression, and ferric iron deposition after TBI. These changes were accompanied by attenuation of neutrophil infiltration and oxidative insults, reduced activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9, decreased Keap 1 expression, increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation, and increased expression of superoxide dismutase 1 and quinone 1. However, EC did not significantly reduce lesion volume or improve neurologic deficits in Nrf2 knockout mice after TBI. Our results show that EC protects the TBI brain by activating the Nrf2 pathway, inhibiting heme oxygenase-1 protein expression, and reducing iron deposition. The latter two effects could represent an Nrf2

  13. Lateral fluid percussion: model of traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, Janet; Fujioka, Wendy; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Crockett, David P; Thakker-Varia, Smita

    2011-08-22

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) research has attained renewed momentum due to the increasing awareness of head injuries, which result in morbidity and mortality. Based on the nature of primary injury following TBI, complex and heterogeneous secondary consequences result, which are followed by regenerative processes (1,2). Primary injury can be induced by a direct contusion to the brain from skull fracture or from shearing and stretching of tissue causing displacement of brain due to movement (3,4). The resulting hematomas and lacerations cause a vascular response (3,5), and the morphological and functional damage of the white matter leads to diffuse axonal injury (6-8). Additional secondary changes commonly seen in the brain are edema and increased intracranial pressure (9). Following TBI there are microscopic alterations in biochemical and physiological pathways involving the release of excitotoxic neurotransmitters, immune mediators and oxygen radicals (10-12), which ultimately result in long-term neurological disabilities (13,14). Thus choosing appropriate animal models of TBI that present similar cellular and molecular events in human and rodent TBI is critical for studying the mechanisms underlying injury and repair. Various experimental models of TBI have been developed to reproduce aspects of TBI observed in humans, among them three specific models are widely adapted for rodents: fluid percussion, cortical impact and weight drop/impact acceleration (1). The fluid percussion device produces an injury through a craniectomy by applying a brief fluid pressure pulse on to the intact dura. The pulse is created by a pendulum striking the piston of a reservoir of fluid. The percussion produces brief displacement and deformation of neural tissue (1,15). Conversely, cortical impact injury delivers mechanical energy to the intact dura via a rigid impactor under pneumatic pressure (16,17). The weight drop/impact model is characterized by the fall of a rod with a specific

  14. Higher brain extracellular potassium is associated with brain metabolic distress and poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Elevated brain potassium levels ([K+]) are associated with neuronal damage in experimental models. The role of brain extracellular [K+] in patients with poor-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and its association with hemorrhage load, metabolic dysfunction and outcome has not been studied so far. Methods Cerebral microdialysis (CMD) samples from 28 poor grade aSAH patients were analyzed for CMD [K+] for 12 consecutive days after ictus, and time-matched to brain metabolic and hemodynamic parameters as well as corresponding plasma [K+]. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized estimating equation with an autoregressive function to handle repeated observations of an individual patient. Results CMD [K+] did not correlate with plasma [K+] (Spearman’s ρ = 0.114, P = 0.109). Higher CMD [K+] was associated with the presence of intracerebral hematoma on admission head computed tomography, CMD lactate/pyruvate ratio >40 and CMD lactate >4 mmol/L (P < 0.05). In vitro retrodialysis data suggest that high CMD [K+] was of brain cellular origin. Higher CMD [K+] was significantly associated with poor 3-month outcome, even after adjusting for age and disease severity (P < 0.01). Conclusions The results of this pilot study suggest that brain extracellular [K+] may serve as a biomarker for brain tissue injury in poor-grade aSAH patients. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of brain interstitial K+ levels in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury after aSAH. PMID:24920041

  15. Analysis of the cerebral transcriptome in mice subjected to traumatic brain injury: importance of IL-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Molinero, Amalia

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is one of the leading causes of incapacity and death among young people. Injury to the brain elicits a potent inflammatory response, comprising recruitment of inflammatory cells, reactive astrogliosis and activation of brain macrophages. Under the influence of presumably se...

  16. Using Post-Traumatic Amnesia To Predict Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie L; Spitz, Gershon; McKenzie, Dean

    2016-06-01

    Duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) has emerged as a strong measure of injury severity after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Despite the growing international adoption of this measure, there remains a lack of consistency in the way in which PTA duration is used to classify severity of injury. This study aimed to establish the classification of PTA that would best predict functional or productivity outcomes. We conducted a cohort study of 1041 persons recruited from inpatient admissions to a TBI rehabilitation center between 1985 and 2013. Participants had a primary diagnosis of TBI, emerged from PTA before discharge from inpatient hospital, and engaged in productive activities before injury. Eight models that classify duration of PTA were evaluated-six that were based on the literature and two that were statistically driven. Models were assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as well as model-based Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) statistics. All categorization models showed longer PTA to be associated with a greater likelihood of being nonproductive at 1 year after TBI. Classification systems with a greater number of categories performed better than two-category systems. The dimensional (continuous) form of PTA resulted in the greatest AUC, and lowest AIC as well as BIC, of the classification systems examined. This finding indicates that the greatest accuracy in prognosis is likely to be achieved using PTA as a continuous variable. This enables the probability of productive outcomes to be estimated with far greater precision than that possible using a classification system. Categorizing PTA to classify severity of injury may be reducing the precision with which clinicians can plan the treatment of patients after TBI.

  17. Attention and driving in traumatic brain injury : A question of coping with time-pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, WH; Withaar, FK; Tant, MLM; van Zomeren, AH

    Background: Diffuse and focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in perceptual, cognitive, and motor dysfunction possibly leading to activity limitations in driving. Characteristic dysfunctions for severe diffuse TBI are confronted with function requirements derived from the hierarchical task

  18. 77 FR 13578 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project; Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... evidenced by loss of consciousness or post- traumatic amnesia due to brain trauma or by objective... examination. Both penetrating and non- penetrating wounds that fit this criteria are included, but, primary...

  19. Management and outcome of traumatic brain injury patients at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boniface Respicious; Lugazia Edwin Rwebugisa; Ntungi Abel Mussa; Kiloloma Othman

    2017-01-01

    .... However, access to neurosurgical care is poor in low income countries like Tanzania. The aim of this study was to assess the management and outcome of Traumatic brain injury patients at a tertiary level health facility in Tanzania...

  20. Uncovering precision phenotype-biomarker associations in traumatic brain injury using topological data analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Nielson (Jessica L.); S.R. Cooper (Shelly); J.K. Yue (John); M.D. Sorani (Marco); T. Inoue (Tomoo); E.L. Yuh (Esther); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); T.C. Petrossian (Tanya C.); J. Paquette (Jesse); P.Y. Lum (Pek Y.); G.E. Carlsson (Gunnar E.); M.J. Vassar (Mary); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); A.B. Valadka (Alex); D. Okonkwo (David); G. Manley (Geoffrey); A.R. Ferguson (Adam)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex disorder that is traditionally stratified based on clinical signs and symptoms. Recent imaging and molecular biomarker innovations provide unprecedented opportunities for improved TBI precision medicine, incorporating

  1. Rat Models and Identification of Candidate Early Serum Biomarkers of Battlefield Traumatic Brain Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonessa, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    ...) Application of TBI, neurobehavioral testing and collection of biofluids and tissues; 2) Optimization of proteomic protocols for the identification of differentially expressed proteins in the plasma of brain-traumatized rats; 3...

  2. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...

  3. Continuous Multimodality Monitoring in Children after Traumatic Brain Injury-Preliminary Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Adam M. H.; Donnelly, Joseph; Czosnyka, Marek; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Liu, Xiuyun; Aries, Marcel J.; Fernandes, Helen M.; Garnett, Matthew R.; Smielewski, Peter; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Agrawal, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multimodality monitoring is regularly employed in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients where it provides physiologic and therapeutic insight into this heterogeneous condition. Pediatric studies are less frequent. Methods An analysis of data collected prospectively from 12

  4. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury: what is the pathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Sharon; Scher, Ann I; Perl, Daniel P; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2012-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is among the earliest illnesses described in human history and remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in the modern era. It is estimated that 2% of the US population lives with long-term disabilities due to a prior TBI, and incidence and prevalence rates are even higher in developing countries. One of the most feared long-term consequences of TBIs is dementia, as multiple epidemiologic studies show that experiencing a TBI in early or midlife is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. The best data indicate that moderate and severe TBIs increase risk of dementia between 2- and 4-fold. It is less clear whether mild TBIs such as brief concussions result in increased dementia risk, in part because mild head injuries are often not well documented and retrospective studies have recall bias. However, it has been observed for many years that multiple mild TBIs as experienced by professional boxers are associated with a high risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a type of dementia with distinctive clinical and pathologic features. The recent recognition that CTE is common in retired professional football and hockey players has rekindled interest in this condition, as has the recognition that military personnel also experience high rates of mild TBIs and may have a similar syndrome. It is presently unknown whether dementia in TBI survivors is pathophysiologically similar to Alzheimer disease, CTE, or some other entity. Such information is critical for developing preventive and treatment strategies for a common cause of acquired dementia. Herein, we will review the epidemiologic data linking TBI and dementia, existing clinical and pathologic data, and will identify areas where future research is needed.

  5. The effects of clopidogrel on elderly traumatic brain injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David K; Lurie, Fedor; Wong, Linda L

    2008-12-01

    Patients are living longer with cardiovascular disease managed with antiplatelet drugs. These seniors are asked to be more physically active and are prone to falls or injuries. Few have studied the mortality or morbidity from anticoagulants in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). With the increasing use of clopidogrel in the elderly, studies on the consequences of TBI are warranted. This is a retrospective case-controlled study using a trauma data registry of 3,817 closed head trauma cases (2001-2005). Patients with preinjury use of clopidogrel, aspirin or warfarin, and evidence of traumatic intracranial bleeding were identified (n = 131). These were compared with a frequency-matched control group (n = 178) with similar age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, and Injury Severity Scores. Main outcome measure included mortality, hospital or intensive care unit duration, and discharge disposition. Of 131 patients on anticoagulants, patients on clopidogrel (n = 21) were more likely to die (OR = 14.7; 95% CI: 2.3-93.6) and be discharged to an inpatient long-term facility (OR = 3.25; 95%CI: 1.06-9.96). Length of hospital stay and intensive care unit stay were not different from control. Mortality in aspirin patients (n = 90) and warfarin patients (n = 20) did not differ from control. Warfarin patients had increased hospital and ICU stay (10.6 and 5.3 days) when compared with the control (4.7 and 0.9 days, respectively). TBI patients on clopidogrel may have increased long-term disability and fatal consequences when compared with patients who are not on these drugs or on other anticoagulants. Patients on clopidogrel should be advised of safety when engaging in potentially dangerous activities to avoid the consequences of TBI.

  6. Computer-Based Cognitive Rehabilitation Interventions for Traumatic Brain Injury: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetta, Joseph; Starkweather, Angela; Gill, Jessica M

    2017-08-01

    Computer-based interventions have been developed to improve cognitive performance after mild traumatic brain injury; however, a thorough evaluation of this body of research has not been addressed in the literature. The aim of this study was to provide a synthesis and critical review of current research studies that have tested the efficacy of computer-based interventions on cognitive performance after mild traumatic brain injury. A critical review was conducted by identifying relevant studies in the electronic databases PubMed/MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and CINAHL from 2011 to the present. Because of the limited number of publications focused exclusively on mild traumatic brain injury, research studies that assessed the impact of computer-based interventions on cognitive outcomes in populations with acquired brain injury were included. Of the 58 studies identified, only 10 publications included participants with mild traumatic brain injury. Overall, the identified studies did not use a standard method for assessing the severity of traumatic brain injury, and many studies included participants with a wide variety of etiologies for acquired brain injury and used multiple measures of cognitive performance, which made comparisons difficult across studies. In addition to small sample sizes, the study samples were heterogeneous in regard to the number of previous traumatic brain injuries, time elapsed since injury, and age and gender distributions. Preinjury comorbidities that may affect cognitive performance, such as depression, anxiety, or learning disabilities, were often not assessed. There is weak evidence that computer-based interventions can improve working memory and cognitive function in individuals after mild traumatic brain injury. Because of the low-quality evidence, seminal questions remain regarding the optimal format, dosage, timing, and duration of computer-based intervention for improving cognitive performance. Future studies should focus on using a strong

  7. Therapies targeting lipid peroxidation in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthonymuthu, Tamil Selvan; Kenny, Elizabeth Megan; Bayır, Hülya

    2016-06-01

    Lipid peroxidation can be broadly defined as the process of inserting a hydroperoxy group into a lipid. Polyunsaturated fatty acids present in the phospholipids are often the targets for peroxidation. Phospholipids are indispensable for normal structure of membranes. The other important function of phospholipids stems from their role as a source of lipid mediators - oxygenated free fatty acids that are derived from lipid peroxidation. In the CNS, excessive accumulation of either oxidized phospholipids or oxygenated free fatty acids may be associated with damage occurring during acute brain injury and subsequent inflammatory responses. There is a growing body of evidence that lipid peroxidation occurs after severe traumatic brain injury in humans and correlates with the injury severity and mortality. Identification of the products and sources of lipid peroxidation and its enzymatic or non-enzymatic nature is essential for the design of mechanism-based therapies. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based lipidomics/oxidative lipidomics offers remarkable opportunities for quantitative characterization of lipid peroxidation products, providing guidance for targeted development of specific therapeutic modalities. In this review, we critically evaluate previous attempts to use non-specific antioxidants as neuroprotectors and emphasize new approaches based on recent breakthroughs in understanding of enzymatic mechanisms of lipid peroxidation associated with specific death pathways, particularly apoptosis. We also emphasize the role of different phospholipases (calcium-dependent and -independent) in hydrolysis of peroxidized phospholipids and generation of pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Altering leukocyte recruitment following traumatic brain injury with ghrelin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jisook; Costantini, Todd W; D'Mello, Ryan; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul; Bansal, Vishal

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced cerebral inflammation involves several mediators including activation of resident microglia, infiltration of leukocytes, and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines at the site of injury. Invading leukocytes, mainly neutrophil and inflammatory monocytes, contribute to ongoing post-TBI cerebral edema and neuronal injury. Based on the beneficial effect of ghrelin hormone treatment following TBI, we hypothesized that ghrelin may alter the infiltrating inflammatory cell profile. A weight drop model was used to create severe TBI. C57 mice were divided into three groups: sham, no TBI or ghrelin treatment; TBI, TBI only; TBI/ghrelin, animals were treated with ghrelin 20 μg (intraperitoneally) immediately following TBI and again 1 hour later. Seven days after injury, brain sections were immunostained with Iba-1 and CD11b to assess the recruitment and activation of resident microglia and infiltrated leukocytes. Alternatively, brain dissociates were isolated, and flow cytometry was used to gate for microglia (CD11b, CD45 cells), monocytes (CD11b, CD45, F4/80 cells), and neutrophils (CD11b, CD45, F4/80 cells) to measure their recruitment to injury site. TBI resulted in a rapid invasion (16-fold) of inflammatory leukocytes to the site of injury, which persisted for at least 1 week. Ghrelin treatment significantly reduced infiltration of peripheral leukocytes (2.8-fold). In particular, recruitment of CD11bCD45 inflammatory monocytes (2.4-fold) and CD11bCD45F4/80 neutrophils (1.7-fold) was reduced following ghrelin treatment. There were no observed ghrelin-mediated changes in either the number of CD11bCD45 resident microglia or its activation state. Together, our data demonstrate that ghrelin attenuated leukocyte recruitment, which correlates with improved histologic outcome following TBI.

  9. Diverging volumetric trajectories following pediatric traumatic brain injury

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    Emily L. Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant public health concern, and can be especially disruptive in children, derailing on-going neuronal maturation in periods critical for cognitive development. There is considerable heterogeneity in post-injury outcomes, only partially explained by injury severity. Understanding the time course of recovery, and what factors may delay or promote recovery, will aid clinicians in decision-making and provide avenues for future mechanism-based therapeutics. We examined regional changes in brain volume in a pediatric/adolescent moderate-severe TBI (msTBI cohort, assessed at two time points. Children were first assessed 2–5 months post-injury, and again 12 months later. We used tensor-based morphometry (TBM to localize longitudinal volume expansion and reduction. We studied 21 msTBI patients (5 F, 8–18 years old and 26 well-matched healthy control children, also assessed twice over the same interval. In a prior paper, we identified a subgroup of msTBI patients, based on interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT, with significant structural disruption of the white matter (WM at 2–5 months post injury. We investigated how this subgroup (TBI-slow, N = 11 differed in longitudinal regional volume changes from msTBI patients (TBI-normal, N = 10 with normal WM structure and function. The TBI-slow group had longitudinal decreases in brain volume in several WM clusters, including the corpus callosum and hypothalamus, while the TBI-normal group showed increased volume in WM areas. Our results show prolonged atrophy of the WM over the first 18 months post-injury in the TBI-slow group. The TBI-normal group shows a different pattern that could indicate a return to a healthy trajectory.

  10. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption And Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

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    Renee Jade Turner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB, increased risk of hemorrhagic complications and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke.

  11. Erythropoietin in traumatic brain injury: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nichol, Alistair

    2015-02-08

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Laboratory and clinical studies demonstrate a possible beneficial effect of erythropoietin in improving outcomes in the traumatic brain injury cohort. However, there are concerns regarding the association of erythropoietin and thrombosis in the critically ill. A large-scale, multi-centre, blinded, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, randomised trial is currently underway to address this hypothesis.

  12. Mycotic Aneurysm of External Carotid Artery following Traumatic Brain Injury: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Khalili, Hosseinali; Derakhshan, Nima; Malekmohammadi, Zahed; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysm of external carotid artery is extremely rare. We herein report a case of external carotid artery (ECA) aneurysm following severe traumatic brain injury. A 24-year-old man with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) following a car accident was referred to Rajaee Trauma Center Emergency Room affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz, Iran. He underwent ventriculostomy on arrival for intracerebral pressure (ICP) monitoring and for a second time due to hydroceph...

  13. Occurrence and severity of agitated behavior after severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth Wolffbrandt, Mia; Poulsen, Ingrid; Engberg, Aase W

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the occurrence and severity of agitation in patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), to identify predictors of agitation and to study interrater reliability for a translated version of the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS).......To investigate the occurrence and severity of agitation in patients after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), to identify predictors of agitation and to study interrater reliability for a translated version of the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS)....

  14. Genetic Variation Underlying Traumatic Brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0588 TITLE: Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD...14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Late-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease (LOAD) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genetic variation underlying traumatic brain injury...accelerating individual’s memory decline and possibly accelerating LOAD like neuro-degeneration. In addition, genetic risk factors including non- coding and

  15. Reversing brain damage in former NFL players: implications for traumatic brain injury and substance abuse rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Daniel G; Wu, Joseph C; Taylor, Derek; Willeumier, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Brain injuries are common in professional American football players. Finding effective rehabilitation strategies can have widespread implications not only for retired players but also for patients with traumatic brain injury and substance abuse problems. An open label pragmatic clinical intervention was conducted in an outpatient neuropsychiatric clinic with 30 retired NFL players who demonstrated brain damage and cognitive impairment. The study included weight loss (if appropriate); fish oil (5.6 grams a day); a high-potency multiple vitamin; and a formulated brain enhancement supplement that included nutrients to enhance blood flow (ginkgo and vinpocetine), acetylcholine (acetyl-l-carnitine and huperzine A), and antioxidant activity (alpha-lipoic acid and n-acetyl-cysteine). The trial average was six months. Outcome measures were Microcog Assessment of Cognitive Functioning and brain SPECT imaging. In the retest situation, corrected for practice effect, there were statistically significant increases in scores of attention, memory, reasoning, information processing speed and accuracy on the Microcog. The brain SPECT scans, as a group, showed increased brain perfusion, especially in the prefrontal cortex, parietal lobes, occipital lobes, anterior cingulate gyrus and cerebellum. This study demonstrates that cognitive and cerebral blood flow improvements are possible in this group with multiple interventions.

  16. Diffuse traumatic brain injury induces prolonged immune dysregulation and potentiates hyperalgesia following a peripheral immune challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Rachel K; Ellis, Gavin I; Harrison, Jordan L; Bachstetter, Adam D; Corder, Gregory F; Van Eldik, Linda J; Taylor, Bradley K; Marti, Francesc; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Nociceptive and neuropathic pain occurs as part of the disease process after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans. Central and peripheral inflammation, a major secondary injury process initiated by the traumatic brain injury event, has been implicated in the potentiation of peripheral nociceptive pain. We hypothesized that the inflammatory response to diffuse traumatic brain injury potentiates persistent pain through prolonged immune dysregulation. To test this, adult, male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to midline fluid percussion brain injury or to sham procedure. One cohort of mice was analyzed for inflammation-related cytokine levels in cortical biopsies and serum along an acute time course. In a second cohort, peripheral inflammation was induced seven days after surgery/injury with an intraplantar injection of carrageenan. This was followed by measurement of mechanical hyperalgesia, glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba1 immunohistochemical analysis of neuroinflammation in the brain, and flow cytometric analysis of T-cell differentiation in mucosal lymph. Traumatic brain injury increased interleukin-6 and chemokine ligand 1 levels in the cortex and serum that peaked within 1-9 h and then resolved. Intraplantar carrageenan produced mechanical hyperalgesia that was potentiated by traumatic brain injury. Further, mucosal T cells from brain-injured mice showed a distinct deficiency in the ability to differentiate into inflammation-suppressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). We conclude that traumatic brain injury increased the inflammatory pain associated with cutaneous inflammation by contributing to systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells are immune suppressors and failure of T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells leads to unregulated cytokine production which may contribute to the potentiation of peripheral pain through the excitation of peripheral sensory neurons. In addition, regulatory T cells are identified as a potential target for

  17. Does early beta-blockade in isolated severe traumatic brain injury reduce the risk of post traumatic depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, Rebecka; Sjolin, Gabriel; Mohseni, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Depressive symptoms occur in approximately half of trauma patients, negatively impacting on functional outcome and quality of life following severe head injury. Pontine noradrenaline has been shown to increase upon trauma and associated β-adrenergic receptor activation appears to consolidate memory formation of traumatic events. Blocking adrenergic activity reduces physiological stress responses during recall of traumatic memories and impairs memory, implying a potential therapeutic role of β-blockers. This study examines the effect of pre-admission β-blockade on post-traumatic depression. All adult trauma patients (≥18 years) with severe, isolated traumatic brain injury (intracranial Abbreviated Injury Scale score (AIS) ≥3 and extracranial AIS depression was defined as the prescription of antidepressants within one year of trauma. Patients with and without pre-admission β-blockers were matched 1:1 by age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score and head AIS. Analysis was carried out using McNemar's and Student's t-test for categorical and continuous data, respectively. A total of 545 patients met the study criteria. Of these, 15% (n=80) were prescribed β-blockers. After propensity matching, 80 matched pairs were analyzed. 33% (n=26) of non β-blocked patients developed post-traumatic depression, compared to only 18% (n=14) in the β-blocked group (p=0.04). There were no significant differences in ICU (mean days: 5.8 (SD 10.5) vs. 5.6 (SD 7.2), p=0.85) or hospital length of stay (mean days: 21 (SD 21) vs. 21 (SD 20), p=0.94) between cohorts. β-blockade appears to act prophylactically and significantly reduces the risk of post-traumatic depression in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injuries. Further prospective randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SPECTRUM OF SKULL FRACTURES IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI – A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Bhola Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a considerable cause of morbidity and mortality in India and around the world. Head injury provides one of the major contributions to death and better practical understanding of intracranial injuries is essential to the forensic expert. The cross sectional CT imaging makes the radiologic contribution to forensic autopsy more valuable and may improve accuracy of forensic investigation. To this reason we retrospectively evaluated the patterns of skull fractures on CT scan imaging of deceased patients. METHODS This cross sectional analysis was conducted in the department of forensic medicine Career institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow over a period of two years 2013-2015. In this study, we reviewed images of all the deceased patients (died in our hospital who underwent CT scanning at index admission for head injury. Demographic details and mode of injury was recorded from available data. Age was presented using mean and standard deviation, gender, mode of injury and type of skull fractures were presented as numbers and percentages. RESULTS Linear skull fractures were 172 out of which RTA due to unknown was 99 followed by fall of unknown reason was 32, RTA fall from two wheeler was 32. The cause of death in all these cases was due to head injury associated with fracture of skull or intracranial hemorrhages or brain injury. CONCLUSION Majority of fatal head injuries are due to road traffic accidents (RTA especially in younger and middle age, followed by fall from height. The common skull fracture type was linear (fissured skull fractures followed by depressed fractures. Retrospective CT evaluated has reinforced reporting medico legal of these cases.

  19. Sport-Related Structural Brain Injury: 3 Cases of Subdural Hemorrhage in American High School Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengo-Kahn, Aaron M; Gardner, Ryan M; Kuhn, Andrew W; Solomon, Gary S; Bonfield, Christopher M; Zuckerman, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    The risk of sport-related concussion (SRC) has emerged as a major public health concern. In rare instances, sport-related head injuries can be even more severe, such as subdural hemorrhage, epidural hemorrhage, or malignant cerebral edema. Unlike SRCs, sport-related structural brain injury (SRSBI) is rare, may require neurosurgical intervention, and can lead to permanent neurologic deficit or death. Data characterizing SRSBI are limited, and many have recognized the need to better understand these catastrophic brain injuries. The goal of the current series is to describe, in detail, the presentation, management, and outcomes of examples of these rare injuries. During the fall of 2015, three high school football players presented with acute subdural hemorrhages following in-game collisions and were treated at our institution within a span of 2 months. For the 2 athletes who required surgical intervention, a previous SRC was sustained within 4 weeks before the catastrophic event. One year after injury, 2 players have returned to school, though with persistent deficits. One patient remains nonverbal and wheelchair bound. None of the athletes has returned to sports. Acute subdural hemorrhage resultant from an in-game football collision is rare. The temporal proximity of the reported SRSBIs to recent SRCs emphasizes the importance of return-to-play protocols and raises questions regarding the possibility of second impact syndrome. Although epidemiologic conclusions cannot be drawn from this small sample, these cases provide a unique opportunity to demonstrate the presentation, management, and long-term outcomes of SRSBI in American high school football. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain CT to Assess Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappu, Suguna; Lerma, Jesus; Khraishi, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Morphologic features of computed tomography (CT) scans of the brain can be used to estimate intracranial pressure (ICP) via an image-processing algorithm. Clinically, such estimations can be used to prognosticate outcomes and avoid placement of invasive intracranial monitors in certain patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Features on a CT scan that may correlate with measurements of low ICP are sought. A measure is proposed that is a function of the distribution of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in and around the brain. In our method, we present an algorithm that semiautomatically segments brain parenchyma from CSF, and apply standard image processing calculations. The ratio of CSF volume to the size of the intracranial vault (ICV) or volume inside the skull, csf(v) /icv(v) is calculated and then plotted against the actual recorded ICP, yielding a relationship between the image features and ICP. We analyzed a total of 45 scans from 20 patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We showed that a ratio csf(v)/icv(v) > .034 correlates with an ICP < 20 mmHg (P = .0046). For csf(v)/icv(v) ≤ .034, a distinction between low and high ICP cannot be effectively estimated by this univariate measure. This method permits a noninvasive means of identifying patients who are low risk for having elevated ICP; by following Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines strictly such a patient may be subjected to an unnecessary, invasive procedure. This work is a promising pilot study that will need to be analyzed for a larger population. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  1. Delirium after a traumatic brain injury: predictors and symptom patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneewong J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jutaporn Maneewong,1 Benchalak Maneeton,1 Narong Maneeton,1 Tanat Vaniyapong,2 Patrinee Traisathit,3 Natthanidnan Sricharoen,3 Manit Srisurapanont1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Statistics, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Delirium in traumatic brain injury (TBI is common, may be predictable, and has a multifaceted symptom complex. This study aimed to examine: 1 the sum score of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and if its component scores could predict delirium in TBI patients, and 2 the prominent symptoms and their courses over the first days after TBI. Methods: TBI patients were recruited from neurosurgical ward inpatients. All participants were hospitalized within 24 hours after their TBI. Apart from the sum score of GCS, which was obtained at the emergency department (ED, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, diagnostic criteria for delirium were applied daily. The severity of delirium symptoms was assessed daily using the Delirium Rating Scale – Revised-98 (DRS-R-98. Results: The participants were 54 TBI patients with a mean GCS score of 12.7 (standard deviation [SD] =2.9. A total of 25 patients (46.3% met the diagnosis of delirium and had a mean age of 36.7 years (SD =14.8. Compared with 29 non-delirious patients, 25 delirious patients had a significantly lower mean GCS score (P=0.04, especially a significantly lower verbal component score (P=0.03. Among 18 delirious patients, four symptoms of the DRS-R-98 cognitive domain (orientation, attention, long-term memory, and visuospatial ability were moderate symptoms (score ≥2 at the first day of admission. After follow-up, three cognitive (orientation, attention, and visuospatial ability and two noncognitive symptoms (lability of affect and motor agitation rapidly resolved. Conclusion: Almost half of patients with mild to moderate head injuries may develop

  2. Traumatic brain injury, diabetic neuropathy and altered-psychiatric health: The fateful triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Dia, Batoul; Choucair, Khalil; Eid, Stephanie A; Najdi, Farah; Baki, Lama; Talih, Farid; Eid, Assaad A; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a detrimental medical condition particularly when accompanied by diabetes. There are several comorbidities going along with diabetes including, but not limited to, kidney failure, obesity, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, hypertension, stroke, neuropathies and amputations. Unlike diabetes type 1, diabetes type 2 is more common in adults who simultaneously suffer from other comorbid conditions making them susceptible to repetitive fall incidents and sustaining head trauma. The resulting brain insult exacerbates current psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, which, in turn, increases the risk of sustaining further brain traumas. The relationship between diabetes, traumatic brain injury and psychiatric health constitutes a triad forming a non-reversible vicious cycle. At the proteomic and psychiatric levels, cellular, molecular and behavioral alterations have been reported with the induction of non-traumatic brain injury in diabetic models such as stroke. However, research into traumatic brain injury has not been systematically investigated. Thus, in cases of diabetic neuropathy complicated with traumatic brain injury, utilizing fine structural and analytical techniques allows the identification of key biological markers that can then be used as innovative diagnostics as well as novel therapeutic targets in an attempt to treat diabetes and its sequelae especially those arising from repetitive mild brain trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-invasive brain stimulation for the treatment of symptoms following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simarjot K Dhaliwal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a common cause of physical, psychological, and cognitive impairment, but many current treatments for TBI are ineffective or produce adverse side effects. Non-invasive methods of brain stimulation could help ameliorate some common trauma-induced symptoms.Objective: This review summarizes instances in which repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS have been used to treat symptoms following a traumatic brain injury. A subsequent discussion attempts to determine the value of these methods in light of their potential risks.Methods: The research databases of PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO were electronically searched using terms relevant to the use of rTMS and tDCS as a tool to decrease symptoms in the context of rehabilitation post-TBI.Results: Eight case-studies and four multi-subject reports using rTMS and six multi-subject studies using tDCS were found. Two instances of seizure are discussed. Conclusions: There is evidence that rTMS can be an effective treatment option for some post-TBI symptoms such as depression, tinnitus, and neglect. Although the safety of this method remains uncertain, the use of rTMS in cases of mild-TBI without obvious structural damage may be justified. Evidence on the effectiveness of tDCS is mixed, highlighting the need for additional

  4. Traumatic rupture of adrenal pseudocyst leading to massive hemorrhage in retroperitoneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favorito Luciano A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a patient who had a large pseudocyst in the right adrenal gland, which was ruptured following blunt abdominal trauma, leading to a voluminous hemorrhage in retroperitoneum. A 29-year old female patient was admitted in the emergency room following a fall from stairs with trauma in right flank. She underwent a computerized tomography that evidenced a large retroperitoneal collection, with no apparent renal damage. She was submitted to surgery, where a large ruptured cyst was observed, originating from the upper portion of the right adrenal gland. Cystic diseases of adrenal gland are rare. Highly voluminous cysts can be damaged in cases of blunt trauma to the lumbar region leading to large hematomas in retroperitoneum.

  5. Regional brain morphometry predicts memory rehabilitation outcome after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Strangman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI commonly include difficulties with memory, attention, and executive dysfunction. These deficits are amenable to cognitive rehabilitation, but optimally selecting rehabilitation programs for individual patients remains a challenge. Recent methods for quantifying regional brain morphometry allow for automated quantification of tissue volumes in numerous distinct brain structures. We hypothesized that such quantitative structural information could help identify individuals more or less likely to benefit from memory rehabilitation. Fifty individuals with TBI of all severities who reported having memory difficulties first underwent structural MRI scanning. They then participated in a 12 session memory rehabilitation program emphasizing internal memory strategies (I-MEMS. Primary outcome measures (HVLT, RBMT were collected at the time of the MRI scan, immediately following therapy, and again at one month post-therapy. Regional brain volumes were used to predict outcome, adjusting for standard predictors (e.g., injury severity, age, education, pretest scores. We identified several brain regions that provided significant predictions of rehabilitation outcome, including the volume of the hippocampus, the lateral prefrontal cortex, the thalamus, and several subregions of the cingulate cortex. The prediction range of regional brain volumes were in some cases nearly equal in magnitude to prediction ranges provided by pretest scores on the outcome variable. We conclude that specific cerebral networks including these regions may contribute to learning during I-MEMS rehabilitation, and suggest that morphometric measures may provide substantial predictive value for rehabilitation outcome in other cognitive interventions as well.

  6. Brain structure in post-traumatic stress disorder: A voxel-based morphometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liwen; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Lu, Guangming; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Jun; Li, Weihui

    2013-09-15

    This study compared the difference in brain structure in 12 mine disaster survivors with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder, 7 cases of improved post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, and 14 controls who experienced the same mine disaster but did not suffer post-traumatic stress disorder, using the voxel-based morphometry method. The correlation between differences in brain structure and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms was also investigated. Results showed that the gray matter volume was the highest in the trauma control group, followed by the symptoms-improved group, and the lowest in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. Compared with the symptoms-improved group, the gray matter volume in the lingual gyrus of the right occipital lobe was reduced in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. Compared with the trauma control group, the gray matter volume in the right middle occipital gyrus and left middle frontal gyrus was reduced in the symptoms-improved group. Compared with the trauma control group, the gray matter volume in the left superior parietal lobule and right superior frontal gyrus was reduced in the chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group. The gray matter volume in the left superior parietal lobule was significantly positively correlated with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory subscale score in the symptoms-improved group and chronic post-traumatic stress disorder group (r = 0.477, P = 0.039). Our findings indicate that (1) chronic post-traumatic stress disorder patients have gray matter structural damage in the prefrontal lobe, occipital lobe, and parietal lobe, (2) after post-traumatic stress, the disorder symptoms are improved and gray matter structural damage is reduced, but cannot recover to the trauma-control level, and (3) the superior parietal lobule is possibly associated with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder. Post-traumatic stress disorder patients exhibit gray matter abnormalities.

  7. Profiles of Executive Function Across Children with Distinct Brain Disorders: Traumatic Brain Injury, Stroke, and Brain Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Gabriel C; Antonini, Tanya N; Anderson, Vicki; Vannatta, Kathryn A; Salley, Christina G; Bigler, Erin D; Taylor, H Gerry; Gerhardt, Cynthia; Rubin, Kenneth; Dennis, Maureen; Lo, Warren; Mackay, Mark T; Gordon, Anne; Hajek Koterba, Christine; Gomes, Alison; Greenham, Mardee; Owen Yeates, Keith

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether children with distinct brain disorders show different profiles of strengths and weaknesses in executive functions, and differ from children without brain disorder. Participants were children with traumatic brain injury (N=82; 8-13 years of age), arterial ischemic stroke (N=36; 6-16 years of age), and brain tumor (N=74; 9-18 years of age), each with a corresponding matched comparison group consisting of children with orthopedic injury (N=61), asthma (N=15), and classmates without medical illness (N=68), respectively. Shifting, inhibition, and working memory were assessed, respectively, using three Test of Everyday Attention: Children's Version (TEA-Ch) subtests: Creature Counting, Walk-Don't-Walk, and Code Transmission. Comparison groups did not differ in TEA-Ch performance and were merged into a single control group. Profile analysis was used to examine group differences in TEA-Ch subtest scaled scores after controlling for maternal education and age. As a whole, children with brain disorder performed more poorly than controls on measures of executive function. Relative to controls, the three brain injury groups showed significantly different profiles of executive functions. Importantly, post hoc tests revealed that performance on TEA-Ch subtests differed among the brain disorder groups. Results suggest that different childhood brain disorders result in distinct patterns of executive function deficits that differ from children without brain disorder. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. (JINS, 2017, 23, 529-538).

  8. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnada A. Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h and at follow-up (~90 days. DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS. Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM. MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI.

  9. Effect of cocaine use on outcomes in traumatic brain injury

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    Jacky T Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Animal and molecular studies have shown that cocaine exerts a neuroprotective effect against cerebral ischemia. Aims: To determine if the presence of cocaine metabolites on admission following traumatic brain injury (TBI is associated with better outcomes. Settings and Design: Level-1 trauma center, retrospective cohort. Materials and Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board (IRB approval, the trauma registry was searched from 2006 to 2009 for all patients aged 15-55 years with blunt head trauma and non-head AIS <3. Exclusion criteria were pre-existing brain pathology and death within 30 min of admission. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality; secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay (LOS, and Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS. Statistical Analysis: Logistic regression was used to determine the independent effect of cocaine on mortality. Hospital LOS was compared with multiple linear regression. Results: A total of 741 patients met criteria and had drug screens. The screened versus unscreened groups were similar. Cocaine positive patients were predominantly African-American (46% vs. 21%, P < 0.0001, older (40 years vs. 30 years, P < 0.0001, and had ethanol present more often (50.7% vs. 37.8%, P = 0.01. There were no differences in mortality (cocaine-positive 1.4% vs. cocaine-negative 2.7%, P = 0.6 on both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Positive cocaine screening was not associated with mortality in TBI. An effect may not have been detected because of the low mortality rate. LOS is affected by many factors unrelated to the injury and may not be a good surrogate for recovery. Similarly, GOS may be too coarse a measure to identify a benefit.

  10. Life satisfaction and disability after severe traumatic brain injury.

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    Mailhan, Laurence; Azouvi, Philippe; Dazord, Alice

    2005-04-01

    To assess the relationships between life satisfaction and disability after a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cross-sectional study, including 75 patients 2 years or more after a severe TBI. Life satisfaction was assessed with the Subjective Quality of Life Profile. Impairments, activities and participation were assessed with standardized tests. The satisfaction profile was flat, i.e. the majority of items obtained mean satisfaction scores close to 0, suggesting that participants felt indifferent to these items or in other words that they were neither satisfied nor unsatisfied. Patients were on average slightly dissatisfied with their cognitive functions, physical abilities and self-esteem. A factor analysis revealed three underlying factors. The main finding was that the relationships between life satisfaction and disability were not linear: the lowest satisfaction scores were reported by participants with moderate disability rated by the Glasgow Outcome Scale, while individuals with severe disability did not significantly differ from the good recovery group. Life satisfaction is not linearly related to disability after severe TBI.

  11. The diagnosis of traumatic brain injury on the battlefield.

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    Kara eSchmid

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed an increased awareness on traumatic brain injury (TBI. Various publications have estimated the incidence of TBI for our deployed servicemen, however all have been based on extrapolations of data sets or subjective evaluations due to our current method of diagnosing a TBI. Therefore it has been difficult to get an accurate rate and severity of deployment related TBIs, or the incidence of multiple TBIs our service members are experiencing. As such, there is a critical need to develop a rapid objective method to diagnose TBI on the battlefield. Because of the austere environment of the combat theatre the ideal diagnostic platform faces numerous logistical constraints not encountered in civilian trauma centers. Consequently, a simple blood test to diagnosis TBI represents a viable option for the military. This perspective will provide information on some of the current options for TBI biomarkers, detail concerning battlefield constraints and a possible acquisition strategy for the military. The end result is a non-invasive TBI diagnostic platform capable of providing much needed advances in objective triage capabilities and improved clinical management of in-Theatre TBI.

  12. Therapeutic Hypothermia in Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Alireza eFaridar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is considered to improve survival with favorable neurological outcome in the case of global cerebral ischemia after cardiac arrest and perinatal asphyxia. The efficacy of hypothermia in acute ischemic stroke (AIS and traumatic brain injury (TBI, however, is not well studied. Induction of TH typically requires a multimodal approach, including the use of both pharmacological agents and physical techniques. To date, clinical outcomes for patients with either AIS or TBI who received TH have yielded conflicting results; thus, no adequate therapeutic consensus has been reached. Nevertheless, it seems that by determining optimal TH parameters and also appropriate applications, cooling therapy still has the potential to become a valuable neuroprotective intervention.Among the various methods for hypothermia induction, intravascular cooling (IVC may have the most promise in the awake patient in terms of clinical outcomes. Currently, the IVC method has the capability of more rapid target temperature attainment and more precise control of temperature. However, this technique requires expertise in endovascular surgery that can preclude its application in the field and/or in most emergency settings. It is very likely that combining neuroprotective strategies will yield better outcomes than utilizing a single approach.

  13. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Antagonists and Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Bruce Lyeth

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Despite more than 30 years of research, no pharmacological agents have been identified that improve neurological function following TBI. However, several lines of research described in this review provide support for further development of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. Following TBI, neurons and astrocytes experience a rapid and sometimes enduring increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. These fluxes in [Ca2+]i drive not only apoptotic and necrotic cell death, but also can lead to long-term cell dysfunction in surviving cells. In a limited number of in vitro experiments, both L-type and N-type VGCC antagonists successfully reduced calcium loads as well as neuronal and astrocytic cell death following mechanical injury. In rodent models of TBI, administration of VGCC antagonists reduced cell death and improved cognitive function. It is clear that there is a critical need to find effective therapeutics and rational drug delivery strategies for the management and treatment of TBI, and we believe that further investigation of VGCC antagonists should be pursued before ruling out the possibility of successful translation to the clinic.

  14. Determinants of Effective Caregiver Communication After Adolescent Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Hobart-Porter, Laura; Wade, Shari; Minich, Nori; Kirkwood, Michael; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, Hudson Gerry

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the effects of caregiver mental health and coping strategies on interactions with an injured adolescent acutely after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Multi-site, cross-sectional study. Outpatient setting of 3 tertiary pediatric hospitals and 2 tertiary general medical centers. Adolescents (N = 125) aged 12-17 years, 1-6 months after being hospitalized with complicated mild to severe TBI. Data were collected as part of a multi-site clinical trial of family problem-solving therapy after TBI. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the relationship of caregiver and environmental characteristics to the dimensions of effective communication, warmth, and negativity during caregiver-adolescent problem-solving discussions. Adolescent and caregiver interactions, as measured by the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales. Caregivers who utilized problem-focused coping strategies were rated as having higher levels of effective communication (P adolescent and fewer children in the home were associated with increased parental warmth during the interaction (P adolescent TBI severity nor caregiver depression significantly influenced caregiver-teen interactions. Problem-focused coping strategies are associated with higher levels of effective communication and lower levels of caregiver negativity during the initial months after adolescent TBI, suggesting that effective caregiver coping may facilitate better caregiver-adolescent interactions after TBI. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Irony and empathy in children with traumatic brain injury.

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    Dennis, Maureen; Simic, Nevena; Agostino, Alba; Taylor, H Gerry; Bigler, Erin D; Rubin, Kenneth; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Stancin, Terry; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2013-03-01

    Social communication involves influencing what other people think and feel about themselves. We use the term conative theory of mind (ToM) to refer to communicative interactions involving one person trying to influence the mental and emotional state of another, paradigmatic examples of which are irony and empathy. This study reports how children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) understand ironic criticism and empathic praise, on a task requiring them to identify speaker belief and intention for direct conative speech acts involving literal truth, and indirect speech acts involving either ironic criticism or empathic praise. Participants were 71 children in the chronic state of a single TBI and 57 age- and gender-matched children with orthopedic injuries (OI). Group differences emerged on indirect speech acts involving conation (i.e., irony and empathy), but not on structurally and linguistically identical direct speech acts, suggesting specific deficits in this aspect of social cognition in school-age children with TBI. Deficits in children with mild-moderate TBI were less widespread and more selective than those of children with more severe injuries. Deficits in understanding the social, conative function of indirect speech acts like irony and empathy have widespread and deep implications for social function in children with TBI.

  16. Prospective memory in pediatric traumatic brain injury: a preliminary study.

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    McCauley, Stephen R; Levin, Harvey S

    2004-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) performance was investigated in a preliminary study of children and adolescents ages 10-19 in 3 groups: individuals with orthopedic injuries (not involving the head) requiring hospitalization (Ortho, N = 15), mild traumatic brain injury (TBI, N = 17), and severe TBI (N = 15). All participants with TBI were at least 5 years postinjury and participants in the Ortho group were at least 3 years postinjury. The PM task involved reporting words presented in blue during a category decision task in which words were presented in several different colors and participants were to determine which of two categories the word belonged. Participants were asked to make their choices as quickly as possible. After a 10- to 15-min intervening computer task in which all words were presented in black letters, a large proportion of participants with mild or severe TBI failed to indicate any blue words when they appeared. After a reminder to perform the PM task was given to all at the same point in the task, PM performance increased in the Ortho and Mild TBI groups, but remained comparably impaired in the Severe TBI group. Reaction time (RT) data indicated that mean RT was slower with increasing TBI severity. Further, there was a significant cost in RT for performing the PM task during the ongoing category decision task for all groups. The cost in terms of slowed RT increased with greater TBI severity.

  17. Traumatic brain injury: endocrine consequences in children and adults.

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    Richmond, Erick; Rogol, Alan D

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of death and disability in young adults with consequences ranging from physical disabilities to long-term cognitive, behavioral, psychological and social defects. Recent data suggest that pituitary hormone deficiency is not infrequent among TBI survivors; the prevalence of reported hypopituitarism following TBI varies widely among published studies. The most common cause of TBI is motor vehicle accidents, including pedestrian-car and bicycle car encounters, falls, child abuse, violence and sports injuries. Prevalence of hypopituitarism, from total to isolated pituitary deficiency, ranges from 5 to 90 %. The time interval between TBI and pituitary function evaluation is one of the major factors responsible for variations in the prevalence of hypopituitarism reported. Endocrine dysfunction after TBI in children and adolescents is common. Adolescence is a time of growth, freedom and adjustment, consequently TBI is also common in this group. Sports-related TBI is an important public health concern, but many cases are unrecognized and unreported. Sports that are associated with an increased risk of TBI include those involving contact and/or collisions such as boxing, football, soccer, ice hockey, rugby, and the martial arts, as well as high velocity sports such as cycling, motor racing, equestrian sports, skiing and roller skating. The aim of this paper is to summarize the best evidence of TBI as a cause of pituitary deficiency in children and adults.

  18. Neurobehavioral Characteristics of Older Veterans With Remote Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Peltz, Carrie B; Gardner, Raquel C; Kenney, Kimbra; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Kramer, Joel H; Yaffe, Kristine

    While traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common across the life span, the detailed neurobehavioral characteristics of older adults with prior TBI remain unclear. Our goal was to compare the clinical profile of older independently living veterans with and without prior TBI. Two veterans' retirement communities. Seventy-five participants with TBI and 71 without (mean age = 78 years). Cross-sectional. TBI history was determined by the Ohio State University TBI Questionnaire. We assessed psychiatric and medical history via interviews and chart review and conducted measures assessing functional/lifestyle, psychiatric, and cognitive outcomes. Regression analyses (adjusted for demographics, diabetes, prior depression, substance abuse, and site) were performed to compare between TBI and non-TBI participants. Compared with veterans without TBI, those with TBI had greater functional impairment (adjusted P = .05), endorsed more current depressive (adjusted P = .04) and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms (adjusted P = .01), and had higher rates of prior depression and substance abuse (both adjusted Ps < .01). While composite memory and language scores did not differ between groups, participants with TBI performed worse on tests of executive functioning/processing speed (adjusted P = .01). Our results suggest that TBI may have adverse long-term neurobehavioral consequences and that TBI-exposed adults may require careful screening and follow-up.

  19. Exploring Vocational Evaluation Practices following Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Christina Dillahunt-Aspillaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI face many challenges when attempting to return to work (RTW. Vocational evaluation (VE is a systematic process that involves assessment and appraisal of an individual’s current work-related characteristics and abilities. Objective. The aims of this study are to (1 examine demographic and employment characteristics of vocational rehabilitation providers (VRPs, (2 identify the specific evaluation methods that are used in the VE of individuals with TBI, and (3 examine the differences in assessment method practices based upon evaluator assessment preferences. Methods. This exploratory case study used a forty-six-item online survey which was distributed to VRPs. Results. One hundred and nine VRPs accessed the survey. Of these, 74 completed the survey. A majority of respondents were female (79.7%, Caucasian (71.6%, and holding a master’s degree (74.3%, and more than half (56.8% were employed as state vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRCs. In addition, over two-thirds (67.6% were certified rehabilitation counselors (CRCs. Respondents reported using several specific tools and assessments during the VE process. Conclusions. Study findings reveal differences in use of and rationales for specific assessments amongst VRPs. Understanding VRP assessment practices and use of an evidence-based framework for VE following TBI may inform and improve VE practice.

  20. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

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    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  1. Executive Functioning of Combat Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

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    Gaines, Katy D; Soper, Henry V; Berenji, Gholam R

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates neuropsychological deficits in recently deployed veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Veterans discharged from 2007 to 2012 were recruited from Veterans Affairs clinics. Independent groups of participants with mTBI (n = 57) and those without TBI (n = 57) were administered the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Combat Exposure Scale, Word Memory Test, and the Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview. Neuropsychological instruments included the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, Letter and Category Fluency, Trail-Making Test-Parts A and B, Christiansen H-abbreviated, Soper Neuropsychology Screen, Wechsler Memory Scale subtests Logical Memory I and II, and the Street Completion Test. The mTBI group performed significantly worse on all of the executive and nonexecutive measurements with the exception of Category Fluency, after controlling for age, depression effort, and combat exposure. Depression and combat exposure were greater for the mTBI group. The mTBI group scored poorer on effort, but only the Multiple Choice subtest was significant. The mTBI group had good awareness of their deficits.

  2. Verbal learning strategy following mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Geary, Elizabeth K; Kraus, Marilyn F; Rubin, Leah H; Pliskin, Neil H; Little, Deborah M

    2011-07-01

    That learning and memory deficits persist many years following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is controversial due to inconsistent objective evidence supporting subjective complaints. Our prior work demonstrated significant reductions in performance on the initial trial of a verbal learning task and overall slower rate of learning in well-motivated mTBI participants relative to demographically matched controls. In our previous work, we speculated that differences in strategy use could explain the differences in rate of learning. The current study serves to test this hypothesis by examining strategy use on the California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition. Our present findings support the primary hypothesis that mTBI participants under-utilize semantic clustering strategies during list-learning relative to control participants. Despite achieving comparable total learning scores, we posit that the persisting learning and memory difficulties reported by some mTBI patients may be related to reduced usage of efficient internally driven strategies that facilitate learning. Given that strategy training has demonstrated improvements in learning and memory in educational and occupational settings, we offer that these findings have translational value in offering an additional approach in remediation of learning and memory complaints reported by some following mTBI.

  3. Neuropsychological differential diagnosis of mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Larrabee, Glenn J; Rohling, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis and evaluation of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is reviewed from the perspective of meta-analyses of neuropsychological outcome, showing full recovery from a single, uncomplicated mTBI by 90 days post-trauma. Persons with history of complicated mTBI characterized by day-of-injury computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, and those who have suffered prior mTBIs may or may not show evidence of complete recovery similar to that experienced by persons suffering a single, uncomplicated mTBI. Persistent post-concussion syndrome (PCS) is considered as a somatoform presentation, influenced by the non-specificity of PCS symptoms which commonly occur in non-TBI samples and co-vary as a function of general life stress, and psychological factors including symptom expectation, depression and anxiety. A model is presented for forensic evaluation of the individual mTBI case, which involves open-ended interview, followed by structured interview, record review, and detailed neuropsychological testing. Differential diagnosis includes consideration of other neurologic and psychiatric disorders, symptom expectation, diagnosis threat, developmental disorders, and malingering. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Resilience is associated with fatigue after mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Losoi, Heidi; Wäljas, Minna; Turunen, Senni; Brander, Antti; Helminen, Mika; Luoto, Teemu M; Rosti-Otajärvi, Eija; Julkunen, Juhani; Öhman, Juha

    2015-01-01

    To examine resilience as a predictor of change in self-reported fatigue after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A consecutive series of 67 patients with MTBI and 34 orthopedic controls. Prospective longitudinal study. Resilience Scale, Beck Depression Inventory-Second Edition, and Pain subscale from Ruff Neurobehavioral Inventory 1 month after injury and Barrow Neurological Institute Fatigue Scale 1 and 6 months after injury. Insomnia, pain, and depressive symptoms were significantly correlated with fatigue, but even when these variables were controlled for, resilience significantly predicted the change in fatigue from 1 to 6 months after MTBI. In patients with MTBI, the correlation between resilience and fatigue strengthened during follow-up. In controls, significant associations between resilience and fatigue were not found. Resilience is a significant predictor of decrease in self-reported fatigue following MTBI. Resilience seems to be a relevant factor to consider in the management of fatigue after MTBI along with the previously established associated factors (insomnia, pain, and depressive symptoms).

  5. Prognostic significance of age in traumatic brain injury

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    S S Dhandapani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age is a strong prognostic factor following traumatic brain injury (TBI, with discrepancies defining the critical prognostic age threshold. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of various age thresholds on outcome after TBI. Materials and Methods : The ages of patients admitted with TBI were prospectively studied in relation to mode of injury, Glasgow coma score (GCS, CT category and surgical intervention. Mortality was assessed at 1 month, and neurological outcome was assessed at 6 months. Appropriate statistical analyzes (details in article were performed. Results: Of the total 244 patients enrolled, 144 patients had severe, 38 patients had moderate and 62 patients had mild TBI, respectively. Age had significant association with grade of injury, CT category and surgical intervention (P 59 years respectively (P 40 years in all subgroups, based on GCS and surgical intervention (P < 0.05. Conclusions : In patients with TBI, age demonstrates independent association with unfavorable outcome at 6 months, in stepwise manner centered on a threshold of 40 years.

  6. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Kent Reifschneider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life.

  7. Traumatic brain injury amongst indigenous people: a systematic review.

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    Lakhani, Ali; Townsend, Clare; Bishara, Jason

    2017-01-01

    To identify the types of research focusing on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) amongst Indigenous people in order to (i) synthesise their findings and (ii) ascertain where research gaps exist. A systematic review using the PRISMA approach was employed. Eight databases were searched for peer-reviewed literature published at any date. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. The majority of studies focused on the prevalence or incidence of TBI amongst Indigenous people (n = 15). Twelve of these found Indigenous people had a higher prevalence or incidence of TBI compared to non-Indigenous people. Under-researched areas include (with number of articles identified in brackets): Indigenous level of injury or recovery (n = 2), neuropsychological assessment and TBI (n = 3), Indigenous perspectives of TBI (n = 2), Indigenous intervention for TBI (n = 1), and rehabilitation for TBI (n = 4). Published studies demonstrate that Indigenous people have a higher prevalence or incidence of TBI compared to non-Indigenous people. Limited studies explore culturally appropriate rehabilitation and intervention methods and Indigenous understandings of TBI. It is imperative that future research consider the nature and efficacy of culturally appropriate approaches and their contribution towards better outcomes for Indigenous people with TBI, and their families and communities.

  8. Return to work following mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Wäljas, Minna; Iverson, Grant L; Lange, Rael T; Liimatainen, Suvi; Hartikainen, Kaisa M; Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo; Ohman, Juha

    2014-01-01

    To examine factors relating to return to work (RTW) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). One hundred and nine patients (Age: M = 37.4 years, SD = 13.2; 52.3% women) who sustained an mTBI. Inception cohort design with questionnaires and neuropsychological testing completed approximately 3 to 4 weeks postinjury. Emergency Department of Tampere University Hospital, Finland. Self-report (postconcussion symptoms, depression, fatigue, and general health) and neurocognitive measures (attention and memory). The cumulative RTW rates were as follows: 1 week = 46.8%, 2 weeks = 59.6%, 3 weeks = 67.0%, 4 weeks = 70.6%, 2 months = 91.7%, and 1 year = 97.2%. Four variables were significant predictors of the number of days to RTW: age, multiple bodily injuries, intracranial abnormality at the day of injury, and fatigue ratings (all P work fewer than 30 days after injury (n = 82, 75.2%) versus more than 30 days (n = 27, 24.8%) did not differ on demographic or neuropsychological variables. The vast majority of this cohort returned to work within 2 months. Predictors of slower RTW included age, multiple bodily injuries, intracranial abnormality at the day of injury, and fatigue.

  9. Detecting Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Resting State Magnetoencephalographic Connectivity.

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    Vasily A Vakorin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate means to detect mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI using objective and quantitative measures remain elusive. Conventional imaging typically detects no abnormalities despite post-concussive symptoms. In the present study, we recorded resting state magnetoencephalograms (MEG from adults with mTBI and controls. Atlas-guided reconstruction of resting state activity was performed for 90 cortical and subcortical regions, and calculation of inter-regional oscillatory phase synchrony at various frequencies was performed. We demonstrate that mTBI is associated with reduced network connectivity in the delta and gamma frequency range (>30 Hz, together with increased connectivity in the slower alpha band (8-12 Hz. A similar temporal pattern was associated with correlations between network connectivity and the length of time between the injury and the MEG scan. Using such resting state MEG network synchrony we were able to detect mTBI with 88% accuracy. Classification confidence was also correlated with clinical symptom severity scores. These results provide the first evidence that imaging of MEG network connectivity, in combination with machine learning, has the potential to accurately detect and determine the severity of mTBI.

  10. Pain Catastrophizing Correlates with Early Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Outcome

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    Geneviève Chaput

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Identifying which patients are most likely to be at risk of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI is a difficult clinical challenge. Objectives. To examine the relationship between pain catastrophizing, defined as the exaggerated negative appraisal of a pain experience, and early MTBI outcome. Methods. This cross-sectional design included 58 patients diagnosed with a MTBI. In addition to medical chart review, postconcussion symptoms were assessed by self-report at 1 month (Time 1 and 8 weeks (Time 2 after MTBI. Pain severity, psychological distress, level of functionality, and pain catastrophizing were measured by self-report at Time 2. Results. The pain catastrophizing subscales of rumination, magnification, and helplessness were significantly correlated with pain severity (r=.31 to .44, number of postconcussion symptoms reported (r=.35 to .45, psychological distress (r=.57 to .67, and level of functionality (r=-.43 to -.29. Pain catastrophizing scores were significantly higher for patients deemed to be at high risk of postconcussion syndrome (6 or more symptoms reported at both Time 1 and Time 2. Conclusions. Higher levels of pain catastrophizing were related to adverse early MTBI outcomes. The early detection of pain catastrophizing may facilitate goal-oriented interventions to prevent or minimize the development of chronic pain and other postconcussion symptoms.

  11. Traumatic brain injury–Modeling neuropsychiatric symptoms in rodents

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    Oz eMalkesman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the United States, approximately 1.5 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI. Victims of TBI can suffer from chronic post-TBI symptoms, such as sensory and motor deficits, cognitive impairments including problems with memory, learning, and attention, and neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, irritability, aggression, and suicidal rumination. Although partially associated with the site and severity of injury, the biological mechanisms associated with many of these symptoms—and why some patients experience differing assortments of persistent maladies—are largely unknown. The use of animal models is a promising strategy for elucidation of the mechanisms of impairment and treatment, and learning, memory, sensory and motor tests have widespread utility in rodent models of TBI and psychopharmacology. Comparatively, behavioral tests for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric symptomatology are rarely employed in animal models of TBI and, as determined in this review, the results have been inconsistent. Animal behavioral studies contribute to the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which TBI is associated with neurobehavioral symptoms and offer a powerful means for pre-clinical treatment validation. Therefore, further exploration of the utility of animal behavioral tests for the study of injury mechanisms and therapeutic strategies for the alleviation of emotional symptoms are relevant and essential.

  12. Exploring theory of mind after severe traumatic brain injury.

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    Muller, François; Simion, Audrey; Reviriego, Elsa; Galera, Cédric; Mazaux, Jean-Michel; Barat, Michel; Joseph, Pierre-Alain

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have reported a dissociation between social behavioral impairments after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and relatively preserved performances in traditional tasks that investigate cognitive abilities. Theory of mind (ToM) refers to the ability to make inferences about other's mental states and use them to understand and predict others' behavior. We tested a group of 15 patients with severe TBI and 15 matched controls on a series of four verbal and non-verbal ToM tasks: the faux pas test, the first-order and second-order false belief task, the character intention task and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test. Participants with severe TBI were also compared to controls on non-ToM inference tasks of indirect speech act from the Montreal Evaluation of Communication (M.E.C.) Protocol and empathy (Davis Interpersonal Reactivity Index - I.R.I.) and tests for executive functions. Subjects with TBI performed worse than control subjects on all ToM tasks, except the first-order false belief task. The findings converge with previous evidence for ToM deficit in TBI and dissociation between ToM and executive functions. We show that ToM deficit is probably distinct from other aspects of social cognition like empathy and pragmatic communication skills. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive correlates of narrative impairment in moderate traumatic brain injury.

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    Marini, Andrea; Zettin, Marina; Galetto, Valentina

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are often associated with communicative deficits. The incoherent and impoverished language observed in non-aphasic individuals with severe TBI has been linked to a problem in the global organization of information at the text level. The present study aimed to analyze the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with moderate TBI (modTBI). 10 non-aphasic speakers with modTBI and 20 neurologically intact participants were recruited for the experiment. Their cognitive, linguistic and narrative skills were thoroughly assessed. The persons with modTBI exhibited normal phonological, lexical and grammatical skills. However, their narratives were characterized by lower levels of Lexical Informativeness and more errors of both Local and Global Coherence that, at times, made their narratives vague and ambiguous. Significant correlations were found between these narrative difficulties and the production of both perseverative and non-perseverative errors on the WCST. These disturbances confirm previous findings which suggest a deficit at the interface between cognitive and linguistic processing rather than a specific linguistic disturbance in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive assessment of pycnogenol therapy following traumatic brain injury.

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    Scheff, Stephen W; Roberts, Kelly N

    2016-11-10

    We have previously shown that pycnogenol (PYC) increases antioxidants, decreases oxidative stress, suppresses neuroinflammation and enhances synaptic plasticity following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we investigate the effects of PYC on cognitive function following a controlled cortical impact (CCI). Adult Sprague-Dawley rats received a CCI injury followed by an intraperitoneal injection of PYC (50 or 100mg/kg). Seven days post trauma, subjects were evaluated in a Morris water maze (MWM) and evaluated for changes in lesion volume. Some animals were evaluated at 48h for hippocampal Fluoro-jade B (FJB) staining. The highest dose of PYC therapy significantly reduced lesion volume, with no improvement in MWM compared to vehicle controls. PYC failed to reduce the total number of FJB positive neurons in the hippocampus. These results suggest that the reduction of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are not the key components of the secondary injury that contribute to cognitive deficits following TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Visual-vestibular processing deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

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    Wright, W G; Tierney, R T; McDevitt, J

    2017-01-01

    The search for reliable and valid signs and symptoms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly synonymous with concussion, has lead to a growing body of evidence that individuals with long-lasting, unremitting impairments often experience visual and vestibular symptoms, such as dizziness, postural and gait disturbances. Investigate the role of visual-vestibular processing deficits following concussion. A number of clinically accepted vestibular, oculomotor, and balance assessments as well as a novel virtual reality (VR)-based balance assessment device were used to assess adults with post-acute concussion (n = 14) in comparison to a healthy age-matched cohort (n = 58). Significant between-group differences were found with the VR-based balance device (p = 0.001), with dynamic visual motion emerging as the most discriminating balance condition. The symptom reports collected after performing the oculomotor and vestibular tests: rapid alternating horizontal eye saccades, optokinetic stimulation, and gaze stabilization, were all sensitive to health status (p vestibular tasks most closely linked to spatial and self-motion perception had the greatest discriminatory outcomes. The current findings suggest that mesencephalic and parieto-occipital centers and pathways may be involved in concussion.

  16. Sleep and wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, C; Dumont, M; Wiseman-Hakes, C; Arbour, C; Mongrain, V; Gaudreault, P-O; Khoury, S; Lavigne, G; Desautels, A; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern in industrialised countries. Sleep and wake disturbances are among the most persistent and disabling sequelae after TBI. Yet, despite the widespread complaints of post-TBI sleep and wake disturbances, studies on their etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments remain inconclusive. This narrative review aims to summarise the current state of knowledge regarding the nature of sleep and wake disturbances following TBI, both subjective and objective, spanning all levels of severity and phases post-injury. A second goal is to outline the various causes of post-TBI sleep-wake disturbances. Globally, although sleep-wake complaints are reported in all studies and across all levels of severity, consensus regarding the objective nature of these disturbances is not unanimous and varies widely across studies. In order to optimise recovery in TBI survivors, further studies are required to shed light on the complexity and heterogeneity of post-TBI sleep and wake disturbances, and to fully grasp the best timing and approach for intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondria and microRNA crosstalk in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Sullivan, Patrick G; Springer, Joe E

    2017-02-06

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of long-term impairments in higher cognitive functioning, including deficits in attention and memory. It is well known that some of these persistent deficits are related, in part, to ongoing secondary injury events characterized by pervasive biochemical and pathophysiological stressors, including a rapid and sustained phase of mitochondrial dysfunction. A loss of mitochondrial function impacts a number of important cellular events and we have begun to investigate the novel hypothesis that mitochondria play a critical role in regulating the cellular activity of specific microRNAs in response to cellular demands and stressors. In this special issue report, we summarize briefly the rationale for investigating the crosstalk between mitochondria and microRNA, and provide recent preliminary data suggesting that mitochondria-microRNA interactions are modified in response to TBI-related cellular stressors. We postulate that this interaction is critical for regulating appropriate cellular microRNA responses, which opens up opportunities for therapeutic interventions targeting both mitochondrial function and microRNA activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Social reintegration of traumatic brain-injured: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelle, J-L; Wild, K Von; Onillon, M; Montreuil, M

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) may lead to specific handicap, often hidden, mainly due to cognitive and behavioural sequelae. Social re-entry is a long-term, fluctuant and precarious process. The French experience will be illustrated by 6 initiatives answering to 6 challenges to do with TBI specificities:1. bridging the gap, between initial rehabilitation and community re-entry, via transitional units dealing with assessment, retraining, social/vocational orientation and follow-up. Today, there are 30 such units based on multidisciplinary teams.2. assessing recovery by TBI-specific and validated evaluation tools: EBIS holistic document, BNI Screening of higher cerebral functions, Glasgow outcome extended, and QOLIBRI, a TBI-specific quality of life tool.3. promoting specific re-entry programmes founded on limited medication, ecological neuro-psychological rehabilitation, exchange groups and workshops, violence prevention, continuity of care, environmental structuration, and "resocialisation".4. taking into account the "head injured family"5. facilitating recovery after sports-related concussion6. facing medico-legal consequences and compensation: In that perspective, we developed guidelines for TBI-specific expert appraisal, including mandatory neuro-psychological assessment, family interview and an annual forum gathering lawyers and health professionals.

  19. Effectiveness of Traumatic Brain Injury management guideline introduction in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorinola, Abayomi; Buki, Andras; Sandor, Janos; Czeiter, Endre

    2017-04-27

    The aim of this study was to describe the impact of the Traumatic Brain Injury management guideline introduction in Hungary. Hospital discharge records (HDR) including age, gender, codes of interventions applied, ICD codes of diagnosed disorders of patients admitted between 01/01/2004 and 31/12/2010 with diagnosis of intracranial injury (S06 by ICD10) from every inpatient institution in Hungary were collected from the database of National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF). The Case Fatality Rates (CFR) for one week, one month and six months were calculated for the periods before and after the guideline introduction. The change of CFRs was applied as indicators for change of clinical quality elicited by guideline. The centers together at one week, one month and six months had pre-guideline introduction CFRs of 23.4 %, 37.7 % and 47.5 % and post-guideline introduction CFRs of 22.1%, 39.1%, and 50.0% respectively. The secondary institutions together at one week, one month and six months had pre-guideline introduction CFRs of 21.5 %, 34.8 % and 46.3 % and post-guideline introduction CFRs of 21.9%, 37.0%, and 48.9% respectively. None of the CFRs showed significant change. The effectiveness of TBI management guideline adaptation in Hungary is poor. Without supportive financing and external auditing system, guideline introduction alone cannot achieve standard clinical practice and a reduction in CFR.

  20. Labetalol Prevents Intestinal Dysfunction Induced by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Yuhuang; Fu, Fengming; Sun, Dalong; Xi, Chenhui; Chen, Fengyuan

    2015-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic blockade has been hypothesized to have a protective effect on intestinal dysfunction and increased intestinal permeability associated with the epinephrine surge after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wister rats were subjected to either a weight drop TBI, and intraperitoneally injected or not with labetalol, or a sham procedure (18 rats per group). After 3, 6, or 12h (6 rats per subgroup), intestinal permeability to 4.4 kDa FITC-Dextran and plasma epinephrine levels were measured as was intestinal tight junction protein ZO-1 expression at 12h. Terminal ileum was harvested to measure levels of intestinal tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and to evaluate histopathology. In TBI group vs. sham group, intestinal permeability (Plabetalol group, 1) intestinal permeability was significantly lower at 6 and 12h (94.31±7.64 vs. 102.16±6.40 μg/mL; 110.21±7.52 vs. 118.95±7.11 μg/mL, respectively); 2) levels of plasma epinephrine and intestinal TNF-α were significantly lower at 3, 6 and 12h; and 3) intestinal ZO-1 expression was higher at 3, 6 and 12h (p=0.018). Histopathological evaluation showed that labetalol use preserved intestinal architecture throughout. In a rat model of TBI, labetalol reduced TBI-induced sympathetic hyperactivity, and prevented histopathological intestinal injury accompanied by changes in gut permeability and gut TNF-α expression.

  1. Alexithymia and avoidance coping following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Rodger Ll; Doughty, Caitríona

    2013-01-01

    Individuals who develop maladaptive coping styles after traumatic brain injury (TBI) usually experience difficulty expressing their emotional state, increasing the risk of psychological distress. Difficulties expressing emotion and identifying feelings are features of alexithymia, which is prevalent following TBI. To examine the relations among coping styles, alexithymia, and psychological distress following TBI. Seventy-one patients with TBI drawn from a head injury clinic population and 54 demographically matched healthy controls. Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20, Estonian COPE-D Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. The participants with TBI exhibited significantly higher rates of alexithymia and psychological distress and lower levels of task-oriented coping than healthy controls. Levels of avoidance coping and psychological distress were significantly higher in a subgroup of TBI patients with alexithymia than in a non-alexithymic TBI subsample. There were significant relations among alexithymia, avoidance coping, and levels of psychological distress. Regression analysis revealed that difficulty identifying feelings was a significant predictor for psychological distress. Early screening for alexithymia following TBI might identify those most at risk of developing maladaptive coping mechanisms. This could assist in developing early rehabilitation interventions to reduce vulnerability to later psychological distress.

  2. Neurobehavioral Abnormalities Associated with Executive Dysfunction after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodger Ll. Wood

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article will address how anomalies of executive function after traumatic brain injury (TBI can translate into altered social behavior that has an impact on a person’s capacity to live safely and independently in the community.Method: Review of literature on executive and neurobehavioral function linked to cognitive ageing in neurologically healthy populations and late neurocognitive effects of serious TBI. Information was collated from internet searches involving MEDLINE, PubMed, PyscINFO and Google Scholar as well as the authors’ own catalogs.Conclusions: The conventional distinction between cognitive and emotional-behavioral sequelae of TBI is shown to be superficial in the light of increasing evidence that executive skills are critical for integrating and appraising environmental events in terms of cognitive, emotional and social significance. This is undertaken through multiple fronto-subcortical pathways within which it is possible to identify a predominantly dorsolateral network that subserves executive control of attention and cognition (so-called cold executive processes and orbito-frontal/ventro-medial pathways that underpin the hot executive skills that drive much of behavior in daily life. TBI frequently involves disruption to both sets of executive functions but research is increasingly demonstrating the role of hot executive deficits underpinning a wide range of neurobehavioral disorders that compromise relationships, functional independence and mental capacity in daily life.

  3. Impaired emotional contagion following severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Jacqueline Ann; McDonald, Skye; Randall, Rebekah; de Sousa, Arielle; Trimmer, Emily; Fisher, Alana

    2013-09-01

    Empathy deficits are widely-documented in individuals after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study examined the relationship between empathy deficits and psychophysiological responsivity in adults with TBI to determine if impaired responsivity is ameliorated through repeated emotional stimulus presentations. Nineteen TBI participants (13 males; 41 years) and 25 control participants (14 males; 31 years) viewed five repetitions of six 2-min film clip segments containing pleasant, unpleasant, and neutral content. Facial muscle responses (zygomaticus and corrugator), tonic heart rate (HR) and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded. Mean responses for each viewing period were compared to a pre-experiment 2-min resting baseline period. Self-reported emotional empathy was also assessed. TBI participants demonstrated identical EMG response patterns to controls, i.e. an initial large facial response to both pleasant and unpleasant films, followed by habituation over repetitions for pleasant films, and sustained response to unpleasant films. Additionally, an increase in both arousal and HR deceleration to stimulus repetitions was found, which was larger for TBI participants. Compared to controls, TBI participants self-reported lower emotional empathy, and had lower resting arousal, and these measures were positively correlated. Results are consistent with TBI producing impairments in emotional empathy and responsivity. While some normalisation of physiological arousal appeared with repeated stimulus presentations, this came at the cost of greater attentional effort. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrastructural mitochondria changes in perihematomal brain and neuroprotective effects of Huperzine A after acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu H

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haiying Lu,1,* Mei Jiang,2,* Lei Lu,3 Guo Zheng,1 Qiang Dong3 1Department of Neurology, Nanjing Children’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Pudong New Area Gongli Hospital, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: The purpose of the study was to observe the ultrastructural changes of neuronal mitochondria in perihematomal brain tissue and assess the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A (HA, a mitochondrial protector following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods: Brain hemorrhage was induced in adult Sprague Dawley rats by injecting autologous blood into the striatum and then removing the brains 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 hours later to analyze mitochondrial ultrastructure in a blinded manner. Parallel groups of ICH rats were treated with HA or saline immediately after ICH. Perihematomal apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation were tracked by immunoblots, and neurobehavioral test results were compared between the groups. Results: Mitochondria in perihematomal neurons demonstrated dramatic changes including mitochondrial swelling, intracristal dilation, and decreased matrix density. HA treatment decreased mitochondrial injury and apoptosis, inhibited caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation, and improved behavioral recovery. Conclusion: These data show that ICH induces dramatic mitochondrial damage, and HA exhibits protective effects possibly through ameliorating mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest a new direction for novel therapeutics. Keywords: apoptosis, intracerebral hemorrhage, mitochondria, huperzine A, neuroprotection

  5. [Munchausen syndrome, a factitious injury, presenting brain abscess and intraventricular hemorrhage: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yukihiro; Sasajima, Hiroyasu; Aita, Kazuyasu; Furuno, Yuichi; Owada, Kei; Tatsuzawa, Kazunori; Inoue, Yasuo; Mineura, Katsuyoshi

    2011-04-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a factitious disorder. Patients sometimes inflict injury on themselves in order to assume a sick role. The authors report a patient with Munchausen syndrome suffered from brain abscess, reopened wound and intraventricular hemorrhage. A 64-year-old male was admitted to our hospital after head injury. CT and MR imaging revealed a mass with surrounding edema in the right frontal lobe. The mass was surgically removed, and diagnosed as brain abscess. During the surgery, the authors noticed a small bone defect in the frontal bone above the brain abscess; therefore, we considered that head injury just concerned this lesion. There were no particular clues leading to other possible pathologies. After the first surgery, the patient presented atypical seizures several times. Once we discharged him from our hospital, we hospitalized him again because the wound had reopened. A subsequent operation was needed, and we removed the bone flap which we considered the origin of the infection. After the second surgery, he stabbed a nail into his head where the bone had been removed due to the previous surgery, and presented intraventricular hemorrhage. The hemorrhage decreased in size through non-surgical treatment and he was referred to the psychiatry department under a diagnosis of Munchausen syndrome. Diagnosis of this entity is difficult and often made at the later stage of hospitalization, because patients present a variety of complaints and clinical symptoms, which are hardly proved factitious. Early consideration of this syndrome will offer an early and accurate diagnosis, and is mandatory for a good prognosis.

  6. Irreversible Total Loss of Brain Function and Organ Donation in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohme, Malte; Sauvigny, Thomas; Grensemann, Jörn; Söffker, Gerold; Kluge, Stefan; Westphal, Manfred; Czorlich, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a life-threatening disease with an often fatal clinical course leading to irreversible loss of brain function (ILBF) (i.e., brain death). The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and characteristics of patients with aSAH who became organ donors after diagnosis of ILBF. Anonymized clinical data sets of 395 patients treated for aSAH at a university medical center from January 2011 to December 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. Prevalence of consent for organ donation and clinical characteristics, including parameters for diagnosis of irreversible loss of brain function, were assessed. After initial admission to the intensive care unit, 18.0% of patients (n = 71) died (Glasgow Outcome Scale score 1). Intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 42.3% of patients who died, aneurysmal rebleeding occurred in 19.7%, and intraventricular hemorrhage occurred in 87.3%. In 50.7% of patients who died (n = 36), ILBF was diagnosed, and 32.4% (n = 23) of these patients became organ donors. In 55.6%, additional diagnostic electroencephalography was performed. Male patients significantly more often became organ donors than female patients (P = 0.008). ILBF with subsequent organ donation was predominantly seen in patients organs were explanted for donation, including 42 kidneys, 21 livers, 3 pancreas, 11 hearts and 8 lungs. ILBF in the setting of fatal aSAH is a prevalent diagnosis with complex demands for neurointensive care physicians. We demonstrated the clinical characteristics and epidemiologic factors of patients with aSAH converting to organ donors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Disconnection of network hubs and cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerholm, Erik D; Hellyer, Peter J; Scott, Gregory; Leech, Robert; Sharp, David J

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury affects brain connectivity by producing traumatic axonal injury. This disrupts the function of large-scale networks that support cognition. The best way to describe this relationship is unclear, but one elegant approach is to view networks as graphs. Brain regions become nodes in the graph, and white matter tracts the connections. The overall effect of an injury can then be estimated by calculating graph metrics of network structure and function. Here we test which graph metrics best predict the presence of traumatic axonal injury, as well as which are most highly associated with cognitive impairment. A comprehensive range of graph metrics was calculated from structural connectivity measures for 52 patients with traumatic brain injury, 21 of whom had microbleed evidence of traumatic axonal injury, and 25 age-matched controls. White matter connections between 165 grey matter brain regions were defined using tractography, and structural connectivity matrices calculated from skeletonized diffusion tensor imaging data. This technique estimates injury at the centre of tract, but is insensitive to damage at tract edges. Graph metrics were calculated from the resulting connectivity matrices and machine-learning techniques used to select the metrics that best predicted the presence of traumatic brain injury. In addition, we used regularization and variable selection via the elastic net to predict patient behaviour on tests of information processing speed, executive function and associative memory. Support vector machines trained with graph metrics of white matter connectivity matrices from the microbleed group were able to identify patients with a history of traumatic brain injury with 93.4% accuracy, a result robust to different ways of sampling the data. Graph metrics were significantly associated with cognitive performance: information processing speed (R(2) = 0.64), executive function (R(2) = 0.56) and associative memory (R(2) = 0.25). These

  8. Cerebral extracellular lactate increase is predominantly nonischemic in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, Nathalie; Suys, Tamarah; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Bouzat, Pierre; Messerer, Mahmoud; Bloch, Jocelyne; Levivier, Marc; Magistretti, Pierre J; Meuli, Reto; Oddo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that endogenous lactate is an important substrate for neurons. This study aimed to examine cerebral lactate metabolism and its relationship with brain perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective cohort of 24 patients with severe TBI monitored with cerebral microdialysis (CMD) and brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2) was studied. Brain lactate metabolism was assessed by quantification of elevated CMD lactate samples (>4 mmol/L); these ...

  9. Association of initial CT findings with quality-of-life outcomes for traumatic brain injury in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Jonathan O. [Seattle Children' s Hospital and University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Vavilala, Monica S.; Wang, Jin; Rivara, Frederick P. [Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Pruthi, Sumit [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt University, Department of Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Fink, James [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Jaffe, Kenneth M. [University of Washington, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Dennis [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Pediatrics, Center for Injury Research and Prevention, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Koepsell, Thomas [University of Washington, Department of Epidemiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Temkin, Nancy [University of Washington, Biostatistics, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of acquired disability in children and adolescents. To demonstrate the association between specific findings on initial noncontrast head CT and long-term outcomes in children who have suffered TBI. This was an IRB-approved prospective study of children ages 2-17 years treated in emergency departments for TBI and who underwent a head CT as part of the initial work-up (n = 347). The change in quality of life at 12 months after injury was measured by the PedsQL scale. Children with TBI who had intracranial injuries identified on the initial head CT had a significantly lower quality-of-life scores compared to children with TBI whose initial head CTs were normal. In multivariate analysis, children whose initial head CT scans demonstrated intraventricular hemorrhage, parenchymal injury, midline shift {>=}5 mm, hemorrhagic shear injury, abnormal cisterns or subdural hematomas {>=}3 mm had lower quality of life scores 1 year after injury than children whose initial CTs did not have these same injuries. Associations exist between findings from the initial noncontrast head CT and quality of life score 12 months after injury in children with TBI. (orig.)

  10. Clinical analysis and treatment of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after deep brain stimulation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Haikang; Li, Nan; Ge, Shunnan; Chen, Lei; Li, Jiaming; Jing, Jiangpeng; Su, Mingming; Zheng, Zhaohui; Zhang, Jinan; Gao, Guodong; Wang, Xuelian

    2017-04-01

    Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) may lead to permanent neurological disability of patients and has impeded the extensive clinical application of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The present study was conducted to discuss the incidence, prevention, and treatment of symptomatic ICH after DBS surgery. From January 2009 to December 2014, 396 patients underwent DBS with a total of 691 implanted leads. In all, 10 patients had symptomatic ICH. We analyzed these cases' clinical characteristics, including comorbid diagnoses and coagulation profile. We described the onset of ICH, imaging features, clinical manifestations, treatment, neurological impairment, and outcome of DBS. Of the 10 patients with symptomatic ICH, 2 had hypertension. Three cases of ICH occurred within 12 h of the procedure; four cases within 24 h. Five experienced grand mal seizures concurrently with hemorrhage. Unilateral frontal lobe hemorrhage occurred in all cases. In seven cases, hematomas occurred around the electrodes. Some hematomas were not well-circumscribed and had perihematomal edema. Conservative therapy was administered to 8 patients, and 2 patients underwent craniotomy and hematoma evacuation. All electrodes were successfully preserved. Neurological dysfunction in all patients gradually improved. Nine patients ultimately experienced effective symptom relief of Parkinson's disease with DBS. Symptomatic ICH should be identified as soon as possible after implantation surgery and treated effectively to limit neurological deficit and preserve DBS leads.

  11. Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimers Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Alricsson M (2012) Physical exercise ameliorates deficits induced by traumatic brain injury. Acta Neurol Scand 125, 293-302. [19] Qu C, Mahmood A...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0582 TITLE: Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for Alzheimer’s...COVERED 09/25/2012-09/24/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Down-Regulation of Olfactory Receptors in Response to Traumatic Brain Injury Promotes Risk for

  12. Association Between Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Brain Lesions and Long-term Caregiver Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Andrea Brioschi; Demonet, Jean-Francois; Polejaeva, Elena; Knutson, Kristine M; Wassermann, Eric M; Grafman, Jordan; Krueger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related brain lesions and long-term caregiver burden in relation to dysexecutive syndrome. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. A total of 256 participants: 105 combat veterans with TBI, 23 healthy control combat veterans (HCv), and 128 caregivers. Caregiver burden assessed by the Zarit Burden Interview at 40 years postinjury. Participants with penetrating TBI were compared with HCv on perceived caregiver burden and neuropsychological assessment measures. Data of computed tomographic scans (overlay lesion maps of participants with a penetrating TBI whose caregivers have a significantly high burden) and behavioral statistical analyses were combined to identify brain lesions associated with caregiver burden. Burden was greater in caregivers of veterans with TBI than in caregivers of HCv. Caregivers of participants with lesions affecting cognitive and behavioral indicators of dysexecutive syndrome (ie, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) showed greater long-term burden than caregivers of participants with lesions elsewhere in the brain. The TBI-related brain lesions have a lasting effect on long-term caregiver burden due to cognitive and behavioral factors associated with dysexecutive syndrome.

  13. Brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury as assessed by DWI-thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazoe, Jun; Yamada, Kei; Akazawa, Kentaro [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan); Sakai, Koji [Kyoto University, Department of Human Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Mineura, Katsuyoshi [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto City, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the brain core temperature of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) using a noninvasive temperature measurement technique based on the diffusion coefficient of the cerebrospinal fluid. This retrospective study used the data collected from April 2008 to June 2011. The patient group comprised 20 patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 14 or 15 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging within 30 days after head trauma. The normal control group comprised 14 subjects who volunteered for a brain checkup (known in Japan as ''brain dock''). We compared lateral ventricular (LV) temperature between patient and control groups. Follow-up studies were performed for four patients. LV temperature measurements were successfully performed for both patients and controls. Mean (±standard deviation) measured LV temperature was 36.9 ± 1.5 C in patients, 38.7 ± 1.8 C in follow-ups, and 37.9 ± 1.2 C in controls, showing a significant difference between patients and controls (P = 0.017). However, no significant difference was evident between patients and follow-ups (P = 0.595) or between follow-ups and controls (P = 0.465). A reduction in brain core temperature was observed in patients with mTBI, possibly due to a global decrease in metabolism. (orig.)

  14. Increased brain activation during working memory processing after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Daniel R.; West, John D.; Bailey, Jessica N.; Arnold, Todd W.; Kersey, Patrick A.; Saykin, Andrew J.; McDonald, Brenna C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The neural substrate of post-concussive symptoms following the initial injury period after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in pediatric populations remains poorly elucidated. This study examined neuropsychological, behavioral, and brain functioning in adolescents post-mTBI to assess whether persistent differences were detectable up to a year post-injury. Methods Nineteen adolescents (mean age 14.7 years) who experienced mTBI 3–12 months previously (mean 7.5 months) and 19 matched healthy controls (mean age 14.0 years) completed neuropsychological testing and an fMRI auditory-verbal N-back working memory task. Parents completed behavioral ratings. Results No between-group differences were found for cognition, behavior, or N-back task performance, though the expected decreased accuracy and increased reaction time as task difficulty increased were apparent. However, the mTBI group showed significantly greater brain activation than controls during the most difficult working memory task condition. Conclusion Greater working memory task-related activation was found in adolescents up to one year post-mTBI relative to controls, potentially indicating compensatory activation to support normal task performance. Differences in brain activation in the mTBI group so long after injury may indicate residual alterations in brain function much later than would be expected based on the typical pattern of natural recovery, which could have important clinical implications. PMID:26684070

  15. Dedifferentiation Does Not Account for Hyperconnectivity after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Anne Bernier

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveChanges in functional network connectivity following traumatic brain injury (TBI have received increasing attention in recent neuroimaging literature. This study sought to understand how disrupted systems adapt to injury during resting and goal-directed brain states. Hyperconnectivity has been a common finding, and dedifferentiation (or loss of segregation of networks is one possible explanation for this finding. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI would show dedifferentiation of networks (as noted in other clinical populations and these effects would be associated with cognitive dysfunction.MethodsGraph theory was implemented to examine functional connectivity during periods of task and rest in 19 individuals with moderate/severe TBI and 14 healthy controls (HCs. Using a functional brain atlas derived from 83 functional imaging studies, graph theory was used to examine network dynamics and determine whether dedifferentiation accounts for changes in connectivity. Regions of interest were assigned to one of three groups: task-positive, default mode, or other networks. Relationships between these metrics were then compared with performance on neuropsychological tests.ResultsHyperconnectivity in TBI was most commonly observed as increased within-network connectivity. Network strengths within networks that showed differences between TBI and HCs were correlated with performance on five neuropsychological tests typically sensitive to deficits commonly reported in TBI. Hyperconnectivity within the default mode network (DMN during task was associated with better performance on Digit Span Backward, a measure of working memory [R2(18 = 0.28, p = 0.02]. In other words, increased differentiation of networks during task was associated with better working memory. Hyperconnectivity within the task-positive network during rest was not associated with behavior. Negative correlation weights were not associated with behavior

  16. Long-term outcome in elderly patients after operation for traumatic intracranial hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolle, Mark D; Geffe, Kevin; Getchell, John; Reed, James F; Fulda, Gerard; Sugarman, Michael; Tinkoff, Glen H

    2014-08-01

    This study examined outcomes in elderly TBI patients who underwent a cranial operation. We identified TBI patients > or = 65 who underwent a cranial operation from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2008. Data collected included: age, admission GCS, mechanism of injury, ISS, Head AIS, type of operation, hemorrhage acuity, time to operation, pre-hospital warfarin or clopidogrel, and in-hospital death. Survivors were contacted by phone to determine an Extended Glasgow Outcome Score (GOSE). A favorable outcome was defined as having a GOSE of > or = 5 at follow-up, an unfavorable outcome was defined as: in-hospital death, death within one year of injury, and a GOSE or = 5, and ten had a GOSE < 5. Mean follow-up was 42.6 +/- 14.9 months. Of all the factors analyzed, only older age was associated with an unfavorable outcome. While age was associated with outcome, we were unable to demonstrate any other early factors that were associated with long-term functional outcome in elderly patients that underwent a cranial operation for TBI.

  17. Reducing Traumatic Brain Injuries in Youth Sports: Youth Sports Traumatic Brain Injury State Laws, January 2009–December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. I sought to describe current state-wide youth sports traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws and their relationship to prevailing scientific understandings of youth sports TBIs, and to facilitate further research by creating an open-source data set of current laws. Methods. I used Westlaw and LexisNexis databases to create a 50-state data set of youth sports TBI laws enacted between January 2009 and December 2012. I collected and coded the text and citations of each law and developed a protocol and codebook to facilitate future research. Results. Forty-four states and Washington, DC, passed youth sports TBI laws between 2009 and 2012. No state’s youth sports TBI law focuses on primary prevention. Instead, such laws focus on (1) increasing coaches’ and parents’ ability to identify and respond to TBIs and (2) reducing the immediate risk of multiple TBIs. Conclusions. Existing youth sports TBI laws were not designed to reduce initial TBIs. Evaluation is required to assess their effectiveness in reducing the risk and consequences of multiple TBIs. Continued research and evaluation of existing laws will be needed to develop a more comprehensive youth TBI-reduction solution. PMID:23678903

  18. Reducing traumatic brain injuries in youth sports: youth sports traumatic brain injury state laws, January 2009-December 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Hosea H

    2013-07-01

    I sought to describe current state-wide youth sports traumatic brain injury (TBI) laws and their relationship to prevailing scientific understandings of youth sports TBIs, and to facilitate further research by creating an open-source data set of current laws. I used Westlaw and LexisNexis databases to create a 50-state data set of youth sports TBI laws enacted between January 2009 and December 2012. I collected and coded the text and citations of each law and developed a protocol and codebook to facilitate future research. Forty-four states and Washington, DC, passed youth sports TBI laws between 2009 and 2012. No state's youth sports TBI law focuses on primary prevention. Instead, such laws focus on (1) increasing coaches' and parents' ability to identify and respond to TBIs and (2) reducing the immediate risk of multiple TBIs. Existing youth sports TBI laws were not designed to reduce initial TBIs. Evaluation is required to assess their effectiveness in reducing the risk and consequences of multiple TBIs. Continued research and evaluation of existing laws will be needed to develop a more comprehensive youth TBI-reduction solution.

  19. Gender differences in self reported long term outcomes following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratcliff Graham

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of research on health outcomes after a traumatic brain injury is focused on male participants. Information examining gender differences in health outcomes post traumatic brain injury is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in symptoms reported after a traumatic brain injury and to examine the degree to which these symptoms are problematic in daily functioning. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of a retrospective cohort study of 306 individuals who sustained a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury 8 to 24 years ago. Data were collected using the Problem Checklist (PCL from the Head Injury Family Interview (HIFI. Using Bonferroni correction, group differences between women and men were explored using Chi-square and Wilcoxon analysis. Results Chi-square analysis by gender revealed that significantly more men reported difficulty setting realistic goals and restlessness whereas significantly more women reported headaches, dizziness and loss of confidence. Wilcoxon analysis by gender revealed that men reported sensitivity to noise and sleep disturbances as significantly more problematic than women, whereas for women, lack of initiative and needing supervision were significantly more problematic in daily functioning. Conclusion This study provides insight into gender differences on outcomes after traumatic brain injury. There are significant differences between problems reported by men compared to women. This insight may facilitate health service planners and clinicians when developing programs for individuals with brain injury.

  20. Mechanism of Traumatic Brain Injury at Distant Locations After Exposure to Blast Waves: Preliminary Results from Animal and Phantom Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Goda, Keisuke; Kudo, Daisuke; Arafune, Tatsuhiko; Washio, Toshikatsu; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the least understood of the four phases of blast injury. Distant injury induced by the blast wave, on the opposite side from the wave entry, is not well understood. This study investigated the mechanism of distant injury in bTBI. Materials and Methods Eight 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: group 1 served as the control group and did not receive any shock wave (SW) exposure; group 2 was exposed to SWs (12.5 ± 2.5 MPa). Propagation of SWs within a brain phantom was evaluated by visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation. Results Intracerebral hemorrhage near the ignition site and elongation of the distant nucleus were observed, despite no apparent damage between the two locations in the animal experiment. Visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation indicated the presence of complex wave dynamics accompanying a sudden increase in pressure, followed by negative pressure in the phantom experiment. Conclusion A local increase in pressure above the threshold caused by interference of reflection and rarefaction waves in the vicinity of the brain-skull surface may cause distant injury in bTBI.

  1. Safety of a DVT chemoprophylaxis protocol following traumatic brain injury: a single center quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickele, Christopher M; Kamps, Timothy K; Medow, Joshua E

    2013-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a complication that affects approximately 30 % of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients when pharmacologic prophylaxis is not used. Following TBI, specifically in the case of contusions, the safety and efficacy of pharmacologic thromboembolism prophylaxis (PTP) has been studied only in small sample sizes. In this study, we attempt to assess the safety and efficacy of a PTP protocol for TBI patients, as a quality improvement (QI) initiative, in the neuroscience intensive care unit (NSICU). Between January 1st and December 31st, 2009, consecutive patients discharged from the University of Wisconsin NSICU after >a 48 h minimum stay were evaluated as part of a QI project. A protocol for the initiation of PTP was designed and implemented for NSICU patients. The protocol did not vary based on type of intracranial injury. The rate of VTE was reported as was heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and PTP-related expansion of intracranial hemorrhage (IH) requiring reoperation. The number of patients receiving PTP and the timing of therapy were tracked. Patients were excluded for persistent coagulopathy, other organ system bleeding (such as the gastrointestinal tract), or pregnancy. Faculty could opt out of the protocol without reason. Using the same criteria, patients discharged during the preceding 6 months, from July 1st to December 31st, 2008, were evaluated as controls as the PTP protocol was not in effect during this time. During the control period, there were 48 head trauma admissions who met the inclusion criteria. In 22 patients (45.8 %), PTP was initiated at an average of 4.9 ± 5.4 days after admission. During the protocol period, there were 87 head trauma admissions taken from 1,143 total NSICU stays who met criteria. In 63 patients (72.4 %), the care team in the NSICU successfully initiated PTP, at an average of 3.4 ± 2.8 days after admission. All 87 trauma patients were analyzed, and the rate of clinically

  2. Symptomatic heterotopic ossification after very severe traumatic brain injury in 114 patients: incidence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Louise Lau; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of heterotopic ossification (HO) among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) varies in the literature from 11 to 73.3%. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HO among patients with very severe TBI treated in a new established intensive rehabilitation Brain...

  3. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  4. PET Imaging of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Whiplash Associated Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vállez García, David

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is the leading cause of brain injury in our society with 235 per 100,000 inhabitants per year in the European Union and about 500 per 100,000 inhabitants per year in the United States. About 80% of all these events are accounted for as mild cases. At the same time,

  5. A 2-years description of traumatic brain injury admissions in Tikur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a nondegenerative, noncongenital insult to the brain from an external mechanical force, possibly leading to permanent or temporary impairment of cognitive, physical, and psychosocial functions, with an associated diminished or altered state of consciousness.This study was ...

  6. Structural Dissociation of Attentional Control and Memory in Adults with and without Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niogi, Sumit N.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Ghajar, Jamshid; Johnson, Carl E.; Kolster, Rachel; Lee, Hana; Suh, Minah; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; McCandliss, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Memory and attentional control impairments are the two most common forms of dysfunction following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and lead to significant morbidity in patients, yet these functions are thought to be supported by different brain networks. This 3 T magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study investigates whether…

  7. 78 FR 13600 - Proposed Priority-National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research-Traumatic Brain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... mechanical force as evidenced by loss of consciousness or post-traumatic amnesia due to brain trauma or by... examination. Both penetrating and non- penetrating wounds that fit these criteria are included, but primary... of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 25(2), 72-80. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center. (2012). DoD...

  8. Functional oral intake and time to reach unrestricted dieting for patients with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Trine S; Engberg, Aase W; Larsen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the status of functional oral intake for patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and time to return to unrestricted dieting; and to investigate whether severity of brain injury is a predictor for unrestricted dieting. DESIGN: Observational retrospective cohort...

  9. Progressive inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration after traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faden, Alan I; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan A; Loane, David J

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been linked to dementia and chronic neurodegeneration. Described initially in boxers and currently recognized across high contact sports, the association between repeated concussion (mild TBI) and progressive neuropsychiatric abnormalities has recently received widespread attention, and has been termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Less well appreciated are cognitive changes associated with neurodegeneration in the brain after isolated spinal cord injury. Also under-recognized is the role of sustained neuroinflammation after brain or spinal cord trauma, even though this relationship has been known since the 1950s and is supported by more recent preclinical and clinical studies. These pathological mechanisms, manifested by extensive microglial and astroglial activation and appropriately termed chronic traumatic brain inflammation or chronic traumatic inflammatory encephalopathy, may be among the most important causes of post-traumatic neurodegeneration in terms of prevalence. Importantly, emerging experimental work demonstrates that persistent neuroinflammation can cause progressive neurodegeneration that may be treatable even weeks after traumatic injury. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. The impact of preinjury anticoagulants and prescription antiplatelet agents on outcomes in older patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kimberly A; Calvo, Richard Y; Schechter, Mark S; Sise, C Beth; Kahl, Jessica E; Shackford, Meghan C; Shackford, Steven R; Sise, Michael J; Blaskiewicz, Donald J

    2014-02-01

    Anticoagulants and prescription antiplatelet (ACAP) agents widely used by older adults have the potential to adversely affect traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcomes. We hypothesized that TBI patients on preinjury ACAP agents would have worse outcomes than non-ACAP patients. This was a 5.5-year retrospective review of patients 55 years and older admitted to a Level I trauma center with blunt force TBI. Patients were categorized as ACAP (warfarin, clopidogrel, dipyridamole/aspirin, enoxaparin, subcutaneous heparin, or multiple agents) or non-ACAP. ACAP patients were further stratified by class of agent (anticoagulant or antiplatelet). Initial and subsequent head computerized tomographic results were examined for type and progression of TBI. Patient preadmission living status and discharge destination were identified. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were progression of initial TBI, development of new intracranial hemorrhage (remote from initial), and the need for an increased level of care at discharge. A total of 353 patients met inclusion criteria: 273 non-ACAP (77%) and 80 ACAP (23%). Upon exclusion of three patients taking a combination of agents, 350 were available for advanced analyses. ACAP status was significantly related to in-hospital mortality. After adjustment for patient and injury characteristics, anticoagulant users were more likely than non-ACAP patients to show progression of initial hemorrhage and develop a new hemorrhagic focus. However, compared with non-ACAP users, antiplatelet users were more likely to die in the hospital. Among survivors to discharge, anticoagulant users were more likely to be discharged to a care facility, but this finding was not robust to adjustment. Older TBI patients on preinjury ACAP agents experience a comparatively higher rate of inpatient mortality and other adverse outcomes caused by the effects of antiplatelet agents. Our findings should inform decision making regarding prognosis and

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Cranial Simulants for Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-28

    REPORT TYPE 08/28/2017 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Additive Manufacturing of Cranial Sin1ulants for Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injut’y 6...devices (IEOs) in warfare has resulted in devastating injuries to United States military personnel, with blast induced traumat ic brain Injury...hrgher fidelity 1es1 object. Mold and Oalllsllc Gelatin Sample of Rcanstic Brain Geomelrv I Acknowledgements Sandia N1tional 1.ahor:.t.ori" r ..uuhcr f’"""" Clwllltr\\M Paul ’""" (PE = ..

  12. Use of Hippotherapy With a Boy After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Ellen A; Pierce, Samuel R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe the use of hippotherapy with a boy who sustained a brain injury. A 13-year-old boy, 6 months after traumatic brain injury received 12 physical therapy sessions, which included hippotherapy. Improvements were noted in balance, strength, gross motor skills, gait speed, functional mobility, and reported participation. Hippotherapy used with a 13-year-old boy after traumatic brain injury may have had a positive effect in the body structure, activity, and participation domains.

  13. Prosodic processing post traumatic brain injury - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Gabriela; Cusimano, Michael D; Li, Wenshan

    2017-01-04

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors often report difficulties with understanding and producing paralinguistic cues, as well as understanding and producing basic communication tasks. However, a large range of communicative deficits in this population cannot be adequately explained by linguistic impairment. The review examines prosodic processing performance post-TBI, its relationship with injury severity, brain injury localization, recovery and co-occurring psychiatric or mental health issues post-TBI METHODS: A systematic review using several databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, LLBA (Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstract) and Web of Science (January 1980 to May 2015), as well as a manual search of the cited references of the selected articles and the search cited features of PubMed was performed. The search was limited to comparative analyses between individuals who had a TBI and non-injured individuals (control). The review included studies assessing prosodic processing outcomes after TBI has been formally diagnosed. Articles that measured communication disorders, prosodic impairments, aphasia, and recognition of various aspects of prosody were included. Methods of summary included study characteristics, sample characteristics, demographics, auditory processing task, age at injury, brain localization of the injury, time elapsed since TBI, reports between TBI and mental health, socialization and employment difficulties. There were no limitations to the population size, age or gender. Results were reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. Two raters evaluated the quality of the articles in the search, extracted data using data abstraction forms and assessed the external and internal validity of the studies included using STROBE criteria. Agreement between the two raters was very high (Cohen's kappa = .89, P < 0.001). Results are reported according to the PRISMA guidelines. A systematic review of 5212 records between 1980 and 2015

  14. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Keskin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence exists that enoxaparin can reduce brain injury because of its anticoagulant activity. To investigate the potential therapeutic effect of enoxaparin on cold-induced traumatic brain injury, at 20 minutes after modeling, male BALB/c mouse models of cold-induced traumatic brain injury were intraperitoneally administered 3 and 10 mg/kg enoxaparin or isotonic saline solution. Twenty-four hours later, enoxaparin at 10 mg/kg greatly reduced infarct volume, decreased cell apoptosis in the cortex and obviously increased serum level of total antioxidant status. By contrast, administration of enoxaparin at 3 mg/kg did not lead to these changes. These findings suggest that enoxaparin exhibits neuroprotective effect on cold-induced traumatic brain injury in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Novel brain arteriovenous malformation mouse models for type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Jung Choi

    Full Text Available Endoglin (ENG is a causative gene of type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1. HHT1 patients have a higher prevalence of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM than the general population and patients with other HHT subtypes. The pathogenesis of brain AVM in HHT1 patients is currently unknown and no specific medical therapy is available to treat patients. Proper animal models are crucial for identifying the underlying mechanisms for brain AVM development and for testing new therapies. However, creating HHT1 brain AVM models has been quite challenging because of difficulties related to deleting Eng-floxed sequence in Eng(2fl/2fl mice. To create an HHT1 brain AVM mouse model, we used several Cre transgenic mouse lines to delete Eng in different cell-types in Eng(2fl/2fl mice: R26CreER (all cell types after tamoxifen treatment, SM22α-Cre (smooth muscle and endothelial cell and LysM-Cre (lysozyme M-positive macrophage. An adeno-associated viral vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF was injected into the brain to induce focal angiogenesis. We found that SM22α-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo caused AVMs in the postnatal brain, spinal cord, and intestines. Induction of Eng deletion in adult mice using R26CreER plus local VEGF stimulation induced the brain AVM phenotype. In both models, Eng-null endothelial cells were detected in the brain AVM lesions, and formed mosaicism with wildtype endothelial cells. However, LysM-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo did not cause AVM in the postnatal brain even after VEGF stimulation. In this study, we report two novel HHT1 brain AVM models that mimic many phenotypes of human brain AVM and can thus be used for studying brain AVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. Further, our data indicate that macrophage Eng deletion is insufficient and that endothelial Eng homozygous deletion is required for HHT1 brain AVM development.

  16. Connexin40 correlates with oxidative stress in brains of traumatic brain injury rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Guo, Yijun; Yang, Wenjin; Zheng, Ping; Zeng, Jinsong; Tong, Wusong

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an important factor in the pathophysiologic changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Connexin43 (Cx43) was reported to contribute to cerebral damage. However, the impacts of Cx40 have not been investigated in detail. In the present study, we hypothesized that Cx40 was involved in oxidative stress-induced brain injury after TBI. The controlled cortical impact (CCI) model was introduced to Wistar rats as a TBI model. Neurological deficits, oxidative stress and Cx40 were evaluated in TBI rats and N-acetylcysteine (NAC)-treated TBI rats. Neurological severity score (NSS) was used to assess neurological deficits. Brain infarction was measured by histo-staining. Brain edema was evaluated by measuring the brain water content. Cortex samples were collected to measure the tissue levels of malonyldialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) and NADPH oxidase activity. Cx40 expression was determined by Western-blot. TBI-induced brain injuries gradually increased from 6 h to 24 h post CCI, and the severity remained till 72 h. The level of oxidative stress was consistent with the extent of neurological deficits. Cx40 was upregulated after TBI in a linear correlated manner with increased oxidative stress. With NAC intervention, both neurological deficits and oxidative stress were significantly attenuated. Meanwhile, elevated Cx40 expression in cortex was also prevented by NAC treatment. These studies revealed the relationship between levels of Cx40 and oxidative stress after TBI. The cortex Cx40 expression was positively correlated with the cerebral oxidative stress, indicating the involvement of Cx40 in the progress of brain damage.

  17. Mild and moderate pediatric traumatic brain injury: replace routine repeat head computed tomography with neurologic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hassan; Rhee, Peter; Pandit, Viraj; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Wynne, Julie; Zangbar, Bardiya; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Friese, Randall S; Joseph, Bellal

    2013-10-01

    Opinion is divided on the role of routine repeat head computed tomography (RHCT) for guiding clinical management in pediatric patients with blunt head trauma. We hypothesize that routine RHCT does not lead to change in management in mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is a 3-year retrospective study of all patients of age 2 years to 18 years with blunt TBI admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with an abnormal head CT. Indications for RHCT (routine vs. neurologic deterioration) and their findings (progression or improvement) were recorded. Neurosurgical intervention was defined as extraventricular drain placement, craniectomy, or craniotomy. Primary outcome was a change in management after RHCT. A total of 291 pediatric patients were identified; of which 191 patients received an RHCT. Routine RHCT did not lead to neurosurgical intervention in the mild and moderate TBI group. In patients who received RHCT due to neurologic decline (n = 7), radiographic progression was seen on 85% of the patients (n = 6), with subsequent neurosurgical interventions in three patients. Two of these patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 8 at admission. Our study showed that the neurologic examination can be trusted and is reliable in pediatric blunt TBI patients in determining when an RHCT scan is necessary. We recommend that RHCT is required routinely in patients with intracranial hemorrhage with GCS score of 8 or less and in patients with GCS greater than 8 and that RHCT be performed only when there are clinical indications. Diagnostic/therapeutic study, level IV.

  18. Value of repeat head computed tomography after traumatic brain injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljic, Tea; Mahony, Helen; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Etchason, Jeff; Paxton, Hannah; Flores, Michelle; Kumar, Ambuj

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is crucial to improve patient outcomes. While initial head computed tomography (CT) scan is the optimum tool for quick and accurate detection of intracranial hemorrhage, the guidelines on use of repeat CT differ among institutions. Three systematic reviews have been conducted on a similar topic; none have performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of all studies. Search of Medline, the Cochrane Library database, and Clinicaltrials.gov , and a hand search of conference abstracts and references for all completed studies reporting data on change in management following repeat CT was conducted. Two authors reviewed all studies and extracted data using a standardized form. A proportional meta-analysis was conducted using the random-effects model for outcomes related to any change in management following repeat CT. Any change in management included intracranial intervention, change in intracranial pressure monitoring, and/or administration of drug therapy. Search results yielded 6982 references. In all, 41 studies enrolling 10,501 patients were included. Change in management following repeat CT was reported in 13 prospective and 28 retrospective studies and yielded a pooled proportion of 11.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] 5.9-18.4) and 9.6% (95% CI 6.5-13.2), respectively. In a subgroup analysis of mild TBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 13 to 15), five prospective and nine retrospective studies reported on change in management following repeat CT with the pooled proportion across prospective studies at 2.3% (95% CI 0.3-6.3) and across retrospective studies at 3.9% (95% CI 2.3-5.7), respectively. The evidence suggests that repeat CT in patients with TBI results in a change in management for only a minority of patients. Better designed studies are needed to address the issue of the value of repeat CT in the management of TBI.

  19. Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury and Development of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Potential Role for Biomarkers in Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Turner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE upon autopsy in a growing number of athletes and soldiers alike has resulted in increased awareness, by both the scientific/medical and lay communities, of the potential for lasting effects of repetitive traumatic brain injury. While we have come to better understand the clinical presentation and underlying pathophysiology of CTE, the diagnosis of CTE remains autopsy-based, which prevents adequate monitoring and tracking of the disease. The lack of established biomarkers or imaging modalities for diagnostic and prognostic purposes also prevents the development and implementation of therapeutic protocols. In this work the clinical history and pathologic findings associated with CTE are reviewed as well as imaging modalities that have demonstrated some promise for future use in the diagnosis and/or tracking of CTE or repetitive brain injury. Biomarkers under investigation are also discussed with particular attention to the timing of release and potential utility in situations of repetitive traumatic brain injury. Further investigation into imaging modalities and biomarker elucidation for the diagnosis of CTE is clearly both needed as well as warranted.

  20. Venous thromboembolic events in isolated severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Mohseni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactic anticoagulation on the incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. Materials and Methods: Retrospective matched case-control study in adult patients sustaining isolated severe TBI (head AIS ≥3, with extracranial AIS ≤2 receiving VTE prophylaxis while in the surgical intensive care unit from 1/2007 through 12/2009. Patients subjected to VTE prophylaxis were matched 1:1 by age, gender, glasgow coma scale (GCS score at admission, presence of hypotension on admission, injury severity score, and head abbreviated injury scale (AIS score, with patients who did not receive chemical VTE prophylaxis. The primary outcome measure was VTE. Secondary outcomes were SICU and hospital length of stay (HLOS, adverse effects of anticoagulation, and mortality. Results: After propensity matching, 37 matched pairs were analysed. Cases and controls had similar demographics, injury characteristics, rate of craniotomies/craniectomies, SICU LOS, and HLOS. The median time of commencement of VTE prophylaxis was 10 days. The incidence of VTE was increased 3.5-fold in the controls compared to the cases (95% CI 1.0-12.1, P=0.002. The mortality was higher in patients who did not receive anticoagulation (19% vs. 5%, P=0.001. No adverse outcomes were detected in the anticoagulated patients. Conclusion: Prophylactic anticoagulation decreases the overall risk for clinically significant VTE in patients with severe isolated TBI. Prospective validation of the timing and safety of chemical VTE prophylaxis in these instances is warranted.