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Sample records for brain extracellular space

  1. Glia and extracellular space in the aging brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    London : The Parthenon Publishing Group, 2003 - (Genazzani, A.), s. 3-11 ISBN 1-84214-168-6 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Glia * extracellular space * aging brain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  2. Astrocytes and diffusive spread of substances in brain extracellular space

    OpenAIRE

    Sherpa, Ang D.; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Brain function is based on communication between individual cells, neurons and glia. From a traditional point of view, neurons play a central role in the fast transfer of information in the central nervous system while astrocytes, major type of glia, serve as housekeeping elements maintaining homeostasis of the extracellular microenvironment. This view has dramatically changed in recent years as many findings ascribe new roles to astrocytes. It is becoming evident that astrocytes communica...

  3. Changes in astrocyte morphology and extracellular space volume fraction in brain slices after ischemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anděrová, Miroslava; Hock, Miroslav; Antonova, Tatiana; Chvátal, Alexandr; Syková, Eva

    Lisabon, 2004. s. 495. [Forum of European Neuroscience /4./. 10.07.2004-14.07.2004, Lisabon] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1528; GA ČR GA305/03/1172; GA ČR GA305/04/1293; GA MŠk LN00A065 Keywords : extracellular space * brain ischemia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Aquaporin-4–dependent K+ and water transport modeled in brain extracellular space following neuroexcitation

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Byung-Ju; Zhang, Hua; Binder, Devin K.; Verkman, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions released into brain extracellular space (ECS) during neuroexcitation are efficiently taken up by astrocytes. Deletion of astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in mice alters neuroexcitation by reducing ECS [K+] accumulation and slowing K+ reuptake. These effects could involve AQP4-dependent: (a) K+ permeability, (b) resting ECS volume, (c) ECS contraction during K+ reuptake, and (d) diffusion-limited water/K+ transport coupling. To investigate the role of these mechan...

  5. A Model of Effective Diffusion and Tortuosity in the Extracellular Space of the Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrabě, J.; Hrabětová, S.; Segeth, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 87, - (2004), s. 1606-1617. ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/04/1503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : extracellular space * tortuosity * diffusion Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 4.585, year: 2004

  6. Volume transmission in health and disease: communication via the brain extracellular space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 2 (2003), s. 2. ISSN 0022-3042. [Meeting of the European Society for Neurochemistry /14./. Varšava, 01.06.2003-04.06.2003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : volume transmission * extracellular space Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.825, year: 2003

  7. Extracellular Vesicles in Brain Tumor Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Asti, Esterina; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Lee, Tae Hoon; Rak, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    Brain tumors can be viewed as multicellular 'ecosystems' with increasingly recognized cellular complexity and systemic impact. While the emerging diversity of malignant disease entities affecting brain tissues is often described in reference to their signature alterations within the cellular genome and epigenome, arguably these cell-intrinsic changes can be regarded as hardwired adaptations to a variety of cell-extrinsic microenvironmental circumstances. Conversely, oncogenic events influence the microenvironment through their impact on the cellular secretome, including emission of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs serve as unique carriers of bioactive lipids, secretable and non-secretable proteins, mRNA, non-coding RNA, and DNA and constitute pathway(s) of extracellular exit of molecules into the intercellular space, biofluids, and blood. EVs are also highly heterogeneous as reflected in their nomenclature (exosomes, microvesicles, microparticles) attempting to capture their diverse origin, as well as structural, molecular, and functional properties. While EVs may act as a mechanism of molecular expulsion, their non-random uptake by heterologous cellular recipients defines their unique roles in the intercellular communication, horizontal molecular transfer, and biological activity. In the central nervous system, EVs have been implicated as mediators of homeostasis and repair, while in cancer they may act as regulators of cell growth, clonogenicity, angiogenesis, thrombosis, and reciprocal tumor-stromal interactions. EVs produced by specific brain tumor cell types may contain the corresponding oncogenic drivers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) in glioblastoma (and hence are often referred to as 'oncosomes'). Through this mechanism, mutant oncoproteins and nucleic acids may be transferred horizontally between cellular populations altering their individual and collective phenotypes. Oncogenic pathways

  8. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  9. Comparative animal studies for the determination of the extracellular space with several radioactively labelled substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume of the total extracellular space and of the extracellular space of the organs (liver, lungs, heart, spleen, brain) was determined with the aid of 5 radioactively labelled substances, each in 10 rats. The test substances (inulin-3H, 51Cr-EDTA, thiosulfate-35S, NH4-82Br, 60Co-vitamin B12) are described in the relevant literature as substances for the determination of the extracellular space and as clearance substances. (BSC/AK)

  10. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Ascorbic acid: Nonradioactive extracellular space marker in canine heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution pattern of ascorbic acid and L-[14C]ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue was compared with those of the classical radioactive extracellular space markers [3H]-inulin, [3H]sucrose, and Na82Br. A new polarographic techniques was developed for analogue registration of ascorbic acid concentration in coronary venous blood. The kinetic data of the markers were studied in an open-chest canine heart preparation during a constant tracer infusion of up to 9 min. Distribution volumes were calculated based on the mean transit time method of Zierler. The distribution volume of ascorbic acid as well as of L-[14C]ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue agreed closely with those of [3H]inulin and [3H]sucrose as well as 82Br. The obtained kinetic data confirmed that ascorbic acid exhibits the physicochemical properties of an extracellular space marker, though this compound was shown to leak slowly into myocardial cells. Favorable attributes of this indicator are its low molecular weight, high diffusibility in interstitial fluid, low binding affinity to macromolecules, and high transcapillary as well as low transplasmalemmal penetration rate. Therefore, this nonradioactive marker can be applied in a safe and simple fashion, and without untoward side effects in experimental animals as well as in patients

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACELLULAR GABA IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA-RETICULATA BY MEANS OF BRAIN MICRODIALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; ZWAVELING, J; WESTERINK, BHC

    1992-01-01

    Brain microdialysis was used to characterize extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) of freely moving rats. The extracellular GABA in the SNR was characterized using acutely implanted probes (4-8 h after surgery; day 1) and chronically implanted probes (

  13. Extracellular space diffusion analysis in the infant and adult rat striatum using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuangfeng; Wang, Yan; Li, Kai; Tang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Kuo; Shi, Chunyan; Han, Hongbin; Peng, Yun

    2016-10-01

    The extracellular space (ECS) in the brain provides an extrasynaptic transfer channel among neurons, axons and glial cells. It is particularly important in the early stage after birth, when angiogenesis is not yet complete and the ECS may provide the main pathway for metabolite transport. However, the characteristics of extracellular transport remain unclear. In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method was used to perform real-time visualization and quantification of diffusion in the brain ECS of infant (postnatal day 10 (P10)) and adult rats. Using a modified diffusion equation and the linear relationship between the signal intensity and the gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) concentration, diffusion parameters were obtained; these parameters include the effective diffusion coefficient (D*), clearance rate (k'), tortuosity (λ) and the volume fraction of distribution (Vd%). There were significant differences in the diffusion parameters between P10 and adult rats. This finding provides a reference for future treatment of brain diseases using drugs administered via interstitial pathways. PMID:27296518

  14. Brain intra- and extracellular sodium concentration in multiple sclerosis: a 7 T MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, Maria; Vancea, Roxana O; Fleysher, Lazar; Jonkman, Laura E; Oesingmann, Niels; Inglese, Matilde

    2016-03-01

    Intra-axonal accumulation of sodium ions is one of the key mechanisms of delayed neuro-axonal degeneration that contributes to disability accrual in multiple sclerosis. In vivo sodium magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated an increase of brain total sodium concentration in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially in patients with greater disability. However, total sodium concentration is a weighted average of intra- and extra-cellular sodium concentration whose changes reflect different tissue pathophysiological processes. The in vivo, non-invasive measurement of intracellular sodium concentration is quite challenging and the few applications in patients with neurological diseases are limited to case reports and qualitative assessments. In the present study we provide first evidence of the feasibility of triple quantum filtered (23)Na magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T, and provide in vivo quantification of global and regional brain intra- and extra-cellular sodium concentration in 19 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 17 heathy controls. Global grey matter and white matter total sodium concentration (respectively P < 0.05 and P < 0.01), and intracellular sodium concentration (both P < 0.001) were higher while grey matter and white matter intracellular sodium volume fraction (indirect measure of extracellular sodium concentration) were lower (respectively P = 0.62 and P < 0.001) in patients compared with healthy controls. At a brain regional level, clusters of increased total sodium concentration and intracellular sodium concentration and decreased intracellular sodium volume fraction were found in several cortical, subcortical and white matter regions when patients were compared with healthy controls (P < 0.05 family-wise error corrected for total sodium concentration, P < 0.05 uncorrected for multiple comparisons for intracellular sodium concentration and intracellular sodium volume fraction). Measures of total sodium

  15. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haqqani Arsalan S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes. Extracellular microvesicles contain cell-specific collections of proteins, glycoproteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecules. These vesicles play important roles in intercellular communication by acting as carrier for essential cell-specific information to target cells. Endothelial cells in the brain form the blood–brain barrier, a specialized interface between the blood and the brain that tightly controls traffic of nutrients and macromolecules between two compartments and interacts closely with other cells forming the neurovascular unit. Therefore, brain endothelial cell extracellular microvesicles could potentially play important roles in ‘externalizing’ brain-specific biomarkers into the blood stream during pathological conditions, in transcytosis of blood-borne molecules into the brain, and in cell-cell communication within the neurovascular unit. Methods To study cell-specific molecular make-up and functions of brain endothelial cell exosomes, methods for isolation of extracellular microvesicles using mass spectrometry-compatible protocols and the characterization of their signature profiles using mass spectrometry -based proteomics were developed. Results A total of 1179 proteins were identified in the isolated extracellular microvesicles from brain endothelial cells. The microvesicles were validated by identification of almost 60 known markers, including Alix, TSG101 and the tetraspanin proteins CD81 and CD9. The surface proteins on isolated microvesicles could potentially

  16. Extracellular space preservation aids the connectomic analysis of neural circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotto, Marta; Watkins, Paul V; Fubara, Boma; Singer, Joshua H; Briggman, Kevin L

    2015-01-01

    Dense connectomic mapping of neuronal circuits is limited by the time and effort required to analyze 3D electron microscopy (EM) datasets. Algorithms designed to automate image segmentation suffer from substantial error rates and require significant manual error correction. Any improvement in segmentation error rates would therefore directly reduce the time required to analyze 3D EM data. We explored preserving extracellular space (ECS) during chemical tissue fixation to improve the ability to segment neurites and to identify synaptic contacts. ECS preserved tissue is easier to segment using machine learning algorithms, leading to significantly reduced error rates. In addition, we observed that electrical synapses are readily identified in ECS preserved tissue. Finally, we determined that antibodies penetrate deep into ECS preserved tissue with only minimal permeabilization, thereby enabling correlated light microscopy (LM) and EM studies. We conclude that preservation of ECS benefits multiple aspects of the connectomic analysis of neural circuits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08206.001 PMID:26650352

  17. Myeloid Extracellular Vesicles: Messengers from the Demented Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Nigro, Annamaria; Colombo, Federico; Casella, Giacomo; Finardi, Annamaria; Verderio, Claudia; Furlan, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e., Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and ALS). Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are ...

  18. Extrasynaptic transmission and the diffusion parameters of the extracellular space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Vargová, Lýdia

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, 1-2 (2008), s. 5-13. ISSN 0197-0186 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/04/0753 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Diffusion * Extracellular volume * Magnetic resonance Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.228, year: 2008

  19. Diffusion Parameters of the Extracellular Space in Human Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, L.; Homola, A.; Zámečník, J.; Tichý, M.; Beneš, V.; Syková, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 1 (2003), s. 77-88. ISSN 0894-1491 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1430 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004; CEZ:MZd 00000064203 Keywords : apparent diffusion coefficient * brain tumors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.677, year: 2003

  20. Electrical stunning and exsanguination decrease the extracellular volume in the broiler brain as studied with brain impendance recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, B; Lambooij, E; Pieterse, C; Korf, J

    2000-07-01

    Electrical stunning in the process of slaughtering poultry is used to induce unconsciousness and immobilize the animal for easier processing. Unconsciousness is a function of brain damage. Brain damage has been studied with brain impedance recordings under ischemic conditions. This experiment studies brain impedance as a response to a general epileptiform insult caused by electrical stunning and ischemia caused by exsanguination. Brain impedance was recorded in 10 broiler chickens for each of three killing methods: whole body electrical stunning, which induces cardiac arrest; head only electrical stunning followed by exsanguination; and exsanguination without stunning. Brain impedance was converted into relative extracellular volume (ECV) values. Results showed that, immediately after electrical stunning, the ECV decreased 5.5% from base ECV. With exsanguination only, the ECV decreased from base ECV only after 4 min after neck cutting. The ECV decrease after 10 min did not differ between treatments. With a time of 228 s to reach one-half of the ECV decrease found at 10 min, electrical stunning resulted in a much faster change in ECV than exsanguination only (373 s). Within the head only stunning group, six animals showed a response similar to that found with whole body stunning; the other four animals responded similarly to the animals that were exsanguinated only. It was concluded that brain impedance recordings used with electrical stunning reflect brain damage. This damage was both epileptic and ischemic in nature. Whole body stunning induced immediate brain damage, suggesting that an adequate stun was delivered. The dual response found with head only stunning might indicate that this stunning method does not always produce an adequate stun. PMID:10901211

  1. Hindered diffusion of MRI contrast agents in rat brain extracellular micro-environment assessed by acquisition of dynamic T1 and T2 maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of brain tissues characteristics (such as extracellular space and tortuosity) represents valuable information for the design of optimal MR probes for specific bio-markers targeting. This work proposes a methodology based on dynamic acquisition of relaxation time maps to quantify in vivo MRI contrast agent concentration after intracerebral injection in rat brain. It was applied to estimate the hindered diffusion in brain tissues of five contrast agents with different hydrodynamic diameters (DotaremW1 nm, P8464 nm, P7927 nm, P90422 nm and Gd-based emulsion 170 nm). In vivo apparent diffusion coefficients were compared with those estimated in an obstacle-free medium to determine brain extracellular space and tortuosity. At a 2 h imaging timescale, all contrast agents except the Gd-based emulsion exhibited significant diffusion through brain tissues, with characteristic times compatible with MR molecular imaging (≤70 min to diffuse between two capillaries). In conclusion, our experiments indicate that MRI contrast agents with sizes up to 22 nm can be used to perform molecular imaging on intra-cerebral bio-markers. Our quantification methodology allows a precise estimation of apparent diffusion coefficients, which is helpful to calibrate optimal timing between contrast agent injection and MRI observation for molecular imaging studies. (authors)

  2. Traumatic brain injury increases levels of miR-21 in extracellular vesicles: implications for neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Emily B; Hochfelder, Colleen G; Lamberty, Benjamin G; Meays, Brittney M; Morsey, Brenda M; Kelso, Matthew L; Fox, Howard S; Yelamanchili, Sowmya V

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important health concern and effective treatment strategies remain elusive. Understanding the complex multicellular response to TBI may provide new avenues for intervention. In the context of TBI, cell-cell communication is critical. One relatively unexplored form of cell-cell communication in TBI is extracellular vesicles (EVs). These membrane-bound vesicles can carry many different types of cargo between cells. Recently, miRNA in EVs have been shown to mediate neuroinflammation and neuronal injury. To explore the role of EV-associated miRNA in TBI, we isolated EVs from the brain of injured mice and controls, purified RNA from brain EVs, and performed miRNA sequencing. We found that the expression of miR-212 decreased, while miR-21, miR-146, miR-7a, and miR-7b were significantly increased with injury, with miR-21 showing the largest change between conditions. The expression of miR-21 in the brain was primarily localized to neurons near the lesion site. Interestingly, adjacent to these miR-21-expressing neurons were activated microglia. The concurrent increase in miR-21 in EVs with the elevation of miR-21 in neurons, suggests that miR-21 is secreted from neurons as potential EV cargo. Thus, this study reveals a new potential mechanism of cell-cell communication not previously described in TBI. PMID:27516962

  3. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26916207

  4. Blood-brain barrier properties in vitro depend on composition and assembly of endogenous extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Kathrin; Hansen, Uwe; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are enveloped by the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. The contribution of matrix components secreted by the various cell types at the neurovascular unit, however, remains unclear with respect to their effect on endothelial barrier function. In this study, a new in vitro model was established by growing endothelial cells on an ECM produced by pericytes, astrocytes or a serial combination of both. The last-mentioned was found to be more in vivo-like. We investigated the role of the composition and morphology of ECM supra-structures in maintaining BBB function. The composition was analysed by protein analysis (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and the ultrastructure of generated matrices was analysed by transmission electron microscopy including immunogold labelling. We could show by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements that pericytes and combined matrices significantly improved the barrier tightness of porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC). The increase of the resistance was verified by enhanced expression of tight junction proteins. Thus, for the first time, we have shown that barrier integrity is strictly controlled by the ECM, which is a product of all cells involved in the secretion of ECM components and their modification by corresponding cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that complex matrices by the various cells of the BBB induce barrier marker enzymes in PBCEC, such as alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27053246

  5. Glia and extracellular matrix changes affect extracellular diffusion and volume transmission in the brain in health and disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, S1 (2011), S38. ISSN 0894-1491. [European meeting on Glial Cells in Health and Disease /10./. 13.09.2011-17.09.2011, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : diffusion * extracellular matrix * extrasynaptic transmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  6. Brain infection with Staphylococcus aureus leads to high extracellular levels of glutamate, aspartate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bjørnar; Dahlberg, Daniel; Mariussen, Espen; Goverud, Ingeborg Løstegaard; Antal, Ellen-Ann; Tønjum, Tone; Maehlen, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcal brain infections may cause mental deterioration and epileptic seizures, suggesting interference with normal neurotransmission in the brain. We injected Staphylococcus aureus into rat striatum and found an initial 76% reduction in the extracellular level of glutamate as detected by microdialysis at 2 hr after staphylococcal infection. At 8 hr after staphylococcal infection, however, the extracellular level of glutamate had increased 12-fold, and at 20 hr it had increased >30-fold. The extracellular level of aspartate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) also increased greatly. Extracellular Zn(2+) , which was estimated at ∼2.6 µmol/liter in the control situation, was increased by 330% 1-2.5 hr after staphylococcal infection and by 100% at 8 and 20 hr. The increase in extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and GABA appeared to reflect the degree of tissue damage. The area of tissue damage greatly exceeded the area of staphylococcal infiltration, pointing to soluble factors being responsible for cell death. However, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 ameliorated neither tissue damage nor the increase in extracellular neuroactive amino acids, suggesting the presence of neurotoxic factors other than glutamate and aspartate. In vitro staphylococci incubated with glutamine and glucose formed glutamate, so bacteria could be an additional source of infection-related glutamate. We conclude that the dramatic increase in the extracellular concentration of neuroactive amino acids and zinc could interfere with neurotransmission in the surrounding brain tissue, contributing to mental deterioration and a predisposition to epileptic seizures, which are often seen in brain abscess patients. PMID:25043715

  7. A compact and autoclavable system for acute extracellular neural recording and brain pressure monitoring for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angotzi, Gian Nicola; Baranauskas, Gytis; Vato, Alessandro; Bonfanti, Andrea; Zambra, Guido; Maggiolini, Emma; Semprini, Marianna; Ricci, Davide; Ansaldo, Alberto; Castagnola, Elisa; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Fadiga, Luciano

    2015-02-01

    One of the most difficult tasks for the surgeon during the removal of low-grade gliomas is to identify as precisely as possible the borders between functional and non-functional brain tissue with the aim of obtaining the maximal possible resection which allows to the patient the longer survival. For this purpose, systems for acute extracellular recordings of single neuron and multi-unit activity are considered promising. Here we describe a system to be used with 16 microelectrodes arrays that consists of an autoclavable headstage, a built-in inserter for precise electrode positioning and a system that measures and controls the pressure exerted by the headstage on the brain with a twofold purpose: to increase recording stability and to avoid disturbance of local perfusion which would cause a degradation of the quality of the recording and, eventually, local ischemia. With respect to devices where only electrodes are autoclavable, our design permits the reduction of noise arising from long cable connections preserving at the same time the flexibility and avoiding long-lasting gas sterilization procedures. Finally, size is much smaller and set up time much shorter compared to commercial systems currently in use in surgery rooms, making it easy to consider our system very useful for intra-operatory mapping operations. PMID:25486648

  8. Enzyme-Immobilized 3D-Printed Reactors for Online Monitoring of Rat Brain Extracellular Glucose and Lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Yen, Shuo-Chih; Li, Tzu-Wen; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2016-06-21

    In this study we constructed a highly sensitive system for in vivo monitoring of the concentrations of rat brain extracellular glucose and lactate. This system involved microdialysis (MD) sampling and fluorescence determination in conjunction with a novel sample derivatization scheme in which glucose oxidase and lactate oxidase were immobilized in ABS flow bioreactors (manufactured through low-cost three-dimensional printing (3DP)), via fused deposition modeling, for online oxidization of sampled glucose and lactate, respectively, in rat brain microdialysate. After optimizing the experimental conditions for MD sampling, the manufacture of the designed flow reactors, the enzyme immobilization procedure, and the online derivatization scheme, the available sampling frequency was 15 h(-1) and the system's detection limits reached as low as 0.060 mM for glucose and 0.059 mM for lactate, based on a 20-μL conditioned microdialysate; these characteristics were sufficient to reliably determine the concentrations of extracellular glucose and lactate in the brains of living rats. To demonstrate the system's applicability, we performed (i) spike analyses of offline-collected rat brain microdialysate and (ii) in vivo dynamic monitoring of the extracellular glucose and lactate in living rat brains, in addition to triggering neuronal depolarization by perfusing a high-K(+) medium from the implanted MD probe. Our analytical results and demonstrations confirm that postprinting functionalization of analytical devices manufactured using 3DP technology can be a powerful strategy for extending the diversity and adaptability of currently existing analytical configurations. PMID:27232384

  9. The source of net ultrafiltration during hemodialysis is mostly the extracellular space regardless of hydration status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Chae-Wan; Choi, Hye-Min; Oh, Dong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Fluid shifts are common in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis (HD) during the intradialytic periods, as several liters of fluid are removed during ultrafiltration (UF). Some patients have experienced frequent intradialytic hypotension (IDH). However, the characteristics of fluid shifts and which fluid space is affected remain controversial. Therefore, we designed this study to evaluate the fluid spaces most affected by UF and to determine whether hydration status influences the fluid shifts during HD. This was a prospective cohort study of 40 patients undergoing HD. We measured the patient's fluid spaces using a whole-body bioimpedance apparatus to evaluate the changes in the fluid spaces before HD and 1-4 hours of HD and 30 minutes after HD. UF achieved during HD by the 40 patients (age, 60.0 ± 5.2 years; 50% men; 50% of patients with diabetes; body weight, 61.3 ± 10.5 kg) was 2.18 ± 0.78 L (measured fluid overload, 2.15 ± 1.24 L). 1) Mean relative reduction of total body water and extracellular water was reduced from the start to the end of HD. 2) However, mean relative reduction of intracellular water was not reduced from the start to the end of HD. 3) No significant differences in fluid shifts were observed according to hydration status. The source of net UF during HD is mostly the extracellular space regardless of hydration status. Thus, IDH may be related to differences in the interstitial fluid shift to the vascular space. PMID:26046949

  10. Brain metastatic cancer cells release microRNA-181c-containing extracellular vesicles capable of destructing blood–brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Tominaga, Naoomi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ono, Makiko; Katsuda, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Tamura, Kenji; Lötvall, Jan; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastasis is an important cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. A key event during brain metastasis is the migration of cancer cells through blood–brain barrier (BBB). However, the molecular mechanism behind the passage through this natural barrier remains unclear. Here we show that cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), mediators of cell–cell communication via delivery of proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs), trigger the breakdown of BBB. Importantly, miR-181c promotes the de...

  11. Method for isolation and molecular characterization of extracellular microvesicles released from brain endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haqqani Arsalan S; Delaney Christie E; Tremblay Tammy-Lynn; Sodja Caroline; Sandhu Jagdeep K; Stanimirovic Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In addition to possessing intracellular vesicles, eukaryotic cells also produce extracellular microvesicles, ranging from 50 to 1000 nm in diameter that are released or shed into the microenvironment under physiological and pathological conditions. These membranous extracellular organelles include both exosomes (originating from internal vesicles of endosomes) and ectosomes (originating from direct budding/shedding of plasma membranes). Extracellular microvesicles contain ...

  12. Behavior-associated and post-consumption glucose entry into the nucleus accumbens extracellular space during glucose free-drinking in trained rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene A Kiyatkin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is the primary energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery from the arterial blood is essential for neural activity and normal brain functions. Glucose is also a unique natural reinforcer, supporting glucose-drinking behavior without food or water deprivation. While it is known that glucose enters brain tissue via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion, it remains unclear how glucose levels are changed during natural behavior and whether the direct central action of ingested glucose can be involved in regulating glucose-drinking behavior. Here, we used glucose biosensors with high-speed amperometry to examine the pattern of phasic and tonic changes in extracellular glucose in the nucleus accumbens (NAc during unrestricted glucose-drinking in well-trained rats. We found that the drinking behavior is highly cyclic and is associated with relatively large and prolonged increases in extracellular glucose levels. These increases had two distinct components: a highly phasic but relatively small behavior-related rise and a larger tonic elevation that results from the arrival of consumed glucose into the brain’s extracellular space. The large post-ingestion increases in NAc glucose began minutes after the cessation of drinking and were consistently associated with periods of non-drinking, suggesting that the central action of ingested glucose could inhibit drinking behavior by inducing a pause in activity between repeated drinking bouts. Finally, the difference in NAc glucose responses found between active, behavior-mediated and passive glucose delivery via an intra-gastric catheter confirms that motivated behavior is also associated with metabolic glucose use by brain cells.

  13. Brain Machine Interfaces for Robotic Control in Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will study the application of a brain machine interface (BMI) to enable crew to remotely operate and monitor robots from inside a flight vehicle, habitat...

  14. Site-dependent effects of an acute intensive exercise on extracellular 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Merino, D; Béquet, F; Berthelot, M; Chennaoui, M; Guezennec, C Y

    2001-03-30

    Previous neurochemical studies have reported different pattern of 5-HT release during exercise varying across either exercise conditions or forebrain sites. This in vivo microdialysis study is the first to examine the impact of an acute intensive treadmill running (2 h at 25 m.min(-1), which is close to exhaustion time), on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels in two different brain areas in rats, the ventral hippocampus and the frontal cortex. Hippocampal and cortical 5-HT levels increased significantly after 90 min of exercise and were maximal in the first 30 min of recovery. Thereafter, cortical 5-HT levels followed a rapid and significant decrease when hippocampal levels are still maximal. During exercise, changes in extracellular 5-HIAA levels paralleled 5-HT changes, but showed no difference between the two brain areas during recovery. Thus, an intensive exercise induces a delayed increase in brain 5-HT release but recovery seems to display site-dependent patterns. PMID:11248443

  15. Machine learning approaches for discrimination of Extracellular Matrix proteins using hybrid feature space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Farman; Hayat, Maqsood

    2016-08-21

    Extracellular Matrix (ECM) proteins are the vital type of proteins that are secreted by resident cells. ECM proteins perform several significant functions including adhesion, differentiation, cell migration and proliferation. In addition, ECM proteins regulate angiogenesis process, embryonic development, tumor growth and gene expression. Due to tremendous biological significance of the ECM proteins and rapidly increases of protein sequences in databases, it is indispensable to introduce a new high throughput computation model that can accurately identify ECM proteins. Various traditional models have been developed, but they are laborious and tedious. In this work, an effective and high throughput computational classification model is proposed for discrimination of ECM proteins. In this model, protein sequences are formulated using amino acid composition, pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) and di-peptide composition (DPC) techniques. Further, various combination of feature extraction techniques are fused to form hybrid feature spaces. Several classifiers were employed. Among these classifiers, K-Nearest Neighbor obtained outstanding performance in combination with the hybrid feature space of PseAAC and DPC. The obtained accuracy of our proposed model is 96.76%, which the highest success rate has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:27179459

  16. Diffusio and extracellular space volume in the cerebral cortex in a mouse model of Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voříšek, Ivan; Antonova, Tatiana; Mazel, Tomáš; Meyer-Luehmann, M.; Jucker, M.; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    Kyoto: organizer, 2004. s. 1285. [International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Scientific Meeting and Exhibition /12./. 15.05.2004-21.05.2004, Kyoto] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Keywords : extracellular space Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  17. Cortical evoked potential and extracellular K+ and H+ at critical levels of brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, J; Symon, L; Branston, N M; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    evoked response. This study tests the hypothesis that electrical failure in ischemia may be directly associated with a massive release of intracellular K+ or with a critical degree of extracellular acidosis. By microelectrode techniques, measurements of blood flow, extracellular activity of K+ and H+ as...... occurred at 18 greater than 6 greater than 2 ml/100 gm per minute (median with 5% confidence limits). Thus a dual threshold in ischemia for neuronal function is described, the threshold for release of K+ being clearly lower than the threshold for complete electrical failure. Further, the findings support...

  18. Simvastatin and atorvastatin facilitates amyloid β-protein degradation in extracellular spaces by increasing neprilysin secretion from astrocytes through activation of MAPK/Erk1/2 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujii, Yoko; Kasahara, Rika; Tanida, Mamoru; Ohora, Kentaro; Ono, Yoko; Suzuki, Kenji; Sobue, Kazuya

    2016-06-01

    One of the major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the brain. Aβ accumulation seems to arise from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance. Neprilysin (NEP) and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) are the important Aβ-degrading enzymes in the brain, and deficits in their expression may promote Aβ deposition in patients with sporadic late-onset AD. Statins, which are used clinically for reducing cholesterol levels, can exert beneficial effects on AD. Therefore, we examined whether various statins are associated with Aβ degradation by inducing NEP and IDE expression, and then evaluating the relation between activation of intracellular signaling transduction, inhibition of cholesterol production, and morphological changes to astrocytes. Treating cultured rat astrocytes with simvastatin and atorvastatin significantly decreased the expression of NEP but not IDE in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The decrease in NEP expression was a result of activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not the reduction of cholesterol synthesis pathway. This NEP reduction was achieved by the release to the extracellular space of cultured astrocytes. Furthermore, the cultured medium prepared from simvastatin- and atorvastatin-treated astrocytes significantly induced the degradation of exogenous Aβ. These results suggest that simvastatin and atorvastatin induce the increase of Aβ degradation of NEP on the extracellular of astrocytes by inducing ERK-mediated pathway activity and that these reagents regulate the differential mechanisms between the secretion of NEP, the induction of cholesterol reduction, and the morphological changes in the cultured astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:952-962. PMID:26875818

  19. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  20. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles as Vehicles for Brain Cell-to-Cell Interactions in Physiological as well as Pathological Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Schiera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are involved in a great variety of physiological events occurring in the nervous system, such as cross talk among neurons and glial cells in synapse development and function, integrated neuronal plasticity, neuronal-glial metabolic exchanges, and synthesis and dynamic renewal of myelin. Many of these EV-mediated processes depend on the exchange of proteins, mRNAs, and noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, which occurs among glial and neuronal cells. In addition, production and exchange of EVs can be modified under pathological conditions, such as brain cancer and neurodegeneration. Like other cancer cells, brain tumours can use EVs to secrete factors, which allow escaping from immune surveillance, and to transfer molecules into the surrounding cells, thus transforming their phenotype. Moreover, EVs can function as a way to discard material dangerous to cancer cells, such as differentiation-inducing proteins, and even drugs. Intriguingly, EVs seem to be also involved in spreading through the brain of aggregated proteins, such as prions and aggregated tau protein. Finally, EVs can carry useful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of diseases. Herein we summarize possible roles of EVs in brain physiological functions and discuss their involvement in the horizontal spreading, from cell to cell, of both cancer and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  1. Bral1: "Superglue" for the extracellular matrix in the brain white matter.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cicanič, Michal; Syková, Eva; Vargová, Lýdia

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 4 (2012), s. 596-599. ISSN 1357-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1597; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/11/0184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : extracellular matrix * link proteins * signal transmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.152, year: 2012

  2. Extracellular Vesicles and a Novel Form of Communication in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Basso, Manuela; Bonetto, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    In numerous neurodegenerative diseases, the interplay between neurons and glia modulates the outcome and progression of pathology. One particularly intriguing mode of interaction between neurons, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes is characterized by the release of extracellular vesicles that transport proteins, lipids, and nucleotides from one cell to another. Notably, several proteins that cause disease, including the prion protein and mutant SOD1, have been detected in glia-derive...

  3. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  4. Oxytocin regulates changes of extracellular glutamate and GABA levels induced by methamphetamine in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jia; Han, Wen-Yan; Yang, Jing-Yu; Wang, Li-Hui; Dong, Ying-Xu; Wang, Fang; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu

    2012-07-01

    Oxytocin (OT), a neurohypophyseal neuropeptide, affects adaptive processes of the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated the effects of OT on extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) induced by methamphetamine (MAP) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DHC) of freely moving mice, using in vivo microdialysis coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. The results showed that OT had no effect on basal Glu levels, but attenuated MAP-induced Glu increase in the mPFC and decrease in the DHC. OT increased the basal levels of extracellular GABA in mPFC and DHC of mice, and inhibited the MAP-induced GABA decrease in DHC. Western blot results indicated that OT significantly inhibited the increased glutamatergic receptor (NR1 subunit) levels in the PFC after acute MAP administration, whereas OT further enhanced the elevated levels of glutamatergic transporter (GLT1) induced by MAP in the hippocampus of mice. Atosiban, a selective inhibitor of OT receptor, antagonized the effects of OT. The results provided the first neurochemical evidence that OT, which exerted its action via its receptor, decreased Glu release induced by MAP, and attenuated the changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission partially via regulation of NR1 and GLT1 expression. OT-induced extracellular GABA increase also suggests that OT acts potentially as an inhibitory neuromodulator in mPFC and DHC of mice. PMID:22507692

  5. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found in...... cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...... µM in brain slices. In vivo recordings showed a tendency towards increased adenosine levels in rats with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation compared to a control group (3.7 ± 0.7 vs. 0.8 ± 0.2 µM, P = 0.06). This was associated with a significant increase in ICP and CBF. Intervention with the...

  6. Turing Revisited: Decoding the microRNA Messages in Brain Extracellular Vesicles for Early Detection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Virginie; Hunting, Darel John; Takser, Larissa

    2016-09-01

    The prevention of neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD) of prenatal origin suffers from the lack of objective tools for early detection of susceptible individuals and the long time lag, usually in years, between the neurotoxic exposure and the diagnosis of mental dysfunction. Human data on the effects of alcohol, lead, and mercury and experimental data from animals on developmental neurotoxins and their long-term behavioral effects have achieved a critical mass, leading to the concept of the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD). However, there is currently no way to evaluate the degree of brain damage early after birth. We propose that extracellular vesicles (EVs) and particularly exosomes, released by brain cells into the fetal blood, may offer us a non-invasive means of assessing brain damage by neurotoxins. We are inspired by the strategy applied by Alan Turing (a cryptanalyst working for the British government), who created a first computer to decrypt German intelligence communications during World War II. Given the growing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs), which are among the molecules carried by EVs, are involved in cell-cell communication, we propose that decrypting messages from EVs can allow us to detect damage thus offering an opportunity to cure, reverse, or prevent the development of NDD. This review summarizes recent findings on miRNAs associated with selected environmental toxicants known to be involved in the pathophysiology of NDD. PMID:27301443

  7. The glycosyltransferase activities of lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3) in the extracellular space are important for cell growth and viability

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chunguang; Kovanen, Vuokko; Raudasoja, Päivi; Eskelinen, Sinikka; Pospiech, Helmut; Myllylä, Raili

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Lysyl hydroxylase (LH) isoform 3 is a post-translational enzyme possessing LH, collagen galactosyltransferase (GT) and glucosyltransferase (GGT) activities. We have demonstrated that LH3 is found not only intracellularly, but also on the cell surface and in the extracellular space, suggesting additional functions for LH3. Here we show that the targeted disruption of LH3 by siRNA causes a marked reduction of both glycosyltransferase activities, and the overexpression of LH3 in HT-1080...

  8. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is Present in the Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Promotes Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Enbergs, Helmut; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger; Schmidt, Henrik; Müller-Decker, Karin; Mollenhauer, Jan; Fisslthaler, Beate; Eble, Johannes A; Fleming, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily of proteins and is implicated in innate immunity, cell polarity, and differentiation. Here we studied the role of DMBT1 in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: DMBT1 was secreted...

  9. Extracellular matrix heparin induces alteration of the cell adhesion during brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ushakova, GA; Nikonenko, IR; Nikonenko, AG; Skibo, GG

    2002-01-01

    The studies of neuronal cell-glycosaminoglycan interactions indicate an increasing interest in the question of how heparin can mediate adhesion properties of the cell. We have found that high levels of both N-CAM concentration and heparin-binding activity were noticed in the early stages of brain fo

  10. Modification of cellular radiosensitivity by the extracellular concentration of hydrogen ions - a possible explanation of the radiation resistance of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tumours show a much higher local relapse frequency than other tumours after radiologic treatment. Influences of the extracellular environment on the radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells were examined in vitro. The results indicate that the low pH-value in the tumour might contribute to the radiation resistence. (orig.)

  11. Derivatization for the simultaneous LC/MS quantification of multiple neurotransmitters in extracellular fluid from rat brain microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minli; Fang, Chengwei; Smagin, Gennady

    2014-11-01

    Quantification of amino acid based neurotransmitters in extracellular fluids, such as those in the neuron synapse, presents a challenge to the analytical chemistry because of the absence of UV- or fluorescence-detectable functional groups and the low sensitivity in mass spectrometric detection. This report describes a novel use of the succinimide reagent, N-α-Boc-l-tryptophan hydroxysuccinimide ester (Boc-TRP), for the pre-column derivatization to simultaneously quantify multiple neurotransmitters in the rat brain microdialysis samples. The Boc-TRP derivatization was rapid and quantitative in phosphate the buffer (pH 7.4) at room temperature. The derivatized neurotransmitters were suitable for rapid LC/MS quantification with less than 3-min chromatographic separation. The Boc-group in the derivatized product generated unique fragmentation patterns in the triple quadrupole mass spectrometric analysis under Multiple Reaction Monitoring mode and significantly increased the specificity and sensitivity. The derivatization and rapid LC/MS quantification method developed in this study showed a linear dynamic range from single digit nM to 1000nM with coefficient greater than 0.990. At the LOQ, the accuracy ranged from 95 to 108% and the precision (CV%) was less than 20%. Since there was no concentration and reconstitution in the sample workup process, this derivatization approach simplified the neurotransmitter quantification of the brain microdialysis samples. PMID:25200427

  12. Extracellular Vesicles Isolated from the Brains of rTg4510 Mice Seed Tau Protein Aggregation in a Threshold-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Scicluna, Benjamin James; Hill, Andrew Francis; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-06-10

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has a critical role in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies. There is accumulating evidence that tau aggregates spread and replicate in a prion-like manner, with the uptake of pathological tau seeds causing misfolding and aggregation of monomeric tau in recipient cells. Here we focused on small extracellular vesicles enriched for exosomes that were isolated from the brains of tau transgenic rTg4510 and control mice. We found that these extracellular vesicles contained tau, although the levels were significantly higher in transgenic mice that have a pronounced tau pathology. Tau in the vesicles was differentially phosphorylated, although to a lower degree than in the brain cells from which they were derived. Several phospho-epitopes (AT8, AT100, and AT180) thought to be critical for tau pathology were undetected in extracellular vesicles. Despite this, when assayed with FRET tau biosensor cells, extracellular vesicles derived from transgenic mice were capable of seeding tau aggregation in a threshold-dependent manner. We also observed that the dye used to label extracellular vesicle membranes was still present during nucleation and formation of tau inclusions, suggesting either a role for membranes in the seeding or in the process of degradation. Together, we clearly demonstrate that extracellular vesicles can transmit tau pathology. This indicates a role for extracellular vesicles in the transmission and spreading of tau pathology. The characteristics of tau in extracellular vesicles and the seeding threshold we identified may explain why tau pathology develops very slowly in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:27030011

  13. Prospects of brain-machine interfaces for space system control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Carlo; de Negueruela, Cristina; Millán, José del R.; Tonet, Oliver; Carpi, Federico; Broschart, Michael; Ferrez, Pierre; Buttfield, Anna; Tecchio, Franca; Sepulveda, Francisco; Citi, Luca; Laschi, Cecilia; Tombini, Mario; Dario, Paolo; Maria Rossini, Paolo; De Rossi, Danilo

    2009-02-01

    The dream of controlling and guiding computer-based systems using human brain signals has slowly but steadily become a reality. The available technology allows real-time implementation of systems that measure neuronal activity, convert their signals, and translate their output for the purpose of controlling mechanical and electronic systems. This paper describes the state of the art of non-invasive brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) and critically investigates both the current technological limits and the future potential that BMIs have for space applications. We present an assessment of the advantages that BMIs can provide and justify the preferred candidate concepts for space applications together with a vision of future directions for their implementation.

  14. The diffusion parameters of the extracellular space are altered in focal cortical dysplasias

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, Lýdia; Homola, Aleš; Cicanič, Michal; Kuncová, K.; Kršek, P.; Marusič, P.; Syková, Eva; Zámečník, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 499, č. 1 (2011), s. 19-23. ISSN 0304-3940 Grant ostatní: GA MZO(CZ) NS9915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : epilepsy * focal cortical dysplasia * extracellular diffusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2011

  15. Extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 signal pathway and responses of astrocytes after diffuse brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxing Li; Haimei Zhao; Yu Li; Chong Wang; Jiashan Zhao; Xianli Zhu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of diffuse brain injury during an acute period is focused on relieving degrees of secondary brain injury. Generation and development of pathological changes of secondary brain injury depend on signal conduction, so down-regulating over response of astrocyte through interfering a key link of signal conduction pathway may bring a new thinking for the treatment of diffuse brain injury. OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of over activity of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signal pathway on the response of astrocyte during an acute period of diffuse brain injury. DESIGN: Completely randomized grouping and controlled animal study.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Nanchang University; Department of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: A total of 158 healthy male SD rats, of 11 weeks old, weighing 320 - 370 g, were provided by Experimental Animal Faulty, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Rabbit-anti-phosphorylated ERK1/2 (pERKl/2) polyclonal antibody was provided by R&D Company; rabbit-anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) polyclonal antibody, SP immunohistochemical kit and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled goat-anti-rabbit IgG by Santa Cruz Company; specific inhibitor U0126 of ERK1/2 signal pathway by Alexis Company. METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Neurosurgery, Union Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology from September 2004 to March 2006. ①Detection of pERKl/2 expression: A total of 110 rats were randomly divided into sham operation group (n =5), model group (n =35), high-dosage U0126 group (n =35) and low-dosage U0126 group (n =35). Rats in the sham operation group were only treated with incision of epicranium and fixation of backup plate, but not hit. Rats in the model group

  16. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille;

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical...... intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7 pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only the...

  17. The hyaluronan and proteoglycan link proteins: Organizers of the brain extracellular matrix and key molecules for neuronal function and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohashi, Toshitaka; Edamatsu, Midori; Bekku, Yoko; Carulli, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    The hyaluronan and proteoglycanbinding link protein (Hapln) is a key molecule in the formation and control of hyaluronan-based condensed perineuronal matrix in the adult brain. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding the role of Haplns in the formation and control of two distinct types of perineuronal matrices, one for "classical" PNN and the other for the specialized extracellular matrix (ECM) at the node of Ranvier in the central nervous system (CNS). We introduce the structural components of each ECM organization including the basic concept of supramolecular structure named "HLT model". We furthermore summarize the developmental and physiological role of perineuronal ECMs from the studies of Haplns and related molecules. Finally, we also discuss the potential mechanism modulating PNNs in the adult CNS. This layer of organized matrices may exert a direct effect via core protein or sugar moiety from the structure or by acting as a binding site for biologically active molecules, which are important for neuronal plasticity and saltatory conduction. PMID:26387938

  18. Variable domain I of nematode CLEs directs post-translational targeting of CLE peptides to the extracellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianying; Joshi, Sneha; Korkin, Dmitry; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2010-12-01

    Effector proteins expressed in the esophageal gland cells of cyst nematodes are delivered into plant cells through a hollow, protrusible stylet. Although evidence indicates that effector proteins function in the cytoplasm of the syncytium, technical constraints have made it difficult to directly determine where nematode effector proteins are initially delivered: cytoplasm, extracellular space, or both. Recently, we demonstrated that soybean cyst nematode CLE (HgCLE) propeptides are delivered to the cytoplasm of syncytial cells. Genetic and biochemical analyses indicate that the variable domain (VD) sequence is then required for targeting cytoplasmically delivered nematode CLEs to the apoplast where they function as ligand mimics of endogenous plant CLE peptides. The fact that nematode CLEs are targeted through the gland cell secretory pathway and delivered as mature propeptides into plant cells makes it impossible for these proteins to be subsequently delivered to the extracellular space via co-translational translocation through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) secretory pathway of the host cell. However, when expressed in transgenic plants, if the mature nematode CLE propeptide harbored a functional cryptic signal peptide, it could possibly traffic to the apoplast through the ER secretory pathway by co-translational translocation. Here, we present evidence that VDI, the N-terminal sequence of the variable domain of HgCLE2, is sufficient for trafficking CLE peptides to the apoplast and that trafficking is indeed through an alternative pathway other than co-translational translocation. PMID:21150256

  19. Evidence that brain glucose availability influences exercise-enhanced extracellular 5-HT level in hippocampus: a microdialysis study in exercising rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béquet, F; Gomez-Merino, D; Berthelot, M; Guezennec, C Y

    2002-09-01

    The relationship between brain glucose and serotonin is still unclear and no direct evidence of an action of brain glucose on serotonergic metabolism in central fatigue phenomena has been shown yet. In order to determine whether or not brain glucose could influence the brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system, we have monitored in microdialysis the effects of a direct injection of glucose in rat brain hippocampus on serotonergic metabolism [i.e. 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and tryptophan (TRP)], during high intensive treadmill running. The injection was performed just before and after exercise. We have shown that glucose induced a decrease of brain 5-HT levels to a minimum of 73.0 +/- 3.5% of baseline after the first injection (P exercise-induced 5-HT enhanced levels. We have observed the same phenomenon concerning the 5-HIAA, but brain TRP levels were not decreased by the injections. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that brain glucose can act on serotonergic metabolism and thus can prevent exercise-induced increase of 5-HT levels. The results also suggest that extracellular brain glucose does not act on the synthesis way of 5-HT, but probably on the release/reuptake system. PMID:12193220

  20. Redefining the role of metallothionein within the injured brain: extracellular metallothioneins play an important role in the astrocyte-neuron response to injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Roger S; Penkowa, Milena; Dittmann, Justin;

    2008-01-01

    A number of intracellular proteins that are protective after brain injury are classically thought to exert their effect within the expressing cell. The astrocytic metallothioneins (MT) are one example and are thought to act via intracellular free radical scavenging and heavy metal regulation, and......-dependent axonal regeneration. First, we show that MT can be detected within the extracellular fluid of the injured brain, and that cultured astrocytes are capable of actively secreting MT in a regulatable manner. Second, we identify a receptor, megalin, that mediates MT transport into neurons. Third, we directly...

  1. Accumulation of extracellular proteins bearing unique proline-rich motifs in intercellular spaces of the legume nodule parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrier, D J; Taylor, G S; Silverstein, K A T; Gonzales, M B; VandenBosch, K A

    2005-04-01

    Nodulins encoding repetitive proline-rich cell wall proteins (PRPs) are induced during early interactions with rhizobia, suggesting a massive restructuring of the plant extracellular matrix during infection and nodulation. However, the proteins corresponding to these gene products have not been isolated or characterized, nor have cell wall localizations been confirmed. Posttranslational modifications, conformation, and interactions with other wall polymers are difficult to predict on the basis of only the deduced amino acid sequence of PRPs. PsENOD2 is expressed in nodule parenchyma tissue during nodule organogenesis and encodes a protein with distinctive PRP motifs that are rich in glutamate and basic amino acids. A database search for the ENOD2 signature motifs indicates that similar proteins may have a limited phylogenetic distribution, as they are presently only known from legumes. To determine the ultrastructural location of the proteins, antibodies were raised against unique motifs from the predicted ENOD2 sequence. The antibodies recognized nodule-specific proteins in pea (Pisum sativum), with a major band detected at 110 kDa, representing a subset of PRPs from nodules. The protein was detected specifically in organelles of the secretory pathway and intercellular spaces in the nodule parenchyma, but it was not abundant in primary walls. Similar proteins with an analogous distribution were detected in soybean (Glycine max). The use of polyclonal antibodies raised against signature motifs of extracellular matrix proteins thus appears to be an effective strategy to identify and isolate specific structural proteins for functional analysis. PMID:15868212

  2. Natural world physical, brain operational, and mind phenomenal space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A.; Fingelkurts, Alexander A.; Neves, Carlos F. H.

    2010-06-01

    Concepts of space and time are widely developed in physics. However, there is a considerable lack of biologically plausible theoretical frameworks that can demonstrate how space and time dimensions are implemented in the activity of the most complex life-system - the brain with a mind. Brain activity is organized both temporally and spatially, thus representing space-time in the brain. Critical analysis of recent research on the space-time organization of the brain's activity pointed to the existence of so-called operational space-time in the brain. This space-time is limited to the execution of brain operations of differing complexity. During each such brain operation a particular short-term spatio-temporal pattern of integrated activity of different brain areas emerges within related operational space-time. At the same time, to have a fully functional human brain one needs to have a subjective mental experience. Current research on the subjective mental experience offers detailed analysis of space-time organization of the mind. According to this research, subjective mental experience (subjective virtual world) has definitive spatial and temporal properties similar to many physical phenomena. Based on systematic review of the propositions and tenets of brain and mind space-time descriptions, our aim in this review essay is to explore the relations between the two. To be precise, we would like to discuss the hypothesis that via the brain operational space-time the mind subjective space-time is connected to otherwise distant physical space-time reality.

  3. Glia and Extracellular Space Diffusion Parameters in the Injured and Aging Brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    New Jersey : Humana Press, 2001 - (Vellis, J.), s. 77-98 ISBN 0-89603-594-8 R&D Projects: GA MŠk VS96130; GA ČR GV307/96/K226; GA ČR GV309/97/K048; GA ČR GA309/99/0657 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : volume transmission diffusion ion homeostasis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Extracellular space diffusion parameters in the brain of APP23 mice: an Alzheimer's disease model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazel, Tomáš; Antonova, Tatiana; Voříšek, Ivan; Meyer-Luehmann, M.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.; Syková, Eva

    Praha, 2003. s. 99. ISBN 80-239-0887-1. [IBRO World Congress of Neuroscience /6./. 10.07.2003-15.07.2003, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  5. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology.

  6. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Stine N; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-08-15

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical detection provided limits of quantifications (LOQs) between 3.6 and 12nM. Within the linear range, obtained recoveries were from 90.9±9.9 to 120±14% and intra-day and inter-day precisions found to be less than 5.5% and 12%, respectively. The analytical method was applicable for quantification of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in frontal cortex, as compared to cerebellum. The chemical turnover in frontal cortex tissue of guinea pig was for serotonin successfully predicted from the turnover observed in the frontal cortex cell culture. In conclusion, the present analytical method shows high precision, accuracy and sensitivity and is broadly applicable to monoamine measurements in cell cultures as well as brain biopsies from animal models used in preclinical neurochemistry. PMID:27379407

  7. Increased extracellular dopamine concentrations and FosB/DeltaFosB expression in striatal brain areas of heterozygous GDNF knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airavaara, Mikko; Planken, Anu; Gäddnäs, Helena; Piepponen, Timo Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Ahtee, Liisa

    2004-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been shown to be involved in the maintenance of striatal dopaminergic neurons. To study whether reduced levels of endogenous GDNF affect the striatal dopaminergic transmission we estimated the basal extracellular levels of dopamine in vivo, the basal expression of FosB-related proteins in striatal brain areas as well as the effects of acute and repeated cocaine on locomotor activity and dopamine output in mice lacking one GDNF allele (heterozygous GDNF+/- mice). As expected the striatal GDNF protein content was found to be smaller in the GDNF+/- mice than in their wild-type littermates. Unexpectedly the extracellular dopamine concentration in the GDNF+/- mice in the dorsal striatum (CPu) was 2.0-fold, and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) 1.6-fold the concentration found in the wild-type littermates. Also FosB/DeltaFosB-like immunoreactivity was found to be elevated in the CPu as well as in the core and in the shell of NAc of the GDNF+/- mice as compared with the wild-type mice. This suggests chronic postsynaptic activation of these brain areas and is in line with elevated extracellular dopamine concentrations. Cocaine's effects acutely and after repeated treatment on locomotor activity were similar in the GDNF+/- and the wild-type mice. Neither did cocaine's acute effects on dopamine output differ between the mice of the two strains. Our findings demonstrate that reduced levels of endogenous GDNF induce alterations in dorsal striatal and accumbal dopaminergic transmission, and stress the importance of endogenous GDNF in the regulation of the dopaminergic neurons. PMID:15525275

  8. Pharmacodynamic interactions between MDMA and concomitants in MDMA tablets on extracellular dopamine and serotonin in the rat brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Rie; Igari, Yoshiko; Fuchigami, Yuki; Wada, Mitsuhiro; Kuroda, Naotaka; Nakashima,Kenichiro

    2011-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a psychoactive stimulant abused by young people as the recreational drug ecstasy. Other compounds, either deliberately added or present as byproducts, are often found in MDMA tablets and can unexpectedly interact with each other. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacodynamic effects of interactions caused by concomitants in MDMA tablets on extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT) by microdialysis in the striatum of ethylcarbamate-anes...

  9. Fresh-frozen plasma resuscitation after traumatic brain injury and shock attenuates extracellular nucleosome levels and deoxyribonuclease 1 depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Jin, Guang; Oklu, Rahmi; Albadawi, Hassan; Imam, Ayesha M; Jepsen, Cecilie H; Hwabejire, John O; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Johansson, Pär I; Rasmussen, Lars S; Alam, Hasan B

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury and shock are among the leading causes of trauma-related mortality. We have previously shown that fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation reduces the size of brain lesion and associated swelling compared with crystalloids. We hypothesized that this effect would be associate...... with an attenuation of circulating nucleosome levels, a biomarker of injury with cytotoxic potential, through reconstitution of circulating deoxyribonuclease-1 (DNAse1), an enzyme identified as critical in nucleosome clearance from the circulation....

  10. Validated methods for determination of neurotransmitters and metabolites in rodent brain tissue and extracellular fluid by reversed phase UHPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, Marianne Skov-Skov; Bogen, Inger Lise; Lundanes, Elsa; Øiestad, Åse Marit Leere

    2016-08-15

    Fast and sensitive methods for simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA), the two DA-metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), serotonin (5-HT) and the 5-HT-metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), glutamic acid (Glu) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in rodent brain tissue (1.0-4000nM) and extracellular fluid (ECF) (0.5-2000nM) based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) have been developed. Of the three different sample preparation methods for brain tissue samples tested, a simple and rapid protein precipitation procedure with formic acid was found to give the best results. The neurotransmitters (NTs) and NT metabolites were separated using UHPLC with an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 C18 column (2.1×100mm, 1.8μm particle size) with acidic mobile phase. Gradient elution with methanol was used and quantification was performed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The total run time was 5.2min including equilibration time. The methods were validated by determining calibration model, intra- and inter-day precision and accuracy, limit of detection (LOD), lower limit of quantification (LLOQ), matrix effects (ME), carry-over and stability. Surrogate analytes were used to enable determination of the recovery and ME of the endogenous analytes in brain tissue. The methods were applied for determination of NTs at basal levels in rodent brain ECF and brain tissue homogenate. The developed methods are valuable tools in the studies of mechanisms of drugs of abuse, and neurologic and psychiatric disease. PMID:27336704

  11. PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLES OF AQUAPORIN-4 IN BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Nagelhus, Erlend A.; Ottersen, Ole P.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is one of the most abundant molecules in the brain and is particularly prevalent in astrocytic membranes at the blood-brain and brain-liquor interfaces. While AQP4 has been implicated in a number of pathophysiological processes, its role in brain physiology has remained elusive. Only recently has evidence accumulated to suggest that AQP4 is involved in such diverse functions as regulation of extracellular space volume, potassium buffering, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, i...

  12. Statistical probabilistic mapping in the individual brain space: decreased metabolism in epilepsy with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jung Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In the statistical probabilistic mapping, commonly, differences between two or more groups of subjects are statistically analyzed following spatial normalization. However, to our best knowledge, there is few study which performed the statistical mapping in the individual brain space rather than in the stereotaxic brain space, i.e., template space. Therefore, in the current study, a new method for mapping the statistical results in the template space onto individual brain space has been developed. Four young subjects with epilepsy and their age-matched thirty normal healthy subjects were recruited. Both FDG PET and T1 structural MRI was scanned in these groups. Statistical analysis on the decreased FDG metabolism in epilepsy was performed on the SPM with two sample t-test (p < 0.001, intensity threshold 100). To map the statistical results onto individual space, inverse deformation was performed as follows. With SPM deformation toolbox, DCT (discrete cosine transform) basis-encoded deformation fields between individual T1 images and T1 MNI template were obtained. Afterward, inverse of those fields, i.e., inverse deformation fields were obtained. Since both PET and T1 images have been already normalized in the same MNI space, inversely deformed results in PET is on the individual brain MRI space. By applying inverse deformation field on the statistical results of the PET, the statistical map of decreased metabolism in individual spaces were obtained. With statistical results in the template space, localization of decreased metabolism was in the inferior temporal lobe, which was slightly inferior to the hippocampus. The statistical results in the individual space were commonly located in the hippocampus, where the activation should be decreased according to a priori knowledge of neuroscience. With our newly developed statistical mapping on the individual spaces, the localization of the brain functional mapping became more appropriate in the sense of neuroscience.

  13. Statistical probabilistic mapping in the individual brain space: decreased metabolism in epilepsy with FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the statistical probabilistic mapping, commonly, differences between two or more groups of subjects are statistically analyzed following spatial normalization. However, to our best knowledge, there is few study which performed the statistical mapping in the individual brain space rather than in the stereotaxic brain space, i.e., template space. Therefore, in the current study, a new method for mapping the statistical results in the template space onto individual brain space has been developed. Four young subjects with epilepsy and their age-matched thirty normal healthy subjects were recruited. Both FDG PET and T1 structural MRI was scanned in these groups. Statistical analysis on the decreased FDG metabolism in epilepsy was performed on the SPM with two sample t-test (p < 0.001, intensity threshold 100). To map the statistical results onto individual space, inverse deformation was performed as follows. With SPM deformation toolbox, DCT (discrete cosine transform) basis-encoded deformation fields between individual T1 images and T1 MNI template were obtained. Afterward, inverse of those fields, i.e., inverse deformation fields were obtained. Since both PET and T1 images have been already normalized in the same MNI space, inversely deformed results in PET is on the individual brain MRI space. By applying inverse deformation field on the statistical results of the PET, the statistical map of decreased metabolism in individual spaces were obtained. With statistical results in the template space, localization of decreased metabolism was in the inferior temporal lobe, which was slightly inferior to the hippocampus. The statistical results in the individual space were commonly located in the hippocampus, where the activation should be decreased according to a priori knowledge of neuroscience. With our newly developed statistical mapping on the individual spaces, the localization of the brain functional mapping became more appropriate in the sense of neuroscience

  14. The Arabidopsis apyrase AtAPY1 is localized in the Golgi instead of the extracellular space

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller Madlen; Massalski Carolin; Kurth Thomas; Steinebrunner Iris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The two highly similar Arabidopsis apyrases AtAPY1 and AtAPY2 were previously shown to be involved in plant growth and development, evidently by regulating extracellular ATP signals. The subcellular localization of AtAPY1 was investigated to corroborate an extracellular function. Results Transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing AtAPY1 fused to the SNAP-(O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase)-tag were used for indirect immunofluorescence and AtAPY1 was detected in punctate st...

  15. The extracellular space in the CNS: Its regulation, volume and geometry in normal and pathological neuronal function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    1997-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 1 (1997), s. 28-41. ISSN 1073-8584 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/96/0884 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : apparent diffusion coefficient diffusion * glia * extracellular volume Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Adaptive changes of rhythmic EEG oscillations in space implications for brain-machine interface applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Cebolla, A M; Petieau, M; Bengoetxea, A; Palmero-Soler, E; Leroy, A; Dan, B

    2009-01-01

    The dramatic development of brain machine interfaces has enhanced the use of human brain signals conveying mental action for controlling external actuators. This chapter will outline current evidences that the rhythmic electroencephalographic activity of the brain is sensitive to microgravity environment. Experiments performed in the International Space Station have shown significant changes in the power of the astronauts' alpha and mu oscillations in resting condition, and other adaptive modifications in the beta and gamma frequency range during the immersion in virtual navigation. In this context, the dynamic aspects of the resting or default condition of the awaken brain, the influence of the "top-down" dynamics, and the possibility to use a more constrained configuration by a new somatosensory-evoked potential (gating approach) are discussed in the sense of future uses of brain computing interface in space mission. Although, the state of the art of the noninvasive BCI approach clearly demonstrates their ability and the great expectance in the field of rehabilitation for the restoration of defective communication between the brain and external world, their future application in space mission urgently needs a better understanding of brain neurophysiology, in particular in aspects related to neural network rhythmicity in microgravity. PMID:19607999

  17. Prospects on Brain-Machine Interfaces for Space System Control

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, C.; de Negueruela, Christina; Millán, José Del R; Tonet, O.; Carpi, F.; Broschart, M.; Ferrez, Pierre W.; Buttfield, Anna; Dario, P.; Citi, L; Laschi, C.; Tombini, M.; Sepulveda, F.; Poli, R.; Palaniappan, R.

    2006-01-01

    The dream of controlling and guiding computer-based systems using human brain signals has slowly but steadily become a reality. The available technology allows real-time implementation of systems that measure neuronal activity, convert their signals, and translate their output for the purpose of controlling mechanical systems. This paper describes the state of the art of non-invasive BMIs and critically investigates both the current technological limits and the future potential that BMIs have...

  18. Brain in Space: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Walter W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The lessons and activities in this guide will engage your students in the excitement of space life science investigations after the Neurolab Spacelab mission. It is the authors' goal that the information in this guide will inspire both you and your students to become interested and active participants in this space mission. Few experiences can compare with the excitement and thrill of watching a Shuttle launch. This guide provides an opportunity for you and your students to go one step further by conducting the experiments on Earth that are relevent to the research conducted in space.

  19. Cenicriviroc blocks HIV entry but does not lead to redistribution of HIV into extracellular space like maraviroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kramer

    2014-11-01

    , while in vitro analysis showed that CVC-treated cells do not repel virus back into the extracellular space, as seen with MVC. Experiments are underway to determine whether or not interactions between CVC and HIV at the binding site may explain these unanticipated findings.

  20. Extracellular cadmium in the bronchoalveolar space of long-term tobacco smokers with and without COPD and its association with inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Britt-Marie; Ji, Jie; Levänen, Bettina; Midander, Klara; Julander, Anneli; Larsson, Kjell; Palmberg, Lena; Lindén, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco contains cadmium, and this metal has been attributed a causative role in pulmonary emphysema among smokers, although extracellular cadmium has not to date been quantified in the bronchoalveolar space of tobacco smokers with or without COPD. We determined whether cadmium is enhanced in the bronchoalveolar space of long-term tobacco smokers with or without COPD in vivo, its association with inflammation, and its effect on chemokine release in macrophage-like cells in vitro. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), sputum, and blood samples were collected from current, long-term smokers with and without COPD and from healthy nonsmokers. Cadmium concentrations were determined in cell-free BAL fluid using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Blood monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to cadmium chloride in vitro. Depending upon the type of sample, molecular markers of inflammation were quantified either as protein (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) or as mRNA (real-time polymerase chain reaction). Cadmium concentrations were markedly increased in cell-free BAL fluid of smokers compared to that of nonsmokers (n=19–29; P<0.001), irrespective of COPD. In these smokers, the measured cadmium displayed positive correlations with macrophage TNF-α mRNA in BAL, neutrophil and CD8+ cell concentrations in blood, and finally with IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-9 protein in sputum (n=10–20; P<0.05). The cadmium chloride exposure caused a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular IL-8 protein in monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. In conclusion, extracellular cadmium is enhanced in the bronchoalveolar space of long-term smokers and displays pro-inflammatory features. Its pathogenic role in tobacco-induced disease deserves further evaluation. PMID:27274222

  1. Modelling Human Cortical Network in Real Brain Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-Bai; FENG Hong-Bo; TANG Yi-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Highly specific structural organization is of great significance in the topology of cortical networks.We introduce a human cortical network model.taking the specific cortical structure into account,in which nodes are brain sites placed in the actual positions of cerebral cortex and the establishment of edges depends on the spatial path length rather than the linear distance.The resulting network exhibits the essential features of cortical connectivity,properties of small-world networks and multiple clusters structure.Additionally.assortative mixing is also found in this roodel.All of these findings may be attributed to the spedtic cortical architecture.

  2. Chordin forms a self-organizing morphogen gradient in the extracellular space between ectoderm and mesoderm in the Xenopus embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; Zakin, Lise; Moriyama, Yuki; De Robertis, Edward M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan follows stereotypical dorsal–ventral (D-V) tissue differentiation controlled by bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and secreted BMP antagonists, such as Chordin. The three germ layers—ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm—are affected coordinately by the Chordin–BMP morphogen system. However, extracellular morphogen gradients of endogenous proteins have not been directly visualized in vertebrate embryos to date. In this study, we improved immunolocalization methods in Xenopus embryos and analyzed the distribution of endogenous Chordin using a specific antibody. Chordin protein secreted by the dorsal Spemann organizer was found to diffuse along a narrow region that separates the ectoderm from the anterior endoderm and mesoderm. This Fibronectin-rich extracellular matrix is called “Brachet’s cleft” in the Xenopus gastrula and is present in all vertebrate embryos. Chordin protein formed a smooth gradient that encircled the embryo, reaching the ventral-most Brachet cleft. Depletion with morpholino oligos showed that this extracellular gradient was regulated by the Chordin protease Tolloid and its inhibitor Sizzled. The Chordin gradient, as well as the BMP signaling gradient, was self-regulating and, importantly, was able to rescale in dorsal half-embryos. Transplantation of Spemann organizer tissue showed that Chordin diffused over long distances along this signaling highway between the ectoderm and mesoderm. Chordin protein must reach very high concentrations in this narrow region. We suggest that as ectoderm and mesoderm undergo morphogenetic movements during gastrulation, cells in both germ layers read their positional information coordinately from a single morphogen gradient located in Brachet’s cleft. PMID:24284174

  3. The Arabidopsis apyrase AtAPY1 is localized in the Golgi instead of the extracellular space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiller Madlen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The two highly similar Arabidopsis apyrases AtAPY1 and AtAPY2 were previously shown to be involved in plant growth and development, evidently by regulating extracellular ATP signals. The subcellular localization of AtAPY1 was investigated to corroborate an extracellular function. Results Transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing AtAPY1 fused to the SNAP-(O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase-tag were used for indirect immunofluorescence and AtAPY1 was detected in punctate structures within the cell. The same signal pattern was found in seedlings stably overexpressing AtAPY1-GFP by indirect immunofluorescence and live imaging. In order to identify the nature of the AtAPY1-positive structures, AtAPY1-GFP expressing seedlings were treated with the endocytic marker stain FM4-64 (N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl-4-(p-diethylaminophenyl-hexatrienyl-pyridinium dibromide and crossed with a transgenic line expressing the trans-Golgi marker Rab E1d. Neither FM4-64 nor Rab E1d co-localized with AtAPY1. However, live imaging of transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing AtAPY1-GFP and either the fluorescent protein-tagged Golgi marker Membrin 12, Syntaxin of plants 32 or Golgi transport 1 protein homolog showed co-localization. The Golgi localization was confirmed by immunogold labeling of AtAPY1-GFP. There was no indication of extracellular AtAPY1 by indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies against SNAP and GFP, live imaging of AtAPY1-GFP and immunogold labeling of AtAPY1-GFP. Activity assays with AtAPY1-GFP revealed GDP, UDP and IDP as substrates, but neither ATP nor ADP. To determine if AtAPY1 is a soluble or membrane protein, microsomal membranes were isolated and treated with various solubilizing agents. Only SDS and urea (not alkaline or high salt conditions were able to release the AtAPY1 protein from microsomal membranes. Conclusions AtAPY1 is an integral Golgi protein with the substrate specificity typical for Golgi apyrases. It is

  4. Exercise pre‑conditioning alleviates brain damage via excitatory amino acid transporter 2 and extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 following ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Min; Feng, Rui; Li, Wen-Bin; Ren, Shi-Qing; Zhang, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have reported that physical exercise may exert a neuroprotective effect in humans as well as animals. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of exercise has remained to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore the possible signaling pathways involved in the protective effect of pre‑ischemic treadmill training for ischemic stroke in rats. A total of 36 male Sprague‑Dawley rats were divided at random into three groups as follows (n=12 for each): Sham surgery group; middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) group; and exercise with MCAO group. Following treadmill training for three weeks, the middle cerebral artery was occluded for 90 min in order to induce ischemic stroke, followed by reperfusion. Following 24 h post‑reperfusion, six rats from each group were assessed for neurological deficits and then sacrificed to calculate the infarct volume. The remaining rats (n=6 for each group) were sacrificed and the expression levels of excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT‑2) and extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were detected using western blot analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that rats that underwent pre‑ischemic exercise intervention had a significantly decreased brain infarct volume and neurological deficits; in addition, the pre‑ischemic exercise group showed decreased overexpression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and increased expression of EAAT‑2 following ischemic stroke. In conclusion, treadmill training exercise prior to ischemic stroke alleviated brain damage in rats via regulation of EAAT‑2 and ERK1/2. PMID:25370789

  5. Solution space of pharmacokinetics and its application on mice brain with 18F-FECNT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To forward the concept of solution space of pharmacokinetics for studying radiopharmaceutical distributions in animal models. Methods: On the basis of special solutions of differential equations of pharmacokinetics, the solution space was established using the characteristics of linearly independent particular solutions and used to express the pharmacokinetics of pharmaceuticals in vivo. 0. 2 ml (7.4 MBq) 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-corophenyl)-8-(2-18F-fluoroethyl) nortropane (18F-FECNT) was injected through tail vein into normal mice. The mice were sacrificed by decapitation at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min post-injection. Brain tissues were removed and weighed, and radioactivity was counted with the γ-counter. The solution space theory was used to study pharmacokinetics of 18F-FECNT in brain tissues of mice. Results: The result showed that all solutions of pharmacokinetics models, based on differential equations, were included in the solution space. The solution of any organ or tissue could be linearly expressed by bases of the solution space. When the dimension number of the solution space was no more than 3, the solution could be directly expressed with coordinate picture. By this rule in our theory, the quantity of 18F-FECNT in brain tissues of mice changed with time, which was accorded with the experiment. The coordinates of striatum, frontal cortex, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, parietal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum in the solution space were (10.13, 1.49), (4.27, 0.84), (4.48, 0.81), (2.89, 0.98), (3.65, 0.83),(3.55, 0.98) and (2.03, 1.25), respectively. Conclusion: The theory of solution space could be used to study pharmacokinetics of 18F-FECNT in mice brain. (authors)

  6. Extracellular cadmium in the bronchoalveolar space of long-term tobacco smokers with and without COPD and its association with inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundblad BM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Britt-Marie Sundblad,1,* Jie Ji,1,* Bettina Levänen,1 Klara Midander,2 Anneli Julander,2 Kjell Larsson,1 Lena Palmberg,1 Anders Lindén1 1Unit for Lung and Airway Research, 2Unit for Occupational and Environmental Dermatology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Tobacco contains cadmium, and this metal has been attributed a causative role in pulmonary emphysema among smokers, although extracellular cadmium has not to date been quantified in the bronchoalveolar space of tobacco smokers with or without COPD. We determined whether cadmium is enhanced in the bronchoalveolar space of long-term tobacco smokers with or without COPD in vivo, its association with inflammation, and its effect on chemokine release in macrophage-like cells in vitro. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, sputum, and blood samples were collected from current, long-term smokers with and without COPD and from healthy nonsmokers. Cadmium concentrations were determined in cell-free BAL fluid using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Blood monocyte-derived macrophages were exposed to cadmium chloride in vitro. Depending upon the type of sample, molecular markers of inflammation were quantified either as protein (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or as mRNA (real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cadmium concentrations were markedly increased in cell-free BAL fluid of smokers compared to that of nonsmokers (n=19–29; P<0.001, irrespective of COPD. In these smokers, the measured cadmium displayed positive correlations with macrophage TNF-α mRNA in BAL, neutrophil and CD8+ cell concentrations in blood, and finally with IL-6, IL-8, and MMP-9 protein in sputum (n=10–20; P<0.05. The cadmium chloride exposure caused a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular IL-8 protein in monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. In conclusion, extracellular cadmium is enhanced in the

  7. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  8. Antioxidant effect of hyaluronan on polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived reactive oxygen species is dependent on its molecular weight and concentration and mainly involves the extracellular space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Krasiński

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyaluronan (HA, a component of the extracellular matrix, may regulate immune cell functions through its interactions with cellular receptors. Besides its effect on cytokine and chemokine production, its antioxidant properties have been described. However, the mechanisms of this are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HA concentration and molecular weight and its antioxidant properties towards human neutrophils. Also assessed was whether the antioxidant effect of HA is connected with a reduction in intracellular oxygen potential, which could indicate its direct effect on neutrophil respiratory burst.Materials/Methods: The relationship between HA’s antioxidant properties and its concentration and molecular weight was assessed by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence method (CL. To evaluate the effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential selectively, the dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123 flow cytometric method was used.Results: Reduction of both HA molecular weight and its concentration decreased its antioxidant properties in the CL method. A selective effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential measured by the DHR123 method was not shown.Conclusions: The antioxidant properties of HA are related to both its molecular weight and its concentration. The lack of an antioxidant effect of HA in the DHR123 test compared with a significant reduction in CL values at the same HA concentration suggests that HA acts mainly as a chemical ROI scavenger in the extracellular space.

  9. Advancing brain-machine interfaces: moving beyond linear state space models

    OpenAIRE

    Rouse, Adam G.; Schieber, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in recent years have dramatically improved output control by Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs). Such devices nevertheless remain robotic and limited in their movements compared to normal human motor performance. Most current BMIs rely on transforming recorded neural activity to a linear state space composed of a set number of fixed degrees of freedom. Here we consider a variety of ways in which BMI design might be advanced further by applying non-linear dynamics observed in normal moto...

  10. Source Space Analysis of Event-Related Dynamic Reorganization of Brain Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas A. Ioannides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available How the brain works is nowadays synonymous with how different parts of the brain work together and the derivation of mathematical descriptions for the functional connectivity patterns that can be objectively derived from data of different neuroimaging techniques. In most cases static networks are studied, often relying on resting state recordings. Here, we present a quantitative study of dynamic reconfiguration of connectivity for event-related experiments. Our motivation is the development of a methodology that can be used for personalized monitoring of brain activity. In line with this motivation, we use data with visual stimuli from a typical subject that participated in different experiments that were previously analyzed with traditional methods. The earlier studies identified well-defined changes in specific brain areas at specific latencies related to attention, properties of stimuli, and tasks demands. Using a recently introduced methodology, we track the event-related changes in network organization, at source space level, thus providing a more global and complete view of the stages of processing associated with the regional changes in activity. The results suggest the time evolving modularity as an additional brain code that is accessible with noninvasive means and hence available for personalized monitoring and clinical applications.

  11. Brain metabolism and extracellular space diffusion parameters during and after transient global hypoxia in the rat cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zoremba, N.; Homola, Aleš; Rossaint, R.; Syková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 203, - (2007), s. 34-41. ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hypoxia * Cortex * Recovery Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2007

  12. Efficacy of head space solid-phase microextraction coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for determination of the trace extracellular hydrocarbons of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wenna; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Yuejie; Zhang, Zhongyi; Jin, Zhao; Wang, Cong; Bai, Fali

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are widespread in cyanobacteria, and the biochemical synthetic pathways were recently identified. Intracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria have been detected by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, whether fatty alka(e)nes can be released to cyanobacterial culture media remains to be clarified. This work develops a sensitive method for analyzing the trace level of extracellular hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial culture media by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled to GC/MS. Headspace (HS) extraction mode using polydimethylsiloxane fiber to extract for 30min at 50°C was employed as the optimal extraction conditions. Five cyanobacterial fatty alka(e)nes analogs including pentadecene (C15:1), pentadecane (C15:0), heptadecene (C17:1), heptadecane (C17:0), nonadecane (C19:0) were analyzed, and the data obtained from HS-SPME-GC/MS method were quantified using internal standard peak area comparisons. Limits of detection (LOD), limits of quantitation (LOQ), linear dynamic range, precisions (RSD) and recovery for the analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes of cyanobacteria by HS-SPME-GC/MS were evaluated. The LODs limits of detection (S/N = 3) varied from 10 to 21 ng L-1. The correlation coefficients (r) of the calibration curves ranged from 0.9873 to 0.9977 with a linearity from 0.1 to 50 μg L-1. The RSD values were ranging from 7.8 to 14.0% and from 4.0 to 8.8% at 1.0 μg L-1 and 10.0 μg L-1 standard solutions, respectively. Comparative analysis of extracellular fatty alka(e)nes in the culture media of model cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 demonstrated that sensitivity of HS-SPME-GC/MS method was significantly higher than LLE method. Finally, we found that heptadecane can be released into the culture media of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 at the later growth period. PMID:27428454

  13. Anomalous extracellular diffusion in rat cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fanrong; Hrabe, Jan; Hrabetova, Sabina

    2015-05-01

    Extracellular space (ECS) is a major channel transporting biologically active molecules and drugs in the brain. Diffusion-mediated transport of these substances is hindered by the ECS structure but the microscopic basis of this hindrance is not fully understood. One hypothesis proposes that the hindrance originates in large part from the presence of dead-space (DS) microdomains that can transiently retain diffusing molecules. Because previous theoretical and modeling work reported an initial period of anomalous diffusion in similar environments, we expected that brain regions densely populated by DS microdomains would exhibit anomalous extracellular diffusion. Specifically, we targeted granular layers (GL) of rat and turtle cerebella that are populated with large and geometrically complex glomeruli. The integrative optical imaging (IOI) method was employed to evaluate diffusion of fluorophore-labeled dextran (MW 3000) in GL, and the IOI data analysis was adapted to quantify the anomalous diffusion exponent dw from the IOI records. Diffusion was significantly anomalous in rat GL, where dw reached 4.8. In the geometrically simpler turtle GL, dw was elevated but not robustly anomalous (dw = 2.6). The experimental work was complemented by numerical Monte Carlo simulations of anomalous ECS diffusion in several three-dimensional tissue models containing glomeruli-like structures. It demonstrated that both the duration of transiently anomalous diffusion and the anomalous exponent depend on the size of model glomeruli and the degree of their wrapping. In conclusion, we have found anomalous extracellular diffusion in the GL of rat cerebellum. This finding lends support to the DS microdomain hypothesis. Transiently anomalous diffusion also has a profound effect on the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules released into the ECS, especially at diffusion distances on the order of a few cell diameters, speeding up short-range diffusion-mediated signals in less permeable

  14. Role of serotonin and/or norepinephrine in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis in the rat brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pachmerhiwala, Rashida; Bhide, Nirmal; Straiko, Megan; Gudelsky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The acute administration of MDMA has been shown to promote glycogenolysis and increase the extracellular concentration of glucose in the striatum. In the present study the role of serotonergic and/or noradrenergic mechanisms in the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular glucose and glycogenolysis was assessed. The relationship of these responses to the hyperthermia produced by MDMA also was examined. The administration of MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant and sustained increase ...

  15. Space-Frequency Detail-Preserving Construction of Neonatal Brain Atlases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyao; Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Brain atlases are an integral component of neuroimaging studies. However, most brain atlases are fuzzy and lack structural details, especially in the cortical regions. In particular, neonatal brain atlases are especially challenging to construct due to the low spatial resolution and low tissue contrast. This is mainly caused by the image averaging process involved in atlas construction, often smoothing out high-frequency contents that indicate fine anatomical details. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for detail-preserving construction of atlases. Our approach combines space and frequency information to better preserve image details. This is achieved by performing reconstruction in the space-frequency domain given by wavelet transform. Sparse patch-based atlas reconstruction is performed in each frequency subband. Combining the results for all these subbands will then result in a refined atlas. Compared with existing atlases, experimental results indicate that our approach has the ability to build an atlas with more structural details, thus leading to better performance when used to normalize a group of testing neonatal images.

  16. The perception of peripersonal space in right and left brain damage hemiplegic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eBartolo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripersonal space, as opposed to extrapersonal space, is the space that contains reachable objects and in which multisensory and sensorimotor integration is enhanced. Thus, the perception of peripersonal space requires combining information on the spatial properties of the environment with information on the current capacity to act. In support of this, recent studies have provided converging evidences that perceiving objects in peripersonal space activates a neural network overlapping with that subtending voluntary motor action and motor imagery. Other studies have also underlined the dominant role of the right hemisphere in motor planning and of the left hemisphere in on-line motor guiding, respectively. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a right or left hemiplegia in the perception of peripersonal space. 16 hemiplegic patients with brain damage to the left (LH or right (RH hemisphere and 8 matched healthy controls (HC performed a colour discrimination, a motor imagery and a reachability judgment task. Analyses of response times and accuracy revealed no variation among the three groups in the colour discrimination task, suggesting the absence of any specific perceptual or decisional deficits in the patient groups. In contrast, the patient groups revealed longer response times in the motor imagery task when performed in reference to the hemiplegic arm (RH and LH or to the healthy arm (RH. Moreover, RH group showed longer response times in the reachability judgement task, but only for stimuli located at the boundary of peripersonal space, which was furthermore significantly reduced in size. Considered together, these results confirm the crucial role of the motor system in motor imagery task and the perception of peripersonal space. They also revealed that right hemisphere damage has a more detrimental effect on reachability estimates, suggesting that motor planning processes contribute specifically to the perception of

  17. Interaction patterns of brain activity across space, time and frequency. Part I: methods

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D

    2011-01-01

    We consider exploratory methods for the discovery of cortical functional connectivity. Typically, data for the i-th subject (i=1...NS) is represented as an NVxNT matrix Xi, corresponding to brain activity sampled at NT moments in time from NV cortical voxels. A widely used method of analysis first concatenates all subjects along the temporal dimension, and then performs an independent component analysis (ICA) for estimating the common cortical patterns of functional connectivity. There exist many other interesting variations of this technique, as reviewed in [Calhoun et al. 2009 Neuroimage 45: S163-172]. We present methods for the more general problem of discovering functional connectivity occurring at all possible time lags. For this purpose, brain activity is viewed as a function of space and time, which allows the use of the relatively new techniques of functional data analysis [Ramsay & Silverman 2005: Functional data analysis. New York: Springer]. In essence, our method first vectorizes the data from...

  18. Consciousness viewed in the framework of brain phase space dynamics, criticality, and the Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of this paper will be addressed in three stages: I will first review currently prominent theoretical conceptualizations of the neurobiology of consciousness and, where appropriate, identify ill-advised and flawed notions in theoretical neuroscience that may impede viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in the physics of brain. In this context, I will also introduce relevant facts that tend not to receive adequate attention in much of the current consciousness discourse. Next, I will review the evidence that accrued in the last decade that identifies the resting brain as being in a state of criticality. In the framework of state phase dynamics of statistical physics, this observational evidence also entails that the resting brain is poised at the brink of a second order phase transition. On this basis, I will in the third stage propose applying the framework of the Renormalization Group to viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in statistical physics. In physics, concepts of phase space transitions and the Renormalization Group are powerful tools for interpreting phenomena involving many scales of length and time in complex systems. The significance of these concepts lies in their accounting for the emergence of different levels of new collective behaviors in complex systems, each level with its distinct macroscopic physics, organization, and laws, as a new pattern of reality. In this framework, I propose to view subjectivity as the symbolic description of the physical brain state of consciousness that emerges as one of the levels of phase transitions of the brain-body-environment system, along the trajectory of Renormalization Group Transformations

  19. Effect of peptides corresponding to extracellular domains of serotonin 1B/1D receptors and melanocortin 3 and 4 receptors on hormonal regulation of adenylate cyclase in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakova, E A; Derkach, K V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-03-01

    The ligand-recognizing part of G protein-coupled receptors consists of their extracellular loops and N-terminal domain. Identification of these sites is essential for receptor mapping and for the development and testing of new hormone system regulators. The peptides corresponding by their structure to extracellular loop 2 of serotonin 1B/1D receptor (peptide 1), extracellular loop 3 of melanocortin 3 receptor (peptide 2), and N-terminal domain of melanocortin 4 (peptide 3) were synthesized by the solid-phase method. In synaptosomal membranes isolated from rat brain, peptide 1 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) attenuated the effects of 5-nonyloxytryptamine (selective agonist of serotonin 1B/1D receptor) and to a lesser extent serotonin and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine acting on all the subtypes of serotonin receptor 1. Peptide 2 (10(-5)-10(-4) M) significantly reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (agonist of melanocortin receptor 3), but had no effect on the adenylate cyclase effect of THIQ (agonist melanocortin receptor 4). Peptide 3 reduced the adenylate cyclase-stimulating effects of THIQ and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (non-selective agonist of melanocortin receptors 3 and 4), but did not modulate the effect of γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. The effect of peptide 3 was weaker: it was observed at peptide 3 concentration of 10(-4) M. Peptides 1-3 did no change the adenylate cyclase-modulating effects of hormones acting through non-homologous receptors. Thus, the synthesized peptides specifically inhibited the regulatory effects of hormones acting through homologous receptors. This suggests that the corresponding extracellular domains are involved in ligand recognition and binding and determine functional activity of the receptor. PMID:24770752

  20. Task-Driven Activity Reduces the Cortical Activity Space of the Brain: Experiment and Whole-Brain Modeling.

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián Ponce-Alvarez; He, Biyu J.; Patric Hagmann; Gustavo Deco

    2015-01-01

    How a stimulus or a task alters the spontaneous dynamics of the brain remains a fundamental open question in neuroscience. One of the most robust hallmarks of task/stimulus-driven brain dynamics is the decrease of variability with respect to the spontaneous level, an effect seen across multiple experimental conditions and in brain signals observed at different spatiotemporal scales. Recently, it was observed that the trial-to-trial variability and temporal variance of functional magnetic reso...

  1. Relationship between myocardial extracellular space expansion estimated with post-contrast T1 mapping MRI and left ventricular remodeling and neurohormonal activation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Son, Jung Woo; Chung, Hye Moon [Cardiology Division, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-10-15

    Post-contrast T1 values are closely related to the degree of myocardial extracellular space expansion. We determined the relationship between post-contrast T1 values and left ventricular (LV) diastolic function, LV remodeling, and neurohormonal activation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Fifty-nine patients with DCM (mean age, 55 ± 15 years; 41 males and 18 females) who underwent both 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography were enrolled. The post-contrast 10-minute T1 value was generated from inversion time scout images obtained using the Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence and a curve-fitting algorithm. The T1 sample volume was obtained from three interventricular septal points, and the mean T1 value was used for analysis. The N-Terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level was measured in 40 patients. The mean LV ejection fraction was 24 ± 9% and the post-T1 value was 254.5 ± 46.4 ms. The post-contrast T1 value was significantly correlated with systolic longitudinal septal velocity (s'), peak late diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus (a'), the diastolic elastance index (Ed, [E/e']/stroke volume), LV mass/volume ratio, LV end-diastolic wall stress, and LV end-systolic wall stress. In a multivariate analysis without NT-proBNP, T1 values were independently correlated with Ed (β = -0.351, p = 0.016) and the LV mass/volume ratio (β = 0.495, p = 0.001). When NT-proBNP was used in the analysis, NT-proBNP was independently correlated with the T1 values (β = -0.339, p = 0.017). Post-contrast T1 is closely related to LV remodeling, diastolic function, and neurohormonal activation in patients with DCM.

  2. Metabolism of [3-3H]oleanolic acid in the isolated ''Calendula officinalis'' leaf cells and transport of the synthesized glycosides, to the cell wall and the extracellular space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown for the first time that [3-3H]oleanolic acid glycosides formed in the cytosol of ''C. officinalis'' leaf cells are transported to the extracellular space in the form of pentaglucoside VI (44%), whereas glucuronides derived from [3-3H]oleanolic acid 3-O-monoglucuronide (29%) as well as a part of glucosides (24%) were transported into the cell walls. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  3. Metabolism of [3-{sup 3}H]oleanolic acid in the isolated ``Calendula officinalis`` leaf cells and transport of the synthesized glycosides, to the cell wall and the extracellular space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szakiel, A.; Wasiukiewicz, I.; Janiszowska, W. [Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Katedra Biochemii

    1995-12-31

    It has been shown for the first time that [3-{sup 3}H]oleanolic acid glycosides formed in the cytosol of ``C. officinalis`` leaf cells are transported to the extracellular space in the form of pentaglucoside VI (44%), whereas glucuronides derived from [3-{sup 3}H]oleanolic acid 3-O-monoglucuronide (29%) as well as a part of glucosides (24%) were transported into the cell walls. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab.

  4. Extracellular Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Receptor and Transporter Protein and mRNA Levels Are Differentially Altered in the Developing Rat Brain Due to Dietary Iron Deficiency and Manganese Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Joel G.; Fordahl, Steven C.; Cooney, Paula T.; Weaver, Tara L.; Colyer, Christa L.; Erikson, Keith M.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element, but overexposure is characterized by Parkinson’s like symptoms in extreme cases. Previous studies have shown Mn accumulation is exacerbated by dietary iron deficiency (ID) and disturbances in norepinephrine (NE) have been reported. Because behaviors associated with Mn neurotoxicity are complex, the goal of this study was to examine the effects of Mn exposure and ID-associated Mn accumulation on NE uptake in synaptosomes, extracellular NE concentra...

  5. Joint Time-Frequency-Space Classification of EEG in a Brain-Computer Interface Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molina Gary N Garcia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interface is a growing field of interest in human-computer interaction with diverse applications ranging from medicine to entertainment. In this paper, we present a system which allows for classification of mental tasks based on a joint time-frequency-space decorrelation, in which mental tasks are measured via electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The efficiency of this approach was evaluated by means of real-time experimentations on two subjects performing three different mental tasks. To do so, a number of protocols for visualization, as well as training with and without feedback, were also developed. Obtained results show that it is possible to obtain good classification of simple mental tasks, in view of command and control, after a relatively small amount of training, with accuracies around 80%, and in real time.

  6. Imaging of perivascular spaces of the brain. MR-clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okudera, Toshio; Tamura, Hajime; Uemura, Kazuo [Akita Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    We evaluated the perivascular spaces (PVS) of the intraparenchymal arteries of the brain obtained from MRI, and compared them with the microangiograms of the injected autopsied brains of normal adults. The three dimensional microangiograms revealed 3 types of intraparenchymal arteries: intracortical, subcortical (including arteries of arcuate fibers) and medullary arteries. PVS of those arteries had punctated or small linear-shaped appearances according to the dimension and level of MR slices. Basic MR findings of normal PVS showed smooth and well-defined round or elliptical configurations up to 3 mm in diameter without a halo in the surrounding tissue, located along the intraparenchymal arteries, and isointense with cerebro-spinal fluid. PVS around the medullary arteries was dilated with age. Definite PVS was found in the lower portion of the basal ganglia in almost all healthy children and relatively young adults, however, it was less frequent in the subcortical white matter of frontal and parietal lobes. In adults over 60 years of age, dilatation of PVS along the medullary arteries was quite common and progressed into the frontal and parietal lobes. Dilatation of PVS around the medullary arteries was prominent and increased with the number of lacunar infarcts. The sclerotic change of medullary arteries was more accelerated in subjects with hypertension. (author)

  7. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  8. Cell attachment to frozen sections of injured adult mouse brain: effects of tenascin antibody and lectin perturbation of wound-related extracellular matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laywell, E D; Friedman, P; Harrington, K; Robertson, J T; Steindler, D A

    1996-06-01

    Previous studies describing the use of cryoculture methods have focused on the efficacy of the method for studying neuron attachment and neurite outgrowth on intact sections of nerve, and rodent and even human brain. The cryoculture method has shown promise for determining the presence of cell attachment- and neurite-growth-inhibiting molecules in such specimens, and some studies have also attempted to neutralize such molecules with antibodies to myelin inhibitory proteins, nerve growth factor, or factors present in conditioned media that may counteract the repulsiveness of some of these molecules preserved in sections of, for example, myelinated nerves or adult brain white matter. The present study describes the novel use of lesioned central nervous system cryocultures as substrates for investigating the attachment of embryonic neurons and PC12 cells. In addition to demonstrating the use of this novel scar substrate to extend previous 'scar-in-a-dish' models (David et al. (1990) Neuron, 5:463-469; Rudge and Silver (1990) J. Neurosci., 10: 3594-3603; Rudge et al. (1989) Exp. Neurol., 103: 1-16), the present study also describes antibody and lectin perturbations of putative inhibitory molecules that result in an enhanced attachment of cells to cryosection cultures of brain and spinal cord wounds. PMID:8835793

  9. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules

    OpenAIRE

    R. Scardigli; Cargiolo, C; Tosoni, D.; Borello, U; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Sciorati, C.; Cannata, S.; E. Clementi; Brunelli, S.; Cossu, G.

    2008-01-01

    Background sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh) to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane rece...

  10. Advancing brain-machine interfaces: moving beyond linear state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Adam G; Schieber, Marc H

    2015-01-01

    Advances in recent years have dramatically improved output control by Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs). Such devices nevertheless remain robotic and limited in their movements compared to normal human motor performance. Most current BMIs rely on transforming recorded neural activity to a linear state space composed of a set number of fixed degrees of freedom. Here we consider a variety of ways in which BMI design might be advanced further by applying non-linear dynamics observed in normal motor behavior. We consider (i) the dynamic range and precision of natural movements, (ii) differences between cortical activity and actual body movement, (iii) kinematic and muscular synergies, and (iv) the implications of large neuronal populations. We advance the hypothesis that a given population of recorded neurons may transmit more useful information than can be captured by a single, linear model across all movement phases and contexts. We argue that incorporating these various non-linear characteristics will be an important next step in advancing BMIs to more closely match natural motor performance. PMID:26283932

  11. Advancing brain-machine interfaces: Moving beyond linear state space models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam G Rouse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in recent years have dramatically improved output control by Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs. Such devices nevertheless remain robotic and limited in their movements compared to normal human motor performance. Most current BMIs rely on transforming recorded neural activity to a linear state space composed of a set number of fixed degrees of freedom. Here we consider a variety of ways in which BMI design might be advanced further by applying non-linear dynamics observed in normal motor behavior. We consider i the dynamic range and precision of natural movements, ii differences between cortical activity and actual body movement, iii kinematic and muscular synergies, and iv the implications of large neuronal populations. We advance the hypothesis that a given population of recorded neurons may transmit more useful information than can be captured by a single, linear model across all movement phases and contexts. We argue that incorporating these various non-linear characteristics will be an important next step in advancing BMIs to more closely match natural motor performance.

  12. Implicit short-lived motor representations of space in brain damaged and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Y

    1998-09-01

    This article reviews experimental evidence for a specific sensorimotor function which can be dissociated from higher level representations of space. It attempts to delineate this function on the basis of results obtained by psychophysical experiments performed with brain damaged and healthy subjects. Eye and hand movement control exhibit automatic features, such that they are incompatible with conscious control. In addition, they rely on a reference frame different from the one used by conscious perception. Neuropsychological cases provide a strong support for this specific motor representation of space, which can be spared in patients with lesions of primary sensory systems who have lost conscious perception of visual, tactile or proprioceptive stimuli. Observation of these patients also showed that their motor behavior can be "attracted" by a goal only under specific conditions, that is, when the response is immediate and when no cognitive representation of this goal is elaborated at the same time. Beyond the issue of the dissociation between an implicit motor representation and more cognitive processing of spatial information, the issue of the interaction between these two systems is thus a matter of interest. It is suggested that the conscious, cognitive representation of a stimulus can contaminate or override the short-lived motor representation, but no reciprocal influence seem to occur. The interaction observed in patients can also be investigated in normals. The literature provides examples of interaction between sensorimotor and cognitive framing of space, which confirm that immediate action is not mediated by the same system as delayed action, and that elaborating a categorial representation of the action goal prevents the expression of the short-lived sensorimotor representation. It is concluded that action can be controlled by a sensory system which is specialized for on-line processing of relevant goal characteristics. The temporal constraints of this

  13. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  14. Unique semantic space in the brain of each beholder predicts perceived similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Charest, Ian; Kievit, Rogier A.; Schmitz, Taylor W.; Deca, Diana; KRIEGESKORTE, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Everyone is different. Understanding the unique way an individual perceives the world is a fundamental goal of psychology and brain science. Using novel methods for analyzing functional MRI (fMRI) data, we show that each person viewing a set of objects represents the objects uniquely in his or her brain. Moreover, given an individual’s measured brain-activity patterns, idiosyncrasies in his or her perception of the similarities among the objects can be predicted. Prediction accuracy is modest...

  15. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. A map of auditory space in the mammalian brain: neural computation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A J

    1993-09-01

    The experiments described in this review have demonstrated that the SC contains a two-dimensional map of auditory space, which is synthesized within the brain using a combination of monaural and binaural localization cues. There is also an adaptive fusion of auditory and visual space in this midbrain nucleus, providing for a common access to the motor pathways that control orientation behaviour. This necessitates a highly plastic relationship between the visual and auditory systems, both during postnatal development and in adult life. Because of the independent mobility of difference sense organs, gating mechanisms are incorporated into the auditory representation to provide up-to-date information about the spatial orientation of the eyes and ears. The SC therefore provides a valuable model system for studying a number of important issues in brain function, including the neural coding of sound location, the co-ordination of spatial information between different sensory systems, and the integration of sensory signals with motor outputs. PMID:8240794

  16. Extravasation of contrast medium into brain parenchyma and CSF space after CT or DSA of the chest or abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of clinical and CT findings in patients with signs of disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier after i.v. or i.a. administration of non-ionic contrast media. Methods: 1. Retrospective analysis of 8 patients with clinical and CT findings of disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier after i.v. or i.a. administration of non-ionic contrast media (200-450 ml). 2. Prospective analysis of 30 intensive care patients with sepsis and suspected abscess, who underwent CT of the chest and abdomen with 240 ml of a non-ionic contrast medium followed by cranial CT to rule out septic lesions. Results: The retrospective analysis proved that disruption of the blood-brain barrier may occur in elderly patients with risk factors after injection of higher amounts of contrast media. In the prospective study, equivalent CT phenomena were observed in 3 of 30 patients with sepsis. Conclusions: Hypoxemic and toxics damage to the blood-brain barrier as well as higher amounts of contrast media may result in extravasation of contrast medium into the CSF space, which can be demonstrated by CT. For differential diagnosis, the clinical symptoms and CT patterns of a disruption of the blood-brain or blood-CSF barrier should be known. (orig.)

  17. Experimental MR-guided cryotherapy of the brain with almost real-time imaging by radial k-space scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test radial k-space scanning by MR fluoroscopy to guide and control MR-guided interstitial cryotherapy of the healthy pig brain. Methods: After MR tomographic planning of the approach, an MR-compatible experimental cryotherapy probe of 2.7 mm diameter was introduced through a 5 mm burr hole into the right frontal brain of five healthy pigs. The freeze-thaw cycles were imaged using a T1-weighted gradient echo sequence with radial k-space scanning in coronal, sagittal, and axial directions. Results: The high temporal resolution of the chosen sequence permits a continuous representation of the freezing process with good image quality and high contrast between ice and unfrozen brain parenchyma. Because of the interactive conception of the sequence the layer plane could be chosen as desired during the measurement. Ice formation was sharply demarcated, spherically configurated, and was free of signals. Its maximum diameter was 13 mm. Conclusions: With use of the novel, interactively controllable gradient echo sequence with radial k-space scanning, guidance of the intervention under fluoroscopic conditions with the advantages of MRT is possible. MR-guided cryotherapy allows a minimally-invasive, precisely dosable focal tissue ablation. (orig.)

  18. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking models then use the directions of greatest diffusion as estimates of white matter fibre orientation. Several fibre tracking algorithms have emerged in the last few years that provide reproducible visu...

  19. Electric fields of motor and frontal tDCS in a standard brain space: A computer simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mikkonen, Marko; Koyama, Soichiro; Sadato, Norihiro; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-08-15

    The electric field produced in the brain is the main physical agent of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Inter-subject variations in the electric fields may help to explain the variability in the effects of tDCS. Here, we use multiple-subject analysis to study the strength and variability of the group-level electric fields in the standard brain space. Personalized anatomically-accurate models of 62 subjects were constructed from T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The finite-element method was used to computationally estimate the individual electric fields, which were registered to the standard space using surface based registration. Motor cortical and frontal tDCS were modelled for 16 electrode montages. For each electrode montage, the group-level electric fields had a consistent strength and direction in several brain regions, which could also be located at some distance from the electrodes. In other regions, the electric fields were more variable, and thus more likely to produce variable effects in each individual. Both the anode and cathode locations affected the group-level electric fields, both directly under the electrodes and elsewhere. For motor cortical tDCS, the electric fields could be controlled at the group level by moving the electrodes. However, for frontal tDCS, the group-level electric fields were more variable, and the electrode locations had only minor effects on the group average fields. Our results reveal the electric fields and their variability at the group level in the standard brain space, providing insights into the mechanisms of tDCS for plasticity induction. The data are useful for planning, analysing and interpreting tDCS studies. PMID:27188218

  20. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  1. Quadcopter control in three-dimensional space using a noninvasive motor imagery based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Karl; Cassady, Kaitlin; Doud, Alexander; Shades, Kaleb; Rogin, Eitan; He, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Objective At the balanced intersection of human and machine adaptation is found the optimally functioning brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional physical space using noninvasive scalp EEG in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that operation of a real world device has on subjects’ control with comparison to a two-dimensional virtual cursor task. Approach Five human subjects were trained to modulate their sensorimotor rhythms to control an AR Drone navigating a three-dimensional physical space. Visual feedback was provided via a forward facing camera on the hull of the drone. Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while travelling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m/s. Significance Freely exploring and interacting with the world around us is a crucial element of autonomy that is lost in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Brain-computer interfaces are systems that aim to restore or enhance a user’s ability to interact with the environment via a computer and through the use of only thought. We demonstrate for the first time the ability to control a flying robot in the three-dimensional physical space using noninvasive scalp recorded EEG in humans. Our work indicates the potential of noninvasive EEG based BCI systems to accomplish complex control in three-dimensional physical space. The present study may serve as a framework for the investigation of multidimensional non-invasive brain-computer interface control in a physical environment using telepresence robotics. PMID:23735712

  2. Comparison of Mouse Brain DTI Maps Using K-space Average, Image-space Average, or No Average Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Shu-Wei; Mei, Jennifer; Tuel, Keelan

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is achieved by collecting a series of diffusion-weighted images (DWIs). Signal averaging of multiple repetitions can be performed in the k-space (k-avg) or in the image space (m-avg) to improve the image quality. Alternatively, one can treat each acquisition as an independent image and use all of the data to reconstruct the DTI without doing any signal averaging (no-avg). To compare these three approaches, in this study, in vivo DTI data was collected from five ...

  3. The pulmonary extracellular lining.

    OpenAIRE

    George, G; Hook, G E

    1984-01-01

    The extracellular lining of the lungs is reviewed. The pulmonary extracellular lining is a complex mixture of phospholipids, proteins and carbohydrates which is absolutely essential for the maintenance of normal pulmonary functions such as gas exchange. Without the lining the lungs would collapse. Alterations in the pulmonary extracellular lining may underlie some disease conditions induced by toxic agents, especially those which interfere with the formation of pulmonary surfactant. The extra...

  4. Pig brain stereotaxic standard space: mapping of cerebral blood flow normative values and effect of MPTP-lesioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, F; Watanabe, Hideaki; Bjarkam, Carsten;

    2005-01-01

    developed an analogous stereotaxic coordinate system for the brain of the Gottingen miniature pig, based on automatic co-registration of magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in 22 male pigs. The origin of the pig brain stereotaxic space (0, 0, 0) was arbitrarily placed in the centroid of the pineal gland...... as identified on the average MRI template. The orthogonal planes were imposed using the line between stereotaxic zero and the optic chiasm. A series of mean MR images in the coronal, sagittal and horizontal planes were generated. To test the utility of the common coordinate system for functional....... After global normalization of these maps, an undirected search for differences between the groups was then performed using statistical parametric mapping. Using this method, we detected a statistically significant focal increase in CBF in the left cerebellum of the MPTP-lesioned group. We expect the...

  5. Directed cortical information flow during human object recognition: analyzing induced EEG gamma-band responses in brain's source space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot G Supp

    Full Text Available The increase of induced gamma-band responses (iGBRs; oscillations >30 Hz elicited by familiar (meaningful objects is well established in electroencephalogram (EEG research. This frequency-specific change at distinct locations is thought to indicate the dynamic formation of local neuronal assemblies during the activation of cortical object representations. As analytically power increase is just a property of a single location, phase-synchrony was introduced to investigate the formation of large-scale networks between spatially distant brain sites. However, classical phase-synchrony reveals symmetric, pair-wise correlations and is not suited to uncover the directionality of interactions. Here, we investigated the neural mechanism of visual object processing by means of directional coupling analysis going beyond recording sites, but rather assessing the directionality of oscillatory interactions between brain areas directly. This study is the first to identify the directionality of oscillatory brain interactions in source space during human object recognition and suggests that familiar, but not unfamiliar, objects engage widespread reciprocal information flow. Directionality of cortical information-flow was calculated based upon an established Granger-Causality coupling-measure (partial-directed coherence; PDC using autoregressive modeling. To enable comparison with previous coupling studies lacking directional information, phase-locking analysis was applied, using wavelet-based signal decompositions. Both, autoregressive modeling and wavelet analysis, revealed an augmentation of iGBRs during the presentation of familiar objects relative to unfamiliar controls, which was localized to inferior-temporal, superior-parietal and frontal brain areas by means of distributed source reconstruction. The multivariate analysis of PDC evaluated each possible direction of brain interaction and revealed widespread reciprocal information-transfer during familiar

  6. Quadcopter control in three-dimensional space using a noninvasive motor imagery-based brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Karl; Cassady, Kaitlin; Doud, Alexander; Shades, Kaleb; Rogin, Eitan; He, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Objective. At the balanced intersection of human and machine adaptation is found the optimally functioning brain-computer interface (BCI). In this study, we report a novel experiment of BCI controlling a robotic quadcopter in three-dimensional (3D) physical space using noninvasive scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in human subjects. We then quantify the performance of this system using metrics suitable for asynchronous BCI. Lastly, we examine the impact that the operation of a real world device has on subjects' control in comparison to a 2D virtual cursor task. Approach. Five human subjects were trained to modulate their sensorimotor rhythms to control an AR Drone navigating a 3D physical space. Visual feedback was provided via a forward facing camera on the hull of the drone. Main results. Individual subjects were able to accurately acquire up to 90.5% of all valid targets presented while travelling at an average straight-line speed of 0.69 m s-1. Significance. Freely exploring and interacting with the world around us is a crucial element of autonomy that is lost in the context of neurodegenerative disease. Brain-computer interfaces are systems that aim to restore or enhance a user's ability to interact with the environment via a computer and through the use of only thought. We demonstrate for the first time the ability to control a flying robot in 3D physical space using noninvasive scalp recorded EEG in humans. Our work indicates the potential of noninvasive EEG-based BCI systems for accomplish complex control in 3D physical space. The present study may serve as a framework for the investigation of multidimensional noninvasive BCI control in a physical environment using telepresence robotics.

  7. A Skew-t space-varying regression model for the spectral analysis of resting state brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Salimah; Sun, Wenqi; Nathoo, Farouk S; Babul, Arif; Moiseev, Alexader; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Virji-Babul, Naznin

    2013-08-01

    It is known that in many neurological disorders such as Down syndrome, main brain rhythms shift their frequencies slightly, and characterizing the spatial distribution of these shifts is of interest. This article reports on the development of a Skew-t mixed model for the spatial analysis of resting state brain activity in healthy controls and individuals with Down syndrome. Time series of oscillatory brain activity are recorded using magnetoencephalography, and spectral summaries are examined at multiple sensor locations across the scalp. We focus on the mean frequency of the power spectral density, and use space-varying regression to examine associations with age, gender and Down syndrome across several scalp regions. Spatial smoothing priors are incorporated based on a multivariate Markov random field, and the markedly non-Gaussian nature of the spectral response variable is accommodated by the use of a Skew-t distribution. A range of models representing different assumptions on the association structure and response distribution are examined, and we conduct model selection using the deviance information criterion. (1) Our analysis suggests region-specific differences between healthy controls and individuals with Down syndrome, particularly in the left and right temporal regions, and produces smoothed maps indicating the scalp topography of the estimated differences. PMID:22614763

  8. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the extra-cellular space affects proliferation, differentiation and morphogenetic events regulated by the two molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Scardigli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein. Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in

  9. Clinical MRI study of influence of unfavourable factors during ante natal period on state of liquor-containing brain spaces in fetus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI investigations of the fetal brain spaces containing liquor were carried out in 150 high risk pregnant women and 50 healthy pregnant women (controls) with 32-34 weeks gestation. The dependence between the degree of changes in the liquor-containing spaces and the degree of the ante natal unfavourable factors was determined in high-risk pregnant women. The presence of risk factors not always caused pathological changes in the fetal liquor-containing spaces

  10. The Sileye-3/Alteino experiment for the study of Light Flashes, radiation environment and astronaut brain activity on board the International Space Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we describe the instrument Sileye-3/Alteino, placed on board the International Space Station in April 2002. The instrument is constituted by an Electroencephalograph and a cosmic ray silicon detector. The scientific aims include the investigation of the Light Flash phenomenon, the measurement of the radiation environment and the nuclear abundance insider the International Space Station (ISS) and the study of astronaut brain activity in space when subject to cosmic rays. (author)

  11. Extracellular matrix molecules play diverse roles in the growth and guidance of central nervous system axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Pires-Neto

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Axon growth and guidance represent complex biological processes in which probably intervene diverse sets of molecular cues that allow for the appropriate wiring of the central nervous system (CNS. The extracellular matrix (ECM represents a major contributor of molecular signals either diffusible or membrane-bound that may regulate different stages of neural development. Some of the brain ECM molecules form tridimensional structures (tunnels and boundaries that appear during time- and space-regulated events, possibly playing relevant roles in the control of axon elongation and pathfinding. This short review focuses mainly on the recognized roles played by proteoglycans, laminin, fibronectin and tenascin in axonal development during ontogenesis.

  12. The effect of ionic diffusion on extracellular potentials in neural tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Halnes, Geir; Keller, Daniel; Pettersen, Klas H; Eivenoll, Gaute T

    2015-01-01

    In computational neuroscience, it is common to use the simplifying assumption that diffusive currents are negligible compared to Ohmic currents. However, endured periods of intense neural signaling may cause local ion concentration changes in the millimolar range. Theoretical studies have identified scenarios where steep concentration gradients give rise to diffusive currents that are of comparable magnitude with Ohmic currents, and where the simplifying assumption that diffusion can be neglected does not hold. We here propose a novel formalism for computing (1) the ion concentration dynamics and (2) the electrical potential in the extracellular space surrounding multi-compartmental neuron models or networks of such (e.g., the Blue-Brain simulator). We use this formalism to explore the effects that diffusive currents can have on the extracellular (ECS) potential surrounding a small population of active cortical neurons. Our key findings are: (i) Sustained periods of neuronal output (simulations were run for 8...

  13. Changes in brain extracellular space volume fraction and tortuosity in the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazel, Tomáš; Antonova, Tatiana; Meyer-Lühmann, M.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.; Syková, Eva

    San Diego: Elseviere, 2001. s. -. [The 2nd Neurobiology of Aging Conference. 08.11.2001-10.11.2001, San Diego] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0657 Keywords : diffusion * cortex Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  14. Extracellular space diffusion parameters are altered in the brain of the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer´s disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazel, Tomáš; Antonova, Tatiana; Meyer-Lühmann, M.; Sturchler, C.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.; Syková, Eva

    San Diego: organizer, 2001. s. -. [Annual Meeting in San Diego /31./. 10.11.2001-15.11.2001, San Diego] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0657; GA ČR GV309/97/K048 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  15. 3D Reconstructed Cyto-, Muscarinic M2 Receptor, and Fiber Architecture of the Rat Brain Registered to the Waxholm Space Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Nicole; Axer, Markus; Schober, Martin; Huynh, Anh-Minh; Huysegoms, Marcel; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Leergaard, Trygve B.; Kirlangic, Mehmet E.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution multiscale and multimodal 3D models of the brain are essential tools to understand its complex structural and functional organization. Neuroimaging techniques addressing different aspects of brain organization should be integrated in a reference space to enable topographically correct alignment and subsequent analysis of the various datasets and their modalities. The Waxholm Space (http://software.incf.org/software/waxholm-space) is a publicly available 3D coordinate-based standard reference space for the mapping and registration of neuroanatomical data in rodent brains. This paper provides a newly developed pipeline combining imaging and reconstruction steps with a novel registration strategy to integrate new neuroimaging modalities into the Waxholm Space atlas. As a proof of principle, we incorporated large scale high-resolution cyto-, muscarinic M2 receptor, and fiber architectonic images of rat brains into the 3D digital MRI based atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat in Waxholm Space. We describe the whole workflow, from image acquisition to reconstruction and registration of these three modalities into the Waxholm Space rat atlas. The registration of the brain sections into the atlas is performed by using both linear and non-linear transformations. The validity of the procedure is qualitatively demonstrated by visual inspection, and a quantitative evaluation is performed by measurement of the concordance between representative atlas-delineated regions and the same regions based on receptor or fiber architectonic data. This novel approach enables for the first time the generation of 3D reconstructed volumes of nerve fibers and fiber tracts, or of muscarinic M2 receptor density distributions, in an entire rat brain. Additionally, our pipeline facilitates the inclusion of further neuroimaging datasets, e.g., 3D reconstructed volumes of histochemical stainings or of the regional distributions of multiple other receptor types, into the Waxholm Space

  16. 脑机接口技术在航天领域的潜在应用%Brain-Machine Interface Technology for Potential Space Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鑫; 吴边; 陈卫东; 张韶岷; 代建华; 郑筱祥

    2012-01-01

    The space application of brain-machine interface technology may improve the safety and effect of space operations. The current development of non-invasive brain-machine interface technology is addressed, and potential space applications of brain-machine interface are investigated by introducing the most advanced brain signal monitor technology and decoding model. While the brain-machine interface based on Electro-encephalography are always limited to rate, capacity and transmission accuracy, the limitations will be removed gradually with the development of brain-machine interface technology.%脑机接口技术应用于航天领域可提升空间操作的安全性和效率。介绍非植入式脑机接口技术的发展现状,通过引入最新的脑信号监测技术和解码模型,探讨脑机接口技术在航天领域的潜在应用。目前基于头皮脑电的脑机接口方法受限于速度、容量和传输精度,但这些局限会随着该技术的发展而逐渐减小。

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  18. Optimal space-time precoding of artificial sensory feedback through mutichannel microstimulation in bi-directional brain-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, John; Liu, Jianbo; Aghagolzadeh, Mehdi; Oweiss, Karim

    2012-12-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to restore lost sensorimotor and cognitive function in subjects with severe neurological deficits. In particular, lost somatosensory function may be restored by artificially evoking patterns of neural activity through microstimulation to induce perception of tactile and proprioceptive feedback to the brain about the state of the limb. Despite an early proof of concept that subjects could learn to discriminate a limited vocabulary of intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) patterns that instruct the subject about the state of the limb, the dynamics of a moving limb are unlikely to be perceived by an arbitrarily-selected, discrete set of static microstimulation patterns, raising questions about the generalization and the scalability of this approach. In this work, we propose a microstimulation protocol intended to activate optimally the ascending somatosensory pathway. The optimization is achieved through a space-time precoder that maximizes the mutual information between the sensory feedback indicating the limb state and the cortical neural response evoked by thalamic microstimulation. Using a simplified multi-input multi-output model of the thalamocortical pathway, we show that this optimal precoder can deliver information more efficiently in the presence of noise compared to suboptimal precoders that do not account for the afferent pathway structure and/or cortical states. These results are expected to enhance the way microstimulation is used to induce somatosensory perception during sensorimotor control of artificial devices or paralyzed limbs.

  19. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2011-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: Several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various literatures which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the...

  20. HZE particle effects in the mammalian brain: relevance to manned space flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The brain of rodents has been studied following high LET neon particle irradiation with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 rad. The changes observed by light microscopy after 1000 rad irradiation, for example, include acute necrosis of interstitial cells within 36 h of exposure, necrotic neurons, hyperchromatic neuroglia, and axonal degeneration beginning at 3 months postexposure. These changes are compared with those reported following exposure to other radiation modalities. Neuronal necrosis following high LET argon particle irradiation was comparable to that with neon. Low doses (25 rad and below) of iron nuclei resulted in no visible necrotic nerve cells. Acute neuroglial cell loss or damage is discussed as to its possible role in chronic neuronal necrosis and in loss of axonal integrity

  1. Context-aware brain-computer interfaces: exploring the information space of user, technical system and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, T. O.; Jatzev, S.

    2012-02-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems are usually applied in highly controlled environments such as research laboratories or clinical setups. However, many BCI-based applications are implemented in more complex environments. For example, patients might want to use a BCI system at home, and users without disabilities could benefit from BCI systems in special working environments. In these contexts, it might be more difficult to reliably infer information about brain activity, because many intervening factors add up and disturb the BCI feature space. One solution for this problem would be adding context awareness to the system. We propose to augment the available information space with additional channels carrying information about the user state, the environment and the technical system. In particular, passive BCI systems seem to be capable of adding highly relevant context information—otherwise covert aspects of user state. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework based on general human-machine system research for adding context awareness to a BCI system. Building on that, we present results from a study on a passive BCI, which allows access to the covert aspect of user state related to the perceived loss of control. This study is a proof of concept and demonstrates that context awareness could beneficially be implemented in and combined with a BCI system or a general human-machine system. The EEG data from this experiment are available for public download at www.phypa.org. Parts of this work have already been presented in non-journal publications. This will be indicated specifically by appropriate references in the text.

  2. Q-space trajectory imaging for multidimensional diffusion MRI of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Hans; Pasternak, Ofer; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Özarslan, Evren; van Westen, Danielle; Mattisson, Cecilia; Bogren, Mats; O'Donnell, Lauren J; Kubicki, Marek; Topgaard, Daniel; Nilsson, Markus

    2016-07-15

    This work describes a new diffusion MR framework for imaging and modeling of microstructure that we call q-space trajectory imaging (QTI). The QTI framework consists of two parts: encoding and modeling. First we propose q-space trajectory encoding, which uses time-varying gradients to probe a trajectory in q-space, in contrast to traditional pulsed field gradient sequences that attempt to probe a point in q-space. Then we propose a microstructure model, the diffusion tensor distribution (DTD) model, which takes advantage of additional information provided by QTI to estimate a distributional model over diffusion tensors. We show that the QTI framework enables microstructure modeling that is not possible with the traditional pulsed gradient encoding as introduced by Stejskal and Tanner. In our analysis of QTI, we find that the well-known scalar b-value naturally extends to a tensor-valued entity, i.e., a diffusion measurement tensor, which we call the b-tensor. We show that b-tensors of rank 2 or 3 enable estimation of the mean and covariance of the DTD model in terms of a second order tensor (the diffusion tensor) and a fourth order tensor. The QTI framework has been designed to improve discrimination of the sizes, shapes, and orientations of diffusion microenvironments within tissue. We derive rotationally invariant scalar quantities describing intuitive microstructural features including size, shape, and orientation coherence measures. To demonstrate the feasibility of QTI on a clinical scanner, we performed a small pilot study comparing a group of five healthy controls with five patients with schizophrenia. The parameter maps derived from QTI were compared between the groups, and 9 out of the 14 parameters investigated showed differences between groups. The ability to measure and model the distribution of diffusion tensors, rather than a quantity that has already been averaged within a voxel, has the potential to provide a powerful paradigm for the study of

  3. Mapping number to space in the two hemispheres of the avian brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugani, Rosa; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Regolin, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Pre-verbal infants and non-human animals associate small numbers with the left space and large numbers with the right space. Birds and primates, trained to identify a given position in a sagittal series of identical positions, whenever required to respond on a left/right oriented series, referred the given position starting from the left end. Here, we extended this evidence by selectively investigating the role of either cerebral hemisphere, using the temporary monocular occlusion technique. In birds, lacking the corpus callosum, visual input is fed mainly to the contralateral hemisphere. We trained 4-day-old chicks to identify the 4th element in a sagittal series of 10 identical elements. At test, the series was identical but left/right oriented. Test was conducted in right monocular, left monocular or binocular condition of vision. Right monocular chicks pecked at the 4th right element; left monocular and binocular chicks pecked at the 4th left element. Data on monocular chicks demonstrate that both hemispheres deal with an ordinal (sequential) task. Data on binocular chicks indicate that the left bias is linked to a right hemisphere dominance, that allocates the attention toward the left hemispace. This constitutes a first step towards understanding the neural basis of number space mapping. PMID:27246250

  4. Plasticity in the neural coding of auditory space in the mammalian brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew J.; Parsons, Carl H.; Moore, David R.

    2000-10-01

    Sound localization relies on the neural processing of monaural and binaural spatial cues that arise from the way sounds interact with the head and external ears. Neurophysiological studies of animals raised with abnormal sensory inputs show that the map of auditory space in the superior colliculus is shaped during development by both auditory and visual experience. An example of this plasticity is provided by monaural occlusion during infancy, which leads to compensatory changes in auditory spatial tuning that tend to preserve the alignment between the neural representations of visual and auditory space. Adaptive changes also take place in sound localization behavior, as demonstrated by the fact that ferrets raised and tested with one ear plugged learn to localize as accurately as control animals. In both cases, these adjustments may involve greater use of monaural spectral cues provided by the other ear. Although plasticity in the auditory space map seems to be restricted to development, adult ferrets show some recovery of sound localization behavior after long-term monaural occlusion. The capacity for behavioral adaptation is, however, task dependent, because auditory spatial acuity and binaural unmasking (a measure of the spatial contribution to the "cocktail party effect") are permanently impaired by chronically plugging one ear, both in infancy but especially in adulthood. Experience-induced plasticity allows the neural circuitry underlying sound localization to be customized to individual characteristics, such as the size and shape of the head and ears, and to compensate for natural conductive hearing losses, including those associated with middle ear disease in infancy.

  5. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Ç.

    2009-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various works in the literature which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the mentioned real signals.

  6. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  7. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  8. Joint EEG/fMRI state space model for the detection of directed interactions in human brains--a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Michael; Musso, Mariachristina; Linke, Yannick; Tüscher, Oliver; Timmer, Jens; Weiller, Cornelius; Schelter, Björn

    2011-11-01

    An often addressed challenge in neuroscience research is the assignment of different tasks to specific brain regions. In many cases several brain regions are activated during a single task. Therefore, one is also interested in the temporal evolution of brain activity to infer causal relations between activated brain regions. These causal relations may be described by a directed, task specific network which consists of activated brain regions as vertices and directed edges. The edges describe the causal relations. Inference of the task specific brain network from measurements like electroencephalography (EEG) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is challenging, due to the low spatial resolution of the former and the low temporal resolution of the latter. Here, we present a simulation study investigating a possible combined analysis of simultaneously measured EEG and fMRI data to address the challenge specified above. A nonlinear state space model is used to distinguish between the underlying brain states and the (simulated) EEG/fMRI measurements. We make use of a modified unscented Kalman filter and a corresponding unscented smoother for the estimation of the underlying neural activity. Model parameters are estimated using an expectation-maximization algorithm, which exploits the partial linearity of our model. Inference of the brain network structure is then achieved using directed partial correlation, a measure for Granger causality. The results indicate that the convolution effect of the fMRI forward model imposes a big challenge for the parameter estimation and reduces the influence of the fMRI in combined EEG-fMRI models. It remains to be investigated whether other models or similar combinations of other modalities such as, e.g., EEG and magnetoencephalography can increase the profit of the promising idea of combining various modalities. PMID:22027197

  9. Fractal fluctuations and quantum-like chaos in the brain by analysis of variability of brain waves: A new method based on a fractal variance function and random matrix theory: A link with El Naschie fractal Cantorian space-time and V. Weiss and H. Weiss golden ratio in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a new method for analysis of fundamental brain waves as recorded by the EEG. To this purpose we introduce a Fractal Variance Function that is based on the calculation of the variogram. The method is completed by using Random Matrix Theory. Some examples are given. We also discuss the link of such formulation with H. Weiss and V. Weiss golden ratio found in the brain, and with El Naschie fractal Cantorian space-time theory.

  10. The role of extracellular proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Konopka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of the central nervous system has a specific structure and protein composition that are different from those in other organs. Today we know that the ECM not only provides physical scaffolding for the neurons and glia, but also actively modifies their functions. Over the last two decades, a growing body of research evidence has been collected, suggesting an important role of ECM proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the brain. So far the majority of data concern two large families of proteases: the serine proteases and the matrix metalloproteinases. The members of these families are localized at the synapses, and are secreted into the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner. The proteases remodel the local environment as well as influencing synapse structure and function. The structural modifications induced by proteases include shape and size changes, as well as synapse elimination, and synaptogenesis. The functional changes include modifications of receptor function in the postsynaptic part of the synapse, as well as the potentiation or depression of neurotransmitter secretion by the presynaptic site. The present review summarizes the current view on the role of extracellular proteolysis in the physiological synaptic plasticity underlying the phenomena of learning and memory, as well as in the pathological plasticity occurring during epileptogenesis or development of drug addiction. 

  11. Metal ion toxins and brain aquaporin-4 expression: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eXimenes-Da-Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage.

  12. Metal Ion Toxins and Brain Aquaporin-4 Expression: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metal ions such as iron, zinc, and manganese are essential to metabolic functions, protein synthesis, neurotransmission, and antioxidant neuroprotective mechanisms. Conversely, non-essential metals such as mercury and lead are sources of human intoxication due to occupational activities or environmental contamination. Essential or non-essential metal accumulation in the central nervous system (CNS) results in changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, as well as triggering microglia activation and astrocyte reactivity and changing water transport through the cells, which could result in brain swelling. Aquaporin-4 is the main water channel in the CNS, is expressed in astrocyte foot processes in brain capillaries and along the circumventricular epithelium in the ventricles, and has important physiological functions in maintaining brain osmotic homeostasis and supporting brain excitability through regulation of the extracellular space. Some evidence has pointed to a role of AQP4 during metal intoxication in the brain, where it may act in a dual form as a neuroprotector or a mediator of the development of oxidative stress in neurons and astrocytes, resulting in brain swelling and neuronal damage. This mini-review presents the way some metal ions affect changes in AQP4 expression in the CNS and discuss the ways in which water transport in brain cells can be involved in brain damage. PMID:27313504

  13. Evaluation of intracranial space-occupying lesion with Tc99m-glucoheptonate brain single photon emission computed tomography in treatment-naïve patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Glucoheptonate is a glucose analog with strong affinity for neoplastic brain tissues. Though extensively used as a tracer for detection of brain tumor recurrence, it′s utility for characterization of intracranial lesions as neoplastic or otherwise has not been evaluated in treatment-naοve patients. Aim : The study was conducted to determine if glucoheptonate has sufficient specificity for neoplastic lesions of brain so that it can be utilized as a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-tracer for differentiating neoplastic intracranial lesions from non-neoplastic ones in treatment-naοve patients. Settings and Design : A cross-sectional analysis of treatment-naοve patients with intracranial space-occupying lesion done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods : Fifty-four consecutive patients with clinical and radiological features of space-occupying lesion were included in this study. Glucoheptonate brain SPECT was performed before any definitive therapeutic intervention. Histopathological verification of diagnosis was obtained in all cases. Statistical Analysis Used : Descriptive statistics and student′s ′t′ test. Result : Increased glucoheptonate uptake over the site of radiological lesion was noted in 41 patients and no uptake was noticed in 13 patients. Histopathology of 12 out of the 13 glucoheptonate non-avid lesions turned out to be non-neoplastic lesion; however, one lesion was reported as a Grade-2 astrocytoma. Histology from all the glucoheptonate concentrating lesions was of mitotic pathology. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of glucoheptonate for neoplastic lesion was 97.6%, 100% and 98.1%. Conclusions : Glucoheptonate has high degree of specificity for neoplastic tissues of brain and may be used as a tracer for SPECT study to differentiate neoplastic intracranial lesions from non-neoplastic ones.

  14. Extracellular Recordings of Field Potentials from Single Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Klauke, Norbert; Smith, Godfrey L.; Cooper, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Open microfluidic channels were used to separate the extracellular space around a cardiomyocyte into three compartments: the cell ends and a central partition (insulating gap). The microchannels were filled with buffer solution and overlaid with paraffin oil, thus forming the cavities for the cell ends. The central part of the cardiomyocyte rested on the partition between two adjacent microchannels and was entirely surrounded by the paraffin oil. This arrangement increased the extracellular e...

  15. Extracellular distribution of radiolabel obscures specific binding of diethylstilbestrol in mouse skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extracellular distribution of 3H-diethylstilbestrol (3H-DES) in mouse skeletal muscle was assessed following intraperitoneal injection. Total muscle extracellular space was measured with 14C-inulin, and the vascular space with 125I-albumin. A significant difference in the distribution of native 3H-DES and its metabolites in muscle and blood was found. This could only be explained if these compounds distributed with the albumin space and not the inulin space

  16. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  17. Alterations in the sense of time, space, and body in the mindfulness-trained brain: a neurophenomenologically-guided MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Dor-Ziderman, Yair; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Meditation practice can lead to what have been referred to as "altered states of consciousness."One of the phenomenological characteristics of these states is a joint alteration in the sense of time, space, and body. Here, we set out to study the unique experiences of alteration in the sense of time and space by collaborating with a select group of 12 long-term mindfulness meditation (MM) practitioners in a neurophenomenological setup, utilizing first-person data to guide the neural analyses. We hypothesized that the underlying neural activity accompanying alterations in the sense of time and space would be related to alterations in bodily processing. The participants were asked to volitionally bring about distinct states of "Timelessness" (outside time) and "Spacelessness" (outside space) while their brain activity was recorded by MEG. In order to rule out the involvement of attention, memory, or imagination, we used control states of "Then" (past) and "There" (another place). MEG sensors evidencing alterations in power values were identified, and the brain regions underlying these changes were estimated via spatial filtering (beamforming). Particularly, we searched for similar neural activity hypothesized to underlie both the state of "Timelessness" and "Spacelessness." The results were mostly confined to the theta band, and showed that: (1) the "Then"/"There" overlap yielded activity in regions related to autobiographic memory and imagery (right posterior parietal lobule (PPL), right precentral/middle frontal gyrus (MFG), bilateral precuneus); (2) "Timelessness"/"Spacelessness" conditions overlapped in a different network, related to alterations in the sense of the body (posterior cingulate, right temporoparietal junction (TPJ), cerebellum); and (3) phenomenologically-guided neural analyses enabled us to dissociate different levels of alterations in the sense of the body. This study illustrates the utility of employing experienced contemplative practitioners

  18. Proteoglycans and brain repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, Francesca; Fawcett, James W

    2004-02-01

    Proteoglycans are complex molecules composed of long, unbranched sugar chains attached to a protein core. In the mammalian central nervous system, they are a major component of the extracellular matrix and of the cellular surface. After a central nervous system injury, their expression in the lesion area changes strongly and contributes to the inhibition of axon regrowth and brain repair. PMID:14739401

  19. Evaluation of gene, protein and neurotrophin expression in the brain of mice exposed to space environment for 91 days.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Santucci

    Full Text Available Effects of 3-month exposure to microgravity environment on the expression of genes and proteins in mouse brain were studied. Moreover, responses of neurobiological parameters, nerve growth factor (NGF and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, were also evaluated in the cerebellum, hippocampus, cortex, and adrenal glands. Spaceflight-related changes in gene and protein expression were observed. Biological processes of the up-regulated genes were related to the immune response, metabolic process, and/or inflammatory response. Changes of cellular components involving in microsome and vesicular fraction were also noted. Molecular function categories were related to various enzyme activities. The biological processes in the down-regulated genes were related to various metabolic and catabolic processes. Cellular components were related to cytoplasm and mitochondrion. The down-regulated molecular functions were related to catalytic and oxidoreductase activities. Up-regulation of 28 proteins was seen following spaceflight vs. those in ground control. These proteins were related to mitochondrial metabolism, synthesis and hydrolysis of ATP, calcium/calmodulin metabolism, nervous system, and transport of proteins and/or amino acids. Down-regulated proteins were related to mitochondrial metabolism. Expression of NGF in hippocampus, cortex, and adrenal gland of wild type animal tended to decrease following spaceflight. As for pleiotrophin transgenic mice, spaceflight-related reduction of NGF occurred only in adrenal gland. Consistent trends between various portions of brain and adrenal gland were not observed in the responses of BDNF to spaceflight. Although exposure to real microgravity influenced the expression of a number of genes and proteins in the brain that have been shown to be involved in a wide spectrum of biological function, it is still unclear how the functional properties of brain were influenced by 3-month exposure to microgravity.

  20. Alterations in the sense of time, space and body in the Mindfulness-trained brain: A neurophenomenologically-guided MEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviva eBerkovich-Ohana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Meditation practice can lead to what have been referred to as 'altered states of consciousness'. One of the phenomenological characteristics of these states is a joint alteration in the sense of time, space and body. Here, we set out to study the unique experiences of alteration in the sense of time and space by collaborating with a select group of 12 long-term Mindfulness meditation practitioners in a neurophenomenological setup, utilizing first-person data to guide the neural analyses. We hypothesized that the underlying neural activity accompanying alterations in the sense of time and space would be related to alterations in bodily processing.The participants were asked to volitionally bring about distinct states of 'Timelessness' (outside time and 'Spacelessness' (outside space while their brain activity was recorded by MEG. In order to rule out the involvement of attention, memory or imagination, we used control states of 'Then' (past and 'There' (another place. MEG sensors evidencing alterations in power values were identified, and the brain regions underlying these changes were estimated via spatial filtering (beamforming. Particularly, we searched for similar neural activity hypothesized to underlie both the state of 'Timelessness' and 'Spacelessness'. The results were mostly confined to the theta band, and showed that: 1 the 'Then' / 'There' overlap yielded activity in regions related to autobiographic memory and imagery (right posterior parietal lobule, right precentral / middle frontal gyrus, bilateral precuneus; 2 'Timelessness' / 'Spacelessness' conditions overlapped in a different network, related to alterations in the sense of the body (posterior cingulate, right temporoparietal junction, cerebellum; and 3 phenomenologically-guided neural analyses enabled us to dissociate different levels of alterations in the sense of the body. This study illustrates the utility of employing experienced contemplative practitioners within a

  1. Extracellular alkaline-acid pH shifts evoked by iontophoresis of glutamate and aspartate in turtle cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, M; Rice, M E

    1991-01-01

    The effect of glutamate and aspartate iontophoresis on extracellular pH was investigated in the turtle cerebellum in vitro. Both amino acids produced a rapid alkaline transient, typically followed by a prolonged acidification. These responses could be evoked in all layers of the cerebellum. Transition from bicarbonate to N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid-buffered media amplified the pH shifts. Similar alkaline-acid transients could be evoked in the molecular layer by electrical stimulation of the parallel fibers or the ipsilateral peduncle, or by superfusion of glutamate or aspartate. However, no alkaline shifts were evoked in the granular layer by either parallel fiber or peduncle stimulation. In contrast, the iontophoretically induced alkaline shifts were largest in the granular layer. Compared with the stimulus-evoked alkalinizations, the iontophoretic alkaline shifts were relatively insensitive to Mn2+ or Cd2+. These data suggest that the activity-dependent alkalinization of brain extracellular space is generated by a bicarbonate-independent mechanism related to excitatory synaptic transmission. The results are consistent with a flux of hydrogen ions through cationic channels, but do not support a direct role for voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. In view of the sensitivity of ion channels to changes in external pH, and the magnitude of the amino acid-induced pH shifts, these results indicate that extracellular pH could play an important modulatory role in excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:1711651

  2. Hippocampal extracellular GABA correlates with metabolism in human epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, J.W.; Cavus, I.; Kim, J.; Hetherington, H P.; Spencer, D. D.

    2008-01-01

    As the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in human brain, GABA is an important modulator of hyperexcitability in epilepsy patients. Given the high energetic cost of neurotransmission and synaptic activity, GABA concentrations may be hypothesized to correlate with metabolic function. We studied human epilepsy patients undergoing intracranial EEG monitoring for seizure localization to examine microdialysis measures of extracellular GABA (ecGABA), pre-operative MR spectroscopic measures of neuron...

  3. Astrocytes and extracellular matrix in extrasynaptic volume transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vargová, Lýdia; Syková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 369, č. 1654 (2014). ISSN 0962-8436 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11867S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : extracellular space * diffusion * astrocytes Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 7.055, year: 2014

  4. Brain pharmacokinetics of ganciclovir in rats with orthotopic BT4C glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynther, Mikko; Kääriäinen, Tiina M; Hakkarainen, Jenni J; Jalkanen, Aaro J; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Lehtonen, Marko; Peura, Lauri; Kurkipuro, Jere; Samaranayake, Haritha; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Rautio, Jarkko; Forsberg, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) is an essential part of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene therapy of malignant gliomas. The purpose of this study was to investigate the brain pharmacokinetics and tumor uptake of GCV in the BT4C rat glioma model. GCV's brain and tumor uptakes were investigated by in vivo microdialysis in rats with orthotopic BT4C glioma. In addition, the ability of GCV to cross the blood-brain barrier and tumor vasculature was assessed with in situ rat brain perfusion. Finally, the extent to which GCV could permeate across the BT4C glioma cell membrane was assessed in vitro. The areas under the concentration curve of unbound GCV in blood, brain extracellular fluid (ECF), and tumor ECF were 6157, 1658, and 4834 μM⋅min, respectively. The apparent maximum unbound concentrations achieved within 60 minutes were 46.9, 11.8, and 25.8 μM in blood, brain, and tumor, respectively. The unbound GCV concentrations in brain and tumor after in situ rat brain perfusion were 0.41 and 1.39 nmol/g, respectively. The highly polar GCV likely crosses the fenestrated tumor vasculature by paracellular diffusion. Thus, GCV is able to reach the extracellular space around the tumor at higher concentrations than that in healthy brain. However, GCV uptake into BT4C cells at 100 μM was only 2.1 pmol/mg of protein, and no active transporter-mediated disposition of GCV could be detected in vitro. In conclusion, the limited efficacy of HSV-tk/GCV gene therapy may be due to the poor cellular uptake and rapid elimination of GCV. PMID:25349125

  5. Extracellular enzymes of Legionella pneumophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Thorpe, T C; Miller, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    All strains of Legionella pneumophila tested produced detectable levels of extracellular protease, phosphatase, lipase, deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, and beta-lactamase activity. Weak starch hydrolysis was also demonstrated for all strains. Elastase, collagenase, phospholipase C, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase, neuraminidase, or coagulase were not detected in any of these laboratory-maintained strains.

  6. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  7. Vascular basement membranes as pathways for the passage of fluid into and out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alan W J; Sharp, Matthew MacGregor; Albargothy, Nazira J; Fernandes, Rute; Hawkes, Cheryl A; Verma, Ajay; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of conventional lymphatics, drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes is along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Perivascular pathways are also involved in the entry of CSF into the brain by the convective influx/glymphatic system. The objective of this study is to differentiate the cerebral vascular basement membrane pathways by which fluid passes out of the brain from the pathway by which CSF enters the brain. Experiment 1: 0.5 µl of soluble biotinylated or fluorescent Aβ, or 1 µl 15 nm gold nanoparticles was injected into the mouse hippocampus and their distributions determined at 5 min by transmission electron microscopy. Aβ was distributed within the extracellular spaces of the hippocampus and within basement membranes of capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Nanoparticles did not enter capillary basement membranes from the extracellular spaces. Experiment 2: 2 µl of 15 nm nanoparticles were injected into mouse CSF. Within 5min, groups of nanoparticles were present in the pial-glial basement membrane on the outer aspect of cortical arteries between the investing layer of pia mater and the glia limitans. The results of this study and previous research suggest that cerebral vascular basement membranes form the pathways by which fluid passes into and out of the brain but that different basement membrane layers are involved. The significance of these findings for neuroimmunology, Alzheimer's disease, drug delivery to the brain and the concept of the Virchow-Robin space are discussed. PMID:26975356

  8. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging of metastatic brain tumor at 3 Tesla. Utility of T1-weighted SPACE compared with 2D spin echo and 3D gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the newly developed whole-brain, isotropic, 3-dimensional turbo spin-echo imaging with variable flip angle echo train (SPACE) for contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging in detecting brain metastases at 3 tesla (T). Twenty-two patients with suspected brain metastases underwent postcontrast study with SPACE, magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MP-RAGE), and 2-dimensional T1-weighted spin echo (2D-SE) imaging at 3 T. We quantitatively compared SPACE, MP-RAGE, and 2D-SE images by using signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) for GM-to-WM, lesion-to-GM, and lesion-to-WM. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the detection of brain metastases by segment-by-segment analysis and continuously-distributed test. The CNR between GM and WM was significantly higher on MP-RAGE images than on SPACE images (P1-weighted imaging. (author)

  9. Modelling Brain Tissue using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrby, Tim Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    an ongoing chemical reaction due to the fixative used. Short-term instabilities within the first 15 hours of DWI scanning were observed and found likely to be caused by the preparation of the postmortem tissue prior to MR scanning. This artefact can be avoided e.g. by simply excluding DW......Diffusion MRI, or diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), is a technique that measures the restricted diffusion of water molecules within brain tissue. Different reconstruction methods quantify water-diffusion anisotropy in the intra- and extra-cellular spaces of the neural environment. Fibre tracking...... environment differs from that of in vivo both due to a lowered environmental temperature and due to the fixation process itself. We argue that the perfusion fixation procedure employed in this thesis ensures that the postmortem tissue is as close to that of in vivo as possible. Different fibre reconstruction...

  10. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  11. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  12. Extracellular metalloproteinases in Phytomonas serpens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Alane B; Almeida, Flávia V S; Bronzato, Leandro S; Branquinha, Marta H

    2003-03-01

    The detection of extracellular proteinases in Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid isolated from tomato fruits, is demonstrated in this paper. Maximal production occurred at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth. These enzymes exhibited selective substrate utilization in SDS-PAGE, being more active with gelatin; hemoglobin and bovine serum albumin were not degraded. Three proteinases were detected in SDS-PAGE-gelatin, with apparent molecular masses between 94 and 70 kDa. The proteolytic activity was completely blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas a partial inhibition was observed with trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-(4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and soybean trypsin inhibitor; phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride weakly inhibited the enzymes. This inhibition profile indicated that these extracellular proteinases belong to the metalloproteinase class. PMID:12795409

  13. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  14. Quantification of convection-enhanced delivery to the ischemic brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) could have clinical application in the delivery of neuroprotective agents following ischemic stroke. However, ischemic brain tissue changes such as cytotoxic edema, in which cellular swelling decreases the fractional volume of the extracellular space, would be expected to significantly alter the distribution of neuroprotective agents delivered by CED. We sought to predict and characterize these effects using the magnetic resonance contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) as a model therapeutic agent. CED was observed using MRI in a normal rat brain and in a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion rat model of brain ischemia. Gd-DTPA was infused to the caudate putamen in the normal rat (n = 6) and MCA occlusion model (n = 6). In each rat, baseline apparent diffusion coefficient images were acquired prior to infusion, and T1 maps were then acquired 13 times throughout the duration of the experiment. These T1 maps were used to compute Gd-DTPA concentrations throughout each brain. In the MCA occlusion group, CED delivered Gd-DTPA to a comparatively larger volume with lower average tissue concentrations. Following the infusion, the total content of Gd-DTPA decreased more slowly in the MCA occlusion group than in the normal group. This quantitative characterization confirms that edematous ischemic tissue changes alter the distribution of agents by CED. These findings may have important implications for CED in the treatment of brain injury, and will assist in future efforts to model the distribution of therapeutic agents

  15. Association between the fMRI manifestations of activated brain areas and muscle strength in patients with space-occupying lesions in motor cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbin Zheng; Xiaoke Chen; Guorui Liu; Renhua Wu

    2006-01-01

    was obvious smaller in the patients with motor deficit than in those without motor deficit (P < 0.01). ② The M1 activation and changes were observed in contralateral hemisphere in the patient group, and the activated volume was obviously larger than that in the control group (P < 0.01). The activated volumes of M1 and PMC in ipsilateral hemisphere were obviously larger than those in the control group (P < 0.05), but that of SMA had no obvious difference between the two groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: fMRI can be used to observe the activation of the brain motor functional areas of patient with space-occupying lesions in motor area, and evaluate the state of their motor function. The larger the distance of displacement of M1 compressed by tumor, the more obviously the muscle strength decreases in the patients.

  16. Brain carbonic acid acidosis after acetazolamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuser, D; Astrup, J; Lassen, N A;

    1975-01-01

    In cats in barbiturate anesthesia extracellular pH and potassium were continously recorded from brian cortex by implanted microelectrodes. Implantation of the electrodes preserved the low permeability of the blood-brain-barrier to HCO3-minus and H+ions as indicated by the development of brain...

  17. Therapeutic and space radiation exposure of mouse brain causes impaired DNA repair response and premature senescence by chronic oxidant production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Rodriguez, Olga C; Winters, Thomas A; Fornace, Albert J; Albanese, Chris; Datta, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent epidemiological evidences linking radiation exposure and a number of human ailments including cancer, mechanistic understanding of how radiation inflicts long-term changes in cerebral cortex, which regulates important neuronal functions, remains obscure. The current study dissects molecular events relevant to pathology in cerebral cortex of 6 to 8 weeks old female C57BL/6J mice two and twelve months after exposure to a γ radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly employed in fractionated radiotherapy. For a comparative study, effects of 1.6 Gy heavy ion 56Fe radiation on cerebral cortex were also investigated, which has implications for space exploration. Radiation exposure was associated with increased chronic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis. These results when considered with decreased cortical thickness, activation of cell-cycle arrest pathway, and inhibition of DNA double strand break repair factors led us to conclude to our knowledge for the first time that radiation caused aging-like pathology in cerebral cortical cells and changes after heavy ion radiation were more pronounced than γ radiation. PMID:23928451

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The Working Brain ... to mental disorders, such as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  1. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders. PMID:26920424

  2. The Extracellular Protease Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Is Activated by Inhibitory Avoidance Learning and Required for Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Vanja; Bozdagi, Ozlem; Huntley, George W.

    2007-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of extracellularly acting proteolytic enzymes with well-recognized roles in plasticity and remodeling of synaptic circuits during brain development and following brain injury. However, it is now becoming increasingly apparent that MMPs also function in normal, nonpathological synaptic plasticity of the…

  3. 细胞外信号调节蛋白激酶5在慢性氟中毒大鼠脑组织中的表达及其与大鼠记忆力改变的关系%Correlation between expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 5 in rat brain and changed capacity of learning and memory of rats with chronic fluorosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱志伟; 刘艳洁; 官志忠

    2016-01-01

    ,the time of escape latency and the number of crossing the platform between groups were statistically significant (H =28.20,29.90,26.47,27.23,35.34,27.62,all P < 0.01);the fifth day of space exploration experiment,the difference of the time of the first crossing platform and the number of crossing the platform between groups were statistically significant (H =31.41,30.80,all P < 0.01);the protein level of phosphor-ERK5 in brain tissue of rats was negatively correlated with the number of the first crossing platform (r =-0.470,P < 0.01),while positively related to escape latencies at the fifth day of the test (r =0.591,P < 0.01).Conclusion The changes of ERK5 signaling pathway in rat brain tissue caused by chronic fluorosis are found,which are related to the decrease of leaming and memory ability of animals with chronic fluorosis.%目的通过观察慢性氟中毒大鼠脑组织中细胞外调节蛋白激酶5 (extracellular-signa1 regulatedkinase 5,ERK5)的表达与活性,及与大鼠学习记忆能力变化的关系,深入探讨慢性氟中毒神经系统损害的发病机制.方法30只SD大鼠按体质量采用随机数字表法分为3组,每组10只,雌雄各半.对照组自由饮用自来水(含氟量< 0.5 mg/L),低氟组、高氟组饮水含氟量分别为10.0、50.0 mg/L.实验6个月后,取大鼠脑组织,实时荧光定量PCR(real-time PCR)检测ERK5的mRNA表达水平,蛋白免疫印迹法检测细胞外ERK5的蛋白表达水平及活性;Morris水迷宫检测慢性氟中毒大鼠学习记忆能力.结果低氟组、高氟组大鼠出现不同程度的氟斑牙,且随着染氟剂量的升高大鼠尿氟含量逐渐升高(F=164.10,P< 0.05).对照组、低氟组、高氟组大鼠脑组织磷酸化(p)-ERK5蛋白水平分别是0.13±0.03、0.29±0.10、0.43±0.17,组间比较差异有统计学意义(F=11.96,P< 0.05),其中低氟组、高氟组高于对照组(P均<0.05);总-ERK5蛋白水平分别是032±0.11、0.37±0.13、0.49±0.16,各组间比

  4. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  5. Postulated Role of Vasoactive Neuropeptide-Related Immunopathology of the Blood Brain Barrier and Virchow-Robin Spaces in the Aetiology of Neurological-Related Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Staines

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasoactive neuropeptides (VNs such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP have critical roles as neurotransmitters, vasodilators including perfusion and hypoxia regulators, as well as immune and nociception modulators. They have key roles in blood vessels in the central nervous system (CNS including maintaining functional integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB and blood spinal barrier (BSB. VNs are potent activators of adenylate cyclase and thus also have a key role in cyclic AMP production affecting regulatory T cell and other immune functions. Virchow-Robin spaces (VRSs are perivascular compartments surrounding small vessels within the CNS and contain VNs. Autoimmunity of VNs or VN receptors may affect BBB and VRS function and, therefore, may contribute to the aetiology of neurological-related conditions including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. VN autoimmunity will likely affect CNS and immunological homeostasis. Various pharmacological and immunological treatments including phosphodiesterase inhibitors and plasmapheresis may be indicated.

  6. Extracellular fluid conductivity analysis by dielectric spectroscopy for in vitro determination of cortical tissue vitality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain tissue is extremely metabolically active in part due to its need to constantly maintain a precise extracellular ionic environment. Under pathological conditions, unhealthy cortical tissue loses its ability to maintain this precise environment and there is a net efflux of charged particles from the cells. Typically, this ionic efflux is measured using ion-selective microelectrodes, which measure a single ionic species at a time. In this paper, we have used a bio-sensing method, dielectric spectroscopy (DS), which allows for the simultaneous measurement of the net efflux of all charged particles from cells by measuring extracellular conductivity. We exposed cortical brain slices from the mouse to different solutions that mimic various pathological states such as hypokalemia, hyperkalemia and ischemia (via oxygen-glucose deprivation). We have found that the changes in conductivity of the extracellular solutions were proportional to the severity of the pathological insult experienced by the brain tissue. Thus, DS allows for the measurement of changes in extracellular conductivity with enough sensitivity to monitor the health of brain tissue in vitro. (paper)

  7. Brain herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Gibberella zeae extracellular lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. zeae extracellular lipase has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 Å resolution. Fusarium head blight, one of the most destructive crop diseases, is mainly caused by Fusarium graminearum (known in its sexual stage as Gibberella zeae). F. graminearum secretes various extracellular enzymes that have been hypothesized to be involved in host infection. One of the extracellular enzymes secreted by this organism is the G. zeae extracellular lipase (GZEL), which is encoded by the FGL1 gene. In order to solve the crystal structure of GZEL and to gain a better understanding of the biological functions of the protein and of possible inhibitory mechanisms of lipase inhibitors, recombinant GZEL was crystallized at 291 K using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. A data set was collected to 2.8 Å resolution from a single flash-cooled crystal (100 K). The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.4, b = 91.0, c = 195.8 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The presence of four molecules was assumed per asymmetric unit, which gave a Matthews coefficient of 2.6 Å3 Da−1

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neural plasticity in a rat model of spinal cord transection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruxin Xing; Jia Liu; Hua Jin; Ping Dai; Tinghua Wang

    2011-01-01

    The present study employed a rat model of T10 spinal cord transection. Western blot analyses revealed increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in spinal cord segments caudal to the transection site following injection of replication incompetent herpes simplex virus vector (HSV-BDNF) into the subarachnoid space. In addition, hindlimb locomotor functions were improved. In contrast, BDNF levels decreased following treatment with replication defective herpes simplex virus vector construct small interference BDNF (HSV-siBDNF). Moreover, hindlimb locomotor functions gradually worsened. Compared with the replication incompetent herpes simplex virus vector control group, extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 expression increased in the HSV-BDNF group on days 14 and 28 after spinal cord transection, but expression was reduced in the HSV-siBDNF group. These results suggested that BDNF plays an important role in neural plasticity via extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 signaling pathway in a rat model of adult spinal cord transection.

  10. The Evolution of Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Suat; Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Tucker, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    We present a perspective on the molecular evolution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in metazoa that draws on research publications and data from sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag libraries. ECM components do not function in isolation, and the biological ECM system or “adhesome” also depends on posttranslational processing enzymes, cell surface receptors, and extracellular proteases. We focus principally on the adhesome of internal tissues and discuss its origins at the dawn of the metazoa and the expansion of complexity that occurred in the chordate lineage. The analyses demonstrate very high conservation of a core adhesome that apparently evolved in a major wave of innovation in conjunction with the origin of metazoa. Integrin, CD36, and certain domains predate the metazoa, and some ECM-related proteins are identified in choanoflagellates as predicted sequences. Modern deuterostomes and vertebrates have many novelties and elaborations of ECM as a result of domain shuffling, domain innovations and gene family expansions. Knowledge of the evolution of metazoan ECM is important for understanding how it is built as a system, its roles in normal tissues and disease processes, and has relevance for tissue engineering, the development of artificial organs, and the goals of synthetic biology. PMID:21160071

  11. Fibronectin-Containing Extracellular Vesicles Protect Melanocytes against Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Nan-Hyung; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kim, Sung Tae; Gho, Yong Song; Lee, Ai-Young; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-05-01

    Skin melanocytes are activated by exposure to UV radiation to secrete melanin-containing melanosomes to protect the skin from UV-induced damage. Despite the continuous renewal of the epidermis, the turnover rate of melanocytes is very slow, and they survive for long periods. However, the mechanisms underlying the survival of melanocytes exposed to UV radiation are not known. Here, we investigated the role of melanocyte-derived extracellular vesicles in melanocyte survival. Network analysis of the melanocyte extracellular vesicle proteome identified the extracellular matrix component fibronectin at a central node, and the release of fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles was increased after exposure of melanocytes to UVB radiation. Using an anti-fibronectin neutralizing antibody and specific inhibitors of extracellular vesicle secretion, we demonstrated that extracellular vesicles enriched in fibronectin were involved in melanocyte survival after UVB radiation. Furthermore, we observed that in the hyperpigmented lesions of patients with melasma, the extracellular space around melanocytes contained more fibronectin compared with normal skin, suggesting that fibronectin is involved in maintaining melanocytes in pathological conditions. Collectively, our findings suggest that melanocytes secrete fibronectin-containing extracellular vesicles to increase their survival after UVB radiation. These data provide important insight into how constantly stimulated melanocytes can be maintained in pathological conditions such as melasma. PMID:26854492

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism ...

  13. Trash or Treasure: extracellular microRNAs and cell-to-cell communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Hagiwara, Keitaro; Tominaga, Naoomi; Katsuda, Takeshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    Circulating RNAs in human body fluids are promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. However, the biological significance of circulating RNAs remains elusive. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), were isolated from multiple human body fluids, and these “circulating miRNAs” have been implicated as novel disease biomarkers. Concurrently, miRNAs were also identified in the extracellular space associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are small membrane vesicles secre...

  14. Segmentation editing improves efficiency while reducing inter-expert variation and maintaining accuracy for normal brain tissues in the presence of space-occupying lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image segmentation has become a vital and often rate-limiting step in modern radiotherapy treatment planning. In recent years, the pace and scope of algorithm development, and even introduction into the clinic, have far exceeded evaluative studies. In this work we build upon our previous evaluation of a registration driven segmentation algorithm in the context of 8 expert raters and 20 patients who underwent radiotherapy for large space-occupying tumours in the brain. In this work we tested four hypotheses concerning the impact of manual segmentation editing in a randomized single-blinded study. We tested these hypotheses on the normal structures of the brainstem, optic chiasm, eyes and optic nerves using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume, and signed Euclidean distance error to evaluate the impact of editing on inter-rater variance and accuracy. Accuracy analyses relied on two simulated ground truth estimation methods: simultaneous truth and performance level estimation and a novel implementation of probability maps. The experts were presented with automatic, their own, and their peers’ segmentations from our previous study to edit. We found, independent of source, editing reduced inter-rater variance while maintaining or improving accuracy and improving efficiency with at least 60% reduction in contouring time. In areas where raters performed poorly contouring from scratch, editing of the automatic segmentations reduced the prevalence of total anatomical miss from approximately 16% to 8% of the total slices contained within the ground truth estimations. These findings suggest that contour editing could be useful for consensus building such as in developing delineation standards, and that both automated methods and even perhaps less sophisticated atlases could improve efficiency, inter-rater variance, and accuracy. (paper)

  15. New directions in inflammation and immunity: the multi-functional role of the extracellular RNA/RNase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deindl, Elisabeth; Fischer, Silvia; Preissner, Klaus T

    2009-12-01

    In the mid-eighties of the last century, extracellular-proteolipid complexes have been identified in tumor patients and circulating RNA was suggested to represent a specific secretory product of cancer cells. The presence of specific types of RNA in a variety of cancer types proved to be useful in cancer diagnosis. It has been suggested that extracellular RNA and DNA are not inert molecules, but contain biological activities. Recent data have demonstrated that extracellular RNA is likely to present the up to now undefined "natural foreign surface", serving as an initiating factor in blood coagulation in vivo. Yet, extracellular RNA seems to have even more functions. Investigations on blood-brain-barrier have shown that extracellular RNA mediates endothelial permeability. Ample success has been achieved in administrating RNase in different animal models of vascular diseases, thereby significantly delaying thrombus formation and reducing cerebral edema formation with neuroprotection in acute stroke models. Furthermore, extracellular mammalian RNA was found to decrease tumor yield in a murine model system, suggesting that extracellular RNA might trigger immune response. Finally, extracellular nucleic acids were identified as danger signals involved in innate immunity related to neutrophil-mediated bacterial killing and haemocyte activation and coagulation in the insects. Thus, a new area of research on extracellular RNA functions with promising future perspectives just started in the field of inflammation and immunity. PMID:20361709

  16. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  17. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  18. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  19. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01–0.03 min−1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20–60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration. (paper)

  20. ECM in brain aging and dementia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morawski, M.; Filippov, M.; Tzinia, A.; Tsilibary, E.; Vargová, Lýdia

    Amsterdam: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2014 - (Dityatev, A. - WehrleHaller, B. - Pitkanen, A.), s. 207-227 ISBN 978-0-444-63486-3 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * extracellular space * perineuronal nets Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  1. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  2. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  3. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  4. Afferent and efferent immunological pathways of the brain. Anatomy, function and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carare, R O; Hawkes, C A; Weller, R O

    2014-02-01

    Immunological privilege appears to be a product of unique lymphatic drainage systems for the brain and receptor-mediated entry of inflammatory cells through the blood-brain barrier. Most organs of the body have well-defined lymphatic vessels that carry extracellular fluid, antigen presenting cells, lymphocytes, neoplastic cells and even bacteria to regional lymph nodes. The brain has no such conventional lymphatics, but has perivascular pathways that drain interstitial fluid (ISF) from brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the subarachnoid space to cervical lymph nodes. ISF and solutes drain along narrow, ∼100 nm-thick basement membranes within the walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries to cervical lymph nodes; this pathway does not allow traffic of lymphocytes or antigen presenting cells from brain to lymph nodes. Although CSF drains into blood through arachnoid villi, CSF also drains from the subarachnoid space through channels in the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone into nasal lymphatics and thence to cervical lymph nodes. This pathway does allow the traffic of lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells from CSF to cervical lymph nodes. Efferent pathways by which lymphocytes enter the brain are regulated by selected integrins on lymphocytes and selective receptors on vascular endothelial cells. Here we review: (1) the structure and function of afferent lymphatic drainage of ISF and CSF, (2) mechanisms involved in the efferent pathways by which lymphocytes enter the brain and (3) the failure of lymphatic drainage of the brain parenchyma with age and the role of such failure in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24145049

  5. EXTRACELLULAR HSPs: The Complicated Roles of Extracellular HSPs in Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Keith Calderwood

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs interact with the immune system in a very complex manner. Many such HSPs exert powerful effects on the immune response, playing both stimulatory and regulatory roles. However, the influence of the HSPs on immunity appears to be black or white in nature - rarely neutral. Thus the HSPs can act as dominant antigens and can comprise key components of anti-tumor vaccines. They can also function as powerful immunoregulatory agents and, as such are employed to treat inflammatory diseases or to extend the lifespan of tissue transplants. Small modifications in the cellular milieu have been shown to flip the allegiances of HSPs from immunoregulatory agents towards a potent inflammatory alignment. These mutable properties of HSPs may be related to the ability of these proteins to interact with multiple receptors often with mutually confounding properties in immune cells. Therefore, understanding the complex immune properties of HSPs may help us to harness their potential in treatment of a range of conditions.

  6. Building an organic computing device with multiple interconnected brains

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Pais-Vieira; Gabriela Chiuffa; Mikhail Lebedev; Amol Yadav; Nicolelis, Miguel A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we proposed that Brainets, i.e. networks formed by multiple animal brains, cooperating and exchanging information in real time through direct brain-to-brain interfaces, could provide the core of a new type of computing device: an organic computer. Here, we describe the first experimental demonstration of such a Brainet, built by interconnecting four adult rat brains. Brainets worked by concurrently recording the extracellular electrical activity generated by populations of cortical ...

  7. Indomethacin abolishes cerebral blood flow increase in response to acetazolamide-induced extracellular acidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Paulson, O B; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    by acetazolamide (Az), a drug that induces brain extracellular acidosis, which triggers its effect on CBF. We compared the results to the inhibitory effect of indomethacin on the CBF increase during hypercapnia. Indomethacin but not diclofenac, another potent cyclooxygenase inhibitor, was found to...... block almost completely the CBF increase caused by Az-induced extracellular acidosis or by CO2, but it did not influence the CBF increase produced by sodium nitroprusside or papaverine. The results suggest that indomethacin exerts its action on CO2 reactivity by a nonprostaglandin-mediated mechanism...

  8. GLUCOSE-CONCENTRATION IN SUBCUTANEOUS EXTRACELLULAR-SPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHMIDT, FJ; SLUITER, WJ; SCHOONEN, AJM

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- To compare the subcutaneous glucose sensor measurements with two reference methods. Previous studies provide conflicting findings about the real glucose concentrations in subcutaneous tissue. Some suggest substantially lower concentration, whereas others measure proportionally higher gluc

  9. Extrasynaptic volume transmission and diffusion parameters of the extracellular space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 129, - (2004), s. 861-876. ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : anisotropy * apparent diffusion coefficient Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.456, year: 2004

  10. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  11. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  12. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  13. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are metastatic, ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the brain communicate and work with each other How changes in the brain ...

  15. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  16. Brain Fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ravi kumar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain Fingerprinting is a scientific technique to determine whether or not specific information is stored in an individual's brain by measuring a electrical brain wave response to Word, phrases, or picture that are presented on computer screen. Brain Fingerprinting is a controversial forensic science technique that uses electroencephalograph y (EEG to determine whether specific information is stored in a subject's brain

  17. Xanthurenic acid distribution, transport, accumulation and release in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobaille, Serge; Kemmel, Véronique; Brumaru, Daniel; Dugave, Christophe; Aunis, Dominique; Maitre, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Tryptophan metabolism through the kynurenine pathway leads to several neuroactive compounds, including kynurenic and picolinic acids. Xanthurenic acid (Xa) has been generally considered as a substance with no physiological role but possessing toxic and apoptotic properties. In the present work, we present several findings which support a physiological role for endogenous Xa in synaptic signalling in brain. This substance is present in micromolar amounts in most regions of the rat brain with a heterogeneous distribution. An active vesicular synaptic process inhibited by bafilomycin and nigericin accumulates xanthurenate into pre-synaptic terminals. A neuronal transport, partially dependant on adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), sodium and chloride ions exists in NCB-20 neurons which could participate in the clearance of extracellular xanthurenate. Both transports (neuronal and vesicular) are greatly enhanced by the presence of micromolar amounts of zinc ions. Finally, electrical in vivo stimulation of A10-induced Xa release in the extracellular spaces of the rat prefrontal cortex. This phenomenon is reproduced by veratrine, K+ ions and blocked by EGTA and tetrodotoxin. These results strongly argue for a role for Xa in neurotransmission/neuromodulation in the rat brain, thus providing the existence of specific Xa receptors. PMID:18182052

  18. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in huma

  19. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ScottChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  20. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J; Stubgaard, M; Henriksen, O

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty-two of ...... diffusion capability signifies an increase of the extracellular water space, which probably is related to the degree ofdemyelination. Thus, measurement of water self-diffusion in multiple sclerosis plaques may contribute to the study of pathogenesis of demyelination.......Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty-two of...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the ... distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... others live with symptoms of mental illness every day. They can be moderate, or serious and cause ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... helps Sarah to better cope with her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists ... the treatment for a person's specific conditions. Such brain research help increase the understanding of how the brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as depression. The Growing Brain Inside the Brain: Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain ... specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic parts: Cell body which includes ...

  7. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ... grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... science, such as: How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic ... that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct this ...

  12. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in various types of brain tumor. Effect of the space-occupying lesion on blood flow in brain tissue close to and remote from tumor site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuroda, K; Skyhøj Olsen, T; Lassen, N A

    1982-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 23 patients with brain tumors using the 133Xe intra-carotid injection method and a 254 channel gamma camera. The glioblastomas (4) and astrocytomas (4) all showed hyperemia in the tumor and tumor-near region. This was also seen in several...

  14. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  15. Brain mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-01-01

    Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping") aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1) acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2) transformation of data into a common reference, (3) visualization and interpretation of results, and (4) databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prere...

  16. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  17. Brain circuitry outside the synaptic cleft

    OpenAIRE

    Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Alexander E Dityatev

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of experimental evidence suggests that astroglia, and possibly microglia, play an important part in regulating synaptic networking of the brain. It has also emerged that extracellular matrix (ECM) structures that enwrap synaptic connections can generate molecular signals affecting both neuronal and glial activity. Thus it appears that the mechanism of information processing in the brain, which has hitherto been associated almost exclusively with neural circuits, could also invo...

  18. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  19. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an or...

  20. Optical ATP Biosensor for Extracellular ATP Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Huang, C.-Y.C.; Lin, W-C

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular Adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) is an important multi-functional molecule which can mediate numerous physiological activities by activating purinergic P2 receptors. The objective of this study was to develop a novel optical ATP sensor for in-situ extracellular ATP measurement in biological tissues. The optical ATP sensor was made by applying two layers of sol-gel coating to the end of an optical fiber probe end. The first layer contained ruthenium complex for sensing changes in ...

  1. Extracellular acid proteases produced by Saccharomycopsis lipolytica.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Yamada; Ogrydziak, D M

    1983-01-01

    Saccharomycopsis lipolytica CX161-1B produced at least three extracellular acid proteases during exponential growth in medium containing glycerol, Difco Proteose Peptone, and mineral salts at pH 3.4 (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, Mich.). Little extracellular acid protease activity was produced with glutamic acid as the sole nitrogen source, somewhat higher levels were obtained with peptone, and much higher levels were obtained with Difco Proteose Peptone. The relative amounts of the three prot...

  2. Role of extracellular adenosine in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    FENCKOVÁ, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes several aspects of the role for extracellular adenosine in Drosophila. Reverse genetic, molecular and microscopic methods together with the most forefront Drosophila research techniques have been applied to elucidate the role of adenosine signaling in the regulation of development, physiology and metabolism of Drosophila larvae. The thesis helps to establish the model for extracellular adenosine as a stress-signal for the release of energy stores. It also describes the e...

  3. Neutrophil recruitment to the brain in mouse and human ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-de-Puig, Isabel; Miró-Mur, Francesc; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Gelpi, Ellen; Pedragosa, Jordi; Justicia, Carles; Urra, Xabier; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils are rapidly recruited in response to local tissue infection or inflammation. Stroke triggers a strong inflammatory reaction but the relevance of neutrophils in the ischemic brain is not fully understood, particularly in the absence of reperfusion. We investigated brain neutrophil recruitment in two murine models of permanent ischemia induced by either cauterization of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery (c-MCAo) or intraluminal MCA occlusion (il-MCAo), and three fatal cases of human ischemic stroke. Flow cytometry analyses revealed progressive neutrophil recruitment after c-MCAo, lesser neutrophil recruitment following il-MCAo, and absence of neutrophils after sham operation. Confocal microscopy identified neutrophils in the leptomeninges from 6 h after the occlusion, in the cortical basal lamina and cortical Virchow-Robin spaces from 15 h, and also in the cortical brain parenchyma at 24 h. Neutrophils showed signs of activation including histone-3 citrullination, chromatin decondensation, and extracellular projection of DNA and histones suggestive of extracellular trap formation. Perivascular neutrophils were identified within the entire cortical infarction following c-MCAo. After il-MCAo, neutrophils prevailed in the margins but not the center of the cortical infarct, and were intraluminal and less abundant in the striatum. The lack of collaterals to the striatum and a collapsed pial anastomotic network due to brain edema in large hemispheric infarctions could impair neutrophil trafficking in this model. Neutrophil extravasation at the leptomeninges was also detected in the human tissue. We concluded that neutrophils extravasate from the leptomeningeal vessels and can eventually reach the brain in experimental animal models and humans with prolonged arterial occlusion. PMID:25548073

  4. Composition and Properties of Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposing Systems in Extracellular and Total Extracts from Needles of Norway Spruce (Picea abies L., Karst.)

    OpenAIRE

    Polle, A.; Chakrabarti, K.; Schurmann, W.; Renneberg, H.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging systems of spruce (Picea abies) needles were investigated in both extracts obtained from the extracellular space and extracts of total needles. As assessed by the lack of activity of symplastic marker enzymes, the extracellular washing fluid was free from intracellular contaminations. In the extracellular washing fluid ascorbate, glutathione, cysteine, and high specific activities of guaiacol peroxidases were observed. Guaiacol peroxidases in the extracellu...

  5. Extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cause invasive disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Trappetti

    Full Text Available During infection, pneumococci exist mainly in sessile biofilms rather than in planktonic form, except during sepsis. However, relatively little is known about how biofilms contribute to pneumococcal pathogenesis. Here, we carried out a biofilm assay on opaque and transparent variants of a clinical serotype 19F strain WCH159. After 4 days incubation, scanning electron microscopy revealed that opaque biofilm bacteria produced an extracellular matrix, whereas the transparent variant did not. The opaque biofilm-derived bacteria translocated from the nasopharynx to the lungs and brain of mice, and showed 100-fold greater in vitro adherence to A549 cells than transparent bacteria. Microarray analysis of planktonic and sessile bacteria from transparent and opaque variants showed differential gene expression in two operons: the lic operon, which is involved in choline uptake, and in the two-component system, ciaRH. Mutants of these genes did not form an extracellular matrix, could not translocate from the nasopharynx to the lungs or the brain, and adhered poorly to A549 cells. We conclude that only the opaque phenotype is able to form extracellular matrix, and that the lic operon and ciaRH contribute to this process. We propose that during infection, extracellular matrix formation enhances the ability of pneumococci to cause invasive disease.

  6. Data of NODDI diffusion metrics in the brain and computer simulation of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI) acquisition scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodiweera, Chandana; Wu, Yu-Chien

    2016-06-01

    This article provides NODDI diffusion metrics in the brains of 52 healthy participants and computer simulation data to support compatibility of hybrid diffusion imaging (HYDI), "Hybrid diffusion imaging"[1] acquisition scheme in fitting neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) model, "NODDI: practical in vivo neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging of the human brain"[2]. HYDI is an extremely versatile diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) technique that enables various analyzes methods using a single diffusion dataset. One of the diffusion data analysis methods is the NODDI computation, which models the brain tissue with three compartments: fast isotropic diffusion (e.g., cerebrospinal fluid), anisotropic hindered diffusion (e.g., extracellular space), and anisotropic restricted diffusion (e.g., intracellular space). The NODDI model produces microstructural metrics in the developing brain, aging brain or human brain with neurologic disorders. The first dataset provided here are the means and standard deviations of NODDI metrics in 48 white matter region-of-interest (ROI) averaging across 52 healthy participants. The second dataset provided here is the computer simulation with initial conditions guided by the first dataset as inputs and gold standard for model fitting. The computer simulation data provide a direct comparison of NODDI indices computed from the HYDI acquisition [1] to the NODDI indices computed from the originally proposed acquisition [2]. These data are related to the accompanying research article "Age Effects and Sex Differences in Human Brain White Matter of Young to Middle-Aged Adults: A DTI, NODDI, and q-Space Study" [3]. PMID:27115027

  7. Extrasynaptic neurotransmission in the modulation of brain function. Focus on the striatal neuronal-glial networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell eFuxe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal

  8. Prediction of brain target site concentrations on the basis of CSF PK : impact of mechanisms of blood-to-brain transport and within brain distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Westerhout, Joost

    2014-01-01

    In the development of drugs for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders, the prediction of human CNS drug action is a big challenge. Direct measurement of brain extracellular fluid (brainECF) concentrations is highly restricted in human. Therefore, unbound drug concentrations in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used as a surrogate for human brainECF concentrations. Due to qualitative and quantitative differences in processes that govern the pharmacokinetics (PK) of drugs in...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... in Real Life Brain Research Glossary Brain Basics (PDF, 10 pages) Introduction Watch the Brain Basics video ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. ... rise to disabilities or diseases. neural circuit —A network of neurons ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure, studies ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, ... highly developed area at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ...

  13. Pathogenesis of Brain Edema and Investigation into Anti-Edema Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Shotaro Michinaga; Yutaka Koyama

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that occurs after brain injuries such as stroke and head trauma. In the edematous brain, excess accumulation of extracellular fluid results in elevation of intracranial pressure, leading to impaired nerve function. Despite the seriousness of brain edema, only symptomatic treatments to remove edema fluid are currently available. Thus, the development of novel anti-edema drugs is required. The pathogenesis of brain edema is classified as vas...

  14. Effects of sleep deprivation on extracellular serotonin in hippocampus and frontal cortex of the rat

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Sleep deprivation improves the mood of depressed patients, but the exact mechanism behind this effect is unclear. An enhancement of serotonergic neurotransmission has been suggested. In this study, we used in vivo microdialysis to monitor extracellular serotonin in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of rats during an 8 h sleep deprivation period. These brain regions were selected since both have been implicated in depression. The behavioral state of the animal was continuously monitored b...

  15. Brain mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Koritnik

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Cartography of the brain ("brain mapping" aims to represent the complexities of the working brain in an understandable and usable way. There are four crucial steps in brain mapping: (1 acquiring data about brain structure and function, (2 transformation of data into a common reference, (3 visualization and interpretation of results, and (4 databasing and archiving. Electrophysiological and functional imaging methods provide information about function of the human brain. A prerequisite for multisubject, multidimensional and multimodal mapping is transformation of individual images to match a standard brain template. To produce brain maps, color, contours, and other visual cues are used to differentiate metabolic rates, electrical field potentials, receptor densities, and other attributes of structure or function. Databases are used to organize and archive data records. By relating the maps to cognitive functions and psychological models, brain mapping offers a prerequisite for the understanding of organizational principles of the human brain.

  16. Deltorphin II enhances extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens via opioid receptor-independent mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murakawa, K.; Hirose, N.; Takada, K.; Suzuki, T.; Nagase, H.; Cools, A.R.; Koshikawa, N.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the delta2-opioid receptor agonist, deltorphin II, on extracellular levels of dopamine in the rat nucleus accumbens were investigated in awake animals by in vivo brain microdialysis. In agreement with previous studies, perfusion of deltorphin II (50.0 nmol) into the nucleus accumbens

  17. Extracellular diffusion parameters in the rat somatosensory cortex during recovery from transient global ischemia/hypoxia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zoremba, N.; Homola, Aleš; Šlais, Karel; Voříšek, Ivan; Rossaint, R.; Lehmenkühler, A.; Syková, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 10 (2008), s. 1665-1673. ISSN 0271-678X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR GA305/06/1316 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Diffusion * Edema * Extracellular space Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.741, year: 2008

  18. Proteases decode the extracellular matrix cryptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-03-01

    The extracellular matrix is comprised of 1100 core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins and of glycosaminoglycans. This structural scaffold contributes to the organization and mechanical properties of tissues and modulates cell behavior. The extracellular matrix is dynamic and undergoes constant remodeling, which leads to diseases if uncontrolled. Bioactive fragments, called matricryptins, are released from the extracellular proteins by limited proteolysis and have biological activities on their own. They regulate numerous physiological and pathological processes such as angiogenesis, cancer, diabetes, wound healing, fibrosis and infectious diseases and either improve or worsen the course of diseases depending on the matricryptins and on the molecular and biological contexts. Several protease families release matricryptins from core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins both in vitro and in vivo. The major proteases, which decrypt the extracellular matrix, are zinc metalloproteinases of the metzincin superfamily (matrixins, adamalysins and astacins), cysteine proteinases and serine proteases. Some matricryptins act as enzyme inhibitors, further connecting protease and matricryptin fates and providing intricate regulation of major physiopathological processes such as angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. They strengthen the role of the extracellular matrix as a key player in tissue failure and core-matrisome and matrisome-associated proteins as important therapeutic targets. PMID:26382969

  19. General solutions to poroviscoelastic model of hydrocephalic human brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane

    2011-12-21

    Hydrocephalus is a well-known disorder of brain fluidic system. It is commonly associated with complexities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation in brain. In this paper, hydrocephalus and shunting surgery which is used in its treatment are modeled. Brain tissues are considered to follow a poroviscoelastic constitutive model in order to address the effects of time dependence of mechanical properties of soft tissues and fluid flow hydraulics. Our solution draws from Biot's theory of poroelasticity, generalized to account for viscoelastic effects through the correspondence principle. Geometrically, the brain is conceived to be spherically symmetric, where the ventricles are assumed to be a hollow concentric space filled with cerebrospinal fluid. A generalized Kelvin model is considered for the rheological properties of brain tissues. The solution presented is useful in the analysis of the disorder of hydrocephalus as well as the treatment associated with it, namely, ventriclostomy surgery. The sensitivity of the solution to various factors such as aqueduct blockage level and trabeculae stiffness is thoroughly analyzed using numerical examples. Results indicate that partial aqueduct stenosis may be a cause of hydrocephalus. However, only severe occlusion of the aqueduct can cause a significant increase in the ventricle and brain's extracellular fluid pressure. Ventriculostomy shunts are commonly used as a remedy to hydrocephalus. They serve to reduce the ventricular pressure to the normal level. However, sensitivity analysis on the shunt's fluid deliverability parameter has shown that inappropriate design or selection of design shunt may cause under-drainage or over-drainage of the ventricles. Excessive drainage of CSF may increase the normal tensile stress on trabeculae. It can cause rupture of superior cerebral veins or damage to trabeculae or even brain tissues which in turn may lead to subdural hematoma, a common side-effect of the surgery. These Post

  20. Osmotherapy in brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grände, Per-Olof; Romner, Bertil

    2012-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been used since the 1960s in diseases associated with brain edema and has been investigated in >150 publications on head injury, very little has been published on the outcome of osmotherapy. We can only speculate whether osmotherapy improves outcome, has no effect......, osmotherapy can be negative for outcome, which may explain why we lack scientific support for its use. These drawbacks, and the fact that the most recent Cochrane meta-analyses of osmotherapy in brain edema and stroke could not find any beneficial effects on outcome, make routine use of osmotherapy in brain...... edema doubtful. Nevertheless, the use of osmotherapy as a temporary measure may be justified to acutely prevent brain stem compression until other measures, such as evacuation of space-occupying lesions or decompressive craniotomy, can be performed. This article is the Con part in a Pro-Con debate...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Neurons & Neural Circuits Neurons are the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells ... A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Trials — Participants Statistics Help for Mental Illnesses Outreach Research Priorities Funding Labs at NIMH News About Us Home > Health & Education > Educational Resources Brain Basics Introduction The Growing Brain The ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... brain may play a role in disorders like schizophrenia or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) . Glutamate —the ... mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medical professionals who can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social workers. The psychiatrist asked Sarah ... important research tool in understanding how the brain functions. Another type of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain Basics will introduce you ... of DNA. Sometimes this copying process is imperfect, leading to a gene mutation that causes the gene ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and epigenetic changes can be passed on to future generations. Further understanding of genes and epigenetics may ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development and function ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play a role in ... obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain Regions Just as many neurons working together form a ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... medications could reduce the amount of trial and error and frustration that many people with depression experience ... early brain development, and may also assist in learning and memory. hippocampus —A portion of the brain ...

  13. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Brain Basics will introduce you to some of this science, such as: How the brain develops How ... cell, and responds to signals from the environment; this all helps the cell maintain its balance with ...

  14. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle- ... However, recent research points to a possible new class of antidepressants that can relieve symptoms of the ...

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ... depression experience when starting treatment. Gene Studies Advanced technologies are also making it faster, easier, and more ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... have been linked to many mental disorders, including autism , obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) , schizophrenia , and depression . Brain ... studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as they grow ...

  17. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... body, the results can affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works in healthy people, and how normal brain development ...

  18. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of ... nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep ...

  20. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... mainly involved in controlling movement and aiding the flow of information to the front of the brain, ... the neuron will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and ...

  1. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... speech. The brain continues maturing well into a person's early 20s. Knowing how the brain is wired ... in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... of brain scan called magnetoencephalography, or MEG, can capture split-second changes in the brain. Using MEG, ... The study of how environmental factors like diet, stress and post-natal care can change gene expression ( ...

  3. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... neurons, the most highly specialized cells of all, conduct messages. Every cell in our bodies contains a ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  4. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ...

  5. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences journals NIH Research Fact Sheets NIH Office of Science ...

  6. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ... inside contents of the cell from its surrounding environment and controls what enters and leaves the cell, ...

  7. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat disorders. Mental disorders are common. You may have a ...

  8. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... affect many aspects of life. Scientists are continually learning more about how the brain grows and works ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate ...

  9. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she ... than ever before. Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses ...

  10. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the brain How different parts of the ... for the cell to work properly including small structures called cell organelles. Dendrites branch off from the ...

  11. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... may help improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex ( ... brain's structure, studies show that brain growth in children with autism appears to peak early. And as ...

  12. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... blues" from time to time. In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  13. Experimental MR-guided cryotherapy of the brain with almost real-time imaging by radial k-space scanning; Experimentelle MR-gesteuerte Kryotherapie des Gehirns mit nahezu Echtzeitdarstellung durch radiale k-Raum-Abtastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J.; Schorn, R.; Glowinski, A.; Grosskortenhaus, S.; Adam, G.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Speetzen, R.; Rau, G. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Biomedizinische Technik, Aachen (Germany); Rasche, V. [Philips GmbH Forschungslaboratorium, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-02-01

    Purpose: To test radial k-space scanning by MR fluoroscopy to guide and control MR-guided interstitial cryotherapy of the healthy pig brain. Methods: After MR tomographic planning of the approach, an MR-compatible experimental cryotherapy probe of 2.7 mm diameter was introduced through a 5 mm burr hole into the right frontal brain of five healthy pigs. The freeze-thaw cycles were imaged using a T{sub 1}-weighted gradient echo sequence with radial k-space scanning in coronal, sagittal, and axial directions. Results: The high temporal resolution of the chosen sequence permits a continuous representation of the freezing process with good image quality and high contrast between ice and unfrozen brain parenchyma. Because of the interactive conception of the sequence the layer plane could be chosen as desired during the measurement. Ice formation was sharply demarcated, spherically configurated, and was free of signals. Its maximum diameter was 13 mm. Conclusions: With use of the novel, interactively controllable gradient echo sequence with radial k-space scanning, guidance of the intervention under fluoroscopic conditions with the advantages of MRT is possible. MR-guided cryotherapy allows a minimally-invasive, precisely dosable focal tissue ablation. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Erprobung der radialen k-Raum-Abtastung bei der MR-Fluoroskopie zur Steuerung und Kontrolle MR-gesteuerter interstitieller Kryotherapie des gesunden Schweinegehirns. Methoden: Nach MR-tomographischer Planung des Zugangsweges wurde eine MR-kompatible experimentelle Kryotherapiesonde von 2,7 mm Durchmesser ueber ein 5 mm Bohrloch in das rechte Frontalhirn von fuenf gesunden Schweinen eingebracht. Die Frier-/Tauzyklen wurden anhand einer T{sub 1}-gewichteten Gradientenechosequenz mit radialer k-Raum-Abtastung in koronarer, sagittaler und axialer Schichtfuehrung dargestellt. Ergebnisse: Die hohe zeitliche Aufloesung der gewaehlten Sequenz erlaubte eine kontinuierliche Darstellung des Friervorgangs bei

  14. Alterations in the sense of time, space, and body in the mindfulness-trained brain: a neurophenomenologically-guided MEG study

    OpenAIRE

    Berkovich-Ohana, Aviva; Dor-Ziderman, Yair; Glicksohn, Joseph; Goldstein, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Meditation practice can lead to what have been referred to as “altered states of consciousness.”One of the phenomenological characteristics of these states is a joint alteration in the sense of time, space, and body. Here, we set out to study the unique experiences of alteration in the sense of time and space by collaborating with a select group of 12 long-term mindfulness meditation (MM) practitioners in a neurophenomenological setup, utilizing first-person data to guide the neural analyses....

  15. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Brain Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah ... having trouble coping with the stresses in her life. She began to think of suicide because she ...

  16. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman ... new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A brain-body ... stress. impulse —An electrical communication signal sent between neurons ...

  17. Brain Aneurysm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain aneurysm is an abnormal bulge or "ballooning" in the wall of an artery in the brain. They are sometimes called berry aneurysms because they ... often the size of a small berry. Most brain aneurysms produce no symptoms until they become large, ...

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons make connections with each other and with distant nerve cells (via axons) to form brain circuits. These circuits control specific body functions such as sleep and speech. The brain continues ...

  19. Amyloid β-Protein as a Substrate Interacts with Extracellular Matrix to Promote Neurite Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Edward H.; Park, Lisa; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1993-05-01

    Progressive deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain parenchyma and blood vessels is a characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease. Recent evidence suggests that addition of solubilized synthetic Aβ to medium may produce toxic or trophic effects on cultured hippocampal neurons. Because soluble Aβ may not accumulate in significant quantities in brain, we asked whether immobilized Aβ peptide as a substrate alters neurite outgrowth from cultured rat peripheral sensory neurons. This paradigm may closely mimic the conditions in Alzheimer disease brain tissue, in which neurites contact insoluble, extracellular aggregates of β-amyloid. We detected no detrimental effects of Aβ substrate on neurite outgrowth. Rather, Aβ in combination with low doses of laminin or fibronectin enhanced neurite out-growth from these neuronal explants. Our results suggest that insoluble Aβ in the cerebral neuropil may serve as a neurite-promoting matrix, perhaps explaining the apparent regenerative response of neurites observed around amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease. Moreover, in concert with the recent discovery of Aβ production by cultured neurons, our data suggest that Aβ plays a normal physiological role in brain by complexing with the extracellular matrix.

  20. Left Brain. Right Brain. Whole Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    2004-01-01

    As the United States student population is becoming more diverse, library media specialists need to find ways to address these distinctive needs. However, some of these differences transcend culture, touching on variations in the brain itself. Most people have a dominant side of the brain, which can affect their personality and learning style.…

  1. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26690495

  2. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  3. Cellular pathways of energy metabolism in the brain: is glucose used by neurons or astrocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid; Coles, Jonathan A

    2007-09-01

    Most techniques presently available to measure cerebral activity in humans and animals, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET), autoradiography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, do not record the activity of neurons directly. Furthermore, they do not allow the investigator to discriminate which cell type is using glucose, the predominant fuel provided to the brain by the blood. Here, we review the experimental approaches aimed at determining the percentage of glucose that is taken up by neurons and by astrocytes. This review is integrated in an overview of the current concepts on compartmentation and substrate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. In the brain in vivo, about half of the glucose leaving the capillaries crosses the extracellular space and directly enters neurons. The other half is taken up by astrocytes. Calculations suggest that neurons consume more energy than do astrocytes, implying that astrocytes transfer an intermediate substrate to neurons. Experimental approaches in vitro on the honeybee drone retina and on the isolated vagus nerve also point to a continuous transfer of intermediate metabolites from glial cells to neurons in these tissues. Solid direct evidence of such transfer in the mammalian brain in vivo is still lacking. PET using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose reflects in part glucose uptake by astrocytes but does not indicate to which step the glucose taken up is metabolized within this cell type. Finally, the sequence of metabolic changes occurring during a transient increase of electrical activity in specific regions of the brain remains to be clarified. PMID:17659529

  4. Drosophila melanogaster brain invasion: pathogenic Wolbachia in central nervous system of the fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunov, Anton; Kiseleva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The pathogenic Wolbachia strain wMelPop rapidly over-replicates in the brain, muscles, and retina of Drosophila melanogaster, causing severe tissue degeneration and premature death of the host. The unique features of this endosymbiont make it an excellent tool to be used for biological control of insects, pests, and vectors of human diseases. To follow the dynamics of bacterial morphology and titer in the nerve cells we used transmission electron microscopy of 3-d-old female brains. The neurons and glial cells from central brain of the fly had different Wolbachia titers ranging from single bacteria to large accumulations, tearing cell apart and invading extracellular space. The neuropile regions of the brain were free of wMelPop. Wolbachia tightly interacted with host cell organelles and underwent several morphological changes in nerve cells. Based on different morphological types of bacteria described we propose for the first time a scheme of wMelPop dynamics within the somatic tissue of the host. PMID:25394184

  5. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  6. Cell adhesion to agrin presented as a nanopatterned substrate is consistent with an interaction with the extracellular matrix and not transmembrane adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram Tobias; Spatz Joachim P; Burgess Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular spacing is important for cell adhesion in a number of ways, ranging from the ordered arrangement of matrix polymers extracellularly, to steric hindrance of adhesion/signaling complexes intracellularly. This has been demonstrated using nanopatterned RGD peptides, a canonical extracellular matrix ligand for integrin interactions. Cell adhesion was greatly reduced when the RGD-coated nanoparticles were separated by more than 60 nm, indicating a sharp spacing-depende...

  7. Further characterization of Renibacterium salmoninarum extracellular products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, T A; Bannister, L A; Griffiths, S G; Lynch, W H

    1997-10-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum, the agent of bacterial kidney disease in salmonids, releases high concentrations of extracellular protein in tissues of infected fish. The extracellular protein consists almost entirely of a 57-kDa protein and derivatives of degradation and aggregation of the same molecule. The 57-kDa protein and its derivatives were fractionated into defined ranges of molecular mass. Separated fractions continued to produce degradation and aggregation products. One-dimensional electrophoretic separation of extracellular protein revealed a number of proteolytically active bands from > 100 to approximately 18 kDa associated with various 57-kDa protein derivatives in the different molecular mass fractions. Two-dimensional separation of extracellular protein showed that continued degradation and aggregation, similar both in location and behavior to some of the 57-kDa protein derivatives, was also displayed by the proteolytically active bands after their separation. Effects of reducing agents and sulfhydryl group proteinase inhibitors indicated a common mechanism for the proteolytically active polypeptides characteristic of a thiol proteinase. The results suggested that the 57-kDa protein and some of its derivatives undergo autolytic cleavage, releasing a proteolytically active polypeptide(s) of at least 18 kDa. Soluble polysaccharide-like material also was detected in extracellular products and tissue from infected fish. Antiserum to the polysaccharide-like material cross-reacted with O-polysaccharide of the fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida, suggesting some structural similarity between these polysaccharides. The polysaccharide and the proteolytic activity associated with the 57-kDa protein derivatives should be investigated with respect to the pathogenesis of R. salmoninarum infections. PMID:9480644

  8. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  9. The modulation of TRPM7 currents by nafamostat mesilate depends directly upon extracellular concentrations of divalent cations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xuanmao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Concentrations of extracellular divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+ fall substantially during intensive synaptic transmission as well as during some pathophysiological conditions such as epilepsy and brain ischemia. Here we report that a synthetic serine protease inhibitor, nafamostat mesylate (NM, and several of its analogues, block recombinant TRPM7 currents expressed in HEK293T cells in inverse relationship to the concentration of extracellular divalent cations. Lowering extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+ also evokes a divalent-sensitive non-selective cation current that is mediated by TRPM7 expression in hippocampal neurons. In cultured hippocampal neurons, NM blocked these TRPM7-mediated currents with an apparent affinity of 27 μM, as well as the paradoxical Ca2+ influx associated with lowering extracellular Ca2+. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure to NM strongly potentiated TRPM7 currents. In the presence of physiological concentrations of extracellular divalent cations, NM activates TRPM7. The stimulating effects of NM on TRPM7 currents are also inversely related to extracellular Ca2+ and Mg2+. DAPI and HSB but not netropsin, blocked and stimulated TRPM7. In contrast, mono-cationic, the metabolites of NM, p-GBA and AN, as well as protease inhibitor leupeptin and gabexate failed to substantially modulate TRPM7. NM thus provides a molecular template for the design of putative modulators of TRPM7.

  10. Trash or Treasure: extracellular microRNAs and cell-to-cell communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyoshi eKosaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating RNAs in human body fluids are promising candidates for diagnostic purposes. However, the biological significance of circulating RNAs remains elusive. Recently, small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, were isolated from multiple human body fluids, and these circulating miRNAs have been implicated as novel disease biomarkers. Concurrently, miRNAs were also identified in the extracellular space associated with extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are small membrane vesicles secreted from various types of cells. The function of these secreted miRNAs has been revealed in several papers. Circulating miRNAs have been experimentally found to be associated with EVs, however, other types of extracellular miRNAs were also described. This review discusses studies related to extracellular miRNAs, including circulating miRNAs and secreted miRNAs, to highlight the importance of studying not only secreted miRNAs but also circulating miRNAs to determine the contribution of extracellular miRNAs especially in cancer development.

  11. Rapid method for fetal brain fixation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholls, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    A quicker alternative to the standard removal and fixation of brain tissue was sought. Whole fetal brains were fixed in situ using a mercuric based fixative. The subarachnoid space was perfused overnight with Heidenhain's Susa fixative. The following day the brains were removed from the cranium in the standard manner. After storage for three days in Susa's fixative the brain was sliced and processed, with excellent preservation of gross and microscopic architecture. The cost is only marginall...

  12. Brain image Compression, a brief survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleha Masood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain image compression is known as a subfield of image compression. It allows the deep analysis and measurements of brain images in different modes. Brain images are compressed to analyze and diagnose in an effective manner while reducing the image storage space. This survey study describes the different existing techniques regarding brain image compression. The techniques come under different categories. The study also discusses these categories.

  13. Extracellular proteolysis in structural and functional plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz eWiera

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain is continuously altered in response to experience and environmental changes. One of the underlying mechanisms is synaptic plasticity, which is manifested by modification of synapse structure and function. It is becoming clear that regulated extracellular proteolysis plays a pivotal role in the structural and functional remodeling of synapses during brain development, learning and memory formation. Clearly, plasticity mechanisms may substantially differ between projections. Mossy fiber synapses onto CA3 pyramidal cells display several unique functional features, including pronounced short-term facilitation, a presynaptically expressed LTP that is independent of NMDAR activation, and NMDA-dependent metaplasticity. Moreover, structural plasticity at mossy fiber synapses ranges from the reorganization of projection topology after hippocampus-dependent learning, through intrinsically different dynamic properties of synaptic boutons to pre- and postsynaptic structural changes accompanying LTP induction. Although concomitant functional and structural plasticity in this pathway strongly suggests a role of extracellular proteolysis, its impact only starts to be investigated in this projection. In the present report, we review the role of extracellular proteolysis in various aspects of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. A growing body of evidence demonstrates that among perisynaptic proteases, tPA/plasmin system, β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 and metalloproteinases play a crucial role in shaping plastic changes in this projection. We discuss recent advances and emerging hypotheses on the roles of proteases in mechanisms underlying mossy fiber target specific synaptic plasticity and memory formation.

  14. A Novel Molecular Diagnostic of Glioblastomas: Detection of an Extracellular Fragment of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase μ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Burden-Gulley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently found that normal human brain and low-grade astrocytomas express the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ and that the more invasive astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, downregulate full-length PTPμ expression. Loss of PTPμ expression in GBMs is due to proteolytic cleavage that generates an intracellular and potentially a cleaved and released extracellular fragment of PTPμ. Here, we identify that a cleaved extracellular fragment containing the domains required for PTPμ-mediated adhesion remains associated with GBM tumor tissue. We hypothesized that detection of this fragment would make an excellent diagnostic tool for the localization of tumor tissue within the brain. To this end, we generated a series of fluorescently tagged peptide probes that bind the PTPμ fragment. The peptide probes specifically recognize GBM cells in tissue sections of surgically resected human tumors. To test whether the peptide probes are able to detect GBM tumors in vivo, the PTPμ peptide probes were tested in both mouse flank and intracranial xenograft human glioblastoma tumor model systems. The glial tumors were molecularly labeled with the PTPμ peptide probes within minutes of tail vein injection using the Maestro FLEX In Vivo Imaging System. The label was stable for at least 3 hours. Together, these results indicate that peptide recognition of the PTPμ extracellular fragment provides a novel molecular diagnostic tool for detection of human glioblastomas. Such a tool has clear translational applications and may lead to improved surgical resections and prognosis for patients with this devastating disease.

  15. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) constitutes a nucleoprotein component of extracellular inflammatory exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Dahmane, Nadia; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Williams, Dewight R; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Showe, Louise C; Zhang, Rugang; Huang, Qihong; Conejo-Garcia, José R; Lieberman, Paul M

    2015-11-17

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) has been identified as a telomere-associated regulator of chromosome end protection. Here, we report that TERRA can also be found in extracellular fractions that stimulate innate immune signaling. We identified extracellular forms of TERRA in mouse tumor and embryonic brain tissue, as well as in human tissue culture cell lines using RNA in situ hybridization. RNA-seq analyses revealed TERRA to be among the most highly represented transcripts in extracellular fractions derived from both normal and cancer patient blood plasma. Cell-free TERRA (cfTERRA) could be isolated from the exosome fractions derived from human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) culture media. cfTERRA is a shorter form (∼200 nt) of cellular TERRA and copurifies with CD63- and CD83-positive exosome vesicles that could be visualized by cyro-electron microscopy. These fractions were also enriched for histone proteins that physically associate with TERRA in extracellular ChIP assays. Incubation of cfTERRA-containing exosomes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated transcription of several inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNFα, IL6, and C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10) Exosomes engineered with elevated TERRA or liposomes with synthetic TERRA further stimulated inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that exosome-associated TERRA augments innate immune signaling. These findings imply a previously unidentified extrinsic function for TERRA and a mechanism of communication between telomeres and innate immune signals in tissue and tumor microenvironments. PMID:26578789

  16. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) constitutes a nucleoprotein component of extracellular inflammatory exosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Deng, Zhong; Dahmane, Nadia; Tsai, Kevin; Wang, Pu; Williams, Dewight R.; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Showe, Louise C.; Zhang, Rugang; Huang, Qihong; Conejo-Garcia, José R.; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) has been identified as a telomere-associated regulator of chromosome end protection. Here, we report that TERRA can also be found in extracellular fractions that stimulate innate immune signaling. We identified extracellular forms of TERRA in mouse tumor and embryonic brain tissue, as well as in human tissue culture cell lines using RNA in situ hybridization. RNA-seq analyses revealed TERRA to be among the most highly represented transcripts in extracellular fractions derived from both normal and cancer patient blood plasma. Cell-free TERRA (cfTERRA) could be isolated from the exosome fractions derived from human lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) culture media. cfTERRA is a shorter form (∼200 nt) of cellular TERRA and copurifies with CD63- and CD83-positive exosome vesicles that could be visualized by cyro-electron microscopy. These fractions were also enriched for histone proteins that physically associate with TERRA in extracellular ChIP assays. Incubation of cfTERRA-containing exosomes with peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated transcription of several inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNFα, IL6, and C-X-C chemokine 10 (CXCL10) Exosomes engineered with elevated TERRA or liposomes with synthetic TERRA further stimulated inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that exosome-associated TERRA augments innate immune signaling. These findings imply a previously unidentified extrinsic function for TERRA and a mechanism of communication between telomeres and innate immune signals in tissue and tumor microenvironments. PMID:26578789

  17. Proton production, regulation and pathophysiological roles in the mammalian brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Zheng Zeng; Tian-Le Xu

    2012-01-01

    The recent demonstration of proton signaling in C elegans muscle contraction suggests a novel mechanism for proton-based intercellular communication and has stimulated enthusiasm for exploring proton signaling in higher organisms.Emerging evidence indicates that protons are produced and regulated in localized space and time.Furthermore,identification of proton regulators and sensors in the brain leads to the speculation that proton production and regulation may be of major importance for both physiological and pathological functions ranging from nociception to learning and memory.Extracellular protons may play a role in signal transmission by not only acting on adjacent cells but also affecting the cell from which they were released.In this review,we summarize the upstream and downstream pathways of proton production and regulation in the mammalian brain,with special emphasis on the proton extruders and sensors that are critical in the homeostatic regulation of pH,and discuss their potential roles in proton signaling under normal and pathophysiological conditions.

  18. Mapping proteolytic cancer cell-extracellular matrix interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, K.A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    For cancer progression and metastatic dissemination, cancer cells migrate and penetrate through extracellular tissues. Cancer invasion is frequently facilitated by proteolytic processing of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular regions mediating proteolysis are diverse and depen

  19. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  20. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  1. Neurocan is dispensable for brain development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, X H; Brakebusch, C; Matthies, H;

    2001-01-01

    Neurocan is a component of the extracellular matrix in brain. Due to its inhibition of neuronal adhesion and outgrowth in vitro and its expression pattern in vivo it was suggested to play an important role in axon guidance and neurite growth. To study the role of neurocan in brain development we ...... appear largely normal. Mild deficits in synaptic plasticity may exist, as maintenance of late-phase hippocampal long-term potentiation is reduced. These data indicate that neurocan has either a redundant or a more subtle function in the development of the brain.......Neurocan is a component of the extracellular matrix in brain. Due to its inhibition of neuronal adhesion and outgrowth in vitro and its expression pattern in vivo it was suggested to play an important role in axon guidance and neurite growth. To study the role of neurocan in brain development we...... generated neurocan-deficient mice by targeted disruption of the neurocan gene. These mice are viable and fertile and have no obvious deficits in reproduction and general performance. Brain anatomy, morphology, and ultrastructure are similar to those of wild-type mice. Perineuronal nets surrounding neurons...

  2. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  3. Decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Chang, David W.; Zhang, Qixu

    2013-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds that represent native extracellular matrix (ECM) properties of musculofascial tissues have great importance in musculofascial tissue engineering. However, detailed characterization of musculofascial tissues’ ECM (particularly, of fascia) from large animals is still lacking. In this study, we developed a decellularization protocol for processing pig composite musculofascial tissues. Decellularized muscle (D-muscle) and decellularized fascia (D-fascia), which are two important c...

  4. Design of Artificial Modular Extracellular Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Gräter, Stefan V. W.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular functions such as cell growth, adhesion and differentiation are essentially controlled by the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical, chemical and structural properties of the ECM are consequently crucial for the selection of cells at interfaces and the formation of tissues. The objective of this thesis was to develop an artificial ECM to determine and control the parameters influencing the crosstalk between cells and their surroundings on a molecular level. Artificia...

  5. Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Outflow Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kate E Keller; Mini, Aga; Bradley, John M.; Kelley, Mary J.; Acott, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Normal homeostatic adjustment of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) involves remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). This entails sensing elevated IOP, releasing numerous activated proteinases to degrade existing ECM and concurrent biosynthesis of replacement ECM components. To increase or decrease IOP, the quantity, physical properties and/or organization of new components should be somewhat different from those replaced in order to modify outflow resistan...

  6. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  7. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond b...

  8. Extracellular Aldonolactonase from Myceliophthora thermophila▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Beeson, William T.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Hausmann, Corinne D.; Cate, Jamie H.D.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Fungi secrete many different enzymes to deconstruct lignocellulosic biomass, including several families of hydrolases, oxidative enzymes, and many uncharacterized proteins. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and primary sequence analysis of an extracellular aldonolactonase from the thermophilic fungus Myceliophthora thermophila (synonym Sporotrichum thermophile). The lactonase is a 48-kDa glycoprotein with a broad pH optimum. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucono-δ-lac...

  9. Extracellular enzymes of Fusarium graminearum isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Eleonora Kikot; Roque Alberto Hours; Teresa María Alconada

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum isolates from three different agroecological regions in Argentina were examined according to the production of different extracellular enzyme activities of potential biotechnological interest: pectinases (PGase: polygalacturonase and PMGase: polymethylgalacturonase), cellulase (CMCase: carboxymethylcellulase) and hemicellulase (xylanase). The isolates were grown in minimum salt medium supplemented with 0.25% glucose, 0.125% citric pectin and 0.125% oat bran as carbon sour...

  10. Extracellular TG2: emerging functions and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Belkin, Alexey M.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed member of the transglutaminase family of Ca2+-dependent cross-linking enzymes. Unlike other family members, TG2 is a multifunctional protein, which has several other well documented enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions. A significant body of evidence accumulated over the last decade reveals multiple and complex activities of this protein on the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix (ECM), including its role in the regulation of...

  11. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    OpenAIRE

    Sayaka Oshikawa; Hiroko Sonoda; Masahiro Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs fro...

  12. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  13. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  14. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  15. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  16. Gd-DTPA T1 relaxivity in brain tissue obtained by convection-enhanced delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haar, Peter J [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Broaddus, William C; Chen Zhijian; Gillies, George T [Department of Neurosurgery, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Fatouros, Panos P; Corwin, Frank D, E-mail: wbroaddus@mcvh-vcu.ed [Department of Radiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2010-06-21

    A common approach to quantify gadolinium (Gd) contrast agents involves measuring the post-contrast change in T1 rate and then using the constant T1 relaxivity R to determine the contrast agent concentration. Because this method is fast and non-invasive, it could be potentially valuable in many areas of brain research. However, to accurately measure contrast agent concentrations in the brain, the T1 relaxivity R of the specific agent must be accurately known. Furthermore, the macromolecular content and compartmentalization of the brain extracellular space (ECS) are expected to significantly alter R from values measured in aqueous solutions. In this study, the T1 relaxivity R of gadolinium-diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was measured following direct interstitial infusions of three different contrast agent concentrations to the parenchyma of rat brains. Changes in magnetic resonance (MR) T1 values were compared to brain slice concentrations determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to determine R in 15 rats. Additionally, samples of cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine were analyzed to evaluate possible Gd-DTPA clearance from the brain. The T1 relaxivity R of Gd-DTPA in the brain ECS was measured to be 5.35 (mM s){sup -1} in a 2.4 T field. This value is considerably higher than estimations used in studies by other groups. Measurements of brain Gd-DTPA tissue concentrations using MRI and ICP-AES demonstrated a high degree of coincidence. Clearance of Gd-DTPA was minimal at the time point immediately after infusion. These results suggest that the environment of the brain does in fact significantly affect Gd T1 relaxivity, and that MRI can accurately measure contrast agent concentrations when this relaxivity is well characterized.

  17. Extracellular calcium-sensing receptor: structural and functional features and association with diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Hauache

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently cloned extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays an essential role in the regulation of extracellular calcium homeostasis. This receptor is expressed in all tissues related to this control (parathyroid glands, thyroid C-cells, kidneys, intestine and bones and also in tissues with apparently no role in the maintenance of extracellular calcium levels, such as brain, skin and pancreas. The CaR amino acid sequence is compatible with three major domains: a long and hydrophilic aminoterminal extracellular domain, where most of the activating and inactivating mutations described to date are located and where the dimerization process occurs, and the agonist-binding site is located, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain involved in the signal transduction mechanism from the extracellular domain to its respective G protein, and a carboxyterminal intracellular tail, with a well-established role for cell surface CaR expression and for signal transduction. CaR cloning was immediately followed by the association of genetic human diseases with inactivating and activating CaR mutations: familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism are caused by CaR-inactivating mutations, whereas autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism is secondary to CaR-activating mutations. Finally, we will comment on the development of drugs that modulate CaR function by either activating (calcimimetic drugs or antagonizing it (calcilytic drugs, and on their potential therapeutic implications, such as medical control of specific cases of primary and uremic hyperparathyroidism with calcimimetic drugs and a potential treatment for osteoporosis with a calcilytic drug.

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as judgment, decision making, and problem solving. ... brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as judgment, decision making and problem solving, ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such children to those with normal brain development may help scientists to pinpoint when and where mental disorders begin and perhaps how to slow or stop ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and are working to compare that with brain development in people mental disorders. Genes and environmental cues both help to direct ... as they grow there are differences in brain development in children who develop bipolar disorder than children who do not. Studies comparing such ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her symptoms were not caused by a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of medical doctor who is an expert on mental ... of serotonin in the brain and help reduce symptoms of depression. Sarah also ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain, which is linked to thought and emotion. It is also linked to reward systems in the brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to move as they want to, resulting ...

  5. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  6. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will fire. This enhances the electrical flow among brain cells required for normal function and plays an important ... of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. ...

  7. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... piece of tumor for a biopsy Remove abnormal brain tissue Drain blood or an infection Free a nerve The bone flap is usually replaced after surgery, using small metal ... or if the brain was swollen. (This is called a craniectomy.) The ...

  8. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little dopamine or problems using dopamine in the thinking and feeling regions of the brain may play ... axis —A brain-body circuit which plays a critical role in the body's response to stress. impulse — ...

  9. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who seemed to have it all. She was happily married and successful in business. Then, after a serious setback at work, she lost interest ...

  10. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Brain Imaging Using brain imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses magnetic fields to take pictures of ... to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research tool in understanding ...

  11. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Basics in Real Life Brain Basics in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a ... medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ... In contrast, major depression is a serious disorder that lasts for weeks. ...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... her feelings. Brain Research Modern research tools and techniques are giving scientists a more detailed understanding of the brain than ... a person responds to a certain medication. This information may someday ... is allowing scientists to make important discoveries that could change the ...

  13. Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know what causes some brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. The symptoms of brain diseases vary widely depending on the specific problem. In some cases, damage is permanent. In other cases, treatments such as surgery, medicines, or physical therapy can correct the source of the problem or ...

  14. The phospholipid composition of extracellular herpes simplex virions differs from that of host cell nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    van Genderen, I.L.; Brandimarti, R; Torrisi, M R; Campadelli, G; van Meer, G.

    1994-01-01

    Enveloped viruses of eukaryotes obtain their membrane by budding through a cellular membrane. Therefore, most frequently the lipid composition of the virion envelope reflects that of the membrane where budding took place. In the case of herpes simplex viruses, nucleocapsids assemble in the nucleus and bud through the inner nuclear membrane. The pathway from the perinuclear space to the extracellular medium is as yet poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that the phospholipid composition of e...

  15. Regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 inlfuences hippocampal neuronal survival in a rat model of diabetic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaning Zhao; Jianmin Li; Qiqun Tang; Pan Zhang; Liwei Jing; Changxiang Chen; Shuxing Li

    2014-01-01

    Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 has been demonstrated in acute brain ischemia. We hypothesized that activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 can protect hippocampal neurons from injury in a diabetic model after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. In this study, transient whole-brain ischemia was induced by four-vessel occlusion in normal and diabetic rats, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 inhibitor (U0126) was administered into diabetic rats 30 minutes before ischemia as a pretreatment. Results showed that the number of surviving neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region was reduced, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and Ku70 activity were decreased, and pro-apoptotic Bax expression was upregulated after intervention using U0126. These ifndings demonstrate that inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity aggravated neuronal loss in the hippocampus in a diabetic rat after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, further decreased DNA repairing ability and ac-celerated apoptosis in hippocampal neurons. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation plays a neuroprotective role in hippocampal neurons in a diabetic rat after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

  16. The extracellular matrix in multiple sclerosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobel R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular matrix (ECM molecules play important roles in the pathobiology of the major human central nervous system (CNS inflammatory/demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS. This mini-review highlights some recent work on CNS endothelial cell interactions with vascular basement membrane ECM as part of the cellular immune response, and roles for white matter ECM molecules in demyelination and remyelination in MS lesions. Recent basic and clinical investigations of MS emphasize axonal injury, not only in chronic MS plaques, but also in acute lesions; progressive axonal degeneration in normal-appearing white matter also may contribute to brain and spinal cord atrophy in MS patients. Remodeling of the interstitial white matter ECM molecules that affect axon regeneration, however, is incompletely characterized. Our ongoing immunohistochemical studies demonstrate enhanced ECM versican, a neurite and axon growth-inhibiting white matter ECM proteoglycan, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycans at the edges of inflammatory MS lesions. This suggests that enhanced proteoglycan deposition in the ECM and axonal growth inhibition may occur early and are involved in expansion of active lesions. Decreased ECM proteoglycans and their phagocytosis by macrophages along with myelin in plaque centers imply that there is "injury" to the ECM itself. These results indicate that white matter ECM proteoglycan alterations are integral to MS pathology at all disease stages and that they contribute to a CNS ECM that is inhospitable to axon regrowth/regeneration.

  17. Brain templates and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alan C; Janke, Andrew L; Collins, D Louis; Baillet, Sylvain

    2012-08-15

    The core concept within the field of brain mapping is the use of a standardized, or "stereotaxic", 3D coordinate frame for data analysis and reporting of findings from neuroimaging experiments. This simple construct allows brain researchers to combine data from many subjects such that group-averaged signals, be they structural or functional, can be detected above the background noise that would swamp subtle signals from any single subject. Where the signal is robust enough to be detected in individuals, it allows for the exploration of inter-individual variance in the location of that signal. From a larger perspective, it provides a powerful medium for comparison and/or combination of brain mapping findings from different imaging modalities and laboratories around the world. Finally, it provides a framework for the creation of large-scale neuroimaging databases or "atlases" that capture the population mean and variance in anatomical or physiological metrics as a function of age or disease. However, while the above benefits are not in question at first order, there are a number of conceptual and practical challenges that introduce second-order incompatibilities among experimental data. Stereotaxic mapping requires two basic components: (i) the specification of the 3D stereotaxic coordinate space, and (ii) a mapping function that transforms a 3D brain image from "native" space, i.e. the coordinate frame of the scanner at data acquisition, to that stereotaxic space. The first component is usually expressed by the choice of a representative 3D MR image that serves as target "template" or atlas. The native image is re-sampled from native to stereotaxic space under the mapping function that may have few or many degrees of freedom, depending upon the experimental design. The optimal choice of atlas template and mapping function depend upon considerations of age, gender, hemispheric asymmetry, anatomical correspondence, spatial normalization methodology and disease

  18. Specialization of Functions in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Parvizi, Josef

    2013-01-01

    The brain has fascinated us for ages. Some of the first serious discussions about the human brain started in ancient Egypt where the king of Alexandria allowed live dissections of criminals for the study of human anatomy [1]. Those who performed the dissections opened up the skull bone and saw the brain live. When they cut through the brain, they discovered large spaces inside it. These spaces were connected to each other like chambers in a house. They were also filled with a unique looking, ...

  19. Apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide protects against diffuse brain injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaning Zhao; Jianmin Li; Qiqun Tang; Junling Gao; Changxiang Chen; Liwei Jing; Pan Zhang; Shuxing Li

    2014-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E plays a crucial role in inhibiting chronic neurodegenerative processes. Howev-er, its impact on neurological function following diffuse brain injury is still unclear. This study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effects and mechanisms of action of apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide on diffuse brain injury. Apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide was administered into the caudal vein of rats with diffuse brain injury before and after injury. We found that apo-lipoprotein E mimetic peptide signiifcantly decreased the number of apoptotic neurons, reduced extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation, down-regulated Bax and cytochrome c expression, decreased malondialdehyde content, and increased superoxide dismutase activity in a dose-dependent manner. These experimental ifndings demonstrate that apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide improves learning and memory function and protects against diffuse brain injury-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2-Bax mito-chondrial apoptotic pathway.

  20. Neutrophil extracellular traps in sheep mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, Salvatore; Cubeddu, Tiziana; Pagnozzi, Daniela; Rocca, Stefano; Cacciotto, Carla; Alberti, Alberto; Marogna, Gavino; Uzzau, Sergio; Addis, Maria Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are structures composed of DNA, histones, and antimicrobial proteins that are released extracellularly by neutrophils and other immune cells as a means for trapping and killing invading pathogens. Here, we describe NET formation in milk and in mammary alveoli of mastitic sheep, and provide a dataset of proteins found in association to these structures. Nucleic acid staining, immunomicroscopy and fluorescent in-situ hybridization of mastitic mammary tissue from sheep infected with Streptococcus uberis demonstrated the presence of extranuclear DNA colocalizing with antimicrobial proteins, histones, and bacteria. Then, proteomic analysis by LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometry provided detailed information on protein abundance changes occurring in milk upon infection. As a result, 1095 unique proteins were identified, of which 287 being significantly more abundant in mastitic milk. Upon protein ontology classification, the most represented localization classes for upregulated proteins were the cytoplasmic granule, the nucleus, and the mitochondrion, while function classes were mostly related to immune defence and inflammation pathways. All known NET markers were massively increased, including histones, granule proteases, and antimicrobial proteins. Of note was the detection of protein arginine deiminases (PAD3 and PAD4). These enzymes are responsible for citrullination, the post-translational modification that is known to trigger NET formation by inducing chromatin decondensation and extracellular release of NETs. As a further observation, citrullinated residues were detected by tandem mass spectrometry in histones of samples from mastitic animals. In conclusion, this work provides novel microscopic and proteomic information on NETs formed in vivo in the mammary gland, and reports the most complete database of proteins increased in milk upon bacterial mastitis. PMID:26088507

  1. Extracellular Signatures as Indicators of Processing Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Karen L.

    2012-01-09

    As described in other chapters within this volume, many aspects of microbial cells vary with culture conditions and therefore can potentially be analyzed as forensic signatures of growth conditions. In addition to changes or variations in components of the microbes themselves, extracellular materials indicative of production processes may remain associated with the final bacterial product. It is well recognized that even with considerable effort to make pure products such as fine chemicals or pharmaceuticals, trace impurities from components or synthesis steps associated with production processes can be detected in the final product. These impurities can be used as indicators of production source or methods, such as to help connect drugs of abuse to supply chains. Extracellular residue associated with microbial cells could similarly help to characterize production processes. For successful growth of microorganisms on culture media there must be an available source of carbon, nitrogen, inorganic phosphate and sulfur, trace metals, water and vitamins. The pH, temperature, and a supply of oxygen or other gases must also be appropriate for a given organism for successful culture. The sources of these components and the range in temperature, pH and other variables has adapted over the years with currently a wide range of possible combinations of media components, recipes and parameters to choose from for a given organism. Because of this wide variability in components, mixtures of components, and other parameters, there is the potential for differentiation of cultured organisms based on changes in culture conditions. The challenge remains how to narrow the field of potential combinations and be able to attribute variations in the final bacterial product and extracellular signatures associated with the final product to information about the culture conditions or recipe used in the production of that product.

  2. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  3. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  4. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  5. Extracellular matrix of the developing ovarian follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving-Rodgers, Helen F; Rodgers, Raymond J

    2006-09-01

    There are many different types of extracellular matrices in the different follicle compartments. These have different roles in follicle development and atresia, and they change in composition during these processes. This review focuses on basal lamina matrix in particular, and considers follicular fluid, the newly identified focimatrix, and thecal matrices. When follicles commence growing, the follicular basal lamina changes in its composition from containing all six alpha chains of type IV collagen to only alpha1 and alpha2. Perlecan and nidogen-1 and -2 subsequently become components of the follicular basal lamina, and there is an increase in the amount of laminin chains alpha1, beta2, and gamma1, in the bovine at least. Late in follicular development and on atresia some follicles contain laminin alpha2. On atresia the follicular basal lamina is not degraded, as occurs in ovulation, but can be breached by cells from the thecal layer when it is not aligned by granulosa cells. A novel type of basal lamina-like matrix, called focimatrix (abbreviated from focal intraepithelial matrix), develops between the cells of the membrana granulosa as aggregates of basal lamina material. It does not envelop cells and so cannot perform functions of basal lamina as currently understood. It is hypothesized that focimatrix assists or initiates depolarization of the membrana granulosa necessary for the transformation into luteal cells. The largest osmotically active molecules in follicular fluid are hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, including versican and inter-alpha trypsin inhibitor. It has been suggested that these might be responsible for the formation of follicular fluid by creating an osmotic gradient across the follicular wall. The formation, development, and then either ovulation or regression of follicles requires considerable tissue remodeling, cellular replication, and specialization. The expectation of researchers is that extracellular matrix will be

  6. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  7. Comparison of manual and automatic segmentation methods for brain structures in the presence of space-occupying lesions: a multi-expert study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to characterize expert variation in segmentation of intracranial structures pertinent to radiation therapy, and to assess a registration-driven atlas-based segmentation algorithm in that context. Eight experts were recruited to segment the brainstem, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and eyes, of 20 patients who underwent therapy for large space-occupying tumors. Performance variability was assessed through three geometric measures: volume, Dice similarity coefficient, and Euclidean distance. In addition, two simulated ground truth segmentations were calculated via the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation algorithm and a novel application of probability maps. The experts and automatic system were found to generate structures of similar volume, though the experts exhibited higher variation with respect to tubular structures. No difference was found between the mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of the automatic and expert delineations as a group at a 5% significance level over all cases and organs. The larger structures of the brainstem and eyes exhibited mean DSC of approximately 0.8-0.9, whereas the tubular chiasm and nerves were lower, approximately 0.4-0.5. Similarly low DSCs have been reported previously without the context of several experts and patient volumes. This study, however, provides evidence that experts are similarly challenged. The average maximum distances (maximum inside, maximum outside) from a simulated ground truth ranged from (-4.3, +5.4) mm for the automatic system to (-3.9, +7.5) mm for the experts considered as a group. Over all the structures in a rank of true positive rates at a 2 mm threshold from the simulated ground truth, the automatic system ranked second of the nine raters. This work underscores the need for large scale studies utilizing statistically robust numbers of patients and experts in evaluating quality of automatic algorithms.

  8. Frequency-domain measurements of changes of optical pathlength during spreading depression in a rodent brain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Michael B.; Mayevsky, Avraham; Sevick, Eva M.; Chance, Britton

    1991-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that time-resolved spectroscopy can monitor changes in the distribution of photon migration pathlengths which are reflective of the changes in the tissue absorption due primarily to oxygenated or deoxygenated hemoglobin. In this study, we have monitored mean photon migration pathlengths in the frequency domain in the rodent brain insulted by hypoxia, ischemia and spreading depression (SD) using phase modulated spectroscopy (PMS). This technique consisted of monitoring light which emerged from the exposed rodent skull at 8 mm form an incident light source of 754 nm and 816 nm whose intensity was modulated at 220 MHz. The changes in phase-shift, (theta), of the emergent light with respect to the incident light are reflective of the photon pathlengths and hemoglobin absorbance. A multiprobe assembly holding PMS source fiber, nicotinamide dinucleotide (NADH) fluorometric probe, electrocortigraph (ECoG) electrodes, and doppler blood flow probe was placed on the rodent brain to simultaneously monitor brain metabolism, electrical cortical activity (ECoG) and blood flow. The PMS detector fiber was placed 8 mm posterior to the multiprobe assembly. Correlations between changes in intracellular deoxygenation (NADH) and hemoglobin deoxygenation as measured by PMS changes at 754 nm and 816 nm during hypoxia, and ischemia were found. The depolarization phase of spreading depression resulted in a similar increase at both 754 nm and 816 nm. We attribute this result to vasoconstriction and/or the decrease of extracellular space due to water shift in the rodent brain.

  9. Proteomic and immunologic analyses of brain tumor exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Graner, Michael W.; Alzate, Oscar; Dechkovskaia, Angelika M.; Keene, Jack D.; Sampson, John H; Mitchell, Duane A; Bigner, Darell D.

    2009-01-01

    Brain tumors are horrific diseases with almost universally fatal outcomes; new therapeutics are desperately needed and will come from improved understandings of glioma biology. Exosomes are endosomally derived 30–100 nm membranous vesicles released from many cell types into the extracellular milieu; surprisingly, exosomes are virtually unstudied in neuro-oncology. These microvesicles were used as vaccines in other tumor settings, but their immunological significance is unevaluated in brain tu...

  10. Brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT in the past was not widely accepted because of poor usability of a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. Recently, technical advancements in the accelerator field have made accelerator-based BNCT feasible. Consequently, clinical trials of intractable brain tumors have started using it since 2012. In this review, our clinical results obtained from conventional reactor-based BNCT for treatment of brain tumors are introduced. It is strong hope that accelerator-based BNCT becomes a standard therapy for current intractable brain tumors. (author)

  11. Hypoosmolar conditions reduce extracellular volume fraction and enhance epileptiform activity in the CA3 region of the immature hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kilb, W.; Dierkes, P.W.; Syková, Eva; Vargová, Lýdia; Luhmann, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 84, - (2006), s. 119-129. ISSN 0360-4012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Epileptic seizure * Field potential recordings * Extracellular space Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.476, year: 2006

  12. Sounds, signals and space maps

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The auditory system transforms information from one frame of reference into another to create a map of space in the brain. The source of a visual signal that guides this transformation in barn owls has now been found.

  13. Lactography as an approach to monitor glucose metabolism on-line in brain and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, J; de Boer, J

    1990-01-01

    1. Thus far metabolic processes in the intact animal (or man) have been studied either by the analysis of body fluids, of biopsies, of tissue obtained post mortem or by techniques, requiring dedicated and expensive equipment (such as positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance spectroscopy). 2. Here we describe a relatively simple and inexpensive technique, that can be applied in vivo to study metabolism in brain regions and muscle in the freely moving rat and in human peripheral tissue. 3. The method is based on microdialysis allowing continuous sampling from the extracellular space, the enzymatic conversion of lactate and the on-line detection of fluorescent NADH. 4. Examples of the application of our technique include the monitoring of lactate efflux from various brain regions of behaving animals under a variety of stress exposures, during ischemia or hypoxia and drug treatments. 5. The results indicate that in brain lactate is not exclusively formed under hypoxia and that neuronal activation leads also to lactate formation, possibly due to the compartmentation of both the involved enzymes and the energy metabolism. 6. The increase of lactate formation in contracting or ischemic muscle or during exercise could also be followed on-line in the rat, suggesting that our approach allows the continuous monitoring of anaerobic metabolism in man e.g. during traumatic or arteriosclerotic limb ischemia or lactic acidosis in shock states. 7. The principle of our approach can easily be adapted to other metabolites, thus enabling to monitor other metabolic pathways in vivo as well. PMID:2276411

  14. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T1weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  15. Brain and Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teens / Drug Facts / Brain and Addiction Brain and Addiction Print Your Brain Your brain is who you ... is taken over and over. What Is Drug Addiction? Addiction is a chronic brain disease that causes ...

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  17. Targeting of EMILIN-1 and EMILIN-2 to Fibrillin Microfibrils Facilitates their Incorporation into the Extracellular Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavinato, Alvise; Keene, Douglas R; Wohl, Alexander P; Corallo, Diana; Colombatti, Alfonso; Wagener, Raimund; Paulsson, Mats; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sengle, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Elastin microfibril interface-located proteins (EMILINs) 1 and 2 belong to a family of structurally related extracellular glycoproteins with unique functions in the extracellular space, such as modulation of pro-transforming growth factor-β processing, activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and regulation of Hedgehog and Wnt ligand bioavailability. However, little is known about how EMILINs may exert their extracellular functions. We therefore investigated the spatiotemporal localization and deposition of EMILIN-1 and -2 within the extracellular space. By using immunoelectron and immunofluorescence microscopy together with biochemical extraction, we showed that EMILIN-1 and -2 are targeted to fibrillin microfibrils in the skin. In addition, during skin wound healing and in vitro matrix fiber assembly by primary dermal fibroblasts, EMILIN-1 and -2 are deposited on and coregulated with fibrillin. Analysis of wounds and mouse embryonic fibroblast cultures showed that EMILIN-1 and -2 network formation also requires the presence of fibronectin. Disruption of microfibrils in fibrillin-1-deficient mice leads to fragmentation of the EMILIN-1 and -2 networks, suggesting an involvement of EMILINs in fibrillin-related skin disorders. The addition of EMILINs to the ligand repertoire of fibrillin strengthens the concept of fibrillin microfibrils as extracellular scaffolds integrating cellular force transmission and growth factor bioactivity. PMID:26945878

  18. Nanostructured gold microelectrodes for extracellular recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueggemann, Dorothea; Wolfrum, Bernhard; Maybeck, Vanessa; Offenhaeusser, Andreas [CNI Center of Nanoelectronic Systems for Information Technology and Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems 2, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Electrophysiological activity of electrogenic cells is currently recorded with planar bioelectronic interfaces such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel concept of biocompatible nanostructured gold MEAs for extracellular signal recording is presented. MEAs were fabricated using clean room technologies, e.g. photolithography and metallization. Subsequently, they were modified with gold nanopillars of approximately 300 to 400 nm in height and 60 nm width. The nanostructuring process was carried out with a template-assisted approach using nanoporous aluminium oxide. Impedance spectroscopy of the resulting nanostructures showed higher capacitances compared to planar gold. This confirmed the expected increase of the surface area via nanostructuring. We used the nanostructured microelectrodes to record extracellular potentials from heart muscle cells (HL1), which were plated onto the chips. Good coupling between the HL1 cells and the nanostructured electrodes was observed. The resulting signal-to-noise ratio of nanopillar-MEAs was increased by a factor of 2 compared to planar MEAs. In future applications this nanopillar concept can be adopted for distinct interface materials and coupling to cellular and molecular sensing components.

  19. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... to another. Share Science News Connectome Re-Maps Human Cortex ECT Lifts Depression, Sustains Remission in Older ...

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    Full Text Available ... he saw, Sarah's husband took her to the doctor, who ran some tests. After deciding her symptoms ... a stroke, brain tumor, or similar conditions, Sarah's doctor referred her to a psychiatrist, a type of ...

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    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... NIMH Strategic Plan in 2016 August 31, 2016, 2:00-3:00 PM ET General Health Information ...

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    Full Text Available ... sends impulses and extends from cell bodies to meet and deliver impulses to another nerve cell. Axons ... in Real Life—How Depression affects the Brain Meet Sarah Sarah is a middle-aged woman who ...

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  1. Brain Health

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    ... Love Your Brain Stay Physically Active Adopt a Healthy Diet Stay Mentally and Socially Active We Can Help ... of any wellness plan. Learn More Adopt a Healthy Diet > Eat a heart-healthy diet that benefits both ...

  2. Brain Basics

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    Full Text Available ... Offices and Divisions Careers@NIMH Advisory Boards and Groups Staff Directories Getting to NIMH National Institutes of ... electrical signals. The brain begins as a small group of cells in the outer layer of a ...

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, such as depression, can occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can ...

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    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability ...

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    Full Text Available ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a gene, which may be harmless or even helpful, but sometimes give rise to disabilities or diseases. neural ...

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    Full Text Available ... interconnections. neuron —A nerve cell that is the basic, working unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ...

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  19. Brain Basics

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  5. Brain imaging and brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage

  6. Hyaluronic acid changes of the extracellular matrix in colon carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arab MR.; Allahyari A.; Sargolzaie Aval F.; Rafighdoost H; Karimi M

    2007-01-01

    Background: The extracellular matrix is a complex three-dimensional network of proteins and glycosaminoglycans, which have important roles in cellular physiology and cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Any changes in the extracellular matrix of tumors may be implicated in cellular transformation and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to identify changes in the hyaluronic acid of the stroma of colonic carcinoma.Methods: Paraffin blocks of 30 patients with colon carc...

  7. Regulation of extracellular slime production by Actinomyces viscosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ooshima, T; Kuramitsu, H K

    1981-01-01

    Extracellular slime polysaccharides produced two Actinomyces viscosus strains, T14V and T14AV, were compared. In various media containing glucose, T14Av produced abundant extracellular viscous slime polysaccharide, whereas T14V produced lower levels. Furthermore, fractionation of these polysaccharides showed that the two extracellular polysaccharides differed in molecular size and net charge. Since there was a significant difference in the relative abilities of chemically defined medium and c...

  8. Extracellular Acidification Alters Lysosomal Trafficking in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kristine Glunde; Sandra E. Guggino; Meiyappan Solaiyappan; Pathak, Arvind P.; Yoshitaka Ichikawa; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2003-01-01

    Cancer cells invade by secreting degradative enzymes, which are sequestered in lysosomal vesicles. In this study, the impact of an acidic extracellular environment on lysosome size, number, and distance from the nucleus in human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and breast cancer cells of different degrees of malignancy was characterized because the physiological microenvironment of tumors is frequently characterized by extracellular acidity. An acidic extracellular pH (pHe) resulted in a dist...

  9. Diverse Biological Functions of Extracellular Collagen Processing Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Trackman, Philip C.

    2005-01-01

    Collagens are abundant proteins in higher organisms, and are formed by a complex biosynthetic pathway involving intracellular and extracellular post-translational modifications. Starting from simple soluble precursors, this interesting pathway produces insoluble functional fibrillar and non-fibrillar elements of the extracellular matrix. The present review highlights recent progress and new insights into biological regulation of extracellular procollagen processing, and some novel functions o...

  10. The brain is a context machine

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolić, Danko

    2010-01-01

    A thesis is presented that the basic operational principle of the brain is to process each input in relation to the context in which it occurs—in space and time. The brain has evolved such that it knows no better or more fundamental approach to computation but contextual comparisons. A brain without context would be a whole another system, with a mind nothing like that of a human.

  11. Circular RNAs Co-Precipitate with Extracellular Vesicles: A Possible Mechanism for circRNA Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasda, Erika; Parker, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Backspliced circular RNAs (circRNAs) are prevalent in many eukaryotic systems and are spliced from thousands of different genes. Where examined, circRNAs are often highly stable and the mechanisms by which cells degrade and/or clear circRNAs from the cells are unknown. Here we investigated the possibility that cells can eliminate circRNAs into extracellular space, possibly within released vesicles such as exosomes and microvesicles. From three different cell lines and examining multiple circRNAs, we show that extracellular vesicle (EVs) preparations recovered from cell culture conditioned media contain established circRNAs. Moreover, these circRNAs are enriched over their linear counterparts within EV preparations when compared to the producing cells. This supports the idea that expulsion from cells into extracellular space, as by EVs release, can be a mechanism by which cells clear circRNAs. Moreover, since EVs can be taken up by other cells, excreted circRNAs could contribute to cell to cell communication. PMID:26848835

  12. Extracellular matrix motion and early morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Rongish, Brenda J; Smith, Christopher M; Filla, Michael B; Czirok, Andras; Bénazéraf, Bertrand; Little, Charles D

    2016-06-15

    For over a century, embryologists who studied cellular motion in early amniotes generally assumed that morphogenetic movement reflected migration relative to a static extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold. However, as we discuss in this Review, recent investigations reveal that the ECM is also moving during morphogenesis. Time-lapse studies show how convective tissue displacement patterns, as visualized by ECM markers, contribute to morphogenesis and organogenesis. Computational image analysis distinguishes between cell-autonomous (active) displacements and convection caused by large-scale (composite) tissue movements. Modern quantification of large-scale 'total' cellular motion and the accompanying ECM motion in the embryo demonstrates that a dynamic ECM is required for generation of the emergent motion patterns that drive amniote morphogenesis. PMID:27302396

  13. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald;

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and...... motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin......, or basement membrane glycoproteins, but also in terms of matrix rigidity. This can regulate the release and subsequent biol. activity of matrix-bound growth factors, for example, transforming growth factor-β. In the environment of tumors, there may be changes in cell populations and their receptor...

  14. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina; Genazzani, Armando A; Sethi, Jaswinder K

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro-environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro-environment. PMID:27128025

  15. Extracellular enzymes of Fusarium graminearum isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Eleonora Kikot

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum isolates from three different agroecological regions in Argentina were examined according to the production of different extracellular enzyme activities of potential biotechnological interest: pectinases (PGase: polygalacturonase and PMGase: polymethylgalacturonase, cellulase (CMCase: carboxymethylcellulase and hemicellulase (xylanase. The isolates were grown in minimum salt medium supplemented with 0.25% glucose, 0.125% citric pectin and 0.125% oat bran as carbon sources and/or enzyme inducers. PGase activity was detected early (after two days of incubation in all the cultures; it was found to be the highest for all the isolates. PMGase was high only for those isolates of the II region. CMCase and endoxylanase activities were particularly found at late stages (after four and seven days of incubation, respectively and the maximum values were lower than pectinase activities.

  16. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  17. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  18. Pneumolysin activates neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G Nel, J; Theron, A J; Durandt, C; Tintinger, G R; Pool, R; Mitchell, T J; Feldman, C; Anderson, R

    2016-06-01

    The primary objective of the current study was to investigate the potential of the pneumococcal toxin, pneumolysin (Ply), to activate neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation in vitro. Isolated human blood neutrophils were exposed to recombinant Ply (5-20 ng ml(-1) ) for 30-90 min at 37°C and NET formation measured using the following procedures to detect extracellular DNA: (i) flow cytometry using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Ruby; (ii) spectrofluorimetry using the fluorophore, Sytox(®) Orange (5 μM); and (iii) NanoDrop(®) technology. These procedures were complemented by fluorescence microscopy using 4', 6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) (nuclear stain) in combination with anti-citrullinated histone monoclonal antibodies to visualize nets. Exposure of neutrophils to Ply resulted in relatively rapid (detected within 30-60 min), statistically significant (P DNA impregnated with both citrullinated histone and myeloperoxidase. Microscopy revealed that NETosis appeared to be restricted to a subpopulation of neutrophils, the numbers of NET-forming cells in the control and Ply-treated systems (10 and 20 ng ml(-1) ) were 4·3 (4·2), 14.3 (9·9) and 16·5 (7·5), respectively (n = 4, P < 0·0001 for comparison of the control with both Ply-treated systems). Ply-induced NETosis occurred in the setting of retention of cell viability, and apparent lack of involvement of reactive oxygen species and Toll-like receptor 4. In conclusion, Ply induces vital NETosis in human neutrophils, a process which may either contribute to host defence or worsen disease severity, depending on the intensity of the inflammatory response during pneumococcal infection. PMID:26749379

  19. Identification of a Receptor for Extracellular Renalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Velazquez, Heino; Chang, John; Safirstein, Robert; Desir, Gary V.

    2015-01-01

    Background An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI) and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI) in wild type (WT) mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase. Methods and Results RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase. Conclusions PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling. PMID:25906147

  20. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  1. Brain SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain SPECT investigations have gained broad acceptance since the introduction of the lipophilic tracer Tc-99m-HMPAO. Depending on equipment and objectives in different departments, the examinations can be divided into three groups: 1. Under normal conditions and standardised patient preparation the 'rest' SPECT can be performed in every department with a tomographic camera. In cerebrovascular disease there is a demand for determination of either the perfusion reserve in reversible ischemia or prognostic values in completed stroke. In cases of dementia, SPECT may yield useful results according to differential diagnosis. Central cerebral system involvement in immunologic disease may be estimated with higher sensitivity than in conventional brain imaging procedures. In psychiatric diseases there is only a relative indication for brain SPECT, since results during recent years have been contradictory and may be derived only in interventional manner. In brain tumor diagnostics SPECT with Tl-201 possibly permits grading. In inflammatory disease, especially in viral encephalitis, SPECT may be used to obtain early diagnosis. Normal pressure hydrocephalus can be distinguished from other forms of dementia and, consequently, the necessity for shunting surgery can be recognised. 2. In departments equipped for emergency cases an 'acute' SPECT can be performed in illnesses with rapid changing symptoms such as different forms of migraine, transient global amnesia, epileptic seizures (so-called 'ictal SPECT') or urgent forms like trauma. 3. In cooperation with several departments brain SPECT can be practised as an interventional procedure in clinical and in scientific studies. (orig./MG)

  2. MONITORING EXTRACELLULAR PH, OXYGEN, AND DOPAMINE DURING REWARD DELIVERY IN THE STRIATUM OF PRIMATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Ariansen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine projections that extend from the ventral tegmental area to the striatum have been implicated in the biological basis for behaviors associated with reward and addiction. Until recently, it has been difficult to evaluate the complex balance of energy utilization and neural activity in the striatum. Many techniques such as electrophysiology, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry have been employed to monitor these neurochemical and neurophysiological changes. In this brain region, physiological responses to cues and rewards cause local, transient pH changes. Oxygen and pH are coupled in the brain through a complex system of blood flow and metabolism as a result of transient neural activity. Indeed, this balance is at the heart of imaging studies such as fMRI. To this end, we measured pH and O2 changes with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the striatum as indices of changes in metabolism and blood flow in vivo in three Macaca mulatta monkeys. The animals were presented with Pavlovian conditioned cues that predicted different probabilities of liquid reward. They also received free reward without predictive cues. The primary change consisted of pH shifts in the striatal extracellular environment following the reward predicting cues or the free reward. We observed three types of cue responses which consisted of purely basic pH shifts, basic pH shifts followed by acidic pH shifts, and purely acidic pH shifts. These responses increased with reward probability. The pH changes were accompanied by increases in extracellular O2. The changes in pH and extracellular O2 are consistent with current theories of metabolism and blood flow. The findings suggest a role of these chemical responses in neuronal reward processing

  3. Diffusion characteristics and extracellular volume fraction during normoxia and hypoxia in slices of rat neostriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M E; Nicholson, C

    1991-02-01

    1. Diffusion properties of submerged, superfused slices from the rat neostriatum were measured by quantitative analysis of concentration-time profiles of tetramethylammonium (TMA+) introduced by iontophoresis. TMA+ was sensed at an ion-selective microelectrode (ISM) positioned 100-150 microns from the source pipette. Slice viability was assessed from the extracellular field potentials evoked by intrastriatal electrical stimulation. 2. Under normoxic conditions the extracellular volume fraction (alpha) was 0.21 (range 0.18-0.24), and the tortuosity (lambda) was 1.54, in slices with good field potentials. In slices with poor field potentials, alpha was 0.09-0.16. Extraction of correct alpha and lambda in the slice required evaluation of nonspecific uptake, k', which was 1 x 10(-2) s-1. 3. Slices were made hypoxic by superfusing physiological saline equilibrated with 95% N2-5% CO2 for 10-30 min. Synaptic components of field potentials were inhibited after 3-4 min in hypoxic media. In some experiments extracellular K+ concentration [( K+]o) was monitored with ISMs. During hypoxia, [K+]o rose from an average baseline of 5.1 mM to 7-10 mM. After reoxygenation, [K+]o transiently fell below the original level. 4. The average value for alpha during hypoxia was 0.13 (a 38% decrease), which was significantly different from control (P less than 0.001) and increased progressively during hypoxic exposure. In contrast, tortuosity and k' were unchanged by this treatment. 5. These data represent the first characterization of the diffusion properties of the rat striatal slice and of changes in extracellular volume fraction during hypoxia in a brain slice preparation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2016641

  4. Astrocytes as a source for Extracellular matrix molecules and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eWiese

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Research of the past 25 years has shown that astrocytes do more than participating and building up the blood brain barrier and detoxify the active synapse by reuptake of neurotransmitters and ions. Indeed, astrocytes express neurotransmitter receptors and, as a consequence, respond to stimuli. Deeper knowledge of the differentiation processes during development of the central nervous system (CNS might help explaining and even help treating neurological diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and psychiatric disorders in which astrocytes have been shown to play a role. Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes develop from a multipotent stem cell that prior to this has produced primarily neuronal precursor cells. This switch towards the more astroglial differentiation is regulated by a change in receptor composition on the cell surface and responsiveness of the respective trophic factors Fibroblast growth factor (FGF and Epidermal growth factor (EGF. The glial precursor cell is driven into the astroglial direction by signaling molecules like Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, and EGF. However, the early astrocytes influence their environment not only by releasing and responding to diverse soluble factors but also express a wide range of extracellular matrix (ECM molecules, in particular proteoglycans of the lectican family and tenascins. Lately these ECM molecules have been shown to participate in glial development. In this regard, especially the matrix protein Tenascin C (Tnc proved to be an important regulator of astrocyte precursor cell proliferation and migration during spinal cord development. On the other hand, ECM molecules expressed by reactive astrocytes are also known to act mostly in an inhibitory fashion under pathophysiological conditions. In this regard, we further summarize recent data concerning the role of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and Tnc under pathological

  5. How brains make decisions

    CERN Document Server

    Yukalov, V I

    2014-01-01

    This chapter, dedicated to the memory of Mino Freund, summarizes the Quantum Decision Theory (QDT) that we have developed in a series of publications since 2008. We formulate a general mathematical scheme of how decisions are taken, using the point of view of psychological and cognitive sciences, without touching physiological aspects. The basic principles of how intelligence acts are discussed. The human brain processes involved in decisions are argued to be principally different from straightforward computer operations. The difference lies in the conscious-subconscious duality of the decision making process and the role of emotions that compete with utility optimization. The most general approach for characterizing the process of decision making, taking into account the conscious-subconscious duality, uses the framework of functional analysis in Hilbert spaces, similarly to that used in the quantum theory of measurements. This does not imply that the brain is a quantum system, but just allows for the simple...

  6. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  7. Enhanced invasion of metastatic cancer cells via extracellular matrix interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangrui Zhu

    Full Text Available Cancer cell invasion is a major component of metastasis and is responsible for extensive cell diffusion into and major destruction of tissues. Cells exhibit complex invasion modes, including a variety of collective behaviors. This phenomenon results in the structural heterogeneity of the extracellular matrix (ECM in tissues. Here, we systematically investigated the environmental heterogeneity facilitating tumor cell invasion via a combination of in vitro cell migration experiments and computer simulations. Specifically, we constructed an ECM microenvironment in a microfabricated biochip and successfully created a three-dimensional (3D funnel-like matrigel interface inside. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the interface was at the interior defects of the nano-scale molecular anisotropic orientation and the localized structural density variations in the matrigel. Our results, particularly the correlation of the collective migration pattern with the geometric features of the funnel-like interface, indicate that this heterogeneous in vitro ECM structure strongly guides and promotes aggressive cell invasion in the rigid matrigel space. A cellular automaton model was proposed based on our experimental observations, and the associated quantitative analysis indicated that cell invasion was initiated and controlled by several mechanisms, including microenvironment heterogeneity, long-range cell-cell homotype and gradient-driven directional cellular migration. Our work shows the feasibility of constructing a complex and heterogeneous in vitro 3D ECM microenvironment that mimics the in vivo environment. Moreover, our results indicate that ECM heterogeneity is essential in controlling collective cell invasive behaviors and therefore determining metastasis efficiency.

  8. Extracellular superoxide dismutase attenuates release of pulmonary hyaluronan from the extracellular matrix following bleomycin exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Zelko, Igor N.; Folz, Rodney J

    2010-01-01

    The major pulmonary antioxidant enzyme involved in the protection of the lung interstitium from oxidative stress is extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD). It has been previously shown that EC-SOD knockout mice are more susceptible to bleomycin induced lung injury, however, the molecular mechanism(s) remains unclear. We report here that bleomycin-induced lung damage, in EC-SOD KO mice, is associated with increased hyaluronan release into alveolar fluid. Analysis of hyaluronan synthase ge...

  9. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  10. Active regions' setting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human interleukin-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reliable three dimensional (3-D) structure of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6R) has been constructed by means of computer-guided homology modeling techniques using the crystal structure of the extracellular ligand-binding region (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. The space location of some key residues which influence the combination ability between the receptor and the ligand has been observed and the effects of point mutagenesis of the four conservative cysteine residues on the space conformation are analyzed. The results show that the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 plays a key role in the ligand-binding ability. Furthermore, the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 is very important for the electrostatic potential complementarity between hIL-6R and hIL-6 according to the docking method.

  11. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corr...

  12. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Amygdala —The brain's "fear hub," which activates our natural "fight-or-flight" response to confront or escape ... husband questions about Sarah's symptoms and family medical history. Epigenetic changes from stress or early-life experiences ...

  13. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... managing proper emotional reactions. Reduced ACC activity or damage to this brain area has been linked to ... can diagnose mental disorders are psychologists or clinical social ... —A network of neurons and their interconnections. neuron —A nerve ...

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how to slow or stop them from progressing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is another important research ... magnetic fields to take pictures of the brain's structure. mutation —A change in the code for a ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive functions, such as ... making, and problem solving. Different parts of the PFC are involved in using short-term or "working" ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at the front of the brain that, in humans, plays a role in executive functions such as ... ClinicalTrials.gov : Federally and privately supported research using human volunteers PubMed Central: An archive of life sciences ...

  17. Robot brains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babuska, R.

    2011-01-01

    The brain hosts complex networks of neurons that are responsible for behavior in humans and animals that we generally call intelligent. I is not easy to give an exact definition of intelligence – for the purpose of this talk it will suffice to say that we refer to intelligence as a collection of cap

  18. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improve treatments for anxiety disorders like phobias or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) . Prefrontal cortex (PFC) —Seat of the brain's executive ... events. Some research shows that people who have PTSD or ADHD have reduced activity in their PFCs. ...

  19. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin —helps control many functions, such as mood, ... brain. Problems in producing dopamine can result in Parkinson's disease, a disorder that affects a person's ability to ...

  20. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... occur when this process does not work correctly. Communication between neurons can also be electrical, such as in areas of the brain that control movement. When electrical signals are abnormal, they can cause tremors or symptoms found in Parkinson's disease. Serotonin — ...

  1. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... brain disorders. Evidence shows that they can be related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry ... MEDLINEPlus : Authoritative information from government agencies and health-related organizations, available in both English and Spanish ( Español ) ...

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... unit of the brain and nervous system, which processes and transmits information. neurotransmitter —A chemical produced by ... decision making and problem solving, as well as emotional control and memory. serotonin —A neurotransmitter that regulates ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... early brain development. It may also assist in learning and memory. Problems in making or using glutamate have been linked ... we see, and help us to solve a problem. Some of the regions most commonly ... also appears to be involved in learning to fear an event, such as touching a ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ADHD , schizophrenia , and depression . Hippocampus —Helps create and file new memories. When the hippocampus is damaged, a ... portion of the brain involved in creating and filing new memories. hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis —A ...

  5. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  6. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  7. Unruptured Brain Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  8. Brain Aneurysm: Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ... Brain Aneurysm Statistics and Facts Seeking Medical Attention Pediatric Aneurysms Brain Aneurysm Causes and Risk Factors Family History ...

  9. Changes in the extracellular matrix and glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the initiation of regeneration in adult newt forelimbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the distal tissues in a newt limb stump is completely reorganized in the 2-3-week period following amputation. In view of numerous in vitro studies showing that extracellular material influences cellular migration and proliferation, it is likely that the changes in the limb's ECM are important activities in the process leading to regeneration of such limbs. Using biochemical, autoradiographic, and histochemical techniques we studied temporal and spatial differences in the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during the early, nerve-dependent phase of limb regeneration. Hyaluronic acid synthesis began with the onset of tissue dedifferentiation, became maximal within 1 weeks, and continued throughout the period of active cell proliferation. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis began somewhat later, increased steadily, and reached very high levels during chondrogenesis. During the first 10 days after amputation, distributions of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs were both uniform throughout dedifferentiating tissues, except for a heavier localization near the bone. Since nerves are necessary to promote the regenerative process, we examined the neural influence on synthesis and accumulation of extracellular GAGs. Denervation decreased GAG production in all parts of the limb stump by approximately 50%. Newt dorsal root ganglia and brain-derived fibroblast growth factor each produced twofold stimulation of GAG synthesis in cultured 7-day regenerates. The latter effect was primarily on synthesis of hyaluronic acid. The results indicate that the trophic action of nerves on amphibian limb regeneration includes a positive influence on synthesis and extracellular accumulation of GAGs

  10. Changes in the extracellular matrix and glycosaminoglycan synthesis during the initiation of regeneration in adult newt forelimbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mescher, A.L.; Munaim, S.I.

    1986-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the distal tissues in a newt limb stump is completely reorganized in the 2-3-week period following amputation. In view of numerous in vitro studies showing that extracellular material influences cellular migration and proliferation, it is likely that the changes in the limb's ECM are important activities in the process leading to regeneration of such limbs. Using biochemical, autoradiographic, and histochemical techniques we studied temporal and spatial differences in the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during the early, nerve-dependent phase of limb regeneration. Hyaluronic acid synthesis began with the onset of tissue dedifferentiation, became maximal within 1 weeks, and continued throughout the period of active cell proliferation. Chondroitin sulfate synthesis began somewhat later, increased steadily, and reached very high levels during chondrogenesis. During the first 10 days after amputation, distributions of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs were both uniform throughout dedifferentiating tissues, except for a heavier localization near the bone. Since nerves are necessary to promote the regenerative process, we examined the neural influence on synthesis and accumulation of extracellular GAGs. Denervation decreased GAG production in all parts of the limb stump by approximately 50%. Newt dorsal root ganglia and brain-derived fibroblast growth factor each produced twofold stimulation of GAG synthesis in cultured 7-day regenerates. The latter effect was primarily on synthesis of hyaluronic acid. The results indicate that the trophic action of nerves on amphibian limb regeneration includes a positive influence on synthesis and extracellular accumulation of GAGs.

  11. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  12. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  13. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  14. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  15. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  16. Tumorigenic potential of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, S; Hymowitz, M; Rollo, E E; Mann, R; Conner, C E; Cao, J; Foda, H D; Tompkins, D C; Toole, B P

    2001-06-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  17. Biochemistry of the extracellular matrix of Volvox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumper, M; Hallmann, A

    1998-01-01

    The volvocine algae range in complexity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular organisms in the genus Volvox. The transition from unicellularity to multicellularity in the Volvocales is a recent event in evolution. Thus, these organisms provide a unique opportunity for exploring the development of a complex extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell wall of a unicellular ancestor. The ECM of Volvox is divided into four main zones: The flagellar, boundary, cellular, and deep zones. Each zone is defined by ultrastructure and by characteristic ECM glycoproteins. Volvox ECM is modified under developmental control or in response to external stimuli, like the sex-inducing pheromone or stress factors. The structures of more than 10 ECM glycoproteins from a single species of Volvox are now known in molecular detail and are compared to other algal and plant cell wall/ECM glycoproteins. Although usually classified as hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, the striking feature of all algal ECM glycoproteins is a modular composition. Rod-shaped hydroxyproline-rich modules are combined with hydroxyproline-free domains that meet the multiple functional requirements of a complex ECM. The algal ECM provides another example of the combinatorial advantage of shuffling modules that is so evident in the evolution of the metazoan ECMs. PMID:9496634

  18. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  19. Roles of extracellular matrix in follicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; van Wezel, I L; Irving-Rodgers, H F; Lavranos, T C; Irvine, C M; Krupa, M

    1999-01-01

    The cellular biology and changes in the extracellular matrix of ovarian follicles during their development are reviewed. During growth of the bovine ovarian follicle the follicular basal lamina doubles 19 times in surface area. It changes in composition, having collagen IV alpha 1-26 and laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the primordial stage, and collagen IV alpha 1 and alpha 2, reduced amounts of alpha 3-alpha 5, and a higher content of laminin alpha 1, beta 2 and gamma 1 at the antral stage. In atretic antral follicles laminin alpha 2 was also detected. The follicular epithelium also changes from one layer to many layers during follicular growth. It is clear that not all granulosal cells have equal potential to divide, and we have evidence that the granulosal cells arise from a population of stem cells. This finding has important ramifications and supports the concept that different follicular growth factors can act on different subsets of granulosal cells. In antral follicles, the replication of cells occurs in the middle layers of the membrana granulosa, with older granulosal cells towards the antrum and towards the basal lamina. The basal cells in the membrana granulosa have also been observed to vary in shape between follicies. In smaller antral follicles, they were either columnar or rounded, and in follicles > 5 mm the cells were all rounded. The reasons for these changes in matrix and cell shapes are discussed in relation to follicular development. PMID:10692866

  20. Experimental evaluation of electrical conductivity imaging of anisotropic brain tissues using a combination of diffusion tensor imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kyung, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyun Bum; Oh, Tong In; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2016-06-01

    Anisotropy of biological tissues is a low-frequency phenomenon that is associated with the function and structure of cell membranes. Imaging of anisotropic conductivity has potential for the analysis of interactions between electromagnetic fields and biological systems, such as the prediction of current pathways in electrical stimulation therapy. To improve application to the clinical environment, precise approaches are required to understand the exact responses inside the human body subjected to the stimulated currents. In this study, we experimentally evaluate the anisotropic conductivity tensor distribution of canine brain tissues, using a recently developed diffusion tensor-magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography method. At low frequency, electrical conductivity of the biological tissues can be expressed as a product of the mobility and concentration of ions in the extracellular space. From diffusion tensor images of the brain, we can obtain directional information on diffusive movements of water molecules, which correspond to the mobility of ions. The position dependent scale factor, which provides information on ion concentration, was successfully calculated from the magnetic flux density, to obtain the equivalent conductivity tensor. By combining the information from both techniques, we can finally reconstruct the anisotropic conductivity tensor images of brain tissues. The reconstructed conductivity images better demonstrate the enhanced signal intensity in strongly anisotropic brain regions, compared with those resulting from previous methods using a global scale factor.

  1. Invariant measures in brain dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This note concerns brain activity at the level of neural ensembles and uses ideas from ergodic dynamical systems to model and characterize chaotic patterns among these ensembles during conscious mental activity. Central to our model is the definition of a space of neural ensembles and the assumption of discrete time ensemble dynamics. We argue that continuous invariant measures draw the attention of deeper brain processes, engendering emergent properties such as consciousness. Invariant measures supported on a finite set of ensembles reflect periodic behavior, whereas the existence of continuous invariant measures reflect the dynamics of nonrepeating ensemble patterns that elicit the interest of deeper mental processes. We shall consider two different ways to achieve continuous invariant measures on the space of neural ensembles: (1) via quantum jitters, and (2) via sensory input accompanied by inner thought processes which engender a 'folding' property on the space of ensembles

  2. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist promotes M1 microglia biased cytokines and chemokines following human traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Adel; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Carpenter, Keri Lh; Pickard, John D; Menon, David K; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1ra) has demonstrated efficacy in a wide range of animal models of neuronal injury. We have previously published a randomised controlled study of IL1ra in human severe TBI, with concomitant microdialysis and plasma sampling of 42 cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we have used partial least squares discriminant analysis to model the effects of drug administration and time following injury on the cytokine milieu within the injured brain. We demonstrate that treatment with rhIL1ra causes a brain-specific modification of the cytokine and chemokine response to injury, particularly in samples from the first 48 h following injury. The magnitude of this response is dependent on the concentration of IL1ra achieved in the brain extracellular space. Chemokines related to recruitment of macrophages from the plasma compartment (MCP-1) and biasing towards a M1 microglial phenotype (GM-CSF, IL1) are increased in patient samples in the rhIL1ra-treated patients. In control patients, cytokines and chemokines biased to a M2 microglia phenotype (IL4, IL10, MDC) are relatively increased. This pattern of response suggests that a simple classification of IL1ra as an 'anti-inflammatory' cytokine may not be appropriate and highlights the importance of the microglial response to injury. PMID:26661249

  3. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  4. Rearrangement of the Extracellular Domain/Extracellular Loop 1 Interface Is Critical for Thyrotropin Receptor Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaarschmidt, Joerg; Nagel, Marcus B M; Huth, Sandra; Jaeschke, Holger; Moretti, Rocco; Hintze, Vera; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Meiler, Jens; Paschke, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    The thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with a characteristic large extracellular domain (ECD). TSHR activation is initiated by binding of the hormone ligand TSH to the ECD. How the extracellular binding event triggers the conformational changes in the transmembrane domain (TMD) necessary for intracellular G protein activation is poorly understood. To gain insight in this process, the knowledge on the relative positioning of ECD and TMD and the conformation of the linker region at the interface of ECD and TMD are of particular importance. To generate a structural model for the TSHR we applied an integrated structural biology approach combining computational techniques with experimental data. Chemical cross-linking followed by mass spectrometry yielded 17 unique distance restraints within the ECD of the TSHR, its ligand TSH, and the hormone-receptor complex. These structural restraints generally confirm the expected binding mode of TSH to the ECD as well as the general fold of the domains and were used to guide homology modeling of the ECD. Functional characterization of TSHR mutants confirms the previously suggested close proximity of Ser-281 and Ile-486 within the TSHR. Rigidifying this contact permanently with a disulfide bridge disrupts ligand-induced receptor activation and indicates that rearrangement of the ECD/extracellular loop 1 (ECL1) interface is a critical step in receptor activation. The experimentally verified contact of Ser-281 (ECD) and Ile-486 (TMD) was subsequently utilized in docking homology models of the ECD and the TMD to create a full-length model of a glycoprotein hormone receptor. PMID:27129207

  5. The restless brain: how intrinsic activity organizes brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichle, Marcus E

    2015-05-19

    Traditionally studies of brain function have focused on task-evoked responses. By their very nature such experiments tacitly encourage a reflexive view of brain function. While such an approach has been remarkably productive at all levels of neuroscience, it ignores the alternative possibility that brain functions are mainly intrinsic and ongoing, involving information processing for interpreting, responding to and predicting environmental demands. I suggest that the latter view best captures the essence of brain function, a position that accords well with the allocation of the brain's energy resources, its limited access to sensory information and a dynamic, intrinsic functional organization. The nature of this intrinsic activity, which exhibits a surprising level of organization with dimensions of both space and time, is revealed in the ongoing activity of the brain and its metabolism. As we look to the future, understanding the nature of this intrinsic activity will require integrating knowledge from cognitive and systems neuroscience with cellular and molecular neuroscience where ion channels, receptors, components of signal transduction and metabolic pathways are all in a constant state of flux. The reward for doing so will be a much better understanding of human behaviour in health and disease. PMID:25823869

  6. In Vivo Microdialysis Reveals Age-Dependent Decrease of Brain Interstitial Fluid Tau Levels in P301S Human Tau Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Kaoru; Cirrito, John R.; Stewart, Floy R; Jiang, Hong; Finn, Mary Beth; Holmes, Brandon B.; Binder, Lester I.; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Diamond, Marc I.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Holtzman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although tau is a cytoplasmic protein, it is also found in brain extracellular fluids, e.g., CSF. Recent findings suggest that aggregated tau can be transferred between cells and extracellular tau aggregates might mediate spread of tau pathology. Despite these data, details of whether tau is normally released into the brain interstitial fluid (ISF), its concentration in ISF in relation to CSF, and whether ISF tau is influenced by its aggregation are unknown. To address these issues, we develo...

  7. Development of brain damage as measured by brain impedance recordings, and changes in heart rate, and blood pressure induced by different stunning and killing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savenije, B; Lambooij, E; Gerritzen, M A; Korf, J

    2002-04-01

    Poultry are electrically stunned before slaughter to induce unconsciousness and to immobilize the chickens for easier killing. From a welfare point of view, electrical stunning should induce immediate and lasting unconsciousness in the chicken. As an alternative to electroencephalography, which measures brain electrical activity, this study used brain impedance recordings, which measure brain metabolic activity, to determine the onset and development of brain damage. Fifty-six chickens were surgically equipped with brain electrodes and a canula in the wing artery and were subjected to one of seven stunning and killing methods: whole body electrical stunning; head-only electrical stunning at 50, 100 or 150 V; or an i.v. injection with MgCl2. After 30 s, the chickens were exsanguinated. Brain impedance and blood pressure were measured. Extracellular volume was determined from the brain impedance data and heart rate from the blood pressure data. An immediate and progressive reduction in extracellular volume in all chickens was found only with whole body stunning at 150 V. This treatment also caused cardiac fibrillation or arrest in all chickens. With all other electrical stunning treatments, extracellular volume was immediately reduced in some but not all birds, and cardiac fibrillation or arrest was not often found. Ischemic conditions, caused by cessation of the circulation, stimulated this epileptic effect. A stunner setting of 150 V is therefore recommended to ensure immediate and lasting unconsciousness, which is a requirement for humane slaughter. PMID:11989758

  8. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  9. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos Baltazar, Ludmila; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasma capsulatum produces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment of H. capsulatum cells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bind H. capsulatum heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion. IMPORTANCE Diverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a common pathway for the delivery of molecules to the extracellular space. However, there has

  10. Synthesis and use of radio cobaltic EDTA as an extracellular marker in rabbit heart

    OpenAIRE

    Bridge, John H. B.; Bersohn, Malcolm M.; Gonzalez, Frank; BASSINGTHWAIGHTE, JAMES B.

    1982-01-01

    A new γ-labeled marker for extracellular space is the cobaltic form of 58Co-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (58Co-EDTA). The cobaltic ion has a much higher affinity for EDTA than the cobaltous ion; it is prepared as a potassium salt, K+(58Co3+-EDTA4−), and is apparently biologically inert. Testing by equilibration in intact rabbits and comparing the myocardial content with that of [14C]sucrose give values of the volume of distribution in the myocardium of 0.294 ± 0.052 ml/g for 58Co-EDTA and ...

  11. Internalization of the Extracellular Full-Length Tau Inside Neuro2A and Cortical Cells Is Enhanced by Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Mathilde; Wattiez, Ruddy; Ris, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein is mainly intracellular. However, several studies have demonstrated that full-length Tau can be released into the interstitial fluid of the brain. The physiological or pathological function of this extracellular Tau remains unknown. Moreover, as evidence suggests, extracellular Tau aggregates can be internalized by neurons, seeding Tau aggregation. However, much less is known about small species of Tau. In this study, we hypothesized that the status of phosphorylation could alter the internalization of recombinant Tau in Neuro2A and cortical cells. Our preliminary results revealed that the highly phosphorylated form of Tau entered the cells ten times more easily than a low phosphorylated one. This suggests that hyperphosphorylated Tau protein could spread between neurons in pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27548242

  12. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. PMID:27232382

  13. Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents: Differences in stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents (Gd-CA) are either linear or macrocyclic chelates available as ionic or non-ionic preparations. The molecular structure whether cyclic or linear and ionicity determines the stability of Gd-CA. Linear chelates are flexible open chains which do not offer a strong binding to Gd3+. In contrast, the macrocyclic chelates offer a strong binding to Gd3+ by the virtue of being preorganized rigid rings of almost optimal size to cage the gadolinium atom. Non-ionic preparations are also less stable in comparison to the ionic ones as the binding between Gd3+ with the negatively charged carboxyl groups is stronger in comparison to that with amides or alcohol in the non-ionic preparations. According to stability constants and kinetic measurements, the most stable Gd-CM is the ionic-macrocyclic chelate Gd-DOTA and the least stable agents are the non-ionic linear chelates gadodiamide and gadoversetamide. In vivo data confirmed the low stability of non-ionic linear chelates but no significant difference was observed amongst the macrocyclic agents whether ionic (Gd-DOTA) or non-ionic such as Gd-HP-DO3A and Gd-BT-DO3A. The stability of Gd-CA seems to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the serious complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Gd-CA of low stability are likely to undergo transmetallation and release free Gd ions that deposit in tissue and attract circulating fibrocytes to initiate the process of fibrosis. No cases of NSF have been observed so far after the exclusive use of the stable macrocyclic Gd-CA

  14. Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents: Differences in stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcos, S.K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield S5 7AU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: sameh.morcos@sth.nhs.uk

    2008-05-15

    Extracellular gadolinium contrast agents (Gd-CA) are either linear or macrocyclic chelates available as ionic or non-ionic preparations. The molecular structure whether cyclic or linear and ionicity determines the stability of Gd-CA. Linear chelates are flexible open chains which do not offer a strong binding to Gd{sup 3+}. In contrast, the macrocyclic chelates offer a strong binding to Gd{sup 3+} by the virtue of being preorganized rigid rings of almost optimal size to cage the gadolinium atom. Non-ionic preparations are also less stable in comparison to the ionic ones as the binding between Gd{sup 3+} with the negatively charged carboxyl groups is stronger in comparison to that with amides or alcohol in the non-ionic preparations. According to stability constants and kinetic measurements, the most stable Gd-CM is the ionic-macrocyclic chelate Gd-DOTA and the least stable agents are the non-ionic linear chelates gadodiamide and gadoversetamide. In vivo data confirmed the low stability of non-ionic linear chelates but no significant difference was observed amongst the macrocyclic agents whether ionic (Gd-DOTA) or non-ionic such as Gd-HP-DO3A and Gd-BT-DO3A. The stability of Gd-CA seems to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of the serious complication of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. Gd-CA of low stability are likely to undergo transmetallation and release free Gd ions that deposit in tissue and attract circulating fibrocytes to initiate the process of fibrosis. No cases of NSF have been observed so far after the exclusive use of the stable macrocyclic Gd-CA.

  15. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  16. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  17. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  18. Behavioral and Brain Functions. A new journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagvolden Terje

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Behavioral and Brain Functions (BBF is an Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal considering original research, review, and modeling articles in all aspects of neurobiology or behavior, favoring research that relates to both domains. Behavioral and Brain Functions is published by BioMed Central. The greatest challenge for empirical science is to understand human behavior; how human behavior arises from the myriad functions such as attention, language, memory and emotion; how these functions are reflected in brain structures and functions; and how the brain and behavior are altered in disease. Behavioral and Brain Functions covers the entire area of behavioral and cognitive neuroscience – an area where animal studies traditionally play a prominent role. Behavioral and Brain Functions is published online, allowing unlimited space for figures, extensive datasets to allow readers to study the data for themselves, and moving pictures, which are important qualities assisting communication in modern science.

  19. Proteomic database mining opens up avenues utilizing extracellular protein phosphorylation for novel therapeutic applications

    OpenAIRE

    Yalak, Garif; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in extracellular signaling suggest that extracellular protein phosphorylation is a regulatory mechanism outside the cell. The list of reported active extracellular protein kinases and phosphatases is growing, and phosphorylation of an increasing number of extracellular matrix molecules and extracellular domains of trans-membrane proteins is being documented. Here, we use public proteomic databases, collagens – the major components of the extracellular matrix, extracell...

  20. Penetration of the brain by nonionic water soluble tri- and hexaiodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After suboccipital injection of Iotrol and Iopamidol labelled with iodine 125 in rabbits, we measured residual radioactivity in the whole brain and measured optical density on autoradiographs of brain sections obtained 2, 8 and 24 h after injection. Residual radioactivity is higher with Iotrol than with Iopamidol after 8 h and 24 h. At densitometry, while the penetration of the cortex is the same with both media at 2 h (although subcortical passage of Iotrol is greater) by 8 h the concentration of Iopamidol is twice that of Iotrol, and at 24 h it is three times as high. A similar pattern was seen in the subcortical region. These densitometric findings are in agreement with previous electrophysiological studies, in which changes were less severe and more transient with Iotrol than with Iohexol. There is nevertheless an apparent lack of agreement between the studies of radioactivity studies and the electrical findings. The lower neurotoxicity of Iotrol may be explained by: 1. a longer half-life in the subarachnoid space; 2. its larger molecules, which inhibit diffusion in the extracellular fluid, and 3. its more hydrophilic nature, which reduces intracellular penetration. (orig.)