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Sample records for brain diseases metabolic

  1. Typical Cerebral Metabolic Patterns in Neurodegenerative Brain Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Bartels, Anna L.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T. M.; Eshuis, Silvia A.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2010-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative brain diseases on clinical grounds is difficult, especially at an early disease stage. Several studies have found specific regional differences of brain metabolism applying [F-18]-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), suggesting t

  2. The metabolic syndrome: a brain disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, R.M.; Kreier, F.

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of obesity with, as consequence, a rise in associated diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia--the metabolic syndrome--is reaching epidemic proportions in industrialized countries. Here, we provide a hypothesis that the biological clock which normally prepares us each

  3. Validation of Parkinsonian Disease-Related Metabolic Brain Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; Mudali, Deborah; De Jong, Bauke M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to validate disease-related metabolic brain patterns for Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods: The study included 20 patients with Parkinson’s disease, 21 with multiple system atrophy, and 17 with progre

  4. The metabolic syndrome: a brain disease?

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    Buijs, Ruud M; Kreier, Felix

    2006-09-01

    The incidence of obesity with, as consequence, a rise in associated diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia--the metabolic syndrome--is reaching epidemic proportions in industrialized countries. Here, we provide a hypothesis that the biological clock which normally prepares us each morning for the coming activity period is altered due to a modern life style of low activity during the day and late-night food intake. Furthermore, we review the anatomical evidence supporting the proposal that an unbalanced autonomic nervous system output may lead to the simultaneous occurrence of diabetes type 2, dyslipidemia, hypertension and visceral obesity.

  5. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

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    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  6. Systematic analysis of transcription-level effects of neurodegenerative diseases on human brain metabolism by a newly reconstructed brain-specific metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sertbaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Network-oriented analysis is essential to identify those parts of a cell affected by a given perturbation. The effect of neurodegenerative perturbations in the form of diseases of brain metabolism was investigated by using a newly reconstructed brain-specific metabolic network. The developed stoichiometric model correctly represents healthy brain metabolism, and includes 630 metabolic reactions in and between astrocytes and neurons, which are controlled by 570 genes. The integration of transcriptome data of six neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia with the model was performed to identify reporter features specific and common for these diseases, which revealed metabolites and pathways around which the most significant changes occur. The identified metabolites are potential biomarkers for the pathology of the related diseases. Our model indicated perturbations in oxidative stress, energy metabolism including TCA cycle and lipid metabolism as well as several amino acid related pathways, in agreement with the role of these pathways in the studied diseases. The computational prediction of transcription factors that commonly regulate the reporter metabolites was achieved through binding-site analysis. Literature support for the identified transcription factors such as USF1, SP1 and those from FOX families are known from the literature to have regulatory roles in the identified reporter metabolic pathways as well as in the neurodegenerative diseases. In essence, the reconstructed brain model enables the elucidation of effects of a perturbation on brain metabolism and the illumination of possible machineries in which a specific metabolite or pathway acts as a regulatory spot for cellular reorganization.

  7. The Alzheimer's Disease-Related Glucose Metabolic Brain Pattern

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Strijkert, Fijanne; Renken, Remco J.; Izaks, Gerbrand J.; de Vries, Jeroen J.; Segbers, Marcel; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging of the brain can be used to assist in the differential diagnosis of dementia. Group differences in glucose uptake between patients with dementia and controls are well-known. However, a multivariate analysis technique called scaled subprofile model

  8. Brain metabolic stress and neuroinflammation at the basis of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda G. De Felice

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain metabolic dysfunction is known to influence brain activity in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In fact, deregulation of neuronal metabolism has been postulated to play a key role leading to the clinical outcomes observed in AD. Besides deficits in glucose utilization in AD patients, recent evidence has implicated neuroinflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress as components of a novel form of brain metabolic stress that develop in AD and other neurological disorders. Here we review findings supporting this novel paradigm and further discuss how these mechanisms seem to participate in synapse and cognitive impairments that are germane to AD. These deleterious processes resemble pathways that act in peripheral tissues leading to insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, in an intriguing molecular connection linking AD to diabetes. The discovery of detailed mechanisms leading to neuronal metabolic stress may be a key step that will allow the understanding how cognitive impairment develops in AD, thereby offering new avenues for effective disease prevention and therapeutic targeting.

  9. Mitochondria: A crossroads for lipid metabolism defect in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation diseases.

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    Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) comprises a group of brain iron deposition syndromes that lead to mixed extrapyramidal features and progressive dementia. Exact pathologic mechanism of iron deposition in NBIA remains unknown. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are hallmarked by metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid profile. Among the identified disease genes, four encode for proteins localized in mitochondria, which are directly or indirectly implicated in lipid metabolism: PANK2, CoASY, PLA2G6 and C19orf12. Mutations in PANK2 and CoASY, both implicated in CoA biosynthesis that acts as a fatty acyl carrier, lead, respectively, to PKAN and CoPAN forms of NBIA. Mutations in PLA2G6, which plays a key role in the biosynthesis and remodeling of membrane phospholipids including cardiolipin, lead to PLAN. Mutations in C19orf12 lead to MPAN, a syndrome similar to that caused by mutations in PANK2 and PLA2G6. Although the function of C19orf12 is largely unknown, experimental data suggest its implication in mitochondrial homeostasis and lipid metabolism. Altogether, the identified mutated proteins localized in mitochondria and associated with different NBIA forms support the concept that dysfunctions in mitochondria and lipid metabolism play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  10. Abnormal metabolic brain networks in Parkinson's disease from blackboard to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chris C; Eidelberg, David

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic imaging in the rest state has provided valuable information concerning the abnormalities of regional brain function that underlie idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Moreover, network modeling procedures, such as spatial covariance analysis, have further allowed for the quantification of these changes at the systems level. In recent years, we have utilized this strategy to identify and validate three discrete metabolic networks in PD associated with the motor and cognitive manifestations of the disease. In this chapter, we will review and compare the specific functional topographies underlying parkinsonian akinesia/rigidity, tremor, and cognitive disturbance. While network activity progressed over time, the rate of change for each pattern was distinctive and paralleled the development of the corresponding clinical symptoms in early-stage patients. This approach is already showing great promise in identifying individuals with prodromal manifestations of PD and in assessing the rate of progression before clinical onset. Network modulation was found to correlate with the clinical effects of dopaminergic treatment and surgical interventions, such as subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) and gene therapy. Abnormal metabolic networks have also been identified for atypical parkinsonian syndromes, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Using multiple disease-related networks for PD, MSA, and PSP, we have developed a novel, fully automated algorithm for accurate classification at the single-patient level, even at early disease stages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The neurological effects of ghrelin in brain diseases: Beyond metabolic functions.

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    Jiao, Qian; Du, Xixun; Li, Yong; Gong, Bing; Shi, Limin; Tang, Tingting; Jiang, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Ghrelin, a peptide released by the stomach that plays a major role in regulating energy metabolism, has recently been shown to have effects on neurobiological behaviors. Ghrelin enhances neuronal survival by reducing apoptosis, alleviating inflammation and oxidative stress, and accordingly improving mitochondrial function. Ghrelin also stimulates the proliferation, differentiation and migration of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs). Additionally, the ghrelin is benefit for the recovery of memory, mood and cognitive dysfunction after stroke or traumatic brain injury. Because of its neuroprotective and neurogenic roles, ghrelin may be used as a therapeutic agent in the brain to combat neurodegenerative disease. In this review, we highlight the pre-clinical evidence and the proposed mechanisms underlying the role of ghrelin in physiological and pathological brain function.

  12. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Juan; Qiang LIU

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD)...

  13. Metabolic management of brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael A; Marsh, Jeremy; Shelton, Laura M; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Mukherjee, Purna

    2011-06-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults. Conventional therapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful in providing long-term management. As primarily a metabolic disease, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate) for energy under reduced glucose, malignant brain tumors are strongly dependent on glycolysis for energy. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome and normal mitochondria can effectively transition from one energy state to another. Mutations restrict genomic and metabolic flexibility thus making tumor cells more vulnerable to energy stress than normal cells. We propose an alternative approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and metabolically challenged tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in mice and humans treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are presented for the metabolic management of brain cancer.

  14. Cholesterol metabolism and homeostasis in the brain.

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    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    Cholesterol is an essential component for neuronal physiology not only during development stage but also in the adult life. Cholesterol metabolism in brain is independent from that in peripheral tissues due to blood-brain barrier. The content of cholesterol in brain must be accurately maintained in order to keep brain function well. Defects in brain cholesterol metabolism has been shown to be implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and some cognitive deficits typical of the old age. The brain contains large amount of cholesterol, but the cholesterol metabolism and its complex homeostasis regulation are currently poorly understood. This review will seek to integrate current knowledge about the brain cholesterol metabolism with molecular mechanisms.

  15. Brain metabolic correlates of dopaminergic degeneration in de novo idiopathic Parkinson's disease

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    Berti, Valentina; Polito, Cristina; Vanzi, Eleonora; Cristofaro, Maria Teresa de; Pellicano, Giannantonio; Mungai, Francesco; Formiconi, Andreas Robert; Pupi, Alberto [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, Florence (Italy); Ramat, Silvia; Marini, Paolo; Sorbi, Sandro [University of Florence, Department of Psychiatric and Neurological Sciences, Florence (Italy)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reciprocal relationships between motor impairment, dopaminergic dysfunction, and cerebral metabolism (rCMRglc) in de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Twenty-six de novo untreated PD patients were scanned with {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET. The dopaminergic impairment was measured with putaminal {sup 123}I-FP-CIT binding potential (BP), estimated with two different techniques: an iterative reconstruction algorithm (BP{sub OSEM}) and the least-squares (LS) method (BP{sub LS}). Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the specific brain regions in which UPDRS III scores and putaminal BP values correlated with rCMRglc. The SPM results showed a negative correlation between UPDRS III and rCMRglc in premotor cortex, and a positive correlation between BP{sub OSEM} and rCMRglc in premotor and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, not surviving at multiple comparison correction. Instead, there was a positive significant correlation between putaminal BP{sub LS} and rCMRglc in premotor, dorsolateral prefrontal, anterior prefrontal, and orbitofrontal cortex (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparison). Putaminal BP{sub LS} is an efficient parameter for exploring the correlations between PD severity and rCMRglc cortical changes. The correlation between dopaminergic degeneration and rCMRglc in several prefrontal regions likely represents the cortical functional correlate of the dysfunction in the motor basal ganglia-cortical circuit in PD. This finding suggests focusing on the metabolic course of these areas to follow PD progression and to analyze treatment effects. (orig.)

  16. Identification of elevated urea as a severe, ubiquitous metabolic defect in the brain of patients with Huntington's disease.

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    Patassini, Stefano; Begley, Paul; Reid, Suzanne J; Xu, Jingshu; Church, Stephanie J; Curtis, Maurice; Dragunow, Mike; Waldvogel, Henry J; Unwin, Richard D; Snell, Russell G; Faull, Richard L M; Cooper, Garth J S

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder wherein the aetiological defect is a mutation in the Huntington's gene (HTT), which alters the structure of the huntingtin protein through the lengthening of a polyglutamine tract and initiates a cascade that ultimately leads to dementia and premature death. However, neurodegeneration typically manifests in HD only in middle age, and processes linking the causative mutation to brain disease are poorly understood. Here, our objective was to elucidate further the processes that cause neurodegeneration in HD, by measuring levels of metabolites in brain regions known to undergo varying degrees of damage. We applied gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics in a case-control study of eleven brain regions in short post-mortem-delay human tissue from nine well-characterized HD patients and nine controls. Unexpectedly, a single major abnormality was evident in all eleven brain regions studied across the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, namely marked elevation of urea, a metabolite formed in the urea cycle by arginase-mediated cleavage of arginine. Urea cycle activity localizes primarily in the liver, where it functions to incorporate protein-derived amine-nitrogen into urea for recycling or urinary excretion. It also occurs in other cell-types, but systemic over-production of urea is not known in HD. These findings are consistent with impaired local urea regulation in brain, by up-regulation of synthesis and/or defective clearance. We hypothesize that defective brain urea metabolism could play a substantive role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, perhaps via defects in osmoregulation or nitrogen metabolism. Brain urea metabolism is therefore a target for generating novel monitoring/imaging strategies and/or therapeutic interventions aimed at ameliorating the impact of HD in patients.

  17. Brain glucose metabolism is associated with hormone level in Cushing's disease: A voxel-based study using FDG-PET

    OpenAIRE

    Shuai Liu; Yinyan Wang; Kaibin Xu; Fan Ping; Renzhi Wang; Fang Li; Xin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids can exert a neurotoxic effect in patients, possibly manifesting as molecular imaging alterations in patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between brain metabolism and elevated hormone level using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. We retrospectively enrolled 92 consecutive patients with confirmed diagnosis of Cushing's disease. A voxel-based analysis was performed to investigate the...

  18. Apolipoprotein E metabolism and functions in brain and its role in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fan; Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Jungsu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review APOE4 genotype is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Prevailing evidence suggests that amyloid β plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease. The objective of this article is to review the recent findings about the metabolism of apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and amyloid β and other possible mechanisms by which ApoE contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent findings ApoE isoforms have differential effects on amyloid β metabolism. Recent studies demonstrated that ApoE-interacting proteins, such as ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) and LDL receptor, may be promising therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease treatment. Activation of liver X receptor and retinoid X receptor pathway induces ABCA1 and other genes, leading to amyloid β clearance. Inhibition of the negative regulators of ABCA1, such as microRNA-33, also induces ABCA1 and decreases the levels of ApoE and amyloid β. In addition, genetic inactivation of an E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein, increases LDL receptor levels and inhibits amyloid accumulation. Although amyloid β-dependent pathways have been extensively investigated, there have been several recent studies linking ApoE with vascular function, neuroinflammation, metabolism, synaptic plasticity, and transcriptional regulation. For example, ApoE was identified as a ligand for a microglial receptor, TREM2, and studies suggested that ApoE may affect the TREM2-mediated microglial phagocytosis. Summary Emerging data suggest that ApoE affects several amyloid β-independent pathways. These underexplored pathways may provide new insights into Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, it will be important to determine to what extent each mechanism contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27922847

  19. Brain Diseases

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    The brain is the control center of the body. It controls thoughts, memory, speech, and movement. It regulates the function of many organs. When the brain is healthy, it works quickly and automatically. However, ...

  20. Data set of interactomes and metabolic pathways of proteins differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer׳s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Minjarez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer׳s disease is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly and its frequency is on the rise worldwide. It is considered the result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors, being many of them unknown. Therefore, there is a dire necessity for the identification of novel molecular players for the understanding of this disease. In this data article we determined the protein expression profiles of whole protein extracts from cortex regions of brains from patients with Alzheimer׳s disease in comparison to a normal brain. We identified 721 iTRAQ-labeled polypeptides with more than 95% in confidence. We analyzed all proteins that changed in their expression level and located them in the KEGG metabolic pathways, as well as in the mitochondrial complexes of the electron transport chain and ATP synthase. In addition, we analyzed the over- and sub-expressed polypeptides through IPA software, specifically Core I and Biomarkers I modules. Data in this article is related to the research article “Identification of proteins that are differentially expressed in brains with Alzheimer’s disease using iTRAQ labeling and tandem mass spectrometry” (Minjarez et al., 2016 [1].

  1. An innovative approach to the treatment of Gaucher disease and possibly other metabolic disorders of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Roscoe O; Yang, Chunzhang; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2013-05-01

    The extraordinary benefit of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) on the systemic manifestations of Gaucher disease was demonstrated in 1991. Since that time, investigators have devoted substantial effort to improve the delivery of enzymes to the brain because many hereditary metabolic disorders are characterized by extensive central nervous system involvement. Because the required supplemental enzyme is too large to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), ERT for central nervous system involvement was out of the question at that time. Several innovative strategies that have been reported to overcome this impediment are discussed. Recent investigations have provided additional insight concerning the pathogenesis of enzyme deficiency disorders. For many years it was presumed that alterations of the amino acid sequence of enzymes such as glucocerebrosidase reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme. It has recently been shown that the decrease of glucocerebrosidase activity was the result of a quantitative loss of the amount of this enzyme. Significant increases of its activity were obtained with small molecule inhibitors of histone deacetylase that cross the BBB. The effect of such materials on neuronopathic Gaucher disease and other CNS metabolic disorders is discussed.

  2. Abnormal metabolic brain network associated with Parkinson's disease: replication on a new European sample

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    Tomse, Petra; Jensterle, Luka; Grmek, Marko; Zaletel, Katja [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pirtosek, Zvezdan; Trost, Maja [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Neurology, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dhawan, Vijay; Peng, Shichun; Eidelberg, David; Ma, Yilong [The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Center for Neurosciences, Manhasset, NY (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the specific metabolic brain pattern characteristic for Parkinson's disease (PD): Parkinson's disease-related pattern (PDRP), using network analysis of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) brain images in a cohort of Slovenian PD patients. Twenty PD patients (age 70.1 ± 7.8 years, Movement Disorder Society Unified Parkinson's Disease Motor Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS-III) 38.3 ± 12.2; disease duration 4.3 ± 4.1 years) and 20 age-matched normal controls (NCs) underwent FDG-PET brain imaging. An automatic voxel-based scaled subprofile model/principal component analysis (SSM/PCA) was applied to these scans for PDRP-Slovenia identification. The pattern was characterized by relative hypermetabolism in pallidum, putamen, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum associated with hypometabolism in sensorimotor cortex, posterior parietal, occipital, and frontal cortices. The expression of PDRP-Slovenia discriminated PD patients from NCs (p < 0.0001) and correlated positively with patients' clinical score (MDS-UPDRS-III, p = 0.03). Additionally, its topography agrees well with the original PDRP (p < 0.001) identified in American cohort of PD patients. We validated the PDRP-Slovenia expression on additional FDG-PET scans of 20 PD patients, 20 NCs, and 25 patients with atypical parkinsonism (AP). We confirmed that the expression of PDRP-Slovenia manifests good diagnostic accuracy with specificity and sensitivity of 85-90% at optimal pattern expression cutoff for discrimination of PD patients and NCs and is not expressed in AP. PDRP-Slovenia proves to be a robust and reproducible functional imaging biomarker independent of patient population. It accurately differentiates PD patients from NCs and AP and correlates well with the clinical measure of PD progression. (orig.)

  3. Association between fatty acid metabolism in the brain and Alzheimer disease neuropathology and cognitive performance: A nontargeted metabolomic study.

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    Stuart G Snowden

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD pathology and expression of AD symptoms is poorly understood. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids have previously been linked to both protective and pathogenic effects in AD. However, to date little is known about how the abundance of these species is affected by differing levels of disease pathology in the brain.We performed metabolic profiling on brain tissue samples from 43 individuals ranging in age from 57 to 95 y old who were stratified into three groups: AD (N = 14, controls (N = 14 and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD, i.e., individuals with significant AD neuropathology at death but without evidence for cognitive impairment during life (N = 15 from the autopsy sample of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA. We measured 4,897 metabolite features in regions both vulnerable in the middle frontal and inferior temporal gyri (MFG and ITG and resistant (cerebellum to classical AD pathology. The levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs in whole brain were compared in controls versus AD, and the differences were as follows: linoleic acid (p = 8.8 x 10-8, FC = 0.52, q = 1.03 x 10-6, linolenic acid (p = 2.5 x 10-4, FC = 0.84, q = 4.03 x 10-4, docosahexaenoic acid (p = 1.7 x 10-7, FC = 1.45, q = 1.24 x 10-6, eicosapentaenoic acid (p = 4.4 x 10-4, FC = 0.16, q = 6.48 x 10-4, oleic acid (p = 3.3 x 10-7, FC = 0.34, q = 1.46 x 10-6, and arachidonic acid (p = 2.98 x 10-5, FC = 0.75, q = 7.95 x 10-5. These fatty acids were strongly associated with AD when comparing the groups in the MFG and ITG, respectively: linoleic acid (p ASYMAD>AD and increases in docosahexanoic acid (AD>ASYMAD>control may represent regionally specific threshold levels of these metabolites beyond which the accumulation of AD pathology triggers the expression of clinical symptoms. The main limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. There are few cohorts with extensive longitudinal cognitive assessments

  4. Association between fatty acid metabolism in the brain and Alzheimer disease neuropathology and cognitive performance: A nontargeted metabolomic study.

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    Snowden, Stuart G; Ebshiana, Amera A; Hye, Abdul; An, Yang; Pletnikova, Olga; O'Brien, Richard; Troncoso, John; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2017-03-01

    The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology and expression of AD symptoms is poorly understood. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids have previously been linked to both protective and pathogenic effects in AD. However, to date little is known about how the abundance of these species is affected by differing levels of disease pathology in the brain. We performed metabolic profiling on brain tissue samples from 43 individuals ranging in age from 57 to 95 y old who were stratified into three groups: AD (N = 14), controls (N = 14) and "asymptomatic Alzheimer's disease" (ASYMAD), i.e., individuals with significant AD neuropathology at death but without evidence for cognitive impairment during life (N = 15) from the autopsy sample of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). We measured 4,897 metabolite features in regions both vulnerable in the middle frontal and inferior temporal gyri (MFG and ITG) and resistant (cerebellum) to classical AD pathology. The levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in whole brain were compared in controls versus AD, and the differences were as follows: linoleic acid (p = 8.8 x 10-8, FC = 0.52, q = 1.03 x 10-6), linolenic acid (p = 2.5 x 10-4, FC = 0.84, q = 4.03 x 10-4), docosahexaenoic acid (p = 1.7 x 10-7, FC = 1.45, q = 1.24 x 10-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (p = 4.4 x 10-4, FC = 0.16, q = 6.48 x 10-4), oleic acid (p = 3.3 x 10-7, FC = 0.34, q = 1.46 x 10-6), and arachidonic acid (p = 2.98 x 10-5, FC = 0.75, q = 7.95 x 10-5). These fatty acids were strongly associated with AD when comparing the groups in the MFG and ITG, respectively: linoleic acid (p ASYMAD>AD) and increases in docosahexanoic acid (AD>ASYMAD>control) may represent regionally specific threshold levels of these metabolites beyond which the accumulation of AD pathology triggers the expression of clinical symptoms. The main limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. There are few cohorts with extensive longitudinal cognitive assessments

  5. Association between fatty acid metabolism in the brain and Alzheimer disease neuropathology and cognitive performance: A nontargeted metabolomic study

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    An, Yang; Pletnikova, Olga; O’Brien, Richard; Troncoso, John; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Thambisetty, Madhav

    2017-01-01

    Background The metabolic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology and expression of AD symptoms is poorly understood. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids have previously been linked to both protective and pathogenic effects in AD. However, to date little is known about how the abundance of these species is affected by differing levels of disease pathology in the brain. Methods and findings We performed metabolic profiling on brain tissue samples from 43 individuals ranging in age from 57 to 95 y old who were stratified into three groups: AD (N = 14), controls (N = 14) and “asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease” (ASYMAD), i.e., individuals with significant AD neuropathology at death but without evidence for cognitive impairment during life (N = 15) from the autopsy sample of the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA). We measured 4,897 metabolite features in regions both vulnerable in the middle frontal and inferior temporal gyri (MFG and ITG) and resistant (cerebellum) to classical AD pathology. The levels of six unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in whole brain were compared in controls versus AD, and the differences were as follows: linoleic acid (p = 8.8 x 10−8, FC = 0.52, q = 1.03 x 10−6), linolenic acid (p = 2.5 x 10−4, FC = 0.84, q = 4.03 x 10−4), docosahexaenoic acid (p = 1.7 x 10−7, FC = 1.45, q = 1.24 x 10−6), eicosapentaenoic acid (p = 4.4 x 10−4, FC = 0.16, q = 6.48 x 10−4), oleic acid (p = 3.3 x 10−7, FC = 0.34, q = 1.46 x 10−6), and arachidonic acid (p = 2.98 x 10−5, FC = 0.75, q = 7.95 x 10−5). These fatty acids were strongly associated with AD when comparing the groups in the MFG and ITG, respectively: linoleic acid (p ASYMAD>AD) and increases in docosahexanoic acid (AD>ASYMAD>control) may represent regionally specific threshold levels of these metabolites beyond which the accumulation of AD pathology triggers the expression of clinical symptoms. The main limitation of this study is the relatively small sample size. There are few

  6. Sequential relationships between grey matter and white matter atrophy and brain metabolic abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.

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    Villain, Nicolas; Fouquet, Marine; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mézenge, Florence; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-11-01

    Hippocampal atrophy, posterior cingulate and frontal glucose hypometabolism, and white-matter tract disruption are well described early macroscopic events in Alzheimer's disease. The relationships between these three types of alterations have been documented in previous studies, but their chronology still remains to be established. The present study used multi-modal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging longitudinal data to address this question in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We found unidirectional, specific sequential relationships between: (i) baseline hippocampal atrophy and both cingulum bundle (r = 0.70; P = 3 × 10⁻³) and uncinate fasciculus (r = 0.75; P = 7 × 10⁻⁴) rate of atrophy; (ii) baseline cingulum bundle atrophy and rate of decline of posterior (r = 0.72; P = 2 × 10⁻³); and anterior (r = 0.74; P = 1 × 10⁻³) cingulate metabolism; and (iii) baseline uncinate white matter atrophy and subgenual metabolism rate of change (r = 0.65; P = 6 × 10⁻³). Baseline local grey matter atrophy was not found to contribute to hypometabolism progression within the posterior and anterior cingulate as well as subgenual cortices. These findings suggest that hippocampal atrophy progressively leads to disruption of the cingulum bundle and uncinate fasciculus, which in turn leads to glucose hypometabolism of the cingulate and subgenual cortices, respectively. This study reinforces the relevance of remote mechanisms above local interactions to account for the pattern of metabolic brain alteration observed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and provides new avenues to assess the sequence of events in complex diseases characterized by multiple manifestations.

  7. Brain Regulation of Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun; Kim, Min Seon

    2016-12-01

    In healthy individuals, energy intake is in balance with energy expenditure, which helps to maintain a normal body weight. The brain's inability to control energy homeostasis underlies the pathology of hyperphagia and obesity. The brain detects body energy excess and deficit by sensing the levels of circulating metabolic hormones and nutrients and by receiving metabolic information from the periphery via the autonomic nervous system. A specialized neuronal network coordinates energy intake behavior and the metabolic processes affecting energy expenditure. Here, we briefly review neuronal mechanisms by which our body maintains energy balance.

  8. Impaired PLP-dependent metabolism in brain samples from Huntington disease patients and transgenic R6/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, M Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Vived, Celia; Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as important to Huntington disease (HD) progression. In a previous HD study, we identified several carbonylated proteins, including pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin, both of which are involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5´-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6. In the present study, pyridoxal kinase levels were quantified and showed to be decreased both in HD patients and a R6/1 mouse model, compared to control samples. A metabolomic analysis was used to analyze metabolites in brain samples of HD patients and R6/1 mice, compared to control samples using mass spectrometry. This technique allowed detection of increased concentrations of pyridoxal, the substrate of pyridoxal kinase. In addition, PLP, the product of the reaction, was decreased in striatum from R6/1 mice. Furthermore, glutamate and cystathionine, both substrates of PLP-dependent enzymes were increased in HD. This reinforces the hypothesis that PLP synthesis is impaired, and could explain some alterations observed in the disease. Together, these results identify PLP as a potential therapeutic agent.

  9. Cholesterol metabolism in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasinska, Joanna M; Hayden, Michael R

    2011-09-06

    The CNS is rich in cholesterol, which is essential for neuronal development and survival, synapse maturation, and optimal synaptic activity. Alterations in brain cholesterol homeostasis are linked to neurodegeneration. Studies have demonstrated that Huntington disease (HD), a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting from polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein, is associated with changes in cellular cholesterol metabolism. Emerging evidence from human and animal studies indicates that attenuated brain sterol synthesis and accumulation of cholesterol in neuronal membranes represent two distinct mechanisms occurring in the presence of mutant huntingtin that influence neuronal survival. Increased knowledge of how changes in intraneuronal cholesterol metabolism influence the pathogenesis of HD will provide insights into the potential application of brain cholesterol regulation as a therapeutic strategy for this devastating disease.

  10. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura K. Teune, MD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: We identified PD-related perfusion and metabolic brain patterns using PCASL and FDG-PET in the same patients which were comparable with results of existing research. In this respect, PCASL appears to be a promising addition in the early diagnosis of individual parkinsonian patients.

  11. Parkinson's disease-related perfusion and glucose metabolic brain patterns identified with PCASL-MRI and FDG-PET imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Willemsen, Antoon T.; van Osch, Matthias J.; Roerdink, Jos B. T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Under normal conditions, the spatial distribution of resting cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of glucose are closely related. A relatively new magnetic resonance (MR) technique, pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL), can be used to measure regional brain perfu

  12. Reduced levels of dopamine and altered metabolism in brains of HPRT knock-out rats: a new rodent model of Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Stephen; Thomson, Alison J; Sutherland, Linda; Sharp, Matthew G F; Thomson, Julie; Bishop, Valerie; Meddle, Simone L; Gloaguen, Yoann; Weidt, Stefan; Singh-Dolt, Karamjit; Buehr, Mia; Brown, Helen K; Gill, Andrew C; Burdon, Tom

    2016-05-17

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a severe neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), an enzyme required for efficient recycling of purine nucleotides. Although this biochemical defect reconfigures purine metabolism and leads to elevated levels of the breakdown product urea, it remains unclear exactly how loss of HPRT activity disrupts brain function. As the rat is the preferred rodent experimental model for studying neurobiology and diseases of the brain, we used genetically-modified embryonic stem cells to generate an HPRT knock-out rat. Male HPRT-deficient rats were viable, fertile and displayed normal caged behaviour. However, metabolomic analysis revealed changes in brain biochemistry consistent with disruption of purine recycling and nucleotide metabolism. Broader changes in brain biochemistry were also indicated by increased levels of the core metabolite citrate and reduced levels of lipids and fatty acids. Targeted MS/MS analysis identified reduced levels of dopamine in the brains of HPRT-deficient animals, consistent with deficits noted previously in human LND patients and HPRT knock-out mice. The HPRT-deficient rat therefore provides a new experimental platform for future investigation of how HPRT activity and disruption of purine metabolism affects neural function and behaviour.

  13. Metabolism and Brain Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suely Kazue Nagahashi Marie; Sueli Mieko Oba Shinjo

    2011-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism is one of the main processes affected during the transition from normal to cancer cells, and it is a crucial determinant of cell proliferation or cell death. As a support for rapid proliferation, cancer cells choose to use glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect) to fuel macromolecules for the synthesis of nucleotides, fatty acids, and amino acids for the accelerated mitosis, rather than fuel the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylati...

  14. In Alzheimer's disease, 6-month treatment with GLP-1 analog prevents decline of brain glucose metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95...... with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe...... in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means...

  15. Aging, the metabolic syndrome, and ischemic stroke: redefining the approach for studying the blood-brain barrier in a complex neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) has many important functions in maintaining the brain's immune-privileged status. Endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes have important roles in preserving vasculature integrity. As we age, cell senescence can contribute to BBB compromise. The compromised BBB allows an influx of inflammatory cytokines to enter the brain. These cytokines lead to neuronal and glial damage. Ultimately, the functional changes within the brain can cause age-related disease. One of the most prominent age-related diseases is ischemic stroke. Stroke is the largest cause of disability and is third largest cause of mortality in the United States. The biggest risk factors for stroke, besides age, are results of the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome, if unchecked, quickly advances to outcomes that include diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. The contribution from these comorbidities to BBB compromise is great. Some of the common molecular pathways activated include: endoplasmic reticulum stress, reactive oxygen species formation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. In this chapter, we examine how age-related changes to cells within the central nervous system interact with comorbidities. We then look at how comorbidities lead to increased risk for stroke through BBB disruption. Finally, we discuss key molecular pathways of interest with a focus on therapeutic targets that warrant further investigation.

  16. [The Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: A metabolic disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieu, I; Boirie, Y; Morio, B; Derost, P; Ulla, M; Marques, A; Debilly, B; Bannier, S; Durif, F

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by motor impairments (tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability) associated or not with non-motor complications (cognitive disorders, dysautonomia). Most of patients loose weight during evolution of their disease. Dysregulations of hypothalamus, which is considered as the regulatory center of satiety and energy metabolism, could play a major role in this phenomenon. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (NST) is an effective method to treat patients with advanced Parkinson's disease providing marked improvement of motor impairments. This chirurgical procedure also induces a rapid and strong body weight gain and sometimes obesity. This post-operative weight gain, which exceeds largely weight lost recorded in non-operated patient, could be responsible of metabolic disorders (such as diabetes) and cardiovascular diseases. This review describes body weight variations generated by Parkinson' disease and deep brain stimulation of the NST, and focuses on metabolic disorders capable to explain them. Finally, this review emphasizes on the importance of an adequate nutritional follow up care for parkinsonian patient.

  17. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Leuner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g. might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease (AD. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, these new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions.

  18. Timing of potential and metabolic brain energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korf, Jakob; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert

    2007-01-01

    The temporal relationship between cerebral electro-physiological activities, higher brain functions and brain energy metabolism is reviewed. The duration of action potentials and transmission through glutamate and GABA are most often less than 5 ms. Subjects may perform complex psycho-physiologic......The temporal relationship between cerebral electro-physiological activities, higher brain functions and brain energy metabolism is reviewed. The duration of action potentials and transmission through glutamate and GABA are most often less than 5 ms. Subjects may perform complex psycho...... functions. We introduce the concepts of potential and metabolic brain energy to distinguish trans-membrane gradients of ions or neurotransmitters and the capacity to generate energy from intra- or extra-cerebral substrates, respectively. Higher brain functions, such as memory retrieval, speaking...

  19. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild;

    2015-01-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean...... age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain...... different parameters of glucose metabolism (impairment of which is characteristic of diabetes mellitus) and brain aging....

  20. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  1. The cost of brain diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DiLuca, Monica; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

    Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists.......Brain diseases represent a considerable social and economic burden in Europe. With yearly costs of about 800 billion euros and an estimated 179 million people afflicted in 2010, brain diseases are an unquestionable emergency and a grand challenge for neuroscientists....

  2. FDG-PET changes in brain glucose metabolism from normal cognition to pathologically verified Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL 400, New York, NY (United States); Mistur, Rachel; Switalski, Remigiusz; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; De Santi, Susan; Reisberg, Barry [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Tsui, Wai Hon; De Leon, Mony J. [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); Nathan Kline Institute, Orangeburg, NY (United States); Wisniewski, Thomas [New York University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We report the first clinicopathological series of longitudinal FDG-PET scans in post-mortem (PM) verified cognitively normal elderly (NL) followed to the onset of Alzheimer's-type dementia (DAT), and in patients with mild DAT with progressive cognitive deterioration. Four NL subjects and three patients with mild DAT received longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and dynamic FDG-PET examinations with arterial input functions. NL subjects were followed for 13 {+-} 5 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 7 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 6 {+-} 3 years after the last FDG-PET. Two NL declined to mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and two developed probable DAT before death. DAT patients were followed for 9 {+-} 3 years, received FDG-PET examinations over 3 {+-} 2 years, and autopsy 7 {+-} 1 years after the last FDG-PET. Two DAT patients progressed to moderate-to-severe dementia and one developed vascular dementia. The two NL subjects who declined to DAT received a PM diagnosis of definite AD. Their FDG-PET scans indicated a progression of deficits in the cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRglc) from the hippocampus to the parietotemporal and posterior cingulate cortices. One DAT patient showed AD with diffuse Lewy body disease (LBD) at PM, and her last in vivo PET was indicative of possible LBD for the presence of occipital as well as parietotemporal hypometabolism. Progressive CMRglc reductions on FDG-PET occur years in advance of clinical DAT symptoms in patients with pathologically verified disease. The FDG-PET profiles in life were consistent with the PM diagnosis. (orig.)

  3. Effects of hyperammonemia on brain energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Leke, Renata;

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to the effects of elevated plasma ammonia levels on brain energy metabolism is abundant, but heterogeneous in terms of the conclusions. Thus, some studies claim that ammonia has a direct, inhibitory effect on energy metabolism whereas others find no such correlation...... but related to the fact that hepatic encephalopathy is always associated with reduced brain activity, a condition clearly characterized by a decreased CMRO2. Whether this may be related to changes in GABAergic function remains to be elucidated....

  4. Cerebral metabolic adaptation and ketone metabolism after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L

    2010-01-01

    The developing central nervous system has the capacity to metabolize ketone bodies. It was once accepted that on weaning, the ‘post-weaned/adult’ brain was limited solely to glucose metabolism. However, increasing evidence from conditions of inadequate glucose availability or increased energy demands has shown that the adult brain is not static in its fuel options. The objective of this review is to summarize the body of literature specifically regarding cerebral ketone metabolism at different ages, under conditions of starvation and after various pathologic conditions. The evidence presented supports the following findings: (1) there is an inverse relationship between age and the brain’s capacity for ketone metabolism that continues well after weaning; (2) neuroprotective potentials of ketone administration have been shown for neurodegenerative conditions, epilepsy, hypoxia/ischemia, and traumatic brain injury; and (3) there is an age-related therapeutic potential for ketone as an alternative substrate. The concept of cerebral metabolic adaptation under various physiologic and pathologic conditions is not new, but it has taken the contribution of numerous studies over many years to break the previously accepted dogma of cerebral metabolism. Our emerging understanding of cerebral metabolism is far more complex than could have been imagined. It is clear that in addition to glucose, other substrates must be considered along with fuel interactions, metabolic challenges, and cerebral maturation. PMID:17684514

  5. UCB Transplant of Inherited Metabolic Diseases With Administration of Intrathecal UCB Derived Oligodendrocyte-Like Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    Adrenoleukodystrophy; Batten Disease; Mucopolysaccharidosis II; Leukodystrophy, Globoid Cell; Leukodystrophy, Metachromatic; Neimann Pick Disease; Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease; Sandhoff Disease; Tay-Sachs Disease; Brain Diseases, Metabolic, Inborn; Alpha-Mannosidosis; Sanfilippo Mucopolysaccharidoses

  6. Specific regions of the brain are capable of fructose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppelt, Sarah A; Zhang, Wanming; Tolan, Dean R

    2017-02-15

    High fructose consumption in the Western diet correlates with disease states such as obesity and metabolic syndrome complications, including type II diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and non-alcoholic fatty acid liver disease. Liver and kidneys are responsible for metabolism of 40-60% of ingested fructose, while the physiological fate of the remaining fructose remains poorly understood. The primary metabolic pathway for fructose includes the fructose-transporting solute-like carrier transport proteins 2a (SLC2a or GLUT), including GLUT5 and GLUT9, ketohexokinase (KHK), and aldolase. Bioinformatic analysis of gene expression encoding these proteins (glut5, glut9, khk, and aldoC, respectively) identifies other organs capable of this fructose metabolism. This analysis predicts brain, lymphoreticular tissue, placenta, and reproductive tissues as possible additional organs for fructose metabolism. While expression of these genes is highest in liver, the brain is predicted to have expression levels of these genes similar to kidney. RNA in situ hybridization of coronal slices of adult mouse brains validate the in silico expression of glut5, glut9, khk, and aldoC, and show expression across many regions of the brain, with the most notable expression in the cerebellum, hippocampus, cortex, and olfactory bulb. Dissected samples of these brain regions show KHK and aldolase enzyme activity 5-10 times the concentration of that in liver. Furthermore, rates of fructose oxidation in these brain regions are 15-150 times that of liver slices, confirming the bioinformatics prediction and in situ hybridization data. This suggests that previously unappreciated regions across the brain can use fructose, in addition to glucose, for energy production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier transport and CNS drug metabolism in diseased and control brain after intravenous L-DOPA in a unilateral rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravenstijn Paulien GM

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB functionality have been implicated in Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate BBB transport of L-DOPA transport in conjunction with its intra-brain conversion, in both control and diseased cerebral hemispheres in the unilateral rat rotenone model of Parkinson's disease. Methods In Lewis rats, at 14 days after unilateral infusion of rotenone into the medial forebrain bundle, L-DOPA was administered intravenously (10, 25 or 50 mg/kg. Serial blood samples and brain striatal microdialysates were analysed for L-DOPA, and the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA. Ex-vivo brain tissue was analyzed for changes in tyrosine hydroxylase staining as a biomarker for Parkinson's disease severity. Data were analysed by population pharmacokinetic analysis (NONMEM to compare BBB transport of L-DOPA in conjunction with the conversion of L-DOPA into DOPAC and HVA, in control and diseased cerebral hemisphere. Results Plasma pharmacokinetics of L-DOPA could be described by a 3-compartmental model. In rotenone responders (71%, no difference in L-DOPA BBB transport was found between diseased and control cerebral hemisphere. However, in the diseased compared with the control side, basal microdialysate levels of DOPAC and HVA were substantially lower, whereas following L-DOPA administration their elimination rates were higher. Conclusions Parkinson's disease-like pathology, indicated by a huge reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase as well as by substantially reduced levels and higher elimination rates of DOPAC and HVA, does not result in changes in BBB transport of L-DOPA. Taking the results of this study and that of previous ones, it can be concluded that changes in BBB functionality are not a specific characteristic of Parkinson's disease, and cannot account for the decreased benefit of L-DOPA at later stages of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Brain glucose metabolism in the early and specific diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. FDG-PET studies in MCI and AD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosconi, Lisa [University of Florence, Department of Clinical Pathophysiology, Nuclear Medicine Unit (Italy); University School of Medicine, Center for Brain Health, MHL400, Department of Psychiatry New York, New York, NY (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The demographics of aging suggest a great need for the early diagnosis of dementia and the development of preventive strategies. Neuropathology and structural MRI studies have pointed to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) as the brain region earliest affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD). MRI findings provide strong evidence that in mild cognitive impairments (MCI), AD-related volume losses can be reproducibly detected in the hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex (EC) and, to a lesser extent, the parahippocampal gyrus; they also indicate that lateral temporal lobe changes are becoming increasingly useful in predicting the transition to dementia. Fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging has revealed glucose metabolic reductions in the parieto-temporal, frontal and posterior cingulate cortices to be the hallmark of AD. Overall, the pattern of cortical metabolic changes has been useful for the prediction of future AD as well as in distinguishing AD from other neurodegenerative diseases. FDG-PET on average achieves 90% sensitivity in identifying AD, although specificity in differentiating AD from other dementias is lower. Moreover, recent MRI-guided FDG-PET studies have shown that MTL hypometabolism is the most specific and sensitive measure for the identification of MCI, while the utility of cortical deficits is controversial. This review highlights cross-sectional, prediction and longitudinal FDG-PET studies and attempts to put into perspective the value of FDG-PET in diagnosing AD-like changes, particularly at an early stage, and in providing diagnostic specificity. The examination of MTL structures, which has so far been exclusive to MRI protocols, is then examined as a possible strategy to improve diagnostic specificity. All told, there is considerable promise that early and specific diagnosis is feasible through a combination of imaging modalities. (orig.)

  9. Imbalanced cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue-shan, Zhao; Juan, Peng; Qi, Wu; Zhong, Ren; Li-hong, Pan; Zhi-han, Tang; Zhi-sheng, Jiang; Gui-xue, Wang; Lu-shan, Liu

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and multifactorial neurodegenerative disease that is mainly caused by β-amyloid accumulation. A large number of studies have shown that elevated cholesterol levels may perform a function in AD pathology, and several cholesterol-related gene polymorphisms are associated with this disease. Although numerous studies have shown the important function of cholesterol in AD pathogenesis and development, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To further elucidate cholesterol metabolism disorder and AD, we first, review metabolism and regulation of the cholesterol in the brain. Second, we summarize the literature stating that hypercholesterolemia is one of the risk factors of AD. Third, we discuss the main mechanisms of abnormal cholesterol metabolism that increase the risk of AD. Finally, the relationships between AD and apolipoprotein E, PCSK9, and LRP1 are discussed in this article.

  10. Improved mitochondrial function in brain aging and Alzheimer disease - the new mechanism of action of the old metabolic enhancer piracetam

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g., might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced ATP production, and ...

  11. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  12. Metabolic syndrome and eye diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Stanley; Mohamed Abdul, Riswana Banu Binte; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Wong, Tien Y; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is becoming a worldwide medical and public health challenge as it has been seen increasing in prevalence over the years. Age-related eye diseases, the leading cause of blindness globally and visual impairment in developed countries, are also on the rise due to aging of the population. Many of the individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been shown to be associated with these eye diseases. However, the association of metabolic syndrome with eye diseases is not clear. In this review, we reviewed the evidence for associations between metabolic syndrome and certain ocular diseases in populations. We also reviewed the association of individual metabolic syndrome components with ocular diseases due to a paucity of research in this area. Besides, we also summarised the current understanding of etiological mechanisms of how metabolic syndrome or the individual components lead to these ocular diseases. With increasing evidence of such associations, it may be important to identify patients who are at risk of developing metabolic syndrome as prompt treatment and intervention may potentially decrease the risk of developing certain ocular diseases.

  13. Quantitative longitudinal interrelationships between brain metabolism and amyloid deposition during a 2-year follow-up in patients with early Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, Stefan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Klupp, Elisabeth [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Rominger, Axel [Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Foerstl, Hans; Kurz, Alexander; Grimmer, Timo [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Munich (Germany); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, TUM-Neuroimaging Center (TUM-NIC), Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Similar regional anatomical distributions were reported for fibrillary amyloid deposition [measured by {sup 11}C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) positron emission tomography (PET)] and brain hypometabolism [measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET] in numerous Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies. However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies evaluating the interrelationships of these two different pathological markers in the same AD population. Our most recent AD study suggested that the longitudinal pattern of hypometabolism anatomically follows the pattern of amyloid deposition with temporal delay, which indicates that neuronal dysfunction may spread within the anatomical pattern of amyloid pathology. Based on this finding we now hypothesize that in early AD patients quantitative longitudinal decline in hypometabolism may be related to the amount of baseline amyloid deposition during a follow-up period of 2 years. Fifteen patients with mild probable AD underwent baseline (T1) and follow-up (T2) examination after 24 {+-} 2.1 months with [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 11}C]PIB PET, structural T1-weighted MRI and neuropsychological testing [Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) neuropsychological battery]. Longitudinal cognitive measures and quantitative PET measures of amyloid deposition and metabolism [standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs)] were obtained using volume of interest (VOI)-based approaches in the frontal-lateral-retrosplenial (FLR) network and in predefined bihemispheric brain regions after partial volume effect (PVE) correction of PET data. Statistical group comparisons (SUVRs and cognitive measures) between patients and 15 well-matched elderly controls who had undergone identical imaging procedures once as well as Pearson's correlation analyses within patients were performed. Group comparison revealed significant cognitive decline and increased mean PIB/decreased FDG SUVRs in the FLR network as well as

  14. In vivo Dynamic Studies of Brain Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xuechun; JIANG Yufeng; ZHANG Riqing

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can noninvasively monitor intracellular concentrations and kinetic properties of numerous inorganic and organic compounds. A 31P NMR surface coil was used in vivo to dynamically measure phosphocreatine (PCr), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and intracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels in mouse brain during ischemia-reperfusion to study the damage of cerebral tissues caused by ischemia and effects of herbs on cerebral energy metabolism during ischemia-reperfusion. The study provides dynamic brain energy metabolism data during different periods. The data show that some herbs more rapidly increase the PCr level during the recovery phase than in the control group.

  15. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  16. Martial Arts and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetaka Hamasaki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of martial arts are practiced worldwide, each with various intensities of physical activity. These disciplines are potentially an effective exercise therapy for metabolic diseases. Tai chi is the most well-studied style of martial arts and has shown evidence of its effect on metabolic diseases; however, little evidence is available regarding the association between other styles of martial arts and metabolic health. To summarize and evaluate the effects of martial arts on metabolic diseases, eligible articles were searched by using Pubmed. To date, systematic reviews provide no definite conclusion on the effectiveness of tai chi for treating metabolic diseases because of a small numbers of subjects, short durations of clinical trials, and some biases involved in testing. However, there are several clinical studies on subjects with metabolic diseases, which show that tai chi improves obesity, glycemic control, blood pressure control, and lipid profiles. Currently, some limited evidence suggests that other martial arts, such as kung fu and karate, may be beneficial for body composition, glycemic control, and arterial stiffness. To clarify the effectiveness of martial arts for treating metabolic diseases, well-designed prospective studies, preferably with a larger number of subjects and of longer duration, are warranted.

  17. Lysophosphatidylinositol Signalling and Metabolic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamsul A. Arifin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism is a chemical process used by cells to transform food-derived nutrients, such as proteins, carbohydrates and fats, into chemical and thermal energy. Whenever an alteration of this process occurs, the chemical balance within the cells is impaired and this can affect their growth and response to the environment, leading to the development of a metabolic disease. Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several metabolic risk factors such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidaemia, is increasingly common in modern society. Metabolic syndrome, as well as other diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia and hypertension, are associated with abnormal lipid metabolism. Cellular lipids are the major component of cell membranes; they represent also a valuable source of energy and therefore play a crucial role for both cellular and physiological energy homeostasis. In this review, we will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the lysophospholipid mediator lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI and its receptor G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55 in metabolic diseases. LPI is a bioactive lipid generated by phospholipase A (PLA family of lipases which is believed to play an important role in several diseases. Indeed LPI can affect various functions such as cell growth, differentiation and motility in a number of cell-types. Recently published data suggest that LPI plays an important role in different physiological and pathological contexts, including a role in metabolism and glucose homeostasis.

  18. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  19. Inflammatory mechanisms linking obesity and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, Alan R; Olefsky, Jerrold M

    2017-01-03

    There are currently over 1.9 billion people who are obese or overweight, leading to a rise in related health complications, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, cancer, and neurodegeneration. The finding that obesity and metabolic disorder are accompanied by chronic low-grade inflammation has fundamentally changed our view of the underlying causes and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We now know that an inflammatory program is activated early in adipose expansion and during chronic obesity, permanently skewing the immune system to a proinflammatory phenotype, and we are beginning to delineate the reciprocal influence of obesity and inflammation. Reviews in this series examine the activation of the innate and adaptive immune system in obesity; inflammation within diabetic islets, brain, liver, gut, and muscle; the role of inflammation in fibrosis and angiogenesis; the factors that contribute to the initiation of inflammation; and therapeutic approaches to modulate inflammation in the context of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  20. Vitamin C in health and disease: its role in the metabolism of cells and redox state in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eFigueroa-Mendez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ever since Linus Pauling published his studies, the effects of vitamin C have been surrounded by contradictory results. This may be because its effects depend on a number of factors such as the redox state of the body, the dose used, and also on the tissue metabolism. This review deals with vitamin C pharmacokinetics and its participation in neurophysiological processes, as well as its role in the maintenance of redox balance. The distribution and the concentration of vitamin C in the organs depend on the ascorbate requirements of each and on the tissue distribution of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 1 and 2 (SVCT1 and SVCT2. This determines the specific distribution pattern of vitamin C in the body. Vitamin C is involved in the physiology of the nervous system, including the support and the structure of the neurons, the processes of differentiation, maturation and neuronal survival; the synthesis of catecholamine, and the modulation of neurotransmission. This antioxidant interacts with self-recycling mechanisms, including its participation in the endogenous antioxidant system. We conclude that the pharmacokinetic properties of ascorbate are related to the redox state and its functions and effects in tissues.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Brain Dopamine Transporter Binding and Glucose Metabolism in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eero Rissanen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a patient with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD who developed initial symptoms mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP. Before the development of typical CJD symptoms, functional imaging supported a diagnosis of PSP when [123I]-FP-CIT-SPECT showed a defect in striatal dopamine transporter binding, while [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET showed cortical hypometabolism suggestive of Lewy body dementia. However, the postmortem neuropathological examination was indicative of CJD only, without tau protein or Lewy body findings. This case demonstrates that CJD should be taken into account in rapidly progressing atypical cases of parkinsonism, even when functional imaging supports a diagnosis of a movement disorder.

  3. Metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharti Vipin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important for a dentist to be well informed and updated on the latest research on the association of oral and systemic health. Of late, the metabolic syndrome has gained importance in dental literature, and metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease have been linked. Metabolic syndrome (MeS is a group of three or more (up to five interrelated metabolic abnormalities, which increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Also, both MeS and periodontal disease may be linked through a common pathophysiological pathway. Some studies have been conducted to show such an association and additional studies are required to establish this association. A dental surgeon can play a major role in evaluating patients with MeS and thus prevent the development of overt cardiovascular disease.

  4. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manxia An

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome.

  5. Ketones and brain development: Implications for correcting deteriorating brain glucose metabolism during aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugent Scott

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain energy metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized mainly by temporo-parietal glucose hypometabolism. This pattern has been widely viewed as a consequence of the disease, i.e. deteriorating neuronal function leading to lower demand for glucose. This review will address deteriorating glucose metabolism as a problem specific to glucose and one that precedes AD. Hence, ketones and medium chain fatty acids (MCFA could be an alternative source of energy for the aging brain that could compensate for low brain glucose uptake. MCFA in the form of dietary medium chain triglycerides (MCT have a long history in clinical nutrition and are widely regarded as safe by government regulatory agencies. The importance of ketones in meeting the high energy and anabolic requirements of the infant brain suggest they may be able to contribute in the same way in the aging brain. Clinical studies suggest that ketogenesis from MCT may be able to bypass the increasing risk of insufficient glucose uptake or metabolism in the aging brain sufficiently to have positive effects on cognition.

  6. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease Information Page Search Disorders ...

  7. Inflammatory diseases of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haehnel, Stefan (ed.) [University of Heidelberg Medical Center (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2009-07-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of inflammatory brain diseases from a neuroradiological point of view. Such diseases may be either infectious (e.g., viral encephalitis and pyogenic brain abscess) or non-infectious (e.g., multiple sclerosis), and many of these entities are becoming increasingly important for differential diagnosis, particularly in immunocompromised persons. Neuroimaging contributes greatly to the differentiation of infectious and noninfectious brain diseases and to the distinction between brain inflammation and other, for instance neoplastic, diseases. In order to ensure a standardized approach throughout the book, each chapter is subdivided into three principal sections: epidemiology, clinical presentation and therapy; imaging; and differential diagnosis. A separate chapter addresses technical and methodological issues and imaging protocols. All of the authors are recognized experts in their fields, and numerous high-quality and informative illustrations are included. This book will be of great value not only to neuroradiologists but also to neurologists, neuropediatricians, and general radiologists. (orig.)

  8. Kynurenine pathway metabolism and the microbiota-gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, P J; Cryan, J F; Dinan, T G; Clarke, G

    2017-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the gut microbiota influences not only gastrointestinal physiology but also central nervous system (CNS) function by modulating signalling pathways of the microbiota-gut-brain axis. Understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning the influence exerted by the gut microbiota on brain function and behaviour has become a key research priority. Microbial regulation of tryptophan metabolism has become a focal point in this regard, with dual emphasis on the regulation of serotonin synthesis and the control of kynurenine pathway metabolism. Here, we focus in detail on the latter pathway and begin by outlining the structural and functional dynamics of the gut microbiota and the signalling pathways of the brain-gut axis. We summarise preclinical and clinical investigations demonstrating that the gut microbiota influences CNS physiology, anxiety, depression, social behaviour, cognition and visceral pain. Pertinent studies are drawn from neurogastroenterology demonstrating the importance of tryptophan and its metabolites in CNS and gastrointestinal function. We outline how kynurenine pathway metabolism may be regulated by microbial control of neuroendocrine function and components of the immune system. Finally, preclinical evidence demonstrating direct and indirect mechanisms by which the gut microbiota can regulate tryptophan availability for kynurenine pathway metabolism, with downstream effects on CNS function, is reviewed. Targeting the gut microbiota represents a tractable target to modulate kynurenine pathway metabolism. Efforts to develop this approach will markedly increase our understanding of how the gut microbiota shapes brain and behaviour and provide new insights towards successful translation of microbiota-gut-brain axis research from bench to bedside. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'.

  9. In Alzheimer’s Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejl, Michael; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke; Møller, Arne; Hansen, Søren B.; Vang, Kim; Rodell, Anders; Brændgaard, Hans; Gottrup, Hanne; Schacht, Anna; Møller, Niels; Brock, Birgitte; Rungby, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    In animal models, the incretin hormone GLP-1 affects Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We hypothesized that treatment with GLP-1 or an analog of GLP-1 would prevent accumulation of Aβ and raise, or prevent decline of, glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in AD. In this 26-week trial, we randomized 38 patients with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [11C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [18F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means in precuneus (P = 0.009, 3.2 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 5.45; 0.92), and in parietal (P = 0.04, 2.1 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 4.21; 0.081), temporal (P = 0.046, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.05; 0.030), and occipital (P = 0.009, 2.10 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.61; 0.59) lobes, and in cerebellum (P = 0.04, 1.54 μmol/hg/min, 95% CI: 3.01; 0.064). In contrast, the GLP-1 analog treatment caused a numerical but insignificant increase of CMRglc after 6 months. Cognitive scores did not change. We conclude that the GLP-1 analog treatment prevented the decline of CMRglc that signifies cognitive impairment, synaptic dysfunction, and disease evolution. We draw no firm conclusions from the Aβ load or cognition measures, for which the study was underpowered. PMID:27252647

  10. A positron emission tomography analysis of glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease brain using [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose : A parallel study with elemental concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Spyrou, NM; Maguire, RP; Stedman, JD; Leenders, KL

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) isa debilitating form of dementia which leads to impaired memory, thinking and behavior. This work examines elemental concentrations between "normal" and AD subjects as well as the hemispherical differences within the brain. Tissue samples from both hemispheres of the fronta

  11. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer's Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using (18)F-FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using (18)F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer's cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  12. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals. PMID:27763550

  13. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1 transgenic (Tg mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr. Morris water maze (MWM was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD. By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD. Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  14. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GAB2 HAPLOTYPE AND HIGHER GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE-AFFECTED BRAIN REGIONS IN COGNITIVELY NORMAL APOEε4 CARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Winnie S.; Chen, Kewei; Lee, Wendy; Sidhar, Kunal; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Allen, April N.; Myers, Amanda; Villa, Stephen; Meechoovet, Bessie; Pruzin, Jeremy; Bandy, Daniel; Fleisher, Adam S.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Jensen, Kendall; Dunckley, Travis; Caselli, Richard J.; Kaib, Susan; Reiman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found an association between common haplotypes of the GAB2 gene and AD risk in carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, the major late-onset AD susceptibility gene. We previously proposed the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements as a quantitative presymptomatic endophenotype, more closely related to disease risk than the clinical syndrome itself, to help evaluate putative genetic and non-genetic modifiers of AD risk. In this study, we examined the relationship between the presence or absence of the relatively protective GAB2 haplotype and PET measurements of regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in several AD-affected brain regions in 158 cognitively normal late-middle-aged APOEε4 homozygotes, heterozygotes, and non-carriers. GAB2 haplotypes were characterized using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array data from each of these subjects. As predicted, the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype was associated with higher regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in AD-affected brain regions in APOEε4 carriers. While additional studies are needed, this study supports the association between the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype and the risk of late-onset AD in APOEε4 carriers. It also supports the use of brain-imaging endophenotypes to help assess possible modifiers of AD risk. PMID:20888920

  15. In Vivo NMR Studies of the Brain with Hereditary or Acquired Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Erica B; Lee, Phil; Choi, In-Young

    2015-12-01

    Metabolic disorders, whether hereditary or acquired, affect the brain, and abnormalities of the brain are related to cellular integrity; particularly in regard to neurons and astrocytes as well as interactions between them. Metabolic disturbances lead to alterations in cellular function as well as microscopic and macroscopic structural changes in the brain with diabetes, the most typical example of metabolic disorders, and a number of hereditary metabolic disorders. Alternatively, cellular dysfunction and degeneration of the brain lead to metabolic disturbances in hereditary neurological disorders with neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques allow us to assess a range of pathophysiological changes of the brain in vivo. For example, magnetic resonance spectroscopy detects alterations in brain metabolism and energetics. Physiological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects accompanying changes in cerebral blood flow related to neurovascular coupling. Diffusion and T1/T2-weighted MRI detect microscopic and macroscopic changes of the brain structure. This review summarizes current NMR findings of functional, physiological and biochemical alterations within a number of hereditary and acquired metabolic disorders in both animal models and humans. The global view of the impact of these metabolic disorders on the brain may be useful in identifying the unique and/or general patterns of abnormalities in the living brain related to the pathophysiology of the diseases, and identifying future fields of inquiry.

  16. Macrophage Polarization in Metabolism and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is now recognized as the main cause of the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is a contributing key factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Numbers of studies have clearly demonstrated that the immune system and metabolism are highly integrated. CONTENT: Macrophages are an essential component of innate immunity and play a central role in inflammation and host defense. Moreover, these cells have homeostatic functions beyond defense, including tissue remodeling in ontogenesis and orchestration of metabolic functions. Diversity and plasticity are hallmarks of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage. In response to interferons (IFNs, toll-like receptor (TLR, or interleukin (IL-4/IL-13 signals, macrophages undergo M1 (classical or M2 (alternative activation. Progress has now been made in defining the signaling pathways, transcriptional networks, and epigenetic mechanisms underlying M1, M2 or M2-like polarized activation. SUMMARY: In response to various signals, macrophages may undergo classical M1 activation (stimulated by TLR ligands and IFN-γ or alternative M2 activation (stimulated by IL-4/IL-13; these states mirror the T helper (Th1–Th2 polarization of T cells. Pathology is frequently associated with dynamic changes in macrophage activation, with classically activated M1 cells implicate in initiating and sustaining inflammation, meanwhile M2 or M2-like activated cells associated with resolution or smoldering chronic inflammation. Identification of the mechanisms and molecules that are associated with macrophage plasticity and polarized activation provides a basis for macrophage centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. KEYWORDS: obesity, adipose tissue, inflammation, macrophage polarization.

  17. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD.

  18. The Role of Metabolomics in Brain Metabolism Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisevic, Julijana; Siuzdak, Gary

    2015-09-01

    This special edition of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology focuses on the leading edge of metabolomics in brain metabolism research. The topics covered include a metabolomic field overview and the challenges in neuroscience metabolomics. The workflow and utility of different analytical platforms to profile complex biological matrices that include biofluids, brain tissue and cells, are shown in several case studies. These studies demonstrate how global and targeted metabolite profiling can be applied to distinguish disease stages and to understand the effects of drug action on the central nervous system (CNS). Finally, we discuss the importance of metabolomics to advance the understanding of brain function that includes ligand-receptor interactions and new insights into the mechanisms of CNS disorders.

  19. Morphine metabolism, transport and brain disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, Simona; De Gregori, Manuela; Ranzani, Guglielmina Nadia; Allegri, Massimo; Minella, Cristina; Regazzi, Mario

    2012-03-01

    The chemical structures of morphine and its metabolites are closely related to the clinical effects of drugs (analgesia and side-effects) and to their capability to cross the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). Morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and Morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) are both highly hydrophilic, but only M6G can penetrate the BBB; accordingly, M6G is considered a more attractive analgesic than the parent drug and the M3G. Several hypotheses have been made to explain these differences. In this review we will discuss recent advances in the field, considering brain disposition of M6G, UDP-glucoronosyltransferases (UGT) involved in morphine metabolism, UGT interindividual variability and transport proteins.

  20. Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: The contribution of cerebral metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Aminian, Kelly; Li, Crystal; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Strafella, Antonio P

    2017-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease associated with a feeling of overwhelming lack of energy. The aim of this study was to identify the neural substrates that may contribute to the development of fatigue in Parkinson's disease. Twenty-three Parkinson's disease patients meeting UK Brain Bank criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease were recruited and completed the 2-[(18) F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET scan. The metabolic activities of Parkinson's disease patients with fatigue were compared to those without fatigue using statistical parametric mapping analysis. The Parkinson's disease group exhibiting higher level of fatigue showed anti-correlated metabolic changes in cortical regions associated with the salience (i.e., right insular region) and default (i.e., bilateral posterior cingulate cortex) networks. The metabolic abnormalities detected in these brain regions displayed a significant correlation with level of fatigue and were associated with a disruption of the functional correlations with different cortical areas. These observations suggest that fatigue in Parkinson's disease may be the expression of metabolic abnormalities and impaired functional interactions between brain regions linked to the salience network and other neural networks. Hum Brain Mapp 38:283-292, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Congenital metabolic diseases: Diagnosis and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wapnir, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains eight parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: The Heritage of Sir Archibald Garrod; New Approaches to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Genetic Disease; Achievements, New Trends, and Policies in the Detection of Inborn Errors of Metabolism; Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism; Diseases of Energy Metabolism; Problems of Abnormal Storage Diseases; Inherited Diseases of Membrane Transport and Receptors; and Inborn Errors of Purine Metabolism and Urea Synthesis.

  2. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  3. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient–host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control and hippocampus (cognitive processing from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  4. Characterization of Behavioral, Neuropathological, Brain Metabolic and Key Molecular Changes in zQ175 Knock-In Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Peng

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is caused by an expansion of the trinucleotide poly (CAG tract located in exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt gene leading to progressive neurodegeneration in selected brain regions, and associated functional impairments in motor, cognitive, and psychiatric domains. Since the discovery of the gene mutation that causes the disease, mouse models have been developed by different strategies. Recently, a new model, the zQ175 knock-in (KI line, was developed in an attempt to have the Htt gene in a context and causing a phenotype that more closely mimics HD in humans. The behavioral phenotype was characterized across the independent laboratories and important features reminiscent of human HD are observed in zQ175 mice. In the current study, we characterized the zQ175 model housed in an academic laboratory under reversed dark-light cycle, including motor function, in vivo longitudinal structural MRI imaging for brain volume, MRS for striatal metabolites, neuropathology, as well as a panel of key disease marker proteins in the striatum at different ages. Our results suggest that homozygous zQ175 mice exhibited significant brain atrophy before the motor deficits and brain metabolite changes. Altered striatal medium spiny neuronal marker, postsynaptic marker protein and complement component C1qC also characterized zQ175 mice. Our results confirmed that the zQ175 KI model is valuable in understanding of HD-like pathophysiology and evaluation of potential therapeutics. Our data also provide suggestions to select appropriate outcome measurements in preclinical studies using the zQ175 mice.

  5. The Triangle of Death in Alzheimer's Disease Brain: The Aberrant Cross-Talk Among Energy Metabolism, Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling, and Protein Homeostasis Revealed by Redox Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Barone, Eugenio; Perluigi, Marzia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2017-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder and represents one of the most disabling conditions. AD shares many features in common with systemic insulin resistance diseases, suggesting that it can be considered as a metabolic disease, characterized by reduced insulin-stimulated growth and survival signaling, increased oxidative stress (OS), proinflammatory cytokine activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired energy metabolism, and altered protein homeostasis. Recent Advances: Reduced glucose utilization and energy metabolism in AD have been associated with the buildup of amyloid-β peptide and hyperphosphorylated tau, increased OS, and the accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is aberrantly activated in AD since early stages, plays a key role during AD neurodegeneration by, on one side, inhibiting insulin signaling as a negative feedback mechanism and, on the other side, regulating protein homeostasis (synthesis/clearance). It is likely that the concomitant and mutual alterations of energy metabolism-mTOR signaling-protein homeostasis might represent a self-sustaining triangle of harmful events that trigger the degeneration and death of neurons and the development and progression of AD. Intriguingly, the altered cross-talk between the components of such a triangle of death, beyond altering the redox homeostasis of the neuron, is further exacerbated by increased levels of OS that target and impair key components of the pathways involved. Redox proteomic studies in human samples and animal models of AD-like dementia led to identification of oxidatively modified components of the pathways composing the triangle of death, therefore revealing the crucial role of OS in fueling this aberrant vicious cycle. The identification of compounds able to restore the function of the pathways targeted by oxidative damage might represent a valuable therapeutic approach to slow or delay AD. Antioxid

  6. Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolic Diseases: Pharmacological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of studies show that alterations in intestinal microbiota are linked with metabolic diseases. Here, we propose that intestinal microbiota regulation by polyphenols may be an important mechanism underlying their therapeutic benefits for metabolic diseases. This helps elucidate the intriguing pharmacology of polyphenols and optimize the treatment of metabolic diseases.

  7. Improved Mitochondrial Function in Brain Aging and Alzheimer Disease – the New Mechanism of Action of the Old Metabolic Enhancer Piracetam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuner, Kristina; Kurz, Christopher; Guidetti, Giorgio; Orgogozo, Jean-Marc; Müller, Walter E.

    2010-01-01

    Piracetam, the prototype of the so-called nootropic drugs’ is used since many years in different countries to treat cognitive impairment in aging and dementia. Findings that piracetam enhances fluidity of brain mitochondrial membranes led to the hypothesis that piracetam might improve mitochondrial function, e.g., might enhance ATP synthesis. This assumption has recently been supported by a number of observations showing enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, enhanced ATP production, and reduced sensitivity for apoptosis in a variety of cell and animal models for aging and Alzheimer disease. As a specific consequence, substantial evidence for elevated neuronal plasticity as a specific effect of piracetam has emerged. Taken together, this new findings can explain many of the therapeutic effects of piracetam on cognition in aging and dementia as well as different situations of brain dysfunctions. PMID:20877425

  8. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and gallstone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ying; Qiao, Qiao-Hua; Zhang, Shan-Chun; Chen, Yu-Hao; Chao, Guan-Qun; Fang, Li-Zheng

    2012-08-21

    To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the development of gallstone disease (GSD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in 7570 subjects (4978 men aged 45.0 ± 8.8 years, and 2592 women aged 45.3 ± 9.5 years) enrolled from the physical check-up center of the hospital. The subjects included 918 patients with gallstones (653 men and 265 women) and 6652 healthy controls (4325 men and 2327 women) without gallstones. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured. Colorimetric method was used to measure cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Dextrose oxidizing enzyme method was used to measure FPG. Subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire that enquired about the information on demographic data, age, gender, histories of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and chronic liver disease and so on. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) criteria. Gallstones were defined by the presence of strong intraluminal echoes that were gravity-dependent or attenuated ultrasound transmission. Among the 7570 subjects, the prevalence of the gallstone disease was 12.1% (13.1% in men and 10.2% in women). BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose and serum triglyceride (TG) in cases group were higher than in controls, while serum high-density lipid was lower than in controls. There were significant differences in the waist circumference, blood pressure, FPG and TG between cases and controls. In an age-adjusted logistic regression model, metabolic syndrome was associated with gallstone disease. The age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for GSD in men was 1.29 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.52; P = 0.0030], and 1.68 (95% CI, 1.26-2.25; P = 0.0004) in women; the overall age-adjusted odds ratio of

  10. Metabolic bone disease of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy E. Rustico, MD

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic bone disease (MBD of prematurity remains a significant problem for preterm, chronically ill neonates. The definition and recommendations for screening and treatment of MBD vary in the literature. A recent American Academy of Pediatrics Consensus Statement may help close the gap in institutional variation, but evidence based practice guidelines remain obscure due to lack of normative data and clinical trials for preterm infants. This review highlights mineral homeostasis physiology, current recommendations in screening and monitoring, prevention and treatment strategies, and an added perspective of a bone health team serving a high volume referral neonatal intensive care center.

  11. Increased brain fatty acid uptake in metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti

    2010-01-01

    To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it.......To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it....

  12. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C. F.; Rosa, Daniela V.; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B. F.; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A.; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M.

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies. PMID:28293169

  13. Brain Metabolism Changes in Patients Infected with HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütze, Manuel; Romanelli, Luiz C F; Rosa, Daniela V; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna B F; Nicolato, Rodrigo; Romano-Silva, Marco A; Brammer, Michael; de Miranda, Débora M

    2017-01-01

    The Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the causal agent of HTLV-associated myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HAM/TSP is the result of demyelination and cell death in the spinal cord and disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), mediated by a virus-induced inflammatory response. In this study, we applied Positron Emission Tomography with 18F-fluordeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET) to evaluate brain metabolism in a group of 47 patients infected with HTLV-1, and 18 healthy controls. Patients were divided into three groups according to their neurological symptoms. A machine learning (ML) based Gaussian Processes classification algorithm (GPC) was applied to classify between patient groups and controls and also to organize the three patient groups, based on gray and white matter brain metabolism. We found that GPC was able to differentiate the HAM/TSP group from controls with 85% accuracy (p = 0.003) and the asymptomatic seropositive patients from controls with 85.7% accuracy (p = 0.001). The weight map suggests diffuse cortical hypometabolism in both patient groups when compared to controls. We also found that the GPC could separate the asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients from the HAM/TSP patients, but with a lower accuracy (72.7%, p = 0.026). The weight map suggests a diffuse pattern of lower metabolism in the asymptomatic group when compared to the HAM/TSP group. These results are compatible with distinctive patterns of glucose uptake into the brain of HTLV-1 patients, including those without neurological symptoms, which differentiate them from controls. Furthermore, our results might unveil surprising aspects of the pathophysiology of HAM/TSP and related diseases, as well as new therapeutic strategies.

  14. Disturbance of iron metabolism in brain and Alzheimer's disease%脑铁代谢紊乱与阿尔茨海默病

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符敬坦; 王璞; 郭闯

    2013-01-01

    脑内铁代谢的异常和其所致的氧化应激与阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)的发病有关.AD是常见于老年人的一种神经退行性疾病,其特征性的病理改变主要是脑内神经细胞外β-淀粉样蛋白(β-amyloid,Aβ)的沉积形成老年斑(senile plague,SP)、胞内神经原纤维缠结(neurofibrillary tangles,NFTs)和胆碱能神经元丢失.研究证实,在普通老年人和AD患者脑内有铁沉积增多的趋势,且铁等过渡金属离子与APP、Aβ和Tau蛋白密切相关,提示铁可能参与了AD的发病和进展等病理生理过程.因此,深入探讨铁在AD发病中可能的作用,有利于了解AD的发病机制,从而为AD疾病的治疗提供新的靶点.%The dysregulation of iron homeostasis and consequential induction of oxidative stress in the brain were related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease(AD). AD is a neurodegenerative disease often occurred in the old stage, with main pathologically features of the extracellular β-amyloid (A β) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and selective cholinergic neuronal loss in the brain. Recent studies have shown that Tau, APP and its proteolytic product A β are associated with metal homeostasis in the AD brain, suggesting that exposure to metals may potentially modulate AD pathology, either triggering or ameliorating disease progression. Exploring the effect of iron on the pathogenesis of AD may provide a new target for the prevention and treatment of AD.

  15. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...

  16. Metabolic syndrome and gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Chen; Qiao-Hua Qiao; Shan-Chun Zhang; Yu-Hao Chen; Guan-Qun Chao; Li-Zheng Fang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the development of gallstone disease (GSD).METHODS:A cross-sectional study was conducted in 7570 subjects (4978 men aged 45.0 ± 8.8 years,and 2592 women aged 45.3 ± 9.5 years) enrolled from the physical check-up center of the hospital.The subjects included 918 patients with gallstones (653 men and 265 women) and 6652 healthy controls (4325 men and 2327 women) without gallstones.Body mass index (BMI),waist circumference,blood pressure,fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured.Colorimetric method was used to measure cholesterol,high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).Dextrose oxidizing enzyme method was used to measure FPG.Subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire that enquired about the information on demographic data,age,gender,histories of diabetes mellitus,hypertension,and chronic liver disease and so on.Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ (ATP Ⅲ) criteria.Gallstones were defined by the presence of strong intraluminal echoes that were gravity-dependent or attenuated ultrasound transmission.RESULTS:Among the 7570 subjects,the prevalence of the gallstone disease was 12.1% (13.1% in men and 10.2% in women).BMI,waist circumference,systolic blood pressure,diastolic blood pressure,fasting blood glucose and serum triglyceride (TG) in cases group were higher than in controls,while serum high-density lipid was lower than in controls.There were significant differences in the waist circumference,blood pressure,FPG and TG between cases and controls.In an ageadjusted logistic regression model,metabolic syndrome was associated with gallstone disease.The age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for GSD in men was 1.29 [95%confidence interval (CI),1.09-1.52; P =0.0030],and 1.68 (95% CI,1.26-2.25; P =0.0004) in women; the overall age-adjusted odds ratio of MetS for

  17. Brain Diseases in Mesopotamian Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad Yuste

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In ancient Mesopotamia were not practiced neither autopsies nor dissections, so the internal organs of human body were known only from occasional inspections on wounds and injuries. The
    brain was considered as a part of the head and was not related to mental activity. However, Babylonian and Assyrian physicians were able to identify the symptoms of many diseases that affect this organ. We will make here a brief overview of them.

  18. Nerve growth factor metabolic dysfunction in Down's syndrome brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulita, M Florencia; Do Carmo, Sonia; Ower, Alison K; Fortress, Ashley M; Flores Aguilar, Lisi; Hanna, Michael; Wisniewski, Thomas; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Buhusi, Mona; Busciglio, Jorge; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-03-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons play a key role in cognition. This neuronal system is highly dependent on NGF for its synaptic integrity and the phenotypic maintenance of its cell bodies. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons progressively degenerate in Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome, and their atrophy contributes to the manifestation of dementia. Paradoxically, in Alzheimer's disease brains, the synthesis of NGF is not affected and there is abundance of the NGF precursor, proNGF. We have shown that this phenomenon is the result of a deficit in NGF's extracellular metabolism that compromises proNGF maturation and exacerbates its subsequent degradation. We hypothesized that a similar imbalance should be present in Down's syndrome. Using a combination of quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting and zymography, we investigated signs of NGF metabolic dysfunction in post-mortem brains from the temporal (n = 14), frontal (n = 34) and parietal (n = 20) cortex obtained from subjects with Down's syndrome and age-matched controls (age range 31-68 years). We further examined primary cultures of human foetal Down's syndrome cortex (17-21 gestational age weeks) and brains from Ts65Dn mice (12-22 months), a widely used animal model of Down's syndrome. We report a significant increase in proNGF levels in human and mouse Down's syndrome brains, with a concomitant reduction in the levels of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator messenger RNA as well as an increment in neuroserpin expression; enzymes that partake in proNGF maturation. Human Down's syndrome brains also exhibited elevated zymogenic activity of MMP9, the major NGF-degrading protease. Our results indicate a failure in NGF precursor maturation in Down's syndrome brains and a likely enhanced proteolytic degradation of NGF, changes which can compromise the trophic support of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. The alterations in pro

  19. Mathematical modeling of the human energy metabolism based on the Selfish Brain Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Matthias; Göbel, Britta

    2012-01-01

    Deregulations in the human energy metabolism may cause diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The origins of these pathologies are fairly unknown. The key role of the brain is the regulation of the complex whole body energy metabolism. The Selfish Brain Theory identifies the priority of brain energy supply in the competition for available energy resources within the organism. Here, we review mathematical models of the human energy metabolism supporting central aspects of the Selfish Brain Theory. First, we present a dynamical system modeling the whole body energy metabolism. This model takes into account the two central control mechanisms of the brain, i.e., allocation and appetite. Moreover, we present mathematical models of regulatory subsystems. We examine a neuronal model which specifies potential elements of the brain to sense and regulate cerebral energy content. We investigate a model of the HPA system regulating the allocation of energy within the organism. Finally, we present a robust modeling approach of appetite regulation. All models account for a systemic understanding of the human energy metabolism and thus do shed light onto defects causing metabolic diseases.

  20. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2016-06-30

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. The mechanisms and mediators (eg, nitric oxide, astrocytes, and ion channels) that regulate CBF-metabolism coupling have been extensively studied. The neurovascular unit is a conceptual model encompassing the anatomical and metabolic interactions between the neurons, vascular components, and glial cells in the brain. It is compromised under disease states such as stroke, diabetes, hypertension, dementias, and with aging, all of which trigger a cascade of inflammatory responses that exacerbate brain damage. Hence, tight regulation and maintenance of neurovascular coupling is central for brain homeostasis. This review article also discusses the waste clearance pathways in the brain such as the glymphatic system. The glymphatic system is a functional waste clearance pathway that removes metabolic wastes and neurotoxins from the brain along paravascular channels. Disruption of the glymphatic system burdens the brain with accumulating waste and has been reported in aging as well as several neurological diseases.

  1. Exercise-induced myokines in health and metabolic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byunghun So

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle has been emerging as a research field since the past 2 decades. Contraction of a muscle, which acts as a secretory organ, stimulates production, secretion, and expression of cytokines or other muscle fiber-derived peptides, i.e., myokines. Exercise-induced myokines influence crosstalk between different organs in an autocrine, endocrine, or paracrine fashion. Myokines are recently recognized as potential candidates for treating metabolic diseases through their ability to stimulate AMP-activated protein kinase signaling, increase glucose uptake, and improve lipolysis. Myokines may have positive effects on metabolic disorders, type 2 diabetes, or obesity. Numerous studies on myokines suggested that myokines offer a potential treatment option for preventing metabolic diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the positive effects of exercise-induced myokines, such as interleukin-15, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, leukemia inhibitory factor, irisin, fibroblast growth factor 21, and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, on metabolic diseases.

  2. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  3. Metabolic disease network and its implication for disease comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Deok-Sun; Oltvai, Zoltan; Christakis, Nicholas; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    Given that most diseases are the result of the breakdown of some cellular processes, a key aim of modern medicine is to establish the relationship between disease phenotypes and the various disruptions in the underlying cellular networks. Here we show that our current understanding of the structure of the human metabolic network can provide insight into potential relationships among often distinct disease phenotypes. Using the known enzyme-disease associations, we construct a human metabolic disease network in which nodes are diseases and two diseases are linked if the enzymes associated with them catalyze adjacent metabolic reactions. We find that the more connected a disease is, the higher is its prevalence and the chance that it is associated with a high mortality. The results indicate that the cellular network-level relationships between metabolic pathways and the associated disease provide insights into disease comorbidity, with potential important consequences on disease diagnosis and prevention.

  4. Metabolic costs and evolutionary implications of human brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzawa, Christopher W; Chugani, Harry T; Grossman, Lawrence I; Lipovich, Leonard; Muzik, Otto; Hof, Patrick R; Wildman, Derek E; Sherwood, Chet C; Leonard, William R; Lange, Nicholas

    2014-09-09

    The high energetic costs of human brain development have been hypothesized to explain distinctive human traits, including exceptionally slow and protracted preadult growth. Although widely assumed to constrain life-history evolution, the metabolic requirements of the growing human brain are unknown. We combined previously collected PET and MRI data to calculate the human brain's glucose use from birth to adulthood, which we compare with body growth rate. We evaluate the strength of brain-body metabolic trade-offs using the ratios of brain glucose uptake to the body's resting metabolic rate (RMR) and daily energy requirements (DER) expressed in glucose-gram equivalents (glucosermr% and glucoseder%). We find that glucosermr% and glucoseder% do not peak at birth (52.5% and 59.8% of RMR, or 35.4% and 38.7% of DER, for males and females, respectively), when relative brain size is largest, but rather in childhood (66.3% and 65.0% of RMR and 43.3% and 43.8% of DER). Body-weight growth (dw/dt) and both glucosermr% and glucoseder% are strongly, inversely related: soon after birth, increases in brain glucose demand are accompanied by proportionate decreases in dw/dt. Ages of peak brain glucose demand and lowest dw/dt co-occur and subsequent developmental declines in brain metabolism are matched by proportionate increases in dw/dt until puberty. The finding that human brain glucose demands peak during childhood, and evidence that brain metabolism and body growth rate covary inversely across development, support the hypothesis that the high costs of human brain development require compensatory slowing of body growth rate.

  5. Mental Illness And Brain Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrick, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    It has become common to say psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases. This reflects a conception of the mental as being biologically based, though it is also thought that thinking of psychiatric illness this way will reduce the stigma attached to psychiatric illness. If psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, however, it is not clear why psychiatry should not collapse into neurology, and some argue for this course. Others try to maintain a distinction by saying that neurology deals with abnormalities of neural structure while psychiatry deals with specific abnormalities of neural functioning. It is not clear that neurologists would accept this division, nor that they should. I argue that if we take seriously the notion that psychiatric illnesses are mental illnesses we can draw a more defensible boundary between psychiatry and neurology. As mental illnesses, psychiatric illnesses must have symptoms that affect our mental capacities and that the sufferer is capable of being aware of, even if they are not always self-consciously aware of them. Neurological illnesses, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, may be diagnosed even if they are silent, just as the person may not be aware of having high blood pressure or may suffer a silent myocardial infarction. It does not make sense to speak of panic disorder if the person has never had a panic attack, however, or of bipolar disorder in the absence of mood swings. This does not mean psychiatric illnesses are not biologically based. Mental illnesses are illnesses of persons, whereas other illnesses are illnesses of biological individuals.

  6. A Cellular Perspective on Brain Energy Metabolism and Functional Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-05-01

    The energy demands of the brain are high: they account for at least 20% of the body\\'s energy consumption. Evolutionary studies indicate that the emergence of higher cognitive functions in humans is associated with an increased glucose utilization and expression of energy metabolism genes. Functional brain imaging techniques such as fMRI and PET, which are widely used in human neuroscience studies, detect signals that monitor energy delivery and use in register with neuronal activity. Recent technological advances in metabolic studies with cellular resolution have afforded decisive insights into the understanding of the cellular and molecular bases of the coupling between neuronal activity and energy metabolism and pointat a key role of neuron-astrocyte metabolic interactions. This article reviews some of the most salient features emerging from recent studies and aims at providing an integration of brain energy metabolism across resolution scales. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We explored cognitive impairment in metabolic syndrome in relation to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 819 participants free of clinical stroke and dementia of the population-based Austrian Stroke Prevention Study who had undergone brain MRI, neuropsychological testing, and a risk factor assessment relevant to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria–defined metabolic syndrome. High-sensitivity C...

  8. 婴幼儿神经系统遗传代谢病的脑MRI研究%Brain imaging characteristics of inherited metabolic diseases in infants and young children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程爱兰; 冯赟; 侯亮; 曹雯君; 汪登斌; 金彪

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨婴幼儿神经系统遗传代谢病的脑MRI表现。方法收集2014年1月—12月我院诊治的16例遗传代谢病病人临床及影像资料,并结合临床特点及实验室检查分析该组病人的脑MRI表现。结果16例遗传代谢病病人中包括有机酸血症12例(甲基丙二酸血症8例,枫糖尿病4例),尿素循环障碍3例,异染性脑白质营养不良1例。12例有机酸血症中,7例基底节区信号异常,主要表现在T1 FLAIR上呈低信号,T2 FLAIR上呈稍高信号,DWI上呈明显高信号;4例脑干及2例小脑半球在DWI上呈明显高信号,2例脑萎缩,1例胼胝体在DWI上呈高信号,1例双侧半卵圆中心在T1 FLAIR上呈低信号、T2 FLAIR高信号、DWI高信号,1例脑室扩大。3例尿素循环障碍病人中2例脑室扩大,1例大脑皮质在DWI上呈弥漫性高信号。1例异染性脑白质营养不良表现为两侧侧脑室周围白质、半卵圆中心T2FLAIR高信号。结论婴幼儿神经系统遗传代谢病脑MRI表现缺乏特异性,根据疾病类型不同MRI表现各异,其中有机酸血症患儿以基底节区受累为主。%Objebtive To explore the characteristics of brain MRI images in pediatric patients with inherited metabolic diseases. Methods Sixteen pediatric patients within herited metabolic diseases were recruited from January 2014 to December 2014. Their clinical features, laboratory examsand brain MRI were analyzed. Results There were twelve cases of organic academia,eight case of methylmalonicacademia,four cases of maple syrup urine disease. Three cases of urea cycle disorders, and 1 case of metachromatic leukodystrophy. Among the 12 patients with organic acidemia, basal ganglia showed hypointensity on T1 FLAIR, mild hyperintensity on T2 FLAIR, and intense hyperintensity on DWI (n=7); brainstem and cerebellum showed intense hyperintensity on DWI (n=4 and 2, respectively);corpus callosum showed hyperintensityon DWI in 1 case

  9. Lipidomics of human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudí, Alba; Cabré, Rosanna; Jové, Mariona; Ayala, Victoria; Gonzalo, Hugo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald

    2015-01-01

    Lipids stimulated and favored the evolution of the brain. Adult human brain contains a large amount of lipids, and the largest diversity of lipid classes and lipid molecular species. Lipidomics is defined as "the full characterization of lipid molecular species and of their biological roles with respect to expression of proteins involved in lipid metabolism and function, including gene regulation." Therefore, the study of brain lipidomics can help to unravel the diversity and to disclose the specificity of these lipid traits and its alterations in neural (neurons and glial) cells, groups of neural cells, brain, and fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, thus helping to uncover potential biomarkers of human brain aging and Alzheimer disease. This review will discuss the lipid composition of the adult human brain. We first consider a brief approach to lipid definition, classification, and tools for analysis from the new point of view that has emerged with lipidomics, and then turn to the lipid profiles in human brain and how lipids affect brain function. Finally, we focus on the current status of lipidomics findings in human brain aging and Alzheimer's disease pathology. Neurolipidomics will increase knowledge about physiological and pathological functions of brain cells and will place the concept of selective neuronal vulnerability in a lipid context. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Amino Acid Catabolism in Alzheimer's Disease Brain: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    There is a dire need to discover new targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug development. Decreased neuronal glucose metabolism that occurs in AD brain could play a central role in disease progression. Little is known about the compensatory neuronal changes that occur to attempt to maintain energy homeostasis. In this review using the PubMed literature database, we summarize evidence that amino acid oxidation can temporarily compensate for the decreased glucose metabolism, but eventually altered amino acid and amino acid catabolite levels likely lead to toxicities contributing to AD progression. Because amino acids are involved in so many cellular metabolic and signaling pathways, the effects of altered amino acid metabolism in AD brain are far-reaching. Possible pathological results from changes in the levels of several important amino acids are discussed. Urea cycle function may be induced in endothelial cells of AD patient brains, possibly to remove excess ammonia produced from increased amino acid catabolism. Studying AD from a metabolic perspective provides new insights into AD pathogenesis and may lead to the discovery of dietary metabolite supplements that can partially compensate for alterations of enzymatic function to delay AD or alleviate some of the suffering caused by the disease. PMID:28261376

  11. Adipocytokines in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Noriyuki

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, particularly excess visceral fat accumulation, is highly associated with the development of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Adipose tissue produces a variety of secreted proteins, referred to as adipocytokines, which directly affect nearby or remote organs. Dysregulation of adipocytokines caused by obese conditions contributes to the pathogenesis of various metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. This review focuses on the significance of several adipocytokines that potentially exert beneficial actions on obesity-related diseases, including atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  12. Mental Illness And Brain Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedrick Jeffrey D.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It has become common to say psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases. This reflects a conception of the mental as being biologically based, though it is also thought that thinking of psychiatric illness this way will reduce the stigma attached to psychiatric illness. If psychiatric illnesses are brain diseases, however, it is not clear why psychiatry should not collapse into neurology, and some argue for this course. Others try to maintain a distinction by saying that neurology deals with abnormalities of neural structure while psychiatry deals with specific abnormalities of neural functioning. It is not clear that neurologists would accept this division, nor that they should. I argue that if we take seriously the notion that psychiatric illnesses are mental illnesses we can draw a more defensible boundary between psychiatry and neurology. As mental illnesses, psychiatric illnesses must have symptoms that affect our mental capacities and that the sufferer is capable of being aware of, even if they are not always self-consciously aware of them. Neurological illnesses, such as stroke or multiple sclerosis, may be diagnosed even if they are silent, just as the person may not be aware of having high blood pressure or may suffer a silent myocardial infarction. It does not make sense to speak of panic disorder if the person has never had a panic attack, however, or of bipolar disorder in the absence of mood swings. This does not mean psychiatric illnesses are not biologically based. Mental illnesses are illnesses of persons, whereas other illnesses are illnesses of biological individuals.

  13. Cholesterol in brain disease: sometimes determinant and frequently implicated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Mauricio G; Pfrieger, Frank; Dotti, Carlos G

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol is essential for neuronal physiology, both during development and in the adult life: as a major component of cell membranes and precursor of steroid hormones, it contributes to the regulation of ion permeability, cell shape, cell–cell interaction, and transmembrane signaling. Consistently, hereditary diseases with mutations in cholesterol-related genes result in impaired brain function during early life. In addition, defects in brain cholesterol metabolism may contribute to neurological syndromes, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), and Parkinson's disease (PD), and even to the cognitive deficits typical of the old age. In these cases, brain cholesterol defects may be secondary to disease-causing elements and contribute to the functional deficits by altering synaptic functions. In the first part of this review, we will describe hereditary and non-hereditary causes of cholesterol dyshomeostasis and the relationship to brain diseases. In the second part, we will focus on the mechanisms by which perturbation of cholesterol metabolism can affect synaptic function. PMID:25223281

  14. Brain aging, Alzheimer's disease, and mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is contentious. One view holds AD results when brain aging surpasses a threshold. The other view postulates AD is not a consequence of brain aging. This review discusses this conundrum from the perspective of different investigative lines that have tried to address it, as well as from the perspective of the mitochondrion, an organelle that appears to play a role in both AD and brain aging. Specific issues addressed include the ...

  15. Brain hydrogen sulfide is severely decreased in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Ko; Asada, Takashi; Arima, Kunimasa; Makifuchi, Takao; Kimura, Hideo

    2002-05-24

    Although hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is generally thought of in terms of a poisonous gas, it is endogenously produced in the brain from cysteine by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS). H2S functions as a neuromodulator as well as a smooth muscle relaxant. Here we show that the levels of H2S are severely decreased in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients compared with the brains of the age matched normal individuals. In addition to H2S production CBS also catalyzes another metabolic pathway in which cystathionine is produced from the substrate homocysteine. Previous findings, which showed that S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM), a CBS activator, is much reduced in AD brain and that homocysteine accumulates in the serum of AD patients, were confirmed. These observations suggest that CBS activity is reduced in AD brains and the decrease in H2S may be involved in some aspects of the cognitive decline in AD.

  16. Effects of brain evolution on human nutrition and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, William R; Snodgrass, J Josh; Robertson, Marcia L

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of large human brain size has had important implications for the nutritional biology of our species. Large brains are energetically expensive, and humans expend a larger proportion of their energy budget on brain metabolism than other primates. The high costs of large human brains are supported, in part, by our energy- and nutrient-rich diets. Among primates, relative brain size is positively correlated with dietary quality, and humans fall at the positive end of this relationship. Consistent with an adaptation to a high-quality diet, humans have relatively small gastrointestinal tracts. In addition, humans are relatively "undermuscled" and "over fat" compared with other primates, features that help to offset the high energy demands of our brains. Paleontological evidence indicates that rapid brain evolution occurred with the emergence of Homo erectus 1.8 million years ago and was associated with important changes in diet, body size, and foraging behavior.

  17. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Ambreen; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Exley, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer's disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer's disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and aluminium has been shown to be present in brain tissue in sporadic Alzheimer's disease. We have made the first ever measurements of aluminium in brain tissue from 12 donors diagnosed with familial Alzheimer's disease. The concentrations of aluminium were extremely high, for example, there were values in excess of 10μg/g tissue dry wt. in 5 of the 12 individuals. Overall, the concentrations were higher than all previous measurements of brain aluminium except cases of known aluminium-induced encephalopathy. We have supported our quantitative analyses using a novel method of aluminium-selective fluorescence microscopy to visualise aluminium in all lobes of every brain investigated. The unique quantitative data and the stunning images of aluminium in familial Alzheimer's disease brain tissue raise the spectre of aluminium's role in this devastating disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  18. Perfusion and metabolism imaging studies in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are important tools in the evaluation of brain blood flow and glucose metabolism in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, conflicting results are reported in the literature depending on the type of imaging data...... analysis employed. The present review gives a comprehensive summary of the perfusion and metabolism literature in the field of PD research, including quantitative PET studies, normalized PET and SPECT studies, autoradiography studies in animal models of PD, and simulation studies of PD data...

  19. Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Brain Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Brain Diseases - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  20. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer: review and hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Purna

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are often unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration, malignant brain cancer is potentially manageable through changes in metabolic environment. A radically different approach to brain cancer management is proposed that combines metabolic control analysis with the evolutionarily conserved capacity of normal cells to survive extreme shifts in physiological environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are largely dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The bioenergetic transition from glucose to ketone bodies metabolically targets brain tumors through integrated anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic, and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. The approach focuses more on the genomic flexibility of normal cells than on the genomic defects of tumor cells and is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with dietary energy restriction and the ketogenic diet.

  1. Devastating metabolic brain disorders of newborns and young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Kim, Ji Hye; Jeon, Tae Yeon; Yoo, So-Young; Eo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders of the brain that manifest in the neonatal or early infantile period are usually associated with acute and severe illness and are thus referred to as devastating metabolic disorders. Most of these disorders may be classified as organic acid disorders, amino acid metabolism disorders, primary lactic acidosis, or fatty acid oxidation disorders. Each disorder has distinctive clinical, biochemical, and radiologic features. Early diagnosis is important both for prompt treatment to prevent death or serious sequelae and for genetic counseling. However, diagnosis is often challenging because many findings overlap and may mimic those of more common neonatal conditions, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and infection. Ultrasonography (US) may be an initial screening method for the neonatal brain, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for evaluating metabolic brain disorders. Although nonspecific imaging findings are common in early-onset metabolic disorders, characteristic patterns of brain involvement have been described for several disorders. In addition, diffusion-weighted images may be used to characterize edema during an acute episode of encephalopathy, and MR spectroscopy depicts changes in metabolites that may help diagnose metabolic disorders and assess response to treatment. Imaging findings, including those of advanced MR imaging techniques, must be closely reviewed. If one of these rare disorders is suspected, the appropriate biochemical test or analysis of the specific gene should be performed to confirm the diagnosis.

  2. Reproducibility of regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Overall, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Changes in regional brain glucose metabolism in response to benzodiazepine agonists have been used as indicators of benzodiazepine-GABA receptor function. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of these responses. Sixteen healthy right-handed men underwent scanning with PET and [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) twice: before placebo and before lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg). The same double FDG procedure was repeated 6-8 wk later on the men to assess test-retest reproducibility. The regional absolute brain metabolic values obtained during the second evaluation were significantly lower than those obtained from the first evaluation regardless of condition (p {le} 0.001). Lorazepam significantly and consistently decreased both whole-brain metabolism and the magnitude. The regional pattern of the changes were comparable for both studies (12.3% {plus_minus} 6.9% and 13.7% {plus_minus} 7.4%). Lorazepam effects were the largest in the thalamus (22.2% {plus_minus} 8.6% and 22.4% {plus_minus} 6.9%) and occipital cortex (19% {plus_minus} 8.9% and 21.8% {plus_minus} 8.9%). Relative metabolic measures were highly reproducible both for pharmacolgic and replication condition. This study measured the test-retest reproducibility in regional brain metabolic responses, and although the global and regional metabolic values were significantly lower for the repeated evaluation, the response to lorazepam was highly reproducible. 1613 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Paulus

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches.

  4. Abnormal erythrocyte metabolism in hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J R; Kay, N E; Gottlieb, A J; Oski, F A

    1975-12-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) metabolic studies were done on 114 patients with severe hepatic disease. Heinz body formation after incubation of RBCs with acetyl phenylhydrazine was found to be significantly higher in patients than in controls. RBC-reduced glutathione levels were lower than those of controls both before and after incubation with acetyl phenylhydrazine, and patients with the highest Heinz body counts had the lowest reduced glutathione levels. RBC methylene blue-stimulated hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt metabolism and glucose recycling through the shunt were significantly lower in patients with active hepatic disease than in controls. There was no difference in resting HMP shunt activity or in resting recycling of glucose. Despite impairment of shunt metabolism, total glucose consumption was greater in patients than in controls. The patients with the lowest stimulated HMP shunt metabolism and glucose recycling had the highest Heinz body counts, lowest reduced glutathione, and highest total glucose consumption. A continuum of abnormal shunt metabolism was seen, from a mild reduction of stimulated HMP shunt activity to a severe combined decrease in both the HMP shunt and glucose recycling. When measured, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and transketolase were normal or increased. Sequential studies were done on 11 patients who had abnormal metabolic studies. Coincident with improvement of HMP shunt metabolism, the Heinz body counts became lower, reduced glutathione higher, hematocrit higher, and liver function improved. Impaired HMP shunt metabolism appears to be a common, acquired RBC abnormality in patients with severe, active liver disease.

  5. Effects of diabetes on brain metabolism - is brain glycogen a significant player?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Waagepetersen, Helle S.

    2015-01-01

    Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose to the br......Brain glycogen, being an intracellular glucose reservoir, contributes to maintain energy and neurotransmitter homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. Under conditions with a disturbance in systemic glucose metabolism such as in diabetes, the supply of glucose...... to the brain may be affected and have important impacts on brain metabolism and neurotransmission. This also implies that brain glycogen may serve an essential role in the diabetic state to sustain appropriate brain function. There are two main types of diabetes; type 1 and type 2 diabetes and both types may...... be associated with brain impairments e.g. cognitive decline and dementia. It is however, not clear how these impairments on brain function are linked to alterations in brain energy and neurotransmitter metabolism. In this review, we will illuminate how rodent diabetes models have contributed to a better...

  6. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Suástegui, W. A.; Ramos-Chávez, L. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M.; Calvillo-Velasco, M.; Atzin-Méndez, J. A.; Guevara, J.

    2017-01-01

    Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism. PMID:28163821

  7. The Role of CYP2E1 in the Drug Metabolism or Bioactivation in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. García-Suástegui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms have metabolic pathways that are responsible for removing toxic agents. We always associate the liver as the major organ responsible for detoxification of the body; however this process occurs in many tissues. In the same way, as in the liver, the brain expresses metabolic pathways associated with the elimination of xenobiotics. Besides the detoxifying role of CYP2E1 for compounds such as electrophilic agents, reactive oxygen species, free radical products, and the bioactivation of xenobiotics, CYP2E1 is also related in several diseases and pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we describe the presence of phase I monooxygenase CYP2E1 in regions of the brain. We also explore the conditions where protein, mRNA, and the activity of CYP2E1 are induced. Finally, we describe the relation of CYP2E1 in brain disorders, including the behavioral relations for alcohol consumption via CYP2E1 metabolism.

  8. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. (Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  9. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  10. Brain aging and metabolic syndrome: a study in Cenischia Valley (Piedmont).

    OpenAIRE

    Marianna Rinaldi; Giuseppe Graffi; Salvatore Gallone; Emma Rabino Massa

    2011-01-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) is a set of conditions, each of which represents a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (central obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension). Recent studies have identified an association between MetS and increased risk of dementia (Vascular Dementia and Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease ). The purpose of our research is the study of brain aging and cognitive decline in a sample of elderly people (n=200) belonging to a rural alpine community, in r...

  11. In Alzheimer's Disease, 6-Month Treatment with GLP-1 Analog Prevents Decline of Brain Glucose Metabolism: Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Gejl; Gjedde, Albert; Egefjord, Lærke

    2016-01-01

    with AD to treatment with the GLP-1 analog liraglutide (n = 18), or placebo (n = 20). We measured Aβ load in brain with tracer [(11)C]PIB (PIB), CMRglc with [(18)F]FDG (FDG), and cognition with the WMS-IV scale (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01469351). The PIB binding increased significantly in temporal lobe...... in placebo and treatment patients (both P = 0.04), and in occipital lobe in treatment patients (P = 0.04). Regional and global increases of PIB retention did not differ between the groups (P ≥ 0.38). In placebo treated patients CMRglc declined in all regions, significantly so by the following means...

  12. Brain Metabolic Changes in Rats following Acoustic Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Zhu, Yejin; Aa, Jiye; Smith, Paul F.; De Ridder, Dirk; Wang, Guangji; Zheng, Yiwen

    2017-01-01

    Acoustic trauma is the most common cause of hearing loss and tinnitus in humans. However, the impact of acoustic trauma on system biology is not fully understood. It has been increasingly recognized that tinnitus caused by acoustic trauma is unlikely to be generated by a single pathological source, but rather a complex network of changes involving not only the auditory system but also systems related to memory, emotion and stress. One obvious and significant gap in tinnitus research is a lack of biomarkers that reflect the consequences of this interactive “tinnitus-causing” network. In this study, we made the first attempt to analyse brain metabolic changes in rats following acoustic trauma using metabolomics, as a pilot study prior to directly linking metabolic changes to tinnitus. Metabolites in 12 different brain regions collected from either sham or acoustic trauma animals were profiled using a gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS)-based metabolomics platform. After deconvolution of mass spectra and identification of the molecules, the metabolomic data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis showed that metabolic patterns varied among different brain regions; however, brain regions with similar functions had a similar metabolite composition. Acoustic trauma did not change the metabolite clusters in these regions. When analyzed within each brain region using the orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis sub-model, 17 molecules showed distinct separation between control and acoustic trauma groups in the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus, superior colliculus, vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), and cerebellum. Further metabolic pathway impact analysis and the enrichment overview with network analysis suggested the primary involvement of amino acid metabolism, including the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways, the arginine and proline metabolic pathways and the purine

  13. Metabolism as a tool for understanding human brain evolution: lipid energy metabolism as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu Pei; Yang, Hao; Wu, Jiang Wei; Gauthier, Nicolas; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Mitchell, Grant A

    2014-12-01

    Genes and the environment both influence the metabolic processes that determine fitness. To illustrate the importance of metabolism for human brain evolution and health, we use the example of lipid energy metabolism, i.e. the use of fat (lipid) to produce energy and the advantages that this metabolic pathway provides for the brain during environmental energy shortage. We briefly describe some features of metabolism in ancestral organisms, which provided a molecular toolkit for later development. In modern humans, lipid energy metabolism is a regulated multi-organ pathway that links triglycerides in fat tissue to the mitochondria of many tissues including the brain. Three important control points are each suppressed by insulin. (1) Lipid reserves in adipose tissue are released by lipolysis during fasting and stress, producing fatty acids (FAs) which circulate in the blood and are taken up by cells. (2) FA oxidation. Mitochondrial entry is controlled by carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1). Inside the mitochondria, FAs undergo beta oxidation and energy production in the Krebs cycle and respiratory chain. (3) In liver mitochondria, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) pathway produces ketone bodies for the brain and other organs. Unlike most tissues, the brain does not capture and metabolize circulating FAs for energy production. However, the brain can use ketone bodies for energy. We discuss two examples of genetic metabolic traits that may be advantageous under most conditions but deleterious in others. (1) A CPT1A variant prevalent in Inuit people may allow increased FA oxidation under nonfasting conditions but also predispose to hypoglycemic episodes. (2) The thrifty genotype theory, which holds that energy expenditure is efficient so as to maximize energy stores, predicts that these adaptations may enhance survival in periods of famine but predispose to obesity in modern dietary environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipids levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  15. Nutrient sensing and inflammation in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S; Erbay, Ebru

    2008-12-01

    The proper functioning of the pathways that are involved in the sensing and management of nutrients is central to metabolic homeostasis and is therefore among the most fundamental requirements for survival. Metabolic systems are integrated with pathogen-sensing and immune responses, and these pathways are evolutionarily conserved. This close functional and molecular integration of the immune and metabolic systems is emerging as a crucial homeostatic mechanism, the dysfunction of which underlies many chronic metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. In this Review we provide an overview of several important networks that sense and manage nutrients and discuss how they integrate with immune and inflammatory pathways to influence the physiological and pathological metabolic states in the body.

  16. Fats for thoughts: An update on brain fatty acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Adele; Koczwara, Justyna Barbara; Gallelli, Cristina Anna; Vergara, Daniele; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Gaetani, Silvana; Giudetti, Anna Maria

    2017-03-01

    Brain fatty acid (FA) metabolism deserves a close attention not only for its energetic aspects but also because FAs and their metabolites/derivatives are able to influence many neural functions, contributing to brain pathologies or representing potential targets for pharmacological and/or nutritional interventions. Glucose is the preferred energy substrate for the brain, whereas the role of FAs is more marginal. In conditions of decreased glucose supply, ketone bodies, mainly formed by FA oxidation, are the alternative main energy source. Ketogenic diets or medium-chain fatty acid supplementations were shown to produce therapeutic effects in several brain pathologies. Moreover, the positive effects exerted on brain functions by short-chain FAs and the consideration that they can be produced by intestinal flora metabolism contributed to the better understanding of the link between "gut-health" and "brain-health". Finally, attention was paid also to the regulatory role of essential polyunsaturated FAs and their derivatives on brain homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolically healthy obesity and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Netterstrøm, Marie K.; Johansen, Nanna B.

    2017-01-01

    Context: Recent studies have suggested that a subgroup of obese individuals is not at increased risk of obesity-related complications. This subgroup has been referred to as metabolically healthy obese. Objective: To investigate whether obesity is a risk factor for development of ischemic heart...... disease (IHD) irrespective of metabolic health. Design: In all, 6238 men and women from the Danish prospective Inter99 study were followed during 10.6 (standard deviation = 1.7) years. Setting: General community. Participants: Participants were classified according to body mass index and four metabolic...

  18. Hepatic diseases related to triglyceride metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Álvarez-Delgado, Carolina; Hernández-Godinez, Daniel; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Triglycerides participate in key metabolic functions such as energy storage, thermal insulation and as deposit for essential and non-essential fatty acids that can be used as precursors for the synthesis of structural and functional phospholipids. The liver is a central organ in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism, and it participates in triglyceride synthesis, export, uptake and oxidation. The metabolic syndrome and associated diseases are among the main concerns of public health worldwide. One of the metabolic syndrome components is impaired triglyceride metabolism. Diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome promote the appearance of hepatic alterations e.g., non-alcoholic steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and cancer. In this article, we review the molecular actions involved in impaired triglyceride metabolism and its association with hepatic diseases. We discuss mechanisms that reconcile the chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and new concepts on the role of intestinal micro-flora permeability and proliferation in fatty liver etiology. We also describe the participation of oxidative stress in the progression of events leading from steatosis to steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Finally, we provide information regarding the mechanisms that link fatty acid accumulation during steatosis with changes in growth factors and cytokines that lead to the development of neoplastic cells. One of the main medical concerns vis-a-vis hepatic diseases is the lack of symptoms at the onset of the illness and, as result, its late diagnosis. The understandings of the molecular mechanisms that underlie hepatic diseases could help design strategies towards establishing markers for their accurate and timely diagnosis.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 metabolism in rat brain: Role of the blood-brain interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strazielle Nathalie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is involved in the regulation of synaptic activity and plasticity, and in brain maturation. It is also an important mediator of the central response to inflammatory challenges. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the tissues forming the blood-brain interfaces to act as signal termination sites for PGE2 by metabolic inactivation. Methods The specific activity of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase was measured in homogenates of microvessels, choroid plexuses and cerebral cortex isolated from postnatal and adult rat brain, and compared to the activity measured in peripheral organs which are established signal termination sites for prostaglandins. PGE2 metabolites produced ex vivo by choroid plexuses were identified and quantified by HPLC coupled to radiochemical detection. Results The data confirmed the absence of metabolic activity in brain parenchyma, and showed that no detectable activity was associated with brain microvessels forming the blood-brain barrier. By contrast, 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activity was measured in both fourth and lateral ventricle choroid plexuses from 2-day-old rats, albeit at a lower level than in lung or kidney. The activity was barely detectable in adult choroidal tissue. Metabolic profiles indicated that isolated choroid plexus has the ability to metabolize PGE2, mainly into 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGE2. In short-term incubations, this metabolite distributed in the tissue rather than in the external medium, suggesting its release in the choroidal stroma. Conclusion The rat choroidal tissue has a significant ability to metabolize PGE2 during early postnatal life. This metabolic activity may participate in signal termination of centrally released PGE2 in the brain, or function as an enzymatic barrier acting to maintain PGE2 homeostasis in CSF during the critical early postnatal period of brain development.

  20. Global brain atrophy and metabolic dysfunction in LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, Morten; Orsi, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cognitive deficits are frequent in leucin-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) encephalitis. We examined structural and metabolic brain abnormalities following LGI1 encephalitis and correlated findings with acute and follow-up clinical outcomes. METHODS: Nine patients unde...

  1. Lactate storm marks cerebral metabolism following brain trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Sanju; Auer, Roland N; Tyson, Randy; Gallagher, Clare N; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2014-07-18

    Brain metabolism is thought to be maintained by neuronal-glial metabolic coupling. Glia take up glutamate from the synaptic cleft for conversion into glutamine, triggering glial glycolysis and lactate production. This lactate is shuttled into neurons and further metabolized. The origin and role of lactate in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Using a modified weight drop model of severe TBI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with infusion of (13)C-labeled glucose, lactate, and acetate, the present study investigated the possibility that neuronal-glial metabolism is uncoupled following severe TBI. Histopathology of the model showed severe brain injury with subarachnoid and hemorrhage together with glial cell activation and positive staining for Tau at 90 min post-trauma. High resolution MR spectroscopy of brain metabolites revealed significant labeling of lactate at C-3 and C-2 irrespective of the infused substrates. Increased (13)C-labeled lactate in all study groups in the absence of ischemia implied activated astrocytic glycolysis and production of lactate with failure of neuronal uptake (i.e. a loss of glial sensing for glutamate). The early increase in extracellular lactate in severe TBI with the injured neurons rendered unable to pick it up probably contributes to a rapid progression toward irreversible injury and pan-necrosis. Hence, a method to detect and scavenge the excess extracellular lactate on site or early following severe TBI may be a potential primary therapeutic measure.

  2. Brain energy metabolism and blood flow differences in healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanerud, Joel; Borghammer, Per; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors...

  3. Chronic kidney disease and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Junichiro James; Matsuo, Koji; Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disease (CKD-MBD) is a syndrome defined as a systemic mineral metabolic disorder associated with CKD, and the term renal osteodystrophy indicates a pathomorphological concept of bone lesions associated with CKD-MBD. Cortical bone thinning, abnormalities in bone turnover and primary/secondary mineralization, elevated levels of circulating sclerostin, increased apoptosis in osteoblasts and osteocytes, disturbance of the coupling phenomenon, iatrogenic factors, accumulated micro-crackles, crystal/collagen disorientation, and chemical modification of collagen crosslinks are all possible candidates found in CKD that could promote osteopenia and/or bone fragility. Some of above factors are the consequences of abnormal systemic mineral metabolism but for others it seem unlikely. We have used the term uremic osteoporosis to describe the uremia-induced bone fragility which is not derived from abnormal systemic mineral metabolism. Interestingly, the disease aspect of uremic osteoporosis appears to be similar to that of senile osteoporosis.

  4. Abnormal regional brain function in Parkinson's disease: truth or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yilong; Tang, Chengke; Moeller, James R; Eidelberg, David

    2009-04-01

    Normalization of regional measurements by the global mean is commonly employed to minimize inter-subject variability in functional imaging studies. This practice is based on the assumption that global values do not substantially differ between patient and control groups. In this issue of NeuroImage, Borghammer and colleagues challenge the validity of this assumption. They focus on Parkinson's disease (PD) and use computer simulations to show that lower global values can produce spurious increases in subcortical brain regions. The authors speculate that the increased signal observed in these areas in PD is artefactual and unrelated to localized changes in brain function. In this commentary, we summarize what is currently known of the relationship between regional and global metabolic activity in PD and experimental parkinsonism. We found that early stage PD patients exhibit global values that are virtually identical to those of age-matched healthy subjects. SPM analysis revealed increased normalized metabolic activity in a discrete set of biologically relevant subcortical brain regions. Because of their higher variability, the corresponding absolute regional measures did not differ across the two groups. Longitudinal imaging studies in this population showed that the subcortical elevations in normalized metabolism appeared earlier and progressed faster than did focal cortical or global metabolic reductions. The observed increases in subcortical activity, but not the global changes, correlated with independent clinical measures of disease progression. Multivariate analysis with SSM/PCA further confirmed that the abnormal spatial covariance structure of early PD is dominated by these subcortical increases as opposed to network-related reductions in cortical metabolic activity or global changes. Thus, increased subcortical activity in PD cannot be regarded as a simple artefact of global normalization. Moreover, stability of the normalized measurements, particularly at

  5. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers.

  6. Peripheral cholesterol, metabolic disorders and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Dotti, Carlos Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    Strong correlations have been made between high levels of blood cholesterol and the risk to suffer Alzheimer's disease (AD). The question arises on how a peripheral event contributes to a disease that so severely affects the integrity and function of the Central Nervous System. Hypercholesterolemia has been also associated to peripheral metabolic disorders like diabetes, obesity or atherosclerosis that, in turn, predispose to AD. Here we review data, which point to alterations in blood cholesterol levels as a link between these metabolic disorders and AD. We describe and discuss common, cholesterol-related, molecular mechanisms and strategies to fight these conditions that, altogether, constitute a major cause of death in our societies.

  7. Gender and metabolic differences of gallstone diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Sun; Hong Tang; Shan Jiang; Li Zeng; En-Qiang Chen; Tao-You Zhou; You-Juan Wang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the risk factors for gallstone disease in the general population of Chengdu, China. METHODS: This study was conducted at the West China Hospital. Subjects who received a physical examination at this hospital between January and December 2007 were included. Body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, serum lipid and lipoproteins concentrations were analyzed. Gallstone disease was diagnosed by ultrasound or on the basis of a history of cholecystectomy because of gallstone disease. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the risk factors for gallstone disease, and the Chi-square test was used to analyze differences in the incidence of metabolic disorders between subjects with and without gallstone disease. RESULTS: A total of 3573 people were included, 10.7% (384/3573) of whom had gallstone diseases. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that the incidence of gallstone disease in subjects aged 40-64 or ≥ 65 years was significantly different from that in those aged 18-39 years ( P < 0.05); the incidence was higher in women than in men ( P < 0.05). In men, in women than in men ( P < 0.05). In men, a high level of fasting plasma glucose was obvious in gallstone disease ( P < 0.05), and in women, hypertriglyceridemia or obesity were significant in gallstone disease ( P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: We assume that age and sex are profoundly associated with the incidence of gallstone disease; the metabolic risk factors for gallstone disease were different between men and women.

  8. Oxidative metabolism of cocaine: comparison of brain and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benuck, M; Reith, M E; Sershen, H; Wiener, H L; Lajtha, A

    1989-01-01

    Norcocaine (NC) and N-hydroxynorcocaine (NHNC), products of the oxidative metabolism of cocaine, were examined in plasma, brain, and liver of mice injected intraperitoneally with cocaine. Plasma levels of NHNC were altered in vivo by inhibiting esterase activity with diazinon and chloral hydrate or activating esterase activity with phenobarbital, and activating the microsomal P-450 system with phenobarbital. Changes in plasma concentrations of NHNC resulted in similar changes in brain, which were often different from those in liver. After intracisternal administration of cocaine to mice, no appreciable amount of NC or NHNC could be detected in brain; the same results were obtained upon intracisternal and intraventricular administration to rats. Microsomal preparations from mouse brain were found to be considerably less active than those from liver in converting NC to NHNC. We conclude that the cerebral oxidative metabolism of cocaine is not appreciable and that most of the NC and NHNC found in the brain after systemic cocaine administration is derived from plasma rather than formed centrally by brain microsomal enzymes.

  9. Adrenergic Receptors and Metabolism: Role in development of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eCiccarelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the adrenergic system has a profound effects on metabolism. Increased circulating catecholamine and activation of the different adrenergic receptors deployed in the various organs produce important metabolic responses which include: 1 increased lipolysis and elevated levels of fatty acids in plasma, 2 increased gluconeogenesis by the liver to provide substrate for the brain and 3 moderate inhibition of insulin release by the pancreas to conserve glucose and to shift fuel metabolism of muscle in the direction of fatty acid oxidation. These physiological responses, typical of the stress conditions, are demonstrated to be detrimental for the functioning of different organs like the cardiac muscle when they become chronic. Indeed, a common feature of many pathological conditions involving over-activation of the adrenergic system is the development of metabolic alterations which can include insulin resistance, altered glucose and lipid metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction. These patterns are involved with a variably extent among the different pathologies , however they are in general strictly correlated to the level of activation of the adrenergic system. Here we will review the effects of the different adrenergic receptors subtypes on the metabolic variation observed in important disease like Heart Failure.

  10. Neurodegenerative disorders and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Germaine

    2013-08-01

    Most genetic causes of neurodegenerative disorders in childhood are due to neurometabolic disease. There are over 200 disorders, including aminoacidopathies, creatine disorders, mitochondrial cytopathies, peroxisomal disorders and lysosomal storage disorders. However, diagnosis can pose a challenge to the clinician when patients present with non-specific problems like epilepsy, developmental delay, autism, dystonia and ataxia. The variety of specialist tests involved can also be daunting. This review aims to give a practical approach to the investigation and diagnosis of neurometabolic disease from the neonatal period to late childhood while prioritising disorders where there are therapeutic options. In particular, patients who have a complex clinical picture of several neurological and non-neurological features should be investigated.

  11. Impaired brain creatine kinase activity in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S F; Hennessey, T; Yang, L; Starkova, N N; Beal, M F; Starkov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is associated with impaired energy metabolism in the brain. Creatine kinase (CK) catalyzes ATP-dependent phosphorylation of creatine (Cr) into phosphocreatine (PCr), thereby serving as readily available high-capacity spatial and temporal ATP buffering. Substantial evidence supports a specific role of the Cr/PCr system in neurodegenerative diseases. In the brain, the Cr/PCr ATP-buffering system is established by a concerted operation of the brain-specific cytosolic enzyme BB-CK and ubiquitous mitochondrial uMt-CK. It is not yet established whether the activity of these CK isoenzymes is impaired in HD. We measured PCr, Cr, ATP and ADP in brain extracts of 3 mouse models of HD - R6/2 mice, N171-82Q and HdhQ(111) mice - and the activity of CK in cytosolic and mitochondrial brain fractions from the same mice. The PCr was significantly increased in mouse HD brain extracts as compared to nontransgenic littermates. We also found an approximately 27% decrease in CK activity in both cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of R6/2 and N171-82Q mice, and an approximately 25% decrease in the mitochondria from HdhQ(111) mice. Moreover, uMt-CK and BB-CK activities were approximately 63% lower in HD human brain samples as compared to nondiseased controls. Our findings lend strong support to the role of impaired energy metabolism in HD, and point out the potential importance of impairment of the CK-catalyzed ATP-buffering system in the etiology of HD. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Vaccines for metabolic diseases: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morais T

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tiago Morais, Sara Andrade, Sofia S Pereira, Mariana P MonteiroDepartment of Anatomy, Unit for Multidisciplinary Biomedical Research, Institute for Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Porto, PortugalAbstract: Several metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity, represent significant risk factors for cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adult populations in western societies. Understandably, these chronic disorders have now replaced infectious diseases as the most important public health problem and economic burden to society in most countries. Treatment of metabolic risk factors in order to prevent cardiovascular disease requires an enduring approach with multiple drugs, which can be associated with considerable costs, side effects, and a low rate of therapeutic compliance due to lack of symptoms until later stages of the disease. Since vaccines have proven to be a powerful and effective approach to preventing infectious diseases, attempts to expand the therapeutic use of vaccines into the context of highly prevalent diseases has been attracting increased research interest. Vaccination strategies for chronic diseases in particular are an exciting area of research, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing on the use of molecular vaccines for the treatment of common and highly prevalent chronic metabolic disorders, ie, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity.Keywords: vaccines, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity

  13. Glutamate Metabolism in Brain Structures in Experimental Hemorrhagic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Jakovlev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study glutamate metabolism characteristics in phylogenetically different parts of the mammalian brain in experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock (HS in cats.Material and methods. Experiments were performed on 76 cats. HS was induced by intermittent bloodletting from femoral artery at a rate of 10ml/kg•10 minutes, with the average volume of 24±0.8 ml/kg. The bloodletting was discontinued after arterial pressure (BP drop to 60.0±1.5 mmHg. We studied ammonia, glutamate (Gt, and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG levels and glutaminase (GS and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDG activity in specimens harvested from phylogenetically different parts of the brain (cortex, limbic system, diencephalon, and medulla oblongata.Results. In intact animals, the peak GDG activity was found in the medulla oblongata (phylogenetically the oldest part of the brain and the peak GS activity was registered in the sensorimotor cortex (phylogenetically the youngest part of the brain; the glutaminase activity did not depend on the phylogenetic age of brain structures.In the case of HS, Gt metabolism changes began in the sensorimotor cortex manifested by decreased GS activity, which progresses by the 70th minute of the post%hemorrhagic period (PHP accompanied by delayed increase in the GDG and glutaminase activity, as well as Gt accumulation. In the limbic system and diencephalon the Gt metabolism was changing (impaired glutamine synthesis, stimuled Gt synthesis with glutamine desamidization and α%KG amination when developed by the 70th minute of the PHP. Similarly to sensorimotor cortex, changes were associated with Gt accumulation. During the agony, α%KG deficiency developed in all parts of the brain as a result of its increased contribution to Gt synthesis. At the same period of time, in the sensorimotor cortex, limbic system and diencephalon the Gt synthesis from glutamine was stimulated, however, the Gt contribution tothe formation of glutamine was decreased. The

  14. Lipid metabolism in Drosophila: development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghua Liu; Xun Huang

    2013-01-01

    Proteins,nucleic acids,and lipids are three major components of the cell.Despite a few basic metabolic pathways,we know very little about lipids,compared with the explosion of knowledge about proteins and nucleic acids.How many different forms of lipids are there? What are the in vivo functions of individual lipid? How does lipid metabolism contribute to normal development and human health? Many of these questions remain unanswered.For over a century,the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a model organism to study basic biological questions.In recent years,increasing evidences proved that Drosophila models are highly valuable for lipid metabolism and energy homeostasis researches.Some recent progresses of lipid metabolic regulation during Drosophila development and in Drosophila models of human diseases will be discussed in this review.

  15. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  16. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, R Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  17. A Metabolic Study of Huntington's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajasree Nambron

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease patients have a number of peripheral manifestations suggestive of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We, therefore, investigated a number of metabolic factors in a 24-hour study of Huntington's disease gene carriers (premanifest and moderate stage II/III and controls.Control (n = 15, premanifest (n = 14 and stage II/III (n = 13 participants were studied with blood sampling over a 24-hour period. A battery of clinical tests including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose distribution was measured using magnetic resonance imaging. We quantified fasting baseline concentrations of glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, lipoprotein (a, fatty acids, amino acids, lactate and osteokines. Leptin and ghrelin were quantified in fasting samples and after a standardised meal. We assessed glucose, insulin, growth hormone and cortisol concentrations during a prolonged oral glucose tolerance test.We found no highly significant differences in carbohydrate, protein or lipid metabolism markers between healthy controls, premanifest and stage II/III Huntington's disease subjects. For some markers (osteoprotegerin, tyrosine, lysine, phenylalanine and arginine there is a suggestion (p values between 0.02 and 0.05 that levels are higher in patients with premanifest HD, but not moderate HD. However, given the large number of statistical tests performed interpretation of these findings must be cautious.Contrary to previous studies that showed altered levels of metabolic markers in patients with Huntington's disease, our study did not demonstrate convincing evidence of abnormalities in any of the markers examined. Our analyses were restricted to Huntington's disease patients not taking neuroleptics, anti-depressants or other medication affecting metabolic pathways. Even with the modest sample sizes studied, the lack of highly significant results, despite many being tested, suggests that

  18. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. (Tufs Univ., Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  19. Hemispherical dominance of glucose metabolic rate in the brain of the 'normal' ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    2004-01-01

    In the 'normal' ageing brain a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate has been determined across many brain regions. This study determines whether age differences would affect metabolic rates in regions and different hemispheres of the brain. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) was exa

  20. Adipokines, Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Abella; Morena Scotece; Javier Conde; Verónica López; Verónica Lazzaro; Jesús Pino; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Oreste Gualillo

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis...

  1. Editorial; Lipids in Metabolic Health and Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glatz, Jan; De Groot, Renate; Hesselink, Matthijs; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Glatz, J. F. C., De Groot, R. H. M., Hesselink, K. C., & Schrauwen, P. (2011). Editorial; Lipids in Metabolic Health and Disease. Prostaglandines, Leukotrienes and Essential fatty Acids, 85, 195. DOI: 10.1016/j.plefa.2011.04.006

  2. Electroacupuncture Treatment Improves Learning-Memory Ability and Brain Glucose Metabolism in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease: Using Morris Water Maze and Micro-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Alzheimer’s disease (AD causes progressive hippocampus dysfunctions leading to the impairment of learning and memory ability and low level of uptake rate of glucose in hippocampus. What is more, there is no effective treatment for AD. In this study, we evaluated the beneficial and protective effects of electroacupuncture in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8. Method. In the electroacupuncture paradigm, electroacupuncture treatment was performed once a day for 15 days on 7.5-month-old SAMP8 male mice. In the normal control paradigm and AD control group, 7.5-month-old SAMR1 male mice and SAMP8 male mice were grabbed and bandaged while electroacupuncture group therapy, in order to ensure the same treatment conditions, once a day, 15 days. Results. From the Morris water maze (MWM test, we found that the treatment of electroacupuncture can improve the spatial learning and memory ability of SAMP8 mouse, and from the micro-PET test, we proved that after the electroacupuncture treatment the level of uptake rate of glucose in hippocampus was higher than normal control group. Conclusion. These results suggest that the treatment of electroacupuncture may provide a viable treatment option for AD.

  3. Migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is emerging that migraine is not solely a headache disorder. Observations that ischemic stroke could occur in the setting of a migraine attack, and that migraine headaches could be precipitated by cerebral ischemia, initially highlighted a possibly association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease. More recently, large population-based studies that have demonstrated that migraineurs are at increased risk of stroke outside the setting of a migraine attack have prompted the concept that migraine and cerebrovascular disease are comorbid conditions. Explanations for this association are numerous and widely debated, particularly as the comorbid association does not appear to be confined to the cerebral circulation as cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease also appear to be comorbid with migraine. A growing body of evidence has also suggested that migraineurs are more likely to be obese, hypertensive, hyperlipidemic and have impaired insulin sensitivity, all features of the metabolic syndrome. The comorbid association between migraine and cerebrovascular disease may consequently be explained by migraineurs having the metabolic syndrome and consequently being at increased risk of cerebrovascular disease. This review will summarise the salient evidence suggesting a comorbid association between migraine, cerebrovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome.

  4. microRNA-33 Regulates ApoE Lipidation and Amyloid-β Metabolism in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaekwang; Yoon, Hyejin; Horie, Takahiro; Burchett, Jack M; Restivo, Jessica L; Rotllan, Noemi; Ramírez, Cristina M; Verghese, Philip B; Ihara, Masafumi; Hoe, Hyang-Sook; Esau, Christine; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Holtzman, David M; Cirrito, John R; Ono, Koh; Kim, Jungsu

    2015-11-04

    Dysregulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolism is critical for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Mounting evidence suggests that apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is involved in Aβ metabolism. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key regulator of ApoE lipidation, which affects Aβ levels. Therefore, identifying regulatory mechanisms of ABCA1 expression in the brain may provide new therapeutic targets for AD. Here, we demonstrate that microRNA-33 (miR-33) regulates ABCA1 and Aβ levels in the brain. Overexpression of miR-33 impaired cellular cholesterol efflux and dramatically increased extracellular Aβ levels by promoting Aβ secretion and impairing Aβ clearance in neural cells. In contrast, genetic deletion of mir-33 in mice dramatically increased ABCA1 levels and ApoE lipidation, but it decreased endogenous Aβ levels in cortex. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of miR-33 via antisense oligonucleotide specifically in the brain markedly decreased Aβ levels in cortex of APP/PS1 mice, representing a potential therapeutic strategy for AD. Brain lipid metabolism, in particular Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) lipidation, is critical to Aβ metabolism and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain lipid metabolism is largely separated from the periphery due to blood-brain barrier and different repertoire of lipoproteins. Therefore, identifying the novel regulatory mechanism of brain lipid metabolism may provide a new therapeutic strategy for AD. Although there have been studies on brain lipid metabolism, its regulation, in particular by microRNAs, is relatively unknown. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of microRNA-33 increases lipidation of brain ApoE and reduces Aβ levels by inducing ABCA1. We provide a unique approach for AD therapeutics to increase ApoE lipidation and reduce Aβ levels via pharmacological inhibition of microRNA in vivo. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514718-10$15.00/0.

  5. Enhanced regional brain metabolic responses to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    While dopamine (DA) appears to be crucial for cocaine reinforcement, its involvement in cocaine addiction is much less clear. Using PET we have shown persistent reductions in striatal DA D2 receptors (which arc predominantly located on GABA cells) in cocaine abusers. This finding coupled to GABA`s role as an effector for DA led us to investigate if there were GABAergic abnormalities in cocaine abusers. In this study we measured regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam, to indirectly assess GABA function (benzodiazepines facilitate GABAergic neurotransmission). Methods: The experimental subjects consisted of 12 active cocaine abusers and 32 age matched controls. Each subject underwent two PET FDG scans obtained within 1 week of each other. The first FDG scan was obtained after administration of placebo (3 cc of saline solution) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG; and the second after administration of lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg) given 40-50 minutes prior to FDG. The subjects were blind to the drugs received. Results: Lorazepam-induced sleepiness was significantly greater in abusers than in controls (p<0.001). Lorazepam-induced decreases in brain glucose metabolism were significantly larger in cocaine abusers than in controls. Whereas in controls whole brain metabolism decreased 13{+-}7 %, in cocaine abusers it decreased 21{+-}13 % (p < 0.05). Lorazepam-induced decrements in regional metabolism were significantly larger in striatum (p < 0.0 1), thalamus (p < 0.01) and cerebellum (p < 0.005) of cocaine abusers than of controls (ANOVA diagnosis by condition (placebo versus lorazepam) interaction effect). The only brain region for which the absolute metabolic changes-induced by lorazepam in cocaine abusers were equivalent to those in controls was the orbitofrontal cortex. These results document an accentuated sensitivity to benzodiazepines in cocaine abusers which is compatible with disrupted GABAergic function in these patients.

  6. Brain metabolic markers reflect susceptibility status in cytokine gene knockout mice with murine cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Sapan B; Bubb, William A; Hunt, Nicholas H; Rae, Caroline

    2006-11-01

    Treatment of cerebral malaria, a complication of the world's most significant parasitic disease, remains problematic due to lack of understanding of its pathogenesis. Metabolic changes, along with cytokine expression alterations and blood cell sequestration in the brain, have previously been reported during severe disease in human infection and mouse models leading to the "cytopathic hypoxia" and "sequestration" theories of pathogenesis. Here, to determine the robustness of the metabolic changes and their relationship to disease development, we investigated changes in cerebral metabolic markers in a mouse model of cerebral malaria (CM) in wildtype (C57BL/6) and cytokine knockout (TNF(-/-), IFNgamma(-/-) and LTalpha(-/-)) mice using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mice susceptible to CM (wildtype, TNF(-/-)) showed decreased cerebral glucose use, decreased Krebs cycle metabolism and decreased high-energy phosphates. Conversely, mice resistant to CM (IFNgamma(-/-), LTalpha(-/-)) showed little sign of these effects, despite identical levels of parasitemia. Previously reported changes in lactate were shown to be strain dependent. Elevated glutamine and decreased phosphorylation potential emerged as robust metabolic markers of susceptibility, further implicating the trytophan/NAD(+) pathway in disease development. Thus these metabolic changes are firmly linked both to the immune system response to malaria and to the occurrence of pathogenic changes in experimental CM.

  7. An online database for brain disease research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richman Sam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Stanley Medical Research Institute online genomics database (SMRIDB is a comprehensive web-based system for understanding the genetic effects of human brain disease (i.e. bipolar, schizophrenia, and depression. This database contains fully annotated clinical metadata and gene expression patterns generated within 12 controlled studies across 6 different microarray platforms. Description A thorough collection of gene expression summaries are provided, inclusive of patient demographics, disease subclasses, regulated biological pathways, and functional classifications. Conclusion The combination of database content, structure, and query speed offers researchers an efficient tool for data mining of brain disease complete with information such as: cross-platform comparisons, biomarkers elucidation for target discovery, and lifestyle/demographic associations to brain diseases.

  8. Increased Brain Fatty Acid Uptake in Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmi, Anna; Iozzo, Patricia; Viljanen, Antti; Hirvonen, Jussi; Fielding, Barbara A.; Virtanen, Kirsi; Oikonen, Vesa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Viljanen, Tapio; Guiducci, Letizia; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Någren, Kjell; Solin, Olof; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test whether brain fatty acid uptake is enhanced in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS) and whether weight reduction modifies it. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We measured brain fatty acid uptake in a group of 23 patients with MS and 7 age-matched healthy control subjects during fasting conditions using positron emission tomography (PET) with [11C]-palmitate and [18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid ([18F]-FTHA). Sixteen MS subjects were restudied after 6 weeks of very low calorie diet intervention. RESULTS At baseline, brain global fatty acid uptake derived from [18F]-FTHA was 50% higher in patients with MS compared with control subjects. The mean percentage increment was 130% in the white matter, 47% in the gray matter, and uniform across brain regions. In the MS group, the nonoxidized fraction measured using [11C]-palmitate was 86% higher. Brain fatty acid uptake measured with [18F]-FTHA-PET was associated with age, fasting serum insulin, and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index. Both total and nonoxidized fractions of fatty acid uptake were associated with BMI. Rapid weight reduction decreased brain fatty acid uptake by 17%. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this is the first study on humans to observe enhanced brain fatty acid uptake in patients with MS. Both fatty acid uptake and accumulation appear to be increased in MS patients and reversed by weight reduction. PMID:20566663

  9. The ketogenic diet: metabolic influences on brain excitability and epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutas, Andrew; Yellen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    A dietary therapy for pediatric epilepsy known as the ketogenic diet has seen a revival in its clinical use in the past decade. Though the diet’s underlying mechanism remains unknown, modern scientific approaches like genetic disruption of glucose metabolism are allowing for more detailed questions to be addressed. Recent work indicates that several mechanisms may exist for the ketogenic diet including disruption of glutamatergic synaptic transmission, inhibition of glycolysis, and activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Here we describe on-going work in these areas that is providing a better understanding of metabolic influences on brain excitability and epilepsy. PMID:23228828

  10. Dysregulation of Iron Metabolism in Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Oshiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of iron metabolism has been observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. Utilization of several importers and exporters for iron transport in brain cells helps maintain iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of iron homeostasis leads to the production of neurotoxic substances and reactive oxygen species, resulting in iron-induced oxidative stress. In Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD, circumstantial evidence has shown that dysregulation of brain iron homeostasis leads to abnormal iron accumulation. Several genetic studies have revealed mutations in genes associated with increased iron uptake, increased oxidative stress, and an altered inflammatory response in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here, we review the recent findings on brain iron metabolism in common NDs, such as AD, PD, and ALS. We also summarize the conventional and novel types of iron chelators, which can successfully decrease excess iron accumulation in brain lesions. For example, iron-chelating drugs have neuroprotective effects, preventing neural apoptosis, and activate cellular protective pathways against oxidative stress. Glial cells also protect neurons by secreting antioxidants and antiapoptotic substances. These new findings of experimental and clinical studies may provide a scientific foundation for advances in drug development for NDs.

  11. Blood-brain barrier-supported neurogenesis in healthy and diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozhilenkova, Elena A; Lopatina, Olga L; Komleva, Yulia K; Salmin, Vladimir V; Salmina, Alla B

    2017-02-14

    Adult neurogenesis is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to brain development, learning, and memory. Alterations in neurogenesis underlie a wide spectrum of brain diseases. Neurogenesis takes place in highly specialized neurogenic niches. The concept of neurogenic niches is becoming widely accepted due to growing evidence of the important role of the microenvironment established in the close vicinity to stem cells in order to provide adequate control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Neurogenic niches represent the platform for tight integration of neurogenesis and angiogenesis supported by specific properties of cerebral microvessel endothelial cells contributing to establishment of partially compromised blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the adjustment of local conditions to the current metabolic needs of stem and progenitor cells. Here, we review up-to-date data on microvascular dynamics in activity-dependent neurogenesis, specific properties of BBB in neurogenic niches, endothelial-driven mechanisms of clonogenic activity, and future perspectives for reconstructing the neurogenic niches in vitro.

  12. Expensive brains: ‘brainy’ rodents have higher metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl eSobrero

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006. Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species body mass is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of body mass for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of body mass and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur.

  13. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  14. Glutamate metabolism in the brain focusing on astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Scafidi, Susanna; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of GABA, is exceedingly complex and highly compartmentalized in brain. Maintenance of these neurotransmitter pools is strictly dependent on the de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes which requires both the anaplero......Metabolism of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter and precursor of GABA, is exceedingly complex and highly compartmentalized in brain. Maintenance of these neurotransmitter pools is strictly dependent on the de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes which requires both...... the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase and glutamine synthetase. Glutamate is formed directly from glutamine by deamidation via phosphate activated glutaminase a reaction that also yields ammonia. Glutamate plays key roles linking carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle......, as well as in nitrogen trafficking and ammonia homeostasis in brain. The anatomical specialization of astrocytic endfeet enables these cells to rapidly and efficiently remove neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to maintain homeostasis, and to provide glutamine to replenish neurotransmitter pools...

  15. Brain imaging of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changhao Yin; Siou Li; Weina Zhao; Jiachun Feng

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly increasing prevalence of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease has the potential to create a major worldwide healthcare crisis. Structural MRI studies in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are currently attracting considerable interest. It is extremely important to study early structural and metabolic changes, such as those in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and gray matter structures in the medial temporal lobe, to allow the early detection of mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The microstructural integrity of white matter can be studied with diffusion tensor imaging. Increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy are found in subjects with white matter damage. Functional imaging studies with positron emission tomography tracer compounds enable detection of amyloid plaques in the living brain in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we will focus on key findings from brain imaging studies in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, including structural brain changes studied with MRI and white matter changes seen with diffusion tensor imaging, and other specific imaging methodologies will also be discussed.

  16. Endogenously Nitrated Proteins in Mouse Brain: Links To Neurodegenerative Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacksteder, Colette A.; Qian, Weijun; Knyushko, Tanya V.; Wang, Haixing H.; Chin, Mark H.; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2006-07-04

    Increased nitrotyrosine modification of proteins has been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types; emerging evidence suggests its additional role in redox regulation of normal metabolism. In order to identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic dataset identifying 7,792 proteins from whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. Over half of the nitrated proteins identified have been reported to be involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces increased nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, characteristics consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. More striking is the five-fold greater nitration of tyrosines having nearby basic sidechains, suggesting electrostatic attraction of basic groups with the negative charge of peroxynitrite. Together, these results suggest that elevated peroxynitrite generation plays a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain and provides a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration.

  17. The rationale for deep brain stimulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Zaman; Bari, Ausaf; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a major worldwide health problem with no effective therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has emerged as a useful therapy for certain movement disorders and is increasingly being investigated for treatment of other neural circuit disorders. Here we review the rationale for investigating DBS as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease. Phase I clinical trials of DBS targeting memory circuits in Alzheimer's disease patients have shown promising results in clinical assessments of cognitive function, neurophysiological tests of cortical glucose metabolism, and neuroanatomical volumetric measurements showing reduced rates of atrophy. These findings have been supported by animal studies, where electrical stimulation of multiple nodes within the memory circuit have shown neuroplasticity through stimulation-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and improved performance in memory tasks. The precise mechanisms by which DBS may enhance memory and cognitive functions in Alzheimer's disease patients and the degree of its clinical efficacy continue to be examined in ongoing clinical trials.

  18. The Intestinal Microbiota in Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anni Woting

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gut bacteria exert beneficial and harmful effects in metabolic diseases as deduced from the comparison of germfree and conventional mice and from fecal transplantation studies. Compositional microbial changes in diseased subjects have been linked to adiposity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Promotion of an increased expression of intestinal nutrient transporters or a modified lipid and bile acid metabolism by the intestinal microbiota could result in an increased nutrient absorption by the host. The degradation of dietary fiber and the subsequent fermentation of monosaccharides to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA is one of the most controversially discussed mechanisms of how gut bacteria impact host physiology. Fibers reduce the energy density of the diet, and the resulting SCFA promote intestinal gluconeogenesis, incretin formation and subsequently satiety. However, SCFA also deliver energy to the host and support liponeogenesis. Thus far, there is little knowledge on bacterial species that promote or prevent metabolic disease. Clostridium ramosum and Enterococcus cloacae were demonstrated to promote obesity in gnotobiotic mouse models, whereas bifidobacteria and Akkermansia muciniphila were associated with favorable phenotypes in conventional mice, especially when oligofructose was fed. How diet modulates the gut microbiota towards a beneficial or harmful composition needs further research. Gnotobiotic animals are a valuable tool to elucidate mechanisms underlying diet–host–microbe interactions.

  19. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  20. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  1. Emerging roles for brain drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes in neuropsychiatric conditions and responses to drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toselli, Francesca; Dodd, Peter R; Gillam, Elizabeth M J

    2016-08-01

    P450s in the human brain were originally considered unlikely to contribute significantly to the clearance of drugs and other xenobiotic chemicals, since their overall expression was a small fraction of that found in the liver. However, it is now recognized that P450s play substantial roles in the metabolism of both exogenous and endogenous chemicals in the brain, but in a highly cell type- and region-specific manner, in line with the greater functional heterogeneity of the brain compared to the liver. Studies of brain P450 expression and the characterization of the catalytic activity of specific forms expressed as recombinant enzymes have suggested possible roles for xenobiotic-metabolizing P450s in the brain. It is now possible to confirm these roles through the use of intracerebroventricular administration of selective P450 inhibitors in animal models, coupled with brain sampling techniques to measure drug concentrations in vivo, and modern neuroimaging techniques. The purpose of this review is to discuss the evidence behind the functional importance of P450s from the "xenobiotic-metabolizing" families, CYP1, CYP2 and CYP3 in the brain. Approaches used to define the quantitative and qualitative significance of these P450s in determining tissue-specific levels of xenobiotics in brain will be considered. Finally, the possible roles of these enzymes in brain biochemistry will be examined in light of the demonstrated activity of these enzymes in vitro and the association of particular P450 forms with disease states.

  2. Brain Metabolism Correlates of the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarra, Paolo; Ghetti, Caterina; Ruffini, Livia; Spallazzi, Marco; Spotti, Annamaria; Barocco, Federica; Guzzo, Caterina; Marchi, Massimo; Gardini, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT) measures immediate and delayed episodic memory and cueing sensitivity and is suitable to detect prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study aimed at investigating the segregation effect of FCSRT scores on brain metabolism of memory-related structures, usually affected by AD pathology, in the Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) stage. A cohort of forty-eight MCI patients underwent FCSRT and 18F-FDG-PET. Multiple regression analysis showed that Immediate Free Recall correlated with brain metabolism in the bilateral anterior cingulate and delayed free recall with the left anterior cingulate and medial frontal gyrus, whereas semantic cueing sensitivity with the left posterior cingulate. FCSRT in MCI is associated with neuro-functional activity of specific regions of memory-related structures connected to hippocampal formation, such as the cingulate cortex, usually damaged in AD.

  3. Brain imaging of neurovascular dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Axel; Nation, Daniel A; Pa, Judy; Sweeney, Melanie D; Toga, Arthur W; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-05-01

    Neurovascular dysfunction, including blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and cerebral blood flow (CBF) dysregulation and reduction, are increasingly recognized to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The spatial and temporal relationships between different pathophysiological events during preclinical stages of AD, including cerebrovascular dysfunction and pathology, amyloid and tau pathology, and brain structural and functional changes remain, however, still unclear. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, i.e., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), offer new possibilities to understand how the human brain works in health and disease. This includes methods to detect subtle regional changes in the cerebrovascular system integrity. Here, we focus on the neurovascular imaging techniques to evaluate regional BBB permeability (dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI), regional CBF changes (arterial spin labeling- and functional-MRI), vascular pathology (structural MRI), and cerebral metabolism (PET) in the living human brain, and examine how they can inform about neurovascular dysfunction and vascular pathophysiology in dementia and AD. Altogether, these neuroimaging approaches will continue to elucidate the spatio-temporal progression of vascular and neurodegenerative processes in dementia and AD and how they relate to each other.

  4. Measurement of tritiated norepinephrine metabolism in intact rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, M.; Kowalik, S.; Barkai, A.I. (New York State Psychiatric Inst., New York (USA))

    1983-06-01

    A procedure for the study of NE metabolism in the intact rat brain is described. The method involves ventriculocisternal perfusion of the adult male rat with artificial CSF containing (/sup 3/H)NE. Radioactivity in the perfusate associated with NE and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid (DOMA), 3,4-dihydroxphenylethyleneglycol (DHPG), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (VMA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG), and normetanephrine (NMN) is separated using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After 80 min the radioactivity in the perfusate reaches an apparent steady-state. Analysis of the steady-state samples shows higher activity in the fractions corresponding to DHPG and MHPG than in those corresponding to DOMA and VMA, confirming glycol formation as the major pathway of NE metabolism in the rat brain. Pretreatment with an MAO inhibitor (tranylcypromine) results in a marked decrease in the deaminated metabolites DHPG and MHPG and a concurrent increase in NMN. The results indicate this to be a sensitive procedure for the in vivo determination of changes in NE metabolism.

  5. [Brain metabolism alterations in patients with anorexia nervosa observed in 1H-MRS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzelak, P.; Gajewicz, W.; Wyszogrodzka-Kucharska, A.; Rotkiewicz, A.; Stefanczyk, L.; Goraj, B.M.; Rabe-Jablonska, J.

    2005-01-01

    The causes of metabolic brain changes in patients with anorexia nervosa are still not fully explained. The purpose of this study was to use the 1H-MRS method in investigating metabolic changes in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa. We studied 10 patients for visible alternations in brain me

  6. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  7. Clinical Factors Associated with Cerebral Metabolism in Term Neonates with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, Anna Lonyai; Votava-Smith, Jodie K; Del Castillo, Sylvia; Kumar, S Ram; Lee, Vince; Schmithorst, Vincent; Lai, Hollie A; O'Neil, Sharon; Bluml, Stefan; Paquette, Lisa; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2017-04-01

    To determine associations between patient and clinical factors with postnatal brain metabolism in term neonates with congenital heart disease (CHD) via the use of quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Neonates with CHD were enrolled prospectively to undergo pre- and postoperative 3T brain magnetic resonance imaging. Short-echo single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy of parietal white matter was used to quantify metabolites related to brain maturation (n-acetyl aspartate, choline, myo- inositol), neurotransmitters (glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid), energy metabolism (glutamine, citrate, glucose, and phosphocreatine), and injury/apoptosis (lactate and lipids). Multivariable regression was performed to search for associations between (1) patient-specific/prenatal/preoperative factors with concurrent brain metabolism and (2) intraoperative and postoperative factors with postoperative brain metabolism. A total of 83 magnetic resonance images were obtained on 55 subjects. No patient-specific, prenatal, or preoperative factors associated with concurrent metabolic brain dysmaturation or elevated lactate could be identified. Chromosome 22q11 microdeletion and age at surgery were predictive of altered concurrent white matter phosphocreatine (P term infants with CHD, but not patient-specific, preoperative, or intraoperative factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural brain lesions in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can; Dolapcioglu; Hatice; Dolapcioglu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system(CNS) complications or manifes-tations of inflammatory bowel disease deserve particular attention because symptomatic conditions can require early diagnosis and treatment, whereas unexplained manifestations might be linked with pathogenic me-chanisms. This review focuses on both symptomatic and asymptomatic brain lesions detectable on imaging studies, as well as their frequency and potential mecha-nisms. A direct causal relationship between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and asymptomatic structural brain changes has not been demonstrated, but several possible explanations, including vasculitis, thromboembolism and malnutrition, have been proposed. IBD is associated with a tendency for thromboembolisms; therefore, cerebro-vascular thromboembolism represents the most frequent and grave CNS complication. Vasculitis, demyelinating conditions and CNS infections are among the other CNS manifestations of the disease. Biological agents also represent a risk factor, particularly for demyelination. Identification of the nature and potential mechanisms of brain lesions detectable on imaging studies would shed further light on the disease process and could improve patient care through early diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Metabolic Imaging of Breast Cancer and the Normal Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar Butt, Sadia

    ) of hyperpolarized substrates enables the visualization, characterization, and quantification of biological processes taking without perturbing them. Biologic processes can, thus, be studied in their own physiologically authentic environment. This ability to measure fine metabolic changes opens up an incredible...... number of exciting possibilities for medical application, including early detection of disease. Such early detection allows for personalized treatment, which may increase the chances for a successful outcome. This PhD thesis is based on experimental studies on the cellular metabolism using MRS in two...

  10. Crosstalk of metabolic factors and neurogenic signaling in adult neurogenesis: Implication of metabolic regulation for mental and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chong; Wang, Qi; Chung, Sookja K; Shen, Jiangang

    2017-02-07

    Metabolic disorders like diabetes and obesity are commonly companied with neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. Accumulating evidences indicated that cellular metabolic factors affect adult neurogenesis and have modulating effects on neurodegenerative disorders and psychiatric diseases. Adult neurogenesis contains multiple steps including proliferation of neural stem cells, lineage commitments of neural progenitor cells, maturation into functional neurons, and integration into neuronal network. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors produced from neural stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment or neurogenic niche take roles in modulating neurogenesis and contribute to the brain repair and functional recoveries in many neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we review current progress about how different growth factors, neurotrophin, neurotransmitters and transcriptional factors work on regulating neurogenic process. In particular, we emphasize the roles of the cellular metabolic factors, such as insulin/IGF signaling, incretins, and lipid metabolic signaling molecules in modulating adult neurogenesis, and discuss their impacts on neurological behaviors. We propose that the metabolic factors could be the new therapeutic targets for adult neurogenesis. Plus, the metabolism-regulating drugs have the potentials for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and mental disorders.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a regulator of systemic and brain energy metabolism and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Wan, Ruiqian; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-08-01

    Overweight sedentary individuals are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of dietary energy restriction (DER) and exercise on brain structural plasticity and behaviors have been demonstrated in animal models of aging and acute (stroke and trauma) and chronic (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) neurological disorders. The findings described later, and evolutionary considerations, suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in the integration and optimization of behavioral and metabolic responses to environments with limited energy resources and intense competition. In particular, BDNF signaling mediates adaptive responses of the central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous systems from exercise and DER. In the hypothalamus, BDNF inhibits food intake and increases energy expenditure. By promoting synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, BDNF mediates exercise- and DER-induced improvements in cognitive function and neuroprotection. DER improves cardiovascular stress adaptation by a mechanism involving enhancement of brainstem cholinergic activity. Collectively, findings reviewed in this paper provide a rationale for targeting BDNF signaling for novel therapeutic interventions in a range of metabolic and neurological disorders.

  12. MR spectroscopy in metabolic disorders of the brain; MR-Spektroskopie bei Stoffwechselerkrankungen des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Metabolic disorders of the brain often present a particular challenge for the neuroradiologist, since the disorders are rare, changes on conventional MR are often non-specific and there are numerous differential diagnoses for the white substance lesions. As a complementary method to conventional brain MRI, MR spectroscopy may help to reduce the scope of the differential diagnosis. Entities with specific MR spectroscopy patterns are Canavan disease, maple syrup urine disease, nonketotic hyperglycinemia and creatine deficiency. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik metabolischer Erkrankungen des Gehirns stellt eine besondere Herausforderung in der Neuroradiologie dar, da die Erkrankungen insgesamt selten, die bildmorphologischen Befunde haeufig unspezifisch sind und es eine Vielzahl von Differenzialdiagnosen fuer die Veraenderungen der weissen Substanz gibt. Als zusaetzliche Technik kann die MR-Spektroskopie bei Stoffwechselerkrankungen helfen, die Diagnose einzugrenzen. Krankheitsentitaeten, die spezifische Veraenderungen in der Spektroskopie aufweisen, sind der Morbus Canavan, die Ahornsirupkrankheit, die nichtketotische Hyperglyzinaemie und Kreatinmangelsyndrome. (orig.)

  13. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  14. The effect of subcutaneous tetrathiomolybdate administration on copper and iron metabolism, including their regional redistribution in the brain, in the Long-Evans Cinnamon rat, a bona fide animal model for Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, N; Ikeda, T; Lai, Y R; Sugawara, C

    1999-05-01

    The present work was performed to examine the effect of tetrathiomolybdate on Cu and Fe metabolism, especially redistribution of Cu and Fe in the brains of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, with inherently abnormal Cu deposition in the liver. The drug was injected subcutaneously at 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a week for 65 days (total dose of 20 mg) into 40-day-old Long-Evans Cinnamon rats. In Long-Evans Cinnamon rats treated with tetrathiomolybdate, the hepatic Cu concentration was 60 microg/g wet weight, compared to 170 microg/g in untreated rats. In seven brain regions (cerebellum, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus, striatum, midbrain, hippocampus and cortex) of the Long-Evans Cinnamon rats treated with tetrathiomolybdate. the Cu concentration (1.5 to 2.3 microg/g) was slightly lower (1.6 to 2.7 microg/g) than in untreated rats. A significant difference between the two groups was found only in the midbrain. Brain Fe concentrations in regions other than the striatum were not changed significantly by the tetrathiomolybdate injections. The hepatic Fe concentration was about 120 microg/g in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats without tetrathiomolybdate. Tetrathiomolybdate injection further increased the concentration to about 250 microg/g. Our results indicated that subcutaneous tetrathiomolybdate injection did not have an effect that stimulated redistribution of Cu and Fe in the seven brain regions examined, although hepatic Cu was markedly decreased and the removed Cu was deposited in kidneys, spleen and testes. The increased hepatic Fe level should be taken into account when considering side effects of the compound.

  15. Carotid body, insulin and metabolic diseases: unravelling the links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia V Conde

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The carotid bodies (CB are peripheral chemoreceptors that sense changes in arterial blood O2, CO2 and pH levels. Hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis activate the CB, which respond by increasing the action potential frequency in their sensory nerve, the carotid sinus nerve (CSN. CSN activity is integrated in the brain stem to induce a panoply of cardiorespiratory reflexes aimed, primarily, to normalize the altered blood gases, via hyperventilation, and to regulate blood pressure and cardiac performance, via sympathetic nervous system (SNS activation. Besides its role in the cardiorespiratory control the CB has been proposed as a metabolic sensor implicated in the control of energy homeostasis and, more recently, in the regulation of whole body insulin sensitivity. Hypercaloric diets cause CB overactivation in rats, which seems to be at the origin of the development of insulin resistance and hypertension, core features of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Consistent with this notion, CB sensory denervation prevents metabolic and hemodynamic alterations in hypercaloric feed animal. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is another chronic disorder characterized by increased CB activity and intimately related with several metabolic and cardiovascular abnormalities. In this manuscript we review in a concise manner the putative pathways linking CB chemoreceptors deregulation with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension. Also, the link between chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH and insulin resistance is discussed. Then, a final section is devoted to debate strategies to reduce CB activity and its use for prevention and therapeutics of metabolic diseases with an emphasis on new exciting research in the modulation of bioelectronic signals, likely to be central in the future.

  16. Plasma antioxidants and brain glucose metabolism in elderly subjects with cognitive complaints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picco, Agnese; Ferrara, Michela; Arnaldi, Dario; Brugnolo, Andrea; Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa and IRCCS San Martino-IST, Clinical Neurology, Department of Neuroscience (DINOGMI), Largo P. Daneo, 3, 16132, Genoa (Italy); Polidori, M.C. [University of Cologne, Institute of Geriatrics, Cologne (Germany); Cecchetti, Roberta; Baglioni, Mauro; Bastiani, Patrizia; Mecocci, Patrizia [University of Perugia, Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Perugia (Italy); Morbelli, Silvia; Bossert, Irene [University of Genoa and IRCCS San Martino-IST, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Health Science (DISSAL), Genoa (Italy); Fiorucci, Giuliana; Dottorini, Massimo Eugenio [Nuclear Medicine, S. M. della Misericordia Hospital, Perugia (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The role of oxidative stress is increasingly recognized in cognitive disorders of the elderly, notably Alzheimer's disease (AD). In these subjects brain{sup 18}F-FDG PET is regarded as a reliable biomarker of neurodegeneration. We hypothesized that oxidative stress could play a role in impairing brain glucose utilization in elderly subjects with increasing severity of cognitive disturbance. The study group comprised 85 subjects with cognitive disturbance of increasing degrees of severity including 23 subjects with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), 28 patients with mild cognitive impairment and 34 patients with mild AD. In all subjects brain FDG PET was performed and plasma activities of extracellular superoxide dismutase (eSOD), catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured. Voxel-based analysis (SPM8) was used to compare FDG PET between groups and to evaluate correlations between plasma antioxidants and glucose metabolism in the whole group of subjects, correcting for age and Mini-Mental State Examination score. Brain glucose metabolism progressively decreased in the bilateral posterior temporoparietal and cingulate cortices across the three groups, from SCI to mild AD. eSOD activity was positively correlated with glucose metabolism in a large area of the left temporal lobe including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri and the fusiform gyrus. These results suggest a role of oxidative stress in the impairment of glucose utilization in the left temporal lobe structures in elderly patients with cognitive abnormalities, including AD and conditions predisposing to AD. Further studies exploring the oxidative stress-energy metabolism axis are considered worthwhile in larger groups of these patients in order to identify pivotal pathophysiological mechanisms and innovative therapeutic opportunities. (orig.)

  17. Familial Alzheimer's disease: genetic analysis related to disease heterogeneity, Down syndrome and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, M B; Rapoport, S I

    1989-01-01

    Etiologically heterogeneous subgroups of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) exist and need to be distinguished so as to better identify genetic causes of familial cases. Furthermore, the presence of AD neuropathology in Down syndrome (trisomy 21) subjects older than 35 years suggests that AD in some cases is caused by dysregulation of expression of genes on chromosome 21. Cerebral metabolic abnormalities in life, and the distribution of AD neuropathology in the post-mortem brain, indicate that AD involves the association neocortices and subcortical regions with which they evolved during evolution of the human brain. Accordingly, understanding the molecular basis of this evolution should elucidate the genetic basis of AD, whereas knowing the genetics of AD should be informative about the genomic changes which promoted brain evolution.

  18. Curcumin regulates insulin pathways and glucose metabolism in the brains of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwen; Su, Caixin; Feng, Huili; Chen, Xiaopei; Dong, Yunfang; Rao, Yingxue; Ren, Ying; Yang, Jinduo; Shi, Jing; Tian, Jinzhou; Jiang, Shucui

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies have shown the therapeutic potential of curcumin in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In 2014, our lab found that curcumin reduced Aβ40, Aβ42 and Aβ-derived diffusible ligands in the mouse hippocampus, and improved learning and memory. However, the mechanisms underlying this biological effect are only partially known. There is considerable evidence in brain metabolism studies indicating that AD might be a brain-specific type of diabetes with progressive impairment of glucose utilisation and insulin signalling. We hypothesised that curcumin might target both the glucose metabolism and insulin signalling pathways. In this study, we monitored brain glucose metabolism in living APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice using a micro-positron emission tomography (PET) technique. The study showed an improvement in cerebral glucose uptake in AD mice. For a more in-depth study, we used immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and western blot techniques to examine key factors in both glucose metabolism and brain insulin signalling pathways. The results showed that curcumin ameliorated the defective insulin signalling pathway by upregulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1R, IRS-2, PI3K, p-PI3K, Akt and p-Akt protein expression while downregulating IR and IRS-1. Our study found that curcumin improved spatial learning and memory, at least in part, by increasing glucose metabolism and ameliorating the impaired insulin signalling pathways in the brain.

  19. Correlation of glucose metabolism in brain cells and brain morphological changes with clinical typing in children with cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongxiang Zhai; Huixian Qiao; Jiqing Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It is widely known that fluorino-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography(18F-FDG PET)is commonly used to evaluate and diagnose epilepsy;however,whether it is beneficial to understand functional metabolism of bra in cells so as to reflect injured site and degree of brain cells or not should be studied further.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the correlation between glucose metabolism and clinical typling as well as the conelation between active function of brain cells and degree of brain injury among children with cerbral palsy with 18F-FDG PET and MRI and compare the results of them.DESIGN:Case analysis.SETTING:Department of Pediatrics,People's Hospital of Guangdong Province.PARTICIPANTS:A total of 31 children with cerebral palsy were selected from Out-patient Clinic and In-patient Department of People's Hospital of Guangdong Province from July 2001 to August 2004.Based on clinical criteria of cerebral palsy,patients were classified into spasm(n=10),gradual movement(n=4),mixed type(n =13)and ataxia(n=4).There were 18 boys and 13 girls aged from 10 months to 4 years.All of them were met the diagnostic criteria of cerebral palsy and all parents of them were told the facts.Exclusion cdteria:Patients who had cerebral palsy caused by genetic metabolism disease were excluded.METHODS:①All children accepted MRI examination after hospitalization with Philips Acs NT 15T superconductling magnetic resonance scanner.②All children were fasted for 4 hours.And then,PET image of brain was collected based on T+EID type.If obvious hypermetabolism or hypometabolism region successively occurred on two layers, the image was regarded as abnormality. ③Different correlations of various abnormal greups of MRI and vadous types of cerebral palsy with PET image were compared and analyzed with Erusal-Willas rank sum test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:①Results of 18F-FDG PET;②Results of MRI examination;③Correlation of variously abnormal groups of MRI and various types of cerebral

  20. Adipokines, metabolic syndrome and rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abella, Vanessa; Scotece, Morena; Conde, Javier; López, Verónica; Lazzaro, Verónica; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Gualillo, Oreste

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  1. Adipokines, Metabolic Syndrome and Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Abella

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of cardiometabolic disorders that result from the increasing prevalence of obesity. The major components of MetS include insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. MetS identifies the central obesity with increased risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients with rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis, have increased prevalence of CVDs. Moreover, CVD risk is increased when obesity is present in these patients. However, traditional cardiovascular risk factors do not completely explain the enhanced cardiovascular risk in this population. Thus, MetS and the altered secretion patterns of proinflammatory adipokines present in obesity could be the link between CVDs and rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, adipokines have been linked to the pathogenesis of MetS and its comorbidities through their effects on vascular function and inflammation. In the present paper, we review recent evidence of the role played by adipokines in the modulation of MetS in the general population, and in patients with rheumatic diseases.

  2. Nutrigenomic programming of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanne, Susan

    2014-10-01

    Over twenty five years ago epidemiological studies revealed that there was a relationship between patterns of early growth and subsequent risk of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and the metabolic syndrome. Studies of identical twins, individuals who were in utero during periods of famine, discordant siblings and animal models have provided strong evidence that the early environment plays an important role in mediating these relationships. Early nutrition is one such important environmental factor. The concept of early life programming is therefore widely accepted and the underlying mechanisms starting to emerge. These include: (1) Permanent structural changes in an organ due to exposure to suboptimal levels of essential hormones or nutrients during a critical period of development leading to permanent changes in tissue function (2) Persistent epigenetic changes such as DNA methylation and histone modifications and miRNAs leading to changes in gene expression. (3) Permanent effects on regulation of cellular ageing through increases in oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction leading to DNA damage and telomere shortening. Further understanding of these processes will enable the development of preventative and intervention strategies to combat the burden of common diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  4. The link between iron, metabolic syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünblatt, Edna; Bartl, Jasmin; Riederer, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Both Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a disease associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), affect a great number of the world population and both have increased prevalence with age. Recently, many studies demonstrated that pre-diabetes, MetS, and T2DM are risk factors in the development of AD and have many common mechanisms. The main focus of studies is the insulin resistance outcome found both in MetS as well as in brains of AD subjects. However, oxidative stress (OS)-related mechanisms, which are well known to be involved in AD, including mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated iron concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and stress-related enzyme or proteins (e.g. heme oxygenase-1, transferrin, etc.), have not been elucidated in MetS or T2DM brains although OS and iron are involved in the degeneration of the pancreatic islet β cells. Therefore, this review sets to cover the current literature regarding OS and iron in MetS and T2DM and the similarities to mechanisms in AD both in human subjects as well as in animal models.

  5. Endogenously nitrated proteins in mouse brain: links to neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacksteder, Colette A; Qian, Wei-Jun; Knyushko, Tatyana V; Wang, Haixing; Chin, Mark H; Lacan, Goran; Melega, William P; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Smith, Desmond J; Squier, Thomas C; Bigelow, Diana J

    2006-07-04

    Increased abundance of nitrotyrosine modifications of proteins have been documented in multiple pathologies in a variety of tissue types and play a role in the redox regulation of normal metabolism. To identify proteins sensitive to nitrating conditions in vivo, a comprehensive proteomic data set identifying 7792 proteins from a whole mouse brain, generated by LC/LC-MS/MS analyses, was used to identify nitrated proteins. This analysis resulted in the identification of 31 unique nitrotyrosine sites within 29 different proteins. More than half of the nitrated proteins that have been identified are involved in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, or other neurodegenerative disorders. Similarly, nitrotyrosine immunoblots of whole brain homogenates show that treatment of mice with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an experimental model of Parkinson's disease, induces an increased level of nitration of the same protein bands observed to be nitrated in brains of untreated animals. Comparing sequences and available high-resolution structures around nitrated tyrosines with those of unmodified sites indicates a preference of nitration in vivo for surface accessible tyrosines in loops, a characteristic consistent with peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine modification. In addition, most sequences contain cysteines or methionines proximal to nitrotyrosines, contrary to suggestions that these amino acid side chains prevent tyrosine nitration. More striking is the presence of a positively charged moiety near the sites of nitration, which is not observed for non-nitrated tyrosines. Together, these observations suggest a predictive tool of functionally important sites of nitration and that cellular nitrating conditions play a role in neurodegenerative changes in the brain.

  6. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura Yukiko K; Omaye Stanley T

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motiva...

  7. Osteoporotic fractures: a brain or bone disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Stanley J

    2008-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder that predisposes individuals to increased risk of fracture. However, most osteoporotic fractures occur in women who do not meet criteria for osteoporosis. Hence, bone density, by itself, is a relatively poor predictor of fracture. Age and age-related factors are now recognized as increasingly important in determining fracture risk. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with increased disability and mortality, suggesting that osteoporosis may be a clinical manifestation of an underlying disease process affecting multiple systems. The systems affected, the musculo-skeletal system and the central nervous system, are shared in many respects with the frailty syndrome. Vitamin D deficiency is a major contributor to the frailty syndrome, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. Its effects are mediated by the development of cerebrovascular disease, postural instability, muscle weakness, and bone fragility. Thus, osteoporotic fractures result from both a bone and brain disease.

  8. ADDICTION IS NOT A BRAIN DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisardo Becoña

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea that addiction is a “brain disease” has gradually been consolidated in the medical-psychiatric field over the last years, as it appears in the current DSM-5. In this paper we analyse the way this idea has arisen and been consolidated, as well as the criticisms that it has received, the professional consequences if this model becomes hegemonic, and the underlying interests. The conclusion defends the need to show, as psychologists, our clear contributions to the field of addictions, and the psychological variables that are necessary in order to understand and prevent addictions, as well as the central role of psychological treatment due to its effectiveness. We must also denounce the reductionism that the model of brain disease represents in comparison with a biopsychosocial model of addiction.

  9. Traumatic brain injury alters methionine metabolism: implications for pathophysiology

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    Pramod K Dash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Methionine is an essential proteinogenic amino acid that is obtained from the diet. In addition to its requirement for protein biosynthesis, methionine is metabolized to generate metabolites that play key roles in a number of cellular functions. Metabolism of methionine via the transmethylation pathway generates S-adenosylmethionine (SAM that serves as the principal methyl (-CH3 donor for DNA and histone methyltransferases to regulate epigenetic changes in gene expression. SAM is also required for methylation of other cellular proteins that serve various functions and phosphatidylcholine synthesis that participate in cellular signaling.. Under conditions of oxidative stress, homocysteine (which is derived from SAM enters the transsulfuration pathway to generate glutathione, an important cytoprotective molecule against oxidative damage. As both experimental and clinical studies have shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI alters DNA and histone methylation and causes oxidative stress, we examined if TBI alters the plasma levels of methionine and its metabolites in human patients. Blood samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n = 20 and patients with mild TBI (GCS > 12; n = 20 or severe TBI (GCS < 8; n = 20 within the first 24 hours of injury. The levels of methionine and its metabolites in the plasma samples were analyzed by either liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS or GC-MS. Severe TBI decreased the levels of methionine, SAM, betaine and 2-methylglycine as compared to healthy volunteers, indicating a decrease in metabolism through the transmethylation cycle. In addition, precursors for the generation of glutathione, cysteine and glycine were also found to be decreased as were intermediate metabolites of the gamma-glutamyl cycle (gamma-glutamyl amino acids and 5-oxoproline. Mild TBI also decreased the levels of methionine, α-ketobutyrate, 2 hydroxybutyrate and glycine, albeit to lesser

  10. Leukocyte set points in metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegaard, Justin I; Chawla, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate tissues comprise precise admixtures of parenchymal and hematopoietic cells, whose interactions are vital to proper tissue function. By regulating this interaction, vertebrates are able to mitigate environmental stress and coordinate dramatic physiologic adaptations. For instance, under conditions of chronic nutrient excess, leukocyte recruitment and activation increase in an effort to decrease excess nutrient storage and alleviate adipocyte stress. While basal equilibria may be reestablished upon normalization of nutrient intake, a new set point characterized by insulin resistance and chronic inflammation is established if the stress persists. Consequently, although this response is adaptive in settings of acute overfeeding and infection, it has catastrophic health consequences in the modern context of obesity. Understanding how leukocyte set points (numbers and activation status) are established, maintained, and regulated in tissues is, thus, critical to our understanding of, and intervention in, chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes.

  11. Noninvasive measurement of brain glycogen by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Oz, Gülin

    2011-12-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors, including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen noninvasively, but, in the past several years, the development of a noninvasive localized (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has allowed the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, (13) C-glucose is administered intravenously, and its incorporation into and washout from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia, and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest that glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, (13) C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions.

  12. Drug metabolism in human brain: high levels of cytochrome P4503A43 in brain and metabolism of anti-anxiety drug alprazolam to its active metabolite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Agarwal

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (P450 is a super-family of drug metabolizing enzymes. P450 enzymes have dual function; they can metabolize drugs to pharmacologically inactive metabolites facilitating their excretion or biotransform them to pharmacologically active metabolites which may have longer half-life than the parent drug. The variable pharmacological response to psychoactive drugs typically seen in population groups is often not accountable by considering dissimilarities in hepatic metabolism. Metabolism in brain specific nuclei may play a role in pharmacological modulation of drugs acting on the CNS and help explain some of the diverse response to these drugs seen in patient population. P450 enzymes are also present in brain where drug metabolism can take place and modify therapeutic action of drugs at the site of action. We have earlier demonstrated an intrinsic difference in the biotransformation of alprazolam (ALP in brain and liver, relatively more alpha-hydroxy alprazolam (alpha-OHALP is formed in brain as compared to liver. In the present study we show that recombinant CYP3A43 metabolizes ALP to both alpha-OHALP and 4-hydroxy alprazolam (4-OHALP while CYP3A4 metabolizes ALP predominantly to its inactive metabolite, 4-OHALP. The expression of CYP3A43 mRNA in human brain samples correlates with formation of relatively higher levels of alpha-OH ALP indicating that individuals who express higher levels of CYP3A43 in the brain would generate larger amounts of alpha-OHALP. Further, the expression of CYP3A43 was relatively higher in brain as compared to liver across different ethnic populations. Since CYP3A enzymes play a prominent role in the metabolism of drugs, the higher expression of CYP3A43 would generate metabolite profile of drugs differentially in human brain and thus impact the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs at the site of action.

  13. Human KATP channelopathies: diseases of metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of an inward rectifier K+ channel pore (Kir6.1/Kir6.2) and an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding regulatory subunit (SUR1/SUR2A/SUR2B) forms ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel heteromultimers, widely distributed in metabolically active tissues throughout the body. KATP channels are metabolism-gated biosensors functioning as molecular rheostats that adjust membrane potential-dependent functions to match cellular energetic demands. Vital in the adaptive response to (patho)physiological stress, KATP channels serve a homeostatic role ranging from glucose regulation to cardioprotection. Accordingly, genetic variation in KATP channel subunits has been linked to the etiology of life-threatening human diseases. In particular, pathogenic mutations in KATP channels have been identified in insulin secretion disorders, namely, congenital hyperinsulinism and neonatal diabetes. Moreover, KATP channel defects underlie the triad of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes (DEND syndrome). KATP channelopathies implicated in patients with mechanical and/or electrical heart disease include dilated cardiomyopathy (with ventricular arrhythmia; CMD1O) and adrenergic atrial fibrillation. A common Kir6.2 E23K polymorphism has been associated with late-onset diabetes and as a risk factor for maladaptive cardiac remodeling in the community-at-large and abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise stress performance in patients with heart failure. The overall mutation frequency within KATP channel genes and the spectrum of genotype–phenotype relationships remain to be established, while predicting consequences of a deficit in channel function is becoming increasingly feasible through systems biology approaches. Thus, advances in molecular medicine in the emerging field of human KATP channelopathies offer new opportunities for targeted individualized screening, early diagnosis, and tailored therapy. PMID:20033705

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflects metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindel, W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Kugel, H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Wendel, U. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Roth, B. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Benz-Bohm, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), accumulation of branchedchain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding 2-oxo acids (BCOA) could be non-invasively demonstrated in the brain of a 9-year-old girl suffering from classical maple syrup urine disease. During acute metabolic decompensation, the compounds caused a signal at a chemical shift of 0.9 ppm which was assigned by in vitro experiments. The brain tissue concentration of the sum of BCAA and BCOA could be estimated as 0.9 mmol/l. Localized {sup 1}H-MRS of the brain appears to be suitable for examining patients suffering from maple syrup urine disease in different metabolic states. (orig.)

  15. The implications of relationships between human diseases and metabolic subpathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    Full Text Available One of the challenging problems in the etiology of diseases is to explore the relationships between initiation and progression of diseases and abnormalities in local regions of metabolic pathways. To gain insight into such relationships, we applied the "k-clique" subpathway identification method to all disease-related gene sets. For each disease, the disease risk regions of metabolic pathways were then identified and considered as subpathways associated with the disease. We finally built a disease-metabolic subpathway network (DMSPN. Through analyses based on network biology, we found that a few subpathways, such as that of cytochrome P450, were highly connected with many diseases, and most belonged to fundamental metabolisms, suggesting that abnormalities of fundamental metabolic processes tend to cause more types of diseases. According to the categories of diseases and subpathways, we tested the clustering phenomenon of diseases and metabolic subpathways in the DMSPN. The results showed that both disease nodes and subpathway nodes displayed slight clustering phenomenon. We also tested correlations between network topology and genes within disease-related metabolic subpathways, and found that within a disease-related subpathway in the DMSPN, the ratio of disease genes and the ratio of tissue-specific genes significantly increased as the number of diseases caused by the subpathway increased. Surprisingly, the ratio of essential genes significantly decreased and the ratio of housekeeping genes remained relatively unchanged. Furthermore, the coexpression levels between disease genes and other types of genes were calculated for each subpathway in the DMSPN. The results indicated that those genes intensely influenced by disease genes, including essential genes and tissue-specific genes, might be significantly associated with the disease diversity of subpathways, suggesting that different kinds of genes within a disease-related subpathway may play

  16. Metabolic triad in brain aging: mitochondria, insulin/IGF-1 signalling and JNK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Jiang, Tianyi; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-02-01

    Mitochondria generate second messengers, such as H2O2, that are involved in the redox regulation of cell signalling and their function is regulated by several cytosolic signalling pathways. IIS [insulin/IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor 1) signalling] in the brain proceeds mainly through the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)-Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, which is involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival via the maintenance of the bioenergetic and metabolic capacities of mitochondria. Conversely, the JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) pathway is induced by increased oxidative stress and JNK translocation to the mitochondrion results in impairment of energy metabolism. Moreover, IIS and JNK signalling interact with and antagonize each other. This review focuses on functional outcomes of a metabolic triad that entails the co-ordination of mitochondrial function (energy transducing and redox regulation), IIS and JNK signalling, in the aging brain and in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  18. Human brain dopamine metabolism in levodopa-induced dyskinesia and wearing-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Ali H; Fenton, Mark E; Di Paolo, Thérèse; Sitte, Harold; Pifl, Christian; Hornykiewicz, Oleh

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify dopamine (DA) metabolism pattern in Lewy body Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with dyskinesia (Dysk) only, with wearing-off (WO) only, or no motor complications (NMC) induced by levodopa (LD). DA, homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) were measured individual basal ganglia nuclei of nine PD patients who received LD for 6-18 years. Three patients had only Dysk, three only WO, and three had neither Dysk nor WO. Biochemical measurements in PD brains were compared with four non-neurological control brains from individuals matched for age and post-mortem retrieval time. DA levels in the PD were reduced in the caudate by 87% and putamen by 99%. In the caudates, the HVA/DA molar ratio as an index of DA metabolism was similar in the WO and the Dysk patients. However, in the putamen, the ratio of HVA/DA was significantly higher in the WO compared with the Dysk (p = 0.03)and the NMC (p = 0.04) groups of patients. In the putamen, the DOPAC levels were higher in the WO cases while in the Dysk cases, 3-MT levels were higher. The results suggest that in the WO only cases, the putaminal DA was in large measure metabolized intraneuronally while the DA metabolism in our Dysk only patients was mainly extraneuronal. We conclude that the magnitude and the site (intra vs. extraneuronal) of the synaptic DA metabolism in the putamen plays a significant role in LD-induced Dysk and WO.

  19. MRI in paediatric hypoxic-ischemic disease, metabolic disorders and malformations-A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitzke, Dietrich [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria)], E-mail: dietrich.beitzke@meduni-graz.at; Simbrunner, Josef [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria); Riccabona, Michael [Department of Radiology, Division of Paediatric Radiology, Medical University, Graz (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    MRI has become the most important modality in paediatric neuroimaging. It provides an excellent anatomical overview with good spatial and temporal resolution, allows investigations of the blood vessels, and - using technologies such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy - it allows quick and exact differentiation of ischemic, hypoxic, inflammatory, oncologic, traumatic and metabolic diseases. This review presents an overview of brain MRI in infants and children with suspected hypoxic-ischemic disease, metabolic disorders or (vascular) malformations, illustrating these issues by some MRI findings in selected important conditions and discussing some major clinical and pathophysiological aspects important for imaging.

  20. Program for Research on Dietary Supplements in Military Operations and Healthcare Metabolically Optimized Brain - JWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    ABSTRACT “The Program for Research on Dietary Supplements in Military Operations and Healthcare: The Metabolically Optimized Brain ( MOB ) Study targets a...Operations and Healthcare: The Metabolically Optimized Brain ( MOB ) Study targets a more specific aspect of dietary nutrition, feeding policy and...psychological consequences of brain injury from high intensity training, and combat operations exposures. The MOB Study has 3 specific aims: 1. Convene a

  1. Periodontal disease: the influence of metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchetti Enrico

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that include obesity, impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Recently, more attention has been reserved to the correlation between periodontitis and systemic health. MetS is characterized by oxidative stress, a condition in which the equilibrium between the production and the inactivation of reactive oxygen species (ROS becomes disrupted. ROS have an essential role in a variety of physiological systems, but under a condition of oxidative stress, they contribute to cellular dysfunction and damage. Oxidative stress may act as a common link to explain the relationship between each component of MetS and periodontitis. All those conditions show increased serum levels of products derived from oxidative damage, promoting a proinflammatory state. Moreover, adipocytokines, produced by the fat cells of fat tissue, might modulate the balance between oxidant and antioxidant activities. An increased caloric intake involves a higher metabolic activity, which results in an increased production of ROS, inducing insulin resistance. At the same time, obese patients require more insulin to maintain blood glucose homeostasis – a state known as hyperinsulinemia, a condition that can evolve into type 2 diabetes. Oxidation products can increase neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis, thus favoring oxidative damage. Hyperglycemia and an oxidizing state promote the genesis of advanced glycation end-products, which could also be implicated in the degeneration and damage of periodontal tissue. Thus, MetS, the whole of interconnected factors, presents systemic and local manifestations, such as cardiovascular disease and periodontitis, related by a common factor known as oxidative stress.

  2. Visfatin, glucose metabolism and vascular disease: a review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saddi-Rosa Pedro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The adipose tissue is an endocrine organ producing substances called adipocytokines that have different effects on lipid metabolism, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular risk. Visfatin was recently described as an adipocytokine with potentially important effects on glucose metabolism and atherosclerosis. Visfatin has been linked to several inflammatory conditions, beta cell function, and cardiovascular disease. The growing number of publications on the subject shall bring further evidence about this adipocytokine. Its findings may contribute in the identification of higher risk individuals for diabetes and cardiovascular disease with a better comprehension about the complex intercorrelation between adiposity, glucose metabolism and vascular disease.

  3. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  4. ECHS1 mutations in Leigh disease: a new inborn error of metabolism affecting valine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Heidi; Buck, Nicole; Wanders, Ronald; Ruiter, Jos; Waterham, Hans; Koster, Janet; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Pitt, James

    2014-11-01

    Two siblings with fatal Leigh disease had increased excretion of S-(2-carboxypropyl)cysteine and several other metabolites that are features of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) deficiency, a rare defect in the valine catabolic pathway associated with Leigh-like disease. However, this diagnosis was excluded by HIBCH sequencing and normal enzyme activity. In contrast to HIBCH deficiency, the excretion of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-carnitine was normal in the children, suggesting deficiency of short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS1 gene). This mitochondrial enzyme is active in several metabolic pathways involving fatty acids and amino acids, including valine, and is immediately upstream of HIBCH in the valine pathway. Both children were compound heterozygous for a c.473C > A (p.A158D) missense mutation and a c.414+3G>C splicing mutation in ECHS1. ECHS1 activity was markedly decreased in cultured fibroblasts from both siblings, ECHS1 protein was undetectable by immunoblot analysis and transfection of patient cells with wild-type ECHS1 rescued ECHS1 activity. The highly reactive metabolites methacrylyl-CoA and acryloyl-CoA accumulate in deficiencies of both ECHS1 and HIBCH and are probably responsible for the brain pathology in both disorders. Deficiency of ECHS1 or HIBCH should be considered in children with Leigh disease. Urine metabolite testing can detect and distinguish between these two disorders.

  5. NLRP3 inflammasomes link inflammation and metabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Nardo, Dominic; Latz, Eicke

    2011-01-01

    A strong link between inflammation and metabolism is becoming increasingly evident. A number of recent landmark studies have implicated the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an interleukin-1β family cytokine-activating protein complex, in a variety of metabolic diseases including obesity, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. Here we review these new developments and discuss their implications for better understanding inflammation in metabolic disease and the prospects of targeting the NLR...

  6. NLRP3 inflammasomes link inflammation and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, Dominic; Latz, Eicke

    2011-08-01

    A strong link between inflammation and metabolism is becoming increasingly evident. A number of recent landmark studies have implicated the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, an interleukin-1β family cytokine-activating protein complex, in a variety of metabolic diseases including obesity, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes. Here, we review these new developments and discuss their implications for a better understanding of inflammation in metabolic disease, and the prospects of targeting the NLRP3 inflammasome for therapeutic intervention.

  7. The role of gap junctions in the brain in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dere, Ekrem; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions connect the cytosolic compartments of adjacent cells for direct electrotonic and metabolic cell-to-cell communication. Gap junctions between glial cells or neurons are ubiquitously expressed in the brain and play a role in brain development including cell differentiation, cell migration and survival, tissue homeostasis, as well as in human diseases including hearing loss, skin disease, neuropathies, epilepsy, brain trauma, and cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, gap junctions are involved in the synchronization and rhythmic oscillation of hippocampal and neocotical neuronal ensembles which might be important for memory formation and consolidation. In this review the accumulated evidence from mouse mutant and pharmacological studies using gap junction blockers is summarized and the progress made in dissecting the physiological, pathophysiological and behavioral roles of gap junction mediated intercellular communication in the brain is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain pyruvate recycling and peripheral metabolism: an NMR analysis ex vivo of acetate and glucose metabolism in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Sébastien; Bezancon, Eric; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Merle, Michel

    2007-06-01

    The occurrence of pyruvate recycling in the rat brain was studied in either pentobarbital anesthetized animals or awake animals receiving a light analgesic dose of morphine, which were infused with either [1-13C]glucose + acetate or glucose + [2-13C]acetate for various periods of time. Metabolite enrichments in the brain, blood and the liver were determined from NMR analyses of tissue extracts. They indicated that: (i) Pyruvate recycling was revealed in the brain of both the anesthetized and awake animals, as well as from lactate and alanine enrichments as from glutamate isotopomer composition, but only after infusion of glucose + [2-13C]acetate. (ii) Brain glucose was labelled from [2-13C]acetate at the same level in anaesthetized and awake rats (approximately 4%). Comparing its enrichment with that of blood and liver glucose indicated that brain glucose labelling resulted from hepatic gluconeogenesis. (iii) Analysing glucose 13C-13C coupling in the brain, blood and the liver confirmed that brain glucose could be labelled in the liver through the activities of both pyruvate recycling and gluconeogenesis. (iv) The rate of appearance and the amount of brain glutamate C4-C5 coupling, a marker of pyruvate recycling when starting from [2-13C]acetate, were lower than those of brain glucose labelling from hepatic metabolism. (v) The evaluation of the contributions of glucose and acetate to glutamate metabolism revealed that more than 60% of brain glutamate was synthesized from glucose whereas only 7% was from acetate and that glutamate C4-C5 coupling was mainly due to the metabolism of glucose labelled through hepatic gluconeogenesis. All these results indicate that, under the present conditions, the pyruvate recycling observed through the labelling of brain metabolites mainly originates from peripheral metabolism.

  9. Energy crisis precedes global metabolic failure in a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer Disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Sheng; Teo, Emelyne; Ng, Li Fang; Chen, Ce-Belle; Lakshmanan, Lakshmi Narayanan; Tsoi, Sau Yee; Moore, Philip Keith; Inoue, Takao; Halliwell, Barry; Gruber, Jan

    2016-09-22

    Alzheimer Disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ), predominantly the Aβ1-42 form, in the brain. Mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism are important components of AD pathogenesis. However, the causal and temporal relationships between them and AD pathology remain unclear. Using a novel C. elegans AD strain with constitutive neuronal Aβ1-42 expression that displays neuromuscular defects and age-dependent behavioural dysfunction reminiscent of AD, we have shown that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit is an early event in AD pathogenesis, preceding dysfunction of mitochondrial electron transfer chain (ETC) complexes and the onset of global metabolic failure. These results are consistent with an emerging view that AD may be a metabolic neurodegenerative disease, and also confirm that Aβ-driven metabolic and mitochondrial effects can be reproduced in organisms separated by large evolutionary distances.

  10. Energy crisis precedes global metabolic failure in a novel Caenorhabditis elegans Alzheimer Disease model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Sheng; Teo, Emelyne; Ng, Li Fang; Chen, Ce-Belle; Lakshmanan, Lakshmi Narayanan; Tsoi, Sau Yee; Moore, Philip Keith; Inoue, Takao; Halliwell, Barry; Gruber, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer Disease (AD) is a progressive neurological disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ), predominantly the Aβ1–42 form, in the brain. Mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism are important components of AD pathogenesis. However, the causal and temporal relationships between them and AD pathology remain unclear. Using a novel C. elegans AD strain with constitutive neuronal Aβ1–42 expression that displays neuromuscular defects and age-dependent behavioural dysfunction reminiscent of AD, we have shown that mitochondrial bioenergetic deficit is an early event in AD pathogenesis, preceding dysfunction of mitochondrial electron transfer chain (ETC) complexes and the onset of global metabolic failure. These results are consistent with an emerging view that AD may be a metabolic neurodegenerative disease, and also confirm that Aβ-driven metabolic and mitochondrial effects can be reproduced in organisms separated by large evolutionary distances. PMID:27653553

  11. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health.

  12. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Pruimboom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often appreciated that chronic inflammation may also promote a sedentary lifestyle, which in turn causes chronic inflammation. Given that even minor increases in chronic inflammation reduce brain volume in otherwise healthy individuals, the bidirectional relationship between inflammation and sedentary behaviour may explain why humans have lost brain volume in the last 30,000 years and also intelligence in the last 30 years. We review evidence that lack of physical activity induces chronic low-grade inflammation and, consequently, an energy conflict between the selfish immune system and the selfish brain. Although the notion that increased physical activity would improve health in the modern world is widespread, here we provide a novel perspective on this truism by providing evidence that recovery of normal human behaviour, such as spontaneous physical activity, would calm proinflammatory activity, thereby allocating more energy to the brain and other organs, and by doing so would improve human health.

  13. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  14. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  15. Astrogliosis in the brain of obese Zucker rat: a model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Nwankwo, Innocent Ejike; Gabrielli, Maria Gabriella; Bhatt, Siddhartha; Muhammad, Abdul Bari; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-05-24

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a disorder characterized primarily by the development of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance and subsequent hyperinsulinemia, originating from abdominal obesity, increases the risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Obesity is probably a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia and is associated with impaired cognitive function. The obese Zucker rat (OZR) represents a model of type 2 diabetes exhibiting a moderate degree of arterial hypertension and of increased oxidative stress. To clarify the possible relationships between MetS and brain damage, the present study has investigated brain microanatomy in OZRs compared with their littermate controls lean Zucker rats (LZRs). Male OZRs and LZRs of 12 weeks of age were used. Their brain was processed for immunochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). In frontal and parietal cortex of OZRs a significant increase in the number of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes was observed. Similar findings were found in the hippocampus, where an increased number of GFAP immunoreactive astrocytes were detected in the CA1 and CA3 subfields and dentate gyrus of OZRs compared to the LZRs. These findings indicating the occurrence of brain injury accompanied by astrogliosis in OZRs suggest that these rats, developed as an animal model of type 2 diabetes, may also represent a model for assessing the influence of MetS on brain. The identification of neurodegenerative changes in OZRs may represent the first step for better characterizing neuronal involvement in this model of MetS and possible treatment for countering it.

  16. Brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2010-09-14

    The evolution of mammalian brain size is directly linked with the evolution of the brain's unique structure and performance. Both maternal life history investment traits and basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlate with relative brain size, but current hypotheses regarding the details of these relationships are based largely on placental mammals. Using encephalization quotients, partial correlation analyses, and bivariate regressions relating brain size to maternal investment times and BMR, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of brain size evolution in marsupials and placentals, whose reproduction and metabolism differ extensively. Our results show that the misconception that marsupials are systematically smaller-brained than placentals is driven by the inclusion of one large-brained placental clade, Primates. Marsupial and placental brain size partial correlations differ in that marsupials lack a partial correlation of BMR with brain size. This contradicts hypotheses stating that the maintenance of relatively larger brains requires higher BMRs. We suggest that a positive BMR-brain size correlation is a placental trait related to the intimate physiological contact between mother and offspring during gestation. Marsupials instead achieve brain sizes comparable to placentals through extended lactation. Comparison with avian brain evolution suggests that placental brain size should be constrained due to placentals' relative precociality, as has been hypothesized for precocial bird hatchlings. We propose that placentals circumvent this constraint because of their focus on gestation, as opposed to the marsupial emphasis on lactation. Marsupials represent a less constrained condition, demonstrating that hypotheses regarding placental brain size evolution cannot be generalized to all mammals.

  17. Limited brain metabolism changes differentiate between the progression and clearance of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Schutsky

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS metabolic profiles were examined from rabies virus (RABV-infected mice that were either mock-treated or received post-exposure treatment (PET with a single dose of the live recombinant RABV vaccine TriGAS. CNS tissue harvested from mock-treated mice at middle and late stage infection revealed numerous changes in energy metabolites, neurotransmitters and stress hormones that correlated with replication levels of viral RNA. Although the large majority of these metabolic changes were completely absent in the brains of TriGAS-treated mice most likely due to the strong reduction in virus spread, TriGAS treatment resulted in the up-regulation of the expression of carnitine and several acylcarnitines, suggesting that these compounds are neuroprotective. The most striking change seen in mock-treated RABV-infected mice was a dramatic increase in brain and serum corticosterone levels, with the later becoming elevated before clinical signs or loss of body weight occurred. We speculate that the rise in corticosterone is part of a strategy of RABV to block the induction of immune responses that would otherwise interfere with its spread. In support of this concept, we show that pharmacological intervention to inhibit corticosterone biosynthesis, in the absence of vaccine treatment, significantly reduces the pathogenicity of RABV. Our results suggest that widespread metabolic changes, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, contribute to the pathogenesis of RABV and that preventing these alterations early in infection with PET or pharmacological blockade helps protect brain homeostasis, thereby reducing disease mortality.

  18. Using bioconductor package BiGGR for metabolic flux estimation based on gene expression changes in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavai, Anand K; Supandi, Farahaniza; Hettling, Hannes; Murrell, Paul; Leunissen, Jack A M; van Beek, Johannes H G M

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the distribution of metabolic fluxes in biochemical networks is of major interest in systems biology. Several databases provide metabolic reconstructions for different organisms. Software to analyze flux distributions exists, among others for the proprietary MATLAB environment. Given the large user community for the R computing environment, a simple implementation of flux analysis in R appears desirable and will facilitate easy interaction with computational tools to handle gene expression data. We extended the R software package BiGGR, an implementation of metabolic flux analysis in R. BiGGR makes use of public metabolic reconstruction databases, and contains the BiGG database and the reconstruction of human metabolism Recon2 as Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) objects. Models can be assembled by querying the databases for pathways, genes or reactions of interest. Fluxes can then be estimated by maximization or minimization of an objective function using linear inverse modeling algorithms. Furthermore, BiGGR provides functionality to quantify the uncertainty in flux estimates by sampling the constrained multidimensional flux space. As a result, ensembles of possible flux configurations are constructed that agree with measured data within precision limits. BiGGR also features automatic visualization of selected parts of metabolic networks using hypergraphs, with hyperedge widths proportional to estimated flux values. BiGGR supports import and export of models encoded in SBML and is therefore interoperable with different modeling and analysis tools. As an application example, we calculated the flux distribution in healthy human brain using a model of central carbon metabolism. We introduce a new algorithm termed Least-squares with equalities and inequalities Flux Balance Analysis (Lsei-FBA) to predict flux changes from gene expression changes, for instance during disease. Our estimates of brain metabolic flux pattern with Lsei-FBA for Alzheimer

  19. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Prodromos I; Karvounaris, Stylianos A; Boumpas, Dimitrios T

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with metabolic syndrome--a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors of which central obesity and insulin resistance are the most characteristic--are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In these subjects, abdominal adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, known to promote insulin resistance. The presence of inflammatory cytokines together with the well-documented increased risk for cardiovascular diseases in patients with inflammatory arthritides and systemic lupus erythematosus has prompted studies to examine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in an effort to identify subjects at risk in addition to that conferred by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These studies have documented a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome which correlates with disease activity and markers of atherosclerosis. The correlation of inflammatory disease activity with metabolic syndrome provides additional evidence for a link between inflammation and metabolic disturbances/vascular morbidity.

  20. Brain monoamine metabolism is altered in rats following spontaneous, long-distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, M; Svensson, T H; Thorén, P

    1987-06-01

    Brain monoamine metabolism in rats was studied during spontaneous, long-term running in a microprocessor-controlled wheel cage. Immediately after heavy spontaneous exercise, DOPA accumulation was decreased in dopamine-rich brain regions such as the limbic forebrain and corpus striatum, indicating a decreased rate of synthesis of dopamine in brain. In contrast, DOPA accumulation was increased in the noradrenaline-predominated region of the brain stem, indicating an increased synthesis of noradrenaline in this region. Alterations in brain monoamine metabolism were normalized in exercising animals analysed 24 h after the last running period. Changes in brain monoamine metabolism may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the clinically observed psychological effects of physical exercise.

  1. Beneficial effects of herbs, spices and medicinal plants on the metabolic syndrome, brain and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2013-03-01

    Herbs and spices have been used since ancient times to not only improve the flavor of edible food but also to prevent and treat chronic health maladies. While the scientific evidence for the use of such common herbs and medicinal plants then had been scarce or lacking, the beneficial effects observed from such use were generally encouraging. It is, therefore, not surprising that the tradition of using such herbs, perhaps even after the advent of modern medicine, has continued. More recently, due to an increased interest in understanding the nutritional effects of herbs/spices more comprehensively, several studies have examined the cellular and molecular modes of action of the active chemical components in herbs and their biological properties. Beneficial actions of herbs/spices include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-hypertensive, gluco-regulatory, and anti-thrombotic effects. One major component of herbs and spices is the polyphenols. Some of the aforementioned properties are attributed to the polyphenols and they are associated with attenuating the metabolic syndrome. Detrimental changes associated with the metabolic syndrome over time affect brain and cognitive function. Metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes are also risk factors for Alzheimer's disease and stroke. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of herbs and spices have been demonstrated and, whether directly or indirectly, such beneficial effects may also contribute to an improvement in cognitive function. This review evaluates the current evidence available for herbs/spices in potentially improving the metabolic syndrome, as well as their neuroprotective effects on the brain, and cognitive function in animal and human studies.

  2. Gut microbiota and immune crosstalk in metabolic disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gut microbiota is considered as a major regulator of metabolic disease. This reconciles the notion of metabolic inflammation and the epidemic development of the disease. In addition to evidence showing that a specific gut microbiota characterizes patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and hepatic steatosis, the mechanisms causal to the disease could be related to the translocation of microbiota from the gut to the tissues, inducing inflammation. The mechanisms regulating such a p...

  3. Metabolic Effects of Obesity and Its Interaction with Endocrine Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa; Hoenig, Margarethe

    2016-09-01

    Obesity in pet dogs and cats is a significant problem in developed countries, and seems to be increasing in prevalence. Excess body fat has adverse metabolic consequences, including insulin resistance, altered adipokine secretion, changes in metabolic rate, abnormal lipid metabolism, and fat accumulation in visceral organs. Obese cats are predisposed to endocrine and metabolic disorders such as diabetes and hepatic lipidosis. A connection likely also exists between obesity and diabetes mellitus in dogs. No system has been developed to identify obese pets at greatest risk for development of obesity-associated metabolic diseases, and further study in this area is needed.

  4. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  5. RNA metabolism in the pathogenesis of Parkinson׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bingwei; Gehrke, Stephan; Wu, Zhihao

    2014-10-10

    Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson׳s disease are progressive disorders of the nervous system that affect the function and maintenance of specific neuronal populations. While most disease cases are sporadic with no known cause, a small percentage of disease cases are caused by inherited genetic mutations. The identification of genes associated with the familial forms of the diseases and subsequent studies of proteins encoded by the disease genes in cellular or animal models have offered much-needed insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. Recent studies of the familial Parkinson׳s disease genes have emphasized the importance of RNA metabolism, particularly mRNA translation, in the disease process. It is anticipated that continued studies on the role of RNA metabolism in Parkinson׳s disease will offer unifying mechanisms for understanding the cause of neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and facilitate the development of novel and rational strategies for treating this debilitating disease.

  6. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Yukiko K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual’s behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes, chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  7. Metabolic diseases and pro- and prebiotics: Mechanistic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukiko K; Omaye, Stanley T

    2012-06-19

    Metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes, are world-wide health problems. The prevalence of metabolic diseases is associated with dynamic changes in dietary macronutrient intake during the past decades. Based on national statistics and from a public health viewpoint, traditional approaches, such as diet and physical activity, have been unsuccessful in decreasing the prevalence of metabolic diseases. Since the approaches strongly rely on individual's behavior and motivation, novel science-based strategies should be considered for prevention and therapy for the diseases. Metabolism and immune system are linked. Both overnutrition and infection result in inflammation through nutrient and pathogen sensing systems which recognize compounds with structural similarities. Dietary macronutrients (fats and sugars) can induce inflammation through activation of an innate immune receptor, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Long-term intake of diets high in fats and meats appear to induce chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, endotoxicity, and metabolic diseases. Recent investigations support the idea of the involvement of intestinal bacteria in host metabolism and preventative and therapeutic potentials of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for metabolic diseases. Specific intestinal bacteria seem to serve as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) sources through LPS and/or bacterial translocation into the circulation due to a vulnerable microbial barrier and increased intestinal permeability and to play a role in systemic inflammation and progression of metabolic diseases. This review focuses on mechanistic links between metabolic diseases (mainly obesity and type 2 diabetes), chronic systemic low-grade inflammation, intestinal environment, and nutrition and prospective views of probiotic and prebiotic interventions for the diseases.

  8. Prion diseases of the brain; Prionenerkrankung des Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Kira; Urbach, Horst [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Neuroradiologie

    2015-09-15

    The prion diseases of the brain, especially Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, are rare fatal neurodegenerative disorders. A definitive CJD diagnosis is currently only possible by a brain biopsy or post mortem autopsy. The diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is based on clinical signs, pathognomonic EEG, on typical MRI findings and the examination of the cerebrospinal fluid. Using the MRI the diagnosis Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease can be confirmed or excluded with high certainty. The MRI examination should contain diffusion-weighted and FLAIR imaging sequences. This review article provides an overview of the prion diseases of the brain with the corresponding imaging findings.

  9. Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Fabry Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Granqvist, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    risk of cerebrovascular disease at a young age in addition to heart and kidney failure. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess brain function and structure in the Danish cohort of patients with Fabry disease in a prospective way using 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) positron emission....... CONCLUSION: Our data indicated that, in patients with Fabry disease, MRI is the preferable clinical modality--if applicable--when monitoring cerebral status, as no additional major brain-pathology was detected with FDG-PET.......BACKGROUND: Fabry disease is a rare metabolic glycosphingolipid storage disease caused by deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme α-galactosidase A--leading to cellular accumulation of globotriasylceramide in different organs, vessels, tissues, and nerves. The disease is associated with an increased...

  10. Association between dopamine D4 receptor polymorphism and age related changes in brain glucose metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with reductions in brain glucose metabolism in some cortical and subcortical regions, but the rate of decrease varies significantly between individuals, likely reflecting genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. Here we test the hypothesis that the variant of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4 gene (VNTR in exon 3, which has been associated with novelty seeking and sensitivity to environmental stimuli (negative and positive including the beneficial effects of physical activity on longevity, influence the effects of aging on the human brain. We used positron emission tomography (PET and [(18F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18FDG to measure brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function under baseline conditions (no stimulation in 82 healthy individuals (age range 22-55 years. We determined their DRD4 genotype and found an interaction with age: individuals who did not carry the 7-repeat allele (7R-, n = 53 had a significant (p<0.0001 negative association between age and relative glucose metabolism (normalized to whole brain glucose metabolism in frontal (r = -0.52, temporal (r = -0.51 and striatal regions (r = -0.47, p<0.001; such that older individuals had lower metabolism than younger ones. In contrast, for carriers of the 7R allele (7R+ n = 29, these correlations with age were not significant and they only showed a positive association with cerebellar glucose metabolism (r = +0.55; p = 0.002. Regression slopes of regional brain glucose metabolism with age differed significantly between the 7R+ and 7R- groups in cerebellum, inferior temporal cortex and striatum. These results provide evidence that the DRD4 genotype might modulate the associations between regional brain glucose metabolism and age and that the carriers of the 7R allele appear to be less sensitive to the effects of age on brain glucose metabolism.

  11. Parkinson's disease biomarkers program brain imaging repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Edward; Du, Guangwei; Babcock, Debra; Huang, Xuemei; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) is a multi-site study designed to identify Parkinson's disease (PD) biomarkers that can be used to improve the understanding of PD pathophysiology and to develop tools that provide novel measures to evaluate PD clinical trials. The PDBP consortium comprises numerous individual projects of which two are specifically geared to the development of brain imaging markers for diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of PD or related disorders. All study data from PD patients, atypical Parkinsonian patients, patients with essential tremor, and healthy controls collected from the sites are integrated in the PDBP database and will be publically available. All subjects are asked to submit blood samples, and undergo a battery of clinical evaluations that cover motor, cognitive, and other background information. In addition, a subset of subjects contributed cerebrospinal fluid samples. A restricted access, web-based Data Management Resource facilitates rapid sharing of data and biosamples across the entire PD research community. The PDBP consortium is a useful resource for research and collaboration aimed at the discovery of biomarkers and their use in understanding the pathophysiology of PD.

  12. Reversible "brain atrophy" in patients with Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gnjidić, Živko; Sajko, Tomislav; Kudelić, Nenad; Malenica, Maša; Vizner, Branka; Vrkljan, Milan; Hat, Josip; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    During the past 25 years, we came across 60 patients with corticotroph pituitary adenomas and Cushing’s disease. Neuroradiological examination showed prominent volume loss of the brain parenchyma, unexpected for the patient’s age. This »brain atrophy« appeared to regress after surgical removal of pituitary adenoma and normalization of cortisol level. Observed difference between degree of »brain atrophy« in the Cushing’s disease group and in the control group was statistically sign...

  13. MRI of brain disease in veterinary patients part 1: Basic principles and congenital brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders in veterinary patients and is quickly becoming the imaging modality of choice in evaluation of brain and intracranial disease. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of MRI, a description of sequences and their applications in brain imaging, and an approach to interpretation of brain MRI. A detailed discussion of imaging findings in general intracranial disorders including hydrocephalus, vasogenic edema, brain herniation, and seizure-associated changes, and the MR diagnosis of congenital brain disorders is provided. MRI evaluation of acquired brain disorders is described in a second companion article.

  14. Reassessing the relationship between brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2014-09-01

    A vigorous discussion surrounds the question as to what enables some mammals--including primates and cetaceans--to evolve large brains. We recently published a study suggesting that the radiation of marsupial mammals is highly relevant to this question because of the unique reproductive and metabolic traits within this clade. In particular, we controversially suggested that marsupial brain sizes are not systematically smaller than those of placentals, and that elevated basal metabolic rates (BMR) are not linked to larger marsupial brains. As our dataset was found to contain some erroneous body size data, derived from a published source, we here use an updated and corrected dataset and employ standard as well as phylogenetically corrected analyses to re-assess and elaborate on our original conclusions. Our proposal that marsupials are not systematically smaller-brained than placentals remains supported, particularly when the unusually large-brained placental clade, Primates, is excluded. Use of the new dataset not only confirms that high metabolic rates are not associated with larger brain size in marsupials, but we additionally find some support for a striking negative correlation between BMR and brain size. The best supported correlates of large brain size remain the reproductive traits of weaning age and litter size. These results support our suggestion that mammalian brain sizes (including, by inference, those of monotremes) are predominantly constrained by the ability of females to fuel the growth of their offspring's large brains, rather than by the maintenance requirements of the adult brain.

  15. Upregulated expression of brain enzymatic markers of arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid metabolism in a rat model of the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Ameer Y

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In animal models, the metabolic syndrome elicits a cerebral response characterized by altered phospholipid and unesterified fatty acid concentrations and increases in pro-apoptotic inflammatory mediators that may cause synaptic loss and cognitive impairment. We hypothesized that these changes are associated with phospholipase (PLA2 enzymes that regulate arachidonic (AA, 20:4n-6 and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6n-6 acid metabolism, major polyunsaturated fatty acids in brain. Male Wistar rats were fed a control or high-sucrose diet for 8 weeks. Brains were assayed for markers of AA metabolism (calcium-dependent cytosolic cPLA2 IVA and cyclooxygenases, DHA metabolism (calcium-independent iPLA2 VIA and lipoxygenases, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and synaptic integrity (drebrin and synaptophysin. Lipid concentrations were measured in brains subjected to high-energy microwave fixation. Results The high-sucrose compared with control diet induced insulin resistance, and increased phosphorylated-cPLA2 protein, cPLA2 and iPLA2 activity and 12-lipoxygenase mRNA, but decreased BDNF mRNA and protein, and drebrin mRNA. The concentration of several n-6 fatty acids in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and lysophosphatidylcholine was increased, as was unesterified AA concentration. Eicosanoid concentrations (prostaglandin E2, thromboxane B2 and leukotriene B4 did not change. Conclusion These findings show upregulated brain AA and DHA metabolism and reduced BDNF and drebrin, but no changes in eicosanoids, in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome. These changes might contribute to altered synaptic plasticity and cognitive impairment in rats and humans with the metabolic syndrome.

  16. Blood-brain interfaces and bilirubin-induced neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghersi-Egea, J F; Gazzin, S; Strazielle, N

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium of the brain microvessels and the choroid plexus epithelium form highly specialized cellular barriers referred to as blood-brain interfaces through which molecular exchanges take place between the blood and the neuropil or the cerebrospinal fluid, respectively. Within the brain, the ependyma and the pia-glia limitans modulate exchanges between the neuropil and the cerebrospinal fluid. All these interfaces are key elements of neuroprotection and fulfill trophic functions; both properties are critical to harmonious brain development and maturation. By analogy to hepatic bilirubin detoxification pathways, we review the transport and metabolic mechanisms which in all these interfaces may participate in the regulation of bilirubin cerebral bioavailability in physiologic conditions, both in adult and in developing brain. We specifically address the role of ABC and OATP transporters, glutathione-S-transferases, and the potential involvement of glucuronoconjugation and oxidative metabolic pathways. Regulatory mechanisms are explored which are involved in the induction of these pathways and represent potential pharmacological targets to prevent bilirubin accumulation into the brain. We then review the possible alteration of the neuroprotective and trophic barrier functions in the course of bilirubin-induced neurological dysfunctions resulting from hyperbilirubinemia. Finally, we highlight the role of the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers in regulating the brain biodisposition of candidate drugs for the treatment or prevention of bilirubin-induced brain injury.

  17. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    , risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites...

  18. Impact of tau and amyloid burden on glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bischof, Gérard N.; Jessen, Frank; van Eimeren, Thilo; Fliessbach, Klaus; Dronse, Julian; Hammes, Jochen; Neumaier, Bernd; Onur, Oezguer; Fink, Gereon R; Kukolja, Juraj; Drzezga, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In a multimodal PET imaging approach, we determined the differential contribution of neurofibrillary tangles (measured with [18F]AV‐1451) and beta‐amyloid burden (measured with [11C]PiB) on degree of neurodegeneration (i.e., glucose metabolism measured with [18F]FDG‐PET) in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Across brain regions, we observed an interactive effect of beta‐amyloid burden and tau deposition on glucose metabolism which was most pronounced in the parietal lobe. Elevated b...

  19. Effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiong; LI Ai-lin; ZHI Da-shi; HUANG Hui-ling

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of mild hypothermia on glucose metabolism and glycerol of brain tissue in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) using clinical microdialysis.Methods: Thirty-one patients with STBI ( GCS ≤8) were randomly divided into hypothermic group (Group A) and control group (Group B). Microdialysis catheters were inserted into the cerebral cortex of perilesional and normal brain tissue. All samples were analyzed using CMA microdialysis analyzer.Results: In comparison with the control group, lactate/glucose ratio ( L/G) , lactate/pyruvate ratio ( L/P) and glycerol (Gly) in perilensional tissue were significantly decreased; L/P in normal brain tissue was significantly decreased. In control group, L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue were higher than that in normal brain tissue. In the hypothermic group, L/P in perilensional tissue was higher than that in relative normal brain.Conclusions: Mild hypothermia protects brain tissues by decreasing L/G, L/P and Gly in perilensional tissue and L/P in "normal brain" tissues. The energy crisis and membrane phospholipid degradation in perilensional tissue are easier to happen after traumatic brain injury, and mild hypothermia protects brain better in perilensional tissue than in normal brain tissue.

  20. Extracellular Nucleotides in Exercise: Possible Effect on Brain Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A review of experiments which demonstrate the release of ATP from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and active brain tissue. Effects of exogenously applied ATP to brain tissue are discussed in relation to whole body exercise. (Author/SA)

  1. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Richardson, Jason R. [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Science, School of Health Sciences and Practice, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University-Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Rutgers University-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  2. Brain glycogen – new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linea Frimodt Obel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g. liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies – it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e. synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on i the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP, ii alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and iii a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g. turnover is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology.

  3. Glucose metabolism in small subcortical structures in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, Per; Hansen, Søren B; Eggers, Carsten;

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests a characteristic pattern of metabolic perturbation in discrete, very small basal ganglia structures. These structures are generally too small to allow valid investigation by conventional positron emission tomography (PET...

  4. Abnormal brain iron metabolism in Irp2 deficient mice is associated with mild neurological and behavioral impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B Zumbrennen-Bullough

    Full Text Available Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2 is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2-/- mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc, expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2-/- mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments.

  5. Brain metabolic maps in Mild Cognitive Impairment predict heterogeneity of progression to dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cerami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [18F]FDG-PET imaging has been recognized as a crucial diagnostic marker in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, supporting the presence or the exclusion of Alzheimer's Disease (AD pathology. A clinical heterogeneity, however, underlies MCI definition. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the predictive role of single-subject voxel-based maps of [18F]FDG distribution generated through statistical parametric mapping (SPM in the progression to different dementia subtypes in a sample of 45 MCI. Their scans were compared to a large normal reference dataset developed and validated for comparison at single-subject level. Additionally, Aβ42 and Tau CSF values were available in 34 MCI subjects. Clinical follow-up (mean 28.5 ± 7.8 months assessed subsequent progression to AD or non-AD dementias. The SPM analysis showed: 1 normal brain metabolism in 14 MCI cases, none of them progressing to dementia; 2 the typical temporo-parietal pattern suggestive for prodromal AD in 15 cases, 11 of them progressing to AD; 3 brain hypometabolism suggestive of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD subtypes in 7 and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB in 2 subjects (all fulfilled FTLD or DLB clinical criteria at follow-up; and 4 7 MCI cases showed a selective unilateral or bilateral temporo-medial hypometabolism without the typical AD pattern, and they all remained stable. In our sample, objective voxel-based analysis of [18F]FDG-PET scans showed high predictive prognostic value, by identifying either normal brain metabolism or hypometabolic patterns suggestive of different underlying pathologies, as confirmed by progression at follow-up. These data support the potential usefulness of this SPM [18F]FDG PET analysis in the early dementia diagnosis and for improving subject selection in clinical trials based on MCI definition.

  6. Test-retest reproducibility for regional brain metabolic responses to lorazepam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Overall, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)]|[VAMC, Northport, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Changes in regional brain glucose metabolism as assessed with PET and FDG in response to acute administration of benzodiazepine agonists have been used as indicators of benzodiazepine-GABA receptor function. The purpose of this study was to assess the reproducibility of these responses. Sixteen healthy right-handed men were scanned with positron emission tomography (PET) and [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) twice: prior to placebo and prior to lorazepam (30 {mu}g/kg). The same double FDG procedure was repeated 6-8 weeks later to assess test-retest reproducibility. The regional absolute brain metabolic values obtained during the second evaluation were significantly lower than those obtained for the first evaluation regardless of condition (p {le} 0.001). Lorazepam significantly and consistently decreased whole brain metabolism and the magnitude as well as the regional pattern of the changes was comparable for both studies (12.3 {plus_minus} 6.9% and 13.7 {plus_minus} 7.4%). Lorazepam effects were largest in thalamus (22.2 {plus_minus} 8.9%). Relative metabolic measures ROI/global were highly reproducible both for drug as well as replication condition. This is the first study to measure test-retest reproducibility in regional brain metabolic response to a pharmacological challenge. While the global and regional absolute metabolic values were significantly lower for the repeated evaluation, the regional brain metabolic response to lorazepam was highly reproducible.

  7. Gestation length, metabolic rate, and body and brain weights in primates: epigenetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, B B

    1989-10-01

    The relationship of brain and body weights can be expressed in log-log regression: log (brain weight) = log (A) + B log (body weight). To investigate further the weights' similarity, gestation length and brain and body weights were determined from the literature for 46 primate genera. The results of allometric and path regression analyses suggest that the relationship between brain and body weights may not be mainly pleiotropic in the order Primates. The correlation between brain and body weights appears to be due to epigenetic factors in hyperplastic growth related to time constraint by gestation length and to energy utilization limitations imposed by metabolic rate.

  8. Therapeutic Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Irene; Baror, Roey; Fried, Peter; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a looming public health crisis that currently lacks an effective treatment. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (NBS), particularly transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), offers a promising alternative approach to pharmacological interventions for an increasing number of neurological and psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is summarize data from therapeutic trials of NBS in AD and other dementing illnesses. Despite the potential of NBS, there is limited theoretical framework and a lack of guidelines for its applications to AD. Several published clinical trials failed to report key parameters of the interventions thus limiting the utility of the study to assess efficacy and safety. Our review concludes with some suggestions for future studies aimed to advance research into NBS as a potential treatment for the symptoms and disabilities caused by AD and to enable comparison of results across trials. Ultimately, appropriately powered, and controlled, multi-site randomized clinical trials will be needed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of NBS in AD.

  9. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no

  10. High-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals metabolic effects of normal brain aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janna L; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Swerdlow, Russell H; Choi, In-Young; Lee, Phil; Brooks, William M

    2014-07-01

    Altered brain metabolism is likely to be an important contributor to normal cognitive decline and brain pathology in elderly individuals. To characterize the metabolic changes associated with normal brain aging, we used high-field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo to quantify 20 neurochemicals in the hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex of young adult and aged rats. We found significant differences in the neurochemical profile of the aged brain when compared with younger adults, including lower aspartate, ascorbate, glutamate, and macromolecules, and higher glucose, myo-inositol, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, total choline, and glutamine. These neurochemical biomarkers point to specific cellular mechanisms that are altered in brain aging, such as bioenergetics, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell membrane turnover, and endogenous neuroprotection. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be a valuable translational approach for studying mechanisms of brain aging and pathology, and for investigating treatments to preserve or enhance cognitive function in aging.

  11. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  12. The emerging role of the intestine in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, William D; Zwingelstein, Catherine; Rondinone, Cristina M

    2011-07-01

    The intestine is an important metabolic organ that has gained attention in recent years for the newly identified role that it plays in the pathophysiology of various metabolic diseases including obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Recent insights regarding the role of enteroendocrine hormones, such as GIP, GLP-1, and PYY in metabolic diseases, as well as the emerging role of the gut microbial community and gastric bypass bariatric surgeries in modulating metabolic function and dysfunction have sparked a wave of interest in understanding the mechanisms involved, in an effort to identify new therapeutics and novel regulators of metabolism. This review summarizes the current evidence that the gastrointestinal tract has a key role in the development of obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance and diabetes and discusses the possible players that can be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Metabolic Modulators in Heart Disease: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2017-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. They continue to be major burden on health care systems throughout the world, despite major advances made over the past 40 years in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat these debilitating diseases. A potential therapeutic approach that has been underutilized in treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure is "metabolic modulation." Major alterations in myocardial energy substrate metabolism occur in ischemic heart disease and heart failure, and are associated with an energy deficit in the heart. A metabolic shift from mitochondrial oxidative metabolism to glycolysis, as well as an uncoupling between glycolysis and glucose oxidation, plays a crucial role in the development of cardiac inefficiency (oxygen consumed per work performed) and functional impairment in ischemic heart disease as well as in heart failure. This has led to the concept that optimizing energy substrate use with metabolic modulators can be a potentially promising approach to decrease the severity of ischemic heart disease and heart failure, primarily by improving cardiac efficiency. Two approaches for metabolic modulator therapy are to stimulate myocardial glucose oxidation and/or inhibit fatty acid oxidation. In this review, the past, present, and future of metabolic modulators as an approach to optimizing myocardial energy substrate metabolism and treating ischemic heart disease and heart failure are discussed. This includes a discussion of pharmacological interventions that target enzymes involved in fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and glucose oxidation in the heart, as well as enzymes involved in ketone and branched chain amino acid catabolism in the heart. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bile acid signaling in metabolic disease and drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y L

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids are the end products of cholesterol catabolism. Hepatic bile acid synthesis accounts for a major fraction of daily cholesterol turnover in humans. Biliary secretion of bile acids generates bile flow and facilitates hepatobiliary secretion of lipids, lipophilic metabolites, and xenobiotics. In the intestine, bile acids are essential for the absorption, transport, and metabolism of dietary fats and lipid-soluble vitamins. Extensive research in the last 2 decades has unveiled new functions of bile acids as signaling molecules and metabolic integrators. The bile acid-activated nuclear receptors farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled bile acid receptor play critical roles in the regulation of lipid, glucose, and energy metabolism, inflammation, and drug metabolism and detoxification. Bile acid synthesis exhibits a strong diurnal rhythm, which is entrained by fasting and refeeding as well as nutrient status and plays an important role for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Recent research revealed an interaction of liver bile acids and gut microbiota in the regulation of liver metabolism. Circadian disturbance and altered gut microbiota contribute to the pathogenesis of liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile acids and their derivatives are potential therapeutic agents for treating metabolic diseases of the liver.

  15. [Study of cytokines content and gangliosides metabolism at experimental brain edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakarian, A V; Kazarian, G S; Zakarian, G V; Melkonian, M M; Ovsesian, L M

    2011-01-01

    The content of cytokines, and gangliosides metabolism, and the quantity of lipid peroxidation products were studied at experimental brain edema. Data obtained show increase the level of proinflammatory cytokins and decrease the level of antiinflammatory cytokines during development of brain edema. Along with this we reveal the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products (diene conjugates, hydroperoxides, and malonic dialdehyde). Each fraction of gangliosides decreased, but the product of their hydrolytic dissociation sphingosine increased at experimental brain edema.

  16. The metabolic syndrome and vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olijhoek, Jobien Karen

    2006-01-01

    In the Western population cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity. There are several important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, among them hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and obesity. The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors associated

  17. The metabolic syndrome and vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olijhoek, Jobien Karen

    2006-01-01

    In the Western population cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of mortality and morbidity. There are several important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, among them hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and obesity. The clustering of cardiovascular risk factors associated

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation programs improve metabolic parameters in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Ignacio P; Zapata, Maria A; Cervantes, Carlos E; Jarabo, Rosario M; Grande, Cristina; Plaza, Rose; Garcia, Sara; Rodriguez, Miriam L; Crespo, Silvia; Perea, Jesús

    2010-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training program on metabolic parameters and coronary risk factors in patients with the metabolic syndrome and coronary heart disease. The study involved 642 patients with coronary heart disease. Of them, 171 (26.7%) fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome. Clinical data, laboratory tests, and exercise testing were performed before and after the program, which lasted 2 to 3 months. Except for waist circumference, there were no significant differences between groups; blood pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose improvements during the follow-up were higher in patients with the metabolic syndrome (all Pmetabolic syndrome, functional capacity increased by 26.45% ( Pmetabolic equivalents, with a slight increase of 1.25% ( P=not significant) in the double product. Patients with the metabolic syndrome who took part in this secondary prevention program reported improvements in cardiovascular risk profile and functional capacity.

  19. Effects of environmental noise exposure on DNA methylation in the brain and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liqiong; Li, Peng-Hui; Li, Hua; Colicino, Elena; Colicino, Silvia; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Ruiping; Feng, Xiaotian; Barrow, Timothy M; Cayir, Akin; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Byun, Hyang-Min

    2017-02-01

    Environmental noise exposure is associated with adverse effects on human health including hearing loss, heart disease, and changes in stress-related hormone levels. Alteration in DNA methylation in response to environmental exposures is a well-known phenomenon and it is implicated in many human diseases. Understanding how environmental noise exposures affect DNA methylation patterns may help to elucidate the link between noise and adverse effects on health. In this pilot study we examined the effects of environmental noise exposure on DNA methylation of genes related to brain function and investigated whether these changes are related with metabolic health. We exposed four groups of male Wistar rats to moderate intensity noise (70-75dB with 20-4000Hz) at night for three days as short-term exposure, and for three weeks as long-term exposure. Noise exposure was limited to 45dB during the daytime. Control groups were exposed to only 45dB, day and night. We measured DNA methylation in the Bdnf, Comt, Crhr1, Mc2r, and Snca genes in tissue from four brain regions of the rats (hippocampus, frontal lobe, medulla oblongata, and inferior colliculus). Further, we measured blood pressure and body weight after long-term noise exposure. We found that environmental noise exposure is associated with gene-specific DNA methylation changes in specific regions of the brain. Changes in DNA methylation are significantly associated with changes in body weight (between Bdnf DNA methylation and Δ body weight: r=0.59, p=0.018; and between LINE-1 ORF DNA methylation and Δ body weight: =-0.80, p=0.0004). We also observed that noise exposure decreased blood pressure (p=0.038 for SBP, p=0.017 for DBP and p 0. 017 for MAP) and decreased body weight (β=-26g, p=0.008). In conclusion, environmental noise exposures can induce changes in DNA methylation in the brain, which may be associated with adverse effects upon metabolic health through modulation of response to stress-related hormones

  20. Metabolic syndrome--psycho neuropathogenesis and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perumal, Madhusoothanan Bhagavathi

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Heightened hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is associated with pathogenesis of MS. Life style, food habits and physical activity also play critical role in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the precise neurophysiology behind chronic stress leading on to such effects is unknown. Review of recent animal and human studies have shown the subtle differences in morphological changes associated with chronic stress between medial prefrontal cortex and amygdaloid complex. The loss of dendritic spines in pyramidal neurons of medial prefrontal cortex, dendritic hypertrophy in basolateral amygdala and dendritic loss in central nucleus of amygdala causes increased basal output from amygdaloid complex to HPA axis and other targets whose networks are evolutionarily well conserved. The increased HPA axis activity, elevated blood pressure and appetite for high calorie diet leads to MS. The evolution of isocortex in primates and associated regression in size of limbic structures predisposed to increased synaptic noise in amygdaloid complex which in turn cause heighetened output from amygdala during chronic stress. Copyright © 2010 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Defective lipid metabolism in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) syndromes: not only a matter of iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombelli, Cristina; Aoun, Manar; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a group of devastating and life threatening rare diseases. Adult and early-onset NBIA syndromes are inherited as X-chromosomal, autosomal dominant or recessive traits and several genes have been identified as responsible for these disorders. Among the identified disease genes, only two code for proteins directly involved in iron metabolism while the remaining NBIA genes encode proteins with a wide variety of functions ranging from fatty acid metabolism and autophagy to still unknown activities. It is becoming increasingly evident that many neurodegenerative diseases are associated with metabolic dysfunction that often involves altered lipid metabolism. This is not surprising since neurons have a peculiar and heterogeneous lipid composition critical for the development and correct functioning of the nervous system. This review will focus on specific NBIA forms, namely PKAN, CoPAN, PLAN, FAHN and MPAN, which display an interesting link between neurodegeneration and alteration of phospholipids and sphingolipids metabolism, mitochondrial morphology and membrane remodelling.

  2. Parameters of glucose metabolism and the aging brain: a magnetization transfer imaging study of brain macro- and micro-structure in older adults without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, Abimbola A; van den Berg, Annette; Altmann-Schneider, Irmhild; Jansen, Steffy W; van Buchem, Mark A; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-08-01

    Given the concurrent, escalating epidemic of diabetes mellitus and neurodegenerative diseases, two age-related disorders, we aimed to understand the relation between parameters of glucose metabolism and indices of pathology in the aging brain. From the Leiden Longevity Study, 132 participants (mean age 66 years) underwent a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to assess glucose tolerance (fasted and area under the curve (AUC) glucose), insulin sensitivity (fasted and AUC insulin and homeostatic model assessment of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS)) and insulin secretion (insulinogenic index). 3-T brain MRI was used to detect macro-structural damage (atrophy, white matter hyper-intensities, infarcts and/or micro-bleeds) and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) to detect loss of micro-structural homogeneity that remains otherwise invisible on conventional MRI. Macro-structurally, higher fasted glucose was significantly associated with white matter atrophy (P = 0.028). Micro-structurally, decreased magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) peak height in gray matter was associated with higher fasted insulin (P = 0.010), AUCinsulin (P = 0.001), insulinogenic index (P = 0.008) and lower HOMA-IS index (P brain parenchymal homogeneity. These findings offer some insight into the association between different parameters of glucose metabolism (impairment of which is characteristic of diabetes mellitus) and brain aging.

  3. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer with calorically restricted ketogenic diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Mukherjee, Purna; Marsh, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Information is presented on the calorically restricted ketogenic diet (CRKD) as an alternative therapy for brain cancer. In contrast to normal neurons and glia, which evolved to metabolize ketone bodies as an alternative fuel to glucose under energy-restricted conditions, brain tumor cells are largely glycolytic due to mitochondrial defects and have a reduced ability to metabolize ketone bodies. The CRKD is effective in managing brain tumor growth in animal models and in patients, and appears to act through antiangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic mechanisms.

  4. Preliminary Study of Brain Glucose Metabolism Changes in Patients with Lung Cancer of Different Histological Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Ling Li; Chang Fu; Ang Xuan; Da-Peng Shi; Yong-Ju Gao; Jie Zhang; Jun-Ling Xu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Cerebral glucose metabolism changes are always observed in patients suffering from malignant tumors.This preliminary study aimed to investigate the brain glucose metabolism changes in patients with lung cancer of different histological types.Methods:One hundred and twenty patients with primary untreated lung cancer,who visited People's Hospital of Zhengzhou University from February 2012 to July 2013,were divided into three groups based on histological types confirmed by biopsy or surgical pathology,which included adenocarcinoma (52 cases),squamous cell carcinoma (43 cases),and small-cell carcinoma (25 cases).The whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (1 8F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) of these cases was retrospectively studied.The brain PET data of three groups were analyzed individually using statistical parametric maps (SPM) software,with 50 age-matched and gender-matched healthy controls for comparison.Results:The brain resting glucose metabolism in all three lung cancer groups showed regional cerebral metabolic reduction.The hypo-metabolic cerebral regions were mainly distributed at the left superior and middle frontal,bilateral superior and middle temporal and inferior and middle temporal gyrus.Besides,the hypo-metabolic regions were also found in the right inferior parietal lobule and hippocampus in the small-cell carcinoma group.The area of the total hypo-metabolic cerebral regions in the small-cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 3255) was larger than those in the adenocarcinoma group (total voxel value 1217) and squamous cell carcinoma group (total voxel value 1292).Conclusions:The brain resting glucose metabolism in patients with lung cancer shows regional cerebral metabolic reduction and the brain hypo-metabolic changes are related to the histological types of lung cancer.

  5. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W.A.; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A.; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W.N.M.; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J.; Schmand, Ben A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A.; Majoie, Charles B.L.M.; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. Methods: A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45–82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machine-learning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 18–90 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD = brain-predicted brain age − chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. Results: HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean ± SD 2.15 ± 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (−0.87 ± 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p < 0.01). Increased brain-PAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. Conclusion: Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging. PMID:28258081

  6. Quantitative Rates of Brain Glucose Metabolism Distinguish Minimally Conscious from Vegetative State Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 8 October 2014; doi:10......The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function...

  7. Variation within the Huntington's disease gene influences normal brain structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Mühlau

    Full Text Available Genetics of the variability of normal and diseased brain structure largely remains to be elucidated. Expansions of certain trinucleotide repeats cause neurodegenerative disorders of which Huntington's disease constitutes the most common example. Here, we test the hypothesis that variation within the IT15 gene on chromosome 4, whose expansion causes Huntington's disease, influences normal human brain structure. In 278 normal subjects, we determined CAG repeat length within the IT15 gene on chromosome 4 and analyzed high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images by the use of voxel-based morphometry. We found an increase of GM with increasing long CAG repeat and its interaction with age within the pallidum, which is involved in Huntington's disease. Our study demonstrates that a certain trinucleotide repeat influences normal brain structure in humans. This result may have important implications for the understanding of both the healthy and diseased brain.

  8. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant a-Synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golovko, Mikhail; Rosenberger, Thad; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2006-01-01

    Because alpha-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of alpha-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids usi...

  9. Acute brain metabolic effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys with a history of cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Porche' Kirkland; Murnane, Kevin S; Votaw, John R; Howell, Leonard L

    2010-12-01

    Cocaine addiction involves an escalation in drug intake which alters many brain functions. The present study documented cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolic activity as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Experimentally naive rhesus monkeys (N = 6) were given increasing access to cocaine under a fixed-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug self-administration. PET imaging with F-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to measure acute intramuscular (i.m.) cocaine-induced changes in brain metabolism in the cocaine-naïve state, following 60 sessions under limited-access conditions (1 h/day), following 60 sessions under extended-access conditions (4 h/day), and following 4 weeks of drug withdrawal. In the cocaine-naïve state, cocaine-induced increases in brain metabolism were restricted to the prefrontal cortex. As cocaine exposure increased from limited to extended access, metabolic effects expanded throughout the frontal cortex and were induced within the striatum. Conversely, cocaine-induced activation was far less robust following withdrawal. The results highlight a progressive expansion of the metabolic effects of cocaine to include previously unaffected dopamine innervated brain regions as a consequence of cocaine self-administration history. The identification of brain regions progressively influenced by drug exposure may be highly relevant toward efforts to develop treatments for cocaine addiction.

  10. Evidence for a membrane defect in Alzheimer disease brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, R. M.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Pittas, A. G.; Slack, B. E.; Growdon, J. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether neurodegeneration in Alzheimer disease brain is associated with degradation of structural cell membrane molecules, we measured tissue levels of the major membrane phospholipids and their metabolites in three cortical areas from postmortem brains of Alzheimer disease patients and matched controls. Among phospholipids, there was a significant (P less than 0.05) decrease in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. There were significant (P less than 0.05) decreases in the initial phospholipid precursors choline and ethanolamine and increases in the phospholipid deacylation product glycerophosphocholine. The ratios of glycerophosphocholine to choline and glycerophosphoethanolamine to ethanolamine were significantly increased in all examined Alzheimer disease brain regions. The activity of the glycerophosphocholine-degrading enzyme glycerophosphocholine choline-phosphodiesterase was normal in Alzheimer disease brain. There was a near stoichiometric relationship between the decrease in phospholipids and the increase of phospholipid catabolites. These data are consistent with increased membrane phospholipid degradation in Alzheimer disease brain. Similar phospholipid abnormalities were not detected in brains of patients with Huntington disease, Parkinson disease, or Down syndrome. We conclude that the phospholipid abnormalities described here are not an epiphenomenon of neurodegeneration and that they may be specific for the pathomechanism of Alzheimer disease.

  11. Exercise as an intervention for the age-related decline in brain metabolic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J Anderson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available To identify interventions for brain aging, we must first identify the processes in which we hope to intervene. Brain aging is a period of decreasing functional capacity and increasing vulnerability, which reflect a reduction in morphological organization and perhaps degeneration. Since life is ultimately dependent upon the ability to maintain cellular organization through metabolism, this review explores evidence for a decline in neural metabolic support during aging, which includes a reduction in whole brain cerebral blood flow, and cellular metabolic capacity. Capillary density may also decrease with age, although the results are less clear. Exercise may be a highly effective intervention for brain aging, because it improves the cardiovascular system as a whole, and increases regional capillary density and neuronal metabolic capacity. Although the evidence is strongest for motor regions, more work may yield additional evidence for exercise-related improvement in metabolic support in non-motor regions. The protective effects of exercise may be specific to brain region and the type of insult. For example, exercise protects striatal cells from ischemia, but it produces mixed results after hippocampal seizures. Exercise can improve metabolic support and bioenergetic capacity in adult animals, but it remains to be determined whether it has similar effects in aging animals. What is clear is that exercise can influence the multiple levels of support necessary for maintaining optimal neuronal function, which is unique among proposed interventions for aging.

  12. Metabolic pathways and activity-dependent modulation of glutamate concentration in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Silvia; Giove, Federico; Dinuzzo, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Glutamate is one of the most versatile molecules present in the human brain, involved in protein synthesis, energy production, ammonia detoxification, and transport of reducing equivalents. Aside from these critical metabolic roles, glutamate plays a major part in brain function, being not only the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter, but also the precursor for γ-aminobutyric acid, the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter. Regulation of glutamate levels is pivotal for normal brain function, as abnormal extracellular concentration of glutamate can lead to impaired neurotransmission, neurodegeneration and even neuronal death. Understanding how the neuron-astrocyte functional and metabolic interactions modulate glutamate concentration during different activation status and under physiological and pathological conditions is a challenging task, and can only be tentatively estimated from current literature. In this paper, we focus on describing the various metabolic pathways which potentially affect glutamate concentration in the brain, and emphasize which ones are likely to produce the variations in glutamate concentration observed during enhanced neuronal activity in human studies.

  13. Nanotechnology-mediated nose to brain drug delivery for Parkinson's disease: a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhijeet D; Vanjari, Yogesh H; Sancheti, Karan H; Belgamwar, Veena S; Surana, Sanjay J; Pardeshi, Chandrakantsing V

    2015-01-01

    Nose to brain delivery of neurotherapeutics have been tried by several researchers to explore the virtues of this route viz. circumvention of BBB, avoidance of hepatic metabolism, practicality, safety, ease of administration and non-invasiveness. Nanoparticle (NP) therapeutics is an emerging modality for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) as it offers targeted delivery and enhances the therapeutic efficacy and/or bioavailability of neurotherapeutics. This review presents a concise incursion into the nanomedicines suitable for PD therapy delivered via naso-brain transport. Clinical signs of PD, its pathophysiology, specific genetic determinants, diagnosis and therapy involved have been hashed out. Properties of brain-targeting NPs, transport efficacy and various nanocarriers developed so far also been furnished. In our opinion, nanotechnology-enabled naso-brain drug delivery is an excellent means of delivering neurotherapeutics and is a promising avenue for researchers to develop new formulations for the effective management of PD.

  14. Metabolic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-na; Ji, Sunggoan; Rothman, Sarah; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases are highly debilitating disorders that affect millions of people worldwide. Efforts towards developing effective treatments for these disorders have shown limited efficacy at best, with no true cure to this day being present. Recent work, both clinical and experimental, indicates that many neurodegenerative disorders often display a coexisting metabolic dysfunction which may exacerbate neurological symptoms. It stands to reason therefore that metabolic pathways may themselves contain promising therapeutic targets for major neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the most recent evidence for metabolic dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease, and discuss several potential mechanisms that may underlie the potential relationships between metabolic dysfunction and etiology of nervous system degeneration. We also highlight some prominent signaling pathways involved in the link between peripheral metabolism and the central nervous system that are potential targets for future therapies, and we will review some of the clinical progress in this field. It is likely that in the near future, therapeutics with combinatorial neuroprotective and 'eumetabolic' activities may possess superior efficacies compared to less pluripotent remedies.

  15. Going nuclear in metabolic and cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, PPARs, and liver X receptors are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors that regulate diverse aspects of development and homeostasis. Recent studies of the biologic roles of these receptors and their mechanisms of action have significantly advanced our understanding of transcriptional programs that control lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, immunity and inflammation, and wound repair. These findings provide insights into the t...

  16. Brain region-specificity of palmitic acid-induced abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melrose Joseph

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease mostly affecting the basal forebrain, cortex and hippocampus whereas the cerebellum is relatively spared. The reason behind this region-specific brain damage in AD is not well understood. Here, we report our data suggesting "differential free fatty acid metabolism in the different brain areas" as a potentially important factor in causing the region-specific damage observed in AD brain. Findings The astroglia from two different rat brain regions, cortex (region affected in AD and cerebellum (unaffected region, were treated with 0.2 mM of palmitic acid. The conditioned media were then transferred to the cortical neurons to study the possible effects on the two main, AD-associated protein abnormalities, viz. BACE1 upregulation and hyperphosphorylation of tau. The conditioned media from palmitic-acid treated cortical astroglia, but not the cerebellar astroglia, significantly elevated levels of phosphorylated tau and BACE1 in cortical neurons as compared to controls (47 ± 7% and 45 ± 4%, respectively. Conclusion The present data provide an experimental explanation for the region-specific damage observed in AD brain; higher fatty acid-metabolizing capacity of cortical astroglia as compared to cerebellar astroglia, may play a causal role in increasing vulnerability of cortex in AD, while sparing cerebellum.

  17. Altered brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic function in Restless Legs Syndrome (Willis-Ekbom Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earley, Christopher J; Connor, James; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Jenner, Peter; Winkelman, John; Zee, Phyllis C; Allen, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), also known as Willis-Ekbom Disease (WED), is a sensorimotor disorder for which the exact pathophysiology remains unclear. Brain iron insufficiency and altered dopaminergic function appear to play important roles in the etiology of the disorder. This concept is based partly on extensive research studies using cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), autopsy material, and brain imaging indicating reduced regional brain iron and on the clinical efficacy of dopamine receptor agonists for alleviating RLS symptoms. Finding causal relations, linking low brain iron to altered dopaminergic function in RLS, has required however the use of animal models. These models have provided insights into how alterations in brain iron homeostasis and dopaminergic system may be involved in RLS. The results of animal models of RLS and biochemical, postmortem, and imaging studies in patients with the disease suggest that disruptions in brain iron trafficking lead to disturbances in striatal dopamine neurotransmission for at least some patients with RLS. This review examines the data supporting an iron deficiency-dopamine metabolic theory of RLS by relating the results from animal model investigations of the influence of brain iron deficiency on dopaminergic systems to data from clinical studies in patients with RLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns in Metabolic and Toxic Brain Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Ege Univ. Hospital, Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate metabolic and toxic brain disorders that manifest with restricted, elevated, or both restricted and elevated diffusion patterns on diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: Echo-planar diffusion MRI examinations were obtained in 34 pediatric patients with metabolic and toxic brain disorders proved by appropriate laboratory studies. The MRI unit operated at 1.5T with a gradient strength of 30 mT/meter, and a rise time of 600 s. b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with ADC values were studied. Results: Three patterns were observed: 1. A restricted diffusion pattern (high signal on b=1000 s/mm{sup 2} images and low ADC values); 2. an elevated diffusion pattern (normal signal on b=1000 s/mm2 images and high ADC values); and 3. a mixed pattern (coexistent restricted and increased diffusion patterns in the same patient). Disorders manifesting with a restricted diffusion pattern included metachromatic leukodystrophy (n=2), phenylketonuria (n=3), maple syrup urine disease (intermediate form) (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Wilson (n=3), and Canavan disease (n=1). Disorders with an elevated diffusion pattern included phenylketonuria (n=1), adrenoleukodystrophy (n=1), merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (n=2), mucopolysaccharidosis (n=2), Lowe syndrome (n=1), Leigh (n=2), Alexander (n=1), Pelizaeus-Merzbacher (n=1), and Wilson (n=3) disease. Disorders with a mixed pattern included L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria (n=2), non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (n=1), infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (n=2), maple syrup urine disease (n=1), and Leigh (n=1) disease. Conclusion: The findings suggested that the three different diffusion patterns reflect the histopathological changes associated with the disorders and different stages of a particular disorder. It is likely that the restricted diffusion pattern corresponds to abnormalities related to myelin, and the elevated

  19. Small vessel ischemic disease of the brain and brain metastases in lung cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Mazzone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain metastases occur commonly in patients with lung cancer. Small vessel ischemic disease is frequently found when imaging the brain to detect metastases. We aimed to determine if the presence of small vessel ischemic disease (SVID of the brain is protective against the development of brain metastases in lung cancer patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A retrospective cohort of 523 patients with biopsy confirmed lung cancer who had received magnetic resonance imaging of the brain as part of their standard initial staging evaluation was reviewed. Information collected included demographics, comorbidities, details of the lung cancer, and the presence of SVID of the brain. A portion of the cohort had the degree of SVID graded. The primary outcome measure was the portion of study subjects with and without SVID of the brain who had evidence of brain metastases at the time of initial staging of their lung cancer.109 patients (20.8% had evidence of brain metastases at presentation and 345 (66.0% had evidence of SVID. 13.9% of those with SVID and 34.3% of those without SVID presented with brain metastases (p<0.0001. In a model including age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and tobacco use, SVID of the brain was found to be the only protective factor against the development of brain metastases, with an OR of 0.31 (0.20, 0.48; p<0.001. The grade of SVID was higher in those without brain metastases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that vascular changes in the brain are protective against the development of brain metastases in lung cancer patients.

  20. The NGF Metabolic Pathway in the CNS and its Dysregulation in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulita, M Florencia; Cuello, A Claudio

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that individuals with Down syndrome develop Alzheimer's disease neuropathology by middle age. Both in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome, this is accompanied by the atrophy of NGF-dependent cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain. An NGF trophic compromise in Alzheimer's disease had been early suspected. This hypothesis was discarded with the finding of unaltered NGF mRNA synthesis and of increased NGF precursor levels (proNGF) in postmortem Alzheimer's disease brains. The possibility of an NGF trophic disconnection has been recently revisited at the light of a newly discovered extracellular NGF metabolic pathway; where proNGF is released in an activity-dependent manner and converted by plasmin to mature NGF in the extracellular space. Mature NGF is ultimately degraded by the metalloprotease MMP-9. This pathway has been shown to be compromised in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome brains, thus reviving the trophic factor hypothesis to explain the atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in these disorders. This chapter will discuss the physiological role of NGF and its biological significance to cholinergic neurons of the CNS, and present the evidence for a dysregulation of the NGF metabolism in Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome.

  1. FGF21 as a hepatokine, adipokine, and myokine in metabolism and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki eItoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor (FGF family members are mostly secreted as signaling proteins with diverse functions in development and metabolism. FGF21 is a unique FGF with metabolic, but not proliferative activities. FGF21 is mostly induced by different kinds of stress and acts though FGF receptor 1c with β−Klotho as a cofactor in an endocrine or, in parts, autocirne/paracrine manner. Hepatic FGF21 directly acts on white adipocytes to inhibit lipolysis and acts through the brain to increase systemic glucocorticoid levels and suppress physical activity in response to starvation. It also protects against dioxin toxicity. Adipocytic FGF21 induces the browning of white adipose tissue (WAT and activates brown adipocytes in response to cold exposure. It also acts as an upstream effector of adiponectin in white adipocytes. Myocytic FGF21 protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, induces the browning of WAT, and protects against cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, Fgf21 polymorphisms are possibly related with metabolic diseases and FGF21 are biomarker of metabolic diseases. These findings indicate that FGF21 plays roles as a hepatokine, adipokine, and myokine in metabolism, injury protection, and diseases.

  2. GPR120 agonism as a countermeasure against metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornall, Lauren M; Mathai, Michael L; Hryciw, Deanne H; McAinch, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease are at epidemic proportions in developed nations globally, representing major causes of ill-health and premature death. The search for drug targets to counter the growing prevalence of metabolic diseases has uncovered G-protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120). GPR120 agonism has been shown to improve inflammation and metabolic health on a systemic level via regulation of adiposity, gastrointestinal peptide secretion, taste preference and glucose homeostasis. Therefore, GPR120 agonists present as a novel therapeutic option that could be exploited for the treatment of impaired metabolic health. This review summarizes the current knowledge of GPR120 functionality and the potential applications of GPR120-specific agonists for the treatment of disease states such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.

  3. Metabolic biomarkers and gallstone disease - a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Skaaby, Tea; Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives for this study were to examine the associations between metabolic biomarkers of obesity including insulin resistance, vascular dysfunction, systemic inflammation, genetic susceptibility and ultrasound proven gallstone disease or cholecystectomy in a population-based cross......). RESULTS: Gallstone disease was associated with fasting glucose (OR 1.14, 95% CI [1.05;1.24]), fasting insulin (OR 1.03, 95% CI [1.01;1.05]), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (OR 1.18, 95% CI [1.02;1.36]), the metabolic syndrome (OR 1.51, 95% CI [1.16;1.96]), white blood cell count (OR 1......-sectional study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 2650 participants were included, of whom 422 had gallstone disease. Associations between selected metabolic biomarkers and gallstone disease were estimated by multivariable logistic regression models and expressed as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI...

  4. [Carbohydrate metabolism in the brain in comatose states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapiĭ, Kh Kh; Gruzman, A B

    1990-01-01

    The article confirms an earlier discovered phenomenon that during comas and in post-coma periods the brain releases glucose and consumes lactate. It is suggested that the phenomenon is based on glucogenesis taking place in the brain from non-carbohydrate glucose precursors, which is phylogenetically predetermined and biologically expedient.

  5. New progress in brain aging and its related neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-wei ZHU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging-related neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA have become one of the major diseases endangering the health of old people in China. Although the mechanism of brain aging and pathogenesis of its related neurodegenerative diseases remain unclear, protein pathological studies such as tau, α-synuclein (α-Syn, TDP-43 and amyloid-β protein (Aβ based on brain tissue bank and case registration database are opening the door to solve the mystery in the brain aging process and unlock pathogenesis of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. Research on functional neuroimaging including 11C-PIB PET and 18F-FDDNP PET in Alzheimer's disease and 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's disease, and biomarkers such as total-tau, phosphorylated-tau, and the 42 amino acid fragment of β-amyloid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in the preclinical stages of Alzheimer's disease now become hot topics in the field of elderly dementia and movement disorders. Clinicopathological correlation research of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy is also one of focuses in the geriatric neurological diseases. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.03.004

  6. Brain damage in patients with manifest arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamt, Anne Fleur van

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we assessed whether the risk factors known to affect markers of brain damage in the general population, also effectuate brain damage in patients who already have symptomatic arterial disease. We found that elevated levels of homocysteine were related to slightly lower global cogniti

  7. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, James H; Underwood, Jonathan; Caan, Matthan W A; De Francesco, Davide; van Zoest, Rosan A; Leech, Robert; Wit, Ferdinand W N M; Portegies, Peter; Geurtsen, Gert J; Schmand, Ben A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Franceschi, Claudio; Sabin, Caroline A; Majoie, Charles B L M; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Sharp, David J; Kalsbeek, A.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. METHODS: A la

  8. Bilateral adaptive deep brain stimulation is effective in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Little, Simon; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Neal, Spencer; Cheeran, Binith; Cagnan, Hayriye; Gratwicke, James; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Pogosyan, Alex; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction & objectives Adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) uses feedback from brain signals to guide stimulation. A recent acute trial of unilateral aDBS showed that aDBS can lead to substantial improvements in contralateral hemibody Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor score

  9. Metabolic syndrome and the immunologic affair with the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eMauro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies reveal an increased incidence of obesity worldwide, which is associated with increased prevalence and severity of cognitive disorders. The blood brain barrier represents the interface between the peripheral circulation and the brain, and plays a fundamental role in the cross-talk between these two compartments. The homeostatic function of the blood-brain barrier is the protection of the brain from peripheral insult/inflammation. Alterations in the function of the blood-brain barrier lead to pathologies of the central nervous system. Recently, metabolic imbalance has been shown to be an important risk factor associated with the decline of blood-brain barrier integrity and function. This has direct etiological consequences to a variety of cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative pathologies with great impact to society. Priority areas for future preclinical research include strategies to improve clinicians’ ability to diagnose, prevent, and manage blood-brain barrier abnormalities. In sharp contrast with epidemiological studies and clinical needs, little is known about the mechanisms that link metabolic syndrome to blood-brain barrier functionality and cognitive disorders. Our view is that immune responses caused by metabolic stress might play a major role in this conundrum.

  10. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P brain stimulation. Our finding of decreased metabolism in vermis and hippocampus of asymptomatic relatives suggests that heterozygocity influences the function of these brain regions.

  11. Is lactate a volume transmitter of metabolic states of the brain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergersen, Linda H; Gjedde, Albert

    2012-01-01

    We present the perspective that lactate is a volume transmitter of cellular signals in brain that acutely and chronically regulate the energy metabolism of large neuronal ensembles. From this perspective, we interpret recent evidence to mean that lactate transmission serves the maintenance...... of network metabolism by two different mechanisms, one by regulating the formation of cAMP via the lactate receptor GPR81, the other by adjusting the NADH/NAD(+) redox ratios, both linked to the maintenance of brain energy turnover and possibly cerebral blood flow. The role of lactate as mediator...... of metabolic information rather than metabolic substrate answers a number of questions raised by the controversial oxidativeness of astrocytic metabolism and its contribution to neuronal function....

  12. Is lactate a Volume Transmitter of Metabolic States of the Brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda H. Bergersen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the perspective that lactate is a volume transmitter of cellular signals in brain that acutely and chronically regulate the energy metabolism of large neuronal ensembles. From this perspective, we interpret recent evidence to mean that lactate transmission serves the maintenance of network metabolism by two different mechanisms, one by regulating the formation of cAMP via the lactate receptor GPR81, the other by adjusting the NADH/NAD+ redox ratios, both linked to the maintenance of brain energy turnover and possibly cerebral blood flow. The roles of lactate as mediator of metabolic information rather than metabolic substrate answer a number of questions raised by the controversial oxidativeness of astrocytic metabolism and its contribution to neuronal function.

  13. Foundation for PSP/CBD and Related Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate I want to learn Overview Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) Prime of life brain diseases FAQ About Our Research Research Initiatives Investigator Resources Healthcare Professional Resources I need Support Overview Personal ...

  14. A metabolic-transcriptional network links sleep and cellular energetics in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisor, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    This review proposes a mechanistic link between cellular metabolic status, transcriptional regulatory changes and sleep. Sleep loss is associated with changes in cellular metabolic status in the brain. Metabolic sensors responsive to cellular metabolic status regulate the circadian clock transcriptional network. Modifications of the transcriptional activity of circadian clock genes affect sleep/wake state changes. Changes in sleep state reverse sleep loss-induced changes in cellular metabolic status. It is thus proposed that the regulation of circadian clock genes by cellular metabolic sensors is a critical intermediate step in the link between cellular metabolic status and sleep. Studies of this regulatory relationship may offer insights into the function of sleep at the cellular level.

  15. Imaging plasma docosahexaenoic acid (dha incorporation into the brain in vivo, as a biomarker of brain DHA: Metabolism and neurotransmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapoport Stanley I.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is critical for normal brain structure and function, and its brain concentration depends on dietary DHA content and hepatic conversion from its dietary derived n-3 precursor, a-linolenic acid (α-LNA. We developed an in vivo method in rats using quantitative autoradiography to image incorporation into brain of unesterified plasma DHA, and showed that the incorporation rate equals the rate of brain metabolic DHA consumption. Thus, quantitative imaging of DHA incorporation from plasma into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain DHA metabolism and neurotransmission. The method has been extended to humans with the use of positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, imaging in unanesthetized rats using DHA incorporation as a biomarker in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA administration confirms that regional DHA signaling is independent of extracellular calcium, and likely mediated by a calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2. Studies in mice in which iPLA2-VIA (β was knocked out confirmed that this enzyme is critical for baseline and muscarinic cholinergic signaling involving DHA.

  16. Inflammation meets metabolic disease: Gut feeling mediated by GLP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara eZietek

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes, cardiovascular and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD share common features in their pathology. Metabolic disorders exhibit strong inflammatory underpinnings and vice versa, inflammation is associated with metabolic alterations. Next to cytokines and cellular stress pathways like the unfolded protein response (UPR, alterations in the enteroendocrine system are intersections of various pathologies. Enteroendocrine cells (EEC have been studied extensively for their ability to regulate gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and insulin release by release of peptide hormones. In particular the L cell-derived incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 has gained enormous attention due to its insulinotropic action and relevance in the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Yet, accumulating data indicates a critical role for EEC and in particular for GLP-1 in metabolic adaptation and in orchestrating immune responses beyond blood glucose control. EEC sense the lamina propria and luminal environment including the microbiota via receptors and transporters. Subsequently mediating signals by secreting hormones and cytokines, EEC can be considered as integrators of metabolic and inflammatory signaling.This review focuses on L cell and GLP-1 functions in the context of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. The effects of incretin-based therapies on metabolism and immune system are discussed and the interrelation and common features of metabolic and immune-mediated disorders are highlighted. Moreover, it presents data on the impact of inflammation, in particular of IBD on EEC and discusses the potential role of the microbiota as link between nutrients, metabolism, immunity and disease.

  17. Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, and Airway Disease: A Bioenergetic Problem?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Common pathophysiological mechanisms are increasingly being recognized between obesity, metabolic dysfunction, and airway disease. Obesity increases asthma risk or severity, in multiple studies across the globe. Metabolic changes of obesity such as diabetes or insulin resistance are associated with asthma as well as poorer lung function. Insulin resistance has also been found to increase asthma risk independent of body mass. Conversely, asthma has been associated with abnormal glucose and lip...

  18. The Role of Gut–brain Axis in Regulating Glucose Metabolism After Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Murphy, Rinki; Cutfield, Richard; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes has become an epidemic in developed and developing countries alike, with an increased demand for new efficacious treatments. A large body of pre-clinical evidence suggests that the gut–brain axis may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for defective glucose homeostasis. This clinical study aimed to investigate a comprehensive panel of glucoregulatory peptides, released by both the gut and brain, in individuals after acute pancreatitis. Methods: Fasting levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glicentin, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and secretin were studied. Modified Poisson and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Pre-determined concentration ranges were used to categorize each peptide into quartiles. Results: A total of 83 individuals were included, of who 30 (36%) developed abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) after acute pancreatitis. In individuals with AGM, the highest quartile of oxyntomodulin differed most significantly from the lowest quartile with a prevalence ratio (PR; 95% confidence interval) of 0.50 (0.21, 1.20; P=0.005); of glicentin with a PR of 0.26 (0.13, 0.54; Pcholecystokinin, ghrelin, and secretin were not significantly associated with AGM. Conclusions: Fasting circulating oxyntomodulin, glicentin, and VIP levels are significantly decreased in patients with defective glucose homeostasis after acute pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin appears to be a promising therapeutic target for future clinical studies on diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:28055028

  19. Scaling of brain metabolism and blood flow in relation to capillary and neural scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Brain is one of the most energy demanding organs in mammals, and its total metabolic rate scales with brain volume raised to a power of around 5/6. This value is significantly higher than the more common exponent 3/4 relating whole body resting metabolism with body mass and several other physiological variables in animals and plants. This article investigates the reasons for brain allometric distinction on a level of its microvessels. Based on collected empirical data it is found that regional cerebral blood flow CBF across gray matter scales with cortical volume V as CBF ~ V(-1/6), brain capillary diameter increases as V(1/12), and density of capillary length decreases as V(-1/6). It is predicted that velocity of capillary blood is almost invariant (~V(ε)), capillary transit time scales as V(1/6), capillary length increases as V(1/6+ε), and capillary number as V(2/3-ε), where ε is typically a small correction for medium and large brains, due to blood viscosity dependence on capillary radius. It is shown that the amount of capillary length and blood flow per cortical neuron are essentially conserved across mammals. These results indicate that geometry and dynamics of global neuro-vascular coupling have a proportionate character. Moreover, cerebral metabolic, hemodynamic, and microvascular variables scale with allometric exponents that are simple multiples of 1/6, rather than 1/4, which suggests that brain metabolism is more similar to the metabolism of aerobic than resting body. Relation of these findings to brain functional imaging studies involving the link between cerebral metabolism and blood flow is also discussed.

  20. Scaling of brain metabolism and blood flow in relation to capillary and neural scaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Karbowski

    Full Text Available Brain is one of the most energy demanding organs in mammals, and its total metabolic rate scales with brain volume raised to a power of around 5/6. This value is significantly higher than the more common exponent 3/4 relating whole body resting metabolism with body mass and several other physiological variables in animals and plants. This article investigates the reasons for brain allometric distinction on a level of its microvessels. Based on collected empirical data it is found that regional cerebral blood flow CBF across gray matter scales with cortical volume V as CBF ~ V(-1/6, brain capillary diameter increases as V(1/12, and density of capillary length decreases as V(-1/6. It is predicted that velocity of capillary blood is almost invariant (~V(ε, capillary transit time scales as V(1/6, capillary length increases as V(1/6+ε, and capillary number as V(2/3-ε, where ε is typically a small correction for medium and large brains, due to blood viscosity dependence on capillary radius. It is shown that the amount of capillary length and blood flow per cortical neuron are essentially conserved across mammals. These results indicate that geometry and dynamics of global neuro-vascular coupling have a proportionate character. Moreover, cerebral metabolic, hemodynamic, and microvascular variables scale with allometric exponents that are simple multiples of 1/6, rather than 1/4, which suggests that brain metabolism is more similar to the metabolism of aerobic than resting body. Relation of these findings to brain functional imaging studies involving the link between cerebral metabolism and blood flow is also discussed.

  1. Dynamic relationships between age, amyloid-β deposition, and glucose metabolism link to the regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwamee; Madison, Cindee; Baker, Suzanne; Rabinovici, Gil; Jagust, William

    2016-08-01

    SEE HANSSON AND GOURAS DOI101093/AWW146 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Although some brain regions such as precuneus and lateral temporo-parietal cortex have been shown to be more vulnerable to Alzheimer's disease than other areas, a mechanism underlying the differential regional vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease remains to be elucidated. Using fluorodeoxyglucose and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging glucose metabolism and amyloid-β deposition, we tested whether and how life-long changes in glucose metabolism relate to amyloid-β deposition and Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism. Nine healthy young adults (age range: 20-30), 96 cognitively normal older adults (age range: 61-96), and 20 patients with Alzheimer's disease (age range: 50-90) were scanned using fluorodeoxyglucose and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography. Among cognitively normal older subjects, 32 were further classified as amyloid-positive, with 64 as amyloid-negative. To assess the contribution of glucose metabolism to the regional vulnerability to amyloid-β deposition, we defined the highest and lowest metabolic regions in young adults and examined differences in amyloid deposition between these regions across groups. Two-way analyses of variance were conducted to assess regional differences in age and amyloid-β-related changes in glucose metabolism. Multiple regressions were applied to examine the association between amyloid-β deposition and regional glucose metabolism. Both region of interest and whole-brain voxelwise analyses were conducted to complement and confirm the results derived from the other approach. Regional differences in glucose metabolism between the highest and lowest metabolism regions defined in young adults (T = 12.85, P Alzheimer's disease-related hypometabolism was observed in brain regions that showed both age-invariance and amyloid-β-related increases in glucose metabolism. Our results indicate that although

  2. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, B Thomas N; Kiebish, Michael; Marsh, Jeremy; Mukherjee, Purna

    2009-09-01

    Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect), malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate) for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  3. Targeting energy metabolism in brain cancer through calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyfried B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are a significant health problem in children and adults and are largely unmanageable. As a metabolic disorder involving the dysregulation of glycolysis and respiration (the Warburg effect, malignant brain cancer can be managed through changes in metabolic environment. In contrast to malignant brain tumors that are mostly dependent on glycolysis for energy, normal neurons and glia readily transition to ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate for energy in vivo when glucose levels are reduced. The transition from glucose to ketone bodies as a major energy source is an evolutionary conserved adaptation to food deprivation that permits the survival of normal cells during extreme shifts in nutritional environment. Only those cells with a flexible genome, honed through millions of years of environmental forcing and variability selection, can transition from one energy state to another. We propose a different approach to brain cancer management that exploits the metabolic flexibility of normal cells at the expense of the genetically defective and less metabolically flexible tumor cells. This approach to brain cancer management is supported from recent studies in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models and in human pediatric astrocytoma treated with calorie restriction and the ketogenic diet. Issues of implementation and use protocols are discussed.

  4. The collective therapeutic potential of cerebral ketone metabolism in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Mayumi L; Matsumoto, Joyce H

    2014-12-01

    The postinjury period of glucose metabolic depression is accompanied by adenosine triphosphate decreases, increased flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway, free radical production, activation of poly-ADP ribose polymerase via DNA damage, and inhibition of glyceraldehyde dehydrogenase (a key glycolytic enzyme) via depletion of the cytosolic NAD pool. Under these post-brain injury conditions of impaired glycolytic metabolism, glucose becomes a less favorable energy substrate. Ketone bodies are the only known natural alternative substrate to glucose for cerebral energy metabolism. While it has been demonstrated that other fuels (pyruvate, lactate, and acetyl-L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the brain, ketones are the only endogenous fuel that can contribute significantly to cerebral metabolism. Preclinical studies employing both pre- and postinjury implementation of the ketogenic diet have demonstrated improved structural and functional outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) models, mild TBI/concussion models, and spinal cord injury. Further clinical studies are required to determine the optimal method to induce cerebral ketone metabolism in the postinjury brain, and to validate the neuroprotective benefits of ketogenic therapy in humans. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Metabolism of [U-13C]glucose in Human Brain Tumors In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Elizabeth A.; Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Bachoo, Robert M.; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Raisanen, Jack; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Jindal, Ashish; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Choi, Changho; Madden, Christopher; Mathews, Dana; Pascual, Juan M.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBMs) and brain metastases demonstrate avid uptake of 18fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) by positron emission tomography (PET) and display perturbations of intracellular metabolite pools by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). These observations suggest that metabolic reprogramming contributes to brain tumor growth in vivo. The Warburg effect, excess metabolism of glucose to lactate in the presence of oxygen, is a hallmark of cancer cells in culture. FDG-positive tumors are assumed to metabolize glucose in a similar manner, with high rates of lactate formation compared to mitochondrial glucose oxidation, but few studies have specifically examined the metabolic fates of glucose in vivo. In particular, the capacity of human brain malignancies to oxidize glucose in the tricarboxylic acid cycle is unknown. Here we studied the metabolism of human brain tumors in situ. [U-13C]glucose was infused during surgical resection, and tumor samples were subsequently subjected to 13C NMR spectroscopy. Analysis of tumor metabolites revealed lactate production, as expected. We also determined that pyruvate dehydrogenase, turnover of the TCA cycle, anaplerosis and de novo glutamine and glycine synthesis contributed significantly to the ultimate disposition of glucose carbon. Surprisingly, less than 50% of the acetyl-CoA pool was derived from blood-borne glucose, suggesting that additional substrates contribute to tumor bioenergetics. This study illustrates a convenient approach that capitalizes on the high information content of 13C NMR spectroscopy and enables the analysis of intermediary metabolism in diverse malignancies growing in their native microenvironment. PMID:22419606

  6. Insulin Stimulates S100B Secretion and These Proteins Antagonistically Modulate Brain Glucose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; de Souza, Daniela F; Biasibetti, Regina; Bobermin, Larissa D; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Brain metabolism is highly dependent on glucose, which is derived from the blood circulation and metabolized by the astrocytes and other neural cells via several pathways. Glucose uptake in the brain does not involve insulin-dependent glucose transporters; however, this hormone affects the glucose influx to the brain. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of S100B (an astrocyte-derived protein) have been associated with alterations in glucose metabolism; however, there is no evidence whether insulin modulates glucose metabolism and S100B secretion. Herein, we investigated the effect of S100B on glucose metabolism, measuring D-(3)H-glucose incorporation in two preparations, C6 glioma cells and acute hippocampal slices, and we also investigated the effect of insulin on S100B secretion. Our results showed that: (a) S100B at physiological levels decreases glucose uptake, through the multiligand receptor RAGE and mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK signaling, and (b) insulin stimulated S100B secretion via PI3K signaling. Our findings indicate the existence of insulin-S100B modulation of glucose utilization in the brain tissue, and may improve our understanding of glucose metabolism in several conditions such as ketosis, streptozotocin-induced dementia and pharmacological exposure to antipsychotics, situations that lead to changes in insulin signaling and extracellular levels of S100B.

  7. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Thang S; Lean, Mike Ej

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a special constellation of reversible major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main, diagnostic, components are reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose, all of which are related to weight gain, specifically intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation and a large waist circumference. Using internationally adopted arbitrary cut-off values for waist circumference, having metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease, but offers an effective treatment approach through weight management. Metabolic syndrome now affects 30-40% of people by age 65, driven mainly by adult weight gain, and by a genetic or epigenetic predisposition to intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation related to poor intra-uterine growth. Metabolic syndrome is also promoted by a lack of subcutaneous adipose tissue, low skeletal muscle mass and anti-retroviral drugs. Reducing weight by 5-10%, by diet and exercise, with or without, anti-obesity drugs, substantially lowers all metabolic syndrome components, and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking should be corrected as a priority. Anti-diabetic agents which improve insulin resistance and reduce blood pressure, lipids and weight should be preferred for diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery offers an alternative treatment for those with BMI ≥ 40 or 35-40 kg/m(2) with other significant co-morbidity. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is expected to rise along with the global obesity epidemic: greater emphasis should be given to effective early weight-management to reduce risk in pre-symptomatic individuals with large waists.

  8. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang S Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a special constellation of reversible major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main, diagnostic, components are reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose, all of which are related to weight gain, specifically intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation and a large waist circumference. Using internationally adopted arbitrary cut-off values for waist circumference, having metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease, but offers an effective treatment approach through weight management. Metabolic syndrome now affects 30–40% of people by age 65, driven mainly by adult weight gain, and by a genetic or epigenetic predisposition to intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation related to poor intra-uterine growth. Metabolic syndrome is also promoted by a lack of subcutaneous adipose tissue, low skeletal muscle mass and anti-retroviral drugs. Reducing weight by 5–10%, by diet and exercise, with or without, anti-obesity drugs, substantially lowers all metabolic syndrome components, and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking should be corrected as a priority. Anti-diabetic agents which improve insulin resistance and reduce blood pressure, lipids and weight should be preferred for diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery offers an alternative treatment for those with BMI ≥ 40 or 35–40 kg/m2 with other significant co-morbidity. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is expected to rise along with the global obesity epidemic: greater emphasis should be given to effective early weight-management to reduce risk in pre-symptomatic individuals with large waists.

  9. Functional Imaging of Dolphin Brain Metabolism and Blood Flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridgway, Sam; Finneran, James; Carder, Don; Keogh, Mandy; Van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Scadeng, Miriam; Dubowitz, David; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the first use of magnetic resonance images (MRls) of living dolphins to register functional brain scans, allowing for the exploration of potential mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep...

  10. Functional imaging of dolphin brain metabolism and blood flow

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ridgway, Sam; Houser, Dorian; Finneran, James; Carder, Don; Keogh, Mandy; Van Bonn, William; Smith, Cynthia; Scadeng, Miriam; Dubowitz, David; Mattrey, Robert; Hoh, Carl

    2006-01-01

    This report documents the first use of magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of living dolphins to register functional brain scans, allowing for the exploration of potential mechanisms of unihemispheric sleep...

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3Chemical Pathology and Immunology, University of Ilorin, Ilorin ... Abstract. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common health problem which is one of the main causes of chronic disability ... Twenty-five patients with TBI (16 men, 9 women; age.

  12. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  13. The gut microbiota and metabolic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arora, T; Bäckhed, Gert Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The human gut microbiota has been studied for more than a century. However, of nonculture-based techniques exploiting next-generation sequencing for analysing the microbiota, development has renewed research within the field during the past decade. The observation that the gut microbiota......, as an environmental factor, contributes to adiposity has further increased interest in the field. The human microbiota is affected by the diet, and macronutrients serve as substrates for many microbially produced metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids and bile acids, that may modulate host metabolism. Obesity......-producing bacteria might be causally linked to type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery, which promotes long-term weight loss and diabetes remission, alters the gut microbiota in both mice and humans. Furthermore, by transferring the microbiota from postbariatric surgery patients to mice, it has been demonstrated...

  14. NAD+ metabolism in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Peter; Bogan, Katrina L; Brenner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is both a coenzyme for hydride-transfer enzymes and a substrate for NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, which include ADP-ribose transferases, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, cADP-ribose synthases and sirtuins. Recent results establish protective roles for NAD(+) that might be applicable therapeutically to prevent neurodegenerative conditions and to fight Candida glabrata infection. In addition, the contribution that NAD(+) metabolism makes to lifespan extension in model systems indicates that therapies to boost NAD(+) might promote some of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. Nicotinamide riboside, the recently discovered nucleoside precursor of NAD(+) in eukaryotic systems, might have advantages as a therapy to elevate NAD(+) without inhibiting sirtuins, which is associated with high-dose nicotinamide, or incurring the unpleasant side-effects of high-dose nicotinic acid.

  15. Latest data on metabolic diseases: Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelidi Angeliki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is closely related with increased cardiovascular risk and renal damage and its prevalence is even greater in elderly patients that are a highly heterogeneous group. The identification of hypertensive patients, as well as prompt initiation and timely titration of pharmacologic therapy in addition to lifestyle therapy in order to achieve blood pressure goals is of paramount importance. In general population, blood pressure goals of <140/90mmHg are recommended. However, treatment strategies and pharmacological therapy should be personalized depending on patient characteristics and comorbidities. Some drug agents or combinations should be considered as the preferential choice in specific conditions. However, the combination of two antagonists of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS is not recommended and should be discouraged. In elderly hypertensives, it is recommended to reduce Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP between 150 and 140mmHg, provided they are in good physical and mental conditions, while a target of SBP <140mmHg may be considered, if treatment is also well tolerated. Lifestyle changes, and particularly weight loss and physical exercise, are to be recommended to all individuals with the metabolic syndrome. These interventions improve not only blood pressure, but the metabolic components of the syndrome. Antihypertensive agents that potentially improve or at least not worsen insulin sensitivity, such as RAS blockers and calcium antagonists, should be considered as the preferred drugs. Regarding patients with diabetes, lifestyle therapy and blood pressure goals of <140/90mmHg is generally recommended (American Diabetes Association, 2017. An ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, at the maximum tolerated dose indicated for blood pressure treatment, is the recommended first-line treatment for hypertension in patients with diabetes and albuminuria. Taking into account several studies and meta-analyses recently published

  16. Relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factor of personality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Lee, Eun Ju; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Temperament factor of personality has been considered to have correlation with activity in a specific central monoaminergic system. In an attempt to explore neuronal substrate of biogenetic personality traits, we examined the relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperament factor of personality. Twenty right-handed healthy subjects (age, 24{+-}4 yr: 10 females and 10 males) were studied with FDG PET. Their temperaments were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), which consisted of four temperament factors (harm avoidance (HA), novelty seeking (NS), reward dependence (RD), persistency) and three personality factors. The relationship between regional glucose metabolism and each temperament score was tested using SPM99 (P < 0.005, uncorrected). NS score was negatively correlated with glucose metabolism in the frontal areas, insula, and superior temporal gyrus mainly in the right hemisphere. Positive correlation between NS score and glucose metabolism was observed in the left superior temporal gyrus. HA score showed negative correlation with glucose metabolism in the middle and orbitofrontal gyri as well as in the parahippocampal gyrus. RD score was positively correlated with glucose metabolism in the left middle frontal gyrus and negative correlated in the posterior cingulate gyrus and caudate nucleus. We identified the relationship between regional brain glucose metabolism and temperamental personality trait. Each temperament factor had a relation with functions of specific brain areas. These results help understand biological background of personality and specific feedback circuits associated with each temperament factor.

  17. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. NF-κB, inflammation, and metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rebecca G; Hayden, Matthew S; Ghosh, Sankar

    2011-01-05

    Metabolic disorders including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and atherosclerosis have been viewed historically as lipid storage disorders brought about by overnutrition. It is now widely appreciated that chronic low-grade inflammation plays a key role in the initiation, propagation, and development of metabolic diseases. Consistent with its central role in coordinating inflammatory responses, numerous recent studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB in the development of such diseases, thereby further establishing inflammation as a critical factor in their etiology and offering hope for the development of new therapeutic approaches for their treatment.

  19. Brain Insulin Resistance and Deficiency as Therapeutic Targets in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease [AD] is the most common cause of dementia in North America. Despite 30+ years of intense investigation, the field lacks consensus regarding the etiology and pathogenesis of sporadic AD, and therefore we still do not know the best strategies for treating and preventing this debilitating and costly disease. However, growing evidence supports the concept that AD is fundamentally a metabolic disease with substantial and progressive derangements in brain glucose utilization and responsiveness to insulin and insulin-like growth factor [IGF] stimulation. Moreover, AD is now recognized to be heterogeneous in nature, and not solely the end-product of aberrantly processed, misfolded, and aggregated oligomeric amyloid-beta peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau. Other factors, including impairments in energy metabolism, increased oxidative stress, inflammation, insulin and IGF resistance, and insulin/IGF deficiency in the brain should be incorporated into all equations used to develop diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to AD. Herein, the contributions of impaired insulin and IGF signaling to AD-associated neuronal loss, synaptic disconnection, tau hyperphosphorylation, amyloid-beta accumulation, and impaired energy metabolism are reviewed. In addition, we discuss current therapeutic strategies and suggest additional approaches based on the hypothesis that AD is principally a metabolic disease similar to diabetes mellitus. Ultimately, our ability to effectively detect, monitor, treat, and prevent AD will require more efficient, accurate and integrative diagnostic tools that utilize clinical, neuroimaging, biochemical, and molecular biomarker data. Finally, it is imperative that future therapeutic strategies for AD abandon the concept of uni-modal therapy in favor of multi-modal treatments that target distinct impairments at different levels within the brain insulin/IGF signaling cascades. PMID:22329651

  20. Astrocyte sodium signaling and neuro-metabolic coupling in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, C R; Chatton, J-Y

    2016-05-26

    At tripartite synapses, astrocytes undergo calcium signaling in response to release of neurotransmitters and this calcium signaling has been proposed to play a critical role in neuron-glia interaction. Recent work has now firmly established that, in addition, neuronal activity also evokes sodium transients in astrocytes, which can be local or global depending on the number of activated synapses and the duration of activity. Furthermore, astrocyte sodium signals can be transmitted to adjacent cells through gap junctions and following release of gliotransmitters. A main pathway for activity-related sodium influx into astrocytes is via high-affinity sodium-dependent glutamate transporters. Astrocyte sodium signals differ in many respects from the well-described glial calcium signals both in terms of their temporal as well as spatial distribution. There are no known buffering systems for sodium ions, nor is there store-mediated release of sodium. Sodium signals thus seem to represent rather direct and unbiased indicators of the site and strength of neuronal inputs. As such they have an immediate influence on the activity of sodium-dependent transporters which may even reverse in response to sodium signaling, as has been shown for GABA transporters for example. Furthermore, recovery from sodium transients through Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase requires a measurable amount of ATP, resulting in an activation of glial metabolism. In this review, we present basic principles of sodium regulation and the current state of knowledge concerning the occurrence and properties of activity-related sodium transients in astrocytes. We then discuss different aspects of the relationship between sodium changes in astrocytes and neuro-metabolic coupling, putting forward the idea that indeed sodium might serve as a new type of intracellular ion signal playing an important role in neuron-glia interaction and neuro-metabolic coupling in the healthy and diseased brain.

  1. Estrous cycle and sex as regulating factors of baseline brain oxidative metabolism and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor González-Pardo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of sex differences in brain function is still today a controversial issue, and contradictory results are reported in the scientific literature. Part of this controversy would be solved by taken into consideration the rhythmic changes in the levels of circulating gonadal steroids during the menstrual or estrous cycle in females as compared to males. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in oxidative metabolism of limbic brain regions in male and female rats at two different stages of estral cycle (estrous and diestrous. Cytochrome oxidase activity was used as a reliable marker of neuronal oxidative metabolism. We found the highest levels of oxidative metabolism during the diestrous phase in several brain regions, when estrogen levels are high. Males displayed similar cytochrome oxidase activity as compared to females in estrous phase. Our results support behavioral and neurobiological studies reporting sex differences in rodents and humans.

  2. Targeting metabolic inflammation in Parkinson's disease: implications for prospective therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Hu, Gang

    2012-06-01

    1. Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although the aetiology of PD has not been clarified as yet, it is believed that ageing, diet, diabetes and adiposity are associated with PD. 2. Type 2 diabetes and lipid abnormalities share multiple common pathophysiological mechanisms with PD. In particular, inflammation plays a critical role in the destruction of both pancreatic islet β-cells and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Emerging evidence indicates that dysfunctions of energy metabolism evoke metabolic inflammation, which differs to the narrow concept of inflammation, participating in systemic pathological processes such as neurodegenerative disease and diabetes. 3. The brain is considered an immunologically privileged organ, free from immune reactions, because it is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, studies have shown that there is gradual impairment of neurovascular function with ageing and in neurodegenerative disorders, resulting in abnormal states, including increased BBB permeability. Consequently, harmful elements that would not normally be able to cross the BBB, such as pro-inflammatory factors, reactive oxygen species and neurotoxins, infiltrate into the brain, triggering neural injury. 4. Currently, the drugs available for the treatment of PD only ameliorate the symptoms of the disease. Therapeutic strategies aimed at stopping or modifying disease progression are still being sought. Most recent studies suggest that both central and peripheral inflammation may be dysregulated in PD. Therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating systemic inflammatory reactions or energy metabolism may represent a goal in neuroprotection in PD.

  3. A reduced cerebral metabolic ratio in exercise reflects metabolism and not accumulation of lactate within the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Quistorff, Bjørn; Danielsen, Else R

    2003-01-01

    During maximal exercise lactate taken up by the human brain contributes to reduce the cerebral metabolic ratio, O(2)/(glucose + 1/2 lactate), but it is not known whether the lactate is metabolized or if it accumulates in a distribution volume. In one experiment the cerebral arterio...... young subjects. In a second experiment magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed after exhaustive exercise to assess lactate levels in the brain (n = 5). Exercise increased the AV(O2) from 3.2 +/- 0.1 at rest to 3.5 +/- 0.2 mM (mean +/-s.e.m.; P ...-venous differences (AV) for O(2), glucose (glc) and lactate (lac) were evaluated in nine healthy subjects at rest and during and after exercise to exhaustion. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was drained through a lumbar puncture immediately after exercise, while control values were obtained from six other healthy...

  4. Brain changes in Alzheimer's disease patients with implanted encapsulated cells releasing nerve growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Westman, Eric; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Almqvist, Per; Lind, Göran; Linderoth, Bengt; Seiger, Ake; Blennow, Kaj; Karami, Azadeh; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Wiberg, Maria; Simmons, Andrew; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Wahlberg, Lars; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2015-01-01

    New therapies with disease-modifying effects are urgently needed for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nerve growth factor (NGF) protein has demonstrated regenerative and neuroprotective effects on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in animal studies. In addition, AD patients treated with NGF have previously shown improved cognition, EEG activity, nicotinic binding, and glucose metabolism. However, no study to date has analyzed brain atrophy in patients treated with NGF producing cells. In this study we present MRI results of the first clinical trial in patients with AD using encapsulated NGF biodelivery to the basal forebrain. Six AD patients received the treatment during twelve months. Patients were grouped as responders and non-responders according to their twelve-months change in MMSE. Normative values were created from 131 AD patients from ADNI, selecting 36 age- and MMSE-matched patients for interpreting the longitudinal changes in MMSE and brain atrophy. Results at baseline indicated that responders showed better clinical status and less pathological levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ1-42. However, they showed more brain atrophy, and neuronal degeneration as evidenced by higher CSF levels of T-tau and neurofilaments. At follow-up, responders showed less brain shrinkage and better progression in the clinical variables and CSF biomarkers. Noteworthy, two responders showed less brain shrinkage than the normative ADNI group. These results together with previous evidence supports the idea that encapsulated biodelivery of NGF might have the potential to become a new treatment strategy for AD with both symptomatic and disease-modifying effects.

  5. 2-Methylcitric acid impairs glutamate metabolism and induces permeability transition in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Alexandre Umpierrez; Cecatto, Cristiane; Castilho, Roger Frigério; Wajner, Moacir

    2016-04-01

    Accumulation of 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA) is observed in methylmalonic and propionic acidemias, which are clinically characterized by severe neurological symptoms. The exact pathogenetic mechanisms of brain abnormalities in these diseases are poorly established and very little has been reported on the role of 2MCA. In the present work we found that 2MCA markedly inhibited ADP-stimulated and uncoupled respiration in mitochondria supported by glutamate, with a less significant inhibition in pyruvate plus malate respiring mitochondria. However, no alterations occurred when α-ketoglutarate or succinate was used as respiratory substrates, suggesting a defect on glutamate oxidative metabolism. It was also observed that 2MCA decreased ATP formation in glutamate plus malate or pyruvate plus malate-supported mitochondria. Furthermore, 2MCA inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase activity at concentrations as low as 0.5 mM. Kinetic studies revealed that this inhibitory effect was competitive in relation to glutamate. In contrast, assays of osmotic swelling in non-respiring mitochondria suggested that 2MCA did not significantly impair mitochondrial glutamate transport. Finally, 2MCA provoked a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and induced swelling in Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria supported by different substrates. These effects were totally prevented by cyclosporine A plus ADP or ruthenium red, indicating induction of mitochondrial permeability transition. Taken together, our data strongly indicate that 2MCA behaves as a potent inhibitor of glutamate oxidation by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase activity and as a permeability transition inducer, disturbing mitochondrial energy homeostasis. We presume that 2MCA-induced mitochondrial deleterious effects may contribute to the pathogenesis of brain damage in patients affected by methylmalonic and propionic acidemias. We propose that brain glutamate oxidation is disturbed by 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), which

  6. Docosahexaenoic acid homeostasis, brain aging and Alzheimer's disease: Can we reconcile the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphael; Castellano, Christian A; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    A crossroads has been reached on research into docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the one hand, several prospective observational studies now clearly indicate a protective effect of higher fish and DHA intake against risk of AD. On the other hand, once AD is clinically evident, supplementation trials demonstrate essentially no benefit of DHA in AD. Despite apparently low DHA intake in AD, brain DHA levels are frequently the same as in controls, suggesting that low DHA intake results in low plasma DHA but does not necessarily reduce brain DHA in humans. Animal models involving dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency to deplete brain DHA may therefore not be appropriate in AD research. Studies in the healthy elderly suggest that DHA homeostasis changes during aging. Tracer methodology now permits estimation of DHA half-life in the human brain and whole body. Apolipoprotein E alleles have an important impact not only on AD but also on DHA homeostasis in humans. We therefore encourage further development of innovative approaches to the study of DHA metabolism and its role in human brain function. A better understanding of DHA metabolism in humans will hopefully help explain how higher habitual DHA intake protects against the risk of deteriorating cognition during aging and may eventually give rise to a breakthrough in the treatment of AD.

  7. Brain Injury with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between brain injury and vasculopathy in 146 sickle cell (SCD patients with hemoglobin SS, the most serious form of SCD, was evaluated by MRI and MRA at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN.

  8. MODERN LIFE AND NEW DISEASES: METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KORKMAZ

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Although modern human genome remained relatively constant, the profound changes in its environment has been appeared. Genome are needed time to adapt these changes and at this point, the discordance leed the problem which have high mortality, morbidity, so-called “diseases of civilisation”. Some of the main changes occurred in environment are daily lifestyle conditions and dietary habits. These changes has started with industrial revolution and hastened with 20th century. If the environmental changes is accepted to continue, it is clear to understand that “diseases of civilisation” remain as a serious public health problem in front of us. This problem is not only for industrialized Western civilitasion but also for our country that continue to industrialize. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(4.000: 307-316

  9. Metabolic syndrome and chronic kidney disease in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Shiohira, Y; Uezu, Y; Higa, A; Iseki, K

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a hospital-based screening program in Okinawa, Japan. The significance of metabolic syndrome as a determinant of CKD was examined using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 6980 participants, aged 30-79 years, participated in a screening program in Tomishiro Chuo Hospital. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the criteria of the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III). Data were also analyzed according to the modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) that defines abdominal obesity as a waist circumference of > oe =85 cm in men and > or =90 cm in women. CKD was defined as dipstick proteinuria (> or =1+) or a reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR). GFR was estimated using the abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and CKD was 12.8 and 13.7%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome was a significant determinant of CKD (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.537 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.277-1.850, P or =60 years; OR 1.254, 95% CI 0.906-1.735, NS). The relationship between the number of metabolic syndrome risk factors and the prevalence of CKD was linear using the modified criteria. The results suggest that metabolic syndrome is a significant determinant of CKD in men under 60 years of age, in Okinawa, Japan.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca(2+)) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca(2+) signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondria in metabolic disease: getting clues from proteomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Juan R; Diaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Frühbeck, Gema; Malagon, Maria M

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria play a key role as major regulators of cellular energy homeostasis, but in the context of mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondria may generate reactive oxidative species and induce cellular apoptosis. Indeed, altered mitochondrial status has been linked to the pathogenesis of several metabolic disorders and specially disorders related to insulin resistance, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other comorbidities comprising the metabolic syndrome. In the present review, we summarize information from various mitochondrial proteomic studies of insulin-sensitive tissues under different metabolic states. To that end, we first focus our attention on the pancreas, as mitochondrial malfunction has been shown to contribute to beta cell failure and impaired insulin release. Furthermore, proteomic studies of mitochondria obtained from liver, muscle, and adipose tissue are summarized, as these tissues constitute the primary insulin target metabolic tissues. Since recent advances in proteomic techniques have exposed the importance of PTMs in the development of metabolic disease, we also present information on specific PTMs that may directly affect mitochondria during the pathogenesis of metabolic disease. Specifically, mitochondrial protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and other PTMs related to oxidative damage, such as nitrosylation and carbonylation, are discussed. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda eBartnik-Olson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

  13. Single-cell imaging tools for brain energy metabolism: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Alejandro; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Tamara; Lerchundi, Rodrigo; Fernández-Moncada, Ignacio; Ceballo, Sebastian; Valdebenito, Rocío; Baeza-Lehnert, Felipe; Alegría, Karin; Contreras-Baeza, Yasna; Garrido-Gerter, Pamela; Romero-Gómez, Ignacio; Barros, L. Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Neurophotonics comes to light at a time in which advances in microscopy and improved calcium reporters are paving the way toward high-resolution functional mapping of the brain. This review relates to a parallel revolution in metabolism. We argue that metabolism needs to be approached both in vitro and in vivo, and that it does not just exist as a low-level platform but is also a relevant player in information processing. In recent years, genetically encoded fluorescent nanosensors have been introduced to measure glucose, glutamate, ATP, NADH, lactate, and pyruvate in mammalian cells. Reporting relative metabolite levels, absolute concentrations, and metabolic fluxes, these sensors are instrumental for the discovery of new molecular mechanisms. Sensors continue to be developed, which together with a continued improvement in protein expression strategies and new imaging technologies, herald an exciting era of high-resolution characterization of metabolism in the brain and other organs. PMID:26157964

  14. Alois Alzheimer and vascular brain disease: Arteriosclerotic atrophy of the brain

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    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available Alois Alzheimer is best known for his description of neurofibrillary changes in brain neurons of a demented patient, identifying a novel disease, soon named after him by Kraepelin. However, the range of his studies was broad, including vascular brain diseases, published between 1894 and 1902. Alzheimer described the clinical picture of Arteriosclerotic atrophy of the brain, differentiating it from other similar disorders. He stated that autopsy allowed pathological distinction between arteriosclerosis and syphilis, thereby achieving some of his objectives of segregating disorders and separating them from syphilis. His studies contributed greatly to establishing the key information on vascular brain diseases, predating the present state of knowledge on the issue, while providing early descriptions of what would be later regarded as the dimensional presentation of the now called "Vascular cognitive impairment", constituted by a spectrum that includes a stage of "Vascular cognitive impairment not dementia" and another of "Vascular dementia".

  15. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  16. First demonstration that brain CYP2D-mediated opiate metabolic activation alters analgesia in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaidi; Khokhar, Jibran Y.; Zhao, Bin; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2013-01-01

    The response to centrally-acting drugs is highly variable between individuals and does not always correlate with plasma drug levels. Drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes in the brain may contribute to this variability by affecting local drug and metabolite concentrations. CYP2D metabolizes codeine to the active morphine metabolite. We investigate the effect of inhibiting brain, and not liver, CYP2D activity on codeine-induced analgesia. Rats received intracerebroventricular injections of CYP2D inhibitors (20 μg propranolol or 40 μg propafenone) or vehicle controls. Compared to vehicle-pretreated rats, inhibitor-pretreated rats had: a) lower analgesia in the tail-flick test (p0.6 and p>0.7, respectively), tested at 30 min after 30 mg/kg subcutaneous codeine, and c) lower morphine formation from codeine ex vivo by brain membranes (p0.9). Analgesia trended toward a correlation with brain morphine concentrations (p=0.07) and correlated with brain morphine to codeine ratios (p0.8) or plasma morphine to codeine ratios (p>0.8). Our findings suggest that brain CYP2D affects brain morphine levels after peripheral codeine administration, and may thereby alter codeine's therapeutic efficacy, side-effect profile and abuse liability. Brain CYPs are highly variable due to genetics, environmental factors and age, and may therefore contribute to interindividual variation in the response to centrally-acting drugs. PMID:23623752

  17. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  18. Crosstalk of Signaling and Metabolism Mediated by the NAD(+)/NADH Redox State in Brain Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ulrike; Hirrlinger, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The energy metabolism of the brain has to be precisely adjusted to activity to cope with the organ's energy demand, implying that signaling regulates metabolism and metabolic states feedback to signaling. The NAD(+)/NADH redox state constitutes a metabolic node well suited for integration of metabolic and signaling events. It is affected by flux through metabolic pathways within a cell, but also by the metabolic state of neighboring cells, for example by lactate transferred between cells. Furthermore, signaling events both in neurons and astrocytes have been reported to change the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. Vice versa, a number of signaling events like astroglial Ca(2+) signals, neuronal NMDA-receptors as well as the activity of transcription factors are modulated by the NAD(+)/NADH redox state. In this short review, this bidirectional interdependence of signaling and metabolism involving the NAD(+)/NADH redox state as well as its potential relevance for the physiology of the brain and the whole organism in respect to blood glucose regulation and body weight control are discussed.

  19. Brain Na+, K+-ATPase Activity In Aging and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina Rodríguez; Ordieres, María Graciela López

    2014-01-01

    Na+/K+ pump or sodium- and potassium-activated adenosine 5’-triphosphatase (Na+, K+-ATPase), its enzymatic version, is a crucial protein responsible for the electrochemical gradient across the cell membranes. It is an ion transporter, which in addition to exchange cations, is the ligand for cardenolides. This enzyme regulates the entry of K+ with the exit of Na+ from cells, being the responsible for Na+/K+ equilibrium maintenance through neuronal membranes. This transport system couples the hydrolysis of one molecule of ATP to exchange three sodium ions for two potassium ions, thus maintaining the normal gradient of these cations in animal cells. Oxidative metabolism is very active in brain, where large amounts of chemical energy as ATP molecules are consumed, mostly required for the maintenance of the ionic gradients that underlie resting and action potentials which are involved in nerve impulse propagation, neurotransmitter release and cation homeostasis. Protein phosphorylation is a key process in biological regulation. At nervous system level, protein phosphorylation is the major molecular mechanism through which the function of neural proteins is modulted in response to extracellular signals, including the response to neurotransmitter stimuli. It is the major mechanism of neural plasticity, including memory processing. The phosphorylation of Na+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit inhibits enzyme activity whereas the inhibition of protein kinase C restores the enzyme activity. The dephosphorylation of neuronal Na+, K+-ATPase is mediated by calcineurin, a serine / threonine phosphatase. The latter enzyme is involved in a wide range of cellular responses to Ca2+ mobilizing signals, in the regulation of neuronal excitability by controlling the activity of ion channels, in the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, as well as in synaptic plasticity and gene transcription. In the present article evidence showing Na+, K+-ATPase involvement in signaling pathways

  20. Metabolic acceleration and the evolution of human brain size and life history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontzer, Herman; Brown, Mary H; Raichlen, David A; Dunsworth, Holly; Hare, Brian; Walker, Kara; Luke, Amy; Dugas, Lara R; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Schoeller, Dale; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Shumaker, Robert W; Ross, Stephen R

    2016-05-19

    Humans are distinguished from the other living apes in having larger brains and an unusual life history that combines high reproductive output with slow childhood growth and exceptional longevity. This suite of derived traits suggests major changes in energy expenditure and allocation in the human lineage, but direct measures of human and ape metabolism are needed to compare evolved energy strategies among hominoids. Here we used doubly labelled water measurements of total energy expenditure (TEE; kcal day(-1)) in humans, chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans to test the hypothesis that the human lineage has experienced an acceleration in metabolic rate, providing energy for larger brains and faster reproduction without sacrificing maintenance and longevity. In multivariate regressions including body size and physical activity, human TEE exceeded that of chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas and orangutans by approximately 400, 635 and 820 kcal day(-1), respectively, readily accommodating the cost of humans' greater brain size and reproductive output. Much of the increase in TEE is attributable to humans' greater basal metabolic rate (kcal day(-1)), indicating increased organ metabolic activity. Humans also had the greatest body fat percentage. An increased metabolic rate, along with changes in energy allocation, was crucial in the evolution of human brain size and life history.

  1. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  2. [Review on periodontal disease and metabolic control of diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, João Paulo; Glaci Reinke, Stella Maria; Angel Muñoz, Miguel; Santos, Fábio André dos; Luiz Pilatti, Gibson

    2010-09-01

    There may be an interaction between periodontal disease and some systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review was to verify, by means of a review of clinical trials, if there is a positive association between periodontal disease and the glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2) patients. Eleven articles that fi t the study criteria were revised. It was concluded that periodontal disease may influence the metabolic control of DM-2. Additional studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow up are necessary for a better clarification of this issue.

  3. Effect of aging on brain respiration and carbohydrate metabolism of Syrian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J H; Parmacek, M S; Patel-Mandlik, K

    1975-01-01

    Syrian hamsters were used to study the effect of aging on brain slice respiration and metabolism. Young animals (average age 8 months) and old animals (average age 18 months) were incubated under standard conditions with the following parameters being measured: oxygen uptake, 14CO2 production, glucose utilization, lactate and pyruvate formation. No differences were found in the two groups. It is still very likely that subtle differences exist but can only be documented under conditions of metabolic stress.

  4. New insights into coupling and uncoupling of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The brain has high metabolic and energy needs and requires continuous cerebral blood flow (CBF), which is facilitated by a tight coupling between neuronal activity, CBF, and metabolism. Upon neuronal activation, there is an increase in energy demand, which is then met by a hemodynamic response that increases CBF. Such regional CBF increase in response to neuronal activation is observed using neuroimaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography...

  5. A new treatment method for brain diseases. Stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirato, Hiroki (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-01-01

    This paper deals with stereotactic radiosurgery, a novel medical treatment technique for brain diseases. It is the most sophisticated modality that allows the functional preservation. Recently, CT scan and MRI scan have dramatically changed the diagnostic accuracy of tumor localization in the brain. A device named stereotactic head fixation system makes it possible to localize deep-seated brain diseases with an accuracy of 1-1.5 mm. Using multiple convergent narrow beams of high-energy X-ray, a stereotactic head frame, and a three dimensional computer graphics of CT images, patients with deep-seated nidus can be treated without any complications. Normal tissues would not receive large doses but the center of the nidus is irradiated heavily because of the convergence of X-ray beams. Thus stereotactic radiosurgery is more accurate, effective, and less toxic than conventional radiotherapy and is safer and more effective than surgery for many brain diseases. Small arteriovenous malformation in the brain, which is a fetal disease, and small acoustic neurinomas, in which surgery often causes facial nerve palsy and hearing loss, are presented as good candidates for radiosurgery. For metastatic brain tumors, stereotactic radiosurgery makes such patients free from neurological symptoms, such as difficulty in walking and speaking, in a few days. (N.K.).

  6. Metabolomics reveals metabolic biomarkers of Crohn's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, J.K.; Willing, B.; Lucio, M.; Fekete, A.; Dicksved, J.; Halfvarson, J.; Tysk, C.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2009-06-01

    The causes and etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) are currently unknown although both host genetics and environmental factors play a role. Here we used non-targeted metabolic profiling to determine the contribution of metabolites produced by the gut microbiota towards disease status of the host. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (ICR-FT/MS) was used to discern the masses of thousands of metabolites in fecal samples collected from 17 identical twin pairs, including healthy individuals and those with CD. Pathways with differentiating metabolites included those involved in the metabolism and or synthesis of amino acids, fatty acids, bile acids and arachidonic acid. Several metabolites were positively or negatively correlated to the disease phenotype and to specific microbes previously characterized in the same samples. Our data reveal novel differentiating metabolites for CD that may provide diagnostic biomarkers and/or monitoring tools as well as insight into potential targets for disease therapy and prevention.

  7. Latest data on metabolic diseases: Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Mitrou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With such a high cost in money and human lives, diabetes mellitus (DM is a major challenge for health care systems and an obstacle to sustainable economic growth. The pathophysiological disorders of diabetes include, besides the defect in pancreatic insulin secretion and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues (liver, muscle and adipose tissue, increased lipolysis, increased glucagon secretion, impaired secretion and action of incretin hormones, increased glucose resorption by the kidney and defects in the central nervous system. The therapeutic intervention must be timely and personalized. Lifestyle interventions (diet, exercise, smoking cessation are the cornerstone of treatment. Treatment should begin with metformin unless there is a contraindication (eg renal failure or intolerance (eg, gastrointestinal disorders. If HbA1c remains off target a second or a third treatment may be added, orally (glitazone, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors, sulfonylurea or by injection (GLP-1 agonist or basal insulin. On failure to achieve glycemic target combinations of injectable treatments (combination of agonist GLP-1 with basal insulin, intensified insulin therapy or in some cases insulin mixtures are recommended. New treatments (weekly administered GLP-1 analogs, combination of a basal insulin / GLP-1 in one injection, SGLT-2 inhibitors, long acting basal insulins in combination with the old tried treatments (e.g. metformin, pioglitazone, inhibitors DPP-4 can contribute to human-centered and individualized management of patients with diabetes. The cardiovascular safety of antidiabetic treatment should be considered. There is a need for early diagnosis and treatment of glucose metabolism disorders during pregnancy (before 24 to 28 weeks of gestation in women at high risk for developing gestational diabetes.

  8. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nahum Méndez-Sánchez; Norberto C. Chavez-Tapia; Daniel Motola-Kuba; Karla Sanchez-Lara; Guadalupe Ponciano-Rodríguez; Héctor Baptista; Martha H. Ramos; Misael Uribe

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish an association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and the development of gallstone disease.METHOIDS: We carried out a cross-sectional study in a check-up unit in a university hospital in Mexico City. We enrolled 245 subjects, comprising 65 subjects with gallstones (36 women, 29 men) and 180 controls (79women and 101 men without gallstones). Body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostasis model assessment. Unconditional logistic regressionanalysis (univariate and multivariate) was used to calculate the risk of gallstone disease associated with the presence of at least three of the criteria (Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ). Analyses were adjusted for age and sex.RESULTS: Among 245 subjects, metabolic syndrome was present in 40% of gallstone disease subjects, compared with 17.2% of the controls, adjusted by age and gender (odds ratio (OR) = 2.79; 95%CI, 1.46-5.33; P = 0.002),a dose-dependent effect was observed with each component of metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.36, 95%CI, 0.72-7.71;P = 0.16 with one component and OR = 5.54, 95%CI,1.35-22.74; P = 0.02 with four components of metabolic syndrome). Homeostasis model assessment was significantly associated with gallstone disease (adjusted OR = 2.25;95%CI, 1.08-4.69; P = 0.03).CONCLUSION: We conclude that as for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus, gallstone disease appears to be strongly associated with metabolic syndrome.

  9. Alzheimer's disease and natural cognitive aging may represent adaptive metabolism reduction programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reser Jared

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present article examines several lines of converging evidence suggesting that the slow and insidious brain changes that accumulate over the lifespan, resulting in both natural cognitive aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD, represent a metabolism reduction program. A number of such adaptive programs are known to accompany aging and are thought to have decreased energy requirements for ancestral hunter-gatherers in their 30s, 40s and 50s. Foraging ability in modern hunter-gatherers declines rapidly, more than a decade before the average terminal age of 55 years. Given this, the human brain would have been a tremendous metabolic liability that must have been advantageously tempered by the early cellular and molecular changes of AD which begin to accumulate in all humans during early adulthood. Before the recent lengthening of life span, individuals in the ancestral environment died well before this metabolism reduction program resulted in clinical AD, thus there was never any selective pressure to keep adaptive changes from progressing to a maladaptive extent. Aging foragers may not have needed the same cognitive capacities as their younger counterparts because of the benefits of accumulated learning and life experience. It is known that during both childhood and adulthood metabolic rate in the brain decreases linearly with age. This trend is thought to reflect the fact that children have more to learn. AD "pathology" may be a natural continuation of this trend. It is characterized by decreasing cerebral metabolism, selective elimination of synapses and reliance on accumulating knowledge (especially implicit and procedural over raw brain power (working memory. Over decades of subsistence, the behaviors of aging foragers became routinized, their motor movements automated and their expertise ingrained to a point where they no longer necessitated the first-rate working memory they possessed when younger and learning actively. Alzheimer

  10. Assessing the human gut microbiota in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Fredrik; Tremaroli, Valentina; Nielsen, Jens; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2013-10-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated that the gut microbiome complements our human genome with at least 100-fold more genes. In contrast to our Homo sapiens-derived genes, the microbiome is much more plastic, and its composition changes with age and diet, among other factors. An altered gut microbiota has been associated with several diseases, including obesity and diabetes, but the mechanisms involved remain elusive. Here we discuss factors that affect the gut microbiome, how the gut microbiome may contribute to metabolic diseases, and how to study the gut microbiome. Next-generation sequencing and development of software packages have led to the development of large-scale sequencing efforts to catalog the human microbiome. Furthermore, the use of genetically engineered gnotobiotic mouse models may increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the gut microbiome modulates host metabolism. A combination of classical microbiology, sequencing, and animal experiments may provide further insights into how the gut microbiota affect host metabolism and physiology.

  11. Glucose metabolism and astrocyte-neuron interactions in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva; Morken, Tora Sund; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Glucose is essentially the sole fuel for the adult brain and the mapping of its metabolism has been extensive in the adult but not in the neonatal brain, which is believed to rely mainly on ketone bodies for energy supply. However, glucose is absolutely indispensable for normal development and recent studies have shed light on glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway and metabolic interactions between astrocytes and neurons in the 7-day-old rat brain. Appropriately (13)C labeled glucose was used to distinguish between glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway during development. Experiments using (13)C labeled acetate provided insight into the GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle between astrocytes and neurons. It could be shown that in the neonatal brain the part of this cycle that transfers glutamine from astrocytes to neurons is operating efficiently while, in contrast, little glutamate is shuttled from neurons to astrocytes. This lack of glutamate for glutamine synthesis is compensated for by anaplerosis via increased pyruvate carboxylation relative to that in the adult brain. Furthermore, compared to adults, relatively more glucose is prioritized to the pentose phosphate pathway than glycolysis and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. The reported developmental differences in glucose metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis may determine the ability of the brain at various ages to resist excitotoxic insults such as hypoxia-ischemia.

  12. Metaflammation, NLRP3 Inflammasome Obesity and Metabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing prevalence of obesity gives rise to many problems associated with multiple morbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, sleep apnea and cancer. The mechanism of obesity is very complex, thus its link to various disease is poorly understood. This review highlights important concepts in our understanding of the pathogenesis of obesity and related complications. CONTENT: Many studies have tried to explore the exciting and puzzling links between metabolic homeostasis and inflammatory responses. A form of subclinical, low-grade systemic inflammation is known to be associated with both obesity and chronic disease. This, later called as "metaflammation", refers to metabolically triggered inflammation. The nutrient-sensing pathway and the immune response coordination are facilitated by these molecular sites in order to maintain homeostasis under diverse metabolic and immune conditions. Recent studies have found that the NLRP3 inflammasome during metabolic stress forms a tie linking TXNIP, oxidative stress, and IL-1β production. This provides new opportunities for research and therapy for the disease often described as the next global pandemic: type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. SUMMARY: The crucial role of metaflammation in many complications of obesity shown by the unexpected overlap between inflammatory and metabolic sensors and their downstream tissue responses. Then great interest arose to explore the pathways that integrate nutrient and pathogen sensing, give more understanding in the mechanisms of insulin resistance type 2 diabetes, and other chronic metabolic pathologies. A family of intracellular sensors called NLR family is a critical component of the innate immune system. They can form multiprotein complexes, called inflammasome which is capable of responding to a wide range of stimuli including both microbial and self molecules by activating the cysteine protease caspase-1, leading to processing and

  13. Hypometabolism in Posterior and Temporal Areas of the Brain is Associated with Cognitive Decline in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tard, Céline; Demailly, Franck; Delval, Arnaud; Semah, Franck; Defebvre, Luc; Dujardin, Kathy; Moreau, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Brain metabolic profiles of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and cognitive impairment or dementia are now available. It would be useful if data on brain metabolism were also predictive of the risk of a pejorative cognitive evolution - especially in the multidisciplinary management of advanced PD patients. The primary objective was to determine whether a specific brain metabolic pattern is associated with cognitive decline in PD. Sixteen advanced PD patients were screened for the absence of cognitive impairment (according to the Mattis dementia rating scale, MDRS) and underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography brain imaging in the "off drug" state. The MDRS was scored again about two years later, categorizing patients as having significant cognitive decline (decliners) or not (stables). The two groups were then compared in terms of their brain metabolism at inclusion. There were six decliners and ten stables. Significant hypometabolism in the two precunei (Brodmann area (BA) 31), the left middle temporal gyrus (BA21) and the left fusiform gyrus (BA37) was found in the decliner group compared withthe stables. In advanced PD, a particular metabolic pattern may be associated with the onset of significant cognitive decline.

  14. Under- and overnutrition and evidence of metabolic disease risk in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under- and overnutrition and evidence of metabolic disease risk in rural black South ... Combined overweight and obesity prevalence was higher in the girls ... in the boys than in the girls in mid to late childhood in a rural setting in South Africa, ...

  15. [Metabolic bone disease in premature infants and genetic polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Funke, S.; Morava, E.; Czako, M.; Vida, G.; Ertl, T.; Kosztolanyi, G.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic bone disease is an important complication among infants very-low-birth-weight (< 1500 g). In adults, osteoporosis has been shown to be associated with polymorphisms of vitamin D receptor, estrogen receptor, and collagen Ialpha1 receptor genes. AIM: The primary goal of the study was to i

  16. INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR REGISTRY OF PATIENTS WITH METABOLIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. Horovenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the problems encountered in the management of medical records of patients with metabolic diseases, and also provides a general solution to these problems through the introduction of a software product. Objective was to reduce the burden on the healthcare registrars and medical genetics center, improving the speed and quality of patient care. In the software implementation the main features of the complex design problems are described: the programming language Java, IDE NetBeans, MySQL database server and web application to work with database server phpMyAdmin and put forward requirements. Also, medical receptionist is able to keep track of patients to form an extract, view statistics. During development were numerous consultations with experienced doctors, medical registrars. With the convenient architecture in the future will be easy to add custom modules in the program. Development of the program management of electronic medical records of patients the center of metabolic diseases is essential, because today in Ukraine all the software that can keep track of patients who did not drawn enough attention to patients with metabolic diseases. Currently the software is installed in the center of metabolic diseases NCSH “OKHMATDYT.”

  17. Metabolic disruption identified in the Huntington's disease transgenic sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Renee R; Reid, Suzanne J; Patassini, Stefano; Rudiger, Skye R; Obolonkin, Vladimir; McLaughlan, Clive J; Jacobsen, Jessie C; Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Waldvogel, Henry J; Bawden, C Simon; Faull, Richard L M; Snell, Russell G

    2016-02-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion within exon 1 of HTT, encoding huntingtin. There are no therapies that can delay the progression of this devastating disease. One feature of HD that may play a critical role in its pathogenesis is metabolic disruption. Consequently, we undertook a comparative study of metabolites in our transgenic sheep model of HD (OVT73). This model does not display overt symptoms of HD but has circadian rhythm alterations and molecular changes characteristic of the early phase disease. Quantitative metabolite profiles were generated from the motor cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum and liver tissue of 5 year old transgenic sheep and matched controls by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Differentially abundant metabolites were evident in the cerebellum and liver. There was striking tissue-specificity, with predominantly amino acids affected in the transgenic cerebellum and fatty acids in the transgenic liver, which together may indicate a hyper-metabolic state. Furthermore, there were more strong pair-wise correlations of metabolite abundance in transgenic than in wild-type cerebellum and liver, suggesting altered metabolic constraints. Together these differences indicate a metabolic disruption in the sheep model of HD and could provide insight into the presymptomatic human disease.

  18. Reactive microglia specifically associated with amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue express melanotransferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferies, W A; Food, M R; Gabathuler, R; Rothenberger, S; Yamada, T; Yasuhara, O; McGeer, P L

    1996-03-11

    Several investigations have implicated the involvement of metals in neuropathologies. In particular, the disruption of iron metabolism and iron transport molecules have been demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a novel pathway of iron uptake into mammalian cells involving melanotransferrin, or p97, which is independent of the transferrin receptor. Here we investigated whether there is a possible link between this molecule and the pathology of AD. The distributions of melanotransferrin, transferrin and the transferrin receptor were studied immunohistochemically in brain tissues from AD cases. In brain tissues from AD, melanotransferrin and the transferrin receptor were highly localized to capillary endothelium, while transferrin itself was mainly localized to glial cells. In brain tissue derived from AD patients, melanotransferrin was additionally detected in a subset of reactive microglia associated with senile plaques. Our demonstration that melanotransferrin mediates iron uptake through a pathway independent of the transferrin receptor indicates that this mechanism may have a role in AD.

  19. Targeting Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Cardiometabolic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jocken, Johan W. E.; Goossens, Gijs H.; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2014-01-01

    With Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease prevalence on the rise, there is a growing need for improved strategies to prevent or treat obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are major risk factors for these chronic diseases. Impairments in adipose tissue lipid metabolism seem to play a critical role in these disorders. In the classical picture of intracellular lipid breakdown, cytosolic lipolysis was proposed as the sole mechanism for triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocy...

  20. Effect of whole-brain irradiation on the specific brain regions in a rat model: Metabolic and histopathological changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálentová, Soňa; Hnilicová, Petra; Kalenská, Dagmar; Murín, Peter; Hajtmanová, Eva; Lehotský, Ján; Adamkov, Marian

    2017-05-01

    Effect of ionizing radiation on the brain affects neuronal, glial, and endothelial cell population and lead to significant morphological, metabolic, and functional deficits. In the present study we investigated a dose- and time-dependent correlation between radiation-induced metabolic and histopathological changes. Adult male Wistar rats received a total dose of 35Gy delivered in 7 fractions (dose 5Gy per fraction) once per week in the same weekday during 7 consecutive weeks. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS), histochemistry, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to determine whether radiation-induced alteration of the brain metabolites correlates with appropriate histopathological changes of neurogenesis and glial cell response in 2 neurogenic regions: the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb axis (SVZ-OB axis). Evaluation of the brain metabolites 18-19 weeks after irradiation performed by (1)H MRS revealed a significant decrease in the total N-acetylaspartate to total creatine (tNAA/tCr) ratio in the striatum and OB. A significant decline of gamma-aminobutyric acid to tCr (GABA/tCr) ratio was seen in the OB and hippocampus. MR revealed absence of gross inflammatory or necrotic lesions in these regions. Image analysis of the brain sections 18-21 weeks after the exposure showed a radiation-induced increase of neurodegeneration, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong resemblance to the reactive astrogliosis. Results showed that fractionated whole-brain irradiation led to the changes in neurotransmission and to the loss of neuronal viability in vivo. Metabolic changes were closely associated with histopathological findings, i.e. initiation of neuronal cell death, inhibition of neurogenesis and strong response of astrocytes indicated development of late radiation-induced changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kawicka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland – they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto’s disease. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones’ activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient’s body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1 and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium. Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the

  2. [Metabolic disorders and nutritional status in autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawicka, Anna; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena; Regulska-Ilow, Bożena

    2015-01-02

    In recent years, the authors of epidemiological studies have documented that autoimmune diseases are a major problem of modern society and are classified as diseases of civilization. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) are caused by an abnormal immune response to autoantigens present in the thyroid gland - they often coexist with other autoimmune diseases. The most common dysfunctions of the thyroid gland are hypothyroidism, Graves-Basedow disease and Hashimoto's disease. Hashimoto's thyroiditis can be the main cause of primary hypothyroidism of the thyroid gland. Anthropometric, biochemical and physicochemical parameters are used to assess the nutritional status during the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid diseases. Patients with hypothyroidism are often obese, whereas patients with hyperthyroidism are often afflicted with rapid weight loss. The consequence of obesity is a change of the thyroid hormones' activity; however, weight reduction leads to their normalization. The activity and metabolic rate of thyroid hormones are modifiable. ATDs are associated with abnormalities of glucose metabolism and thus increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. Celiac disease (CD) also increases the risk of developing other autoimmune diseases. Malnutrition or the presence of numerous nutritional deficiencies in a patient's body can be the cause of thyroid disorders. Coexisting deficiencies of such elements as iodine, iron, selenium and zinc may impair the function of the thyroid gland. Other nutrient deficiencies usually observed in patients suffering from ATD are: protein deficiencies, vitamin deficiencies (A, C, B6, B5, B1) and mineral deficiencies (phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, sodium, chromium). Proper diet helps to reduce the symptoms of the disease, maintains a healthy weight and prevents the occurrence of malnutrition. This article presents an overview of selected documented studies and scientific reports on the relationship of metabolic

  3. Evidence for a metabolic shift of arginine metabolism in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Jager, EH; van der Dijs, FPL; Duits, AJ; Moshage, H; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, a pivotal role has been ascribed to reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability as a contributing factor to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease. We investigated whether arginine metabolism in sickle cell patients is different from healthy controls. Blood samples wer

  4. The impact of metabolic disease associated with metabolic syndrome on human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases induced by metabolic syndrome (MS) have been increased during the past two decades. During healthy pregnancy maternal organs and placenta are challenged to adapt to the increasingly physiological changes. In addition to the increasingly proatherogenic MS, pregnant woman develops a high cardiac output, hypercoagulability, increased inflammatory activity and insulin resistance with dyslipidemia. The MS describes a cluster of metabolic changes associated with an impact on the physiology of many organs. While the metabolic syndrome is directly responsible for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, additional impact on human pregnancy like preterm delivery with low-birth-weight infants as well as the development of diseases such as diabetes, preeclampsia and hypertension. Recent evidence suggests that MS is originated in fetal life in association with maternal nutrition during pregnancy and fetal programming which apparently increases the susceptibility for MS in children and later life. This review will describe the MS in association with the origin of the emerging diseases during pregnancy such as diabetes, preeclampsia and others. The influence of perinatal environment and maternal diet and smoking on MS as well as the genetic biomarkers of MS will be described.

  5. Evidence for a metabolic shift of arginine metabolism in sickle cell disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnog, JJB; Jager, EH; van der Dijs, FPL; Duits, AJ; Moshage, H; Muskiet, FD; Muskiet, FAJ

    2004-01-01

    Over the last few years, a pivotal role has been ascribed to reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability as a contributing factor to the vaso-occlusive process of sickle cell disease. We investigated whether arginine metabolism in sickle cell patients is different from healthy controls. Blood samples wer

  6. Effect of domoic acid on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, B; Arufe, M; Alfonso, M; Duran, R

    1995-04-01

    Domoic acid (Dom) is a neurotoxic secondary amino acid that interacts with the glutamate receptors, producing neurological problems. In the present work, we study the effects of Dom on the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in discrete rat brain regions. The effects of Dom on the brain metabolism of serotonin are also discussed in this paper. Dom stimulates the rat brain serotoninergic system, increasing differentially the synthesis and the catabolism of 5-HT and the elimination of 5-HIAA.

  7. Brain Morphometric Correlates of Metabolic Variables in HIV: The CHARTER Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARCHIBALD, S.L.; MCCUTCHAN, J.A.; SANDERS, C.; WOLFSON, T.; JERNIGAN, T.L.; ELLIS, R.J.; ANCES, B.M.; COLLIER, A.C.; MCARTHUR, J.C.; MORGELLO, S.; SIMPSON, D.M.; MARRA, C.; GELMAN, B.B.; CLIFFORD, D.B.; GRANT, I.; FENNEMA-NOTESTINE, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Obesity and other metabolic variables are associated with abnormal brain structural volumes and cognitive dysfunction in HIV-uninfected populations. Since individuals with HIV infection on combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) often have systemic metabolic abnormalities and changes in brain morphology and function, we examined associations among brain volumes and metabolic factors in the multi-site CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) cohort. Design: Cross-sectional study of 222 HIV-infected individuals. Methods: Metabolic variables included body mass index (BMI), total blood cholesterol (C), low- and high-density lipoprotein C (LDL-C and HDL-C), blood pressure, random blood glucose, and diabetes. MRI measured volumes of cerebral white matter, abnormal white matter, cortical and subcortical gray matter, and ventricular and sulcal CSF. Multiple linear regression models allowed us to examine metabolic variables separately and in combination to predict each regional volume. Results: Greater body mass index (BMI) was associated with smaller cortical gray and larger white matter volumes. Higher total cholesterol (C) levels were associated with smaller cortex volumes; higher LDL-C was associated with larger cerebral white matter volumes, while higher HDL-C levels were associated with larger sulci. Higher blood glucose levels and diabetes were associated with more abnormal white matter. Conclusions: Multiple atherogenic metabolic factors contribute to regional brain volumes in HIV-infected, CART-treated patients, reflecting associations similar to those found in HIV-uninfected individuals. These risk factors may accelerate cerebral atherosclerosis and consequent brain alterations and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25227933

  8. Neuroimaging of Cerebrovascular Disease in the Aging Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ajay; Nair, Sreejit; Andrew D Schweitzer; Kishore, Sirish; Johnson, Carl E.; Comunale, Joseph P.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Sanelli, Pina C.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease remains a significant public health burden with its greatest impact on the elderly population. Advances in neuroimaging techniques allow detailed and sophisticated evaluation of many manifestations of cerebrovascular disease in the brain parenchyma as well as in the intracranial and extracranial vasculature. These tools continue to contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial processes that occur in the age-dependent development of cerebrovascular disease. Str...

  9. Coexistence of reactive plasticity and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer diseased brains

    OpenAIRE

    J. Guevara; Dilhuydy, H.; Espinosa, B.; Delacourte, A; Quirion, R; Mena, R.; Joanette, Y.; Zenteno, E; Robitaille, Y

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a pathological process characterized by neuron degeneration and, as recently suggested, brain plasticity. In this work, we compared the reactive plasticity in AD brains associated to O-glycosydically linked glycans, recognized by lectins from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (MRL), and the tau neuritic degeneration. The neuritic degenerative process was evaluated by the quantification of aggregated neuritic ...

  10. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mirza, A; King, A.; Troakes, C.; Exley, C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer’s disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to aluminium and a...

  11. Aluminium in brain tissue in familial Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The genetic predispositions which describe a diagnosis of familial Alzheimer’s disease can be considered as cornerstones of the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Essentially they place the expression and metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein as the main tenet of disease aetiology. However, we do not know the cause of Alzheimer’s disease and environmental factors may yet be shown to contribute towards its onset and progression. One such environmental factor is human exposure to alumin...

  12. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Multichannel optical brain imaging to separate cerebral vascular, tissue metabolic, and neuronal effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hugang; Luo, Zhongchi; Yuan, Zhijia; Pan, Yingtian; Du, Congwu

    2012-02-01

    Characterization of cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation metabolic changes, as well neuronal function is of great importance to study of brain functions and the relevant brain disorders such as drug addiction. Compared with other neuroimaging modalities, optical imaging techniques have the potential for high spatiotemporal resolution and dissection of the changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF), blood volume (CBV), and hemoglobing oxygenation and intracellular Ca ([Ca2+]i), which serves as markers of vascular function, tissue metabolism and neuronal activity, respectively. Recently, we developed a multiwavelength imaging system and integrated it into a surgical microscope. Three LEDs of λ1=530nm, λ2=570nm and λ3=630nm were used for exciting [Ca2+]i fluorescence labeled by Rhod2 (AM) and sensitizing total hemoglobin (i.e., CBV), and deoxygenated-hemoglobin, whereas one LD of λ1=830nm was used for laser speckle imaging to form a CBF mapping of the brain. These light sources were time-sharing for illumination on the brain and synchronized with the exposure of CCD camera for multichannel images of the brain. Our animal studies indicated that this optical approach enabled simultaneous mapping of cocaine-induced changes in CBF, CBV and oxygenated- and deoxygenated hemoglobin as well as [Ca2+]i in the cortical brain. Its high spatiotemporal resolution (30μm, 10Hz) and large field of view (4x5 mm2) are advanced as a neuroimaging tool for brain functional study.

  14. Phytanic acid metabolism in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Ronald J A; Komen, Jasper; Ferdinandusse, Sacha

    2011-09-01

    Phytanic acid (3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecanoic acid) is a branched-chain fatty acid which cannot be beta-oxidized due to the presence of the first methyl group at the 3-position. Instead, phytanic acid undergoes alpha-oxidation to produce pristanic acid (2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecanoic acid) plus CO(2). Pristanic acid is a 2-methyl branched-chain fatty acid which can undergo beta-oxidation via sequential cycles of beta-oxidation in peroxisomes and mitochondria. The mechanism of alpha-oxidation has been resolved in recent years as reviewed in this paper, although some of the individual enzymatic steps remain to be identified. Furthermore, much has been learned in recent years about the permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane with important consequences for the alpha-oxidation process. Finally, we present new data on the omega-oxidation of phytanic acid making use of a recently generated mouse model for Refsum disease in which the gene encoding phytanoyl-CoA 2-hydroxylase has been disrupted.

  15. Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. La Montagna

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called “metabolic” or “insulin resistance syndrome”. Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III. In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  16. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in preclinical Huntington disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Joost C. H.; Sijens, Paul E.; Roos, Raymund A. C.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2007-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a hereditary brain disease, causing progressive deterioration after a preclinical phase. The pathophysiology of early brain abnormalities around disease onset is largely unknown. Some preclinical mutation carriers (PMC) show structural or metabolic changes on brain imaging

  17. [End stage of chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaboch, J; Opatrná, S; Matoušovic, K; Schück, O

    2012-01-01

    Renal function disorder is inevitably associated with metabolic acidosis. An adult produces approximately 1 mmol of acids/kg of body weight every day (3 mmol/kg in children), derived from metabolization of proteins from food. Development of metabolic acidosis in patients with kidney disease is based on accumulation of acids and insufficient production of bicarbonates; alkaline loss represents a marginal issue here limited to patients with type II renal tubular acidosis only. The prevalence of this disorder increases with declining glomerular filtration (GFR) from 2% in patients with GFR 1.0-1.5 ml/s/1.73 m2 to 39% in patients with GFR inflammation, to progression of tubular interstitial fibrosis that subsequently leads to further GFR reduction. Metabolic acidosis has a number of severe adverse effects on the organism, e.g. deterioration of kidney bone disease through stimulation of bone resorption and inhibition of bone formation, inhibition of vitamin D formation, increased muscle catabolism, reduced albumin production, glucose metabolism disorder, increased insulin resistance, reduced production of thyroid hormones, increased accumulation of β2-microglobulin etc. Non-interventional studies suggest that alkali supplementation may slow down progression of chronic nephropathies. However, this approach, safe and inexpensive, has not been widely implemented in clinical practice yet. With respect to dialyzed patients, abnormal levels of bicarbonates are associated with increased mortality. Both metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, rather regularly seen in a considerable number of patients, have a negative effect on patient survival. Alkali substitution from a dialysis solution is the main pillar of metabolic acidosis management in patients on hemo- as well as peritoneal dialysis. Available technologies allow individualization of the treatment and this should be observed.

  18. Iron-Restricted Diet Affects Brain Ferritin Levels, Dopamine Metabolism and Cellular Prion Protein in a Region-Specific Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. V. Pino

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential micronutrient for several physiological functions, including the regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. On the other hand, both iron, and dopamine can affect the folding and aggregation of proteins related with neurodegenerative diseases, such as cellular prion protein (PrPC and α-synuclein, suggesting that deregulation of iron homeostasis and the consequential disturbance of dopamine metabolism can be a risk factor for conformational diseases. These proteins, in turn, are known to participate in the regulation of iron and dopamine metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effects of dietary iron restriction on brain ferritin levels, dopamine metabolism, and the expression levels of PrPC and α-synuclein. To achieve this goal, C57BL/6 mice were fed with iron restricted diet (IR or with normal diet (CTL for 1 month. IR reduced iron and ferritin levels in liver. Ferritin reduction was also observed in the hippocampus. However, in the striatum of IR group, ferritin level was increased, suggesting that under iron-deficient condition, each brain area might acquire distinct capacity to store iron. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed only in hippocampus of IR group, where ferritin level was reduced. IR also generated discrete results regarding dopamine metabolism of distinct brain regions: in striatum, the level of dopamine metabolites (DOPAC and HVA was reduced; in prefrontal cortex, only HVA was increased along with the enhanced MAO-A activity; in hippocampus, no alterations were observed. PrPC levels were increased only in the striatum of IR group, where ferritin level was also increased. PrPC is known to play roles in iron uptake. Thus, the increase of PrPC in striatum of IR group might be related to the increased ferritin level. α-synuclein was not altered in any regions. Abnormal accumulation of ferritin, increased MAO-A activity or lipid peroxidation are molecular features observed in several neurological

  19. CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES: THE POSSIBILITIES AND EFFICIENCY OF METABOLIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Ya. Umarova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic brain ischemia is accompanied by complex metabolic rearrangements in the neurons. The ability of the cells to survive is largely determined by the presence of energy substrates and oxygen, the synthesis of neurotransmitters, and some other factors. The increasedpersistence of nerve tissue in ischemia and chances of recovering the impaired function can be achieved by the use of neuroprotective and neurotrophic agents. The efficiency of neurometabolic therapy is considered using Ceraxon and Actovegin as an example. It is emphasized that theefficiency of their administration can be achieved by the mandatory concurrent use of a wide range of nondrug treatments.

  20. CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES: THE POSSIBILITIES AND EFFICIENCY OF METABOLIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Ya. Umarova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic brain ischemia is accompanied by complex metabolic rearrangements in the neurons. The ability of the cells to survive is largely determined by the presence of energy substrates and oxygen, the synthesis of neurotransmitters, and some other factors. The increasedpersistence of nerve tissue in ischemia and chances of recovering the impaired function can be achieved by the use of neuroprotective and neurotrophic agents. The efficiency of neurometabolic therapy is considered using Ceraxon and Actovegin as an example. It is emphasized that theefficiency of their administration can be achieved by the mandatory concurrent use of a wide range of nondrug treatments.

  1. Alzheimer and vascular brain diseases: Focal and diffuse subforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available Alois Alzheimer is best known for his description of the pre-senile neurodegenerative disease named after him. However, his previous interest in vascular brain diseases, underlying cognitive and behavioral changes, was very strong. Besides describing the Arteriosclerotic atrophy of the brain and the arteriosclerotic subtype of Senile dementia which he viewed as main forms of vascular brain diseases, he also identified and described a series of conditions he considered subforms. These may be divided, as suggested by the authors of the present paper, into 3 groups: gliosis and sclerosis, subcortical atrophies, and apoplectic. The subforms of the three groups present characteristic neuropathological features and clinical, cognitive and behavioral manifestations. These provide the basis, together with part of the main forms, for the contemporary condition known as Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

  2. The role of ceramides in selected brain pathologies: ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Car

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available  Ceramides, members of the sphingolipids, are produced in the central nervous system by de novo synthesis, sphingomyelin hydrolysis or the so-called salvage pathway. They are engaged in formation of lipid rafts that are essential in regulation and transduction of signals coming to the cell from the environment. Ceramides represent the major transmitters of the sphingomyelin pathway of signal transduction. They regulate proliferation, differentiation, programmed cell death and senescence. Ceramide overexpression, mainly as a result of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, is a component of brain damage caused by ischemia and early reperfusion. Their high concentrations induce mitochondria-dependent neuronal apoptosis, exacerbate the synthesis of reactive oxygen species, decrease ATP level, inhibit electron transport and release cytochrome c, and activate caspase-3. Reduced ceramide accumulation in the brain, dependent mainly on ceramide synthesized de novo, may exert an anti-apoptotic effect after pre-conditioning. The increase of ceramide content in the brain was observed in Alzheimer disease and its animal models. Enhanced ceramide concentration in this pathology is an effect of their synthesis de novo or sphingomyelin metabolism augmentation. The ceramide pathway can directly stimulate biochemical changes in the brain noted at the onset of disease: tau overphosphorylation and β-amyloid peptide accumulation. The higher concentration of ceramides in blood in the pre-clinical phase of the illness may mark early brain changes.

  3. [The role of ceramides in selected brain pathologies: ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Car, Halina; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Sadowska, Anna; Kurek, Krzysztof

    2012-05-30

     Ceramides, members of the sphingolipids, are produced in the central nervous system by de novo synthesis, sphingomyelin hydrolysis or the so-called salvage pathway. They are engaged in formation of lipid rafts that are essential in regulation and transduction of signals coming to the cell from the environment. Ceramides represent the major transmitters of the sphingomyelin pathway of signal transduction. They regulate proliferation, differentiation, programmed cell death and senescence. Ceramide overexpression, mainly as a result of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, is a component of brain damage caused by ischemia and early reperfusion. Their high concentrations induce mitochondria-dependent neuronal apoptosis, exacerbate the synthesis of reactive oxygen species, decrease ATP level, inhibit electron transport and release cytochrome c, and activate caspase-3. Reduced ceramide accumulation in the brain, dependent mainly on ceramide synthesized de novo, may exert an anti-apoptotic effect after pre-conditioning. The increase of ceramide content in the brain was observed in Alzheimer disease and its animal models. Enhanced ceramide concentration in this pathology is an effect of their synthesis de novo or sphingomyelin metabolism augmentation. The ceramide pathway can directly stimulate biochemical changes in the brain noted at the onset of disease: tau overphosphorylation and β-amyloid peptide accumulation. The higher concentration of ceramides in blood in the pre-clinical phase of the illness may mark early brain changes.

  4. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Bariatric Surgery Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proven to be a life-saving measure for some, but for others it has precipitated a plethora of metabolic complications ranging from mild to life-threatening, sometimes to the point of requiring surgical revision. Obesity was previously thought to be bone protective, but this is indeed not the case. Morbidly obese individuals are at risk for metabolic bone disease (MBD due to chronic vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, chronic dieting, underlying chronic diseases, and the use of certain medications used to treat those diseases. After bariatric surgery, the risk for bone-related problems is even greater, owing to severely restricted intake, malabsorption, poor compliance with prescribed supplements, and dramatic weight loss. Patients presenting for bariatric surgery should be evaluated for MBD and receive appropriate presurgical interventions. Furthermore, every patient who has undergone bariatric surgery should receive meticulous lifetime monitoring, as the risk for developing MBD remains ever present.

  5. Saguenay Youth Study: A multi-generational approach to studying virtual trajectories of the brain and cardio-metabolic health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paus

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of the Saguenay Youth Study (SYS and its parental arm. The overarching goal of this effort is to develop trans-generational models of developmental cascades contributing to the emergence of common chronic disorders, such as depression, addictions, dementia and cardio-metabolic diseases. Over the past 10 years, we have acquired detailed brain and cardio-metabolic phenotypes, and genome-wide genotypes, in 1029 adolescents recruited in a population with a known genetic founder effect. At present, we are extending this dataset to acquire comparable phenotypes and genotypes in the biological parents of these individuals. After providing conceptual background for this work (transactions across time, systems and organs, we describe briefly the tools employed in the adolescent arm of this cohort and highlight some of the initial accomplishments. We then outline in detail the phenotyping protocol used to acquire comparable data in the parents.

  6. Bisphenol A and Metabolic Diseases: Challenges for Occupational Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporossi, Lidia; Papaleo, Bruno

    2017-08-25

    The prevalence of metabolic diseases has markedly increased worldwide during the last few decades. Lifestyle factors (physical activity, energy-dense diets), together with a genetic predisposition, are well known factors in the pathophysiology of health problems. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound used for polycarbonate plastics, food containers, epoxy resins coating metallic cans for food and beverage conservation. The ability of BPA to act as an endocrine disruptor-xenoestrogen in particular-is largely documented in literature, with numerous publications of in vivo and in vitro studies as well as epidemiological data on humans. Recently, different researchers studied the involvement of BPA in the development of insulin resistance; evidences in this way showed a potential role in etiology of metabolic disease, both for children and for adults. We review the epidemiological literature in the relation between BPA exposure and the risk of metabolic diseases in adults, with a focus on occupational exposure. Considering published data and the role of occupational physicians in promoting Workers' Health, specific situations of exposure to BPA in workplace are described, and proposals for action to be taken are suggested. The comparison of the studies showed that exposure levels were higher in workers than in the general population, even if, sometimes, the measurement units used did not permit rapid comprehension. Nevertheless, occupational medicine focus on reproductive effects and not metabolic ones.

  7. [Carbohydrate: current role in diabetes mellitus and metabolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna López, Victoria; López Medina, José Antonio; Vázquez Gutiérrez, Mercedes; Fernández Soto, M Luisa

    2014-11-01

    There is a prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), unknown DM and stress hyperglycemia among hospital patients, and the nutritional treatment is a key part of care, where carbohydrates (CH) intake is a controversial issue. There is also a discussion on the increase of prevalence for DM, obesity and metabolic disease with refined CH or sugar. This review examines the recommendations from different scientific societies about the percentage of CH in the total calorie intake of the diabetic patient, the CH value in the glycemic index and glycemic load, the new CH included in enteral formulae and the association of refined CH with the high prevalence of DM and metabolic disease. Systematic review of literature using the electronic scientific databases Pubmed, Science Direct, Scielo, Scopus and Medline. Scientific societies are flexible about the CH intake in the diet of diabetic patients, suggesting to customize it according to each metabolic profile. Using the glycemic index and glycemic load can provide an extra benefit in the postprandial glycemic control. The new diabetes-specific enteral formulae, with fructooligosaccharides, resistant maltodextrins and fructose-free show efficacy in improving the glycemic control, although more controlled and long-term studies are needed. There is still some controversy about the links between sugar intake and DM, obesity and metabolic disease, although this relationship would be more linked to an increase of the total calorie intake than to a specific nutrient. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-06-26

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  9. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Xiao, E; Graves, Dana T

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts. PMID:25857702

  10. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Ying Wu; E Xiao; Dana T Graves

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  11. Metabolic, gastrointestinal, and CNS neuropeptide effects of brain leptin administration in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, G; Seeley, RJ; Thiele, TE; Friedman, MI; Ji, H; Wilkinson, CW; Burn, P; Campfield, LA; Tenenbaum, R; Baskin, DG; Woods, SC; Schwartz, MW; Seeley, Randy J.; Thiele, Todd E.; Friedman, Mark I.; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Baskin, Denis G.; Woods, Stephen C.; Schwartz, Michael W.

    To investigate whether brain leptin involves neuropeptidergic pathways influencing ingestion, metabolism, and gastrointestinal functioning, leptin (3.5 mu g) was infused daily into the third cerebral ventricular of rats for 3 days. To distinguish between direct leptin effects and those secondary to

  12. The MAO A genotype does not modulate resting brain metabolism in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Kriplani, Aarti; Pradhan, Kith; Ma, Jim Yeming; Logan, Jean; Williams, Benjamin; Craig, Ian W.; Telang, Frank; Tomasi, Dardo; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the monoamine-oxidase-A gene has been associated with volumetric changes in corticolimbic regions with differences in their response to relevant emotional tasks. Here we show no changes in baseline regional brain metabolism as a function of genotype indicating that, unchallenged, corticolimbic activity is not modulated by the MAOA genotype. PMID:18706791

  13. Cognitive and Brain Reserve in Prodromal Huntington Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Long, Jeffrey D.; Westervelt, Holly; Tremont, Geoffrey; Aylward, Elizabeth; Paulsen, Jane S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Huntington disease (HD) is associated with decline in cognition and progressive morphological changes in brain structures. Cognitive reserve may represent a mechanism by which disease-related decline may be delayed or slowed. The current study examined the relationship between cognitive reserve and longitudinal change in cognitive functioning and brain volumes among prodromal (gene expansion-positive) HD individuals. Methods Participants were genetically-confirmed individuals with prodromal HD enrolled in the PREDICT-HD study. Cognitive reserve was computed as the composite of performance on a lexical task estimating premorbid intellectual level, occupational status, and years of education. Linear mixed effects regression (LMER) was used to examine longitudinal changes on 4 cognitive measures and 3 brain volumes over approximately 6 years. Results Higher cognitive reserve was significantly associated with a slower rate of change on one cognitive measure (Trail Making Test, Part B) and slower rate of volume loss in two brain structures (caudate, putamen) for those estimated to be closest to motor disease onset. This relationship was not observed among those estimated to be further from motor disease onset. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a relationship between cognitive reserve and both a measure of executive functioning and integrity of certain brain structures in prodromal HD individuals. PMID:23702309

  14. Influence of oxygen therapy on glucose-lactate metabolism after diffuse brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Michael; Schaller, Benoit; Widmer, Hans Rudolf; Seiler, Rolf; Bullock, Ross

    2004-08-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) imposes a huge metabolic load on brain tissue, which can be summarized initially as a state of hypermetabolism and hyperglycolysis. In experiments O2 consumption has been shown to increase early after trauma, especially in the presence of high lactate levels and forced O2 availability. In recent clinical studies the effect of increasing O2 availability on brain metabolism has been analyzed. By their nature, however, clinical trauma models suffer from a heterogeneous injury distribution. The aim of this study was to analyze, in a standardized diffuse brain injury model, the effect of increasing the fraction of inspired O2 on brain glucose and lactate levels, and to compare this effect with the metabolism of the noninjured sham-operated brain. A diffuse severe TBI model developed by Foda and Maramarou, et al., in which a 420-g weight is dropped from a height of 2 m was used in this study. Forty-one male Wistar rats each weighing approximately 300 g were included. Anesthesized rats were monitored by placing a femoral arterial line for blood pressure and blood was drawn for a blood gas analysis. Two time periods were defined: Period A was defined as preinjury and Period B as postinjury. During Period B two levels of fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) were studied: air (FiO2 0.21) and oxygen (FiO2 1). Four groups were studied including sham-operated animals: air-air-sham (AAS); air-O2-sham (AOS); air-air-trauma (AAT); and air-O2-trauma (AOT). In six rats the effect of increasing the FiO2 on serum glucose and lactate was analyzed. During Period B lactate values in the brain determined using microdialysis were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the AOT group than in the AAT group and glucose values in the brain determined using microdialysis were significantly higher (p < 0.04). No differences were demonstrated in the other groups. Increasing the FiO2 had no significant effect on the serum levels of glucose and lactate. Increasing the Fi

  15. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  16. Metabolic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease: Bioenergetics, Redox Homeostasis and Central Carbon Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Jacome, Maria S; Lei, Shulei; Hernandez-Franco, Pablo; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    The loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the accumulation of protein inclusions (Lewy bodies) are the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). PD is triggered by genetic alterations, environmental/occupational exposures and aging. However, the exact molecular mechanisms linking these PD risk factors to neuronal dysfunction are still unclear. Alterations in redox homeostasis and bioenergetics (energy failure) are thought to be central components of neurodegeneration that contribute to the impairment of important homeostatic processes in dopaminergic cells such as protein quality control mechanisms, neurotransmitter release/metabolism, axonal transport of vesicles and cell survival. Importantly, both bioenergetics and redox homeostasis are coupled to neuro-glial central carbon metabolism. We and others have recently established a link between the alterations in central carbon metabolism induced by PD risk factors, redox homeostasis and bioenergetics and their contribution to the survival/death of dopaminergic cells. In this review, we focus on the link between metabolic dysfunction, energy failure and redox imbalance in PD, making an emphasis in the contribution of central carbon (glucose) metabolism. The evidence summarized here strongly supports the consideration of PD as a disorder of cell metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma and brain fatty acid profiles in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnane, Stephen C; Schneider, Julie A; Tangney, Christine; Tremblay-Mercier, Jennifer; Fortier, Mélanie; Bennett, David A; Morris, Martha Clare

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is generally associated with lower omega-3 fatty acid intake from fish but despite numerous studies, it is still unclear whether there are differences in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma or brain. In matched plasma and brain samples provided by the Memory and Aging Project, fatty acid profiles were quantified in several plasma lipid classes and in three brain cortical regions. Fatty acid data were expressed as % composition and as concentrations (mg/dL for plasma or mg/g for brain). Differences in plasma fatty acid profiles between AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and those with no cognitive impairment (NCI) were most apparent in the plasma free fatty acids (lower oleic acid isomers and omega-6 fatty acids in AD) and phospholipids (lower omega-3 fatty acids in AD). In brain, % DHA was lower only in phosphatidylserine of mid-frontal cortex and superior temporal cortex in AD compared to NCI (-14% and -12%, respectively; both p < 0.05). The only significant correlation between plasma and brain fatty acids was between % DHA in plasma total lipids and % DHA in phosphatidylethanolamine of the angular gyrus, but only in the NCI group (+0.77, p < 0.05). We conclude that AD is associated with altered plasma status of both DHA and other fatty acids unrelated to DHA, and that the lipid class-dependent nature of these differences reflects a combination of differences in intake and metabolism.

  18. Deletion of TRAAK Potassium Channel Affects Brain Metabolism and Protects against Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laigle, Christophe; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J.; Viola, Angèle

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral stroke is a worldwide leading cause of disability. The two-pore domain K+ channels identified as background channels are involved in many functions in brain under physiological and pathological conditions. We addressed the hypothesis that TRAAK, a mechano-gated and lipid-sensitive two-pore domain K+ channel, is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia. We studied the effects of TRAAK deletion on brain morphology and metabolism under physiological conditions, and during temporary focal cerebral ischemia in Traak−/− mice using a combination of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques and multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods. We provide the first in vivo evidence establishing a link between TRAAK and neurometabolism. Under physiological conditions, Traak−/− mice showed a particular metabolic phenotype characterized by higher levels of taurine and myo-inositol than Traak+/+ mice. Upon ischemia, Traak−/− mice had a smaller infarcted volume, with lower contribution of cellular edema than Traak+/+ mice. Moreover, brain microcirculation was less damaged, and brain metabolism and pH were preserved. Our results show that expression of TRAAK strongly influences tissue levels of organic osmolytes. Traak−/− mice resilience to cellular edema under ischemia appears related to their physiologically high levels of myo-inositol and of taurine, an aminoacid involved in the modulation of mitochondrial activity and cell death. The beneficial effects of TRAAK deletion designate this channel as a promising pharmacological target for the treatment against stroke. PMID:23285272

  19. Transport and metabolism at blood-brain interfaces and in neural cells: relevance to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGazzin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood-brain interfaces into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, blood-brain interfaces act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of blood-brain interfaces in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as with the potential role of transporters such as ABCC-1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed.

  20. White Matter Lipids as a Ketogenic Fuel Supply in Aging Female Brain: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosinski, Lauren P; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Fonteh, Alfred N; Harrington, Michael G; Christensen, Trace A; Trushina, Eugenia; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2015-12-01

    White matter degeneration is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's. Age remains the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's and the prevalence of age-related late onset Alzheimer's is greatest in females. We investigated mechanisms underlying white matter degeneration in an animal model consistent with the sex at greatest Alzheimer's risk. Results of these analyses demonstrated decline in mitochondrial respiration, increased mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide production and cytosolic-phospholipase-A2 sphingomyelinase pathway activation during female brain aging. Electron microscopic and lipidomic analyses confirmed myelin degeneration. An increase in fatty acids and mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism machinery was coincident with a rise in brain ketone bodies and decline in plasma ketone bodies. This mechanistic pathway and its chronologically phased activation, links mitochondrial dysfunction early in aging with later age development of white matter degeneration. The catabolism of myelin lipids to generate ketone bodies can be viewed as a systems level adaptive response to address brain fuel and energy demand. Elucidation of the initiating factors and the mechanistic pathway leading to white matter catabolism in the aging female brain provides potential therapeutic targets to prevent and treat demyelinating diseases such as Alzheimer's and multiple sclerosis. Targeting stages of disease and associated mechanisms will be critical.

  1. Soy peptide ingestion augments the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Haruka; Moriyasu, Kazuki; Nakahata, Akane; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Ichinose, Takashi; Furuya, Shigeki

    2017-05-01

    To examine whether edible peptide intake affects neurotransmitter metabolism in the brain, we evaluated the effect of peptides derived from soy proteins or fish collagen on free amino acids and monoamines in the mouse brain. Ingestion of soy peptides led to markedly higher levels of tyrosine, a catecholamine precursor, in the serum, and cerebral cortex compared to those following ingestion of vehicle alone or collagen peptides. Soy peptide ingestion also effectively increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol and normetanephrine, the principal metabolites of noradrenaline, in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and brainstem, whereas collagen peptides did not exert such effects. Further, soy peptide ingestion led to a significant increase in noradrenaline itself in the brainstem, where noradrenergic neurons are present. Noradrenergic turnover was also markedly stimulated in these regions after soy peptide ingestion. These in vivo observations suggest that soy peptide ingestion can maintain and promote the synthesis and metabolism of noradrenaline in the brain.

  2. Resting brain metabolic correlates of neuroticism and extraversion in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hee; Hwang, Ji Hee; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2008-05-28

    Neuroticism and extraversion are two core dimensions of personality and are considered to be associated with emotional disorders. We investigated resting state brain metabolic correlates of neuroticism and extraversion using a positron emission tomography. Twenty healthy young men completed an F-flurodeoxyglucose-PET scan at rest and the Korean version of the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Neuroticism was negatively correlated with regional glucose metabolism in prefrontal regions including the medial prefrontal cortex. Extraversion was positively correlated with metabolism in the right putamen. These results suggest close associations between resting state brain activity in the prefrontal and striatal regions and specific personality traits and thus contribute to the understanding of the neurobiological bases of predisposition to psychiatric disorders.

  3. Metabolic and hemodynamic evaluation of brain metastases from small cell lung cancer with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Andersen, P; Daugaard, G

    1998-01-01

    for studies of metabolic and hemodynamic features. This study was performed to determine regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in brain metastases from small cell lung cancer and the surrounding brain. Tumor r......CMRglu, rCBF, and rCBV exerted a broad variability, but were higher than the corresponding values in white matter and higher than or similar to those of gray matter. Tumor rCMRglu and rCBF were highly correlated (P metabolic or hemodynamic parameters...... was not observed. Other methods for noninvasive in vivo analysis of tumor hemodynamics are needed, especially for discrimination between tumor necrosis and hypoxia....

  4. Effects of a ketogenic diet on brain metabolism in epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Kirsten; Law, Ian

    2013-01-01

    For a subpopulation of drug-resistant epilepsies, a ketogenic diet constitutes the treatment of choice. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet, which induces ketosis. Despite the use in treatment of epilepsy since 1924, the clinical efficacy was not demonstrated...... in a controlled, randomized trial until 2008, showing its capability of reducing seizure frequency with more than 50%. However, the exact mechanism of this form of treatment is still unknown. We report here a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, where a brain 18F-FDG PET examination...

  5. The impact of bilingualism on brain reserve and metabolic connectivity in Alzheimer's dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perani, Daniela; Farsad, Mohsen; Ballarini, Tommaso; Lubian, Francesca; Malpetti, Maura; Fracchetti, Alessandro; Magnani, Giuseppe; March, Albert; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2017-02-14

    Cognitive reserve (CR) prevents cognitive decline and delays neurodegeneration. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may act as CR delaying the onset of dementia by ∼4.5 y. Much controversy surrounds the issue of bilingualism and its putative neuroprotective effects. We studied brain metabolism, a direct index of synaptic function and density, and neural connectivity to shed light on the effects of bilingualism in vivo in Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Eighty-five patients with probable AD and matched for disease duration (45 German-Italian bilingual speakers and 40 monolingual speakers) were included. Notably, bilingual individuals were on average 5 y older than their monolingual peers. In agreement with our predictions and with models of CR, cerebral hypometabolism was more severe in the group of bilingual individuals with AD. The metabolic connectivity analyses crucially supported the neuroprotective effect of bilingualism by showing an increased connectivity in the executive control and the default mode networks in the bilingual, compared with the monolingual, AD patients. Furthermore, the degree of lifelong bilingualism (i.e., high, moderate, or low use) was significantly correlated to functional modulations in crucial neural networks, suggesting both neural reserve and compensatory mechanisms. These findings indicate that lifelong bilingualism acts as a powerful CR proxy in dementia and exerts neuroprotective effects against neurodegeneration. Delaying the onset of dementia is a top priority of modern societies, and the present in vivo neurobiological evidence should stimulate social programs and interventions to support bilingual or multilingual education and the maintenance of the second language among senior citizens.

  6. metabolicMine: an integrated genomics, genetics and proteomics data warehouse for common metabolic disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Mike; Smith, Richard N; Lyne, Rachel; Aleksic, Jelena; Hu, Fengyuan; Kalderimis, Alex; Stepan, Radek; Micklem, Gos

    2013-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine diseases such as diabetes affect millions of people worldwide and have a major health impact, frequently leading to complications and mortality. In a search for better prevention and treatment, there is ongoing research into the underlying molecular and genetic bases of these complex human diseases, as well as into the links with risk factors such as obesity. Although an increasing number of relevant genomic and proteomic data sets have become available, the quantity and diversity of the data make their efficient exploitation challenging. Here, we present metabolicMine, a data warehouse with a specific focus on the genomics, genetics and proteomics of common metabolic diseases. Developed in collaboration with leading UK metabolic disease groups, metabolicMine integrates data sets from a range of experiments and model organisms alongside tools for exploring them. The current version brings together information covering genes, proteins, orthologues, interactions, gene expression, pathways, ontologies, diseases, genome-wide association studies and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Although the emphasis is on human data, key data sets from mouse and rat are included. These are complemented by interoperation with the RatMine rat genomics database, with a corresponding mouse version under development by the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) group. The web interface contains a number of features including keyword search, a library of Search Forms, the QueryBuilder and list analysis tools. This provides researchers with many different ways to analyse, view and flexibly export data. Programming interfaces and automatic code generation in several languages are supported, and many of the features of the web interface are available through web services. The combination of diverse data sets integrated with analysis tools and a powerful query system makes metabolicMine a valuable research resource. The web interface makes it accessible to first

  7. Effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志刚; 卢亦成; 朱诚; 张光霁; 丁学华; 江基尧

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of ganglioside GM1 on reduction of brain edema and amelioration of cerebral metabolism after traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: An acute experimental closed TBI model in rats was induced by a fluid-percussion brain injury model. At five and sixty minutes after TBI, the animals were intraperitoneally injected by ganglioside GM1 (30 mg/kg) or the same volume of saline. At the 6th hour after TBI, effects of ganglioside GM1 or saline on changes of mean arterial pressure (MAP), contents of water, lactic acid (LA) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in the injured cerebral tissues were observed.Results: After TBI, MAP decreased and contents of water, LA and LPO increased in brain injury group; however, MAP was back to normal levels and contents of water, LA and LPO decreased in ganglioside GM1 treated group, compared with those in brain injury group (P0.05) was observed.Conclusions: Ganglioside GM1 does have obvious neuroprotective effect on early TBI.

  8. The Endocannabinoid System: Pivotal Orchestrator of Obesity and Metabolic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazier, Wilfrid; Saucisse, Nicolas; Gatta-Cherifi, Blandine; Cota, Daniela

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) functions to adjust behavior and metabolism according to environmental changes in food availability. Its actions range from the regulation of sensory responses to the development of preference for the consumption of calorically-rich food and control of its metabolic handling. ECS activity is beneficial when access to food is scarce or unpredictable. However, when food is plentiful, the ECS favors obesity and metabolic disease. We review recent advances in understanding the roles of the ECS in energy balance, and discuss newly identified mechanisms of action that, after the withdrawal of first generation cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity, have made the ECS once again an attractive target for therapy.

  9. Neuroprotective Effect against Alzheimer's Disease of Porcine Brain Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wipawee Thukham-Mee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Despite the increasing importance of Alzheimer’s disease, no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Therefore, neuroprotective strategy is still required. Recent findings show that numerous substances possessing antioxidant can improve neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Based on the antioxidant effect and its reputation to serve as brain tonic in traditional folklore, we hypothesized that porcine brain extract could mitigate neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Therefore, this study was set up to determine the effect of porcine brain extract on memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease. Approach: Male Wistar rats (180-220 g had been orally given porcine brain extract at doses of 0.5 and 2.5 mg kg-1 BW for a period of 4 weeks before and 1 week after the induction of cognitive deficit condition as those found in early phase of Alzheimer’s disease via the intraventricular injection of AF64A, a cholinotoxin. Rats were assessed the spatial memory using Morris water maze test. Then, they were determined neuron density in hippocampus using histological techniques. Moreover, the assessment of acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level in hippocampus were also performed. Results: It was found that both doses of porcine brain extract could enhance memory, neuron and cholinergic neuron density in all subregions of hippocampus. In addition, the decreased AChE and MDA were also observed. Therefore, our results suggested that the possible underlying mechanism of the extract might occur partly via the decrease in oxidative stress marker, MDA and AChE. Conclusion: This study clearly demonstrates that porcine brain extract can protect against memory impairment and neurodegeneration in animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, it should be serve as the potential food supplement or adjuvant therapy against Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related cognitive

  10. Regional brain stiffness changes across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Matthew C; Jones, David T; Jack, Clifford R; Glaser, Kevin J; Senjem, Matthew L; Manduca, Armando; Felmlee, Joel P; Carter, Rickey E; Ehman, Richard L; Huston, John

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is an MRI-based technique to noninvasively measure tissue stiffness. Currently well established for clinical use in the liver, MRE is increasingly being investigated to measure brain stiffness as a novel biomarker of a variety of neurological diseases. The purpose of this work was to apply a recently developed MRE pipeline to measure regional brain stiffness changes in human subjects across the Alzheimer's disease (AD) spectrum, and to gain insights into the biological processes underlying those stiffness changes by correlating stiffness with existing biomarkers of AD. The results indicate that stiffness changes occur mostly in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes, in accordance with the known topography of AD pathology. Furthermore, stiffness in those areas correlates with existing imaging biomarkers of AD including hippocampal volumes and amyloid PET. Additional analysis revealed preliminary but significant evidence that the relationship between brain stiffness and AD severity is nonlinear and non-monotonic. Given that similar relationships have been observed in functional MRI experiments, we used task-free fMRI data to test the hypothesis that brain stiffness was sensitive to structural changes associated with altered functional connectivity. The analysis revealed that brain stiffness is significantly and positively correlated with default mode network connectivity. Therefore, brain stiffness as measured by MRE has potential to provide new and essential insights into the temporal dynamics of AD, as well as the relationship between functional and structural plasticity as it relates to AD pathophysiology.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates local brain metabolism, brain edema and inflammatory response in a blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongming; Yang, Yanyan; Tang, Hong; Sun, Wenjiang; Xiong, Xiaoxing; Smerin, Daniel; Liu, Jiachuan

    2014-05-01

    Many studies suggest that hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) can provide some clinically curative effects on blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). The specific mechanism by which this occurs still remains unknown, and no standardized time or course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment is currently used. In this study, bTBI was produced by paper detonators equivalent to 600 mg of TNT exploding at 6.5 cm vertical to the rabbit's head. HBO (100% O2 at 2.0 absolute atmospheres) was used once, 12 h after injury. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed to investigate the impact of HBOT on the metabolism of local injured nerves in brain tissue. We also examined blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain water content, apoptotic factors, and some inflammatory mediators. Our results demonstrate that hyperbaric oxygen could confer neuroprotection and improve prognosis after explosive injury by promoting the metabolism of local neurons, inhibiting brain edema, protecting BBB integrity, decreasing cell apoptosis, and inhibiting the inflammatory response. Furthermore, timely intervention within 1 week after injury might be more conducive to improving the prognosis of patients with bTBI.

  12. Relationships between sleep quality and brain volume, metabolism, and amyloid deposition in late adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branger, Pierre; Arenaza-Urquijo, Eider M; Tomadesso, Clémence; Mézenge, Florence; André, Claire; de Flores, Robin; Mutlu, Justine; de La Sayette, Vincent; Eustache, Francis; Chételat, Gaël; Rauchs, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in humans suggest that sleep disruption and amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation are interrelated, and may, thus, exacerbate each other. We investigated the association between self-reported sleep variables and neuroimaging data in 51 healthy older adults. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing sleep quality and quantity and underwent positron emission tomography scans using [18F]florbetapir and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose and an magnetic resonance imaging scan to measure Aβ burden, hypometabolism, and atrophy, respectively. Longer sleep latency was associated with greater Aβ burden in prefrontal areas. Moreover, the number of nocturnal awakenings was negatively correlated with gray matter volume in the insular region. In asymptomatic middle-aged and older adults, lower self-reported sleep quality was associated with greater Aβ burden and lower volume in brain areas relevant in aging and AD, but not with glucose metabolism. These results highlight the potential relevance of preserving sleep quality in older adults and suggest that sleep may be a factor to screen for in individuals at risk for AD.

  13. The impact of brain function and local glucose metabolism of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in Parkinson's disease patients%丘脑底核电刺激对帕金森病患者脑神经功能及局部糖代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹荣; 胡伟; 尤志珺; 邓超

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation ( STN-DBS) in Parkinson disease ( PD) brain function in patients with local glucose metabolism abnormal.Methods From June 2011 to June 2014, 60 cases of PD patients in Shiyan people's Hospital, Hubei Medical College were enrolled in this study, they were randomly divided into observation group and control group with 30 cases in each group.Control group was given oral levodopa daily, the observation group based on the treatment in the control group, also added the uplink STN-DBS treatment, before treatment and after treat-ment for 3 months, using Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale ( UPDRS) to assess motor function of patients in two groups respectively, using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale ( MoCA) and mini mental state table ( MMSE) to evaluate neural function and patients were underwent the resting F-deoxyglucose FDG/PET examination.Results Compared with before treat-ment, after treatment, the two groups of patients'UPDRS total score decreased significantly ( P 0.05), and significantly higher in the obser-vation group than the control group ( P 0.05),且观察组显著高于对照组(P<0.05).观察组治疗后每日左旋多巴口服剂量显著少于治疗前及对照组(P<0.05),异动症及运动症状波动发生率显著低于对照组(3.33%vs.26.67%,0 vs.20.00%,P<0.05).结论 STN-DBS能有效改善PD患者各脑区葡糖糖代谢及脑神经功能,促进肢体协调、改善肢体运动功能,提高患者生存质量.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontal Disease Progression in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, E K; Chen, N; Cabral, H J; Vokonas, P; Garcia, R I

    2016-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of 3 or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is associated with periodontal disease, but few studies have been prospective in design. This study's aim was to determine whether metabolic syndrome predicts tooth loss and worsening of periodontal disease in a cohort of 760 men in the Department of Veterans Affairs Dental Longitudinal Study and Normative Aging Study who were followed up to 33 y from 1981 to 2013. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. Waist circumference was measured in units of 0.1 cm following a normal expiration. Fasting blood samples were measured in duplicate for glucose, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein. Calibrated periodontists served as dental examiners. Periodontal outcome events on each tooth were defined as progression to predefined threshold levels of probing pocket depth (≥5 mm), clinical attachment loss (≥5 mm), mobility (≥0.5 mm), and alveolar bone loss (≥40% of the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the root apex, on radiographs). Hazards ratios (95% confidence intervals) of tooth loss or a periodontitis event were estimated from tooth-level extended Cox proportional hazards regression models that accounted for clustering of teeth within individuals and used time-dependent status of metabolic syndrome. Covariates included age, education, smoking status, plaque level, and initial level of the appropriate periodontal disease measure. Metabolic syndrome as defined by the International Diabetes Federation increased the hazards of tooth loss (1.39; 1.08 to 1.79), pocket depth ≥5 mm (1.37; 1.14 to 1.65), clinical attachment loss ≥5 mm (1.19; 1.00 to 1.41), alveolar bone loss ≥40% (1.25; 1.00 to 1.56), and tooth mobility ≥0.5 mm (1.43; 1.07 to 1.89). The number of positive metabolic syndrome conditions was also associated with each of these outcomes. These findings suggest that the metabolic disturbances that

  15. DUF1220 domains, cognitive disease, and human brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, L; Sikela, J M

    2009-01-01

    We have established that human genome sequences encoding a novel protein domain, DUF1220, show a dramatically elevated copy number in the human lineage (>200 copies in humans vs. 1 in mouse/rat) and may be important to human evolutionary adaptation. Copy-number variations (CNVs) in the 1q21.1 region, where most DUF1220 sequences map, have now been implicated in numerous diseases associated with cognitive dysfunction, including autism, autism spectrum disorder, mental retardation, schizophrenia, microcephaly, and macrocephaly. We report here that these disease-related 1q21.1 CNVs either encompass or are directly flanked by DUF1220 sequences and exhibit a dosage-related correlation with human brain size. Microcephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are deletions, whereas macrocephaly-producing 1q21.1 CNVs are duplications. Similarly, 1q21.1 deletions and smaller brain size are linked with schizophrenia, whereas 1q21.1 duplications and larger brain size are associated with autism. Interestingly, these two diseases are thought to be phenotypic opposites. These data suggest a model which proposes that (1) DUF1220 domain copy number may be involved in influencing human brain size and (2) the evolutionary advantage of rapidly increasing DUF1220 copy number in the human lineage has resulted in favoring retention of the high genomic instability of the 1q21.1 region, which, in turn, has precipitated a spectrum of recurrent human brain and developmental disorders.

  16. Huntington's disease : quantifying structural brain changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaard, Simon Johannes Adrianus van den

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to find potential MRI biomarkers for Huntington’s disease (HD). Therefore, after an overview of the current literature on MRI biomarkers, followed by examinations of volumetric MRI, magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance

  17. Metabolic patterns in prion diseases: an FDG PET voxel-based analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto, Elena; Dominguez-Prado, Ines; Jesus Ribelles, Maria; Arbizu, Javier [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Pamplona (Spain); Riverol, Mario; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Rosario Luquin, Maria; Castro, Purificacion de [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Neurology Department, Pamplona (Spain)

    2015-09-15

    Clinical diagnosis of human prion diseases can be challenging since symptoms are common to other disorders associated with rapidly progressive dementia. In this context, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) might be a useful complementary tool. The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic pattern in human prion diseases, particularly sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the new variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). We retrospectively studied 17 patients with a definitive, probable or possible prion disease who underwent FDG PET in our institution. Of these patients, 12 were diagnosed as sCJD (9 definitive, 2 probable and 1 possible), 1 was diagnosed as definitive vCJD and 4 were diagnosed as definitive FFI. The hypometabolic pattern of each individual and comparisons across the groups of subjects (control subjects, sCJD and FFI) were evaluated using a voxel-based analysis. The sCJD group exhibited a pattern of hypometabolism that affected both subcortical (bilateral caudate, thalamus) and cortical (frontal cortex) structures, while the FFI group only presented a slight hypometabolism in the thalamus. Individual analysis demonstrated a considerable variability of metabolic patterns among patients, with the thalamus and basal ganglia the most frequently affected areas, combined in some cases with frontal and temporal hypometabolism. Patients with a prion disease exhibit a characteristic pattern of brain metabolism presentation in FDG PET imaging. Consequently, in patients with rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, the detection of these patterns in the FDG PET study could orient the diagnosis to a prion disease. (orig.)

  18. Metabolic constraint imposes tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons in human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-11-06

    Despite a general trend for larger mammals to have larger brains, humans are the primates with the largest brain and number of neurons, but not the largest body mass. Why are great apes, the largest primates, not also those endowed with the largest brains? Recently, we showed that the energetic cost of the brain is a linear function of its numbers of neurons. Here we show that metabolic limitations that result from the number of hours available for feeding and the low caloric yield of raw foods impose a tradeoff between body size and number of brain neurons, which explains the small brain size of great apes compared with their large body size. This limitation was probably overcome in Homo erectus with the shift to a cooked diet. Absent the requirement to spend most available hours of the day feeding, the combination of newly freed time and a large number of brain neurons affordable on a cooked diet may thus have been a major positive driving force to the rapid increased in brain size in human evolution.

  19. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  20. Metabolomics reveals metabolic alterations by intrauterine growth restriction in the fetal rabbit brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin van Vliet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40-50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino

  1. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  2. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy.

  3. Influence of metabolic syndrome on upper gastrointestinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogabe, Masahiro; Okahisa, Toshiya; Kimura, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Koichi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    A recent increase in the rate of obesity as a result of insufficient physical exercise and excess food consumption has been seen in both developed and developing countries throughout the world. Additionally, the recent increased number of obese individuals with lifestyle-related diseases associated with abnormalities in glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, defined as metabolic syndrome (MS), has been problematic. Although MS has been highlighted as a risk factor for ischemic heart disease and arteriosclerotic diseases, it was also recently shown to be associated with digestive system disorders, including upper gastrointestinal diseases. Unlike high body weight and high body mass index, abdominal obesity with visceral fat accumulation is implicated in the onset of various digestive system diseases because excessive visceral fat accumulation may cause an increase in intra-abdominal pressure, inducing the release of various bioactive substances, known as adipocytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, resistin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review article focuses on upper gastrointestinal disorders and their association with MS, including obesity, visceral fat accumulation, and the major upper gastrointestinal diseases.

  4. Apolipoprotein M in lipid metabolism and cardiometabolic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Anna; Christensen, Pernille Meyer; Nielsen, Lars B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This review will address recent findings on apolipoprotein M (apoM) and its ligand sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in lipid metabolism and inflammatory diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: ApoM's likely role(s) in health and disease has become more diverse after the discovery that apoM functions...... as a chaperone for S1P. Hence, apoM has recently been implicated in lipid metabolism, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis through in-vivo, in-vitro and genetic association studies. It remains to be established to which degree such associations with apoM can be attributed to its ability to bind S1P. SUMMARY......: The apoM/S1P axis and its implications in atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism have been thoroughly studied. Owing to the discovery of the apoM/S1P axis, the scope of apoM research has broadened. ApoM and S1P have been implicated in lipid metabolism, that is by modulating HDL particles. Also...

  5. Mechanistic modeling of aberrant energy metabolism in human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet eSangar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in energy metabolism—including in pathways localized to the mitochondria—has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide array of disorders, ranging from cancer to neurodegenerative diseases to type II diabetes. The inherent complexities of energy and mitochondrial metabolism present a significant obstacle in the effort to understand the role that these molecular processes play in the development of disease. To help unravel these complexities, systems biology methods have been applied to develop an array of computational metabolic models, ranging from mitochondria-specific processes to genome-scale cellular networks. These constraint-based models can efficiently simulate aspects of normal and aberrant metabolism in various genetic and environmental conditions. Development of these models leverages—and also provides a powerful means to integrate and interpret—information from a wide range of sources including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and enzyme kinetics. Here, we review a variety of mechanistic modeling studies that explore metabolic functions, deficiency disorders, and aberrant biochemical pathways in mitochondria and related regions in the cell.

  6. Abnormal erythrocyte metabolism in hepatic disease: effect of NADP repletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J R; Kay, N E; Gottlieb, A J; Oski, F A

    1979-01-01

    Erythrocytes from ten patients with severe liver disease displayed low methylene blue-stimulated hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt activity and glucose recycling despite elevated total glucose consumption when compared to controls. Heinz body formation was increased and reduced glutathione concentration significantly decreased. After hemolysis, no differences in methylene-blue estimulated HMP shunt activity or glucose recycling could be demonstrated between patients and controls. The addition of 2- and 4-mM NADP to the hemolysates produced significantly greater HMP shunt activity and glucose recycling in the patients' hemolysates. The addition of NADPH to the incubation mixture produced no significant stimulation of either HMP shunt activity or glucose recycling, unless methylene blue was also added. Omission of NAD or phosphate from the incubation mixture produced no change in shunt metabolism. The absence of supplemental ATP resulted in extremely low shunt metabolism and refractoriness to NADP stimulation in both patients and controls. In the absence of additional magnesium, a reduction of shunt metabolism was noted. These data suggest that the defect in stimulated shunt metabolism in the intact erythrocytes of patients with hepatic disease does not result from an absolute enzyme deficiency, but rather from an unavailability of NADP or other cofactor.

  7. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Salman

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, central obesity, dyslipidemia and hypertension that markedly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) isotypes, PPARα, PPARδ/β and PPARγ are ligand-activated nuclear transcription factors, which modulate the expression of an array of genes that play a central role in regulating glucose, lipid and cholesterol metabolism, where imbalance can lead to obesity, T2DM and CVD. They are also drug targets, and currently, PPARα (fibrates) and PPARγ (thiazolodinediones) agonists are in clinical use for treating dyslipidemia and T2DM, respectively. These metabolic characteristics of the PPARs, coupled with their involvement in metabolic diseases, mean extensive efforts are underway worldwide to develop new and efficacious PPAR-based therapies for the treatment of additional maladies associated with the MetS. This article presents an overview of the functional characteristics of three PPAR isotypes, discusses recent advances in our understanding of the diverse biological actions of PPARs, particularly in the vascular system, and summarizes the developmental status of new single, dual, pan (multiple) and partial PPAR agonists for the clinical management of key components of MetS, T2DM and CVD. It also summarizes the clinical outcomes from various clinical trials aimed at evaluating the atheroprotective actions of currently used fibrates and thiazolodinediones. PMID:20932114

  8. Network structure of brain atrophy in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, Yashar; Ulla, Miguel; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Dadar, Mahsa; Zhang, Yu; Larcher, Kevin Michel-Herve; Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C; Collins, D Louis; Dagher, Alain

    2015-09-07

    We mapped the distribution of atrophy in Parkinson's disease (PD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical data from 232 PD patients and 117 controls from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. Deformation-based morphometry and independent component analysis identified PD-specific atrophy in the midbrain, basal ganglia, basal forebrain, medial temporal lobe, and discrete cortical regions. The degree of atrophy reflected clinical measures of disease severity. The spatial pattern of atrophy demonstrated overlap with intrinsic networks present in healthy brain, as derived from functional MRI. Moreover, the degree of atrophy in each brain region reflected its functional and anatomical proximity to a presumed disease epicenter in the substantia nigra, compatible with a trans-neuronal spread of the disease. These results support a network-spread mechanism in PD. Finally, the atrophy pattern in PD was also seen in healthy aging, where it also correlated with the loss of striatal dopaminergic innervation.

  9. Age-Related Sex-Specific Changes in Brain Metabolism and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Akihiro; Ito, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Nishizawa, Sadahiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Ouchi, Yasuomi

    2016-02-01

    With a large database, we aimed to evaluate sex-specific distinctive changes in brain glucose metabolism and morphology during normal aging using MRI and (18)F-FDG PET. A total of 963 cognitively healthy adults were included in this study. All subjects completed a medical questionnaire, took the mini-mental state examination, and underwent brain MRI and whole-body (18)F-FDG PET. The MR and PET images were statistically analyzed using 3-dimensional stereotactic surface projection. All images were corrected for whole-brain pixel value to identify the brain regions with significant changes, and regions of interest were set up with reference to Brodmann areas. We evaluated morphologic and glucose metabolic changes by cross-sectional analysis. The baseline database consisted of subjects from 30 to 40 y old, and the age-step for comparison was 5-y ranges. We also compared sex-specific differences in MR and PET images in each age group. Regarding age-related changes, in both sexes brain atrophy was observed in the lateral frontal and parietal regions and glucose hypometabolism in the medial frontal regions. There were significant differences in these parameters between the sexes; parallel changes in volume and metabolism were manifested in the medial frontal cortex in men and in the lateral and medial temporal cortex in women. By contrast, metabolism-dominant reductions were manifested in the lateral and medial parietal cortex in men and in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, including the Broca area, in women. These differences became insignificant in individuals 66 y or older. Our brain mapping study with a large number of reference human brain data demonstrated age-related parallel changes between morphology and metabolism in the medial frontal regions and sex-specific hypometabolism in the parietal (male) and ventrolateral prefrontal (female) cortices. These findings may suggest an aging vulnerability in sex-specific brain regions: the parietal cortex for

  10. Genetic control of human brain transcript expression in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jennifer A; Gibbs, J Raphael; Clarke, Jennifer; Ray, Monika; Zhang, Weixiong; Holmans, Peter; Rohrer, Kristen; Zhao, Alice; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; McCorquodale, Donald S; Cuello, Cindy; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Nath, Priti; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta; Huentelman, Matthew J; Hu-Lince, Diane; Coon, Keith D; Craig, David W; Pearson, John V; Heward, Christopher B; Reiman, Eric M; Stephan, Dietrich; Hardy, John; Myers, Amanda J

    2009-04-01

    We recently surveyed the relationship between the human brain transcriptome and genome in a series of neuropathologically normal postmortem samples. We have now analyzed additional samples with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD; final n = 188 controls, 176 cases). Nine percent of the cortical transcripts that we analyzed had expression profiles correlated with their genotypes in the combined cohort, and approximately 5% of transcripts had SNP-transcript relationships that could distinguish LOAD samples. Two of these transcripts have been previously implicated in LOAD candidate-gene SNP-expression screens. This study shows how the relationship between common inherited genetic variants and brain transcript expression can be used in the study of human brain disorders. We suggest that studying the transcriptome as a quantitative endo-phenotype has greater power for discovering risk SNPs influencing expression than the use of discrete diagnostic categories such as presence or absence of disease.

  11. Anthropometric parameters--predictive factors for cardio-metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, Laura; Graur, Lidia Iuliana; Popescu, Dana Stefana; Niţă, Otilia; Graur, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate comparatively the predictive power of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), two anthropometric parameters used in daily practice, for detecting cardio-metabolic diseases, in a rural community in north-east Romania. We evaluated 3248 persons, aged 19 or over, for whom we collected the following data: medical history, anthropometric parameters, blood pressure value and biochemical parameters. Both WC and BMI help correctly determine the presence of arterial hypertension, diabetes and dislipidemia. However, the cut-off value of each of these parameters differs for each pathology. The predictive value of WC for different cardio-metabolic diseases is maintained even at normal or borderline overweight values of BMI.

  12. [Gene transfer as treatment for metabolic inherited liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, J L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study gene transfer looking for its future clinical application in the treatment of metabolic inherited liver diseases. METHODS: Bibliographic review about the subject. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Gene transfer into the liver would be an alternative to liver transplantation to treat some inherited metabolic diseases. Various vectors have been employed for gene transfer, including retrovirus vectors, whose integration into the chromosomal DNA would allow stable long term expression of the transgene. The integration of retrovirus vectors into the genoma of the target cell is only possible during mitosis. Therefore, these vectors must be delivered during hepatic regeneration induced by partial hepatectomy, for example. Another obstacle to be overcome is the extra hepatic dissemination of retrovirus, in particular to the germinals cells, due to the risk of changing the genetical heritage of the progeniture.

  13. Lipoprotein Metabolism, Dyslipidemia and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David E.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease represents the most common cause of death in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD patients exhibit an atherogenic dyslipidemia that is characterized by an increased plasma concentration of triglycerides, reduced concentration of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that are smaller and more dense than normal. The pathogenesis of NAFLD-associated atherogenic dyslipidemia is multifaceted, but many aspects are attributable to manifestations of insulin resistance. Here we review the structure, function and metabolism of lipoproteins, which are macromolecular particles of lipids and proteins that transport otherwise insoluble triglyceride and cholesterol molecules within the plasma. We provide a current explanation of the metabolic perturbations that are observed in the setting of insulin resistance. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology of atherogenic dyslipidemia would be expected to guide therapies aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality in NAFLD patients. PMID:24222095

  14. Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program Brain Imaging Repository

    OpenAIRE

    Ofori, Edward; Du, Guangwei; Babcock, Debra; Huang, Xuemei; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) is a multi-site study designed to identify Parkinson’s Disease (PD) biomarkers that can be used to improve the understanding of PD pathophysiology and to develop tools that provide novel measures to evaluate PD clinical trials. The PDBP consortium comprises numerous individual projects of which two are specifically geared to the development of brain imaging markers for diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of PD or related disorders. All study...

  15. Oxidative stress-mediated brain dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA formation in Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geogres eRammouz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurosteroids are steroids made by brain cells independently of peripheral steroidogenic sources. The biosynthesis of most neurosteroids is mediated by proteins and enzymes similar to those identified in the steroidogenic pathway of adrenal and gonadal cells. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA is a major neurosteroid identified in the brain. Over the years we have reported that, unlike other neurosteroids, DHEA biosynthesis in rat, bovine, and human brain is mediated by an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism, independent of the cytochrome P450 17a-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 enzyme activity found in the periphery. This alternative pathway is induced by pro-oxidant agents, such as Fe2+ and b-amyloid peptide. Neurosteroids are involved in many aspects of brain function, and as such, are involved in various neuropathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. AD is a progressive, yet irreversible neurodegenerative disease for which there are limited means for ante-mortem diagnosis. Using brain tissue specimens from control and AD patients, we provided evidence that DHEA is formed in the AD brain by the oxidative stress-mediated metabolism of an unidentified precursor, thus depleting levels of the precursor in the blood stream. We tested for the presence of this DHEA precursor in human serum using a Fe2+-based reaction and determined the amounts of DHEA formed. Fe2+ treatment of the serum resulted in a dramatic increase in DHEA levels in control patients, whereas only a moderate or no increase was observed in AD patients. The DHEA variation after oxidation correlated with the patients’ cognitive and mental status. In this review, we present the cumulative evidence for oxidative stress as a natural regulator of DHEA formation and the use of this concept to develop a blood-based diagnostic tool for neurodegenerative diseases linked to oxidative stress, such as AD.

  16. Regulation of Cerebral Cholesterol Metabolism in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reiss, Allison B; Voloshyna, Iryna

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that manifests as a progressive loss of memory and deterioration of higher cognitive functions. AD is characterized by accumulation in the brain of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Epidemiological studies have linked elevated plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein levels in mid-life with AD development. Cholesterol-fed animal models exhibit neuropathologic...

  17. Silent information regulator 1 modulator resveratrol increases brain lactate production and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism, whereas SRT1720 increases oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Benjamin D; Lau, Chew Ling; Ryall, James G; Thomas, Donald S; Klugmann, Matthias; Beart, Philip M; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Silent information regulators (SIRTs) have been shown to deacetylate a range of metabolic enzymes, including those in glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, and thus alter their activity. SIRTs require NAD(+) for their activity, linking cellular energy status to enzyme activity. To examine the impact of SIRT1 modulation on oxidative metabolism, this study tests the effect of ligands that are either SIRT-activating compounds (resveratrol and SRT1720) or SIRT inhibitors (EX527) on the metabolism of (13)C-enriched substrates by guinea pig brain cortical tissue slices with (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Resveratrol increased lactate labeling but decreased incorporation of (13)C into Krebs cycle intermediates, consistent with effects on AMPK and inhibition of the F0/F1-ATPase. By testing with resveratrol that was directly applied to astrocytes with a Seahorse analyzer, increased glycolytic shift and increased mitochondrial proton leak resulting from interactions of resveratrol with the mitochondrial electron transport chain were revealed. SRT1720, by contrast, stimulated incorporation of (13)C into Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced incorporation into lactate, although the inhibitor EX527 paradoxically also increased Krebs cycle (13)C incorporation. In summary, the various SIRT1 modulators show distinct acute effects on oxidative metabolism. The strong effects of resveratrol on the mitochondrial respiratory chain and on glycolysis suggest that caution should be used in attempts to increase bioavailability of this compound in the CNS.

  18. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-03

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway.

  19. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatic diseases: epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Sidiropoulos, Prodromos I; Karvounaris, Stylianos A; Boumpas, Dimitrios T.

    2008-01-01

    Subjects with metabolic syndrome–a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors of which central obesity and insulin resistance are the most characteristic–are at increased risk for developing diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. In these subjects, abdominal adipose tissue is a source of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, known to promote insulin resistance. The presence of inflammatory cytokines together with the well-documented increased risk for cardiovasc...

  20. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Preisler

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II is caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency, which leads to a block in intra-lysosomal glycogen breakdown. In spite of enzyme replacement therapy, Pompe disease continues to be a progressive metabolic myopathy. Considering the health benefits of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. Methods: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1. We determined (1 peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak and (2 carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during submaximal exercise (33 W for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. Results: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference −1659 mL/min (CI: −2450 to −867, P = 0.001. However, the respiratory exchange ratio increased to >1.0 and lactate levels rose 5-fold in the patients, indicating significant glycolytic flux. In line with this, during submaximal exercise, the rates of oxidation (ROX of carbohydrates and palmitate were similar between patients and controls (mean difference 0.226 g/min (CI: 0.611 to −0.078, P = 0.318 and mean difference 0.016 μmol/kg/min (CI: 1.287 to −1.255, P = 0.710, respectively. Conclusion: Reflecting muscle weakness and wasting, Pompe disease is associated with markedly reduced maximal exercise capacity. However, glycogenolysis is not impaired in exercise. Unlike in other metabolic myopathies, skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise is normal in Pompe disease rendering exercise less complicated for e.g. medical or recreational purposes.

  1. Effect of CoO nanoparticles on the carbohydrate metabolism of the brain of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad M. Shaikh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of CoO nanoparticles (NPs on the brain of mice administered through gastrointestinal tract for a period of 30 days was studied. AAS analysis revealed that NPs administered orally were retained by cerebellum, cerebral cortex, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb. This retention of nanoparticles by the brain promoted a significant increase in glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glycogen levels along with the concomitant increase in hexokinase, glucose 6 phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogense activities. However, a decrease in glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase activity was observed in the brain regions indicating a deterioration of the pentose phosphate pathway. Thus, the present study suggests that the CoO NPs affect the carbohydrate metabolism of the brain.

  2. Metabolic fingerprints of altered brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a Rett syndrome model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Viola

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett syndrome (RS is the leading cause of profound mental retardation of genetic origin in girls. Since RS is mostly caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene, transgenic animal models such as the Mecp2-deleted ("Mecp2-null" mouse have been employed to study neurological symptoms and brain function. However, an interdisciplinary approach drawing from chemistry, biology and neuroscience is needed to elucidate the mechanistic links between the genotype and phenotype of this genetic disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed, for the first time, a metabolomic study of brain extracts from Mecp2-null mice by using high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A large number of individual water-soluble metabolites and phospholipids were quantified without prior selection for specific metabolic pathways. Results were interpreted in terms of Mecp2 gene deletion, brain cell function and brain morphology. This approach provided a "metabolic window" to brain characteristics in Mecp2-null mice (n = 4, revealing (i the first metabolic evidence of astrocyte involvement in RS (decreased levels of the astrocyte marker, myo-inositol, vs. wild-type mice; p = 0.034; (ii reduced choline phospholipid turnover in Mecp2-null vs. wild-type mice, implying a diminished potential of cells to grow, paralleled by globally reduced brain size and perturbed osmoregulation; (iii alterations of the platelet activating factor (PAF cycle in Mecp2-null mouse brains, where PAF is a bioactive lipid acting on neuronal growth, glutamate exocytosis and other processes; and (iv changes in glutamine/glutamate ratios (p = 0.034 in Mecp2-null mouse brains potentially indicating altered neurotransmitter recycling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes, for the first time, detailed metabolic fingerprints of perturbed brain growth, osmoregulation and neurotransmission in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Combined with morphological and neurological findings

  3. Loss of functional GABAA receptors in the Alzheimer diseased brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission systems are known to be severely disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD). GABAergic neurotransmission, in contrast, is generally thought to be well preserved. Evidence from animal models and human postmortem tissue suggest GABAergic remodeling in the AD brain. Nevertheless, there is no information on changes, if any, in the electrophysiological properties of human native GABA receptors as a consequence of AD. To gain such information, we have microtransplanted cell membranes, isolated from temporal cortices of control and AD brains, into Xenopus oocytes, and recorded the electrophysiological activity of the transplanted GABA receptors. We found an age-dependent reduction of GABA currents in the AD brain. This reduction was larger when the AD membranes were obtained from younger subjects. We also found that GABA currents from AD brains have a faster rate of desensitization than those from non-AD brains. Furthermore, GABA receptors from AD brains were slightly, but significantly, less sensitive to GABA than receptors from non-AD brains. The reduction of GABA currents in AD was associated with reductions of mRNA and protein of the principal GABA receptor subunits normally present in the temporal cortex. Pairwise analysis of the transcripts within control and AD groups and analyses of the proportion of GABA receptor subunits revealed down-regulation of α1 and γ2 subunits in AD. In contrast, the proportions of α2, β1, and γ1 transcripts were up-regulated in the AD brains. Our data support a functional remodeling of GABAergic neurotransmission in the human AD brain. PMID:22691495

  4. Assessment of regional glucose metabolism in aging brain and dementia with positron-emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Ferris, S.; Christman, D.; Fowler, J.; MacGregor, R.; Farkas, T.; Greenberg, J.; Dann, R.; Wolf, A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the alterations in regional glucose metabolism that occur in elderly subjects and those with senile dementia compared to normal young volunteers. Results showed a tendency for the frontal regions to have a lower metabolic rate in patients with dementia although this did not reach the level of significance when compared to the elderly control subjects. The changes in glucose metabolism were symmetrical in both the left and right hemispheres. There was a lack of correlation between the mean cortical metabolic rates for glucose and the global mental function in the patients with senile dementia. This is at variance with most of the regional cerebral blood flow data that has been collected. This may be partly related to the use of substrates other than glucose by the brain in elderly and demented subjects. (PSB)

  5. Fluvoxamine alters the activity of energy metabolism enzymes in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela K. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies support the hypothesis that metabolism impairment is involved in the pathophysiology of depression and that some antidepressants act by modulating brain energy metabolism. Thus, we evaluated the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and creatine kinase in the brain of rats subjected to prolonged administration of fluvoxamine. Methods: Wistar rats received daily administration of fluvoxamine in saline (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 14 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, rats were killed by decapitation and the prefrontal cortex, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum were rapidly isolated. Results: The activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV were decreased after prolonged administration of fluvoxamine in rats. However, the activities of complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase were increased. Conclusions: Alterations in activity of energy metabolism enzymes were observed in most brain areas analyzed. Thus, we suggest that the decrease in citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and complexes I, II-III, and IV can be related to adverse effects of pharmacotherapy, but long-term molecular adaptations cannot be ruled out. In addition, we demonstrated that these changes varied according to brain structure or biochemical analysis and were not dose-dependent.

  6. Patterns of regional brain hypometabolism associated with knowledge of semantic features and categories in alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahn, R.; Garrard, P.; Talazko, J.

    2006-01-01

    The study of semantic memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) has raised important questions about the representation of conceptual knowledge in the human brain. It is still unknown whether semantic memory impairments are caused by localized damage to specialized regions or by diffuse...... properties of nonliving objects. Visual property verification of living objects was significantly correlated with left posterior fusiform gyrus metabolism (Brodmann's area [BA] 37/19). Effects of visual and functional property verification for nonliving objects largely overlapped in the left anterior...

  7. Insights into metabolic disease from studying genetics in isolated populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Gloyn, Anna L; Hansen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    for diabetes and metabolic disease, drawing on specific examples from populations in Greece and Greenland. This review summarises a presentation given at the 'Exciting news in genetics of diabetes' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD, with topics presented by Eleftheria Zeggini and Torben Hansen...... variation on disease risk. Current efforts are now focused on extending this to genetic variants in the rare and low-frequency spectrum by capitalising on next-generation sequencing technologies. This review discusses the important contributions that studies in isolated populations are making to this effort...

  8. The heart-liver metabolic axis: defective communication exacerbates disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, Kedryn K; Bookout, Angie L; Olson, Eric N

    2014-04-01

    The heart has been recognized as an endocrine organ for over 30 years (de Bold, 2011); however, little is known about how the heart communicates with other organs in the body, and even less is known about this process in the diseased heart. In this issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine, Magida and Leinwand (2014) introduce the concept that a primary genetic defect in the heart results in aberrant hepatic lipid metabolism, which consequently exacerbates hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This study provides evidence in support of the hypothesis that crosstalk occurs between the heart and liver, and that this becomes disrupted in the diseased state.

  9. Integrative neurobiology of metabolic diseases, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gertjan eVan Dijk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a complex, multifactorial disease with a number of leading mechanisms, including neuroinflammation, processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP to amyloid β peptide, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, relocalization and deposition. These mechanisms are propagated by obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type-2 diabetes mellitus. Stress, sedentariness, dietary overconsumption of saturated fat and refined sugars, and circadian derangements/disturbed sleep contribute to obesity and related metabolic diseases, but also accelerate age-related damage and senescence that all feed the risk of developing AD too. The complex and interacting mechanisms are not yet completely understood and will require further analysis. Instead of investigating AD as a mono- or oligocausal disease we should address the disease by understanding the multiple underlying mechanisms and how these interact. Future research therefore might concentrate on integrating these by systems biology approaches, but also to regard them from an evolutionary medicine point of view. The current review addresses several of these interacting mechanisms in animal models and compares them with clinical data giving an overview about our current knowledge and puts them into an integrated framework.

  10. Reflections on the application of 13C-MRS to research on brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Peter; Bachelard, Herman

    2003-01-01