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Sample records for brain cannabinoid type-1

  1. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile.

  2. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronfeld, Andrea; Müller-Forell, Wibke [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Maus, Stephan; Reuss, Stefan; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Miederer, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.miederer@unimedizin-mainz.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Lutz, Beat [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Duesbergweg 6, Mainz 55128 (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL

  3. Evaluation of MRI and cannabinoid type 1 receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL for spatial normalization of rat brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Image registration is one prerequisite for the analysis of brain regions in magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) or positron-emission-tomography (PET) studies. Diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated Lie algebra (DARTEL) is a nonlinear, diffeomorphic algorithm for image registration and construction of image templates. The goal of this small animal study was (1) the evaluation of a MRI and calculation of several cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor PET templates constructed using DARTEL and (2) the analysis of the image registration accuracy of MR and PET images to their DARTEL templates with reference to analytical and iterative PET reconstruction algorithms. Methods: Five male Sprague Dawley rats were investigated for template construction using MRI and [18F]MK-9470 PET for CB1 receptor representation. PET images were reconstructed using the algorithms filtered back-projection, ordered subset expectation maximization in 2D, and maximum a posteriori in 3D. Landmarks were defined on each MR image, and templates were constructed under different settings, i.e., based on different tissue class images [gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and GM + WM] and regularization forms (“linear elastic energy,” “membrane energy,” and “bending energy”). Registration accuracy for MRI and PET templates was evaluated by means of the distance between landmark coordinates. Results: The best MRI template was constructed based on gray and white matter images and the regularization form linear elastic energy. In this case, most distances between landmark coordinates were <1 mm. Accordingly, MRI-based spatial normalization was most accurate, but results of the PET-based spatial normalization were quite comparable. Conclusions: Image registration using DARTEL provides a standardized and automatic framework for small animal brain data analysis. The authors were able to show that this method works with high reliability and validity. Using DARTEL templates

  4. Cannabinoids on the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Irving

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has a long history of consumption both for recreational and medicinal uses. Recently there have been significant advances in our understanding of how cannabis and related compounds (cannabinoids affect the brain and this review addresses the current state of knowledge of these effects. Cannabinoids act primarily via two types of receptor, CB1 and CB2, with CB1 receptors mediating most of the central actions of cannabinoids. The presence of a new type of brain cannabinoid receptor is also indicated. Important advances have been made in our understanding of cannabinoid receptor signaling pathways, their modulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity, the cellular targets of cannabinoids in different central nervous system (CNS regions and, in particular, the role of the endogenous brain cannabinoid (endocannabinoid system. Cannabinoids have widespread actions in the brain: in the hippocampus they influence learning and memory; in the basal ganglia they modulate locomotor activity and reward pathways; in the hypothalamus they have a role in the control of appetite. Cannabinoids may also be protective against neurodegeneration and brain damage and exhibit anticonvulsant activity. Some of the analgesic effects of cannabinoids also appear to involve sites within the brain. These advances in our understanding of the actions of cannabinoids and the brain endocannabinoid system have led to important new insights into neuronal function which are likely to result in the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of key CNS disorders.

  5. Preclinical evaluation and quantification of [18F]MK-9470 as a radioligand for PET imaging of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [18F]MK-9470 is an inverse agonist for the type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor allowing its use in PET imaging. We characterized the kinetics of [18F]MK-9470 and evaluated its ability to quantify CB1 receptor availability in the rat brain. Dynamic small-animal PET scans with [18F]MK-9470 were performed in Wistar rats on a FOCUS-220 system for up to 10 h. Both plasma and perfused brain homogenates were analysed using HPLC to quantify radiometabolites. Displacement and blocking experiments were done using cold MK-9470 and another inverse agonist, SR141716A. The distribution volume (VT) of [18F]MK-9470 was used as a quantitative measure and compared to the use of brain uptake, expressed as SUV, a simplified method of quantification. The percentage of intact [18F]MK-9470 in arterial plasma samples was 80 ± 23 % at 10 min, 38 ± 30 % at 40 min and 13 ± 14 % at 210 min. A polar radiometabolite fraction was detected in plasma and brain tissue. The brain radiometabolite concentration was uniform across the whole brain. Displacement and pretreatment studies showed that 56 % of the tracer binding was specific and reversible. VT values obtained with a one-tissue compartment model plus constrained radiometabolite input had good identifiability (≤10 %). Ignoring the radiometabolite contribution using a one-tissue compartment model alone, i.e. without constrained radiometabolite input, overestimated the [18F]MK-9470 VT, but was correlated. A correlation between [18F]MK-9470 VT and SUV in the brain was also found (R 2 = 0.26-0.33; p ≤ 0.03). While the presence of a brain-penetrating radiometabolite fraction complicates the quantification of [18F]MK-9470 in the rat brain, its tracer kinetics can be modelled using a one-tissue compartment model with and without constrained radiometabolite input. (orig.)

  6. The effect of anaesthesia on [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 binding to the type 1 cannabinoid receptor in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteels, Cindy; Van Laere, Koen [KU Leuven and University Hospital Gasthuisberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, MoSAIC, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, MoSAIC, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Small animal PET can be applied to study molecular processes in animal models of a variety of human diseases. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during imaging, anaesthesia is in many instances inevitable. Using small animal PET and ex vivo autoradiography, we examined the influence of pentobarbital and isoflurane anaesthesia on the rat brain uptake of [{sup 18}F]MK-9470, a radioligand for the type 1 cannabinoid receptor. PET imaging was performed on adult Wistar rats under pentobarbital (n=6) and isoflurane anaesthesia (n=7), and under control conditions (free moving during tracer uptake, n=8). Parametric PET images were generated, anatomically standardized and analysed by voxel-based Statistical Parametric Mapping and a predefined volume of interest approach. Immediately after in vivo PET, brains were processed for ex vivo autoradiography using manually placed regions of interest. An extra group (n=6) was included ex vivo, in which animals were intravenously injected without the use of anaesthetics. Using in vivo and ex vivo molecular imaging techniques, no significant changes in absolute [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 uptake were present in the brain of pentobarbital and isoflurane rats as compared to control conditions. Relative [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 uptake PET values obtained applying global scaling were, however, decreased in the cortex under both anaesthetics (pentobarbital: -13.3{+-}1.4%; isoflurane -8.7 {+-} 3.1%), while an increase was seen in the cerebellum by 13.5 {+-} 4.0% and 13.9 {+-} 4.1% under pentobarbital and isoflurane, respectively. Ex vivo results were in agreement with in vivo findings. These findings suggest a similar, regionally specific interference of pentobarbital and isoflurane anaesthesia with in vivo CB1 receptor imaging using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470. (orig.)

  7. The effect of anaesthesia on [18F]MK-9470 binding to the type 1 cannabinoid receptor in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small animal PET can be applied to study molecular processes in animal models of a variety of human diseases. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during imaging, anaesthesia is in many instances inevitable. Using small animal PET and ex vivo autoradiography, we examined the influence of pentobarbital and isoflurane anaesthesia on the rat brain uptake of [18F]MK-9470, a radioligand for the type 1 cannabinoid receptor. PET imaging was performed on adult Wistar rats under pentobarbital (n=6) and isoflurane anaesthesia (n=7), and under control conditions (free moving during tracer uptake, n=8). Parametric PET images were generated, anatomically standardized and analysed by voxel-based Statistical Parametric Mapping and a predefined volume of interest approach. Immediately after in vivo PET, brains were processed for ex vivo autoradiography using manually placed regions of interest. An extra group (n=6) was included ex vivo, in which animals were intravenously injected without the use of anaesthetics. Using in vivo and ex vivo molecular imaging techniques, no significant changes in absolute [18F]MK-9470 uptake were present in the brain of pentobarbital and isoflurane rats as compared to control conditions. Relative [18F]MK-9470 uptake PET values obtained applying global scaling were, however, decreased in the cortex under both anaesthetics (pentobarbital: -13.3±1.4%; isoflurane -8.7 ± 3.1%), while an increase was seen in the cerebellum by 13.5 ± 4.0% and 13.9 ± 4.1% under pentobarbital and isoflurane, respectively. Ex vivo results were in agreement with in vivo findings. These findings suggest a similar, regionally specific interference of pentobarbital and isoflurane anaesthesia with in vivo CB1 receptor imaging using [18F]MK-9470. (orig.)

  8. Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors Transiently Silence Glutamatergic Nerve Terminals of Cultured Cerebellar Granule Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Franco, Jorge; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Alonso, Beatris; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors are the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors in the brain and they mediate retrograde short-term inhibition of neurotransmitter release, as well as long-term depression of synaptic transmission at many excitatory synapses. The induction of presynaptically silent synapses is a means of modulating synaptic strength, which is important for synaptic plasticity. Persistent activation of cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) mutes GABAergic terminals, although it is unclea...

  9. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  10. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor mapping with [18F]MK-9470 PET in the rat brain after quinolinic acid lesion: a comparison to dopamine receptors and glucose metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several lines of evidence imply early alterations in metabolic, dopaminergic and endocannabinoid neurotransmission in Huntington's disease (HD). Using [18F]MK-9470 and small animal PET, we investigated cerebral changes in type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor binding in the quinolinic acid (QA) rat model of HD in relation to glucose metabolism, dopamine D2 receptor availability and amphetamine-induced turning behaviour. Twenty-one Wistar rats (11 QA and 10 shams) were investigated. Small animal PET acquisitions were conducted on a Focus 220 with approximately 18 MBq of [18F]MK-9470, [18F]FDG and [11C]raclopride. Relative glucose metabolism and parametric CB1 receptor and D2 binding images were anatomically standardized to Paxinos space and analysed voxel-wise using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM2). In the QA model, [18F]MK-9470 uptake, glucose metabolism and D2 receptor binding were reduced in the ipsilateral caudate-putamen by 7, 35 and 77%, respectively (all p -5), while an increase for these markers was observed on the contralateral side (>5%, all p -4). [18F]MK-9470 binding was also increased in the cerebellum (p = 2.10-5), where it was inversely correlated to the number of ipsiversive turnings (p = 7.10-6), suggesting that CB1 receptor upregulation in the cerebellum is related to a better functional outcome. Additionally, glucose metabolism was relatively increased in the contralateral hippocampus, thalamus and sensorimotor cortex (p = 1.10-6). These data point to in vivo changes in endocannabinoid transmission, specifically for CB1 receptors in the QA model, with involvement of the caudate-putamen, but also distant regions of the motor circuitry, including the cerebellum. These data also indicate the occurrence of functional plasticity on metabolism, D2 and CB1 neurotransmission in the contralateral hemisphere. (orig.)

  11. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons against MPTP neurotoxicity by inhibiting microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Young C; Bok, Eugene; Huh, Sue H; Park, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Kim, Sang R; Kim, Yoon-Seong; Maeng, Sungho; Park, Sung Hyun; Jin, Byung K

    2011-12-15

    This study examined whether the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1)) receptor contributes to the survival of nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease. MPTP induced significant loss of nigrostriatal DA neurons and microglial activation in the substantia nigra (SN), visualized with tyrosine hydroxylase or macrophage Ag complex-1 immunohistochemistry. Real-time PCR, ELISA, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry disclosed upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, activation of microglial NADPH oxidase, and subsequent reactive oxygen species production and oxidative damage of DNA and proteins in MPTP-treated SN, resulting in degeneration of DA neurons. Conversely, treatment with nonselective cannabinoid receptor agonists (WIN55,212-2 and HU210) led to increased survival of DA neurons in the SN, their fibers and dopamine levels in the striatum, and improved motor function. This neuroprotection by cannabinoids was accompanied by suppression of NADPH oxidase reactive oxygen species production and reduced expression of proinflammatory cytokines from activated microglia. Interestingly, cannabinoids protected DA neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium neurotoxicity in cocultures of mesencephalic neurons and microglia, but not in neuron-enriched mesencephalic cultures devoid of microglia. The observed neuroprotection and inhibition of microglial activation were reversed upon treatment with CB(1) receptor selective antagonists AM251 and/or SR14,716A, confirming the involvement of the CB(1) receptor. The present in vivo and in vitro findings clearly indicate that the CB(1) receptor possesses anti-inflammatory properties and inhibits microglia-mediated oxidative stress. Our results collectively suggest that the cannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other disorders associated with neuroinflammation and microglia-derived oxidative damage

  12. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

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    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  13. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available

  14. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  15. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li;

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow...... or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p...

  16. Type 1 cannabinoid receptor modulates water deprivation-induced homeostatic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruginsk, Silvia G; Vechiato, Fernanda M V; Uchoa, Ernane T; Elias, Lucila L K; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) as a potential candidate to mediate the homeostatic responses triggered by 24 h of water deprivation, which constitutes primarily a hydroelectrolytic challenge and also significantly impacts energy homeostasis. The present results demonstrated for the first time that CB1R mRNA expression is increased in the hypothalamus of water-deprived (WD) rats. Furthermore, the administration of ACEA, a CB1R selective agonist, potentiated WD-induced dipsogenic effect, whereas AM251, a CB1R antagonist, attenuated not only water but also salt intake in response to WD. In parallel with the modulation of thirst and salt appetite, we confirmed that CB1Rs are essential for the development of appropriated neuroendocrine responses. Although the administration of ACEA or AM251 did not produce any effects on WD-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion, oxytocin (OXT) plasma concentrations were significantly decreased in WD rats treated with ACEA. At the genomic level, ACEA significantly decreased AVP and OXT mRNA expression in the hypothalamus of WD rats, whereas AM251 potentiated both basal and WD-induced stimulatory effects on the transcription of AVP and OXT genes. In addition, we showed that water deprivation alone upregulated proopiomelanocortin, Agouti-related peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone, and orexin A mRNA levels in the hypothalamus, and that CB1Rs regulate main central peptidergic pathways controlling food intake, being that most of these effects were also significantly influenced by the hydration status. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that CB1Rs participate in the homeostatic responses regulating fluid balance and energy homeostasis during water deprivation. PMID:26468265

  17. Cannabinoids in Neurodegenerative Disorders and Stroke/Brain Trauma: From Preclinical Models to Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Moro, María A; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2015-10-01

    Cannabinoids form a singular family of plant-derived compounds (phytocannabinoids), endogenous signaling lipids (endocannabinoids), and synthetic derivatives with multiple biological effects and therapeutic applications in the central and peripheral nervous systems. One of these properties is the regulation of neuronal homeostasis and survival, which is the result of the combination of a myriad of effects addressed to preserve, rescue, repair, and/or replace neurons, and also glial cells against multiple insults that may potentially damage these cells. These effects are facilitated by the location of specific targets for the action of these compounds (e.g., cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptors, endocannabinoid inactivating enzymes, and nonendocannabinoid targets) in key cellular substrates (e.g., neurons, glial cells, and neural progenitor cells). This potential is promising for acute and chronic neurodegenerative pathological conditions. In this review, we will collect all experimental evidence, mainly obtained at the preclinical level, supporting that different cannabinoid compounds may be neuroprotective in adult and neonatal ischemia, brain trauma, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This increasing experimental evidence demands a prompt clinical validation of cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of all these disorders, which, at present, lack efficacious treatments for delaying/arresting disease progression, despite the fact that the few clinical trials conducted so far with these medicines have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects. PMID:26260390

  18. A study of functional selectivity at the cannabinoid type 1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Priestley, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) which is important in the regulation of neuronal function, predominately via coupling to heterotrimeric Gi/o proteins. The receptor has also been shown to interact with a variety of other intracellular signalling mediators, including other G proteins, several members of the mitogen activated kinase (MAP) superfamily and β-arrestins. The CB1 receptor is recognised by an array of structurally distinct endogenous and exogenous l...

  19. Opposite control of frontocortical 2-arachidonoylglycerol turnover rate by cannabinoid type-1 receptors located on glutamatergic neurons and on astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belluomo, Ilaria; Matias, Isabelle; Pernègre, Camille; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the respective influences of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors expressed either in forebrain GABAergic neurons, in cortical glutamatergic neurons, or in astrocytes on the turnover rates of the endocannabinoids N-arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the non-cannabinoid N-acylethanolamides, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), in mouse forebrain regions. To this end, conditional mutant mice lacking CB1 receptors from either of these cell types were pre-treated systemically with JZL195, a dual inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase, the enzyme degrading AEA, PEA, and OEA, and of monoacylglycerol lipase, the main 2-AG-degrading enzyme. The analyses of frontocortical, hippocampal, and striatal AEA, 2-AG, PEA, and OEA concentrations revealed that their respective baseline concentrations were not influenced by the mouse genotype. On the other hand, the accumulation of frontocortical and/or hippocampal 2-AG levels in JZL195-pre-treated mice was dependent on the mouse genotype. Thus, JZL195-induced 2-AG accumulation rates were diminished in the frontal cortex of mice lacking CB1 receptors in glutamatergic neurons while their respective values were increased in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of mice lacking these receptors in astrocytes. These genotypic differences occurred with parallel and proportionate changes in the fractional rate constants for degradation of 2-AG, thus providing a mechanism whereby the baseline levels of 2-AG remained constant between genotypes. Besides suggesting a cell-type-specific control of frontocortical and/or hippocampal 2-AG synthesis and degradation rates by CB1 receptors, this study highlights the interest of assessing endocannabinoid turnover rates when questioning the status of the endocannabinoid system. PMID:25626460

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Of the Brain in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Shimony, Joshua S.; Tamara Hershey

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are required to carefully manage their insulin dosing, dietary intake, and activity levels in order to maintain optimal blood sugar levels. Over time, exposure to hyperglycaemia is known to cause significant damage to the peripheral nervous system, but its impact on the central nervous system has been less well studied. Researchers have begun to explore the cumulative impact of commonly experienced blood glucose fluctuations on brain structure ...

  1. Cannabinoid effects on CB1 receptor density in the adolescent brain: an autoradiographic study using the synthetic cannabinoid HU210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2010-11-01

    The short- and long-term behavioral effects of cannabinoids differ in adolescent and adult rodents. Few studies though have examined the underlying neurochemical changes that occur in the brain following adolescent cannabinoid exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210, on CB1 receptor density in the brain and on body weight in adolescent male rats. Rats were treated daily with 25, 50, or 100 μg/kg HU210 for 4 or 14 days, or received a single dose of 100 μg/kg HU210 and sacrificed 24 h later. Receptor density was investigated using in vitro autoradiography with the CB1 receptor ligand [(3)H] CP55,940. In contrast to adult animals treated under the same paradigm in a previous study, adolescents continued on average, to gain weight over the course of the study. Weight gain was slowest in the 100 μg/kg group and improved dose dependently with controls gaining the most weight. Following the acute dose of HU210, a trend for a reduction in [(3)H] CP55,940 binding and a significant effect of treatment was observed. Statistically significant, dose-dependent, region-specific decreases in binding were observed in all brain regions examined following 4 and 14 days treatment. The pattern of CB1 receptor downregulation was similar to that observed in adults treated with cannabinoids in previous studies; however, its magnitude was smaller in adolescents. This reduced compensatory response may contribute to some acute behavioral effects, the pharmacological cross-tolerance and the long-lasting, adverse psychological consequences of cannabinoid exposure during adolescence. PMID:20842718

  2. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-González, Maria; Matute, Carlos; Maldonado, Rafael; Mato, Susana; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1) knockout (KO) mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg) manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD). In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg) equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS. PMID:27589806

  3. Cannabinoids promote oligodendrocyte progenitor survival: Involvement of cannabinoid receptors and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Molina-Holgado, E; Vela, J.M. (José Miguel); Arévalo, Maria Ángeles; Almazán, G.; Molina-Holgado, F.; Borrell, Jose; Guaza, Carmen

    2002-01-01

    Cannabinoids exert pleiotropic actions in the CNS, including the inhibition of inflammatory responses and the enhancement of neuronal survival after injury. Although cannabinoid receptors are distributed widely in brain, their presence has not been investigated previously in oligodendrocytes. This study examined the expression of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors in rat oligodendrocytes in vivo and in culture and explored their biological function. Expression of CB1 receptors by oligodendroc...

  4. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ (PPAR-δ)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p < 0.05). Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each p < 0.05). CB1 receptor expression and adipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-δ. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-δ. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-δ by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00 ± 0.06 (n = 3) to 1.91 ± 0.06 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and increased adipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-δ significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39 ± 0.03 (n = 3; p < 0.01) and reduced adipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-δ. Both CB1 and PPAR-δ are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor

  5. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeputte, Caroline; Casteels, Cindy; Koole, Michel; Gerits, Anneleen [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); Struys, Tom [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Veghel, Daisy van; Evens, Nele; Bormans, Guy [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Laboratory of Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Dresselaers, Tom; Himmelreich, Uwe [KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Biomedical NMR Unit, Leuven (Belgium); Lambrichts, Ivo [Hasselt University, Laboratory of Histology, Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Molecular Small Animal Imaging Center, MoSAIC, Leuven (Belgium); UZ Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-11-15

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2} microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 and [{sup 11}C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [{sup 18}F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB{sub 1} binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB{sub 1} immunohistochemical staining. [{sup 11}C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB{sub 2} revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB{sub 1} {sup +} and CB{sub 2} {sup +} cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB{sub 1}, but not CB{sub 2}, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB{sub 1} signalling as the role of CB{sub 2} seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  6. Activation of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R promotes neurogenesis in murine subventricular zone cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Xapelli

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the modulation of adult neurogenesis. Here, we describe the effect of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R activation on self-renewal, proliferation and neuronal differentiation in mouse neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ stem/progenitor cell cultures. Expression of CB1R was detected in SVZ-derived immature cells (Nestin-positive, neurons and astrocytes. Stimulation of the CB1R by (R-(+-Methanandamide (R-m-AEA increased self-renewal of SVZ cells, as assessed by counting the number of secondary neurospheres and the number of Sox2+/+ cell pairs, an effect blocked by Notch pathway inhibition. Moreover, R-m-AEA treatment for 48 h, increased proliferation as assessed by BrdU incorporation assay, an effect mediated by activation of MAPK-ERK and AKT pathways. Surprisingly, stimulation of CB1R by R-m-AEA also promoted neuronal differentiation (without affecting glial differentiation, at 7 days, as shown by counting the number of NeuN-positive neurons in the cultures. Moreover, by monitoring intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+]i in single cells following KCl and histamine stimuli, a method that allows the functional evaluation of neuronal differentiation, we observed an increase in neuronal-like cells. This proneurogenic effect was blocked when SVZ cells were co-incubated with R-m-AEA and the CB1R antagonist AM 251, for 7 days, thus indicating that this effect involves CB1R activation. In accordance with an effect on neuronal differentiation and maturation, R-m-AEA also increased neurite growth, as evaluated by quantifying and measuring the number of MAP2-positive processes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that CB1R activation induces proliferation, self-renewal and neuronal differentiation from mouse neonatal SVZ cell cultures.

  7. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li; Shen, Chen Yi; Ma, Qun Li; Cao, Ting Bing; Wang, Li Juan; Nie, Hai; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin; Zhu, Zhi Ming

    2007-03-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each pAdipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by increased CB1 expression in adipose tissue, whereas exercise significantly reduced CB1 expression (each padipocyte differentiation were directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Adipocyte hypertrophy induced by high-fat diet was accompanied by reduced PPAR-delta. Furthermore, selective silencing of PPAR-delta by RNA interference in 3T3-L1-preadipocyte cells significantly increased CB1 expression from 1.00+/-0.06 (n=3) to 1.91+/-0.06 (n=3; padipocyte differentiation, whereas adenovirus-mediated overexpression of PPAR-delta significantly reduced CB1 expression to 0.39+/-0.03 (n=3; padipocyte differentiation. In the presence of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant adipocyte differentiation in stimulated 3T3 L1 preadipocyte cells was significantly reduced. The study indicates that high-fat diet-induced hypertrophy of adipocytes is associated with increased CB1 receptor expression which is directly regulated by PPAR-delta. Both CB1 and PPAR-delta are intimately involved in therapeutic interventions against a most important cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:17223076

  8. Small-animal PET imaging of the type 1 and type 2 cannabinoid receptors in a photothrombotic stroke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent ex vivo and pharmacological evidence suggests involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of stroke, but conflicting roles for type 1 and 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) have been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate CB1 and CB2 receptor binding over time in vivo in a rat photothrombotic stroke model using PET. CB1 and CB2 microPET imaging was performed at regular time-points up to 2 weeks after stroke using [18F]MK-9470 and [11C]NE40. Stroke size was measured using MRI at 9.4 T. Ex vivo validation was performed via immunostaining for CB1 and CB2. Immunofluorescent double stainings were also performed with markers for astrocytes (GFAP) and macrophages/microglia (CD68). [18F]MK-9470 PET showed a strong increase in CB1 binding 24 h and 72 h after stroke in the cortex surrounding the lesion, extending to the insular cortex 24 h after surgery. These alterations were consistently confirmed by CB1 immunohistochemical staining. [11C]NE40 did not show any significant differences between stroke and sham-operated animals, although staining for CB2 revealed minor immunoreactivity at 1 and 2 weeks after stroke in this model. Both CB1+ and CB2+ cells showed minor immunoreactivity for CD68. Time-dependent and regionally strongly increased CB1, but not CB2, binding are early consequences of photothrombotic stroke. Pharmacological interventions should primarily aim at CB1 signalling as the role of CB2 seems minor in the acute and subacute phases of stroke. (orig.)

  9. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Of the Brain in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Ann V. Antenor-Dorsey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM are required to carefully manage their insulin dosing, dietary intake, and activity levels in order to maintain optimal blood sugar levels. Over time, exposure to hyperglycaemia is known to cause significant damage to the peripheral nervous system, but its impact on the central nervous system has been less well studied. Researchers have begun to explore the cumulative impact of commonly experienced blood glucose fluctuations on brain structure and function in patient populations. To date, these studies have typically used magnetic resonance imaging to measure regional grey and white matter volumes across the brain. However, newer methods, such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can measure the microstructural properties of white matter, which can be more sensitive to neurological effects than standard volumetric measures. Studies are beginning to use DTI to understand the impact of T1DM on white matter structure in the human brain. This work, its implications, future directions, and important caveats, are the focus of this review.

  10. Neurofibromatosis type 1: Diffusion weighted imaging findings of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to evaluate the differences in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values between infra and supratentorial unidentified bright objects (UBOs), between UBOs and normal appearing side (NAS, contralateral regions of the UBOs and/or normal appearing region without UBOs) in the neurofibromatosis type 1 patients (NF1) and control group and also to investigate correlation between age and ADC values. Methods: A total of 30 patients and 26 healthy controls were included. The MRI examination consisted of routine imaging and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Seven distinct locations (frontal, parieto-occipital and cerebellar white matter, globus pallidum, thalamus, hippocampus, and midbrain) were selected for the analysis. The ADC values were calculated directly from these automatically generated ADC maps with ROI. Results: The ADC values of UBOs were significantly increased in cerebellar white matter, hippocampus, globus pallidum, midbrain, and thalamus when compared with NAS and control group. There were statistically significant differences between NAS and control group in the ADC values obtained from hippocampus and thalamus. There were statistically significant differences between supra and infratentorial UBOs in ADC values. There was a negative correlation between age and the ADC values obtained from normal appearing midbrain, hippocampus, thalamus, and globus pallidum. Conclusion: ADC values both in UBOs and in the normal appearing locations as hippocampus and thalamus were detected to be higher in the patients with NF1. The detection of lesions might be independent of MRI appearance in NF1, i.e. although the brain is affected, MRI appearance may be normal. Therefore, DWI and ADC values should also be utilized in the delineation of brain involvement of NF1 patients

  11. Cannabinoid Signaling and Neuroinflammatory Diseases: A Melting pot for the Regulation of Brain Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurchiù, Valerio; Leuti, Alessandro; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2015-06-01

    The concept of the central nervous system (CNS) as an immune-privileged site, essentially due to the presence of the blood brain barrier, appears to be overly simplistic. Indeed, within healthy CNS immune activities are permitted and are required for neuronal function and host defense, not only due to the presence of the resident innate immune cells of the brain, but also by virtue of a complex cross-talk of the CNS with peripheral immune cells. Nonetheless, long-standing and persisting neuroinflammatory responses are most often detrimental and characterize several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A growing body of evidence suggests that Cannabis sativa-derived phytocannabinoids, as well as synthetic cannabinoids, are endowed with significant immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, both in peripheral tissues and in the CNS, through the activation of cannabinoid receptors. In this review, the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoid signaling on the most relevant brain immune cells will be discussed. In addition, the impact of cannabinoid regulation on the overall integration of the manifold brain immune responses will also be highlighted, along with the implication of these compounds as potential agents for the management of neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:25601726

  12. Reducing cannabinoid abuse and preventing relapse by enhancing endogenous brain levels of kynurenic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justinova, Zuzana; Mascia, Paola; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Secci, Maria E; Redhi, Godfrey H; Panlilio, Leigh V; Scherma, Maria; Barnes, Chanel; Parashos, Alexandra; Zara, Tamara; Fratta, Walter; Solinas, Marcello; Pistis, Marco; Bergman, Jack; Kangas, Brian D; Ferré, Sergi; Tanda, Gianluigi; Schwarcz, Robert; Goldberg, Steven R

    2013-11-01

    In the reward circuitry of the brain, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7nAChRs) modulate effects of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), marijuana's main psychoactive ingredient. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous negative allosteric modulator of α7nAChRs. Here we report that the kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) inhibitor Ro 61-8048 increases brain KYNA levels and attenuates cannabinoid-induced increases in extracellular dopamine in reward-related brain areas. In the self-administration model of drug abuse, Ro 61-8048 reduced the rewarding effects of THC and the synthetic cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in squirrel monkeys and rats, respectively, and it also prevented relapse to drug-seeking induced by reexposure to cannabinoids or cannabinoid-associated cues. The effects of enhancing endogenous KYNA levels with Ro 61-8048 were prevented by positive allosteric modulators of α7nAChRs. Despite a clear need, there are no medications approved for treatment of marijuana dependence. Modulation of KYNA offers a pharmacological strategy for achieving abstinence from marijuana and preventing relapse. PMID:24121737

  13. Elevated Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Availability in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    OpenAIRE

    Neumeister, Alexander; Normandin, Marc D.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Piomelli, Daniele; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Gujarro-Anton, Ana; Potenza, Marc N.; Bailey, Christopher R.; Lin, Shu-fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Henry, Shannan; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Carson, Richard E; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and their attending cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) have been implicated in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, their specific role has not been studied in people with PTSD. Herein, we present an in vivo imaging study using positron emission tomography (PET) and the CB1-selective radioligand [11C]OMAR in individuals with PTSD, and healthy controls with lifetime histories of trauma (trauma controls [TC]) and those without such histories (healthy c...

  14. Augmented inhibition from cannabinoid sensitive interneurons diminishes CA1 output after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Neal Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage sensitive dye, field potential and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum was stimulated in slices from injured mice we found decreased depolarization in stratum radiatum and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens, together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in stratum oriens responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate stratum oriens. These results suggest that the increased stratum oriens hyperpolarization evoked by stratum radiatum stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in stratum radiatum, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens. A low concentration (100 nM of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2,restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury.

  15. Brain neuronal CB2 cannabinoid receptors in drug abuse and depression: from mice to human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Onaivi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addiction and major depression are mental health problems associated with stressful events in life with high relapse and reoccurrence even after treatment. Many laboratories were not able to detect the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2-Rs in healthy brains, but there has been demonstration of CB2-R expression in rat microglial cells and other brain associated cells during inflammation. Therefore, neuronal expression of CB2-Rs had been ambiguous and controversial and its role in depression and substance abuse is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of CB2 gene might be associated with depression in a human population and that alteration in CB2 gene expression may be involved in the effects of abused substances including opiates, cocaine and ethanol in rodents. Here we demonstrate that a high incidence of (Q63R but not (H316Y polymorphism in the CB2 gene was found in Japanese depressed subjects. CB2-Rs and their gene transcripts are expressed in the brains of naïve mice and are modulated following exposure to stressors and administration of abused drugs. Mice that developed alcohol preference had reduced CB2 gene expression and chronic treatment with JWH015 a putative CB2-R agonist, enhanced alcohol consumption in stressed but not in control mice. The direct intracerebroventricular microinjection of CB2 anti-sense oligonucleotide into the mouse brain reduced mouse aversions in the plus-maze test, indicating the functional presence of CB2-Rs in the brain that modifies behavior. We report for the using electron microscopy the sub cellular localization of CB2-Rs that are mainly on post-synaptic elements in rodent brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the functional expression of CB2-Rs in brain that may provide novel targets for the effects of cannabinoids in depression and substance abuse disorders beyond neuro-immunocannabinoid activity.

  16. Brain Activation During Working Memory Is Altered in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes During Hypoglycemia

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, Richard L.; Flores, Veronica; Bolo, Nicolas R.; Musen, Gail; Jacobson, Alan Marc; Weinger, Katie; Renshaw, Perry Franklin; Simonson, Donald Craig

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of acute hypoglycemia on working memory and brain function in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging during euglycemic (5.0 mmol/L) and hypoglycemic (2.8 mmol/L) hyperinsulinemic clamps, we compared brain activation response to a working-memory task (WMT) in type 1 diabetic subjects (n = 16) with that in age-matched nondiabetic control subjects (n = 16). Beh...

  17. Brain glycogen content and metabolism in subjects with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; Tesfaye, Nolawit; Kumar, Anjali; Deelchand, Dinesh K; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2012-02-01

    Supercompensated brain glycogen may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in patients with type 1 diabetes by providing energy for the brain during periods of hypoglycemia. Our goal was to determine if brain glycogen content is elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness. We used in vivo (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in five patients with type 1 diabetes and hypoglycemia unawareness and five age-, gender-, and body mass index-matched healthy volunteers to measure brain glycogen content and metabolism. Glucose and insulin were administered intravenously over ∼51 hours at a rate titrated to maintain a blood glucose concentration of 7 mmol/L. (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured at ∼5, 8, 13, 23, 32, 37, and 50 hours, during label wash-in and wash-out. Newly synthesized glycogen levels were higher in controls than in patients (Psupercompensation does not contribute to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness in humans with type 1 diabetes. PMID:21971353

  18. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and espe

  19. Influence of exercise training on ischemic brain injury in type 1 diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Arrick, Denise M.; Sun, Hong; Mayhan, William G.

    2012-01-01

    While exercise training (ExT) appears to influence cerebrovascular function during type 1 diabetes (T1D), it is not clear whether this beneficial effect extends to protecting the brain from ischemia-induced brain injury. Thus our goal was to examine whether modest ExT could influence transient focal ischemia-induced brain injury along with nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent dilation of cerebral (pial) arterioles during T1D. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: nondiabetic sed...

  20. Test–retest reproducibility of cannabinoid-receptor type 1 availability quantified with the PET ligand [11C]MePPEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaño Barros, Daniela A.; McGinnity, Colm J.; Rosso, Lula; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Howes, Oliver D.; Brooks, David J.; Duncan, John S.; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Hammers, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Background Endocannabinoids are involved in normal cognition, and dysfunction in cannabinoid-receptor-mediated neurotransmission has been suggested in a variety of neurological and psychiatric pathologies. The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is widely expressed in the human central nervous system. The objective of this study was to quantify the test–retest reproducibility of measures of the PET ligand [11C]MePPEP in order to assess the stability of CB1-receptor quantification in humans in vivo. Methods Fifteen healthy subjects (eight females; median age 32 years, range 25 to 65 years) had a 90-minute PET scan on two occasions after injection of a median dose of [11C]MePPEP of 364 MBq. Metabolite-corrected arterial plasma input functions were obtained for all scans. Eight ROIs, reflecting different levels of receptor densities/concentrations, were defined automatically: hippocampus, anterior cingulate gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, nucleus accumbens, thalamus, and pons. We used seven quantification methods: reversible compartmental models with one and two tissue classes, two and four rate constants, and a variable blood volume term (2kbv; 4kbv); model-free (spectral) analyses with and without regularisation, including one with voxel-wise quantification; the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) with pons as a pseudo-reference region; and modified standard uptake values (mSUVs) calculated for the period of ~ 30–60 min after injection. Percentage test–retest change and between-subject variability were both assessed, and test–retest reliability was quantified by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The ratio of binding estimates pallidum:pons served as an indicator of a method's ability to reflect binding heterogeneity. Results Neither the SRTM nor the 4kbv model produced reliable measures, with ICCs around zero. Very good (> 0.75) or excellent (> 0.80) ICCs were obtained with the other methods. The most

  1. Macrostructural brain changes in patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes mellitus - a cortical thickness analysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjær, J B; Brock, C; Søfteland, E; Dimcevski, G; Gregersen, H; Simrén, M; M Drewes, A

    2013-01-01

    longstanding (average 24.6 years) type 1 DM and 20 healthy controls were studied in a 3T magnetic resonance scanner. Using an automated surface based cortical segmentation method, cortical thickness was assessed in anatomical regions including total and lobe-wise grey and white matter volumes. Also...... without peripheral neuropathy (P=0.02).Patients with longstanding type 1 diabetes showed cortical thinning involving sensory related areas, even though no overall macrostructural brain alterations were detected. This could possibly have underlying functional significance since cortical thinning was...... associated to presence of peripheral neuropathy. The absence of universal macrostructural changes might illustrate that more pronounced brain pathology is likely to be preceded by more subtle microstructural changes as reported in other studies...

  2. Diabetes and the brain: Cognitive performance in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Brands, A.M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with altered brain function, a complication referred to as diabetic encephalopathy. The issues surrounding the cognitive and emotional status in chronic, older diabetic patients remain complex. The literature shows contrasting findings and especially the role of recurrent hypoglycemic episodes remains controversial. The research of this thesis was designed to further unravel the clinical and cognitive characteristics of altered central n...

  3. Cannabinoid regulation of brain reward processing with an emphasis on the role of CB1 receptors: a step back into the future

    OpenAIRE

    George ePanagis; Brian eMackey; Styliani eVlachou

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the endocannabinoid system has been implicated in a large variety of functions, including a crucial modulation of brain reward circuits and the regulation of motivational processes. Importantly, behavioural studies have shown that cannabinoid compounds activate brain reward mechanisms and circuits in a similar manner to other drugs of abuse, such as nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and heroin, although the conditions under which cannabinoids exert their rewarding effects may b...

  4. Lovastatin regulates brain spontaneous low-frequency brain activity in Neurofibromatosis type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabernaud, C.; Mennes, M.J.J.; Kardel, P.G.; Gaillard, W.D.; Kalbfleisch, M.L.; Vanmeter, J.W.; Packer, R.J.; Milham, M.P.; Castellanos, F.X.; Acosta, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    In the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mouse model, lovastatin, used clinically for hypercholesterolemia, improves cognitive dysfunction. While such impairment has been studied in NF1, the neural substrates remain unclear. The aim of this imaging add-on to a Phase 1 open-label trial was to examine th

  5. Region-specific astrogliosis in brains of mice heterozygous for mutations in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1) tumor suppressor

    OpenAIRE

    Rizvi, Tilat A.; Akunuru, Shailaja; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle; Switzer, Robert C.; Nordlund, Michael L.; Ratner, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Brains from human neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) patients show increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), consistent with activation of astrocytes (M.L. Nordlund, T.A. Rizvi, C.I. Brannan, N. Ratner, Neurofibromin expression and astrogliosis in neurofibromatosis (type 1) brains, J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurology 54 (1995) 588–600). We analyzed brains from transgenic mice in which the Nf1 gene was targeted by homologous recombination. We show here that, in all heterozygous mi...

  6. Regulation of MAP Kinase–Directed Mitogenic and Protein Kinase B–Mediated Signaling by Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lipina, Christopher; Stretton, Clare; Hastings, Simon; Hundal, Jonathan S.; Mackie, Ken; Irving, Andrew J.; Harinder S Hundal

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The endogenous cannabinoid (or endocannabinoid) system (ECS) is part of a central neuromodulatory system thought to play a key role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy balance. However, increasing evidence suggests that modulation of the ECS may also act to regulate peripheral mechanisms involved in these processes, including lipogenesis in adipose tissue and liver, insulin release from pancreatic β-cells, and glucose uptake into skeletal muscle. It was recently shown t...

  7. Atypical focal non-neoplastic brain changes in neurofibromatosis type 1: mass effect and contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract Children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 often have small high-signal foci on T2-weighted images of the brain. We describe follow-up of two patients in whom one of the foci had atypical features, commonly regarded as signs of a neoplasm. In the first, one lesion showed temporary contrast enhancement and decreasing mass effect. The second developed an expanding lesion that increased minimally in size over 4.5 year's follow-up. The borderline between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions seems to be indistinct. (orig.)

  8. Atypical focal non-neoplastic brain changes in neurofibromatosis type 1: mass effect and contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raininko, R. [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Section of Radiology, Uppsala University (Sweden); Thelin, L. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Gaevle County Hospital (Sweden); Eeg-Olofsson, O. [Dept. of Women' s and Children' s Health, Section of Pediatrics, Uppsala University (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    Abstract Children and young adults with neurofibromatosis type 1 often have small high-signal foci on T2-weighted images of the brain. We describe follow-up of two patients in whom one of the foci had atypical features, commonly regarded as signs of a neoplasm. In the first, one lesion showed temporary contrast enhancement and decreasing mass effect. The second developed an expanding lesion that increased minimally in size over 4.5 year's follow-up. The borderline between neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions seems to be indistinct. (orig.)

  9. Bovine brain pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase (type-1): purification and characterisation of a neuropeptide-inactivating peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, P M; O'Connor, B

    1996-08-01

    Pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase type-1 (PAP-I) is reported to be a soluble, broad specificity aminopeptidase, capable of removing the pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) residue from the amino terminus of pGlu-peptides (e.g. TRH, LHRH, neurotensin and bombesin). The central aim of this study was to undertake, for the first time, the complete purification and characterisation of a PAP activity observed within the cytosolic fraction of bovine whole brain and to compare the properties of the enzyme with previous findings. A series of chromatographic steps (DEAE-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200 and Activated Thiol Sepharose 4B) generated a soluble PAP activity purified to near homogeneity with a total active yield of 6.6% The enzyme displayed a native molecular mass of approximately 23,700 Da, which compares well with that value obtained under denaturing conditions via SDS-PAGE (24,000 Da), suggesting that the enzyme exists as a monomer. The expression of PAP activity displayed an absolute requirement for the presence of a disulphide bond-reducing agent such as DTT, whilst optimum activity was observed at pH 8.5. strong inhibition of PAP activity was observed with a number of different agents, including transition metal ions, sulphydryl-blocking agents and 2-pyrrolidone (a pGlu analog). A broad pyroglutamyl substrate specificity, which excludes substrates commencing with the pGlu-Pro bond, was also demonstrated for the bovine brain enzyme. Based on a comparison of these findings with those reported for PAP-I in other mammalian tissues, the soluble PAP activity observed in bovine whole brain can tentatively be classified as a pyroglutamyl aminopeptidase type-1 (EC 3.4.19.3). PMID:8811836

  10. Lovastatin regulates brain spontaneous low-frequency brain activity in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabernaud, Camille; Mennes, Maarten; Kardel, Peter G; Gaillard, William D; Kalbfleisch, M Layne; Vanmeter, John W; Packer, Roger J; Milham, Michael P; Castellanos, Francisco X; Acosta, Maria T

    2012-04-25

    In the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mouse model, lovastatin, used clinically for hypercholesterolemia, improves cognitive dysfunction. While such impairment has been studied in NF1, the neural substrates remain unclear. The aim of this imaging add-on to a Phase 1 open-label trial was to examine the effect of lovastatin on Default Network (DN) resting state functional connectivity (RSFC). Seven children with NF1 (aged 11.9 ± 2.2; 1 female) were treated with lovastatin once daily for 12 weeks. A 7-min 3-T echo-planar-imaging scan was collected one day before beginning treatment (off-drug) and the last day of treatment (on-drug) while performing a flanker task. After regressing-out task-associated variance, we used the residual time series as "continuous resting-state data" for RSFC analyses using 11 DN regions of interest. For qualitative comparisons, we included a group of 19 typically developing children (TDC) collected elsewhere. In the on-drug condition, lovastatin increased long-range positive RSFC within DN core regions (i.e., anterior medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, PCC). In addition, lovastatin produced less diffuse local RSFC in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and PCC. The pattern of RSFC observed in the NF1 participants when on-drug closely resembled the RSFC patterns exhibited by the TDC. Lovastatin administration in this open trial regulated anterior-posterior long-range and local RSFC within the DN. These preliminary results are consistent with a role for lovastatin in normalization of developmental processes and with apparent benefits in a mouse NF1 model. PMID:22433254

  11. Abnormalities in the brain of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats revealed by diffusion tensor imaging ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Mingming; Gao, Lifeng; Yang, Liqin; Lin, Fuchun; Lei, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the brain. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients are associated with white matter (WM) damage observable to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The underlying histopathological mechanisms, however, are poorly understood. The objectives of this study are 1) to determine whether streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes is associated with WM damage observable to DTI; and 2) to understand the pathophysiological aspects underlying STZ-induced brain injuries. Male Sprag...

  12. Age-Related Loss of Brain Volume and T2 Relaxation Time in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Pell, Gaby S; Lin, Ashleigh; Wellard, R. Mark; Werther, George A.; Cameron, Fergus J.; Finch, Sue J.; Papoutsis, Jennifer; Northam, Elisabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—2 Childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is associated with neurocognitive deficits, but there is limited evidence to date regarding associated neuroanatomical brain changes and their relationship to illness variables such as age at disease onset. This report examines age-related changes in volume and T2 relaxation time (a fundamental parameter of magnetic resonance imaging that reflects tissue health) across the whole brain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Type 1 diabetes, N = 79 (mean age 2...

  13. Intrathecal morphine therapy in the management of status dystonicus in neurodegeneration brain iron accumulation type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Kluge Schroeder, Humberto; Santana Neville, Iuri; Jacobsen Teixeira, Manoel; Costa Barbosa, Danilo; Assumpçao de Mônaco, Bernardo; Talamoni Fonoff, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1 (NBIA-1) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction and dementia. NBIA-1 encompasses typical iron brain accumulation, mostly in the globus pallidus with secondary dementia, spasticity, rigidity, dystonia, and choreoathetosis. Treatment remains mostly symptomatic and is challenging. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy diagnosed with NBIA-1, presenting intractable progressive generalized dystonia leading to unresponsive status dystonicus (SD). The patient received a SynchroMed II (model 8637) programmable system pump (Medtronic®, Inc.) implant with an Ascenda intrathecal catheter for intrathecal morphine therapy (IMT). The initial dose of morphine was 1.0 mg/day. Overall, we observed no complications with IMT treatment and important improvement of the patient's motor function with stabilization of his incapacitating dystonia and his quality of life. On the Global Dystonia Severity Rating Scale, he presented 52% improvement, 30% improvement on the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale, and 38% improvement on the Fahn-Marsden Rating Scale after 10 months, when the dose was 1.7 mg/day. IMT should be considered as a potential palliative treatment in the management of intractable dystonia and SD secondary to NBIA-1. PMID:25896138

  14. Type 1 Diabetes Modifies Brain Activation in Young Patients While Performing Visuospatial Working Memory Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisa B. Gallardo-Moreno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the effects of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D on cognitive functions. T1D onset usually occurs during childhood, so it is possible that the brain could be affected during neurodevelopment. We selected young patients of normal intelligence with T1D onset during neurodevelopment, no complications from diabetes, and adequate glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to compare the neural BOLD activation pattern in a group of patients with T1D versus healthy control subjects while performing a visuospatial working memory task. Sixteen patients and 16 matched healthy control subjects participated. There was no significant statistical difference in behavioral performance between the groups, but, in accordance with our hypothesis, results showed distinct brain activation patterns. Control subjects presented the expected activations related to the task, whereas the patients had greater activation in the prefrontal inferior cortex, basal ganglia, posterior cerebellum, and substantia nigra. These different patterns could be due to compensation mechanisms that allow them to maintain a behavioral performance similar to that of control subjects.

  15. Unidentified bright objects on brain MRI in children as a diagnostic criterion for neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesions of the brain denominated as unidentified bright objects (UBOs), which are not included in the diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have been detected by MRI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of including the presence of UBOs as a diagnostic criterion for NF1 in children. The study included 88 children between the ages of 2 and 18 years. The case group consisted of 40 children diagnosed with sporadic or familial NF1 according to the criteria established by the NIH. A control group consisted of 48 individuals referred for routine MRI of the brain for other complaints not related to NF1. UBOs were identified in 70% of the NF1 patients and in none of the control group. The sensitivity of the presence of UBOs for the diagnosis of NF1 was 70% (CI 53-83%), with a false-negative rate of 30% (CI 27-47%), a specificity of 100% (CI 86-100%) and a false-positive rate of 0% (CI 0-14%). Faced with the difficulties in diagnosing NF1 in children and the high frequency and specificity of the presence UBOs identified by MRI in our series, we recommend the inclusion of the presence UBOs as a diagnostic criterion for NF1 in children. (orig.)

  16. Unidentified bright objects on brain MRI in children as a diagnostic criterion for neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes Ferraz Filho, Jose R.; Pontes Munis, Marcos; Soares Souza, Antonio; Sanches, Rafael A. [Medical School in Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Imaging Department, Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Goloni-Bertollo, Eni M.; Pavarino-Bertelli, Erika C. [Center of Research and Attendance in Neurofibromatosis, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-03-15

    Lesions of the brain denominated as unidentified bright objects (UBOs), which are not included in the diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) established by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have been detected by MRI. The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of including the presence of UBOs as a diagnostic criterion for NF1 in children. The study included 88 children between the ages of 2 and 18 years. The case group consisted of 40 children diagnosed with sporadic or familial NF1 according to the criteria established by the NIH. A control group consisted of 48 individuals referred for routine MRI of the brain for other complaints not related to NF1. UBOs were identified in 70% of the NF1 patients and in none of the control group. The sensitivity of the presence of UBOs for the diagnosis of NF1 was 70% (CI 53-83%), with a false-negative rate of 30% (CI 27-47%), a specificity of 100% (CI 86-100%) and a false-positive rate of 0% (CI 0-14%). Faced with the difficulties in diagnosing NF1 in children and the high frequency and specificity of the presence UBOs identified by MRI in our series, we recommend the inclusion of the presence UBOs as a diagnostic criterion for NF1 in children. (orig.)

  17. Magnetization transfer ratio and volumetric analysis of the brain in macrocephalic patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margariti, Persefoni N.; Katzioti, Frosso G.; Zikou, Anastasia K.; Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Blekas, Konstantinos [University of Ioannina, Department of Computer Science, Ioannina (Greece); Tzoufi, Meropi [University of Ioannina, Child Health Department, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2007-02-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate brain myelination by measuring the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and to measure grey (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) in macrocephalic children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Seven NF1 patients (aged 0.65-16.67 years) and seven age- and gender-matched controls were studied. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulse was used for MTR assessment. Volume measurements of GM and WM were performed by applying segmentation techniques on T2-weighted turbo spin echo images (T2WI). MTR of unidentified bright objects (UBOs) on T2WI in cerebellar white matter (52.8{+-}3.3), cerebral peduncles (48.5{+-}1.5), hippocampus (52.6{+-}1.1), internal capsule (55.7{+-}0.3), globus pallidus (52.7{+-}3.9), and periventricular white matter (52.6{+-}1.2) was lower than in the corresponding areas of controls (64.6{+-}2.5, 60.8{+-}1.3, 56.4{+-}0.9, 64.7{+-}1.9, 59.2{+-}2.3, 63.6{+-}1.7, respectively; p<0.05). MTR of normal-appearing brain tissue in patients was not significantly different than in controls. Surface area (mm{sup 2}) of the corpus callosum (809.1{+-}62.8), GMV (cm{sup 3}) (850.7{+-}42.9), and white matter volume (WMV) (cm{sup 3}) (785.1{+-}85.2) were greater in patients than in controls (652.5{+-}52.6 mm{sup 2}, 611.2{+-}92.1 cm{sup 3}, 622.5{+-}108.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively; p<0.05). To conclude, macrocephaly in NF1 patients is related to increased GMV and WMV and corpus callosum enlargement. MTR of UBOs is lower than that of normal brain tissue. (orig.)

  18. Influence of exercise training on ischemic brain injury in type 1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrick, Denise M; Sun, Hong; Mayhan, William G

    2012-10-01

    While exercise training (ExT) appears to influence cerebrovascular function during type 1 diabetes (T1D), it is not clear whether this beneficial effect extends to protecting the brain from ischemia-induced brain injury. Thus our goal was to examine whether modest ExT could influence transient focal ischemia-induced brain injury along with nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent dilation of cerebral (pial) arterioles during T1D. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: nondiabetic sedentary, nondiabetic ExT, diabetic (streptozotocin; 50 mg/kg ip) sedentary, and diabetic ExT. In the first series of studies, we measured infarct volume in all groups of rats following right MCA occlusion for 2 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. In a second series of studies, a craniotomy was performed over the parietal cortex, and we measured responses of pial arterioles to an endothelial NOS (eNOS)-dependent, a neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent, and a NOS-independent agonist in all groups of rats. We found that sedentary diabetic rats had significantly larger total, cortical, and subcortical infarct volumes following ischemia-reperfusion than sedentary nondiabetic, nondiabetic ExT, and diabetic ExT rats. Infarct volumes were similar in sedentary nondiabetic, ExT nondiabetic, and ExT diabetic rats. In contrast, ExT did not alter infarct size in nondiabetic compared with sedentary nondiabetic rats. In addition, ExT diabetic rats had impaired eNOS- and nNOS-dependent, but not NOS-independent, vasodilation that was restored by ExT. Thus ExT of T1D rats lessened ischemic brain injury following middle cerebral artery occlusion and restored impaired eNOS- and nNOS-dependent vascular function. Since the incidence of ischemic stroke is increased during T1D, we suggest that our finding are significant in that modest ExT may be a viable preventative therapeutic approach to lessen ischemia-induced brain injury that may occur in T1D subjects. PMID:22858624

  19. Cognitive and brain function in adults with Type 1 diabetes mellitus : is there evidence of accelerated ageing?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Harriet N.

    2013-01-01

    The physical complications of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have been understood as an accelerated ageing process (Morley, 2008). Do people with T1DM also experience accelerated cognitive and brain ageing? Using findings from research of the normal cognitive and brain ageing process and conceptualized in theories of the functional brain changes in cognitive ageing, a combination of cognitive testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques were used to evaluate evidence o...

  20. Minocycline Attenuates Neonatal Germinal-Matrix-Hemorrhage-Induced Neuroinflammation and Brain Edema by Activating Cannabinoid Receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Chen, Qianwei; Guo, Jing; Yang, Liming; Tao, Yihao; Li, Lin; Miao, Hongping; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common neurological disease of premature newborns leading to detrimental neurological sequelae. Minocycline has been reported to play a key role in neurological inflammatory diseases by controlling some mechanisms that involve cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R). The current study investigated whether minocycline reduces neuroinflammation and protects the brain from injury in a rat model of collagenase-induced GMH by regulating CB2R activity. To test this hypothesis, the effects of minocycline and a CB2R antagonist (AM630) were evaluated in male rat pups that were post-natal day 7 (P7) after GMH. We found that minocycline can lead to increased CB2R mRNA expression and protein expression in microglia. Minocycline significantly reduced GMH-induced brain edema, microglial activation, and lateral ventricular volume. Additionally, minocycline enhanced cortical thickness after injury. All of these neuroprotective effects of minocycline were prevented by AM630. A cannabinoid CB2 agonist (JWH133) was used to strengthen the hypothesis, which showed the identical neuroprotective effects of minocycline. Our study demonstrates, for the first time, that minocycline attenuates neuroinflammation and brain injury in a rat model of GMH, and activation of CBR2 was partially involved in these processes. PMID:25833102

  1. Magnetization transfer ratio and volumetric analysis of the brain in macrocephalic patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate brain myelination by measuring the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and to measure grey (GMV) and white matter volume (WMV) in macrocephalic children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Seven NF1 patients (aged 0.65-16.67 years) and seven age- and gender-matched controls were studied. A three-dimensional (3D) gradient echo sequence with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulse was used for MTR assessment. Volume measurements of GM and WM were performed by applying segmentation techniques on T2-weighted turbo spin echo images (T2WI). MTR of unidentified bright objects (UBOs) on T2WI in cerebellar white matter (52.8±3.3), cerebral peduncles (48.5±1.5), hippocampus (52.6±1.1), internal capsule (55.7±0.3), globus pallidus (52.7±3.9), and periventricular white matter (52.6±1.2) was lower than in the corresponding areas of controls (64.6±2.5, 60.8±1.3, 56.4±0.9, 64.7±1.9, 59.2±2.3, 63.6±1.7, respectively; p2) of the corpus callosum (809.1±62.8), GMV (cm3) (850.7±42.9), and white matter volume (WMV) (cm3) (785.1±85.2) were greater in patients than in controls (652.5±52.6 mm2, 611.2±92.1 cm3, 622.5±108.7 cm3, respectively; p<0.05). To conclude, macrocephaly in NF1 patients is related to increased GMV and WMV and corpus callosum enlargement. MTR of UBOs is lower than that of normal brain tissue. (orig.)

  2. Decreased GABA(A) benzodiazepine binding site densities in postmortem brains of Cloninger type 1 and 2 alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Virpi; Storvik, Markus; Häkkinen, Merja; Akamine, Yumiko; Tupala, Erkki; Virkkunen, Matti; Tiihonen, Jari

    2013-03-01

    Ethanol modulates the GABA(A) receptor to cause sedative, anxiolytic and hypnotic effects that are qualitatively similar to benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The aim of this study was to explore if GABA(A) receptor density is altered in post-mortem brains of anxiety-prone Cloninger type 1 and socially hostile type 2 alcoholic subtypes when compared to controls. The GABA(A) binding site density was measured by whole-hemisphere autoradiography with tritium labeled flunitrazepam ([(3)H]flunitrazepam) from 17 alcoholic (nine type 1, eight type 2) and 10 non-alcoholic post-mortem brains, using cold flumazepam as a competitive ligand. A total of eight specific brain areas were examined. Alcoholics displayed a significantly (p < 0.001, bootstrap type generalizing estimating equations model) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density when compared to controls. When localized, type 2 alcoholics displayed a significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site density in the internal globus pallidus, the gyrus dentatus and the hippocampus, whereas type 1 alcoholics differed from controls in the internal globus pallidus and the hippocampus. While previous reports have demonstrated significant alterations in dopaminergic and serotonergic receptors between type 1 and type 2 alcoholics among these same subjects, we observed no statistically significant difference in [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding site densities between the Cloninger type 1 and type 2 alcoholics. PMID:23332316

  3. It's All in the Rhythm: The Role of Cannabinoids in Neural Oscillations and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skosnik, Patrick D; Cortes-Briones, Jose A; Hajós, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Evidence has accumulated over the past several decades suggesting that both exocannabinoids and endocannabinoids play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The current article presents evidence suggesting that one of the mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce psychosis is through the alteration in synchronized neural oscillations. Neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma (30-80 Hz) and theta (4-7 Hz) ranges, are disrupted in schizophrenia and are involved in various areas of perceptual and cognitive function. Regarding cannabinoids, preclinical evidence from slice and local field potential recordings has shown that central cannabinoid receptor (cannabinoid receptor type 1) agonists decrease the power of neural oscillations, particularly in the gamma and theta bands. Further, the administration of cannabinoids during critical stages of neural development has been shown to disrupt the brain's ability to generate synchronized neural oscillations in adulthood. In humans, studies examining the effects of chronic cannabis use (utilizing electroencephalography) have shown abnormalities in neural oscillations in a pattern similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Finally, recent studies in humans have also shown disruptions in neural oscillations after the acute administration of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive constituent in cannabis. Taken together, these data suggest that both acute and chronic cannabinoids can disrupt the ability of the brain to generate synchronized oscillations at functionally relevant frequencies. Hence, this may represent one of the primary mechanisms whereby cannabinoids induce disruptions in attention, working memory, sensory-motor integration, and many other psychosis-related behavioral effects. PMID:26850792

  4. Brain Lactate Concentration Falls in Response to Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegers, Evita C; Rooijackers, Hanne M; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2016-06-01

    Brain lactate may be involved in the development of impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), a condition that affects approximately 25% of patients with type 1 diabetes and increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoglycemia on brain lactate concentration in patients with IAH as compared with those with normal awareness of hypoglycemia (NAH) and healthy control subjects (n = 7 per group). After an overnight fast, all subjects underwent a two-step hyperinsulinemic euglycemic (5.0 mmol/L)-hypoglycemic (2.8 mmol/L) glucose clamp. Brain lactate concentrations were measured continuously with (1)H-MRS using a specific lactate detection method. Hypoglycemia generated symptoms in patients with NAH and healthy control subjects but not in patients with IAH. Brain lactate fell significantly by ∼20% in response to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes with IAH but remained stable in both healthy control subjects and in patients with NAH. The fall in brain lactate is compatible with increased brain lactate oxidation providing an alternative fuel source during hypoglycemia, which may contribute to the impaired detection of hypoglycemia. PMID:26993070

  5. Brain metastasis of Wilms tumor with diffuse anaplasia and complex cytogenetic phenotype in a child with neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsbeyn, Marianna; Bassani, Luigi; Mikolaenko, Irina; Wisoff, Jeffrey H

    2011-10-01

    The authors report the first case of a Wilms tumor (WT) with diffuse anaplasia metastatic to the brain in a 13-year-old girl with a history of neurofibromatosis Type 1. At presentation, the metastatic tumor had radiological features that suggested a meningioma. Histologically it was characterized by striking anaplasia and features similar to the patient's previously resected WT with diffuse anaplasia. PMID:21961578

  6. THE STUDY OF THE BRAIN IN A PATIENT WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS USING TECHNIQUES OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. G. Samoylova; N. G. Zhukova; M. V. Matveyeva; M. A. Rotkank; O. S. Tonkikh

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is now widely distributed worldwide and in theRussian Federation, it is an important medical and social problem in connection with the development of serious, disabling complications. Some of these complications could make changes in the brain which are accompanied by cognitive impairments that decrease quality of life and worsening disease compensation. The diagnosis of these disorders to date, possible by using modern methods of magnetic resonance imaging, wh...

  7. Cannabinoids and their medicinal potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Tikoo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis sativa L preparations have been used therapeutically since many years. Inspite of their medicinal value, the danger of its abusive potential led to the ban on its use in clinical practice in many countries. The recent research and in depth knowledge about the cannabinoid system which throw a light on their disease management potential has paved way for the cannabinoids to become a new therapeutic focus of attention. Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors which include CB1, predominantly expressed in the brain and CB2 which is primarily found in the cells of the immune system. Despite the addictive properties of cannabis, the therapeutic value of cannabinoids is too high to be put aside. Numerous diseases such as anorexia, pain, inflammation, obesity, cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, hepatic disorders, skin related diseases, respiratory disorders like asthma and eye diseases like glaucoma have suggested cannabinoid agonists/ antagonists/ cannabinoids related compounds as potential treatment options. Developments of new specific ligands for the cannabinoid receptors are now underway and it needs to be seen, if in future, they can prove to be a boon for the medical world. The paper reviews the current understanding of the cannabinoid receptors, their ligands and their possible role in various diseases supported by preclinical and clinical studies. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(2.000: 48-59

  8. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy evidence for the varied nature of asymptomatic focal brain lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A.P. [North Western Medical Physics, Royal Preston Hospital (United Kingdom); Gunawardena, W.J.; Coutinho, C.M.A. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Royal Preston Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    We present the MRI and {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy findings in six patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and asymptomatic focal brain lesions. Variations in imaging appearances were seen, including regression of a previously identified lesion. MR spectra for the lesions and corresponding areas of normal brain show significant differences. The lesions could be separated into two groups, one demonstrating only slight metabolite ratio changes relative to normal brain and the other group showing significant increase in choline and decrease in N-acetyl aspartate. The lesion which regressed fell into the second group. These findings are not in agreement with those previously reported and provide evidence for the varied and possibly transient nature of these asymptomatic lesions. The spectroscopy findings suggest that metabolite changes may be present without visible changes on MRI. (orig.)

  9. 1H MR spectroscopy evidence for the varied nature of asymptomatic focal brain lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the MRI and 1H MR spectroscopy findings in six patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and asymptomatic focal brain lesions. Variations in imaging appearances were seen, including regression of a previously identified lesion. MR spectra for the lesions and corresponding areas of normal brain show significant differences. The lesions could be separated into two groups, one demonstrating only slight metabolite ratio changes relative to normal brain and the other group showing significant increase in choline and decrease in N-acetyl aspartate. The lesion which regressed fell into the second group. These findings are not in agreement with those previously reported and provide evidence for the varied and possibly transient nature of these asymptomatic lesions. The spectroscopy findings suggest that metabolite changes may be present without visible changes on MRI. (orig.)

  10. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  11. THE STUDY OF THE BRAIN IN A PATIENT WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS USING TECHNIQUES OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. G. Samoylova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is now widely distributed worldwide and in theRussian Federation, it is an important medical and social problem in connection with the development of serious, disabling complications. Some of these complications could make changes in the brain which are accompanied by cognitive impairments that decrease quality of life and worsening disease compensation. The diagnosis of these disorders to date, possible by using modern methods of magnetic resonance imaging, which describe not only the morphological changes of the brain, but also the metabolism of nervous tissue. The study of the brain, namely structural and metabolic manifestations of diabetes, is one of the priority problem of modern medical science.The aim of the study was to evaluate dynamics in the different techniques of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of brain changes in patients with T1DM.Research methods included physical examination, in accordance with the diagnostic algorithm of patients with T1DM, a neurologist consultation, an assessment of cognitive function, analysis of brain changes using standard magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Statistical processing was performed using software package R-system. This publication presents a clinical case of a patient with T1DM and severe cognitive impairments are associated with changes in the brain, diagnosed using standard magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. The study shows the positive role of correction of carbohydrate metabolism in improving cognitive function in a patient with T1DM.In addition, the process analysis revealed the absence of dynamic changes in the brain of a patient with T1DM according to standard magnetic resonance imaging. This required the use of additional techniques – magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which revealed changes of metabolism in the thalamus N-acetyl aspartate, choline and creatinine.

  12. Effect of cannabinoids on the binding of /sup 3/H-(3-MeHis/sup 2/)TRH to rat brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matwyshyn, G.A.; Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-05

    Cannabinoids, particularly ..delta../sup 9/-THC is known to affect thyroid function. The effect of naturally occurring and synthetic cannabinoids on brain TRH receptors labeled with /sup 3/H-(3-MeHis/sup 2/)TRH(MeTRH) was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes at a single high affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 48 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein and K/sub d/ of 4.2 +/- 0.4 nM. At 2 nM concentration the amount of /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound specifically was 10.9 +/- 0.6 fmol/mg protein. ..delta.. /sup 9/-THC (10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -3/ M) stimulated the binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH with maximal stimulation of 60% at 10/sup -4/M concentration. Cannabinol (10/sup -6/-/sup -4/M) also enhanced the binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH with maximal (58%) stimulation occurring at 10/sup -5/M concentration. Cannabidiol, on the other hand, had no effect on the binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH up to 10/sup -5/M concentration. However, at 10/sup -4/M concentration of cannabidiol, the binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH was decreased by 65%. The water soluble synthetic cannabinoids, naboctate, menabitan and SP 111 A inhibited the binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH only at 10/sup -4/ or 10/sup -3/M concentration. These results suggest differential interaction of cannabinoids with brain TRH receptors.

  13. [18F]MK-9470, a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for in vivo human PET brain imaging of the cannabinoid-1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, H. Donald; Van Laere, Koen; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Hamill, Terence G.; Bormans, Guy; Eng, Wai-si; Gibson, Ray; Ryan, Christine; Connolly, Brett; Patel, Shil; Krause, Stephen; Vanko, Amy; Van Hecken, Anne; DUPONT, Patrick; De Lepeleire, Inge

    2007-01-01

    [(18)F]MK-9470 is a selective, high-affinity, inverse agonist (human IC(50), 0.7 nM) for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) that has been developed for use in human brain imaging. Autoradiographic studies in rhesus monkey brain showed that [(18)F]MK-9470 binding is aligned with the reported distribution of CB1 receptors with high specific binding in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and hippocampus. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging...

  14. Differential treatment regimen-related effects of cannabinoids on D1 and D2 receptors in adolescent and adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2010-12-01

    Animal studies suggest differential effects of cannabinoids on dopamine-related behaviours in adolescence and adulthood however few studies have investigated the underlying neurochemical effects of cannabinoids during adolescence. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of treatment with the synthetic cannabinoid, HU210, on dopamine receptor density in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (postnatal day (PND) 35) and adult (PND 70) rats received a single dose of 100μg/kg HU210 or 25, 50 or 100μg/kg HU210 for 4 or 14 days. Dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) or D2 receptor (D2R) density was measured in the medial and lateral (CPUL) caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle (TU) and substantia nigra (D1R only) using in vitro autoradiography. D1R and D2R densities were 1.6-1.7- and 1.1-1.4-fold higher respectively in adolescent control rats compared to adults. In adult rats, D1R density was increased by 1.2- and 1.3-fold (pHU210 treatment. A significant overall effect of treatment (pHU210. In adolescents, an overall effect of treatment on D1R density after a single exposure to HU210 was seen (p=0.0026) but no changes in D1R or D2R densities were observed in other treatment groups. These results suggest that the adolescent rat brain does not display the same compensatory mechanisms activated in the adult brain following cannabinoid treatment. PMID:20673846

  15. Reduced artefacts and improved assessment of hyperintense brain lesions with BLADE MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of small brain lesions in children is often compromised by pulsation, flow or movement artefacts. MRI with a rotating blade-like k-space covering (BLADE, PROPELLER) can compensate for these artefacts. We compared T2-weighted FLAIR images that were acquired with different k-space trajectories (conventional Cartesian and BLADE) to evaluate the impact of BLADE technique on the delineation of small or low-contrast brain lesions. The subject group comprised 26 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1), who had been routinely scanned at 1.5 T for optic pathway gliomas with both techniques and who had the typical hyperintense brain lesions seen in NF 1. Four experienced radiologists retrospectively compared unlabelled 4-mm axial images with respect to the presence of artefacts, visibility of lesions, quality of contour and contrast. Both techniques were comparable in depicting hyperintense lesions as small as 2 mm independent of contrast and edge definition. Pulsation and movement artefacts were significantly less common with BLADE k-space trajectory. In 7 of 26 patients (27%), lesions and artefacts were rated as indistinguishable in conventional FLAIR, but not in BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE imaging significantly improved the depiction of lesions in T2-W FLAIR images due to artefact reduction especially in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  16. Reduced artefacts and improved assessment of hyperintense brain lesions with BLADE MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, Thekla von; Fabig-Moritz, Claudia; Mueller-Abt, Peter; Zieger, Michael; Winkler, Peter [Department of Paediatric Radiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Blank, Bernd [Haematology and Immunology, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Stuttgart (Germany); Wohlfarth, Katrin [Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Assessment of small brain lesions in children is often compromised by pulsation, flow or movement artefacts. MRI with a rotating blade-like k-space covering (BLADE, PROPELLER) can compensate for these artefacts. We compared T2-weighted FLAIR images that were acquired with different k-space trajectories (conventional Cartesian and BLADE) to evaluate the impact of BLADE technique on the delineation of small or low-contrast brain lesions. The subject group comprised 26 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1), who had been routinely scanned at 1.5 T for optic pathway gliomas with both techniques and who had the typical hyperintense brain lesions seen in NF 1. Four experienced radiologists retrospectively compared unlabelled 4-mm axial images with respect to the presence of artefacts, visibility of lesions, quality of contour and contrast. Both techniques were comparable in depicting hyperintense lesions as small as 2 mm independent of contrast and edge definition. Pulsation and movement artefacts were significantly less common with BLADE k-space trajectory. In 7 of 26 patients (27%), lesions and artefacts were rated as indistinguishable in conventional FLAIR, but not in BLADE FLAIR images. BLADE imaging significantly improved the depiction of lesions in T2-W FLAIR images due to artefact reduction especially in the posterior fossa. (orig.)

  17. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Rabia Zafar, MD, PhD; Esther Y. Hsiao, MD; Kelly N. Botteron, MD; Robert C. McKinstry, MD, PhD; David H. Gutmann, MD, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumo...

  18. Cerebral Perfusion and Aortic Stiffness Are Independent Predictors of White Matter Brain Atrophy in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Assessed With Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    van Elderen, Saskia G. C.; Brandts, Anne; van der Grond, Jeroen; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; Kroft, Lucia J.M.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Smit, Johannes W.A.; de Roos, Albert

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify vascular mechanisms of brain atrophy in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients by investigating the relationship between brain volumes and cerebral perfusion and aortic stiffness using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Approval from the local institutional review board was obtained, and patients gave informed consent. Fifty-one type 1 DM patients (30 men; mean age 44 ± 11 years; mean DM duration 23 ± 12 years) and 34 age- and sex-matched healt...

  19. Blockade of cannabinoid CB receptor function protects against in vivo disseminating brain damage following NMDA-induced excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.H.; Ramos, J.A.; Fernández-Ruiz, J.; Azcoitia, I.; Hansen, Harald S.; Pons, S.; García-Segura, L.M.; Romero, J.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of cannabinoid CB, receptors to influence glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission has fueled interest in how these receptors and their endogenous ligands may interact in conditions of excitotoxic insults. The present study characterized the impact of stimulated and inhibited CB...

  20. The role of cannabinoids in adult neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenderville, Jack A; Kelly, Áine M; Downer, Eric J

    2015-08-01

    The processes underpinning post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain continue to be defined. Such processes involve the proliferation of neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells (NPCs), neuronal migration, differentiation and integration into a network of functional synapses within the brain. Both intrinsic (cell signalling cascades) and extrinsic (neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cytokines, hormones) signalling molecules are intimately associated with adult neurogenesis and largely dictate the proliferative activity and differentiation capacity of neural cells. Cannabinoids are a unique class of chemical compounds incorporating plant-derived cannabinoids (the active components of Cannabis sativa), the endogenous cannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoid ligands, and these compounds are becoming increasingly recognized for their roles in neural developmental processes. Indeed, cannabinoids have clear modulatory roles in adult neurogenesis, probably through activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. In recent years, a large body of literature has deciphered the signalling networks involved in cannabinoid-mediated regulation of neurogenesis. This timely review summarizes the evidence that the cannabinoid system is intricately associated with neuronal differentiation and maturation of NPCs and highlights intrinsic/extrinsic signalling mechanisms that are cannabinoid targets. Overall, these findings identify the central role of the cannabinoid system in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and the lateral ventricles and hence provide insight into the processes underlying post-developmental neurogenesis in the mammalian brain. PMID:25951750

  1. Brain metabolite changes on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarac, K.; Alkan, A.; Baysal, T. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Malatya (Turkey); Akinci, A.; Aslan, M. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Malatya (Turkey); Oezcan, C. [Inonu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Malatya (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    The metabolite changes in the brains of children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) were investigated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A total of 30 subjects and 14 age-matched healthy volunteers underwent single-voxel MRS (TE: 136). The duration of disease, medication, presence of hypoglycaemia episodes and the level of haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) in the patients were noted. Voxels were placed in the pons, left basal ganglion (LBG) and left posterior parietal white matter (PPWM). N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatinine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were calculated. The average HbA1c level was 11.9{+-}3.4 (8.2-19.4). The average number of keto-acidosis episodes was 1.9{+-}2.2 (0-9) and the average number of daily insulin injections was 2.8{+-}0.97 (2-4). MRS revealed lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios in the pons and lower NAA/Cr ratio in the PPWM of patients with DM than in control subjects. No significant correlation was observed between the number of hypoglycaemia episodes and metabolite ratios. Metabolic abnormalities have been observed by MRS in the brain of poorly controlled type 1 DM children. These metabolic changes, in particular in the pons region, include a decrease in NAA, indicating neuronal loss or functional impairment, and likely explanations for a decrease in Cho may be dynamic changes in membrane lipids and/or decreased membrane turnover. (orig.)

  2. Brain metabolite changes on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolite changes in the brains of children with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) were investigated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). A total of 30 subjects and 14 age-matched healthy volunteers underwent single-voxel MRS (TE: 136). The duration of disease, medication, presence of hypoglycaemia episodes and the level of haemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) in the patients were noted. Voxels were placed in the pons, left basal ganglion (LBG) and left posterior parietal white matter (PPWM). N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatinine (Cr) and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios were calculated. The average HbA1c level was 11.9±3.4 (8.2-19.4). The average number of keto-acidosis episodes was 1.9±2.2 (0-9) and the average number of daily insulin injections was 2.8±0.97 (2-4). MRS revealed lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios in the pons and lower NAA/Cr ratio in the PPWM of patients with DM than in control subjects. No significant correlation was observed between the number of hypoglycaemia episodes and metabolite ratios. Metabolic abnormalities have been observed by MRS in the brain of poorly controlled type 1 DM children. These metabolic changes, in particular in the pons region, include a decrease in NAA, indicating neuronal loss or functional impairment, and likely explanations for a decrease in Cho may be dynamic changes in membrane lipids and/or decreased membrane turnover. (orig.)

  3. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  4. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism by which delta9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta8THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-8THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [3H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta-8THC ([3H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [3H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [3H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  5. De novo development of gliomas in a child with neurofibromatosis type 1, fragile X and previously normal brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Rabia; Hsiao, Esther Y.; Botteron, Kelly N.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Gutmann, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen to 20% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 develop low-grade glial neoplasms. However, since neuroimaging is not routinely obtained until a child is clinically symptomatic, little is known about presymptomatic radiographic characteristics of gliomas in this at-risk population. Herein, we describe a child with neurofibromatosis type 1 who initially had normal brain imaging before the development of multifocal gliomas. Comparison of these serial images demonstrated that brain tumors can arise de novo in children with this cancer predisposition syndrome, further underscoring the limited prognostic value of normal baseline magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26973730

  6. Male and female rats differ in brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function and in behavioural traits predisposing to drug addiction: effect of ovarian hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Maria Paola; Fadda, Paola; Casu, Angelo; Spano, Maria Sabrina; Casti, Alberto; Fratta, Walter; Fattore, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Sex-dependent differences are frequently observed in the biological and behavioural effects of substances of abuse, including cannabis. We recently demonstrated a modulating effect of sex and oestrous cycle on cannabinoid-taking and seeking behaviours. Here, we investigated the influence of sex and oestrogen in the regulation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor density and function, measured by [(3)H]CP55940 and CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding autoradiography, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex (Cg1 and Cg3), caudate- putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus of male and cycling female rats, as well as ovariectomised (OVX) rats and OVX rats primed with oestradiol (10 µg/rat) (OVX+E). CB1 receptor density was significantly lower in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of cycling females than in males and in OVX females, a difference that appeared to be oestradiol-dependent, because it was no more evident in the OVX+E group. CP55940-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding was significantly higher in the Cg3 of OVX rats relative to cycling and OVX+E rats. No difference was observed in CB1 receptor density or function in any of the other brain areas analysed. Finally, sex and oestradiol were also found to affect motor activity, social behaviour and sensorimotor gating in rats tested in locomotor activity boxes, social interaction and prepulse inhibition tasks, respectively. Our findings provide biochemical evidence for sex- and hormone- dependent differences in the density and function of CB1 receptors in selected brain regions, and in behaviours associated with greater vulnerability to drug addiction, revealing a more vulnerable behavioural phenotype in female than in male rats. PMID:23829370

  7. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  8. Increased brain metabolism after acute administration of the synthetic cannabinoid HU210: a small animal PET imaging study with 18F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu H; Verdurand, Mathieu; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wang, Hongqin; Zahra, David; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2012-02-10

    Cannabis use has been shown to alter brain metabolism in both rat models and humans although the observations between both species are conflicting. In the present study, we examined the short term effects of a single-dose injection of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on glucose metabolism in the rat brain using small animal (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of the agonist in the same animal. Young adult male Wistar rats received an intra-peritoneal injection of HU210 (100 μg/kg, n=7) or vehicle (n=5) on Day 1. Approximately 1mCi of (18)F-FDG was injected intravenously into each animal at 15 min (Day 1) and 24h (Day 2) post-injection of HU210. A 5-min Computer Tomography (CT) scan followed by a 20-min PET scan was performed 40 min after each (18)F-FDG injection. Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) were calculated for 10 brain regions of interest (ROIs). Global increased SUVs in the whole brain, hence global brain metabolism, were observed following HU210 treatment on Day 1 compared to the controls (21%, PHU210 treated group returned to control levels (21-30% decrease compared to Day 1), in all ROIs investigated (PHU210 increases brain glucose metabolism in the rat brain shortly after administration, in line with normalised human in vivo studies, an effect that was no longer apparent 24 h later. PMID:22155282

  9. [Transcranial magnetic electro-stimulation with alternate action on brain hemispheres in the correction of cerebral disturbances in children with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filina, N Iu; Bolotova, N V; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Nikolaeva, N V

    2012-01-01

    Correction of psychoemotional and autonomic disturbances in children 7-17 years old with diabetes mellitus type 1 was conducted using transcranial magnetic electro-stimulation with alternate action on brain hemispheres (main group, 42 patients). The method includes the combined action of magnetic field pulses and series of electric impulses; magnetic and electric stimulation were performed synchronously - at first, on one brain hemisphere, then on another hemisphere with alternation frequency 9.5-10.5 Hz. A comparison group consisted of 44 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 who received physiotherapeutic treatment as a combination of transcranial magnetic therapy and electro-stimulation with simultaneous action on both brain hemispheres. Treatment duration was 10 sessions. Treatment efficacy was assessed by the decrease in frequency and intensity of complaints, improvement of patient's health status measured (a scale for assessment of activity, health perception and mood) and improvement of the status of the autonomic nervous system (Vein's questionnaire), mental sphere (the Luscher color test) and cognitive traits (The Concentrated Attention Test of the Toulouse-Pierron Factorial Battery). The status of the autonomic nervous system was evaluated before and after the treatment using cardiointervalography. Brain bioelectrical activity was assessed using encephalography. Significant reduction of autonomic, psychoemotional and cognitive disturbances, normalization of brain bioelectrical activity due to the α-rhythm organization and arrhythmia removal were identified in the main group after the treatment. No adverse effects of this physiotherapeutic treatment was found. PMID:22677753

  10. Preparation of iodine-123 labeled AM251: a potential SPECT radioligand for the brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis and labeling with iodine-123 of N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251). This compound is an analog of the recently described cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, in which a 4-chlorophenyl group is replaced by 4-iodophenyl. Labeling in good yield (62%) and radiochemical purity (> 95%), and high specific activity (> 2500 Ci/mmol) was achieved by an iododestannylation reaction using the tributyltin precursor, no carrier added I-123 iodide, and chloramine-T. (author)

  11. Preparation of iodine-123 labeled AM251: a potential SPECT radioligand for the brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Ruoxi; Makriyannis, Alexandros [Connecticut Univ., Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Storrs, CT (United States); Gatley, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Medical Dept., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We report the synthesis and labeling with iodine-123 of N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251). This compound is an analog of the recently described cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, in which a 4-chlorophenyl group is replaced by 4-iodophenyl. Labeling in good yield (62%) and radiochemical purity (> 95%), and high specific activity (> 2500 Ci/mmol) was achieved by an iododestannylation reaction using the tributyltin precursor, no carrier added I-123 iodide, and chloramine-T. (author).

  12. Brain penetration of telmisartan, a unique centrally acting angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, studied by PET in conscious rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Telmisartan is a widely used, long-acting antihypertensive agent. Known to be a selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB), telmisartan acts as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and inhibits centrally mediated effects of angiotensin II in rats following peripheral administration, although the brain penetration of telmisartan remains unclear. We investigated the brain concentration and localization of telmisartan using 11 C-labeled telmisartan and positron emission tomography (PET) in conscious rhesus macaques. Methods: Three male rhesus macaques were bolus intravenously administered [11 C]telmisartan either alone or as a mixture with unlabeled telmisartan (1 mg/kg). Dynamic PET images were acquired for 95 min following administration. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of plasma concentration and metabolites, and brain and plasma concentrations were calculated from detected radioactivity using the specific activity of the administered drug preparation, in which whole blood radioactivity was used for the correction of intravascular blood radioactivity in brain. Results: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain little but enough to block AT1R and showed a consistently increasing brain/plasma ratio within the PET scanning period, suggesting slow clearance of the compound from the brain compared to the plasma clearance. Brain/plasma ratios at 30, 60, and 90 min were 0.06, 0.13, and 0.18, respectively. No marked localization according to the AT1R distribution was noted over the entire brain, even on tracer alone dosing. Conclusions: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain enough to block AT1R and showed a slow clearance from the brain in conscious rhesus macaques, supporting the long-acting and central responses of telmisartan as a unique property among ARBs.

  13. Escherichia coli K1 RS218 Interacts with Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells via Type 1 Fimbria Bacteria in the Fimbriated State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ching-Hao; Cai, Mian; Shin, Sooan; Xie, Yi; Kim, Kee-Jun; Khan, Naveed Ahmed; Di Cello, Francescopaolo; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli K1 is a major gram-negative organism causing neonatal meningitis. E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) are a prerequisite for E. coli penetration into the central nervous system in vivo. In the present study, we showed using DNA microarray analysis that E. coli K1 associated with HBMEC expressed significantly higher levels of the fim genes compared to nonassociated bacteria. We also showed that E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of HBMEC were significantly decreased with its fimH deletion mutant and type 1 fimbria locked-off mutant, while they were significantly increased with its type 1 fimbria locked-on mutant. E. coli K1 strains associated with HBMEC were predominantly type 1 fimbria phase-on (i.e., fimbriated) bacteria. Taken together, we showed for the first time that type 1 fimbriae play an important role in E. coli K1 binding to and invasion of HBMEC and that type 1 fimbria phase-on E. coli is the major population interacting with HBMEC. PMID:15845498

  14. Deuterium labeled cannabinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex reactions involving ring opening, ring closure and rearrangements hamper complete understanding of the fragmentation processes in the mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns of cannabinoids. Specifically labelled compounds are very powerful tools for obtaining more insight into fragmentation mechanisms and ion structures and therefore the synthesis of specifically deuterated cannabinoids was undertaken. For this, it was necessary to investigate the preparation of cannabinoids, appropriately functionalized for specific introduction of deuterium atom labels. The results of mass spectrometry with these labelled cannabinoids are described. (Auth.)

  15. Effects of insulin detemir and NPH insulin on body weight and appetite-regulating brain regions in human type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa W van Golen

    Full Text Available Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more readily than other insulins. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin detemir treatment differentially modifies brain activation in response to food stimuli as compared to NPH insulin. In addition, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF insulin levels were measured after both treatments. Brain responses to viewing food and non-food pictures were measured using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in 32 type 1 diabetic patients, after each of two 12-week treatment periods with insulin detemir and NPH insulin, respectively, both combined with prandial insulin aspart. CSF insulin levels were determined in a subgroup. Insulin detemir decreased body weight by 0.8 kg and NPH insulin increased weight by 0.5 kg (p = 0.02 for difference, while both treatments resulted in similar glycemic control. After treatment with insulin detemir, as compared to NPH insulin, brain activation was significantly lower in bilateral insula in response to visual food stimuli, compared to NPH (p = 0.02 for right and p = 0.05 for left insula. Also, CSF insulin levels were higher compared to those with NPH insulin treatment (p = 0.003. Our findings support the hypothesis that in type 1 diabetic patients, the weight sparing effect of insulin detemir may be mediated by its enhanced action on the central nervous system, resulting in blunted activation in bilateral insula, an appetite-regulating brain region, in response to food stimuli.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00626080.

  16. Abnormal brain activation in neurofibromatosis type 1: a link between visual processing and the default mode network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês R Violante

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is one of the most common single gene disorders affecting the human nervous system with a high incidence of cognitive deficits, particularly visuospatial. Nevertheless, neurophysiological alterations in low-level visual processing that could be relevant to explain the cognitive phenotype are poorly understood. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study early cortical visual pathways in children and adults with NF1. We employed two distinct stimulus types differing in contrast and spatial and temporal frequencies to evoke relatively different activation of the magnocellular (M and parvocellular (P pathways. Hemodynamic responses were investigated in retinotopically-defined regions V1, V2 and V3 and then over the acquired cortical volume. Relative to matched control subjects, patients with NF1 showed deficient activation of the low-level visual cortex to both stimulus types. Importantly, this finding was observed for children and adults with NF1, indicating that low-level visual processing deficits do not ameliorate with age. Moreover, only during M-biased stimulation patients with NF1 failed to deactivate or even activated anterior and posterior midline regions of the default mode network. The observation that the magnocellular visual pathway is impaired in NF1 in early visual processing and is specifically associated with a deficient deactivation of the default mode network may provide a neural explanation for high-order cognitive deficits present in NF1, particularly visuospatial and attentional. A link between magnocellular and default mode network processing may generalize to neuropsychiatric disorders where such deficits have been separately identified.

  17. A switch in G protein coupling for type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptors promotes excitability in epileptic brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Chakravarthi; Scidmore, Tanner; Jeong, Jaymin; Everest, Michelle; Chidiac, Peter; Poulter, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and stress increase the frequency of epileptic seizures. These behavioral states induce the secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a 40-amino acid neuropeptide neurotransmitter that coordinates many behavioral responses to stress in the central nervous system. In the piriform cortex, which is one of the most seizurogenic regions of the brain, CRF normally dampens excitability. By contrast, CRF increased the excitability of the piriform cortex in rats subjected to kindling, a model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In nonkindled rats, CRF activates its receptor, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate-binding protein)-coupled receptor, and signals through a Gαq/11-mediated pathway. After seizure induction, CRF signaling occurred through a pathway involving Gαs This change in signaling was associated with reduced abundance of regulator of G protein signaling protein type 2 (RGS2), which has been reported to inhibit Gαs-dependent signaling. RGS2 knockout mice responded to CRF in a similar manner as epileptic rats. These observations indicate that seizures produce changes in neuronal signaling that can increase seizure occurrence by converting a beneficial stress response into an epileptic trigger. PMID:27303056

  18. Pharmacology of cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Dronabinol (Delta 9-tetrahydocannabinol, THC), the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the use of cannabis, is an agonist to both the CB1 and the CB2 subtype of cannabinoid receptors. It is available on prescription in several countries. The non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), some analogues of natural cannabinoids and their metabolites, antagonists at the cannabinoid receptors and modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues including spleen, leukocytes; reproductive, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts; endocrine glands, arteries and heart. Five endogenous cannabinoids have been detected so far, of whom anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol are best characterized. There is evidence that besides the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes cloned so far additional cannabinoid receptor subtypes and vanilloid receptors are involved in the complex physiological functions of the cannabinoid system that include motor coordination, memory procession, control of appetite, pain modulation and neuroprotection. Strategies to modulate their activity include inhibition of re-uptake into cells and inhibition of their degradation to increase concentration and duration of action. Properties of cannabinoids that might be of therapeutic use include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, anti-allergic effects, sedation, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, anti-emesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects. PMID:15159677

  19. Signalling through the type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R interacts with canonical Wnt signalling to promote neural proliferation in developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qichen Hu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Signalling through the IGF1R [type 1 IGF (insulin-like growth factor receptor] and canonical Wnt signalling are two signalling pathways that play critical roles in regulating neural cell generation and growth. To determine whether the signalling through the IGF1R can interact with the canonical Wnt signalling pathway in neural cells in vivo, we studied mutant mice with altered IGF signalling. We found that in mice with blunted IGF1R expression specifically in nestin-expressing neural cells (IGF1RNestin−KO mice the abundance of neural β-catenin was significantly reduced. Blunting IGF1R expression also markedly decreased: (i the activity of a LacZ (β-galactosidase reporter transgene that responds to Wnt nuclear signalling (LacZTCF reporter transgene and (ii the number of proliferating neural precursors. In contrast, overexpressing IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor I in brain markedly increased the activity of the LacZTCF reporter transgene. Consistently, IGF-I treatment also markedly increased the activity of the LacZTCF reporter transgene in embryonic neuron cultures that are derived from LacZTCF Tg (transgenic mice. Importantly, increasing the abundance of β-catenin in IGF1RNestin−KO embryonic brains by suppressing the activity of GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β significantly alleviated the phenotypic changes induced by IGF1R deficiency. These phenotypic changes includes: (i retarded brain growth, (ii reduced precursor proliferation and (iii decreased neuronal number. Our current data, consistent with our previous study of cultured oligodendrocytes, strongly support the concept that IGF signalling interacts with canonical Wnt signalling in the developing brain to promote neural proliferation. The interaction of IGF and canonical Wnt signalling plays an important role in normal brain development by promoting neural precursor proliferation.

  20. Cannabinoids and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katchan, Valeria; David, Paula; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-06-01

    Cannabinoids have shown to have a variety effects on body systems. Through CB1 and CB2 receptors, amongst other, they exert an effect by modulating neurotransmitter and cytokine release. Current research in the role of cannabinoids in the immune system shows that they possess immunosuppressive properties. They can inhibit proliferation of leucocytes, induce apoptosis of T cells and macrophages and reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In mice models, they are effective in reducing inflammation in arthritis, multiple sclerosis, have a positive effect on neuropathic pain and in type 1 diabetes mellitus. They are effective as treatment for fibromyalgia and have shown to have anti-fibrotic effect in scleroderma. Studies in human models are scarce and not conclusive and more research is required in this field. Cannabinoids can be therefore promising immunosuppressive and anti-fibrotic agents in the therapy of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26876387

  1. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Galli, Jonathan A.; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointes...

  2. Novel cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, A J

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids have numerous physiological effects. In the years since the molecular identification of the G protein-coupled receptors CB1 and CB2, the ion channel TRPV1, and their corresponding endogenous ligand systems, many cannabinoid-evoked actions have been shown conclusively to be mediated by one of these specific receptor targets. However, there remain several examples where these classical cannabinoid receptors do not explain observed pharmacology. Studies using mice genetically delete...

  3. The Effects of Melatonin on Brain Arginine Vasotocin: Relationship with Sex and Seasonal Differences in Melatonin Receptor Type 1 in Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, C M; Lutterschmidt, D I

    2015-08-01

    The neuroendocrine mechanisms by which animals synchronise their physiological state with environmental cues are vital to timing life-history events appropriately. One important endocrine transducer of environmental cues in vertebrates is the pineal hormone melatonin, the secretion of which is directly sensitive to photoperiod and temperature. Melatonin modulates arginine vasotocin (AVT)-immunoreactive (-IR) cell number in the brain of green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea) during the summer breeding season, and this modulation is sexually dimorphic. In the present study, we investigated whether the influence of melatonin on vasotocin varies seasonally. We show that treatment of nonreproductive male green treefrogs with melatonin-filled silastic implants for 4 weeks during the winter does not alter vasotocin-IR cell number in any brain region (i.e. nucleus accumbens, amygdala, preoptic area, suprachiasmatic nucleus or ventral hypothalamus). Taken together, these results suggest that the influence of melatonin on AVT is associated with sex and seasonal variation in melatonin receptor expression. We tested this hypothesis by using immunohistochemistry to characterise the distribution of melatonin receptor type 1 (MT1, also known as Mel1a) in the brain of reproductive and nonreproductive male and female frogs. We quantified MT1-IR cell number in regions known to contain AVT cell populations. Reproductive males had significantly more MT1-IR cells than nonreproductive males in all brain regions, including the combined nucleus accumbens, diagonal band of Broca and septum, striatum, amygdala, combined preoptic area and suprachiasmatic nucleus, as well as the ventral hypothalamus. In the accumbens region, where the effect of melatonin on AVT is known to be sexually dimorphic, males had significantly more MT1-IR cells than females during the summer breeding season. Based on these findings, we suggest that MT1 plays a role in mediating the interactions between melatonin and

  4. Brain innate immunity in the regulation of neuroinflammation: therapeutic strategies by modulating CD200-CD200R interaction involve the cannabinoid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernangómez, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Mecha, Miriam; Correa, Fernando; Mestre, Leyre; Loría, Frida; Feliú, Ana; Docagne, Fabian; Guaza, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) innate immune response includes an arsenal of molecules and receptors expressed by professional phagocytes, glial cells and neurons that is involved in host defence and clearance of toxic and dangerous cell debris. However, any uncontrolled innate immune responses within the CNS are widely recognized as playing a major role in the development of autoimmune disorders and neurodegeneration, with multiple sclerosis (MS) Alzheimer's disease (AD) being primary examples. Hence, it is important to identify the key regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of CNS innate immunity and which could be harnessed to explore novel therapeutic avenues. Neuroimmune regulatory proteins (NIReg) such as CD95L, CD200, CD47, sialic acid, complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD46, fH, C3a), HMGB1, may control the adverse immune responses in health and diseases. In the absence of these regulators, when neurons die by apoptosis, become infected or damaged, microglia and infiltrating immune cells are free to cause injury as well as an adverse inflammatory response in acute and chronic settings. We will herein provide new emphasis on the role of the pair CD200-CD200R in MS and its experimental models: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's virus induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The interest of the cannabinoid system as inhibitor of inflammation prompt us to introduce our findings about the role of endocannabinoids (eCBs) in promoting CD200-CD200 receptor (CD200R) interaction and the benefits caused in TMEV-IDD. Finally, we also review the current data on CD200-CD200R interaction in AD, as well as, in the aging brain. PMID:24588829

  5. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko, E-mail: mfunada@ncnp.go.jp

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  6. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB1 receptors

  7. High-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of corticotropin-releasing factor and its type-1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-qun CHEN; Fan-ping KONG; Yang ZHAO; Ji-zeng DU

    2012-01-01

    High-altitude hypoxia can induce physiological dysfunction and mountain sickness,but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood.Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF type-1 receptors (CRFR1) are members of the CRF family and the essential controllers of the physiological activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and modulators of endocrine and behavioral activity in response to various stressors.We have previously found that high-altitude hypoxia induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network through activation of CRF and CRFR1 in the brain and periphery that include activation of the HPA axis in a time-and dose-dependent manner,impaired or improved learning and memory,and anxiety-like behavioral change.Meanwhile,hypoxia induces dysfunctions of the hypothalamo-pituitary-endocrine and immune systems,including suppression of growth and development,as well as inhibition of reproductive,metabolic and immune functions.In contrast,the small mammals that live on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau alpine meadow display low responsiveness to extreme high-altitudehypoxia challenge,suggesting well-acclimatized genes and a physiological strategy that developed during evolution through interact-ions between the genes and environment.All the findings provide evidence for understanding the neuroendocrine mechanisms of hypoxia-induced physiological dysfunction.This review extends these findings.

  8. Cannabinoid receptor 2: Potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation Review

    OpenAIRE

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB1, CB2) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthr...

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Cannabinoids in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leweke, F Markus; Mueller, Juliane K; Lange, Bettina; Rohleder, Cathrin

    2016-04-01

    Over recent years, the interest in the endocannabinoid system (ECS) as a new target for the treatment of schizophrenia has evolved. The ECS represents one of the most relevant neurotransmitter systems in the brain and mainly fulfills a homeostatic role in terms of neurotransmission but also with respect to inflammatory processes. Two main approaches to the modulation of endocannabinoid functioning have been chosen so far. First, the selective blockade or inverse agonism of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor has been tested for the improvement of acute psychotic symptoms, as well as for the improvement of cognitive functions in schizophrenia. This was not effective in either case. Second, the modulation of endocannabinoid levels by use of the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol and selective fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors has been proposed, and the antipsychotic properties of cannabidiol are currently being investigated in humans. Unfortunately, for most of these trials that have focused on psychopathological and cognitive effects of cannabidiol, no published data are available. However, there is first evidence that cannabidiol may ameliorate psychotic symptoms with a superior side-effect profile compared with established antipsychotics. In conclusion, several clinical trials targeting the ECS in acute schizophrenia have either been completed or are underway. Although publicly available results are currently limited, preliminary data indicate that selected compounds modulating the ECS may be effective in acute schizophrenia. Nevertheless, so far, sample sizes of patients investigated are not sufficient to come to a final judgment, and no maintenance studies are available to ensure long-term efficacy and safety. PMID:26852073

  10. Acute and chronic effects of cannabinoids on human brain: gene-environment interactions related to psychiatric disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Batalla Cases, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Tesi realitzada a l'Institut Clínic de Neurociències / Hospital Clínic 1) Introduction Cannabis use has been associated to mental health problems and worsened outcome of established psychiatric disorders. Disturbances of the endocannabinoid system may be responsible for long-lasting effects, such as neuropsychological deficits and morphological brain alterations. As not all the exposed individuals are equally affected, proneness to cannabis induced impairment may rely on key factors su...

  11. Cannabinoids go nuclear: evidence for activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, S E

    2007-01-01

    Cannabinoids act at two classical cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a 7TM orphan receptor and the transmitter-gated channel transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 receptor. Recent evidence also points to cannabinoids acting at members of the nuclear receptor family, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, with three subtypes α, β (δ) and γ), which regulate cell differentiation and lipid metabolism. Much evidence now suggests that endocannabinoids are natural activators o...

  12. Cannabinoids and zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akhtar, Muhammad Tayyab

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of terpenophenolic compounds and are naturally found in the cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L). Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) is the psychoactive cannabinoid. The high lipophilicity of Δ9-THC is a hindering factor in the further development of this compound into a large s

  13. Long-term consequences of adolescent cannabinoid exposure in adult psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eRenard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug among adolescents and young adults. Unique cognitive, emotional, and social changes occur during this critical period of development from childhood into adulthood. The adolescent brain is in a state of transition and differs from the adult brain with respect to both anatomy (e.g., neuronal connections and morphology and neurochemistry (e.g., dopamine, GABA, and glutamate. These changes are thought to support the emergence of adult cerebral processes and behaviors. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role in development by acting on synaptic plasticity, neuronal cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Delta-9-tetrahydrocanabinol (THC, the principal psychoactive component in marijuana, acts as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R. Thus, over-activation of the endocannabinoid system by chronic exposure to CB1R agonists (e.g. THC, CP-55,940, and WIN55,212-2 during adolescence can dramatically alter brain maturation and cause long-lasting neurobiological changes that ultimately affect the function and behavior of the adult brain. Indeed, emerging evidence from both human and animal studies demonstrates that early-onset marijuana use has long-lasting consequences on cognition; moreover, in humans, this use is associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of developing a psychotic disorder. Here, we review the relationship between cannabinoid exposure during adolescence and the increased risk of neuropsychiatric disorders, focusing on both clinical and animal studies.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  15. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Jonathan A; Sawaya, Ronald Andari; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2011-12-01

    Coinciding with the increasing rates of cannabis abuse has been the recognition of a new clinical condition known as Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is characterized by chronic cannabis use, cyclic episodes of nausea and vomiting, and frequent hot bathing. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome occurs by an unknown mechanism. Despite the well-established anti-emetic properties of marijuana, there is increasing evidence of its paradoxical effects on the gastrointestinal tract and CNS. Tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and cannabigerol are three cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant with opposing effects on the emesis response. The clinical course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome may be divided into three phases: prodromal, hyperemetic, and recovery phase. The hyperemetic phase usually ceases within 48 hours, and treatment involves supportive therapy with fluid resuscitation and anti-emetic medications. Patients often demonstrate the learned behavior of frequent hot bathing, which produces temporary cessation of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The broad differential diagnosis of nausea and vomiting often leads to delay in the diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome shares several similarities with CHS and the two conditions are often confused. Knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and natural course of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome is limited and requires further investigation. PMID:22150623

  16. Case Series of Synthetic Cannabinoid Intoxication from One Toxicology Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Katz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoid use has risen at alarming rates. This case series describes 11 patients exposed to the synthetic cannabinoid, MAB-CHMINACA who presented to an emergency department with life-threatening toxicity including obtundation, severe agitation, seizures and death. All patients required sedatives for agitation, nine required endotracheal intubation, three experienced seizures, and one developed hyperthermia. One developed anoxic brain injury, rhabdomyolysis and died. A significant number were pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment was aggressive sedation and respiratory support. Synthetic cannabinoids pose a major public health risk. Emergency physicians must be aware of their clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

  17. A Stress-Related Peptide Bombesin Centrally Induces Frequent Urination through Brain Bombesin Receptor Types 1 and 2 in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Shimizu, Shogo; Higashi, Youichirou; Nakamura, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Naoki; Saito, Motoaki

    2016-03-01

    Stress exacerbates symptoms of bladder dysfunction including overactive bladder and bladder pain syndrome, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Bombesin-like peptides and bombesin receptor types 1 and 2 (BB1 and BB2, respectively) in the brain have been implicated in the mediation/integration of stress responses. In this study, we examined effects of centrally administered bombesin on micturition, focusing on their dependence on 1) the sympathoadrenomedullary system (a representative mechanism activated by stress exposure) and 2) brain BB receptors in urethane-anesthetized (1.0-1.2 g/kg, i.p.) male rats. Intracerebroventricularly administered bombesin significantly shortened intercontraction intervals (ICI) at both doses (0.1 and 1 nmol/animal) without affecting maximal voiding pressure. Bombesin at 1 nmol induced significant increments of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels, which were both abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. On the other hand, adrenalectomy showed no effects on the bombesin-induced shortening of ICI. Much lower doses of bombesin (0.01 and 0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) dose-dependently shortened ICI. Pretreatment with either a BB1 receptor antagonist (BIM-23127; d-Nal-cyclo[Cys-Tyr-d-Trp-Orn-Val-Cys]-Nal-NH2; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) or a BB2 receptor antagonist (BEA; H-d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Leu-NHEt; 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), respectively, suppressed the BB (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced shortening of ICI, whereas each antagonist by itself (1 and 3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) had no significant effects on ICI. Bombesin (0.03 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) significantly reduced voided volume per micturition and bladder capacity without affecting postvoid residual volume or voiding efficiency. These results suggest that brain bombesin and BB receptors are involved in facilitation of the rat micturition reflex to induce bladder overactivity, which is independent of the sympathoadrenomedullary outflow modulation. PMID:26729307

  18. Type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Matilda; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with unintentional sleep attacks and cataplexy. The disorder is caused by a loss of hypocretinergic neurons in the brain. The specific loss of these neurons in narcolepsy is thought to result from an autoimmune...... attack, and this is supported by evidence of both environmental and genetic factors pointing toward an involvement of the immune system. However, definitive proof of an autoimmune etiology is still missing. Several different immune-mediated disorders targeting neurons are known, and many of these are...... believed to be caused by autoreactive CD8(+) T cells. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on CD8(+) T cell-mediated neuronal damage on the basis of our understanding of other autoimmune disorders and experimental studies. We identify major histocompatibility complex class I presentation of...

  19. Effect of Cannabinoid Receptor Activation on Spreading Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Hadi; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Speckmann, Erwin-Josef; Gorji, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s):The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cannabinoid on cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Cannabis has been used for centuries for both symptomatic and prophylactic treatment of different types of headaches including migraine. CSD is believed to be a putative neuronal mechanism underlying migraine aura and subsequent pain. Materials and Methods:The effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as, cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists ...

  20. Activation of cannabinoid system in anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex modulates cost-benefit decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Abbas; Kermani, Mojtaba; Hesam, Soghra; Haghparast, Abbas; Argandoña, Enrike G; Rainer, Gregor

    2015-06-01

    Despite the evidence for altered decision making in cannabis abusers, the role of the cannabinoid system in decision-making circuits has not been studied. Here, we examined the effects of cannabinoid modulation during cost-benefit decision making in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), key brain areas involved in decision making. We trained different groups of rats in a delay-based and an effort-based form of cost-benefit T-maze decision-making task. During test days, the rats received local injections of either vehicle or ACEA, a cannabinoid type-1 receptor (CB1R) agonist in the ACC or OFC. We measured spontaneous locomotor activity following the same treatments and characterized CB1Rs localization on different neuronal populations within these regions using immunohistochemistry. We showed that CB1R activation in the ACC impaired decision making such that rats were less willing to invest physical effort to gain high reward. Similarly, CB1R activation in the OFC induced impulsive pattern of choice such that rats preferred small immediate rewards to large delayed rewards. Control tasks ensured that the effects were specific for differential cost-benefit tasks. Furthermore, we characterized widespread colocalizations of CB1Rs on GABAergic axonal ends but few colocalizations on glutamatergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic neuronal ends. These results provide first direct evidence that the cannabinoid system plays a critical role in regulating cost-benefit decision making in the ACC and OFC and implicate cannabinoid modulation of synaptic ends of predominantly interneurons and to a lesser degree other neuronal populations in these two frontal regions. PMID:25529106

  1. Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Cannabis and Cannabinoids (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to ... treatment (see Question 9 ). Questions and Answers About Cannabis What is Cannabis ? Cannabis , also known as marijuana , ...

  2. Prevention of Alzheimer's disease pathology by cannabinoids: Neuroprotection mediated by blockade of microglial activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, B.G.; Blázquez, Cristina; Gómez del Pulgar, Teresa; Guzmán, M.; De Ceballos, ML

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by enhanced β-amyloid peptide (βA) deposition along with glial activation in senile plaques, selective neuronal loss, and cognitive deficits. Cannabinoids are neuroprotective agents against excitotoxicity in vitro and acute brain damage in vivo. This background prompted us to study the localization, expression, and function of cannabinoid receptors in AD and the possible protective role of cannabinoids after βA treatment, both in vivo and in vitro. He...

  3. CHROMENOPYRAZOLES: NON-PSYCHOACTIVE AND SELECTIVE CB1 CANNABINOID AGONISTS WITH PERIPHERAL ANTINOCICEPTIVE PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Cumella, Jose; Hernández-Folgado, Laura; Girón, Rocio; Sánchez, Eva; Morales, Paula; Hurst, Dow P.; Gómez-Cañas, Maria; Gómez-Ruiz, Maria; Pinto, Diana C. G. A.; Goya, Pilar; Reggio, Patricia H; Martin, María Isabel; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Artur M. S. Silva; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2012-01-01

    The unwanted psychoactive effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists have limited their development as medicines. These CB1 mediated side effects are due to the fact that CB1 receptors are largely expressed in the Central Nervous System (CNS). Since it is known that CB1 receptors are also located peripherally, there is a growing interest in targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the brain. A library of chromenopyrazoles designed in analogy to the classical cannabinoid cannabinol were s...

  4. Emerging strategies for exploiting cannabinoid receptor agonists as medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2009-02-01

    Medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor are already in the clinic. These are Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) and Sativex (Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol with cannabidiol). The first two of these medicines can be prescribed to reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Marinol can also be prescribed to stimulate appetite, while Sativex is prescribed for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in adults with multiple sclerosis and as an adjunctive analgesic treatment for adult patients with advanced cancer. One challenge now is to identify additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists, and a number of potential clinical applications for such agonists are mentioned in this review. A second challenge is to develop strategies that will improve the efficacy and/or the benefit-to-risk ratio of a cannabinoid receptor agonist. This review focuses on five strategies that have the potential to meet either or both of these objectives. These are strategies that involve: (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier; (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue; (iii) targeting up-regulated cannabinoid receptors; (iv) targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors; or (v) 'multi-targeting'. Preclinical data that justify additional research directed at evaluating the clinical importance of each of these strategies are also discussed. PMID:19226257

  5. Pregnenolone Can Protect the Brain from Cannabis Intoxication

    OpenAIRE

    Vallee, M; Vitiello, S.; Bellocchio, L.; Hebert-Chatelain, E.; Monlezun, S.; Martin-Garcia, E.; Kasanetz, F.; Baillie, G. L.; Panin, F.; Cathala, A.; Roullot-Lacarriere, V.; Fabre, S.; Hurst, D. P.; Lynch, D. L.; Shore, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnenolone is considered the inactive precursor of all steroid hormones and its potential functional effects have been largely neglected. The administration of the main active principle of Cannabis sativa (marijuana) Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) substantially increases the synthesis of pregnenolone in the brain via the activation of type-1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor. Pregnenolone then, acting as a signaling specific inhibitor of the CB1 receptor, reduces several effects of THC. This negati...

  6. Diabetes, Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Riazi, Afsane; Bradley, Clare

    2007-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the role of psychological stress in Type 1 diabetes. Studies relating to stress and Type 1 diabetes onset and control, as well as the evidence relating to stress management training in people with Type 1 diabetes are discussed.

  7. Cellular mechanisms underlying the interaction between cannabinoid and opioid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolaro, D; Rubino, T; Viganò, D; Massi, P; Guidali, C; Realini, N

    2010-04-01

    Recently, the presence of functional interaction between the opioid and cannabinoid system has been shown in various pharmacological responses. Although there is an increasing interest for the feasible therapeutic application of a co-administration of cannabinoids and opioids in some disorders (i.e. to manage pain, to modulate immune system and emotions) and the combined use of the two drugs by drug abusers is becoming largely diffuse, only few papers focused on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this interaction. This review updates the biochemical and molecular underpinnings of opioid and cannabinoid interaction, both within the central nervous system and periphery. The most convincing theory for the explanation of this reciprocal interaction involves (i) the release of opioid peptides by cannabinoids or endocannabinoids by opioids, (ii) the existence of a direct receptor-receptor interaction when the receptors are co-expressed in the same cells, and (iii) the interaction of their intracellular pathways. Finally, the cannabinoid/opioid interaction might be different in the brain rewarding networks and in those accounting for other pharmacological effects (antinociception, modulation of emotionality and cognitive behavior), as well as between the central nervous system and periphery. Further insights about the cannabinoid/opioid interaction could pave the way for new and promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:20017730

  8. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  9. Cannabinoids: Medical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrot, Richard J; Hubbard, John R

    2016-05-01

    Herbal cannabis has been used for thousands of years for medical purposes. With elucidation of the chemical structures of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) and with discovery of the human endocannabinoid system, the medical usefulness of cannabinoids has been more intensively explored. While more randomized clinical trials are needed for some medical conditions, other medical disorders, like chronic cancer and neuropathic pain and certain symptoms of multiple sclerosis, have substantial evidence supporting cannabinoid efficacy. While herbal cannabis has not met rigorous FDA standards for medical approval, specific well-characterized cannabinoids have met those standards. Where medical cannabis is legal, patients typically see a physician who "certifies" that a benefit may result. Physicians must consider important patient selection criteria such as failure of standard medical treatment for a debilitating medical disorder. Medical cannabis patients must be informed about potential adverse effects, such as acute impairment of memory, coordination and judgment, and possible chronic effects, such as cannabis use disorder, cognitive impairment, and chronic bronchitis. In addition, social dysfunction may result at work/school, and there is increased possibility of motor vehicle accidents. Novel ways to manipulate the endocannbinoid system are being explored to maximize benefits of cannabinoid therapy and lessen possible harmful effects. Key messages The medical disorders with the current best evidence that supports a benefit for cannabinoid use are the following: multiple sclerosis patient-reported symptoms of spasticity (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis central pain or painful spasms (nabiximols, nabilone, dronabinol, and oral cannabis extract), multiple sclerosis bladder frequency (nabiximols), and chronic cancer pain/neuropathic pain (nabiximols and smoked THC). Herbal cannabis has not met rigorous US FDA

  10. Structure of a cannabinoid receptor and functional expression of the cloned cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, L A; Lolait, S J; Brownstein, M J; Young, A C; Bonner, T I

    1990-08-01

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS) in a complex and dose-dependent manner. Although CNS depression and analgesia are well documented effects of the cannabinoids, the mechanisms responsible for these and other cannabinoid-induced effects are not so far known. The hydrophobic nature of these substances has suggested that cannabinoids resemble anaesthetic agents in their action, that is, they nonspecifically disrupt cellular membranes. Recent evidence, however, has supported a mechanism involving a G protein-coupled receptor found in brain and neural cell lines, and which inhibits adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-dependent, stereoselective and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. Also, the receptor is more responsive to psychoactive cannabinoids than to non-psychoactive cannabinoids. Here we report the cloning and expression of a complementary DNA that encodes a G protein-coupled receptor with all of these properties. Its messenger RNA is found in cell lines and regions of the brain that have cannabinoid receptors. These findings suggest that this protein is involved in cannabinoid-induced CNS effects (including alterations in mood and cognition) experienced by users of marijuana. PMID:2165569

  11. Cannabinoids Occlude the HIV-1 Tat-Induced Decrease in GABAergic Neurotransmission in Prefrontal Cortex Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changqing; Hermes, Douglas J; Mackie, Ken; Lichtman, Aron H; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Fitting, Sylvia

    2016-06-01

    In the era of combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is now considered a chronic disease that specifically targets the brain and causes HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Endocannabinoids exhibit neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties in several central nervous system (CNS) disease models, but their effects in HAND are poorly understood. To address this issue, whole-cell recordings were performed on young (14-24 day old) C57BL/6J mice. We investigated the actions of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2 (1 μM) and the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA, 1 μM) in the presence of HIV-1 Tat on GABAergic neurotransmission in mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) slices. We found a Tat concentration-dependent (5-50 nM) decrease in the frequency and amplitude of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). The cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist rimonabant (1 μM) and zero extracellular calcium prevented the significant Tat-induced decrease in mIPSCs. Further, bath-applied WIN55,212-2 or AEA by itself, significantly decreased the frequency, but not amplitude of mIPSCs and/or spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs), and occluded a further downregulation of IPSCs by Tat. Pretreatment with rimonabant but not the CB2R antagonist AM630 (1 μM) prevented the WIN55,212-2- and AEA-induced decrease in IPSCs frequency without any further Tat effect. Results indicated a Tat-induced decrease in GABAergic neurotransmission, which was occluded by cannabinoids via a CB1R-related mechanism. Understanding the relationship between Tat toxicity and endocannabinoid signaling has the potential to identify novel therapeutic interventions to benefit individuals suffering from HAND and other cognitive impairments. PMID:26993829

  12. Neuron-type specific cannabinoid-mediated G protein signalling in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindel, Frauke; Lerner, Raissa; Häring, Martin; Ruehle, Sabine; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Monory, Krisztina

    2013-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is expressed in different neuronal populations in the mammalian brain. In particular, CB1 on GABAergic or glutamatergic neurons exerts different functions and display different pharmacological properties in vivo. This suggests the existence of neuron-type specific signalling pathways activated by different subpopulations of CB1. In this study, we analysed CB1 expression, binding and signalling in the hippocampus of conditional mutant mice, bearing CB1 deletion in GABAergic (GABA-CB1-KO mice) or cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1-KO mice). Compared to their wild-type littermates, Glu-CB1-KO displayed a small decrease of CB1 mRNA amount, immunoreactivity and [³H]CP55,940 binding. Conversely, GABA-CB1-KO mice showed a drastic reduction of these parameters, confirming that CB1 is present at much higher density on hippocampal GABAergic interneurons than glutamatergic neurons. Surprisingly, however, saturation analysis of HU210-stimulated [(35) S]GTPγS binding demonstrated that 'glutamatergic' CB1 is more efficiently coupled to G protein signalling than 'GABAergic' CB1. Thus, the minority of CB1 on glutamatergic neurons is paradoxically several fold more strongly coupled to G protein signalling than 'GABAergic' CB1. This selective signalling mechanism raises the possibility of designing novel cannabinoid ligands that differentially activate only a subset of physiological effects of CB1 stimulation, thereby optimizing therapeutic action. PMID:23289830

  13. Cannabinoid modulation of drug reward and the implications of marijuana legalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Dan P; Wenzel, Jennifer M; Cheer, Joseph F

    2015-12-01

    Marijuana is the most popular illegal drug worldwide. Recent trends indicate that this may soon change; not due to decreased marijuana use, but to an amendment in marijuana's illegal status. The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor mediates marijuana's psychoactive and reinforcing properties. CB1 receptors are also part of the brain endocannabinoid (eCB) system and support numerous forms of learning and memory, including the conditioned reinforcing properties of cues predicting reward or punishment. This is accomplished via eCB-dependent alterations in mesolimbic dopamine function, which plays an obligatory role in reward learning and motivation. Presynaptic CB1 receptors control midbrain dopamine neuron activity and thereby shape phasic dopamine release in target regions, particularly the nucleus accumbens (NAc). By also regulating synaptic input to the NAc, CB1 receptors modulate NAc output onto downstream neurons of the basal ganglia motor circuit, and thereby support goal-directed behaviors. Abused drugs promote short- and long-term adaptations in eCB-regulation of mesolimbic dopamine function, and thereby hijack neural systems related to the pursuit of rewards to promote drug abuse. By pharmacologically targeting the CB1 receptors, marijuana has preferential access to this neuronal system and can potently alter eCB-dependent processing of reward-related stimuli. As marijuana legalization progresses, greater access to this drug should increase the utility of marijuana as a research tool to better understand the eCB system, which has the potential to advance cannabinoid-based treatments for drug addiction. PMID:25463025

  14. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  15. Pharmacokinetics of Cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    McGilveray, Iain J

    2005-01-01

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ-9-THC) is the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis (marijuana). The present review focuses on the pharmacokinetics of THC, but also includes known information for cannabinol and cannabidiol, as well as the synthetic marketed cannabinoids, dronabinol (synthetic THC) and nabilone. The variability of THC in plant material (0.3% to 30%) leads to variability in tissue THC levels from smoking, which is, in itself, a highly individual process. THC bioavailability ...

  16. Hippocampal Cannabinoid Transmission Modulates Dopamine Neuron Activity: Impact on Rewarding Memory Formation and Social Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Loureiro, Michael; Renard, Justine; Zunder, Jordan; Laviolette, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) signaling have been linked to emotional and cognitive deficits characterizing neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Thus, there is growing interest in characterizing the relationship between cannabinoid transmission, emotional processing, and dopamine (DA)-dependent behavioral deficits. The CB1R is highly expressed in the mammalian nervous system, particularly in the hippocampus. Activation of the ventral hippocampal subregion ...

  17. Effects of Insulin Detemir and NPH Insulin on Body Weight and Appetite-Regulating Brain Regions in Human Type 1 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Golen, van, L.W.; Veltman, D.; IJzerman, R. G.; Deijen, J.B.; Heijboer, A.C.; Barkhof, F; Drent, M.L.; Diamant, M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies in rodents have demonstrated that insulin in the central nervous system induces satiety. In humans, these effects are less well established. Insulin detemir is a basal insulin analog that causes less weight gain than other basal insulin formulations, including the current standard intermediate-long acting Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin. Due to its structural modifications, which render the molecule more lipophilic, it was proposed that insulin detemir enters the brain more r...

  18. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 ...

  19. Novel endogenous peptide agonists of cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Ivone; Grushko, Julia S.; Golebiewska, Urszula; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; Gupta, Achla; Heimann, Andrea S.; Ferro, Emer S.; Scarlata, Suzanne; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2009-01-01

    Hemopressin (Hp), a 9-residue α-hemoglobin-derived peptide, was previously reported to function as a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist (1). In this study, we report that mass spectrometry (MS) data from peptidomics analyses of mouse brain extracts identified N-terminally extended forms of Hp containing either three (RVD-Hpα) or two (VD-Hpα) additional amino acids, as well as a β-hemoglobin-derived peptide with sequence similarity to that of hemopressin (VD-Hpβ). Characterization of the α-he...

  20. Neuropathology does not Correlate with Regional Differences in the Extent of Expansion of CTG Repeats in the Brain with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1) is known to be an adult-onset muscular dystrophy caused by the expansion of CTG repeats within the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophin myotonin protein kinase (DMPK) gene. The clinical features of DM1 include CNS symptoms, such as cognitive impairment and personality changes, the pathogenesis of which remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that the distribution of neuropathological changes might be correlated with the extent of the length of the CTG repeats in the DMPK genes in DM1 patients. We studied the neuropathological changes in the brains of subjects with DM1 and investigated the extent of somatic instability in terms of CTG repeat expansion in the different brain regions of the same individuals by Southern blot analysis. The neuropathological changes included état criblé in the cerebral deep white matter and neurofibrillary tangles immunoreactive for phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, both of which were compatible with the subcortical dementia in DM1 patients. However, the length of the CTG repeats did not correlate with the regional differences in the extent of neuropathological changes. Our data suggested that pathomechanisms of dementia in DM1 might be more multifactorial rather than a toxic gain-of-function due to mutant RNA

  1. Diabetes mellitus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Tøraasen, Lisa Vangen; Al-Sultan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Hvert år blir rundt 600 nordmenn diagnostisert med sykdommen diabetes type 1, og Norge er et av landene i verden med størst andel av barnediabetes. I dag er det 15 000- 20 000 personer i Norge som har diabetes type 1, og antall barn som får diabetes har fordoblet seg de siste 30 årene (Diabetesforbundet, 2014). Problemstillingen vår gikk ut på hvordan sykepleiere kan veilede og undervise ungdom med nyoppdaget diabetes type på sykehus. Ut i fra litteraturstudiet har vi arbeidet oss frem for å ...

  2. The endogenous cannabinoid system protects against colonic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, Federico; MARSICANO, Giovanni; Hermann, Heike; Cannich, Astrid; Monory, Krisztina; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Sibaev, Andrei; Storr, Martin; Lutz, Beat

    2004-01-01

    Excessive inflammatory responses can emerge as a potential danger for organisms’ health. Physiological balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory processes constitutes an important feature of responses against harmful events. Here, we show that cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) mediate intrinsic protective signals that counteract proinflammatory responses. Both intrarectal infusion of 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) and oral administration of dextrane sulfate sodium induced stronger ...

  3. Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsch, Jürg; Leonti, Marco; Raduner, Stefan; Racz, Ildiko; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Xie, Xiang-Qun; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (Ki = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis. Molecular docking simulations have identified a putative binding site of (E)-BCP in the CB2 receptor, showing ligand π–π stacking interactions with residues F117 and W258. Upon binding to the CB2 receptor, (E)-BCP inhibits adenylate cylcase, leads to intracellular calcium transients and weakly activates the mitogen-activated kinases Erk1/2 and p38 in primary human monocytes. (E)-BCP (500 nM) inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood and attenuates LPS-stimulated Erk1/2 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation in monocytes. Furthermore, peroral (E)-BCP at 5 mg/kg strongly reduces the carrageenan-induced inflammatory response in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking CB2 receptors, providing evidence that this natural product exerts cannabimimetic effects in vivo. These results identify (E)-BCP as a functional nonpsychoactive CB2 receptor ligand in foodstuff and as a macrocyclic antiinflammatory cannabinoid in Cannabis. PMID:18574142

  4. Cannabinoid conditioned reward and aversion: behavioral and neural processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jennifer E; Bevins, Rick A

    2010-03-10

    The discovery that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) is the primary psychoactive ingredient in marijuana prompted research that helped elucidate the endogenous cannabinoid system of the brain. Δ(9)-THC and other cannabinoid ligands with agonist action (CP 55,940, HU210, and WIN 55,212-2) increase firing of dopamine neurons and increase synaptic dopamine in brain regions associated with reward and drug addiction. Such changes in cellular processes have prompted investigators to examine the conditioned rewarding effects of the cannabinoid ligands using the place conditioning task with rats and mice. As reviewed here, these cannabinoid ligands can condition place preferences (evidence for rewarding effects) and place aversions (evidence for aversive qualities). Notably, the procedural details used in these place conditioning studies have varied across laboratories. Such variation includes differences in apparatus type, existence of procedural biases, dose, number of conditioning trials, injection-to-placement intervals, and pre-training drug exposure. Some differences in outcome across studies can be explained by these procedural variables. For example, low doses of Δ(9)-THC appear to have conditioned rewarding effects, whereas higher doses have aversive effects that either mask these rewarding effects or condition a place aversion. Throughout this review we highlight key areas that need further research. PMID:20495676

  5. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K. Luan

    2013-01-01

    Pre-extinction administration of ∆9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely involves via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a fu...

  6. Identification of Essential Cannabinoid-binding Domains: STRUCTURAL INSIGHTS INTO EARLY DYNAMIC EVENTS IN RECEPTOR ACTIVATION*

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Bertalovitz, Alexander C.; Kendall, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    The classical cannabinoid agonist HU210, a structural analog of (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, binds to brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and activates signal transduction pathways. To date, an exact molecular description of the CB1 receptor is not yet available. Utilizing the minor binding pocket of the CB1 receptor as the primary ligand interaction site, we explored HU210 binding using lipid bilayer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among the potential ligand contact residues, we identifie...

  7. Ghrelin and cannabinoids require the ghrelin receptor to affect cellular energy metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Chung Thong; Kola, Blerina; Feltrin, Daniel; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ghrelin is a potent orexigenic brain-gut peptide with lipogenic and diabetogenic effects, possibly mediated by growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a). Cannabinoids also have orexigenic and lipogenic effects. AMPK is a regulator of energy homeostasis and we have previously shown that ghrelin and cannabinoids stimulate hypothalamic AMPK activity while inhibiting it in the liver and adipose tissue, suggesting that AMPK mediates both the central appetite-inducing and peripher...

  8. Cannabinoids promote embryonic and adult hippocampus neurogenesis and produce anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Yun; Xiao, Lan; Van Cleemput, Jamie; Ji, Shao-Ping; Bai, Guang; Zhang, Xia

    2005-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus in the adult mammalian brain contains neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) capable of generating new neurons, i.e., neurogenesis. Most drugs of abuse examined to date decrease adult hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of cannabis (marijuana or cannabinoids) on hippocampal neurogenesis remain unknown. This study aimed at investigating the potential regulatory capacity of the potent synthetic cannabinoid HU210 on hippocampal neurogenesis and its possible cor...

  9. Diabetes Mellitus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Trydal, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Hvert år får rundt 300 barn og 600 voksne diabetes mellitus type 1, og til sammen har rundt 28 000 personer denne sykdommen i Norge i dag. Det er en kronisk metabolsk sykdom, med en absolutt insulinmangel. Gjennom litteratur og forskning er det vist, at for å forebygge senkomplikasjoner, trenger pasienten informasjon, undervisning og praktisk veiledning når det gjelder medisinering, kosthold og fysisk aktivitet, og motivering til å mestre sykdommen. I praksis vil sykepleier spille en aktiv ro...

  10. Mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine; Schaffer, Julie V

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with numerous lentigines and multiple cafe-au-lait macules on both sides of the face, neck, and trunk as well as on the proximal area of the upper extremities and in the axillae. The pigmented lesions had a Blaschko-linear distribution on the upper trunk and were limited to the left side of the abdomen, with a sharp demarcation at the midline. Multiple, cutaneous neurofibromas were found on the trunk, and ophthalmologic examination showed a Lisch nodule in the left iris. The clinical findings and their widespread but segmental distribution were consistent with a diagnosis of mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1. PMID:18627742

  11. Beyond THC: the new generation of cannabinoid designer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana eFattore

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic cannabinoids are functionally similar to delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the psychoactive principle of cannabis, and bind to the same cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral organs. From 2008, synthetic cannabinoids were detected in herbal smoking mixtures sold on websites and in head shops under the brand name of Spice Gold, Yucatan Fire, Aroma, and others. Although these products (also known as Spice drugs or legal highs do not contain tobacco or cannabis, when smoked they produce effects similar to THC. Intoxication, withdrawal, psychosis and death have been recently reported after consumption, posing difficult social, political and health challenges. More than 140 different Spice products have been identified to date. The ability to induce strong cannabis-like psychoactive effects, along with the fact that they are readily available on the Internet, still legal in many countries, marketed as natural safe substances, and undetectable by conventional drug screening tests, has rendered these drugs very popular and particularly appealing to young and drug-naïve individuals seeking new experiences. An escalating number of compounds with cannabinoid receptor activity are currently being found as ingredients of Spice, of which almost nothing is known in terms of pharmacology, toxicology and safety. Since legislation started to control the synthetic cannabinoids identified in these herbal mixtures, many new analogs have appeared on the market. New cannabimimetic compounds are likely to be synthesized in the near future to replace banned synthetic cannabinoids, leading to a dog chasing its tail situation. Spice smokers are exposed to drugs that are extremely variable in composition and potency, and are at risk of serious, if not lethal, outcomes. Social and health professionals should maintain a high degree of alertness for Spice use and its possible psychiatric effects in vulnerable people.

  12. Cannabinoid system and cyclooxygenases inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Păunescu, H; Coman, OA; Coman, L.; Ghiţă, I; Georgescu, SR; Drăia, F; Fulga, I

    2011-01-01

    Rationale. The cannabinoid system consists of a complex array of receptors, substances with agonist/antagonist properties for those receptors, biosynthetic machineries and mechanisms for cellular uptake and degradation for endocannabinoids. This system is in interrelation with other systems that comprise lipid mediators like prostaglandins/leukotrienes systems. A clear antagonist, additive or synergic effect of nonsteroidal anti–inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)–cannabinoid associations was not yet...

  13. [Palliative pain therapy, cannabinoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, L; Elsner, F

    2005-10-01

    Cancer pain treatment should follow the recommendations of the World Health Organisation. Treatment should be with oral application, regular application times and following the analgesic step-ladder. Non-opioids such as dipyrone or non-steroids are used for slight to moderate pain, step-2 opioids such as tramadol or tilidine/naloxone for moderate pain and step-3 opioids such as morphine, oxycodone or hydromorphone for severe pain. Transdermal application of fentanyl or buprenorphine offer a non-invasive parenteral alternative for patients with stable pain syndromes. Cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol offer a valuable add-on option for cancer patients with refractory pain, spasticity, nausea or appetite loss. PMID:15965665

  14. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  15. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  16. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  17. Intracerebroventricular injections of dronabinol, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, does not attenuate serotonin-induced apnea in Sprague-Dawley rats

    OpenAIRE

    Calik, Michael W.; Carley, David W

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that vagal nerve activity may play a role in sleep apnea induction. In anesthetized rats, dronabinol, a cannabinoid (CB) receptor agonist, injected into the nodose ganglia attenuates reflex apnea and increases genioglossus activity, and reflex apnea attenuation is blocked by systemic pre-treatment with cannabinoid type 1 and/or type 2 receptor antagonists. However, it is unclear whether dronabinol has similar effects in the central nervous system; CB receptors are...

  18. MicroRNA let-7d is a target of cannabinoid CB1 receptor and controls cannabinoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarlone, Anna; Börner, Christine; Martín-Gómez, Laura; Jiménez-González, Ada; García-Concejo, Adrián; García-Bermejo, María L; Lorente, Mar; Blázquez, Cristina; García-Taboada, Elena; de Haro, Amador; Martella, Elisa; Höllt, Volker; Rodríguez, Raquel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Kraus, Jürgen; Guzmán, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor, the molecular target of endocannabinoids and cannabis active components, is one of the most abundant metabotropic receptors in the brain. Cannabis is widely used for both recreational and medicinal purposes. Despite the ever-growing fundamental roles of microRNAs in the brain, the possible molecular connections between the CB1 receptor and microRNAs are surprisingly unknown. Here, by using reporter gene constructs that express interaction sequences for microRNAs in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that CB1 receptor activation enhances the expression of several microRNAs, including let-7d. This was confirmed by measuring hsa-let-7d expression levels. Accordingly, knocking-down CB1 receptor in zebrafish reduced dre-let-7d levels, and knocking-out CB1 receptor in mice decreased mmu-let-7d levels in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Conversely, knocking-down let-7d increased CB1 receptor mRNA expression in zebrafish, SH-SY5Y cells and primary striatal neurons. Likewise, in primary striatal neurons chronically exposed to a cannabinoid or opioid agonist, a let-7d-inhibiting sequence facilitated not only cannabinoid or opioid signaling but also cannabinoid/opioid cross-signaling. Taken together, these findings provide the first evidence for a bidirectional link between the CB1 receptor and a microRNA, namely let-7d, and thus unveil a new player in the complex process of cannabinoid action. PMID:27179908

  19. Plant cannabinoids: a neglected pharmacological treasure trove

    OpenAIRE

    Mechoulam, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    Most of the cannabinoids in Cannabis sativa L. have not been fully evaluated for their pharmacological activity. A publication in this issue presents evidence that a plant cannabinoid, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin is a potent antagonist of anandamide, a major endogenous cannabinoid. It seems possible that many of the non-psychoactive constituents of this plant will be of biological interest.

  20. Effect of synthetic cannabinoid HU210 on memory deficits and neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Bromley-Brits, K; He, G; Cai, F; Zhang, X; Song, W

    2010-05-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to increase neurogenesis in adult brain, as well as protect neurons from excitotoxicity, calcium influx, inflammation, and ischemia. Recent studies have shown that synthetic cannabinoids can alleviate water maze impairments in rats treated with intracranial amyloid beta protein (Abeta); however it is unknown whether this effect is due to the cannabinoids' anti-inflammatory properties or whether it affects Abeta processing. Here we investigate whether cannabinoids have any effect on Alzheimer's disease in vivo. We found that HU210, a potent synthetic cannabinoid, did not improve water maze performance or a contextual fear conditioning task in an APP23/PS45 double transgenic mouse model of AD. HU210 had no effect on APP processing and Abeta generation, as well as neuritic plaque formation in the brains of AD transgenic mice. Our study showed that synthetic cannabinoid HU210 had no beneficial effects on AD neuropathology and behavioral deficits of AD model mice, which advises caution of such drug's application in AD therapies. PMID:20043809

  1. Cannabinoid receptor 2: potential role in immunomodulation and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Slava; Persidsky, Yuri

    2013-06-01

    An accumulating body of evidence suggests that endocannabinoids and cannabinoid receptors type 1 and 2 (CB(1), CB(2)) play a significant role in physiologic and pathologic processes, including cognitive and immune functions. While the addictive properties of marijuana, an extract from the Cannabis plant, are well recognized, there is growing appreciation of the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in multiple pathologic conditions involving chronic inflammation (inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, autoimmune disorders, multiple sclerosis, HIV-1 infection, stroke, Alzheimer's disease to name a few), mainly mediated by CB(2) activation. Development of CB(2) agonists as therapeutic agents has been hampered by the complexity of their intracellular signaling, relative paucity of highly selective compounds and insufficient data regarding end effects in the target cells and organs. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in studies of CB(2) activation in the setting of neuroinflammation, immunomodulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:23471521

  2. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors Modulate Kinase and Phosphatase Activity during Extinction of Conditioned Fear in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamprath, Kornelia; Hermann, Heike; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cannich, Astrid; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2004-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1) play a central role in both short-term and long-term extinction of auditory-cued fear memory. The molecular mechanisms underlying this function remain to be clarified. Several studies indicated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase with its downstream effector AKT, and…

  3. Cannabinoid modulation of neuroinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Viviane M; Rezende, Rafael M; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has been dedicated to the study of the endocannabinoid system. The isolation of Cannabis sativa main psychotropic compound, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has led to the discovery of an atypical neurotransmission system that modulates the release of other neurotransmitters and participates in many biological processes, including the cascade of inflammatory responses. In this context, cannabinoids have been studied for their possible therapeutic properties in neuroinflammatory diseases. In this review, historic and biochemical aspects of cannabinoids are discussed, as well as their function as modulators of inflammatory processes and therapeutic perspectives for neurodegenerative disorders, particularly, multiple sclerosis. PMID:23204985

  4. Cannabinoid receptor 1 suppresses transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-induced inflammatory responses to corneal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, Z; Varadaraj, K; Kumari, S.S.; Mergler, S; Okada, Y.; Saika, S.; Kingsley, P J; Marnett, L J; Reinach, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-induced suppression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation provides a therapeutic option to reduce inflammation and pain in different animal disease models through mechanisms involving dampening of TRPV1 activation and signaling events. As we found in both mouse corneal epithelium and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) that there is CB1 and TRPV1 expression colocalization based on overlap of coimmunostaining, we determined in m...

  5. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Thiophene-Based Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Radiotracers for PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ahmed; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Slavik, Roger; Weber, Markus; Mugnaini, Claudia; Ligresti, Alessia; Schibli, Roger; Mu, Linjing; Mensah Ametamey, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, our understanding of the endocannabinoid system has greatly improved due to the wealth of results obtained from exploratory studies. Currently, two cannabinoid receptor subtypes have been well-characterized. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) is widely expressed in the central nervous system, while the levels of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) in the brain and spinal cord of healthy individuals are relatively low. However, recent studies demonstrated a CB2 upregulation on activated microglia upon neuroinflammation, an indicator of neurodegeneration. Our research group aims to develop a suitable positron emission tomography (PET) tracer to visualize the CB2 receptor in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we report two novel thiophene-based 11C-labeled PET ligands designated [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778. The reference compounds were synthesized using Gewald reaction conditions to obtain the aminothiophene intermediates, followed by amide formation. Saponification of the esters provided their corresponding precursors. Binding affinity studies revealed Ki-values of 3.3 ± 0.5 nM (CB2) and 1.0 ± 0.2 μM (CB1) for AAT-015. AAT-778 showed similar Ki-values of 4.3 ± 0.7 nM (CB2) and 1.1 ± 0.1 μM (CB1). Radiosynthesis was carried out under basic conditions using [11C]iodomethane as methylating agent. After semi-preparative HPLC purification both radiolabeled compounds were obtained in 99% radiochemical purity and the radiochemical yields ranged from 12 to 37%. Specific activity was between 96 and 449 GBq/μmol for both tracers. In order to demonstrate CB2 specificity of [11C]AAT-015 and [11C]AAT-778, we carried out autoradiography studies using CB2-positive mouse/rat spleen tissues. The obtained results revealed unspecific binding in spleen tissue that was not blocked by an excess of CB2-specific ligand GW402833. For in vivo analysis, [11C]AAT-015 was administered to healthy rats via tail-vein injection

  6. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N; Sinha, Satyesh; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  7. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2 which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics.

  8. Small Molecules from Nature Targeting G-Protein Coupled Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Leads for Drug Discovery and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Charu; Sadek, Bassem; Goyal, Sameer N.; Sinha, Satyesh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid molecules are derived from Cannabis sativa plant which acts on the cannabinoid receptors types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) which have been explored as potential therapeutic targets for drug discovery and development. Currently, there are numerous cannabinoid based synthetic drugs used in clinical practice like the popular ones such as nabilone, dronabinol, and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediates its action through CB1/CB2 receptors. However, these synthetic based Cannabis derived compounds are known to exert adverse psychiatric effect and have also been exploited for drug abuse. This encourages us to find out an alternative and safe drug with the least psychiatric adverse effects. In recent years, many phytocannabinoids have been isolated from plants other than Cannabis. Several studies have shown that these phytocannabinoids show affinity, potency, selectivity, and efficacy towards cannabinoid receptors and inhibit endocannabinoid metabolizing enzymes, thus reducing hyperactivity of endocannabinoid systems. Also, these naturally derived molecules possess the least adverse effects opposed to the synthetically derived cannabinoids. Therefore, the plant based cannabinoid molecules proved to be promising and emerging therapeutic alternative. The present review provides an overview of therapeutic potential of ligands and plants modulating cannabinoid receptors that may be of interest to pharmaceutical industry in search of new and safer drug discovery and development for future therapeutics. PMID:26664449

  9. What Are Synthetic Cannabinoids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the same brain cell receptors as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the mind-altering ingredient in marijuana. So far, ... than marijuana to the cell receptors affected by THC, and may produce much stronger effects. The resulting ...

  10. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  11. Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ashley, Shanna L.; Welton, Amanda R.; Harwood, Kirsten M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Spindler, Katherine R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus. Here we determined the extent and functional importance of macrophage infection by MAV-1. Bone marrow-derived macrophages expressed MAV-1 mRNAs and proteins upon ex vivo infection. Adherent perito...

  12. Cannabinoid Control of Learning and Memory through HCN Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroso, Mattia; Szabo, Gergely G; Kim, Hannah K; Alexander, Allyson; Bui, Anh D; Lee, Sang-Hun; Lutz, Beat; Soltesz, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of cannabinoids on cognitive processes are not understood. Here we show that cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs) control hippocampal synaptic plasticity and spatial memory through the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that underlie the h-current (Ih), a key regulator of dendritic excitability. The CB1R-HCN pathway, involving c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs), nitric oxide synthase, and intracellular cGMP, exerts a tonic enhancement of Ih selectively in pyramidal cells located in the superficial portion of the CA1 pyramidal cell layer, whereas it is absent from deep-layer cells. Activation of the CB1R-HCN pathway impairs dendritic integration of excitatory inputs, long-term potentiation (LTP), and spatial memory formation. Strikingly, pharmacological inhibition of Ih or genetic deletion of HCN1 abolishes CB1R-induced deficits in LTP and memory. These results demonstrate that the CB1R-Ih pathway in the hippocampus is obligatory for the action of cannabinoids on LTP and spatial memory formation. PMID:26898775

  13. Pharmacological blockade of either cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rat

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Calvo, Eduardo; Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Vargas, Antonio; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Galeano, Pablo; Rubio, Leticia; Suárez, Juan; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, has recently been linked to alterations in adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates this proliferative response as demonstrated by the finding that pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors not only modulates neurogenesis but also modulates cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alter...

  14. Pharmacological blockade of either, cannabinoid CB1 or CB2 receptors, prevents both cocaine-induced conditioned locomotion and cocaine-induced reduction of cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adult male rats.

    OpenAIRE

    EDUARDO eBLANCO-CALVO; PATRICIA eRIVERA; SERGIO eARRABAL; ANTONIO eVARGAS; FRANCISCO JAVIER ePAVON; ANTONIA eSERRANO; PABLO eGALEANO; LETICIA eRUBIO; JUAN eSUAREZ; FERNANDO eRODRIGUEZ DE FONSECA

    2014-01-01

    Addiction to major drugs of abuse such as cocaine has been recently linked to alterations on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus. The endogenous cannabinoid system modulated this proliferative response since pharmacological activation/blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors by modulating not only neurogenesis but also cell death in the brain. In the present study, we evaluated whether the endogenous cannabinoid system affects cocaine-induced alterations in cell proliferation . To this...

  15. Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Orr; Karsak, Meliha; Leclerc, Nathalie; Fogel, Meirav; Frenkel, Baruch; Wright, Karen; Tam, Joseph; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kram, Vardit; Shohami, Esther; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Bab, Itai

    2006-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids bind to and activate two G protein-coupled receptors, the predominantly central cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Whereas CB1 mediates the cannabinoid psychotropic, analgesic, and orectic effects, CB2 has been implicated recently in the regulation of liver fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Here we show that CB2-deficient mice have a markedly accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and cortical expansion, although cortical thickness remains unaltered. These changes are reminiscent of human osteoporosis and may result from differential regulation of trabecular and cortical bone remodeling. The CB2–/– phenotype is also characterized by increased activity of trabecular osteoblasts (bone-forming cells), increased osteoclast (the bone-resorbing cell) number, and a markedly decreased number of diaphyseal osteoblast precursors. CB2 is expressed in osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts. A CB2-specific agonist that does not have any psychotropic effects enhances endocortical osteoblast number and activity and restrains trabecular osteoclastogenesis, apparently by inhibiting proliferation of osteoclast precursors and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression in bone marrow-derived osteoblasts/stromal cells. The same agonist attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss and markedly stimulates cortical thickness through the respective suppression of osteoclast number and stimulation of endocortical bone formation. These results demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is essential for the maintenance of normal bone mass by osteoblastic and osteoclastic CB2 signaling. Hence, CB2 offers a molecular target for the diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis, the most prevalent degenerative disease in developed countries. PMID:16407142

  16. An update on PPAR activation by cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    Some cannabinoids activate the different isoforms of PPARs (α, β and γ), as shown through the use of reporter gene assays, binding studies, selective antagonists and knockout studies. Activation of all isoforms, but primarily PPARα and γ, mediates some (but not all) of the analgesic, neuroprotective, neuronal function modulation, anti-inflammatory, metabolic, anti-tumour, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of some cannabinoids, often in conjunction with activation of the more traditional target sites of action such as the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and the TRPV1 ion channel. PPARs also mediate some of the effects of inhibitors of endocannabinoid degradation or transport. Cannabinoids may be chaperoned to the PPARs by fatty acid binding proteins. The aims of this review are to update the evidence supporting PPAR activation by cannabinoids and to review the physiological responses to cannabinoids that are mediated, and not mediated, by PPAR activation. PMID:27077495

  17. Loss of inhibition by brain natriuretic peptide over P2X3 receptors contributes to enhanced spike firing of trigeminal ganglion neurons in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenkova, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play an important role in pain pathologies, including migraine. In trigeminal neurons, P2X3Rs are constitutively downregulated by endogenous brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In a mouse knock-in (KI) model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 with upregulated calcium CaV2.1 channel function, trigeminal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability with gain-of-function of P2X3Rs and their deficient BNP-mediated inhibition. We studied whether the absent BNP-induced control over P2X3Rs activity in KI cultures may be functionally expressed in altered firing activity of KI trigeminal neurons. Patch-clamp experiments investigated the excitability of wild-type and KI trigeminal neurons induced by either current or agonists for P2X3Rs or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors. Consistent with the constitutive inhibition of P2X3Rs by BNP, sustained pharmacological block of BNP receptors selectively enhanced P2X3R-mediated excitability of wild-type neurons without affecting firing evoked by the other protocols. This effect included increased number of action potentials, lower spike threshold and shift of the firing pattern distribution toward higher spiking activity. Thus, inactivation of BNP signaling transformed the wild-type excitability phenotype into the one typical for KI. BNP receptor block did not influence excitability of KI neurons in accordance with the lack of BNP-induced P2X3R modulation. Our study suggests that, in wild-type trigeminal neurons, negative control over P2X3Rs by the BNP pathway is translated into tonic suppression of P2X3Rs-mediated excitability. Lack of this inhibition in KI cultures results in a hyperexcitability phenotype and might contribute to facilitated trigeminal pain transduction relevant for migraine. PMID:27346147

  18. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma. PMID:23899642

  19. Cannabinoids in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kogan, Natalya M.; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. preparations have been used in medicine for millenia. However, concern over the dangers of abuse led to the banning of the medicinal use of marijuana in most countries in the 1930s. Only recently, marijuana and individual natural and synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as chemically related compounds, whose mechanism of action is still obscure, have come back to being considered of therapeutic value. However, their use is highly restricted. Desp...

  20. Cannabinoid Modulation of Neuroinflammatory Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Viviane M; Rezende, Rafael M; Teixeira, Antonio L.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a growing interest has been dedicated to the study of the endocannabinoid system. The isolation of Cannabis sativa main psychotropic compound, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has led to the discovery of an atypical neurotransmission system that modulates the release of other neurotransmitters and participates in many biological processes, including the cascade of inflammatory responses. In this context, cannabinoids have been studied for their possible therapeutic properties i...

  1. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. PMID:24006213

  2. Feeding induced by cannabinoids is mediated independently of the melanocortin system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puspha Sinnayah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, stimulate appetite, and cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R antagonists suppress appetite and promote weight loss. Little is known about how CB1-R antagonists affect the central neurocircuitry, specifically the melanocortin system that regulates energy balance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that peripherally administered CB1-R antagonist (AM251 or agonist equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively in A(y , which lack a functional melanocortin system, and wildtype mice, demonstrating that cannabinoid effects on feeding do not require melanocortin circuitry. CB1-R antagonist or agonist administered into the ventral tegmental area (VTA equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively, in both genotypes. In addition, peripheral and central cannabinoid administration similarly induced c-Fos activation in brain sites suggesting mediation via motivational dopaminergic circuitry. Amperometry-detected increases in evoked dopamine (DA release by the CB1-R antagonist in nucleus accumbens slices indicates that AM251 modulates DA release from VTA terminals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that the effects of cannabinoids on energy balance are independent of hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry and is primarily driven by the reward system.

  3. Fasting induces CART down-regulation in the zebrafish nervous system in a cannabinoid receptor 1-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Shin-Ichi; Gibert, Yann; Berekelya, Liubov; Bernard, Laure; Brunet, Frédéric; Guillot, Etienne; Le Bail, Jean-Christophe; Sánchez, Juan Antonio; Galzin, Anne Marie; Triqueneaux, Gerard; Laudet, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Central and peripheral mechanisms modulate food intake and energy balance in mammals and the precise role of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) in these processes is still being explored. Using the zebrafish, Danio rerio, we show that rimonabant, a CB1-specific antagonist with an EC(50) of 5.15 × 10(-8) m, decreases embryonic yolk sac reserve use. We reveal a developmental overlap between CART genes and CB1 expression in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata, two brain structures that play crucial roles in appetite regulation in mammals. We show that morpholino knockdown of CB1 or fasting decreases cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript (CART)-3 expression. Strikingly, this down-regulation occurs only in regions coexpressing CB1 and CART3, reinforcing the link between CB1, CART, and appetite regulation. We show that rimonabant treatment impairs the fasting-induced down-regulation of CART expression in specific brain regions, whereas vehicle alone-treated embryos do not display this rescue of CART expression. Our data reveal that CB1 lies upstream of CART and signals the appetite through the down-regulation of CART expression. Thus, our results establish the zebrafish as a promising system to study appetite regulation. PMID:22700585

  4. Role of Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 Desensitization in Greater Tetrahydrocannabinol Impairment of Memory in Adolescent Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Nicole L. T.; Greenleaf, Ashley L. R.; Acheson, Shawn K.; Wilson, Wilkie A.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott; Kuhn, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescence is a well defined developmental period during which marijuana use is common. However, little is known about the response to marijuana in adolescents compared with adults. We have shown previously that adolescent rats are more impaired than adults by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, in a spatial learning task, but the mechanism responsible for this differential impairment is not understood. We determined the role of THC tolerance and canna...

  5. The role of Astroglial Type 1 Cannabinoid Receptor in Memory Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, José Fernando Oliveira da

    2013-01-01

    O Sistema Endocanabinóide é um importante sistema modulador envolvido na regulação de funções fisiológicas como a aprendizagem e a memória. O receptor canabinóide tipo 1 (CB 1) encontra-se abundantemente expresso no encéfalo primariamente em neurónios. Recentemente, a sua presença foi demonstrada em astrócitos. Os astrócitos, aos quais se atribuem classicamente funções de suporte neuronal, participam intrinsecamente na comunicação bidireccional com neurónios exercendo deste modo uma modulação...

  6. Direct Quantification of Cannabinoids and Cannabinoid Glucuronides in Whole Blood by Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Schwope, David M.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    The first method for quantifying cannabinoids and cannabinoid glucuronides in whole blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed and validated. Solid-phase extraction followed protein precipitation with acetonitrile. HPLC separation was achieved in 16 min via gradient elution. Electrospray ionization was utilized for cannabinoid detection; both positive (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol [THC], cannabinol [CBN]) and negative (11-hydroxy-THC [11-OH-THC], 11-nor-9-carb...

  7. Human Laboratory Studies on Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Mohamed; Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; D'Souza, Deepak Cyril; Ranganathan, Mohini

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most compelling evidence supporting an association between cannabinoid agonists and psychosis comes from controlled laboratory studies in humans. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover laboratory studies demonstrate that cannabinoid agonists, including phytocannabinoids and synthetic cannabinoids, produce a wide range of positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms and psychophysiologic deficits in healthy human subjects that resemble the phenomenology of schizophrenia. These effects are time locked to drug administration, are dose related, and are transient and rarely necessitate intervention. The magnitude of effects is similar to the effects of ketamine but qualitatively distinct from other psychotomimetic drugs, including ketamine, amphetamine, and salvinorin A. Cannabinoid agonists have also been shown to transiently exacerbate symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia in laboratory studies. Patients with schizophrenia are more vulnerable than healthy control subjects to the acute behavioral and cognitive effects of cannabinoid agonists and experience transient exacerbation of symptoms despite treatment with antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, laboratory studies have failed to demonstrate any "beneficial" effects of cannabinoid agonists in individuals with schizophrenia-challenging the cannabis self-medication hypothesis. Emerging evidence suggests that polymorphisms of several genes related to dopamine metabolism (e.g., COMT, DAT1, and AKT1) may moderate the effects of cannabinoid agonists in laboratory studies. Cannabinoid agonists induce dopamine release, although the magnitude of release does not appear to be commensurate to the magnitude and spectrum of their acute psychotomimetic effects. Interactions between the endocannabinoid, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamate systems and their individual and interactive effects on neural oscillations provide a plausible mechanism underlying the psychotomimetic effects of

  8. Enhancing Brain Pregnenolone May Protect Cannabis Intoxication but Should Not Be Considered as an Anti-addiction Therapeutic: Hypothesizing Dopaminergic Blockade and Promoting Anti- Reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many US states now embrace the medical and recreational use of Cannabis. Changes in the laws have heightened interest and encouraged research into both cannabinoid products and the potential harms of Cannabis use, addiction, and intoxication. Some research into those harms will be reviewed here and misgivings about the use of Pregnenolone, to treat cannabis addiction and intoxication explained. Pregnenolone considered the inactive precursor of all steroid hormones, has recently been shown to protect the brain from Cannabis intoxication. The major active ingredient of Cannabis sativa (marijuana, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC enhances Pregnenolone synthesis in the brain via stimulation of the type-1 cannabinoid (CB1 receptor. This steroid has been shown to inhibit the activity of the CB1 receptor thereby reducing many of the effects of THC. While this mechanism seems correct, in our opinion, Vallee et al., incorrectly suggest that blocking CB1 receptors could open unforeseen approaches to the treatment of cannabis intoxication and addiction. In this hypothesis, we caution the scientific community that, other CB1 receptor blockers, such as, Rimonabant (SR141718 have been pulled off the market in Europe. In addition, CB1 receptor blockers were rejected by the FDA due to mood changes including suicide ideation. Blocking CB1 receptors would result in reduced neuronal release of Dopamine by disinhibition of GABA signaling. Longterm blockade of cannabinoid receptors could occur with raising Pregnenolone brain levels, may induce a hypodopaminergic state, and lead to aberrant substance and nonsubstance (behavioral addictions.

  9. Brain regional differences in CB1 receptor adaptation and regulation of transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenka, M.F.; Selley, D.E.; Sim-Selley, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed throughout the brain and mediate the central effects of cannabinoids, including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Repeated THC administration produces tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated effects, although the magnitude of tolerance varies by effect. Consistent with this observation, CB1R desensitization and downregulation, as well induction of immediate early genes (IEGs), varies by brain region. Zif268...

  10. Benzyl-1,2,4-triazoles as CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Ligands: Preparation and In Vitro Pharmacological Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Folgado, Laura; Decara, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Goya, Pilar; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we have identified 3-alkyl-1,5-diaryl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles to be a novel class of cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonists. In order to expand the number of cannabinoid ligands with a central 1,2,4-triazole scaffold, we have synthesized a novel series of 1-benzyl-1H-1,2,4-triazoles, and some of them were evaluated by CB1R radioligand binding assays. Compound 12a showed the most interesting pharmacological properties, possessing a CB1R affinity in the nanomolar range. PMID:27127651

  11. G-protein coupling of cannabinoid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Since the cloning of the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the early 1990's extensive research has focused on understanding their signal transduction pathways. While it has been known for sometime that both receptors can couple to intracellular signalling via pertussis toxin sensitive G-proteins (Gi/Go), the specificity and kinetics of these interactions have only recently been elucidated. We have developed an in situ reconstitution approach to investigating receptor-G-protein interactions. This approach involves chaotropic extraction of receptor containing membranes in order to inactivate or remove endogenous G-proteins. Recombinant or isolated brain G-proteins can then be added back to the receptors, and their activation monitored through the binding of [35S]-GTPγS. This technique has been utilised for an extensive study of cannabinoid receptor mediated activation of G-proteins. In these studies we have established that CB1 couples with high affinity to both Gi and Go type G-proteins. In contrast, CB2 couples strongly to Gi, but has a very low affinity for Go. This finding correlated well with the previous findings that while CB1 and CB2 both couple to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, CB1 but not CB2 could also inhibit calcium channels. We then examined the ability of a range of cannabinoid agonists to activate the Gi and Go via CB1. Conventional receptor theory suggests that a receptor is either active or inactive with regard to a G-protein and that the active receptor activates all relevant G-proteins equally. However, in this study we found that agonists could produce different degrees of activation, depending on which G-protein was present. Further studies have compared the ability of the two endocannabinoids to drive the activation of Gi or Go. These studies show that agonists can induce multiple forms of activated receptor that differ in their ability to catalyse the activation of Gi or Go. The ability of an agonist to drive a receptor

  12. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moran, Jeffery H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Department of Public Health, Public Health Laboratory, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Prather, Paul L., E-mail: pratherpaull@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  13. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB1Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB2Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB2Rs (hCB2Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB2Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB2 membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB2 cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB2Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB2Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB2R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB2Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB2Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB1 and CB2Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018 and JWH-073 are synthetic cannabinoids present in abused K2 products. • JWH-018, JWH-073 and

  14. An animal model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure elicits a long-lasting deficit in presynaptic long-term plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Jonathan W; Corches, Alex; Vieira, Philip A; Hiroto, Alex S; Mackie, Ken; Korzus, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Cannabis continues to be the most accessible and popular illicit recreational drug. Whereas current data link adolescence cannabinoid exposure to increased risk for dependence on other drugs, depression, anxiety disorders and psychosis, the mechanism(s) underlying these adverse effects remains controversial. Here we show in a mouse model of female adolescent cannabinoid exposure deficient endocannabinoid (eCB)-mediated signaling and presynaptic forms of long-term depression at adult central glutamatergic synapses in the prefrontal cortex. Increasing endocannabinoid levels by blockade of monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), with the specific inhibitor JZL 184 ameliorates eCB-LTD deficits. The observed deficit in cortical presynaptic signaling may represent a neural maladaptation underlying network instability and abnormal cognitive functioning. Our study suggests that adolescent cannabinoid exposure may permanently impair brain functions, including the brain's intrinsic ability to appropriately adapt to external influences. PMID:25979486

  15. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  16. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  17. Regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Linda A; Rock, Erin M; Limebeer, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    Considerable evidence demonstrates that manipulation of the endocannabinoid system regulates nausea and vomiting in humans and other animals. The anti-emetic effect of cannabinoids has been shown across a wide variety of animals that are capable of vomiting in response to a toxic challenge. CB1 agonism suppresses vomiting, which is reversed by CB1 antagonism, and CB1 inverse agonism promotes vomiting. Recently, evidence from animal experiments suggests that cannabinoids may be especially usef...

  18. Type 1 diabetes pathogenesis - Prevention???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Muralidhara Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes is multi-faceted, including, autoimmunity, genetics and environment. Autoimmunity directed against pancreatic islet cells results in slowly progressive selective beta-cell destruction ("Primary autoimmune insulitis", culminating over years in clinically manifested insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Circulating serum autoantibodies directed against the endocrine cells of the islets of Langerhans (Islet cell autoantibodies - ICAb are an important hallmark of this disease. Assays for islet cell autoantibodies have facilitated the investigation and understanding of several facets in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Their applications have extended into clinical practice and have opened new avenues for early preclinical prediction and preventive prophylaxis in IDDM/type 1 DM. Recently, surprisingly, differences in insulin content between T1DM islets, as well as, ′patchy′ or ′lobular′ destruction of islets have been described. These unique pathobiological phenomena, suggest that beta cell destruction may not always be inexorable and inevitably complete/total, and thus raise hopes for possible therapeutic interruption of beta cell autoimmunity - destruction and cure of type 1 diabetes. "Recurrent or secondary autoimmune insulitis" refers to the rapid reappearance of islet cell autoantibodies post pancreas transplant, and selective islet beta cell destruction in the grafted pancreas [never forgetting or "anamnestic" beta cell destructive memory], in the absence of any graft pancreas rejection [monozygotic twin to twin transplantation]. The one definite environmental factor is congenital rubella, because of which a subset of children subsequently develop type 1 diabetes. The putative predisposing factors are viruses, gluten and cow′s milk. The putative protective factors include gut flora, helminths, viral infections, and Vitamin D. Prevention of T1DM can include: Primary prevention strategies

  19. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level. As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater

  20. Oleamide is a selective endogenous agonist of rat and human CB1 cannabinoid receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Leggett, James D; Aspley, S; Beckett, S R G; D'Antona, A M; Kendall, D A

    2004-01-01

    The ability of the endogenous fatty acid amide, cis-oleamide (ODA), to bind to and activate cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors was investigated.ODA competitively inhibited binding of the nonselective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP55,940 and the selective CB1 antagonist [3H]SR141716A to rat whole-brain membranes with Ki values of 1.14 μM (0.52–2.53 μM, Hill slope=0.80, n=6) and 2.63 μM (0.62–11.20 μM, Hill slope=0.92, n=4), respectively. AEA inhibited [3H]CP55,940 binding in rat whole-brain membran...

  1. Functional role of cannabinoid receptors in urinary bladder

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Tyagi, Vikas; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa (maijuana), and their derivatives produce a wide spectrum of central and peripheral effects, some of which may have clinical applications. The discovery of specific cannabinoid receptors and a family of endogenous ligands of those receptors has attracted much attention to the general cannabinoid pharmacology. In recent years, studies on the functional role of cannabinoid receptors in bladder have been motivated by the therapeutic effects ...

  2. [Insulitis in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    In't Veld, P; Klöppel, G

    2016-05-01

    Insulitis is considered to be the key morphological lesion of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) for which the diagnostic criteria were recently defined. From the immunophenotype of the lymphocytic infiltration, its frequency and extent during the course of T1DM and the presence of autoantibodies against beta cell proteins, it has been deduced that T1DM is a chronic autoimmune disease leading to gradual destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, profound insulin deficiency and chronic hyperglycemia. This review article presents the morphological findings that support this hypothesis and addresses questions that need to be answered in order to further clarify the pathogenesis and to develop specific treatment options. PMID:27126249

  3. Complex Regional Pain Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael Joseph; Barnett, Peter Leslie John

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is increasingly recognized in the pediatric population. Owing to the nature of presentation with pain, many of these children present to the emergency setting at different stages of the syndrome with or without numerous prior interactions with health professionals. Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is a clinical syndrome characterized by amplified musculoskeletal limb pain that is out of proportion to the history and physical findings, or pain due to non-noxious stimuli (allodynia/hyperalgesia), and accompanied by one or more signs of autonomic dysfunction. Differential diagnosis may include significant trauma (eg, fractures), inflammatory conditions, malignancies, and systemic illness. The diagnosis is clinical. The treatment goals for CRPS1 are restoration of function and relief of pain. Education, physical, and occupational therapy with psychotherapy and defined goals of achievement with reward are the mainstay of treatment for this population. Most children with CRPS1 will have a favorable outcome. PMID:26928099

  4. Detecting constitutive activity and protean agonism at cannabinoid-2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Massimiliano; Brusa, Rossella; Mancini, Isabella; Scandroglio, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Since the cannabinoid system is involved in regulating several physiological functions such as locomotor activity, cognition, nociception, food intake, and inflammatory reaction, it has been the subject of intense study. Research on the pharmacology of this system has enormously progressed in the last 20years. One intriguing aspect that emerged from this research is that cannabinoid receptors (CBs) express a high level of constitutive activity. Investigation on this particular aspect of receptor pharmacology has largely focused on CB1, the CB subtype highly expressed in several brain regions. More recently, research on constitutive activity on the other CB subtype, CB2, was stimulated by the increasing interest on its potential as target for the treatment of various pathologies (e.g., pain and inflammation). There are several possible implications of constitutive activity on the therapeutic action of both agonists and antagonists, and consequently, it is important to have valuable methods to study this aspect of CB2 pharmacology. In the present chapter, we describe three methods to study constitutive activity at CB2: two classical methods relying on the detection of changes in cAMP level and GTPγS binding and a new one based on cell impedance measurement. In addition, we also included a section on detection of protean agonism, which is an interesting pharmacological phenomenon strictly linked to constitutive activity. PMID:21036225

  5. The role of cannabinoids in regulation of nausea and vomiting, and visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Zubair; Baik, Daniel; Schey, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Marijuana derived from the plant Cannabis sativa has been used for the treatment of many gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and others. However, its psychotropic side effects have often limited its use. Several cannabinoid receptors, which include the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), CB2, and possibly GPR55, have been identified throughout the GI tract. These receptors may play a role in the regulation of food intake, nausea and emesis, gastric secretion and gastroprotection, GI motility, ion transport, visceral sensation, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in the gut. However, the regulation of nausea and vomiting by cannabinoids and the endocannabinoid system has shed new knowledge in this field. Thus far, despite evidence of visceral sensitivity inhibition in animal models, data in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients is scarce and not supportive. Furthermore, many compounds that either act directly at the receptor or increase (or reduce) ligand availability have the potential to affect other brain functions and cause side effects. Novel drug targets such as FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) inhibitors appear to be promising in animal models, but more studies are necessary to prove their efficiency. The promise of emerging drugs that are more selective and peripherally acting suggest that, in the near future, cannabinoids will play a major role in managing an array of GI diseases. PMID:25715910

  6. Identification of essential cannabinoid-binding domains: structural insights into early dynamic events in receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Bertalovitz, Alexander C; Kendall, Debra A

    2011-09-23

    The classical cannabinoid agonist HU210, a structural analog of (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, binds to brain cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and activates signal transduction pathways. To date, an exact molecular description of the CB1 receptor is not yet available. Utilizing the minor binding pocket of the CB1 receptor as the primary ligand interaction site, we explored HU210 binding using lipid bilayer molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among the potential ligand contact residues, we identified residues Phe-174(2.61), Phe-177(2.64), Leu-193(3.29), and Met-363(6.55) as being critical for HU210 binding by mutational analysis. Using these residues to guide the simulations, we determined essential cannabinoid-binding domains in the CB1 receptor, including the highly sought after hydrophobic pocket important for the binding of the C3 alkyl chain of classical and nonclassical cannabinoids. Analyzing the simulations of the HU210-CB1 receptor complex, the CP55940-CB1 receptor complex, and the (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-CB1 receptor complex, we found that the positioning of the C3 alkyl chain and the aromatic stacking between Trp-356(6.48) and Trp-279(5.43) is crucial for the Trp-356(6.48) rotamer change toward receptor activation through the rigid-body movement of H6. The functional data for the mutant receptors demonstrated reductions in potency for G protein activation similar to the reductions seen in ligand binding affinity for HU210. PMID:21795705

  7. Modulation Of The Endo-Cannabinoid System: Therapeutic Potential Against Cocaine Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Tanda, Gianluigi

    2007-01-01

    Dependence on cocaine is still a main unresolved medical and social concern, and in spite of research efforts, no pharmacological therapy against cocaine dependence is yet available. Recent studies have shown that the endocannabinoid system participates in specific stages and aspects of drug dependence in general, and some of this evidence suggests an involvement of the cannabinoid system in cocaine effects. For example, cocaine administration has been shown to alter brain endocannabinoid lev...

  8. Activation of cannabinoid system in anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex modulates cost-benefit decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Khani, Abbas; Kermani, Mojtaba; Hesam, 6Soghra; Haghparast, Abbas; Enrike G Argandoña; Rainer, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Despite the evidence for altered decision making in cannabis abusers, the role of the cannabinoid system in decision-making circuits has not been studied. Here, we examined the effects of cannabinoid modulation during cost-benefit decision making in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), key brain areas involved in decision making. We trained different groups of rats in a delay-based and an effort-based form of cost-benefit T-maze decision-making task. During test...

  9. Development of radiometric methods for the determination of enzyme activities of iodothyronine deiodinases. Effect of the antidepressant fluoxetine on type 1, 2 and 3 deiodinase activities in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the present study were to establish valid assay conditions for measurement of the types 1, 2, and 3 (Dl, D2, and D3, respectively) iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) activities, and to use the radiometric enzyme assays especially to follow the effects of antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac) on the metabolism of thyroid hormones (TH) in the rat. In particular, the effects of subchronic administration of fluoxetine alone and in combination with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) on T3 production and degradation in the CNS and peripheral tissues were investigated. The newly developed radiometric enzyme assays for IDs, based on the use of preferred 125I-labeled iodothyronines as substrates, TLC separation of radioactive products from the unconsumed substrates, film-less autoradiography of radiochromatograms using storage phosphor screens, and quantification of the separated compounds with the BAS-5000 laser scanner, proved to be very sensitive and rapid and, at the same time, reliable and robust. (author)

  10. Prolonged oral cannabinoid administration prevents neuroinflammation, lowers β-amyloid levels and improves cognitive performance in Tg APP 2576 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín-Moreno Ana María

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD brain shows an ongoing inflammatory condition and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories diminish the risk of suffering the neurologic disease. Cannabinoids are neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents with therapeutic potential. Methods We have studied the effects of prolonged oral administration of transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP mice with two pharmacologically different cannabinoids (WIN 55,212-2 and JWH-133, 0.2 mg/kg/day in the drinking water during 4 months on inflammatory and cognitive parameters, and on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18FDG uptake by positron emission tomography (PET. Results Novel object recognition was significantly reduced in 11 month old Tg APP mice and 4 month administration of JWH was able to normalize this cognitive deficit, although WIN was ineffective. Wild type mice cognitive performance was unaltered by cannabinoid administration. Tg APP mice showed decreased 18FDG uptake in hippocampus and cortical regions, which was counteracted by oral JWH treatment. Hippocampal GFAP immunoreactivity and cortical protein expression was unaffected by genotype or treatment. In contrast, the density of Iba1 positive microglia was increased in Tg APP mice, and normalized following JWH chronic treatment. Both cannabinoids were effective at reducing the enhancement of COX-2 protein levels and TNF-α mRNA expression found in the AD model. Increased cortical β-amyloid (Aβ levels were significantly reduced in the mouse model by both cannabinoids. Noteworthy both cannabinoids enhanced Aβ transport across choroid plexus cells in vitro. Conclusions In summary we have shown that chronically administered cannabinoid showed marked beneficial effects concomitant with inflammation reduction and increased Aβ clearance.

  11. Rs6295 promoter variants of the serotonin type 1A receptor are differentially activated by c-Jun in vitro and correlate to transcript levels in human epileptic brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernhorst, Katharina; van Loo, Karen M J; von Lehe, Marec; Priebe, Lutz; Cichon, Sven; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Sander, Thomas; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2013-03-01

    Many brain disorders, including epilepsy, migraine and depression, manifest with episodic symptoms that may last for various time intervals. Transient alterations of neuronal function such as related to serotonin homeostasis generally underlie this phenomenon. Several nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene promoters associated with these diseases have been described. For obvious reasons, their regulatory roles on gene expression particularly in human brain tissue remain largely enigmatic. The rs6295 G-/C-allelic variant is located in the promoter region of the human HTR1a gene, encoding the G-protein-coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT1AR). In addition to reported transcriptional repressor binding, our bioinformatic analyses predicted a reduced binding affinity of the transcription factor (TF) c-Jun for the G-allele. In vitro luciferase transfection assays revealed c-Jun to (a) activate the rs6295 C- significantly stronger than the G-allelic variant and (b) antagonize efficiently the repressive effect of Hes5 on the promoter. The G-allele of rs6295 is known to be associated with aspects of major depression and migraine. In order to address a potential role of rs6295 variants in human brain tissue, we have isolated DNA and mRNA from fresh frozen hippocampal tissue of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients (n=140) after epilepsy surgery for seizure control. We carried out SNP genotyping studies and mRNA analyses in order to determine HTR1a mRNA expression in human hippocampal samples stratified according to the rs6295 allelic variant. The mRNA expression of HTR1a was significantly more abundant in hippocampal mRNA of TLE patients homozygous for the rs6295 C-allele as compared to those with the GG-genotype. These data may point to a novel, i.e., rs6295 allelic variant and c-Jun dependent transcriptional 5HT1AR 'receptoropathy'. PMID:23333373

  12. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R V Thakker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is characterized by the occurrence of parathyroid, pancreatic islet and anterior pituitary tumors. Some patients may also develop carcinoid tumors, adrenocortical tumors, facial angiofibromas, collagenomas, and lipomas. MEN1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder, due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene MEN1, which encodes a 610 amino acid protein, menin. Thus, the finding of MEN1 in a patient has important implications for family members because first-degree relatives have a 50% risk of developing the disease and can often be identified by MEN1 mutational analysis. Patients with MEN1 have a decreased life-expectancy and the outcomes of current treatments, which are generally similar to that for the respective tumors occurring in non-MEN1 patients, are not as successful because of multiple tumors, which may be larger, more aggressive, and resistant to treatment, and the concurrence of metastases. The prognosis for MEN1 patients might be improved by pre-symptomatic tumor detection and undertaking treatment specific for MEN1-tumors. Thus, it is recommended that MEN1 patients and their families should be cared for by multi-disciplinary teams comprising relevant specialists with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with endocrine tumors.

  13. Type 1 diabetes associated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Hansen, Martin P

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus is increasing in prevalence worldwide. The economic costs are considerable given the cardiovascular complications and co-morbidities that it may entail. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the loss of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. The pathogenesis of T1D is complex and multifactorial and involves a genetic susceptibility that predisposes to abnormal immune responses in the presence of ill-defined environmental insults to the pancreatic islets. Genetic background may affect the risk for autoimmune disease and patients with T1D exhibit an increased risk of other autoimmune disorders such as autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease, autoimmune gastritis, coeliac disease and vitiligo. Approximately 20%-25% of patients with T1D have thyroid antibodies, and up to 50% of such patients progress to clinical autoimmune thyroid disease. Approximately 0.5% of diabetic patients have concomitant Addison's disease and 4% have coeliac disease. The prevalence of autoimmune gastritis and pernicious anemia is 5% to 10% and 2.6% to 4%, respectively. Early detection of antibodies and latent organ-specific dysfunction is advocated to alert physicians to take appropriate action in order to prevent full-blown disease. Patients and family members should be educated to be able to recognize signs and symptoms of underlying disease. PMID:26903475

  14. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzi Ettore

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions is recommended.

  15. Cannabinoid hyper-emesis syndrome: An enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marijuana is one of the most frequently abused illicit substances in the world especially Australia. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS is characterized by a triad of symptoms: Cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. It involves recurrent episodes of self-limited nausea and vomiting lasting several days and patients are asymptomatic between episodes. We believe that Cannabinoid Hyper emesis Syndrome is much more common than currently recognized. We present a unique case with an apparent positive family history of the same clinical entity.

  16. GABA(A) receptor density is altered by cannabinoid treatment in the hippocampus of adult but not adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Dalton, Victoria Stephanie; Zavitsanou, Katerina

    2010-09-10

    Cannabinoids are known to induce transient psychotic symptoms and cognitive dysfunction in healthy individuals and contribute to trigger schizophrenia in vulnerable individuals, particularly during adolescence. Converging preclinical evidence suggests important interactions between cannabinoid and GABAergic systems. In the present study, we compared the effects of cannabinoid treatment on GABA(A) receptor binding in the brain of adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (5 weeks old) and adult (10 weeks old) rats were treated with the synthetic cannabinoid HU210 (25, 50 or 100 microg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1, 4 or 14 days. Rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last injection and GABA(A) receptor density was measured in several brain regions using [(35)S]TBPS and in vitro autoradiography. Adolescent rats had higher numbers of GABA(A) receptors compared to adults. A 24% increase of binding in adult rats treated with 100 microg/kg HU210 for 14 days compared to controls was observed in the CA1 region of the hippocampus (16.1 versus 12.9 fmol/mg tissue equivalent, t=2.720, pHU210 did not affect GABA(A) receptors in adolescent rats in any treatment regimen and in adult rats treated with HU210 for 1 or 4 days. These data suggest that long-term, high-dose treatment with HU210 increases GABA(A) receptors in the hippocampus of adult rats, changes that may interfere with associated hippocampal cognitive functions such as learning and memory. In addition, our results suggest that the adolescent brain does not display the same compensatory mechanisms that are activated in the adult brain following cannabinoid treatment. PMID:20599838

  17. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Parents > Type 1 ... in learning to live with the disease. About Diabetes Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions SCA1 spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 ( SCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  19. Combined cannabinoid therapy via an oromucosal spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jordi

    2006-08-01

    Extensive basic science research has identified the potential therapeutic benefits of active compounds extracted from the Cannabis sativa L. plant (the cannabinoids). It is recognized that a significant proportion of patients suffering with the debilitating symptoms of pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis or other conditions smoke cannabis despite the legal implications and stigma associated with this controlled substance. GW Pharmaceuticals have developed Sativex (GW- 1,000-02), a combined cannabinoid medicine that delivers and maintains therapeutic levels of two principal cannabinoids, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), via an oromucosal pump spray, that aims to minimize psychotropic side effects. Sativex has proved to be well tolerated and successfully self-administered and self-titrated in both healthy volunteers and patient cohorts. Clinical assessment of this combined cannabinoid medicine has demonstrated efficacy in patients with intractable pain (chronic neuropathic pain, pain due to brachial plexus nerve injury, allodynic peripheral neuropathic pain and advanced cancer pain), rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (bladder problems, spasticity and central pain), with no significant intoxication-like symptoms, tolerance or withdrawal syndrome. PMID:16969427

  20. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulates axon guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duff, Gabriel; Argaw, Anteneh; Cecyre, Bruno; Cherif, Hosni; Tea, Nicolas; Zabouri, Nawal; Casanova, Christian; Ptito, Maurice; Bouchard, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Navigation of retinal projections towards their targets is regulated by guidance molecules and growth cone transduction mechanisms. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo evidences that the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) is expressed along the retino-thalamic pathway and exerts a modulatory action ...

  1. Cannabinoids for Symptom Management and Cancer Therapy: The Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mellar P

    2016-07-01

    Cannabinoids bind not only to classical receptors (CB1 and CB2) but also to certain orphan receptors (GPR55 and GPR119), ion channels (transient receptor potential vanilloid), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors. Cannabinoids are known to modulate a multitude of monoamine receptors. Structurally, there are 3 groups of cannabinoids. Multiple studies, most of which are of moderate to low quality, demonstrate that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and oromucosal cannabinoid combinations of THC and cannabidiol (CBD) modestly reduce cancer pain. Dronabinol and nabilone are better antiemetics for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) than certain neuroleptics, but are not better than serotonin receptor antagonists in reducing delayed emesis, and cannabinoids have largely been superseded by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists and olanzapine; both cannabinoids have been recommended for breakthrough nausea and vomiting among other antiemetics. Dronabinol is ineffective in ameliorating cancer anorexia but does improve associated cancer-related dysgeusia. Multiple cancers express cannabinoid receptors directly related to the degree of anaplasia and grade of tumor. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that cannabinoids may have anticancer activity. Paradoxically, cannabinoid receptor antagonists also have antitumor activity. There are few randomized smoked or vaporized cannabis trials in cancer on which to judge the benefits of these forms of cannabinoids on symptoms and the clinical course of cancer. Smoked cannabis has been found to contain Aspergillosis. Immunosuppressed patients should be advised of the risks of using "medical marijuana" in this regard. PMID:27407130

  2. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bouskila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells. However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp. in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function.

  3. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha; Beierschmitt, Amy; Palmour, Roberta; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells) and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells). However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp.) in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function. PMID:27069692

  4. Nicotine reinforcement is reduced by cannabinoid CB1 receptor blockade in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonnet, Amelie; Cador, Martine; Caille, Stephanie

    2013-11-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors control the motivational properties and reinforcing effects of nicotine. Indeed, peripheral administration of a CB1 receptor antagonist dramatically decreases both nicotine taking and seeking. However, the neural substrates through which the cannabinoid CB1 receptors regulate the voluntary intake of nicotine remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we sought to determine whether central injections of a CB1 receptor antagonist delivered either into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the nucleus accumbens (NAC) may alter nicotine intravenous self-administration (IVSA). Rats were first trained to self-administer nicotine (30 μg/kg/0.1 ml). The effect of central infusions of the CB1 antagonist AM 251 (0, 1 and 10 μg/0.5 μl/side) on nicotine-taking behavior was then tested. Intra-VTA infusions of AM 251 dose dependently reduced IVSA with a significant decrease for the dose 10 μg/0.5 μl/side. Moreover, operant responding for water was unaltered by intra-VTA AM 251 at the same dose. Surprisingly, intra-NAC delivery of AM 251 did not alter nicotine behavior at all. These data suggest that in rats chronically exposed to nicotine IVSA, the cannabinoid CB1 receptors located in the VTA rather than in the NAC specifically control nicotine reinforcement and, subsequently, nicotine-taking behavior. PMID:22784230

  5. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 with Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis: A Rare Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Barış

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder with variable expressivity. The major diagnostic features are cafe-au-lait spots, neurofibromas, Lisch nodules of the iris, optic glioma, axillary freckling and bony dysplasia. Affected patients develop benign and malignant tumors with increased frequency. The major cause of death is malignancy including brain and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a disorder characterized by progressive regression in behavior, myoclonic seizures and finally death. We report a 9 year old girl with Neurofibromatosis Type 1, observed to have myoclonic seizures and progressive deterioration of speech, finally diagnosed as subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Because it is not previously reported in the literature, we aimed to report a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 patient with Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2008; 6: 83-5

  6. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein Crip1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenhuber, Stephan; Alpar, Alan; Chen, Rongqing; Schmitz, Nina; Wickert, Melanie; Mattheus, Tobias; Harasta, Anne E; Purrio, Martin; Kaiser, Nadine; Elphick, Maurice R; Monory, Krisztina; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J; Harkany, Tibor; Lutz, Beat; Klugmann, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 receptor (Cnr1, CB1R) mediates a plethora of physiological functions in the central nervous system as a presynaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release. The recently identified cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (Cnrip1a, CRIP1a) binds to the C-terminal domain of CB1R, a region known to be important for receptor desensitization and internalization. Evidence that CRIP1a and CB1R interact in vivo has been reported, but the neuroanatomical distribution of CRIP1a is unknown. Moreover, while alterations of hippocampal CRIP1a levels following limbic seizures indicate a role in controlling excessive neuronal activity, the physiological function of CRIP1a in vivo has not been investigated. In this study, we analyzed the spatial distribution of CRIP1a in the hippocampus and examined CRIP1a as a potential modulator of CB1R signaling. We found that Cnrip1a mRNA is co-expressed with Cnr1 mRNA in pyramidal neurons and interneurons of the hippocampal formation. CRIP1a protein profiles were largely segregated from CB1R profiles in mossy cell terminals but not in hippocampal CA1 region. CB1R activation induced relocalization to close proximity with CRIP1a. Adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of CRIP1a specifically in the hippocampus revealed that CRIP1a modulates CB1R activity by enhancing cannabinoid-induced G protein activation. CRIP1a overexpression extended the depression of excitatory currents by cannabinoids in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus and diminished the severity of chemically induced acute epileptiform seizures. Collectively, our data indicate that CRIP1a enhances hippocampal CB1R signaling in vivo. PMID:25772509

  7. Spectrum and prevalence of vasculopathy in pediatric neurofibromatosis type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Kaas, Bonnie; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.; Tekes, Aylin; Bergner, Amanda; Blakeley, Jaishri O.; JORDAN, LORI C

    2012-01-01

    To describe the spectrum and associated clinical features of peripheral and cerebral vasculopathy in pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1, children seen at a single center from 2000–2010 with appropriate imaging studies were identified. Scans were assessed for vascular disease by two pediatric neuroradiologists. Of 181 children, 80 had pertinent imaging studies: 77 had brain imaging, 6 had peripheral imaging, and 3 had both. Vasculopathy was identified in 14/80 children (18%, mini...

  8. White Matter Microstructural Integrity in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Meyer, Erin; Rutlin, Jerrel; Perantie, Dana C.; White, Neil H.; Arbelaez, Ana Maria; Shimony, Joshua S.; Hershey, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Decreased white and gray matter volumes have been reported in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but the effects of hyperglycemia on white matter integrity have not been quantitatively assessed during brain development. We performed diffusion tensor imaging, using two complimentary approaches—region-of-interest and voxelwise tract-based spatial statistics—to quantify white matter integrity in a large retrospective study of T1DM youth and control participants. Exposure to chronic hype...

  9. Effects of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahamtan, Alireza; Tavakoli-Yaraki, Masoumeh; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Salimi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active ingredient in marijuana, and their derivatives have received remarkable attention in the last two decades because they can affect tumor growth and metastasis. There is a large body of evidence from in vivo and in vitro models showing that cannabinoids and their receptors influence the immune system, viral pathogenesis, and viral replication. The present study reviews current insights into the role of cannabinoids and their receptors on viral infections. The results reported here indicate that cannabinoids and their receptors have different sequels for viral infection. Although activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors in the majority of viral infections are proper targets for development of safe and effective treatments, caution is required before using pharmaceutical cannabinoids as a treatment agent for patients with viral infections. PMID:26059175

  10. Cannabinoid-induced autophagy: Protective or death role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Lia; Amaral, Cristina; Teixeira, Natércia; Correia-da-Silva, Georgina; Fonseca, Bruno M

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, the "self-digestion" mechanism of the cells, is an evolutionary conserved catabolic process that targets portions of cytoplasm, damaged organelles and proteins for lysosomal degradation, which plays a crucial role in development and disease. Cannabinoids are active compounds of Cannabis sativa and the most prevalent psychoactive substance is Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Cannabinoid compounds can be divided in three types: the plant-derived natural products (phytocannabinoids), the cannabinoids produced endogenously (endocannabinoids) and the synthesized compounds (synthetic cannabinoids). Various studies reported a cannabinoid-induced autophagy mechanism in cancer and non-cancer cells. In this review we focus on the recent advances in the cannabinoid-induced autophagy and highlight the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. PMID:26732541

  11. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Ethan

    2008-01-01

    Ethan B RussoGW Pharmaceuticals, Vashon, WA, USAAbstract: This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol®) and nabilone (Cesamet®) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in devel...

  12. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol®) and nabilone (Cesamet®) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is...

  13. GPR55: a new member of the cannabinoid receptor clan?

    OpenAIRE

    Pertwee, R. G.

    2007-01-01

    In this issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology, Ryberg et al. present convincing in vitro evidence that the orphan GPCR, GPR55, is a cannabinoid receptor. GPR55 was activated by a range of plant, synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids and blocked by the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol. Their experiments have revealed several differences between the pharmacology of GPR55 and the established cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. For example, the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, ...

  14. Pathogenesis of Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Imagawa, Akihisa; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2006-01-01

    Fulminant type 1 diabetes is a new subtype of type 1 diabetes. The term was established in 2000. It is a syndrome characterized by a markedly rapid and almost complete destruction of pancreatic β-cells. Several lines of evidence suggest that both genetic factors, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA), and environmental factors, such as viral infection, contribute to the development of this disease. It is also suggested that autoimmune processes contribute less critically to fulminant type 1 d...

  15. Identification of a Functionally Relevant Cannabinoid Receptor on Mouse Spleen Cells that Is Involved in Cannabinoid-Mediated Immune Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaminski, Norbert E.; Abood, Mary E.; Kessler, Fay K.; Martin, Billy R.; Schatz, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive behavioral and biochemical characterization of cannabinoid-mediated effects on the central nervous system has revealed at least three lines of evidence supporting the role of a putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled cannabinoid receptor for cannabimimetic effects, (i) stereoselectivity, (ii) inhibition of the adenylate cyclase/cAMP second messenger system, and (iii) radioligand-binding studies with the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55,940 indicating a high degree of spec...

  16. Synthetic Cannabinoid 'Bonzai' Intoxication: Six Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergül, Dursun Fırat; Ekemen, Serdar; Yelken, Birgül Büyükkıdan

    2015-10-01

    In the language of the streets, 'bonzai', known as '1-naphthalenyl of methanol', also known as JWH-18 group, is a drug belonging to the group of synthetic cannabinoids. At the beginning of 2004, it started to be sold on the internet and it is seen that private markets. It has structurally similar chemical characteristics as delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the active substance in marijuana. In 2013, in a study conducted by the European Monitoring Centre of Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA), 102 varieties of synthetic cannabinoids were identified; however, more than 200 substances have been reported since 1997. In this study, we report the difficulties in the clinical course, treatment and management of six patients that had a use history of bonzai although it was not detected in blood in a short period of time in the intensive care unit. PMID:27366526

  17. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Marie Figueroa-Rivera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case.

  18. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Rivera, Ivonne Marie; Estremera-Marcial, Rodolfo; Sierra-Mercado, Marielly; Gutiérrez-Núñez, José; Toro, Doris H

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case. PMID:26266060

  19. Non-psychotropic plant cannabinoids: new therapeutic opportunities from an ancient herb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Raffaele; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2009-10-01

    Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol binds cannabinoid (CB(1) and CB(2)) receptors, which are activated by endogenous compounds (endocannabinoids) and are involved in a wide range of physiopathological processes (e.g. modulation of neurotransmitter release, regulation of pain perception, and of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and liver functions). The well-known psychotropic effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which are mediated by activation of brain CB(1) receptors, have greatly limited its clinical use. However, the plant Cannabis contains many cannabinoids with weak or no psychoactivity that, therapeutically, might be more promising than Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here, we provide an overview of the recent pharmacological advances, novel mechanisms of action, and potential therapeutic applications of such non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoids. Special emphasis is given to cannabidiol, the possible applications of which have recently emerged in inflammation, diabetes, cancer, affective and neurodegenerative diseases, and to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabivarin, a novel CB(1) antagonist which exerts potentially useful actions in the treatment of epilepsy and obesity. PMID:19729208

  20. Treatment of Tourette Syndrome with Cannabinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten R. Müller-Vahl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids have been used for hundred of years for medical purposes. To day, the cannabinoid delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and the cannabis extract nabiximols are approved for the treatment of nausea, anorexia and spasticity, respectively. In Tourette syndrome (TS several anecdotal reports provided evidence that marijuana might be effective not only in the suppression of tics, but also in the treatment of associated behavioural problems. At the present time there are only two controlled trials available investigating the effect of THC in the treatment of TS. Using both self and examiner rating scales, in both studies a significant tic reduction could be observed after treatment with THC compared to placebo, without causing significant adverse effects. Available data about the effect of THC on obsessive-compulsive symptoms are inconsistent. According to a recent Cochrane review on the efficacy of cannabinoids in TS, definite conclusions cannot be drawn, because longer trials including a larger number of patients are missing. Notwithstanding this appraisal, by many experts THC is recommended for the treatment of TS in adult patients, when first line treatments failed to improve the tics. In treatment resistant adult patients, therefore, treatment with THC should be taken into consideration.

  1. Quantification of Cannabinoid Content in Cannabis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, F.; Jia, K.; Wen, M.; Yuan, Ch.

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis is an economically important plant that is used in many fields, in addition to being the most commonly consumed illicit drug worldwide. Monitoring the spatial distribution of cannabis cultivation and judging whether it is drug- or fiber-type cannabis is critical for governments and international communities to understand the scale of the illegal drug trade. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cannabinoids content in cannabis could be spectrally quantified using a spectrometer and to identify the optimal wavebands for quantifying the cannabinoid content. Spectral reflectance data of dried cannabis leaf samples and the cannabis canopy were measured in the laboratory and in the field, respectively. Correlation analysis and the stepwise multivariate regression method were used to select the optimal wavebands for cannabinoid content quantification based on the laboratory-measured spectral data. The results indicated that the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content in cannabis leaves could be quantified using laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data and that the 695 nm band is the optimal band for THC content quantification. This study provides prerequisite information for designing spectral equipment to enable immediate quantification of THC content in cannabis and to discriminate drug- from fiber-type cannabis based on THC content quantification in the field.

  2. Role of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Parfieniuk; Robert Flisiak

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds acting primarily via CB1 and CB2 receptors. The expression of cannabinoid receptors in normal liver is low or absent. However, many reports have proven up-regulation of the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors in hepatic myofibroblasts and vascular endothelial cells, as well as increased concentration of endocannabinoids in liver in the course of chronic progressive liver diseases. It has been shown that CB1 receptor signalling exerts profibrogenic and proinflammatory effects in liver tissue, primarily due to the stimulation of hepatic stellate cells, whereas the activation of CB2 receptors inhibits or even reverses liver fibrogenesis. Similarly, CB1 receptor stimulation contributes to progression of liver steatosis. In end-stage liver disease, the endocannabi-noid system has been shown to contribute to hepatic encephalopathy and vascular effects, such as portal hypertension, splanchnic vasodilatation, relative pe-ripheral hypotension and probably cirrhotic cardiomy-opathy. So far, available evidence is based on cellular cultures or animal models. Clinical data on the effects of cannabinoids in chronic liver diseases are limited. However, recent studies have shown the contribution of cannabis smoking to the progression of liver fibrosis and steatosis. Moreover, controlling CB1 or CB2 signal-ling appears to be an attractive target in managing liver diseases.

  3. The discovery of a cannabinoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devane, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A tritiated form of CP-55,940, a Pfizer cannabinoid analog that is 20- to 100-fold more potent than {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol in various in vivo and in vitro models of cannabimimetric activity, was used as the tool with which to probe for a cannabinoid receptor in rat cortical membranes. The bound and free ligand were successfully separated using a centrifugation assay. Specific binding was saturable, rapidly attained, and completely reversible. The K{sub D}'s derived from kinetic analysis of binding agreed well with the K{sub D}'s derived from saturation and displacement analysis. The ({sup 3}H)CP-55,940 binding site exhibited high affinity with a K{sub D} of 68 pM as determined by LIGAND analysis of homologous displacement studies. The ability of other cannabinoid drugs to displace ({sup 3}H)CP-55,940 binding correlated well with the potency of these drugs in in vivo and in vitro models of cannabimimetic activity. The K{sub i} of {Delta}{sup 9}-THC was 1.6 nM. Cannabidiol and cannabigerol, which both lack psychoactivity in man, displaced specific binding by less than 50% at 1 {mu}M.

  4. Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's a Booger? Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? KidsHealth > For Kids > Type 1 Diabetes: What Is It? Print A A A Text Size What's in ... diabetes (say: dye-uh-BEE-tees). What is it? Let's find out. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JM, Mayer-Davis EJ. Epidemiology of type 1 diabetes. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 Sep;39(3):481-97. doi: 10.1016/j.ecl.2010.05.011. Review. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed ... G. Insights into type 1 diabetes provided by genetic analyses. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes ...

  6. The cannabinoid receptor 1 associates with NMDA receptors to produce glutamatergic hypofunction: implications in psychosis and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eSánchez-Blázquez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is widespread throughout the central nervous system and its type 1 receptor (CB1 plays a crucial role in preventing the neurotoxicity caused by activation of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. Indeed, it is the activity of NMDARs themselves that provides the demands on the endogenous cannabinoids in order to control their calcium currents. Therefore, a physiological role of this system is to maintain NMDAR activity within safe limits, thereby protecting neural cells from excitotoxicity. Thus, cannabinoids may be able to control NMDAR overactivation-related neural dysfunctions; however the major obstacles to the therapeutic utilization of these compounds are their psychotropic effects and negative influence on cognitive performance. Studies in humans have indicated that abuse of smoked cannabis can promote psychosis and even circumstantially precipitate symptoms of schizophrenia, although the latter appears to require a prior vulnerability in the individual. It is possible that cannabinoids provoke psychosis/schizophrenia reflecting a mechanism common to neuroprotection the reduction of NMDAR activity. Cannabinoids are proposed to produce such effect by reducing the pre-synaptic release of glutamate or interfering with postsynaptic NMDAR-regulated signaling pathways. The efficacy of such control requires the endocannabinoid system to apply its negative influence in a manner that is proportional to the strength of NMDAR signaling. Thus, cannabinoids acting at the wrong time or exerting an inappropriate influence on their receptors may cause NMDAR hypofunction. The purpose of the present review is to draw the attention of the reader to the newly described functional and physical CB1-NMDAR association, which may elucidate the scenario required for the rapid and efficacious control of NMDAR activity. Whether alterations in these mechanisms may increase NMDAR hypofunction leading to vulnerability to

  7. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders. PMID:24055595

  8. Cannabinoid receptor CB1 mediates baseline and activity-induced survival of new neurons in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Müller Anke; Tauber Svantje; Ramirez-Rodriguez Gerardo; Leal-Galicia Perla; Fabel Klaus; Bick-Sander Anika; Wolf Susanne A; Melnik Andre; Waltinger Tim P; Ullrich Oliver; Kempermann Gerd

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis is a particular example of brain plasticity that is partially modulated by the endocannabinoid system. Whereas the impact of synthetic cannabinoids on the neuronal progenitor cells has been described, there has been lack of information about the action of plant-derived extracts on neurogenesis. Therefore we here focused on the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) fed to female C57Bl/6 and Nestin-GFP-reporter mice on proliferatio...

  9. Pharmacological Activation/Inhibition of the Cannabinoid System Affects Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Neuronal Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxic Insults

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, Marina; Villain, Hélène; Docagne, Fabian; Roussel, Benoit D.; Ramos, José Antonio; Vivien, Denis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Ali, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic c...

  10. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor drives corticospinal motor neuron differentiation through the Ctip2/Satb2 transcriptional regulation axis

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Aguado, Tania; Wu, Chia-Shan; Palazuelos, Javier; Hofmann, Clementine; Garcez, Patricia; Guillemot, Francois; Lu, Hui-Chen; Lutz, Beat; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    The generation and specification of pyramidal neuron subpopulations during development relies on a complex network of transcription factors. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is the major molecular target of endocannabinoids and marijuana active compounds. This receptor has been shown to influence neural progenitor proliferation and axonal growth, but its involvement in neuronal differentiation and the functional impact in the adulthood caused by altering its signaling during brain development are...

  11. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Malfitano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the relevance of cannabinoid drugs in the management and treatment of MS. An increasing body of evidence suggests that cannabinoids have beneficial effects on the symptoms of MS, including spasticity and pain. In this report we focus on the effects of cannabinoids in the relief of spasticity describing the main findings in vivo, in the mouse experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model of MS. We report on the current treatments used to control MS symptoms and the most recent clinical studies based on cannabinoid treatments, although long-term studies are required to establish whether cannabinoids may have a role beyond symptom amelioration in MS.Keywords: cannabinoids, multiple sclerosis, spasticity

  12. The prenatal environment and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stene, L C; Gale, E A M

    2013-09-01

    There is ample evidence that environmental factors are involved in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes, but the nature and timing of the interactions are poorly understood. The intrauterine environment is known to play a role in the later development of type 2 diabetes, and this review considers a possible role in type 1 diabetes. Autoimmune type 1 diabetes is rare in those diagnosed before 6 months of age, but endogenous autoantibodies predictive of future type 1 diabetes may be detectable by 6-12 months of age, suggesting that environmental factors may operate before this age in some cases. Indirect evidence of a protective effect for the intrauterine environment comes from the observation that mothers with type 1 diabetes are less likely than affected fathers to transmit diabetes to their offspring, although the precise role (if any) is unclear. The risk of childhood-onset type 1 diabetes increases with maternal age at delivery, and with high birthweight, but these associations are weak and heterogeneous, and these factors are unlikely to be directly causally related to type 1 diabetes. No firm conclusion can be drawn from studies of maternal enteroviral infection or from various nutritional exposures. The birth process itself may play a role, as suggested by the slightly increased risk in children born by Caesarean section; lack of contact with maternal bacteria is one suggested mechanism. In sum, there is circumstantial evidence, but no proof of principle, that maternal or intrauterine conditions may modulate genetic risk of type 1 diabetes. The disease process culminating in type 1 diabetes typically begins in early life, but it is not clear whether the trail begins before or after birth. PMID:23657800

  13. Synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis resulting in rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argamany, Jacqueline R; Reveles, Kelly R; Duhon, Bryson

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid usage has increased in the past decade. Concurrently, emergency management of associated adverse effects due to synthetic cannabinoid usage has also risen. Reported toxicities include psychosis, seizures, cardiotoxicity, acute kidney injury, and death. While cannabis was first described as a cause of acute hyperemesis in 2004, a more recent case series also describes the association between cannabinoid hyperemesis and risk of acute renal failure. Synthetic cannabinoids have also been reported to cause acute hyperemesis and acute renal failure; however, the risk of rhabdomyolysis-induced renal failure has yet to be elucidated. In this article, we report the first known case of synthetic cannabinoid hyperemesis leading to rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. PMID:26422191

  14. Cannabinoids and Dementia: A Review of Clinical and Preclinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halpern

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system has been shown to be associated with neurodegenerative diseases and dementia. We review the preclinical and clinical data on cannabinoids and four neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and vascular dementia (VD. Numerous studies have demonstrated an involvement of the cannabinoid system in neurotransmission, neuropathology and neurobiology of dementias. In addition, several candidate compounds have demonstrated efficacy in vitro. However, some of the substances produced inconclusive results in vivo. Therefore, only few trials have aimed to replicate the effects seen in animal studies in patients. Indeed, the literature on cannabinoid administration in patients is scarce. While preclinical findings suggest causal treatment strategies involving cannabinoids, clinical trials have only assessed the suitability of cannabinoid receptor agonists, antagonists and cannabidiol for the symptomatic treatment of dementia. Further research is needed, including in vivo models of dementia and human studies.

  15. Ophthalmological manifestations in segmental neurofibromatosis type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggieri, M; Pavone, P; Polizzi, A; Pietro, M Di; Scuderi, A; A GABRIELE; Spalice, A; IANNETTI, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To study the ophthalmological manifestations in individuals with the typical features of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) circumscribed to one or more body segments, usually referred to as segmental NF1.

  16. Birth Weight in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Martens Guy; Van Hoorick Katrien; Vandermotte Valerie; Jacquemyn Yves

    2010-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether birth weight in mothers with diabetes mellitus type 1 is higher as compared to nondiabetic controls. Methods. A retrospective study was performed using an existing database covering the region of Flanders, Belgium. Data included the presence of diabetes type 1, hypertension, parity, maternal age, the use artificial reproductive technology, fetal- neonatal death, congenital anomalies, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, and delivery by Caesarean sect...

  17. Cannabinoid modulation of functional connectivity within regions processing attentional salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Falkenberg, Irina; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Atakan, Zerrin; Crippa, Jose A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; McGuire, Philip

    2015-05-01

    There is now considerable evidence to support the hypothesis that psychotic symptoms are the result of abnormal salience attribution, and that the attribution of salience is largely mediated through the prefrontal cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus. Although these areas show differential activation under the influence of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), the two major derivatives of cannabis sativa, little is known about the effects of these cannabinoids on the functional connectivity between these regions. We investigated this in healthy occasional cannabis users by employing event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) following oral administration of delta-9-THC, CBD, or a placebo capsule. Employing a seed cluster-based functional connectivity analysis that involved using the average time series from each seed cluster for a whole-brain correlational analysis, we investigated the effect of drug condition on functional connectivity between the seed clusters and the rest of the brain during an oddball salience processing task. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC and CBD had opposite effects on the functional connectivity between the dorsal striatum, the prefrontal cortex, and the hippocampus. Delta-9-THC reduced fronto-striatal connectivity, which was related to its effect on task performance, whereas this connection was enhanced by CBD. Conversely, mediotemporal-prefrontal connectivity was enhanced by delta-9-THC and reduced by CBD. Our results suggest that the functional integration of brain regions involved in salience processing is differentially modulated by single doses of delta-9-THC and CBD and that this relates to the processing of salient stimuli. PMID:25249057

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists do not decrease, but may increase, acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen eZheng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus has been suggested to arise from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory areas of the brain and anti-epileptic drugs are sometimes used to provide relief from tinnitus. Recently, the anti-epileptic properties of the cannabinoid drugs have gained increasing interest; however, the use of cannabinoids as a form of treatment for tinnitus is controversial. In the present study, we tested whether a combination of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC and cannabidiol (CBD, delivered in a 1:1 ratio, could affect tinnitus perception in a rat model of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus. Following sham treatment or acoustic trauma, the animals were divided into the following groups: 1 sham (i.e. no acoustic trauma with vehicle treatment; 2 sham with drug treatment (i.e. delta-9-THC + CBD; 3 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting tinnitus, with drug treatment; and 4 acoustic trauma-exposed exhibiting no tinnitus, with drug treatment. The animals received either the vehicle or the cannabinoid drugs every day, 30 min before the tinnitus behavioural testing. Acoustic trauma caused a significant increase in the auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds in the exposed animals, indicating hearing loss; however, there was a partial recovery over 6 months. Acoustic trauma did not always result in tinnitus; however among those that did exhibit tinnitus, some of them had tinnitus at multiple frequencies while others had it only at a single frequency. The cannabinoids significantly increased the number of tinnitus animals in the exposed-tinnitus group, but not in the sham group. The results suggest that cannabinoids may promote the development of tinnitus, especially when there is pre-existing hearing damage.

  19. Blockade of Nicotine and Cannabinoid Reinforcement and Relapse by a Cannabinoid CB1-Receptor Neutral Antagonist AM4113 and Inverse Agonist Rimonabant in Squirrel Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Charles W; Redhi, Godfrey H; Vemuri, Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Le Foll, Bernard; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R; Justinova, Zuzana

    2016-08-01

    Nicotine, the main psychoactive component of tobacco, and (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, play major roles in tobacco and marijuana dependence as reinforcers of drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior. Drugs that act as inverse agonists of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the brain can attenuate the rewarding and abuse-related effects of nicotine and THC, but their clinical use is hindered by potentially serious side effects. The recently developed CB1-receptor neutral antagonists may provide an alternative therapeutic approach to nicotine and cannabinoid dependence. Here we compare attenuation of nicotine and THC reinforcement and reinstatement in squirrel monkeys by the CB1-receptor inverse agonist rimonabant and by the recently developed CB1-receptor neutral antagonist AM4113. Both rimonabant and AM4113 reduced two effects of nicotine and THC that play major roles in tobacco and marijuana dependence: (1) maintenance of high rates of drug-taking behavior, and (2) priming- or cue-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior in abstinent subjects (models of relapse). In contrast, neither rimonabant nor AM4113 modified cocaine-reinforced or food-reinforced operant behavior under similar experimental conditions. However, both rimonabant and AM4113 reduced cue-induced reinstatement in monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, suggesting the involvement of a common cannabinoid-mediated mechanism in the cue-induced reinstatement for different drugs of abuse. These findings point to CB1-receptor neutral antagonists as a new class of medications for treatment of both tobacco dependence and cannabis dependence. PMID:26888056

  20. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome with extreme hydrophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enuh HA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hilary A Enuh,1 Julia Chin,1 Jay Nfonoyim21Department of Medicine, 2Critical Care Unit, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USAAbstract: Marijuana is the most widely used recreational drug in the US. Hyperemetic hydrophilic syndrome is a previously described but infrequently recognized condition of cannabinoid abuse with hyperemesis and obsessive hot showering. We present a 47-year-old male known marijuana addict with intractable abdominal pain who could not wait for physical examination, meal, or medication, because of obsessive compulsive warm baths. He had a history of epilepsy and addiction to marijuana, which he took on the day of admission. He presented to the hospital with a seizure, complicated by nausea, vomiting, and severe abdominal pain. His examination was unremarkable, except for mild epigastric tenderness. His laboratory and radiological tests were within normal limits, except for a positive urine drug screen for marijuana and opiates. He took himself immediately to the bathroom and remained under a hot shower with the exception of two 15-minute breaks for the rest of the day. He stated that it made him feel better than medication. Receiving medication and even eating was a problem because of this compulsive showering. Abstinence from marijuana during the hospital stay made the patient's nausea and vomiting resolve significantly. Cannabinoid hyperemesis is a differential diagnosis among patients with intractable nausea, vomiting, and obsessive hot bathing. The syndrome is an unmistakable indication of marijuana addiction. A thorough history and observation is very valuable. Recognition of this entity will reduce unnecessary testing and utilization of health care resources.Keywords: cannabinoid, compulsive bathing, cyclic vomiting, hyperemesis, hydrophilia, marijuana

  1. Canine adenovirus type 1 in a fennec fox (Vulpes zerda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Won; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Oem, Jae-Ku

    2014-12-01

    A 10-mo-old female fennec fox (Vulpes zerda) with drooling suddenly died and was examined postmortem. Histologic examination of different tissue samples was performed. Vacuolar degeneration and diffuse fatty change were observed in the liver. Several diagnostic methods were used to screen for canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus, canine influenza virus, canine coronavirus, canine parainfluenza virus, and canine adenovirus (CAdV). Only CAdV type 1 (CAdV-1) was detected in several organs (liver, lung, brain, kidney, spleen, and heart), and other viruses were not found. CAdV-1 was confirmed by virus isolation and nucleotide sequencing. PMID:25632689

  2. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor As Potential Target against Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    The CB2 receptor is one of the components of the endogenous cannabinoid system, a complex network of signaling molecules and receptors involved in the homeostatic control of several physiological functions. Accumulated evidence suggests a role for CB2 receptors in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and indicates their potential as a therapeutic target against this neurodegenerative disease. Levels of CB2 receptors are significantly increased in post-mortem AD brains, mainly in microglia surrounding senile plaques, and their expression levels correlate with the amounts of Aβ42 and β-amyloid plaque deposition. Moreover, several studies on animal models of AD have demonstrated that specific CB2 receptor agonists, which are devoid of psychoactive effects, reduce AD-like pathology, resulting in attenuation of the inflammation associated with the disease but also modulating Aβ and tau aberrant processing, among other effects. CB2 receptor activation also improves cognitive impairment in animal models of AD. This review discusses available data regarding the role of CB2 receptors in AD and the potential usefulness of specific agonists of these receptors against AD. PMID:27303261

  3. Fatal intoxication with synthetic cannabinoid MDMB-CHMICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    MDMB-CHMICA is a synthetic cannabinoid that appeared on the European drug market in September 2014. This substance was found in Poland in the herbal mixture "Mocarz" ("Strongman"), which caused a large outbreak of intoxications at the beginning of July 2015. This paper describes the circumstances of death and toxicological findings in a fatal intoxication with MDMB-CHMICA (in combination with alcohol). Loss of consciousness and asystole occurred a few minutes after smoking the 'legal high'. The man died after 4 days of hospitalisation. The cause of death accepted by the medical examiner was multiple organ failure. MDMB-CHMICA was detected and quantified in blood (ante- and postmortem) and internal organs tissues. The samples were analysed using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The concentration of MDMB-CHMICA in antemortem blood was 5.6ng/mL. Although the death occurred after 4 days from administration a relatively high concentration (2.6ng/g) was estimated in the brain. Traces of this compound were also found in other postmortem materials (blood, stomach, liver, bile, and kidney). The presented case shows the health risks associated with MDMB-CHMICA use. The administration of this substance can lead to the number of organ failures, cardiac arrest and consequently death. PMID:26934903

  4. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU. PMID:17952657

  5. Neurofibromatosis type 1: clinical and radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disease with an incidence of approximately 1 in 3,000 people, characterized mainly by systemic and progressive involvement, manifesting by physical deformity and compromising of neurological functions. The diagnosis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 must be performed the earliest possible through clinical exams and familiar history. The use of imaging diagnosis as radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up of patients and control of lesions, preventing complications. In this study we describe the clinical and radiological aspects of the neurofibromatosis type 1, considering clinical features, genetics, bone alterations in chest, vertebral column, upper and lower limbs, and craniofacial abnormalities. (author)

  6. Should Type 1 diabetics fast in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsin, Fauzia; Azad, Kishwar; Zabeen, Bedowra; Tayyeb, Samin; Baki, Abdul; Nahar, Nazmun

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during the holy month of Ramadan is obligatory for all healthy adult and adolescent Muslims from the age of 12 years. This involves abstaining from eating or drinking from early dawn (Suhur/Sehri) till sunset (Iftar).Fasting is not meant to create excessive hardships or impart any adverse effect to the Muslim individual. As such, Islam has exempted certain categories of people from fasting including young children, travelers, the sick, the elderly,and pregnant and lactating women. According to expert opinion, people with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan are at very high risk of metabolic deterioration. However, some recent studies have demonstrated that individuals with type 1 diabetes who are otherwise healthy and stable, can fast during Ramadan provided they comply with the Ramadan focused management plan and are under close professional supervision. This article discusses how to assess, counsel, monitor and manage people with type 1 diabetes who wish to fast during Ramadan. PMID:26013779

  7. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murat; Ucler, Rifki; Kartal, Mehmet; Seven, Ismet; Alay, Murat; Bayram, Irfan; Olmez, Sehmus

    2015-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly. PMID:26347835

  8. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, Murat; Ucler, Rifki; Kartal, Mehmet; Seven, Ismet; Alay, Murat; Bayram, Irfan; Olmez, Sehmus

    2015-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly. PMID:26347835

  9. Phase I hydroxylated metabolites of the K2 synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 retain in vitro and in vivo cannabinoid 1 receptor affinity and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K Brents

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: K2 products are synthetic cannabinoid-laced, marijuana-like drugs of abuse, use of which is often associated with clinical symptoms atypical of marijuana use, including hypertension, agitation, hallucinations, psychosis, seizures and panic attacks. JWH-018, a prevalent K2 synthetic cannabinoid, is structurally distinct from Δ(9-THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. Since even subtle structural differences can lead to differential metabolism, formation of novel, biologically active metabolites may be responsible for the distinct effects associated with K2 use. The present study proposes that K2's high adverse effect occurrence is due, at least in part, to distinct JWH-018 metabolite activity at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: JWH-018, five potential monohydroxylated metabolites (M1-M5, and one carboxy metabolite (M6 were examined in mouse brain homogenates containing CB1Rs, first for CB1R affinity using a competition binding assay employing the cannabinoid receptor radioligand [(3H]CP-55,940, and then for CB1R intrinsic efficacy using an [(35S]GTPγS binding assay. JWH-018 and M1-M5 bound CB1Rs with high affinity, exhibiting K(i values that were lower than or equivalent to Δ(9-THC. These molecules also stimulated G-proteins with equal or greater efficacy relative to Δ(9-THC, a CB1R partial agonist. Most importantly, JWH-018, M2, M3, and M5 produced full CB1R agonist levels of activation. CB1R-mediated activation was demonstrated by blockade with O-2050, a CB1R-selective neutral antagonist. Similar to Δ(9-THC, JWH-018 and M1 produced a marked depression of locomotor activity and core body temperature in mice that were both blocked by the CB1R-preferring antagonist/inverse agonist AM251. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Unlike metabolites of most drugs, the studied JWH-018 monohydroxylated compounds, but not the carboxy metabolite, retain in vitro and in vivo activity at CB1Rs. These observations

  10. The Endocannabinoid System, Cannabinoids, and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry G. Fine

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is involved in a host of homeostatic and physiologic functions, including modulation of pain and inflammation. The specific roles of currently identified endocannabinoids that act as ligands at endogenous cannabinoid receptors within the central nervous system (primarily but not exclusively CB1 receptors and in the periphery (primarily but not exclusively CB2 receptors are only partially elucidated, but they do exert an influence on nociception. Exogenous plant-based cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids and chemically related compounds, like the terpenes, commonly found in many foods, have been found to exert significant analgesic effects in various chronic pain conditions. Currently, the use of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol is limited by its psychoactive effects and predominant delivery route (smoking, as well as regulatory or legal constraints. However, other phytocannabinoids in combination, especially cannabidiol and β-caryophyllene, delivered by the oral route appear to be promising candidates for the treatment of chronic pain due to their high safety and low adverse effects profiles. This review will provide the reader with the foundational basic and clinical science linking the endocannabinoid system and the phytocannabinoids with their potentially therapeutic role in the management of chronic pain.

  11. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Schizophrenia? A Balanced Neurochemical Framework for Both Adverse and Therapeutic Effects of Cannabis Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carissa M. Coulston

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have found that cannabinoids may improve neuropsychological performance, ameliorate negative symptoms, and have antipsychotic properties for a subgroup of the schizophrenia population. These findings are in contrast to the longstanding history of adverse consequences of cannabis use, predominantly on the positive symptoms, and a balanced neurochemical basis for these opposing views is lacking. This paper details a review of the neurobiological substrates of schizophrenia and the neurochemical effects of cannabis use in the normal population, in both cortical (in particular prefrontal and subcortical brain regions. The aim of this paper is to provide a holistic neurochemical framework in which to understand how cannabinoids may impair, or indeed, serve to ameliorate the positive and negative symptoms as well as cognitive impairment. Directions in which future research can proceed to resolve the discrepancies are briefly discussed.

  12. Learning Disabilities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of specific leaning disabilities (SLD in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 was determined in a cohort of 81 patients (43 males, 38 females; mean age 11 years 6 months; age range 8-16 followed at Children's Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

  13. Pulmonary function test in type 1 diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.N. Gajbhiye

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present study was undertaken to find out the effect of diabetes on the respiratory system. Background: Diabetes is a disease with multiple organ involvement. Glycosylation of tissue proteins occur when blood glucose level remain elevated for a prolonged duration. Due to this, there occur irreversible changes in the chemical structure of tissue proteins. Basement membrane and connective tissues in skin, muscles, respiratory system, vascular bed, kidney, peripheral nervous system, etc. are the targets for glycosylation. Pulmonary function testing (P.F.T. is a valuable tool for evaluating the respiratory system, representing an important adjunct to the patient history, various lung imaging studies, and invasive testing such as bronchoscopy and open-lung biopsy. Material and Method: 64 type 1 diabetic subjects and 60 controls were selected for the study. Anthropometric parameters, blood investigations and P.F.T. were performed on all subjects. Result and Discussion: Fasting and Post Meal blood glucose levels as well as HbA1c% were significantly higher in type 1 diabetics as compared to controls. All P.F.T. parameters excepting FEV1 % were also significantly reduced in type 1 diabetics. Decreased values of P.F.T parameters in type 1 diabetics can be attributed to biochemical alteration of connective tissue constituents particularly collagen and elastin as well as by microangiopathy due to nonenzymatic protein glycosylation induced by chronic hyperglycemia.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: optic atrophy type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... optic atrophy type 1 frequently have problems with color vision that make it difficult or impossible to distinguish ... and Prevention: Vision Loss Fact Sheet Cleveland Clinic: Color Blindness Cleveland Clinic: Coping with Vision Loss Cleveland Clinic: Optic Atrophy Disease InfoSearch: Optic ...

  15. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Sporadic Optic Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The natural history of sporadic optic gliomas was compared with that of optic gliomas associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in a study using a Children’s Tumor Registry (CTR) and an NF1 Database (NF1DB) at St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.

  16. Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and Sporadic Optic Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of sporadic optic gliomas was compared with that of optic gliomas associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 in a study using a Children’s Tumor Registry (CTR and an NF1 Database (NF1DB at St Mary’s Hospital, Manchester, UK.

  17. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle;

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported in...

  18. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Anna Z.; Brown, Florence M

    2016-01-01

    Women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) have unique needs during the preconception, pregnancy, and postpartum periods. Preconception counseling is essential for women with T1DM to minimize pregnancy risks. The goals of preconception care should be tight glycemic control with a hemoglobin A1c (A1C) 

  19. Cannabinoids in the management of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Maria Malfitano; Maria Chiara Proto; Maurizio Bifulco

    2008-01-01

    Anna Maria Malfitano, Maria Chiara Proto, Maurizio BifulcoDipartimento di Scienze Farmaceutiche, Università degli Studi di SalernoAbstract: The endocannabinoid system and cannabinoid-based treatments have been involved in a wide number of diseases. In particular, several studies suggest that cannabinoids and endocannabinoids may have a key role in the pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study we highlight the main findings reported in literature about the r...

  20. Medical cannabis vs. synthetic cannabinoids: What does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, D; Ross, R A

    2015-06-01

    The medical use of cannabis has an intricate therapeutic history that finds its roots in ancient China (∼2700 BC). The main psychoactive component of cannabis, Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), was discovered in 1964. This was a significant breakthrough, as it allowed the generation of synthetic analogs of Δ(9) -THC, the discovery of cannabinoid receptors, and the generation of synthetic small molecules. Despite this, today there is still a paucity of drugs that target the cannabinoid system. PMID:25761845

  1. Cannabinoids and cancer: pros and cons of an antitumour strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Bifulco, Maurizio; Laezza, Chiara; Pisanti, Simona; Gazzerro, Patrizia

    2006-01-01

    In the last two decades, research has dramatically increased the knowledge of cannabinoids biology and pharmacology. In mammals, compounds with properties similar to active components of Cannabis sativa, the so called ‘endocannabinoids', have been shown to modulate key cell-signalling pathways involved in cancer cell growth, invasion and metastasis. To date, cannabinoids have been licensed for clinical use as palliative treatment of chemotherapy, but increased evidences showed direct antiprol...

  2. Cannabinoids decrease the th17 inflammatory autoimmune phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozela, Ewa; Juknat, Ana; Kaushansky, Nathali; Rimmerman, Neta; Ben-Nun, Avraham; Vogel, Zvi

    2013-12-01

    Cannabinoids, the Cannabis constituents, are known to possess anti-inflammatory properties but the mechanisms involved are not understood. Here we show that the main psychoactive cannabinoid, Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the main nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), markedly reduce the Th17 phenotype which is known to be increased in inflammatory autoimmune pathologies such as Multiple Sclerosis. We found that reactivation by MOG35-55 of MOG35-55-specific encephalitogenic T cells (cells that induce Experimental Autoimmune Encephalitis when injected to mice) in the presence of spleen derived antigen presenting cells led to a large increase in IL-17 production and secretion. In addition, we found that the cannabinoids CBD and THC dose-dependently (at 0.1-5 μM) suppressed the production and secretion of this cytokine. Moreover, the mRNA and protein of IL-6, a key factor in Th17 induction, were also decreased. Pretreatment with CBD also resulted in increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, CBD and THC did not affect the levels of TNFα and IFNγ. The downregulation of IL-17 secretion by these cannabinoids does not seem to involve the CB1, CB2, PPARγ, 5-HT1A or TRPV1 receptors. In conclusion, the results show a unique cannabinoid modulation of the autoimmune cytokine milieu combining suppression of the pathogenic IL-17 and IL-6 cytokines along with boosting the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. PMID:23892791

  3. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Atmaca; Rifki Ucler; Mehmet Kartal; Ismet Seven; Murat Alay; Irfan Bayram; Sehmus Olmez

    2015-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. ...

  4. Birth Weight in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemyn Yves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate whether birth weight in mothers with diabetes mellitus type 1 is higher as compared to nondiabetic controls. Methods. A retrospective study was performed using an existing database covering the region of Flanders, Belgium. Data included the presence of diabetes type 1, hypertension, parity, maternal age, the use artificial reproductive technology, fetal- neonatal death, congenital anomalies, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, and delivery by Caesarean section or vaginally. Results. In the period studied, 354 women with diabetes type 1 gave birth and were compared with 177.471 controls. Women with type 1 diabetes more often had a maternal age of over 35 years (16.7% versus 12.0%, P=.008, OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.09–1.95. They more frequently suffered hypertension in pregnancy (19.5% versus 4.7%, P<.0001, OR 4.91; 95% CI 3.73–6.44. Perinatal death was significantly higher in the diabetes mellitus group (3.05% versus 0.73%, P<.0001, OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.22–8.01. Caesarean section was performed almost 5 times as frequently in the diabetes versus the control group (OR 4.57; 95% CI 3.70–5.65. Birth weight was significantly higher in diabetic pregnant women from 33 until 38 weeks included, but those reaching 39 weeks and later were not different with control groups. Conclusion. In Belgium, diabetic pregnancy still carries a high risk for fetal and maternal complications; in general birth weight is significantly higher but for those reaching term there is no significant difference in birth weight.

  5. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ilić Aleksandra; Raljević Snežana; Adžić Tatjana; Škodrić-Trifunović Vesna; Stanimirović Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q) and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In ...

  6. [Autoimmune diseases in type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechleitner, Monika; Hoppichler, Friedrich; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    According to literature about 30 % of the patients with type 1 diabetes develop further autoimmune diseases. Thyroid dysfunction represents with 15‒30 % the most common disorder, followed by gastritis with 5‒10 %, celiac disease with 4‒9 % and vitiligo with 2‒10 %. Addison's disease seems to be less prevalent. Diagnostic procedures in the course of the comprehensive care for diabetic patients should therefore include screening for further autoimmune diseases. PMID:27052247

  7. Damping properties of type 1 fimbriae

    CERN Document Server

    Zakrisson, Johan; Axner, Ove; Andersson, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae mediate adhesion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to host cells. It has been hypothesized that fimbriae can, by their ability to uncoil under exposure to force, reduce fluid shear stress on the adhesin-receptor interaction by which the bacterium adheres to the surface. In this work we develop a model that describes how the force on the adhesin-receptor interaction of a type 1 fimbriae varies as a bacterium is affected by a time dependent fluid flow mimicking in vivo conditions. The model combines in vivo hydrodynamic conditions with previously assessed biomechanical properties of the fimbriae. Numerical methods are used to solve for the motion and adhesion force under the presence of time dependent fluid profiles. It is found that a bacterium tethered with a type 1 pilus will experience significantly reduced shear stress for moderate to high flow velocities and that the maximum stress the adhesin will experience is limited to ~120 pN, which is sufficient to activate the conformational ...

  8. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars; Ovesen, Per; Westergaard, Jes Grabow; Møller, Margrethe; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This nationwide prospective multicenter study took place in eight Danish centers treating pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1993......-1999. A total of 990 women with 1,218 pregnancies and delivery after 24 weeks (n=1,215) or early termination due to severe congenital malformations (n=3) were included. Data were collected prospectively by one to three caregivers in each center and reported to a central registry. RESULTS: The perinatal...... mortality rate was 3.1% in type 1 diabetic pregnancies compared with 0.75% in the background population (RR 4.1 [95% CI 2.9-5.6]), and the stillbirth rate was 2.1% compared with 0.45 (4.7 [3.2-7.0]). The congenital malformation rate was 5.0% in the study population and 2.8% (1.7 [1.3-2.2]) in the background...

  9. Postensechalitis gyrus-like calcifications secondary to herpes simples type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of extensive gyriform calcifications after herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in a school child is presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by brain biopsy. We discuss the radiologic evolution with CT. A review of the causes of gyral calcifications reported in the literature is made, concluding that this calcification pattern have never been described associated to herpes simplex virus type 1. (Author) 4 refs

  10. Neurofibromatosis type 1 in childhood: correlation of MRI findings with intelligence.

    OpenAIRE

    Legius, E; Descheemaeker, M J; Steyaert, J.; Spaepen, A; Vlietinck, R; Casaer, P; Demaerel, P; Fryns, J P

    1995-01-01

    In a group of 28 children with neurofibromatosis type 1 aged between 4 and 16 years, neuroradiological findings were correlated with intelligence as measured by the Wechsler scales. The presence or specific location in the brain of T2 weighted prolonged signals on MRI was not associated with cognitive problems. No other physical characteristics associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 were found to correlate significantly with IQ. At the present these T2 weighted hyper-intense spots should no...

  11. Behavioural and molecular consequences of chronic cannabinoid treatment in Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, M J; Howard, M L; Nicholson, L F B; Faull, R L M; Hannan, A J; Glass, M

    2010-09-29

    Early loss of CB1 receptors is a hallmark of human Huntington's disease. Data from rodent studies suggest that preservation and activation of CB1 receptors may be protective against disease progression. R6/1 transgenic mice are considered to be a model of early pathogenic changes in Huntington's disease. We have shown previously that levels of CB1 in R6/1 mice prior to the onset of motor symptoms (12 weeks of age) remain high enough to justify commencement of cannabinoid drug treatment. Eight weeks of daily treatment with the cannabinoid agonists HU210 (0.01 mg/kg) and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 10.00 mg/kg), or the inhibitor of endocannabinoid metabolism URB597 (0.30 mg/kg), did not alter the progressive deterioration of performance observed in motor behavioural testing. HU210-treated R6/1 mice experienced a significant increase in seizure events suggesting that this therapy may lower the seizure threshold and cautioning against highly efficacious agonists as potential therapy in this disease. Molecular characterisation of brains at the end of the study showed that there were no significant effects of HU210 or THC treatment on the ligand binding of cannabinoid CB1, dopamine D1, D2, serotonin 5HT2A or GABA(A) receptors, nor CB1 or fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) mRNA expression in R6/1 mice. Intriguingly, a significant increase in the number of ubiquitinated aggregates was observed in the striatum with HU210 treatment, indicating an influence of CB1 on the disease process. Chronic URB597 treatment preserved CB1 receptors in the R6/1 striatum, suggesting that the manipulation of endocannabinoid levels warrants further exploration. PMID:20600638

  12. CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonism promotes remodeling and cannabinoid treatment prevents endothelial dysfunction and hypotension in rats with myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Jens A.; Hu, Kai; Karcher, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas; Laser, Martin; Han, Hong; Ertl, Georg

    2003-01-01

    To study the long-term effects of altered cannabinoid receptor activity on myocardial and vascular function, Wistar rats were treated with the selective CB1 antagonist AM-251 (0.5 mg kg−1 d−1), the potent synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 (50 μg kg−1 d−1) or vehicle for 12 weeks after coronary artery ligation or sham operation.AM-251 further reduced the pressure-generating capacity, shifted the pressure volume curve to the right (P

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  14. Neurophysiological evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Neeraj; Satpathy, Shankha; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana, which acts within the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), exhibits addictive properties and has powerful actions on the state of arousal of an organism. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), as a component of the reticular activating...... system, is involved in cortical activation and is important in the development of drug addiction-associated behaviours. Therefore, eCBs might exert behavioural effects by actions on the LDT; however, it is unknown whether eCBs have actions on neurons in this nucleus. Accordingly, whole-cell voltage- and...... changes the firing frequency and synaptic activity of neurons in this nucleus. Therefore, endogenous eCB transmission could play a role in processes involving the LDT, such as cortical activation and motivated behaviours and, further, behavioural actions of marijuana are probably mediated, in part, via...

  15. Endogenous cannabinoid release within prefrontal-limbic pathways affects memory consolidation of emotional training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morena, M.; Roozendaal, B.; Trezza, V.; Ratano, P.; Peloso, A.; Hauer, D.; Atsak, P.; Trabace, L.; Cuomo, V.; McGaugh, J.L.; Schelling, G.; Campolongo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have provided extensive evidence that administration of cannabinoid drugs after training modulates the consolidation of memory for an aversive experience. The present experiments investigated whether the memory consolidation is regulated by endogenously released cannabinoids. The ex

  16. Immune intervention in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Michels, Aaron W; Eisenbarth, George S

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results in the specific immune destruction of insulin producing beta cells. Currently there is no cure for T1D and treatment for the disease consists of lifelong administration of insulin. Immunotherapies aimed at preventing beta cell destruction in T1D patients with residual c-peptide or in individuals developing T1D are being evaluated. Networks of researchers such as TrialNet and the Immune Tolerance Network in the U.S. and similar...

  17. Therapeutic perspectives in type-1 diabetes

    CERN Document Server

    SINGH, PRACHI; TUPALLY, KARNAKER R; PODDAR, KINGSHUK; Tan, Aaron; VENKATESAN, VENKY; PAREKH, HARENDRA S; PASTORIN, GIORGIA

    2016-01-01

    This book provides critical insights into and appraisals of recent breakthroughs in type 1 diabetes modulation, with a particular emphasis on the potential impact of current prevention and treatment strategies. It also discusses recent successes and failures in clinical trials. Presenting an comprehensive overview of the disease, it is especially useful for newcomers in the field. It also includes illustrations, which make it easy for the reader to grasp the basic concepts involved. Furthermore, the tables include concise and easy-to-understand information on current clinical trials.

  18. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Kandi Catherine Muze; Edna Siima Majaliwa

    2015-01-01

    Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the...

  19. Cannabinoid-induced apoptosis in immune cells as a pathway to immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Chauhan, Ashok; Singh, Ugra; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids are a group of compounds present in Cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa L.). They mediate their physiological and behavioral effects by activating specific cannabinoid receptors. With the recent discovery of the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and the endocannabinoid system, research in this field has expanded exponentially. Cannabinoids have been shown to act as potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents and have been shown to mediate beneficial effects in a wide rang...

  20. Cannabinoid inhibition of the capsaicin-induced calcium response in rat dorsal root ganglion neurones

    OpenAIRE

    Millns, Paul J; Chapman, Victoria; Kendall, David A.

    2001-01-01

    Cannabinoids have marked inhibitory effects on somatosensory processing, which may arise from actions at both peripheral and central cannabinoid receptors. Here, the effect of a synthetic cannabinoid agonist HU210 on capsaicin-evoked responses in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones was studied. The vanilloid capsaicin produced a concentration-related increase in intracellular calcium in DRG neurones, which was significantly inhibited by HU210 (1 μM). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor ant...

  1. Control of Inhibition by the Direct Action of Cannabinoids on GABAA Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golovko, Tatiana; Min, R.; Lozovaya, Natalia; Falconer, Caroline; Yatsenko, Natalia; Tsintsadze, Timur; Tsintsadze, Vera; Ledent, Catherine; Harvey, Robert J; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J; Rozov, Andrei; Burnashev, Nail

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids are known to regulate inhibitory synaptic transmission via activation of presynaptic G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). Additionally, recent studies suggest that cannabinoids can also directly interact with recombinant GABAA receptors (GABAARs), potentiating currents a

  2. Cannabinoid antagonist in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs): design, characterization and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the preparation, characterization, and in vivo evaluation in rats of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) encapsulating rimonabant (RMN) as prototypical cannabinoid antagonist. A study was conducted in order to optimize NLC production by melt and ultrasonication method. NLCs were prepared by alternatively adding the lipid phase into the aqueous one (direct protocol) or the aqueous phase into the lipid one (reverse protocol). RMN-NLCs have been characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF). Reverse NLCs were treated with polysorbate 80. RMN release kinetics have been determined in vitro by dialysis method. In vivo RMN biodistribution in rats was evaluated after intranasal (i.n.) administration of reverse RMN-NLC. The reverse protocol enabled to prevent the lost of lipid phase and to achieve higher RMN encapsulation efficacy (EE) with respect to the direct protocol (98% w/w versus 67% w/w). The use of different protocols did not affect NLC morphology and dimensional distribution. An in vitro dissolutive release rate of RMN was calculated. The in vivo data indicate that i.n. administration of RMN by reverse NLC treated with polysorbate 80 increased RMN concentration in the brain with respect to the drug in solution. The nanoencapsulation protocol presented here appears as an optimal strategy to improve the low solubility of cannabinoid compounds in an aqueous system suitable for in vivo administration. - Highlights: • Rimonabant (RMN) can be encapsulated in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). • Nanoencapsulation improves RMN solubility in a stable physiologic aqueous formulation. • RMN is released in vitro from NLC by a controlled dissolutive release modality. • I.n. administration leads to higher RMN concentration in the brain with respect to plasma. • NLC increases RMN concentration in the brain with respect to

  3. Cannabinoid antagonist in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs): design, characterization and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Ravani, Laura [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Drechsler, Markus [BIMF/Soft Matter Electron Microscopy, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Mariani, Paolo [Department of Life and Environmental Sciences and CNISM, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60100 Ancona (Italy); Contado, Catia [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Ruokolainen, Janne [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, 00076 Aalto (Finland); Ratano, Patrizia; Campolongo, Patrizia [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sapienza University of Rome, 00185 Roma (Italy); Trezza, Viviana [Department of Science, Roma Tre University, 00146 Roma (Italy); Nastruzzi, Claudio, E-mail: nas@unife.it [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Cortesi, Rita [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the preparation, characterization, and in vivo evaluation in rats of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) encapsulating rimonabant (RMN) as prototypical cannabinoid antagonist. A study was conducted in order to optimize NLC production by melt and ultrasonication method. NLCs were prepared by alternatively adding the lipid phase into the aqueous one (direct protocol) or the aqueous phase into the lipid one (reverse protocol). RMN-NLCs have been characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray, photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF). Reverse NLCs were treated with polysorbate 80. RMN release kinetics have been determined in vitro by dialysis method. In vivo RMN biodistribution in rats was evaluated after intranasal (i.n.) administration of reverse RMN-NLC. The reverse protocol enabled to prevent the lost of lipid phase and to achieve higher RMN encapsulation efficacy (EE) with respect to the direct protocol (98% w/w versus 67% w/w). The use of different protocols did not affect NLC morphology and dimensional distribution. An in vitro dissolutive release rate of RMN was calculated. The in vivo data indicate that i.n. administration of RMN by reverse NLC treated with polysorbate 80 increased RMN concentration in the brain with respect to the drug in solution. The nanoencapsulation protocol presented here appears as an optimal strategy to improve the low solubility of cannabinoid compounds in an aqueous system suitable for in vivo administration. - Highlights: • Rimonabant (RMN) can be encapsulated in nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). • Nanoencapsulation improves RMN solubility in a stable physiologic aqueous formulation. • RMN is released in vitro from NLC by a controlled dissolutive release modality. • I.n. administration leads to higher RMN concentration in the brain with respect to plasma. • NLC increases RMN concentration in the brain with respect to

  4. The Feasibility of Detecting Neuropsychologic and Neuroanatomic Effects of Type 1 Diabetes in Young Children

    OpenAIRE

    Aye, Tandy; Reiss, Allan L.; Kesler, Shelli; Hoang, Sherry; Drobny, Jessica; Park, Yaena; Schleifer, Kristin; Baumgartner, Heidi; Wilson, Darrell M.; Buckingham, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if frequent exposures to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia during early childhood lead to neurocognitive deficits and changes in brain anatomy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this feasibility, cross-sectional study, young children, aged 3 to 10 years, with type 1 diabetes and age- and sex-matched healthy control (HC) subjects completed neuropsychologic (NP) testing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain. RESULTS NP testing and MRI scanning was successfully...

  5. Spectral Energy Distributions of Type 1 AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Heng

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are essential to understand the physics of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. This thesis present a detailed study of AGN SED shapes in the optical-near infrared bands (0.3--3microm) for 413 X-ray selected Type 1 AGNs from the XMM-COSMOS Survey. We define a useful near-IR/optical index-index ('color-color') diagram to investigate the mixture of AGN continuum, host galaxy and reddening contributions. We found that ˜90% of the AGNs lie on mixing curves between the Elvis et al. (1994) mean AGN SED (E94) and a host galaxy, with only the modest reddening [E(B-V)=0.1--0.2] expected in type 1 AGNs. Lower luminosity and Eddington ratio objects have more host galaxy, as expected. The E94 template is remarkably good in describing the SED shape in the 0.3--3microrn decade of the spectrum over a range of 3.2 dex in LOPT, 2.7 dex in L/LEdd, and for redshifts up to 3. The AGN phenomenon is thus insensitive to absolute or relative accretion rate and to cosmic time. However, 10% of the AGNs are inconsistent with any AGN+host+reddening mix. These AGNs have weak or non-existent near-IR bumps, suggesting a lack of the hot dust characteristic of AGNs. The fraction of these hot-dust-poor AGNs evolves with redshift from 6% at low redshift (z times the gravitational stability radii. Either the host-dust is destroyed (dynamically or by radiation), or is offset from the central black hole due to recoiling. Alternatively, the universality of HDP quasars in samples with different selection methods and the continuous distribution of dust covering factor in type 1 AGNs, suggest that the range of SEDs could be related to the range of tilts in warped fueling disks, as in the model of Lawrence and Elvis (2010), with HDP quasars having relatively small warps. A small number of other outliers are found with the help of the mixing diagram, which could represent quasars on different evolutionary stage

  6. The therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Benzi; Triolo, Piera; Jones, Wallace; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    There is growing interest in the therapeutic potential of marijuana (cannabis) and cannabinoid-based chemicals within the medical community and, particularly, for neurological conditions. This interest is driven both by changes in the legal status of cannabis in many areas and increasing research into the roles of endocannabinoids within the central nervous system and their potential as symptomatic and/or neuroprotective therapies. We review basic science as well as preclinical and clinical studies on the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids specifically as it relates to movement disorders. The pharmacology of cannabis is complex, with over 60 neuroactive chemicals identified to date. The endocannabinoid system modulates neurotransmission involved in motor function, particularly within the basal ganglia. Preclinical research in animal models of several movement disorders have shown variable evidence for symptomatic benefits, but more consistently suggest potential neuroprotective effects in several animal models of Parkinson's (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). Clinical observations and clinical trials of cannabinoid-based therapies suggests a possible benefit of cannabinoids for tics and probably no benefit for tremor in multiple sclerosis or dyskinesias or motor symptoms in PD. Data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding HD, dystonia, or ataxia and nonexistent for myoclonus or RLS. Despite the widespread publicity about the medical benefits of cannabinoids, further preclinical and clinical research is needed to better characterize the pharmacological, physiological, and therapeutic effects of this class of drugs in movement disorders. PMID:25649017

  7. Camp for Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan-Bohm, Kelly; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill; DeSalvo, Daniel; Gunn, Sheila; Hilliard, Marisa

    2016-08-01

    Camps for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have grown in size and scope since they first emerged in the 1920s. Anecdotal evidence suggests that attending camp with other youth with T1D is beneficial, largely attributed to sharing fun, active experiences and removing the isolation of living with diabetes. However, few studies have evaluated the psychosocial and medical impacts of T1D camp attendance during and after camp sessions. In addition, T1D camps have been a setting for numerous studies on a variety of T1D-related research questions not related to camp itself, such as testing novel diabetes management technologies in an active, non-laboratory setting. This paper reviews the evidence of psychosocial and medical outcomes associated with T1D camp attendance across the globe, provides an overview of other research conducted at camp, and offers recommendations for future research conducted at T1D camp. PMID:27292106

  8. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    the environment is generally needed. The pathogenesis can be divided into three stages: 1, appearance of β-cell autoimmunity, normoglycaemia, and no symptoms; 2, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and no symptoms; and 3, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and symptoms of diabetes. The genetic......Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one of...... these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not...

  9. Pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colstrup, Miriam; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In 1989 the St. Vincent declaration set a five-year target for approximating outcomes of pregnancies in women with diabetes to those of the background population. We investigated and quantified the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM......) to evaluate if the goals of the 1989 St. Vincent Declaration have been obtained concerning foetal and neonatal complications. Methods: Twelve population-based studies published within the last 10 years with in total 14 099 women with T1DM and 4 035 373 women from the background population were...... adverse pregnancy outcomes was two to five times increased in women with T1DM compared with the general population. The goals of the St. Vincent declaration have not been achieved....

  10. Statins, bone, and neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Bruce R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a dominantly inherited multi-system disorder. Major features include pigmentary abnormalities, benign tumors of the nerve sheath (neurofibromas, malignant tumors, learning disabilities, and skeletal dysplasia. The NF1 gene functions as a tumor suppressor, but haploinsuffiency probably accounts for some aspects of the non-tumor phenotype. The protein product, neurofibromin, is a Ras GTPase-activating protein, and various Ras pathway inhibitors are being tested in preclinical models and clinical trials for effectiveness in treating NF1 complications. This month in BMC Medicine, a paper by Kolanczyk et al describes a preclinical mouse model for tibial dysplasia and provides evidence that the drug lovastatin – in use to treat cardiovascular disease – may be beneficial, opening the door to clinical trials in humans.

  11. Erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the study...... was to explore plasma erythropoietin response to hypoglycaemia and the relationship to basal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and cognitive function. METHODS: We performed a single-blinded, controlled, cross-over study with induced hypoglycaemia or maintained glycaemic level. Nine patients with...... type 1 diabetes with high and nine with low activity in RAS were studied. Hypoglycaemia was induced using a standardized insulin-infusion. RESULTS: Overall, erythropoietin concentrations increased during hypoglycaemia. In the high RAS group erythropoietin rose 29% (p=0.032) whereas no significant...

  12. Insulin and type 1 diabetes: immune connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culina, Sloboda; Brezar, Vedran; Mallone, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Insulin is the hormone produced by pancreatic β-cells, with a central role in carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Together with its precursors preproinsulin and proinsulin, insulin is also a key target antigen (Ag) of the autoimmune islet destruction leading to type 1 diabetes. Being recognized by both autoantibodies (aAbs) and autoreactive T cells, insulin plays a triggering role, at least in rodent models, in diabetes pathogenesis. It is expressed not only by β-cells but also in the thymus, where it plays a major role in central tolerance mechanisms. We will summarize current knowledge concerning insulin, its role in β-cell autoimmunity as initial target Ag, its recognition by aAbs and autoreactive T cells, and the detection of these immune responses to provide biomarkers for clinical trials employing insulin as an immune modulatory agent. PMID:23065992

  13. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  14. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab SALEHPOUR

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  How to Cite this Article: Salehpour Sh. Clinical Manifestations of Type 1 Gaucher Disease. Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6:4 (suppl. 1:13-14.pls see PDF.References 1. Beutler E, Grabowski GA. Gaucher disease. In: Metabolic and molecular bases of inherited disease, Scriver CR, Beaudet AL, Sly WS, Valle D (Eds, McGraw-Hill, New York 2001: 3635. 2. Cox TM, Schofield JP.   Gaucher’s disease: clinical features  and   natural   history.   Baillieres   Clin Haematol. 1997 Dec;10(4:657-89.   

  15. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete M; Westergaard, Tine; Frisch, Morten; Rostgaard, Klaus; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Melbye, Mads; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil......, 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.12; n = 56) for development of T1D. However, adjusting for familial relationship to patients with T1D reduced the excess risk to 44% (relative risk, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.88; n = 56). CONCLUSION: The present nationwide cohort study demonstrates...

  16. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muze, Kandi Catherine; Majaliwa, Edna Siima

    2015-04-01

    Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country's population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups. PMID:25941637

  17. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandi Catherine Muze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups.

  18. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carmody, David

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1\\/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  19. Constitutive cannabinoid 1 and mu opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area: occurrence, function and therapeutic relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Meye, F J

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) play a crucial role in regulating systems dedicated to processing rewards and emotions. It was known that in artificial systems, CB1Rs can exhibit activity that is independent of the typical agonist-driven form. However, it remained largely unclear whether this constitutive activity also occurred in native tissue (e.g. the brain), and if so, what role it plays in neurotransmission and behavior. In this thesis we have taken a multi-disciplinary approach to show ...

  20. Using cannabinoids in pain and palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Sue

    2010-10-01

    Interest in the use of cannabinoids in a clinical setting is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where more conventional treatments have failed. They have been reported as offering perceived benefits in a wide range of conditions, but the major interest at present is centred on their place in pain management and in the palliation of symptoms secondary to terminal cancer and neurological disease. The potential benefits include symptomatic relief for patients suffering from intractable neuropathic pain, anorexia, anxiety and muscle spasm. There is clear consensus that cannibinoids should not be used as a first-line monotherapy, but should be considered as valuable adjuvants to more commonly indicated therapeutic options in the management of palliative care patients. Scientific evidence documenting the benefits of the canibinoids nabilone and sativex is accumulating, but needs to be evaluated carefully in the light of the paucity of available data. Both drugs are usually used under the guidance of specialist units. Nabilone and Sativex are now controlled drugs, and are frequently used outside of their licensed indication (control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting) and hence particular care needs to be taken in evaluating the rational for their use. Sativex has been recently licenced for use in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:20972379

  1. Evaluation of principal cannabinoids in airborne particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, C., E-mail: balducci@iia.cnr.it [Italian National Research Council, Institute for Atmospheric Pollution (CNR-IIA), Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Nervegna, G.; Cecinato, A. [Italian National Research Council, Institute for Atmospheric Pollution (CNR-IIA), Monterotondo Stazione (Italy)

    2009-05-08

    The determination of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol ({Delta}{sup 9}-THC), cannabidiol (CND) and cannabinol (CNB), primary active components in cannabis preparation, was carried out on airborne particulates by applying a specific procedure consisting of soot extraction by ultrasonic bath, purification by solvent partitioning, derivatization with N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide, and separation/detection through gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized procedure was found suitable for measuring the three psychotropic substances at concentrations ranging from ca. 0.001 to ca. 5.0 ng cm{sup -3} of air, with recoveries always higher than 82%, accuracy >7.3% and precision >90%. Application of the procedure performed on field in Rome and Bari, Italy, demonstrated that all three compounds contaminate the air in Italian cities whereas in Algiers, Algeria, only cannabinol, the most stable in the atmosphere, exceeded the limit of quantification of the method. The relative percentages of the three cannabinoids in general reproduced those typical of the Cannabis sativa plant and were very different from those found in human blood, urine and sweat.

  2. Evaluation of principal cannabinoids in airborne particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), cannabidiol (CND) and cannabinol (CNB), primary active components in cannabis preparation, was carried out on airborne particulates by applying a specific procedure consisting of soot extraction by ultrasonic bath, purification by solvent partitioning, derivatization with N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyl-trifluoroacetamide, and separation/detection through gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The optimized procedure was found suitable for measuring the three psychotropic substances at concentrations ranging from ca. 0.001 to ca. 5.0 ng cm-3 of air, with recoveries always higher than 82%, accuracy >7.3% and precision >90%. Application of the procedure performed on field in Rome and Bari, Italy, demonstrated that all three compounds contaminate the air in Italian cities whereas in Algiers, Algeria, only cannabinol, the most stable in the atmosphere, exceeded the limit of quantification of the method. The relative percentages of the three cannabinoids in general reproduced those typical of the Cannabis sativa plant and were very different from those found in human blood, urine and sweat.

  3. Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome with Carbohydrate-Responsive Symptoms but without Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koy, Anne; Assmann, Birgit; Klepper, Joerg; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) is caused by a defect in glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. The main symptoms are epilepsy, developmental delay, movement disorders, and deceleration of head circumference. A ketogenic diet has been shown to be effective in controlling epilepsy in GLUT1-DS. We report a female…

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels in type 1 narcolepsy patients very close to onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Pizza, Fabio; Knudsen, Stine;

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by a loss of hypocretin (orexin) signaling in the brain. Genetic data suggests the disorder is caused by an autoimmune attack on hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. This hypothesis has however not yet been confirmed by consistent findings of autoreactive anti...

  5. Natural and experimental infection of sheep with European bat lyssavirus type-1 of Danish bat origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Fooks, A.R.; Agerholm, J.S.;

    2006-01-01

    In 1998 and 2002, European bat lyssavirus type-1 (EBLV-1) was demonstrated in brain tissue of five Danish sheep suffering from micrological disorders. Four of the five sheep also had encephalic listeriosis. The animals originated from four flocks on pastures within a limited area of western Jutland...

  6. A runner's high depends on cannabinoid receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Steinle, Jörg; Bindila, Laura; Auer, Matthias K; Kirchherr, Hartmut; Lutz, Beat; Gass, Peter

    2015-10-20

    Exercise is rewarding, and long-distance runners have described a runner's high as a sudden pleasant feeling of euphoria, anxiolysis, sedation, and analgesia. A popular belief has been that endogenous endorphins mediate these beneficial effects. However, running exercise increases blood levels of both β-endorphin (an opioid) and anandamide (an endocannabinoid). Using a combination of pharmacologic, molecular genetic, and behavioral studies in mice, we demonstrate that cannabinoid receptors mediate acute anxiolysis and analgesia after running. We show that anxiolysis depends on intact cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) receptors on forebrain GABAergic neurons and pain reduction on activation of peripheral CB1 and CB2 receptors. We thus demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system is crucial for two main aspects of a runner's high. Sedation, in contrast, was not influenced by cannabinoid or opioid receptor blockage, and euphoria cannot be studied in mouse models. PMID:26438875

  7. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  8. Cannabinoids enhance gastric X/A-like cells activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Sawicki

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that cannabinoids may cause overeating in humans and in laboratory animals. Although, endogenous cannabinoids and their receptors (CB1 have been found in the hypothalamus, and recently also in gastrointestinal tract, the precise mechanism of appetite control by cannabinoids remains unknown. Recently, ghrelin--a hormone secreted mainly from the stomach X/A-like cells was proposed to be an appetite stimulating agent. The aim of this study was the evaluation of the influence of a single ip injection of a stable analogue of endogenous cannabinoid--anandamide, R-(+-methanandamide (2.5 mg/kg and CP 55,940 (0.25 mg/kg, an exogenous agonist of CB1 receptors, on ghrelin plasma concentration and on ghrelin immunoreactivity in the gastric mucosa of male Wistar rats. Four hours after a single injection of both cannabinoids or vehicle, the animals were anaesthetized and blood was taken from the abdominal aorta to determinate plasma ghrelin concentration by RIA. Subsequently, the animals underwent resection of distal part of stomach. Immunohistochemical study of gastric mucosa, using the EnVision method and specific monoclonal antibodies against ghrelin was performed. The intensity of ghrelin immunoreactivity in X/A-like cells was analyzed using Olympus Cell D image analysis system. The attenuation of ghrelin-immunoreactivity of gastric mucosa, after a single injection of R-(+-methanandamide and CP 55,940 was accompanied by a significant increase of ghrelin plasma concentration. These results indicate that stimulation of appetite exerted by cannabinoids may be connected with an increase of ghrelin secretion from gastric X/A-like cells.

  9. Efecto neuroprotector de los cannabinoides en las enfermedades neurodegenerativas

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Suero-García; Lucia Martín-Banderas; Mª Ángeles Holgado

    2015-01-01

    Objetivos: Se analiza la situación actual de las investigaciones relacionadas con las sustancias cannabinoides, así como su interacción con el organismo, clasificación, efectos terapéuticos y su uso en las enfermedades neurodegenerativas. Métodos: Se realiza una exhaustiva revisión bibliográfica relacionada con las sustancias cannabinoides y sus derivados sintéticos, haciendo especial hincapié en la forma de interactuar con el organismo y los efectos que provocan dichas interacciones. Concret...

  10. Chemical probes for the study of the endogenous cannabinoid system

    OpenAIRE

    Rueda Zubiaurre, Ainoa

    2015-01-01

    La química biológica nació hace dos décadas con objeto de estudiar la interfase entre la química y la biología, utilizando para ello herramientas capaces de interrogar los distintos sistemas biológicos, facilitando así la comprensión de los mismos.1-3 Sin embargo, existen sistemas biológicos de gran relevancia cuyo estudio no ha sido abordado hasta ahora. Uno de ellos es el sistema cannabinoide endógeno (endogenous cannabinoid system, ECS), que durante los últimos años ha sido relacionado con...

  11. [Analgesic effects of cannabinoids on central pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igon'kina, S I; Churiukanov, M V; Churiukanov, V V; Kukushkin, M L

    2011-01-01

    It was shown that cannabinoids anandamide, HU210 and WIN 55,212-2 inhibit both spontaneous episodes of pain and mechanical allodynia in rats with central pain syndrome caused by disturbance of inhibitory processes in the dorsal horns of lumbar spinal cord. The analgesic effect is most pronounced in the intrathecal route of administration. The intensity of analgesic actions of cannabinoids on the central pain syndrome in rats, depending on the drug is as follows: HU210 > WIN 55,212-2 > anandamide. PMID:22359935

  12. Cannabinoids and Reproduction: A Lasting and Intriguing History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda Cobellis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Starting from an historical overview of lasting Cannabis use over the centuries, we will focus on a description of the cannabinergic system, with a comprehensive analysis of chemical and pharmacological properties of endogenous and synthetic cannabimimetic analogues. The metabolic pathways and the signal transduction mechanisms, activated by cannabinoid receptors stimulation, will also be discussed. In particular, we will point out the action of cannabinoids and endocannabinoids on the different neuronal networks involved in reproductive axis, and locally, on male and female reproductive tracts, by emphasizing the pivotal role played by this system in the control of fertility.

  13. Recent advances in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyi, Mervyn; Wentworth, John M; Nankervis, Alison J; Fourlanos, Spiros; Colman, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is caused by an autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that leads to insulin deficiency. The incidence of T1D in Australia has doubled over the past 20 years. T1D treatment focuses on physiological insulin replacement, aiming for near-normal blood glucose levels. Hypoglycaemia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in T1D. Optimal T1D management is complex, and is enhanced by empowering individuals in all aspects of managing diabetes. New technologies, including insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors and sensor-augmented pumps, can assist people achieve better glycaemic control and reduce the risk of severe hypoglycaemia. Women with T1D can achieve significantly better outcomes during pregnancy and for their infants by planning for their pregnancy and by intensive glycaemic control. Several trials are underway that seek to identify the determinants of autoimmunity and to develop therapies that prevent T1D in at-risk individuals. Pancreatic and islet cell transplants are proven therapies, but are only offered to individuals with diabetes and renal failure (pancreas) or severe hypoglycaemia unawareness (islet cell transplants). Although T1D is still associated with considerable premature mortality, recent findings show that a significant improvement in life expectancy has occurred. PMID:26424063

  14. Stem Cell Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MingLi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a common chronic disease in children, characterized by a loss of  cells, which results in defects in insulin secretion and hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia causes diabetic complications, including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Curative therapies mainly include diet and insulin administration. Although hyperglycemia can be improved by insulin administration, exogenous insulin injection cannot successfully mimic the insulin secretion from normal  cells, which keeps blood glucose levels within the normal range all the time. Islet and pancreas transplantation achieves better glucose control, but there is a lack of organ donors. Cell based therapies have also been attempted to treat T1DM. Stem cells such as embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells and tissue stem cells (TSCs such as bone marrow-, adipose tissue- and cord blood-derived stem cells, have been shown to generate insulin-producing cells. In this review, we summarize the most-recently available information about T1DM and the use of TSCs to treat T1DM.

  15. Neuroimaging findings in glutaric aciduria type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the imaging features of glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA-1) in a group of 20 patients, the largest published series to date. To document the findings not previously reported and compare our findings with the imaging characteristics of GA-1 previously reported in the literature. For 14 patients the original scans were examined and in the remaining 6, where the imaging was unavailable, the radiology reports were consulted. Nine patients had serial cranial US examinations, 13 had 18 CT scans performed and 14 patients had 39 MRI scans. Widening of the sylvian fissures and of the fluid spaces anterior to the temporal lobes was seen in 93% of cases. The mesencephalic cistern was also widened in 86%. Abnormal high-signal intensity on T2-weighted (T2-W) images was seen in the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter in 64% of children. Subdural collections were found in 3 patients, all of which resolved spontaneously. Four neonates followed with serial cranial US showed bilateral multiple caudothalamic cysts. Abnormal high signal on T2-W images was seen in the dentate nucleus, substantia nigra and the pontine medial lemniscus in 79, 43 and 64%, respectively. Widening of the sylvian fissure, mesencephalic cistern and expansion of CSF spaces anterior to the temporal lobes are cardinal signs of GA-1. If combined with abnormalities of the basal ganglia and white matter, GA-1 should be strongly suspected. (orig.)

  16. Obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarón, J J; Benaiges, D; Mañé, L; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores Le-Roux, J A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimise metabolic control became generalised, with two main side effects: a higher rate of severe hypoglycaemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, which reduces or nullifies the benefits of good metabolic control, and which has other negative consequences; therefore, strategies to achieve weight control in patients with T1DM are necessary. At present, treatment with GLP-1 and SGLT-2 inhibitors has yielded promising short-term results that need to be confirmed in studies with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. It is possible that, in coming years, the applicability of bariatric surgery in obese patients with T1DM will be similar to that of the general population or T2DM. PMID:25413942

  17. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In the available medical literature, the thoracic manifestations of NF1 have been rarely described in these patients. There are few reports about intrathoracic neurogenic tumors, kyphoscoliosis, pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with NF1. Case report. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at the Lung Clinic of Belgrade University Clinical Center of Serbia. The patient’s general condition was poor with shortness of breath and present cyanosis. At the same time, the skin changes similar to NF1 were noticed, which were additionally documented by her medical history and diagnosed as NF1. After the application of noninvasive mechanical ventilation and other emergency respiratory medicine measures, the patient soon felt better. The parenchymal changes were viewed by subsequent X-rays and CT scanning of the thorax. Conclusion. This is a case report presenting the NF1 associated with the abnormality of lung parenchyma established during diagnostic procedures at the Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Pulmonology.

  18. Mosaic Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Parkin, Patricia; Lara-Corrales, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Confusion is widespread regarding segmental or mosaic neurofibromatosis type 1 (MNF1). Physicians should use the same terms and be aware of its comorbidities and risks. The objective of the current study was to identify and synthesize data for cases of MNF1 published from 1977 to 2012 to better understand its significance and associations. After a literature search in PubMed, we reviewed all available relevant articles and abstracted and synthetized the relevant clinical data about manifestations, associated findings, family history and genetic testing. We identified 111 articles reporting 320 individuals. Most had pigmentary changes or neurofibromas only. Individuals with pigmentary changes alone were identified at a younger age. Seventy-six percent had localized MNF1 restricted to one segment; the remainder had generalized MNF1. Of 157 case reports, 29% had complications associated with NF1. In one large case series, 6.5% had offspring with complete NF1. The terms "segmental" and "type V" neurofibromatosis should be abandoned, and the correct term, mosaic NF1 (MNF1), should be used. All individuals with suspected MNF1 should have a complete physical examination, genetic testing of blood and skin, counseling, and health surveillance. PMID:26338194

  19. Type 1 diabetes: A predictable disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kimber M Simmons; Aaron W Michels

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterizedby loss of insulin producing beta cells andreliance on exogenous insulin for survival. T1D is one ofthe most common chronic diseases in childhood and theincidence is increasing, especially in children less than 5years of age. In individuals with a genetic predisposition,an unidentified trigger initiates an abnormal immuneresponse and the development of islet autoantibodiesdirected against proteins in insulin producing beta cells.There are currently four biochemical islet autoantibodiesmeasured in the serum directed against insulin, glutamicdecarboxylase, islet antigen 2, and zinc transporter 8.Development of islet autoantibodies occurs before clinicaldiagnosis of T1D, making T1D a predictable disease in anindividual with 2 or more autoantibodies. Screening forislet autoantibodies is still predominantly done throughresearch studies, but efforts are underway to screenthe general population. The benefits of screening forislet autoantibodies include decreasing the incidenceof diabetic ketoacidosis that can be life threatening,initiating insulin therapy sooner in the disease process,and evaluating safe and specific therapies in largerandomized clinical intervention trials to delay or preventprogression to diabetes onset.

  20. Localization and function of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor in the anterolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagore Puente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST is involved in behaviors related to natural reward, drug addiction and stress. In spite of the emerging role of the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB system in these behaviors, little is known about the anatomy and function of this system in the anterolateral BNST (alBNST. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed morphological characterization of the localization of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1 receptor a necessary step toward a better understanding of the physiological roles of the eCB system in this region of the brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have combined anatomical approaches at the confocal and electron microscopy level to ex-vivo electrophysiological techniques. Here, we report that CB1 is localized on presynaptic membranes of about 55% of immunopositive synaptic terminals for the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGluT1, which contain abundant spherical, clear synaptic vesicles and make asymmetrical synapses with alBNST neurons. About 64% of vGluT1 immunonegative synaptic terminals show CB1 immunolabeling. Furthermore, 30% and 35% of presynaptic boutons localize CB1 in alBNST of conditional mutant mice lacking CB1 mainly from GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1-KO mice and mainly from cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1-KO mice, respectively. Extracellular field recordings and whole cell patch clamp in the alBNST rat brain slice preparation revealed that activation of CB1 strongly inhibits excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study supports the anterolateral BNST as a potential neuronal substrate of the effects of cannabinoids on stress-related behaviors.

  1. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Anna Z; Brown, Florence M

    2016-08-01

    Women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) have unique needs during the preconception, pregnancy, and postpartum periods. Preconception counseling is essential for women with T1DM to minimize pregnancy risks. The goals of preconception care should be tight glycemic control with a hemoglobin A1c (A1C) Optimal control of retinopathy, hypertension, and nephropathy should be achieved. During pregnancy, the goal A1C is near-normal at control of T1DM during pregnancy. Data regarding continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in pregnant women with T1DM is conflicting regarding improved glycemic control. However, a recent CGM study does provide some distinct patterns of glucose levels associated with large for gestational age infants. Frequent eye exams during pregnancy are essential due to risk of progression of retinopathy during pregnancy. Chronic hypertension treatment goals are systolic blood pressure 110-129 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure 65-79 mmHg. Labor and delivery target plasma glucose levels are 80-110 mg/dl, and an insulin drip is recommended to achieve these targets during active labor. Postpartum, insulin doses must be reduced and glucoses closely monitored in women with T1DM because of the enhanced insulin sensitivity after delivery. Breastfeeding is recommended and should be highly encouraged due to maternal benefits including increased insulin sensitivity and weight loss and infant and childhood benefits including reduced prevalence of overweight. In this article, we discuss the care of pregnant patients with T1DM. PMID:27337958

  2. Type 1 diabetes in India: Overall insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is also on increase like type 2 diabetes, even though not in the same proportion, but still with a trend of 3-5% increase/year. India has three new cases of T1DM/100,000 children of 0-14 years. Three sets of prevalence data shows 17.93 cases/100,000 children in Karnataka, 3.2 cases/100,000 children in Chennai, and 10.2 cases/100,000 children in Karnal (Haryana.T1DM may be autoimmune or idiopathic in nature and is present in 9% cases of insulin deficiency. T1DM is primarily caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and disorder of the immune regulatory mechanism. A combination of all these three factors causes autoimmune disease, which may ultimately result in the destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and potentially death, if not treated with insulin. Prediabetes is the phase before the onset of T1DM, which provides a window of opportunity for early intervention. All available interventions including steroids, immunosuppressants, and cyclosporins can be possibly applied during the prediabetes phase. The treatment goals for T1DM are simple and include maintaining near normal blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications, which is a constant juggle between insulin and maintaining an appropriate lifestyle. The Indian Council of Medical Research funded Registry of People with diabetes in India with young age at onset (YDR was started in the year 2006 with 10 collaborating centres across India. This registry is focusing on to provide an overview of diabetes in the young.

  3. Mining for Dust in Type 1 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Gallagher, S. C.; Leighly, Karen M.; Hewett, Paul C.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Hall, P. B.

    2015-06-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ˜35,000 uniformly selected quasars with 0\\lt z≤slant 5.3 in order to better understand their intrinsic optical/ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions. Using rest-frame optical-UV photometry taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey’s (SDSS) 7th data release, cross-matched to WISE in the mid-infrared, 2MASS and UKIDSS in the near-infrared, and GALEX in the UV, we isolate outliers in the color distribution and find them well described by an SMC-like reddening law. A hierarchical Bayesian model with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling method was used to find distributions of power law indices and E(B-V) consistent with both the broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL samples. We find that, of the ugriz color-selected type 1 quasars in SDSS, 2.5% (13%) of the non-BAL (BAL) sample are consistent with E(B-V)\\gt 0.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)\\gt 0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index ({{α }λ }) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger high-ionization emission lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former pointing to differences in black hole mass and/or orientation.

  4. Autoimmune mechanisms in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knip, Mikael; Siljander, Heli

    2008-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is perceived as a chronic immune-mediated disease with a subclinical prodromal period characterized by selective loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreatic islets in genetically susceptible subjects. Autoreactive T cells, both CD4 and CD8 cells, have been implicated as active players in beta-cell destruction. A series of autoantigens have been identified in T1D including insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the protein tyrosine phosphatase-related islet antigen 2 (IA-2), and most recently the zinc transporter Slc30A8 residing in the insulin secretory granule of the beta-cell. The issue whether there is any primary autoantigen in T1D has remained controversial. Given that there are two major HLA haplotypes conferring disease susceptibility, i.e. the DR3-DQ2 haplotype and the DR4-DQ8 haplotype, one may assume that there will be at least two primary antigens in T1D. The first signs of beta-cell autoimmunity might appear already during the first year of life. Autoantibodies may be considered as markers of an ongoing disease process in the pancreatic islets, and they can be used for prediction of T1D in non-diabetic individuals. Autoantigen-specific T-cell responses have been detected from peripheral blood in both patients with T1D and in unaffected subjects, but a clear discrimination between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects have rarely been seen until recently. PMID:18625444

  5. Targeted metabolomic approach for assessing human synthetic cannabinoid exposure and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Amy L; Seely, Kathryn A; Chimalakonda, Krishna C; Tran, Johnny P; Trass, Matthew; Miranda, Art; Fantegrossi, William E; Kennedy, Paul D; Dobrowolski, Paul; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; McCain, Keith R; James, Laura P; Endres, Gregory W; Moran, Jeffery H

    2013-10-01

    Designer synthetic cannabinoids like JWH-018 and AM2201 have unique clinical toxicity. Cytochrome-P450-mediated metabolism of each leads to the generation of pharmacologically active (ω)- and (ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolites that retain high affinity for cannabinoid type-1 receptors, exhibit Δ(9)-THC-like effects in rodents, and are conjugated with glucuronic acid prior to excretion in human urine. Previous studies have not measured the contribution of the specific (ω-1)-monohydroxyl enantiomers in human metabolism and toxicity. This study uses a chiral liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy approach (LC-MS/MS) to quantify each specific enantiomer and other nonchiral, human metabolites of JWH-018 and AM2201 in human urine. The accuracy (average % RE = 18.6) and reproducibility (average CV = 15.8%) of the method resulted in low-level quantification (average LLQ = 0.99 ng/mL) of each metabolite. Comparisons with a previously validated nonchiral method showed strong correlation between the two approaches (average r(2) = 0.89). Pilot data from human urine samples demonstrate enantiospecific excretion patterns. The (S)-isomer of the JWH-018-(ω-1)-monohydroxyl metabolite was predominantly excreted (>87%) in human urine as the glucuronic acid conjugate, whereas the relative abundance of the corresponding AM2201-(ω-1)-metabolite was low (<5%) and did not demonstrate enantiospecificity (approximate 50:50 ratio of each enantiomer). The new chiral method provides a comprehensive, targeted metabolomic approach for studying the human metabolism of JWH-018 and AM2201. Preliminary evaluations of specific enantiomeric contributions support the use of this approach in future studies designed to understand the pharmacokinetic properties of JWH-018 and/or AM2201. PMID:23987522

  6. Synthetic Cannabinoids-Further Evidence Supporting the Relationship Between Cannabinoids and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattore, Liana

    2016-04-01

    Consumption of synthetic mind-altering compounds, also known as "new psychoactive substances," is increasing globally at an alarming rate. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are among the most commonly used new psychoactive substances. They are usually purchased as marijuana-like drugs, marketed as herbal blends and perceived as risk-free by inexperienced users. Yet, contrary to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, SCs may lead to severe health consequences, including anxiety, tachycardia, hallucinations, violent behavior, and psychosis. This review focuses on the latest (2010-2015) evidence of psychotic symptoms induced by ingestion of products containing SCs. Reports suggesting that SCs may either exacerbate previously stable psychotic symptoms (in vulnerable individuals) or trigger new-onset psychosis (in individuals with no previous history of psychosis) are reviewed. Pharmacology and toxicology of these compounds are discussed, with particular reference to their psychoactive effects. PMID:26970364

  7. Transcriptional organization of bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, L W; Heilman, C A; Howley, P M

    1983-09-01

    Multiple bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1)-specific polyadenylated RNA species in a BPV-1-infected bovine fibropapilloma were identified and mapped. All of the RNA species were transcribed from the same DNA strand of the BPV-1 genome. Five RNA species previously identified in BPV-1-transformed mouse cells were also present in the bovine fibropapilloma. These five species measured 1,050, 1,150, 1,700, 3,800, and 4,050 bases, mapped within the 69% transforming segment of the BPV-1 genome, and shared a 3' coterminus at 0.53 map units (m.u.). The 5' ends of the bodies of these distinct transcripts were located at ca. 0.03, 0.09, 0.34, 0.39, and 0.41 m.u. Additional polyadenylated RNA species not present in BPV-1-transformed mouse cells were specific for the BPV-1-infected bovine fibropapilloma and measured 1,700, 3,700, 3,800, 6,700, and 8,000 bases. These wart-specific species shared a 3' coterminus at 0.90 m.u. The 5' termini of the bodies of the 1,700- and 3,800-base species mapped at 0.71 and 0.42 m.u., respectively. Exonuclease VII analysis failed to reveal any internal splicing in these two species; however, the presence of small remote 5' leader sequences could not be ruled out. The 3,700-base species hybridized to DNA fragments from the 69% transforming segment as well as from the 31% nontransforming segment of the BPV-1 genome; however, this species was not precisely mapped. The 5' termini of the two largest RNA species (6,700 and 8,000 bases in size) were located at ca. 0.01 and 0.90 m.u., respectively. Since the 5' ends of these mapped adjacent to a TATAAA sequence which could possibly serve as an element of a transcriptional promoter, it is possible that one or both of these species represent nonspliced precursor RNA molecules. PMID:6137574

  8. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stokol

    Full Text Available Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1 causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V. Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM. A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis

  9. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714

  10. Cannabinoids: new promising agents in the treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Mandolino, Giuseppe; Galuppo, Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated. PMID:25407719

  11. Cannabinoids: New Promising Agents in the Treatment of Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Giacoppo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Cannabis sativa is considered the most extensively used narcotic. Nevertheless, this fame obscures its traditional employ in native medicine of South Africa, South America, Turkey, Egypt and in many regions of Asia as a therapeutic drug. In fact, the use of compounds containing Cannabis and their introduction in clinical practice is still controversial and strongly limited by unavoidable psychotropic effects. So, overcoming these adverse effects represents the main open question on the utilization of cannabinoids as new drugs for treatment of several pathologies. To date, therapeutic use of cannabinoid extracts is prescribed in patients with glaucoma, in the control of chemotherapy-related vomiting and nausea, for appetite stimulation in patients with anorexia-cachexia syndrome by HIV, and for the treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms. Recently, researcher efforts are aimed to employ the therapeutic potentials of Cannabis sativa in the modulation of cannabinoid receptor activity within the central nervous system, particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, as well as psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders. This review evaluates the most recent available data on cannabinoids utilization in experimental and clinical studies, and highlights their beneficial effects in the prevention of the main neurological diseases and for the clinical treatment of symptoms with them correlated.

  12. Clinical pharmacology of cannabinoids in early phase drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, Hillie Henka

    2008-01-01

    Although cannabis is especially known for its recreational use as a ‘soft drug’, its potential therapeutic properties have been recognized for hundreds of years. Since the isolation of THC from Cannabis sativa L, the discovery of cannabinoid receptors and their natural ligands (endocannabinoids) the

  13. Candidate PET radioligands for cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors: [{sup 18}F]AM5144 and related pyrazole compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zizhong [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gifford, Andrew [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Liu Qian [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thotapally, Rajesh [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ding Yushin [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Makriyannis, Alexandros [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gatley, S. John [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: s.gatley@neu.edu

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The mammalian brain contains abundant G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors that respond to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis. The availability of a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand would facilitate studies of the addictive and medicinal properties of compounds that bind to this receptor. Among the known classes of ligands for CB{sub 1} receptors, the pyrazoles are attractive targets for radiopharmaceutical development because they are antagonists and are generally less lipophilic than the other classes. Methods: A convenient high-yield synthesis of N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenyl)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)- 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM5144) was devised by coupling the appropriate pyrazole-3-carboxyl chloride compound with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoroaniline. The labeled precursor was synthesized from 1-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene in 60% radiochemical yield for 10 min using an improved procedure involving sodium borohydride reduction with cobalt chloride catalysis. The product was purified by HPLC to give a specific activity >400 mCi/{mu}mol and a radiochemical purity >95%, and a PET study was conducted in a baboon. Results: Although the regional uptake of AM5144 in baboon brain was consistent with binding to cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors, absolute uptake at <0.003% injected radioactivity per cubic centimeter was lower than the previously reported uptake of the radioiodinated pyrazole AM281. Conclusions: The relatively poor brain uptake of AM5144 and other pyrazole CB{sub 1} receptor ligands is not surprising because of their high lipophilicity as compared with most brain PET radiotracers. However, for nine pyrazole compounds for which rodent data are available, brain uptake and calculated logP values are not correlated. Thus, high logP values should not preclude evaluation of radiotracers for targets such as the CB{sub 1} receptor that may require very lipophilic ligands.

  14. Pharmacological benefits of selective modulation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) in experimental Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayant, Shalini; Sharma, Brij Mohan; Bansal, Rani; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that pervasively affects the population across the world. Currently, there is no effective treatment available for this and existing drugs merely slow the progression of cognitive function decline. Thus, massive effort is required to find an intended therapeutic target to overcome this condition. The present study has been framed to investigate the ameliorative role of selective modulator of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), 1-phenylisatin in experimental AD condition. We have induced experimental AD in mice by using two induction models viz., intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of streptozotocin (STZ) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3)+d-galactose. Morris water maze (MWM) and attentional set shifting test (ASST) were used to assess learning and memory. Hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red staining were used to examine the structural variation in brain. Brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and glutathione), nitric oxide levels (nitrites/nitrates), acetyl cholinesterase activity, myeloperoxidase and calcium levels were also estimated. i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose have impaired spatial and reversal learning with executive functioning, increased brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, cholinergic activity, inflammation and calcium levels. Furthermore, these agents have also enhanced the burden of Aβ plaque in the brain. Treatment with 1-phenylisatin and donepezil attenuated i.c.v. STZ as well as AlCl3+d-galactose induced impairment of learning-memory, brain biochemistry and brain damage. Hence, this study concludes that CB2 receptor modulation can be a potential therapeutic target for the management of AD. PMID:26577751

  15. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2 suppresses microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Francisco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, multiple sclerosis (MS, and HIV dementia. It is well known that inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines play an important role in microglial cell-associated neuron cell damage. Our previous studies have shown that CD40 signaling is involved in pathological activation of microglial cells. Many data reveal that cannabinoids mediate suppression of inflammation in vitro and in vivo through stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of a cannabinoid agonist on CD40 expression and function by cultured microglial cells activated by IFN-γ using RT-PCR, Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and anti-CB2 small interfering RNA (siRNA analyses. Furthermore, we examined if the stimulation of CB2 could modulate the capacity of microglial cells to phagocytise Aβ1–42 peptide using a phagocytosis assay. Results We found that the selective stimulation of cannabinoid receptor CB2 by JWH-015 suppressed IFN-γ-induced CD40 expression. In addition, this CB2 agonist markedly inhibited IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of JAK/STAT1. Further, this stimulation was also able to suppress microglial TNF-α and nitric oxide production induced either by IFN-γ or Aβ peptide challenge in the presence of CD40 ligation. Finally, we showed that CB2 activation by JWH-015 markedly attenuated CD40-mediated inhibition of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ1–42 peptide. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insight into beneficial effects provided by cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulation in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD.

  16. Beyond PrPres type 1/Type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-Coste, E.; Cassard, H.; SIMON S.; Lugan, S.; Bilheude, J.M.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Ironside, J.E.; Haik, S; Basset-Leobon, C.; Lacroux, C.; Peoch, K.; Streichenberger, N.; Langeveld, J. P. M.; Head, M. W.; Grassi, J.

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classifi...

  17. Beyond PrPres type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James,; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Head, Mark,; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res)) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrP(res) types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res) in the brain, the basis of this cl...

  18. Beyond PrPres Type 1/Type 2 Dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James W.; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Mark W Head; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classifi...

  19. Beyond PrP res type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    OpenAIRE

    Uro-coste, Emmanuelle; Cassard, Hervé; Simon, Stéphanie; Lugan, Séverine; Bilheude, Jean-Marc; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Ironside, James W.; Haik, Stéphane; Basset-Leobon, Christelle; Lacroux, Caroline; Peoch, Katell; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Langeveld, Jan; Mark W Head; Grassi, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrPres)identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrPres types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrPres in the brain, the basis of this classific...

  20. Beyond PrP9res) type 1/type 2 dichotomy in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Uro-Coste; Hervé Cassard; Stéphanie Simon; Séverine Lugan; Jean-Marc Bilheude; Armand Perret-Liaudet; Ironside, James W.; Stéphane Haik; Christelle Basset-Leobon; Caroline Lacroux; Katell Peoch'; Nathalie Streichenberger; Jan Langeveld; Mark W Head; Jacques Grassi

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) cases are currently subclassified according to the methionine/valine polymorphism at codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the proteinase K (PK) digested abnormal prion protein (PrP(res)) identified on Western blotting (type 1 or type 2). These biochemically distinct PrP(res) types have been considered to represent potential distinct prion strains. However, since cases of CJD show co-occurrence of type 1 and type 2 PrP(res) in the brain, the basis of this cl...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by ...

  2. [Social Cognitive Impairment in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Mutsutaka

    2016-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM 1) is a heritable, multisystem disease that affects not only the muscles but also the brain. DM 1 is often accompanied by developmental behavioral disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The autistic traits in DM 1 may be related to social cognitive dysfunction. The social cognitive function of patients with DM 1 was examined with respect to facial emotion recognition and theory of mind, which is the specific cognitive ability to understand the mental states of other people. With respect to facial emotion recognition, the sensitivities to disgust and anger were lower among patients with DM 1 than among healthy subjects, and this difference could not be attributed to visual impairment. To examine the theory of mind ability, the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" test and the faux pas recognition test were used. Patients with DM 1 were found to be impaired in both tests, but the results were not attributed to visual ability and lexical comprehension. The possible causes of social cognitive dysfunction in DM 1 are the l cerebral atrophy and white matter abnormalities in the temporal, frontal, and insular cortex. Dysfunctions in these areas may affect the emotional and theory of mind abilities in DM 1, which result in the behavioral and communication disorders. PMID:26873233

  3. Effects of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor agonism and antagonism on SKF81297-induced dyskinesia and haloperidol-induced dystonia in Cebus apella monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten V; Peacock, Linda P; Werge, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs may cause extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), such as dyskinesia and dystonia. These effects are believed to involve dysfunctional striatal dopamine transmission. Patients with schizophrenia show increased prevalence of cannabis abuse and this has been linked to severity of EPS....... Endocannabinoids modulate striatal dopamine activity via type 1 cannabinoid (CB(1)) receptors, and studies in rats and humans suggest beneficial effects of CB(1) ligands on EPS. The present study explored the effects of CB(1) receptor ligands on oral dyskinesia induced by the dopamine D(1) receptor agonist SKF...

  4. Tests for genetic interactions in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morahan, Grant; Mehta, Munish; James, Ian; Chen, Wei-Min; Akolkar, Beena; Erlich, Henry A; Hilner, Joan E; Julier, Cécile; Nerup, Jørn; Nierras, Concepcion; Pociot, Flemming; Todd, John A; Rich, Stephen S

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors lead to immune dysregulation causing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders. Recently, many common genetic variants have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, but each has modest individual effects. Familial clustering of type 1...... diabetes has not been explained fully and could arise from many factors, including undetected genetic variation and gene interactions....

  5. Comparative effects of chlorpyrifos in wild type and cannabinoid Cb1 receptor knockout mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baireddy, Praveena; Liu, Jing; Hinsdale, Myron; Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2011-11-15

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55.212-2 (WIN) can modulate organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase toxicity in rats, presumably by inhibiting acetylcholine (ACh) release. Some OP anticholinesterases also inhibit eCB-degrading enzymes. We studied the effects of the OP insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinergic signs of toxicity, cholinesterase activity and ACh release in tissues from wild type (+/+) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor knockout (-/-) mice. Mice of both genotypes (n = 5-6/treatment group) were challenged with CPF (300 mg/kg, 2 ml/kg in peanut oil, sc) and evaluated for functional and neurochemical changes. Both genotypes exhibited similar cholinergic signs and cholinesterase inhibition (82-95% at 48 h after dosing) in cortex, cerebellum and heart. WIN reduced depolarization-induced ACh release in vitro in hippocampal slices from wild type mice, but had no effect in hippocampal slices from knockouts or in striatal slices from either genotype. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO, 100 {mu}M) reduced release in hippocampal slices from both genotypes in vitro, but with a greater reduction in tissues from wild types (21% vs 12%). CPO had no significant in vitro effect on ACh release in striatum. CPF reduced ACh release in hippocampus from both genotypes ex vivo, but reduction was again significantly greater in tissues from wild types (52% vs 36%). In striatum, CPF led to a similar reduction (20-23%) in tissues from both genotypes. Thus, while CB1 deletion in mice had little influence on the expression of acute toxicity following CPF, CPF- or CPO-induced changes in ACh release appeared sensitive to modulation by CB1-mediated eCB signaling in a brain-regional manner. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C57Bl/6 mice showed dose-related cholinergic toxicity following subcutaneous chlorpyrifos exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wild type and

  6. The Structure–Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W.; Rimoldi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure–CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure–activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure–activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  7. The Structure-Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W; Rimoldi, John M

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure-CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure-activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure-activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  8. Interaction between the cholecystokinin and endogenous cannabinoid systems in cued fear expression and extinction retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Mallory E; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is thought to develop, in part, from improper inhibition of fear. Accordingly, one of the most effective treatment strategies for PTSD is exposure-based psychotherapy. Ideally, neuroscience would inform adjunct therapies that target the neurotransmitter systems involved in extinction processes. Separate studies have implicated the cholecystokinin (CCK) and endocannabinoid systems in fear; however, there is a high degree of anatomical colocalization between the cannabinoid 1 receptor (Cnr1) and CCK in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), a brain region critical for emotion regulation. Although most research has focused on GABA and GABAergic plasticity as the mechanism by which Cnr1 mediates fear inhibition, we hypothesize that a functional interaction between Cnr1 and CCKB receptor (CCKBR) is critical for fear extinction processes. In this study, systemic pharmacological manipulation of the cannabinoid system modulated cued fear expression in C57BL/6J mice after consolidation of auditory fear conditioning. Knockout of the CCKBR, however, had no effect on fear- or anxiety-like behaviors. Nonetheless, administration of a Cnr1 antagonist increased freezing behavior during a cued fear expression test in wild-type subjects, but had no effect on freezing behavior in CCKBR knockout littermates. In addition, we found that Cnr1-positive fibers form perisomatic clusters around CCKBR-positive cell bodies in the BLA. These CCKBR-positive cells comprise a molecularly heterogenous population of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. These findings provide novel evidence that Cnr1 contributes to cued fear expression via an interaction with the CCK system. Dysfunctional Cnr1-CCKBR interactions might contribute to the etiology of, or result from, fear-related psychiatric disease. PMID:25176168

  9. Cannabinoids and Glucocorticoids in the Basolateral Amygdala Modulate Hippocampal-Accumbens Plasticity After Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2016-03-01

    Acute stress results in release of glucocorticoids, which are potent modulators of learning and plasticity. This process is presumably mediated by the basolateral amygdala (BLA) where cannabinoids CB1 receptors have a key role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Growing attention has been focused on nucleus accumbens (NAc) plasticity, which regulates mood and motivation. The NAc integrates affective and context-dependent input from the BLA and ventral subiculum (vSub), respectively. As our previous data suggest that the CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU-38486 (RU) can prevent the effects of stress on emotional memory, we examined whether intra-BLA WIN and RU can reverse the effects of acute stress on NAc plasticity. Bilateral, ipsilateral, and contralateral BLA administration of RU or WIN reversed the stress-induced impairment in vSub-NAc long-term potentiation (LTP) and the decrease in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activity in the NAc. BLA CB1 receptors were found to mediate the preventing effects of WIN on plasticity, but not the preventing effects of RU, after stress. Inactivating the ipsilateral BLA, but not the contralateral BLA, impaired LTP. The possible mechanisms underlying the effects of BLA on NAc plasticity are discussed; the data suggest that BLA-induced changes in the NAc may be mediated through neural pathways in the brain's stress circuit rather than peripheral pathways. The results suggest that glucocorticoid and cannabinoid systems in the BLA can restore normal function of the NAc and hence may have a central role in the treatment of a variety of stress-related disorders. PMID:26289146

  10. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel compounds as potential modulators of cannabinoid signalling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    De Bank, Paul A

    2001-01-01

    Most of the biological effects of cannabis are due to the activation of specific cannabinoid receptors. To date, two such receptors have been discovered and are found predominantly in the central nervous system (the CB1 receptor) or the immune system (the CB2 receptor). Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligands, the endocannabinoids, have also been isolated and the mechanisms of their synthesis and degradation postulated. By modulating the activation of cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid...

  11. Dissimilar cannabinoid substitution patterns in mice trained to discriminate Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or methanandamide from vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Baskfield, Cassandra Y.

    2011-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) discrimination in rodents is a behavioral assay that has been used to probe differences among classes of cannabinoids in rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether traditional and anandamide-like cannabinoids were distinguishable in cannabinoid discrimination procedures in mice. Male mice were trained to discriminate 30 mg/kg THC or 70 mg/kg methanandamide from vehicle in a two-lever milk-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. After acquisition, ...

  12. Repeated Cannabinoid Injections into the Rat Periaqueductal Gray Enhances Subsequent Morphine Antinociception

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Adrianne R.; Maher, Lauren; Morgan, Michael M

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opiates inhibit pain, in part, by activating the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Evidence suggests this activation occurs through distinct mechanisms. If the antinociceptive mechanisms are distinct, then cross-tolerance between opioids and cannabinoids should not develop. This hypothesis was tested by measuring the antinociceptive effect of microinjecting morphine into the ventrolateral PAG of rats pretreated with the cannabinoid HU-210 for two days. Male Spraque-Dawley rats were ...

  13. Cannabinoid receptor activation reverses kainate-induced synchronized population burst firing in rat hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Rob Mason; Cheer, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in whole animal models of epilepsy. The present investigation sought to examine the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform neuronal excitability. Under urethane anesthesia, acute KA treatment (10 mg/kg, i.p.) entrained the spiking mode of simultaneously recorded neurons from random firing to synchronous bursting (% change in burst rate). Injection of the high-affinity cannabinoid a...

  14. Hämodynamische Auswirkungen synthetischer, pflanzlicher und endogener Cannabinoide im Modell der isolierten Kaninchenlunge

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jürgen

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoide zeigen komplexe kardiovaskuläre Effekte. Das endogene Cannabinoid Anandamid (Arachidonylethanolamid) induziert in verschiedenen Organsystemen eine hauptsächlich über periphere CB1-Rezeptoren vermittelte Vasodilatation. Der Einfluss von Cannabinoiden auf die pulmonale Strombahn ist jedoch unklar. Am Modell einer isolierten, perfundierten und ventilierten Kaninchenlunge konnte gezeigt werden, dass die endogenen Cannabinoide Anandamid und 2-Arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) dosisabhängig d...

  15. Cannabinoids as modulators of cancer cell viability, neuronal differentiation, and embryonal development

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids (CBs) are compounds that activate the CB1 and CB2 receptors. CB receptors mediate many different physiological functions, and cannabinoids have been reported to decrease tumor cell viability, proliferation, migration, as well as to modulate metastasis. In this thesis, the effects of cannabinoids on human colorectal carcinoma Caco-2 cells (Paper I) and mouse P19 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells (Paper III) were studied.  In both cell lines, the compounds examined produced a concentr...

  16. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Reverses Kainate-Induced Synchronized Population Burst Firing in Rat Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Rob; Cheer, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    Cannabinoids have been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in whole animal models of epilepsy. The present investigation sought to examine the effects of cannabinoid receptor activation on kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform neuronal excitability. Under urethane anesthesia, acute KA treatment (10 mg kg−1, i.p.) entrained the spiking mode of simultaneously recorded neurons from random firing to synchronous bursting (% change in burst rate). Injection of the high-affinity cannabinoid a...

  17. Synthetic cannabinoids: the multi-organ failure and metabolic derangements associated with getting high

    OpenAIRE

    Dolkar Sherpa; Paudel, Bishow M.; Subedi, Bishnu H.; Robert Dobbin Chow

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SC), though not detected with routine urine toxicology screening, can cause severe metabolic derangements and widespread deleterious effects in multiple organ systems. The diversity of effects is related to the wide distribution of cannabinoid receptors in multiple organ systems. Both cannabinoid-receptor-mediated and non-receptor-mediated effects can result in severe cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic manifestations. We report the case of a 45-year-old African Amer...

  18. CANNABINOID AND OPIOID MODULATION OF SOCIAL PLAY BEHAVIOR IN ADOLESCENT RATS: DIFFERENTIAL BEHAVIORAL MECHANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently shown that the pharmacological mechanisms through which cannabinoid and opioid drugs influence social play behavior in adolescent rats can be partially dissociated. Here, we characterize the effects of the direct cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2, the indirect cannabinoid agonist URB597 and the opioid agonist morphine on social play at the behavioral level. By treating either one or both partners of the test dyad, we show that these drugs differentially affect play solicitation...

  19. Candidate PET radioligands for cannabinoid CB1 receptors: [18F]AM5144 and related pyrazole compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The mammalian brain contains abundant G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB1 receptors that respond to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis. The availability of a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand would facilitate studies of the addictive and medicinal properties of compounds that bind to this receptor. Among the known classes of ligands for CB1 receptors, the pyrazoles are attractive targets for radiopharmaceutical development because they are antagonists and are generally less lipophilic than the other classes. Methods: A convenient high-yield synthesis of N-(4-[18F]fluorophenyl)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)- 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM5144) was devised by coupling the appropriate pyrazole-3-carboxyl chloride compound with 4-[18F]fluoroaniline. The labeled precursor was synthesized from 1-[18F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene in 60% radiochemical yield for 10 min using an improved procedure involving sodium borohydride reduction with cobalt chloride catalysis. The product was purified by HPLC to give a specific activity >400 mCi/μmol and a radiochemical purity >95%, and a PET study was conducted in a baboon. Results: Although the regional uptake of AM5144 in baboon brain was consistent with binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors, absolute uptake at 1 receptor ligands is not surprising because of their high lipophilicity as compared with most brain PET radiotracers. However, for nine pyrazole compounds for which rodent data are available, brain uptake and calculated logP values are not correlated. Thus, high logP values should not preclude evaluation of radiotracers for targets such as the CB1 receptor that may require very lipophilic ligands

  20. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome effectively treated with modified Atkins diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlandt, Edda; Karall, Daniela; Jud, Veronika; Baumgartner, Sara Sigl; Zotter, Sibylle; Rostasy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Scholl-Buergi, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    This is a report on the successful treatment of a 6-year-old girl with genetically proven glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) with modified Atkins diet (MAD). GLUT1-DS is an inborn disorder of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier, which leads to energy deficiency of the brain with a broad spectrum of neurological symptoms including therapy-resistant epilepsy. Usually classical ketogenic diet (KD) is the standard treatment for patients with GLUT1-DS. Treatment with MAD, a variant of KD, for an observation period of 17 months resulted in improvement of seizures, alertness, cognitive abilities, and electroencephalography in this patient. PMID:23888468

  1. Whole body MR imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the value of whole body MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Materials and methods: 24 patients (15-59 years; mean and median 36 years; 7 males; 17 females) with genetically proven neurofibromatosis type 1 were examined with whole body MR imaging. Axial and coronal T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (slice thickness 6-12 mm) were acquired on a 1.5 T MR unit (Symphony; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The images were reviewed by 2 radiologists: 1 senior, 1 junior. The criterion for a neurofibroma was a mass lesion with low signal intensity on T1 and high signal intensity on T2, along the course of a nerve. The location, size, general morphology and course along plexuses and nerves were evaluated. Cutaneous and subcutaneous neurofibromas were defined as 'superficial' neurofibromas. The other neurofibromas were regarded as 'deep' neurofibromas. Results: There were no major problems to differentiate neurofibromas from lymph nodes, vessels or cysts. The latter three were easily recognised by their typical shape and location, whereas neurofibromas occurred in regions where no mass lesion was anatomically expected. There was no relation between age and total number of neurofibromas throughout the body. Classification according to location and number of neurofibromas: 8 patients had only superficial neurofibromas, 1 only deep and 15 both superficial and deep lesions. Twelve patients had less than 15 neurofibromas and 12 had more. Classification according to course: in 8 patients the neurofibromas occurred along plexuses or proximal part of the intercostal nerves; in 16 patients the lesions were more peripheral. Classification according to morphology: 4 patients had plexiform neurofibromas and 20 patients had multiple solitary lesions. Twelve of these 20 patients had less than 15 lesions, and 8 had more. In 2 patients multiple solitary neurofibromas occurred along the nerve in a chain configuration. In one patient a clinically

  2. Whole body MR imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerbeeck, S.F.L. van [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: stephen.vm@rad-vanmeerbeeck.be; Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Janssens, S.; Mortier, G. [Department of Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2009-02-15

    Objective: To assess the value of whole body MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Materials and methods: 24 patients (15-59 years; mean and median 36 years; 7 males; 17 females) with genetically proven neurofibromatosis type 1 were examined with whole body MR imaging. Axial and coronal T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (slice thickness 6-12 mm) were acquired on a 1.5 T MR unit (Symphony; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The images were reviewed by 2 radiologists: 1 senior, 1 junior. The criterion for a neurofibroma was a mass lesion with low signal intensity on T1 and high signal intensity on T2, along the course of a nerve. The location, size, general morphology and course along plexuses and nerves were evaluated. Cutaneous and subcutaneous neurofibromas were defined as 'superficial' neurofibromas. The other neurofibromas were regarded as 'deep' neurofibromas. Results: There were no major problems to differentiate neurofibromas from lymph nodes, vessels or cysts. The latter three were easily recognised by their typical shape and location, whereas neurofibromas occurred in regions where no mass lesion was anatomically expected. There was no relation between age and total number of neurofibromas throughout the body. Classification according to location and number of neurofibromas: 8 patients had only superficial neurofibromas, 1 only deep and 15 both superficial and deep lesions. Twelve patients had less than 15 neurofibromas and 12 had more. Classification according to course: in 8 patients the neurofibromas occurred along plexuses or proximal part of the intercostal nerves; in 16 patients the lesions were more peripheral. Classification according to morphology: 4 patients had plexiform neurofibromas and 20 patients had multiple solitary lesions. Twelve of these 20 patients had less than 15 lesions, and 8 had more. In 2 patients multiple solitary neurofibromas occurred along the nerve in a chain configuration. In one

  3. CT detection of basal ganglion lesions in neurofibromatosis type 1: correlation with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospective study of CT and MRI in 41 consecutive children with suspected type 1 neurofibromatosis revealed basal ganglion lesions on T2-weighted spin echo images in 22 cases (54%) and on CT in only 7 of those (32%). T2-weighted spin-echo MRI also revealed multiple signal changes in the supra- and infratentorial white matter and brain stem that went completely unnoticed on CT. (orig.)

  4. Unusual phenotype of glucose transport protein type 1 deficiency syndrome: A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Annio Posar; Margherita Santucci

    2014-01-01

    The glucose transport protein type 1 (GLUT1) deficit causes a chronic brain energy failure. The classic phenotype of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is characterized by: Mild to severe motor delay and mental retardation; infantile-onset epilepsy; head growth deceleration; movement disorders (ataxia, dystonia, spasticity); and non-epileptic paroxysmal events (intermittent ataxia, periodic confusion, recurrent headaches). During last years the classic phenotype of this syndrome, as originally reporte...

  5. Tissue-Specific Remodeling of the Mitochondrial Proteome in Type 1 Diabetic Akita Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bugger, Heiko; Dong CHEN; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Theobald, Heather A.; Hu, Xiao X; Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Bart C Weimer; Abel, E. Dale

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To elucidate the molecular basis for mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondrial matrix and membrane fractions were generated from liver, brain, heart, and kidney of wild-type and type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Comparative proteomics was performed using label-free proteome expression analysis. Mitochondrial state 3 respirations and ATP synthesis were measured, and mitochondrial morphology ...

  6. Aortic stiffness is associated with white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the association between aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness and diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Forty-one patients with type 1 diabetes (23 men, mean age 44 ± 12 years, mean diabetes duration 24 ± 13 years) were included. Aortic PWV was assessed using through-plane velocity-encoded MRI. Brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements were performed on 3-T MRI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated for white and grey matter integrity. Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression analyses including cardiovascular risk factors as covariates were assessed. Multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that aortic PWV is independently associated with white matter integrity FA (β = -0.777, p = 0.008) in patients with type 1 diabetes. This effect was independent of age, gender, mean arterial pressure, body mass index, smoking, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin levels. Aortic PWV was not significantly related to grey matter integrity. Our data suggest that aortic stiffness is independently associated with reduced white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes. (orig.)

  7. Aortic stiffness is associated with white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjeerdema, Nathanja; Schinkel, Linda D. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Westenberg, Jos J.; Elderen, Saskia G. van; Buchem, Mark A. van; Grond, Jeroen van der; Roos, Albert de [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Smit, Johannes W. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Endocrinology and General Internal Medicine (C7-Q), Albinusdreef 2, PO Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); University Medical Center Nijmegen, Department of General Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    To assess the association between aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a marker of arterial stiffness and diffusion tensor imaging of brain white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology. Forty-one patients with type 1 diabetes (23 men, mean age 44 ± 12 years, mean diabetes duration 24 ± 13 years) were included. Aortic PWV was assessed using through-plane velocity-encoded MRI. Brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements were performed on 3-T MRI. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated for white and grey matter integrity. Pearson correlation and multivariable linear regression analyses including cardiovascular risk factors as covariates were assessed. Multivariable linear regression analyses revealed that aortic PWV is independently associated with white matter integrity FA (β = -0.777, p = 0.008) in patients with type 1 diabetes. This effect was independent of age, gender, mean arterial pressure, body mass index, smoking, duration of diabetes and glycated haemoglobin levels. Aortic PWV was not significantly related to grey matter integrity. Our data suggest that aortic stiffness is independently associated with reduced white matter integrity in patients with type 1 diabetes. (orig.)

  8. High Connectivity Between Reduced Cortical Thickness and Disrupted White Matter Tracts in Long-Standing Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Franc, Daniel T.; Kodl, Christopher T.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Muetzel, Ryan L.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have observed disruptions in brain white and gray matter structure in individuals with type 1 diabetes, and these structural differences have been associated with neurocognitive testing deficiencies. This study investigated the relationship between cerebral cortical thickness reductions and white matter microstructural integrity loss in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes and in healthy control subjects using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). RESEARCH DESIGN AND ...

  9. Role of Cannabinoids in the Regulation of Bone Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen I Idris

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system plays a key role in regulating a variety of physiological processes such as appetite control and energy balance, pain perception, and immune responses. Recent studies have implicated the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of bone cell activity and bone remodelling. These studies showed that endogenous cannabinoid ligands, cannabinoid receptors and the enzymes responsible for ligand synthesis and breakdown all play important roles in bone mass and in the regulation of bone disease. These findings suggest that the endocannabinoid pathway could be of value as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases. Here, we review the role of the skeletal endocannabinoid system in the regulation of bone remodelling in health and disease.

  10. Endogenous and Synthetic Cannabinoids as Therapeutics in Retinal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokona, Despina; Georgiou, Panagiota-Christina; Kounenidakis, Mihalis; Kiagiadaki, Foteini; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    The functional significance of cannabinoids in ocular physiology and disease has been reported some decades ago. In the early 1970s, subjects who smoked Cannabis sativa developed lower intraocular pressure (IOP). This led to the isolation of phytocannabinoids from this plant and the study of their therapeutic effects in glaucoma. The main treatment of this disease to date involves the administration of drugs mediating either the decrease of aqueous humour synthesis or the increase of its outflow and thus reduces IOP. However, the reduction of IOP is not sufficient to prevent visual field loss. Retinal diseases, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, have been defined as neurodegenerative diseases and characterized by ischemia-induced excitotoxicity and loss of retinal neurons. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies must be applied in order to target retinal cell death, reduction of visual acuity, and blindness. The aim of the present review is to address the neuroprotective and therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in retinal disease. PMID:26881135

  11. Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor Mediates Nicotine-Induced Anti-Inflammation in N9 Microglial Cells Exposed to β Amyloid via Protein Kinase C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reducing β amyloid- (Aβ- induced microglial activation is considered to be effective in treating Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Nicotine attenuates Aβ-induced microglial activation; the mechanism, however, is still elusive. Microglia could be activated into classic activated state (M1 state or alternative activated state (M2 state; the former is cytotoxic and the latter is neurotrophic. In this investigation, we hypothesized that nicotine attenuates Aβ-induced microglial activation by shifting microglial M1 to M2 state, and cannabinoid CB2 receptor and protein kinase C mediate the process. Methods. We used Aβ1–42 to activate N9 microglial cells and observed nicotine-induced effects on microglial M1 and M2 biomarkers by using western blot, immunocytochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results. We found that nicotine reduced the levels of M1 state markers, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and interleukin- (IL- 6 releases; meanwhile, it increased the levels of M2 state markers, including arginase-1 (Arg-1 expression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF release, in the Aβ-stimulated microglia. Coadministration of cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist or protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor partially abolished the nicotine-induced effects. Conclusion. These findings indicated that cannabinoid CB2 receptor mediates nicotine-induced anti-inflammation in microglia exposed to Aβ via PKC.

  12. Cannabinoid control of neuroinflammation related to multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, D.; Jackson, S. J.; Pryce, G.

    2007-01-01

    The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa) has been known by many names but the question remains ‘Can we call it medicine?' There has been renewed interest in the value of cannabis for the control of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, where it has been shown to have some effect on spasticity and pain both experimentally and in clinical trials in humans. However, in addition to symptom control potential, the question remains whether cannabinoids can modify the neuroinflammatory...

  13. Cannabinoid-Rezeptor1 und Essstörungen

    OpenAIRE

    Reichard, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele Das Endocannabinoidsystem ist ein zentrales Element in der Regulation von Appetit, Nahrungsaufnahme und Energiehomöostase. Bei Patientinnen mit Anorexia nervosa (AN) wurden erhöhte Raten des Endocannabinoids Anandamid gemessen. Auch eine Assoziation zwischen dem restriktiven Typus der Anorexie und einem funktionellen Polymorphismus des Cannabinoid-Rezeptors1 (CB1) konnte aufgedeckt werden. Ein Ziel unserer Studie war, mögliche Unterschiede der CB1-mRNA-Ausprägung bei Fra...

  14. Potencial terapéutico de los cannabinoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Torres

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Los cannabinoides demuestran eficacia en modelos experimentales de dolor agudo y crónico. Parecen seguros en los ensayos desarrollados para algunas indicaciones de dolor y otras. Las nuevas tecnologías han abierto nuevas posibilidades de tratamiento al proporcionar nuevas vías de administración. Se precisan ensayos en pacientes para determinar el verdadero rol de estas sustancias en el tratamiento del dolor.

  15. Potencial terapéutico de los cannabinoides

    OpenAIRE

    L. M. Torres; J. M. Trinidad; E. Calderón

    2013-01-01

    Los cannabinoides demuestran eficacia en modelos experimentales de dolor agudo y crónico. Parecen seguros en los ensayos desarrollados para algunas indicaciones de dolor y otras. Las nuevas tecnologías han abierto nuevas posibilidades de tratamiento al proporcionar nuevas vías de administración. Se precisan ensayos en pacientes para determinar el verdadero rol de estas sustancias en el tratamiento del dolor.

  16. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Bjoern Moosmann; Nadine Roth; Volker Auwärter

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive tes...

  17. High Alert For Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Madhur Rathi

    2015-01-01

    Background: A 32-year-old Caucasian man presented with intractable nausea, psychogenic vomiting, abdominal pain and compulsive hot-water bathing behaviors following the habitual use of cannabis for years, consistent with the uncommon and frequently overlooked diagnosis of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. This was his third admission to the emergency department with the same complaints and symptoms which had persisted for over two years without a recognizable etiology. All imaging studies don...

  18. Medical education on cannabis and cannabinoids: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, M A; Ziemianski, D

    2015-06-01

    The global regulatory landscape regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids is changing rapidly. This has considerable impact on health care professionals who currently receive little or no education on issues regarding medical cannabis. We propose a 'cannabis curriculum' that covers the spectrum of historical, botanical, physiological, clinical and legal issues to allow health care professionals to engage in meaningful discussions with their patients and colleagues around this stigmatized and controversial subject. PMID:25728558

  19. Mastering tricyclic ring systems for desirable functional cannabinoid activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Ravil R.; Knight, Lindsay; Chen, Shao-Rui; Wager-Miller, Jim; McDaniel, Steven W.; Diaz, Fanny; Barth, Francis; Pan, Hui-Lin; Mackie, Ken; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Diaz, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in using cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists for the treatment of neuropathic pain and other indications. In continuation of our ongoing program aiming for the development of new small molecule cannabinoid ligands, we have synthesized a novel series of carbazole and γ-carboline derivatives. The affinities of the newly synthesized compounds were determined by a competitive radioligand displacement assay for human CB2 cannabinoid receptor and rat CB1 cannabinoid receptor. Functional activity and selectivity at human CB1 and CB2 receptors were characterized using receptor internalization and [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. The structure-activity relationship and optimization studies of the carbazole series have led to the discovery of a non-selective CB1 and CB2 agonist, compound 4. Our subsequent research efforts to increase CB2 selectivity of this lead compound have led to the discovery of CB2 selective compound 64, which robustly internalized CB2 receptors. Compound 64 had potent inhibitory effects on pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of neuropathic pain. Other potent and CB2 receptor–selective compounds, including compounds 63 and 68, and a selective CB1 agonist, compound 74 were also discovered. In addition, we identified the CB2 ligand 35 which failed to promote CB2 receptor internalization and inhibited compound CP55,940-induced CB2 internalization despite a high CB2 receptor affinity. The present study provides novel tricyclic series as a starting point for further investigations of CB2 pharmacology and pain treatment. PMID:24125850

  20. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca2+ is known to cause opening of anima...

  1. Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid 1 Receptor (CB1R) Agonists for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzman, Herbert H; Shiner, Craig; Hirt, Erin E; Gilliam, Anne F; Thomas, Brian F; Maitra, Rangan; Snyder, Rod; Black, Sherry L; Patel, Purvi R; Mulpuri, Yatendra; Spigelman, Igor

    2016-08-25

    Alleviation of neuropathic pain by cannabinoids is limited by their central nervous system (CNS) side effects. Indole and indene compounds were engineered for high hCB1R affinity, peripheral selectivity, metabolic stability, and in vivo efficacy. An epithelial cell line assay identified candidates with <1% blood-brain barrier penetration for testing in a rat neuropathy induced by unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE). The SNE-induced mechanical allodynia was reversibly suppressed, partially or completely, after intraperitoneal or oral administration of several indenes. At doses that relieve neuropathy symptoms, the indenes completely lacked, while the brain-permeant CB1R agonist HU-210 (1) exhibited strong CNS side effects, in catalepsy, hypothermia, and motor incoordination assays. Pharmacokinetic findings of ∼0.001 cerebrospinal fluid:plasma ratio further supported limited CNS penetration. Pretreatment with selective CB1R or CB2R blockers suggested mainly CB1R contribution to an indene's antiallodynic effects. Therefore, this class of CB1R agonists holds promise as a viable treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:27482723

  2. Finding cannabinoids in hair does not prove cannabis consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosmann, Bjoern; Roth, Nadine; Auwärter, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Hair analysis for cannabinoids is extensively applied in workplace drug testing and in child protection cases, although valid data on incorporation of the main analytical targets, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THC-COOH), into human hair is widely missing. Furthermore, ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid A (THCA-A), the biogenetic precursor of THC, is found in the hair of persons who solely handled cannabis material. In the light of the serious consequences of positive test results the mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair urgently need scientific evaluation. Here we show that neither THC nor THCA-A are incorporated into human hair in relevant amounts after systemic uptake. THC-COOH, which is considered an incontestable proof of THC uptake according to the current scientific doctrine, was found in hair, but was also present in older hair segments, which already grew before the oral THC intake and in sebum/sweat samples. Our studies show that all three cannabinoids can be present in hair of non-consuming individuals because of transfer through cannabis consumers, via their hands, their sebum/sweat, or cannabis smoke. This is of concern for e.g. child-custody cases as cannabinoid findings in a child's hair may be caused by close contact to cannabis consumers rather than by inhalation of side-stream smoke. PMID:26443501

  3. Disordered eating behaviors in type 1 diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Larrañaga, Alejandra; Docet, María F; García-Mayor, Ricardo V

    2011-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at high risk for disordered eating behaviors (DEB). Due to the fact that type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic illnesses of childhood and adolescence, the coexistence of eating disorders (ED) and diabetes often affects adolescents and young adults. Since weight management during this state of development can be especially difficult for those with type 1 diabetes, some diabetics may restrict or omit insulin, a condition known as d...

  4. Barriers to Physical Activity Among Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Strychar, Irene; Mircescu, Hortensia

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine, in an adult population with type 1 diabetes, barriers to regular physical activity using a diabetes-specific barriers measure (the Barriers to Physical Activity in Diabetes [type 1] [BAPAD1] scale) and factors associated with these barriers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—One hundred adults with type 1 diabetes answered a questionnaire assessing perceived barriers to physical activity and related factors. A1C was obtained from the medical chart of each individual. RESULTS...

  5. Endocannabinoids modulate human blood–brain barrier permeability in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hind, William H.; Tufarelli, Cristina; Neophytou, Maria; Anderson, Susan I; England, Timothy J.; O'Sullivan, Saoirse E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endocannabinoids alter permeability at various epithelial barriers, and cannabinoid receptors and endocannabinoid levels are elevated by stroke, with potential neuroprotective effects. We therefore explored the role of endocannabinoids in modulating blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability in normal conditions and in an ischaemia/reperfusion model. Experimental Approach Human brain microvascular endothelial cell and astrocyte co-cultures modelled the BBB. Ischaemia was mo...

  6. Metabolomics and bioanalysis of terpenoid derived secondary metabolites : Analysis of Cannabis sativa L. metabolite production and prenylases for cannabinoid production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muntendam, Remco

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid research has gained a renenewed interest by both the public and scientist. Focus is mainly directed to the medicinal activities, as reported for various cannabinoid structures. This thesis focusses on prenyl-derived secondary metabolites with main focus on cannabinoids. Firstly the produ

  7. Peripheral and central CB1 cannabinoid receptors control stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Gomis-González, Maria; Srivastava, Raj Kamal; Cutando, Laura; Ortega-Alvaro, Antonio; Ruehle, Sabine; Remmers, Floortje; Bindila, Laura; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni; Lutz, Beat; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2016-08-30

    Stressful events can generate emotional memories linked to the traumatic incident, but they also can impair the formation of nonemotional memories. Although the impact of stress on emotional memories is well studied, much less is known about the influence of the emotional state on the formation of nonemotional memories. We used the novel object-recognition task as a model of nonemotional memory in mice to investigate the underlying mechanism of the deleterious effect of stress on memory consolidation. Systemic, hippocampal, and peripheral blockade of cannabinoid type-1 (CB1) receptors abolished the stress-induced memory impairment. Genetic deletion and rescue of CB1 receptors in specific cell types revealed that the CB1 receptor population specifically in dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH)-expressing cells is both necessary and sufficient for stress-induced impairment of memory consolidation, but CB1 receptors present in other neuronal populations are not involved. Strikingly, pharmacological manipulations in mice expressing CB1 receptors exclusively in DBH(+) cells revealed that both hippocampal and peripheral receptors mediate the impact of stress on memory consolidation. Thus, CB1 receptors on adrenergic and noradrenergic cells provide previously unrecognized cross-talk between central and peripheral mechanisms in the stress-dependent regulation of nonemotional memory consolidation, suggesting new potential avenues for the treatment of cognitive aspects on stress-related disorders. PMID:27528659

  8. Cannabinoids: novel medicines for the treatment of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagredo, Onintza; Pazos, M Ruth; Valdeolivas, Sara; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-04-01

    Cannabinoid pharmacology has experienced a notable increase in the last 3 decades which is allowing the development of novel cannabinoid-based medicines for the treatment of different human pathologies, for example, Cesamet® (nabilone) or Marinol® (synthetic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol for oral administration) that were approved in 80s for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with chemotherapy treatment in cancer patients and in 90s for anorexiacachexia associated with AIDS therapy. Recently, the british company GW Pharmaceuticals plc has developed an oromucosal spray called Sativex®, which is constituted by an equimolecular combination of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol- and cannabidiol- enriched botanical extracts. Sativex® has been approved for the treatment of specific symptoms (i.e. spasticity and pain) of multiple sclerosis patients in various countries (i.e. Canada, UK, Spain, New Zealand). However, this cannabis- based medicine has been also proposed to be useful in other neurological disorders given the analgesic, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties of their components demonstrated in preclinical models. Numerous clinical trials are presently being conducted to confirm this potential in patients. We are particularly interested in the case of Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder caused by an excess of CAG repeats in the genomic allele resulting in a polyQ expansion in the encoded protein called huntingtin, and that affects primarily striatal and cortical neurons thus producing motor abnormalities (i.e. chorea) and dementia. Cannabinoids have been studied for alleviation of hyperkinetic symptoms, given their inhibitory effects on movement, and, in particular, as disease-modifying agents due to their anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. This potential has been corroborated in different experimental models of HD and using different types of cannabinoid agonists

  9. Efecto neuroprotector de los cannabinoides en las enfermedades neurodegenerativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Suero-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Se analiza la situación actual de las investigaciones relacionadas con las sustancias cannabinoides, así como su interacción con el organismo, clasificación, efectos terapéuticos y su uso en las enfermedades neurodegenerativas. Métodos: Se realiza una exhaustiva revisión bibliográfica relacionada con las sustancias cannabinoides y sus derivados sintéticos, haciendo especial hincapié en la forma de interactuar con el organismo y los efectos que provocan dichas interacciones. Concretamente, se estudiarán sus efectos neuroantiinflamatorio y analgésico lo que conlleva al efecto neuroprotector en enfermedades neurodegenerativas tales como Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington, esclerosis múltiple y esclerosis lateral amiotrófica. Resultados: Desde hace miles de años la planta Cannabis Sativa ha sido utilizada por muchas culturas con distintos fines, de ocio, textiles, analgésicos, pero no es hasta finales del siglo XX cuando se empieza a incentivar los estudios científicos relacionados con ésta. La planta posee una mezcla de unos 400 componentes, de los cuales 60 pertenecen al grupo de los cannabinoides siendo los principales el cannabinol, cannabidiol y tetrahidrocannabinol. Con el descubrimiento de las sustancias cannabinoides, sus derivados, y los receptores que interactúan, se amplían las posibilidades terapéuticas teniendo un especial interés el efecto neuroprotector que estas sustancias contienen. Conclusiones. Se ha demostrado el gran potencial de los cannabinoides como sustancias terapéuticas más allá de su uso analgésico o antiemético, esto es, en enfermedades neurodegenerativas en las que pueden no solo disminuir los síntomas, sino frenar el proceso de la enfermedad. Otra posible aplicación puede ser en el campo oncológico, siendo particularmente intensa la actividad investigadora realizada en los últimos 15 años.

  10. A Gut Gone to Pot: A Case of Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome due to K2, a Synthetic Cannabinoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anene Ukaigwe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome (CHS was first described in 2004. Due to its novelty, CHS is often unrecognized by clinicians leading to expensive workup of these patients with cyclical symptoms. It may take up to 9 years to diagnose CHS. CHS is characterized by cyclical nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, and an unusual compulsion to take hot showers in the presence of chronic use of cannabinoids. Cannabicyclohexanol is a synthetic cannabinoid, popularly known as K2 spice. It is a popular marijuana alternative among teenagers and young adults since it is readily available as herbal incense. Unlike marijuana, many users know that K2 is not detected in conventional urine drug screens, allowing those users to conceal their intake from typical detection methods. Serum or urine gas chromatography mass spectrophotometry is diagnostic, though not widely available. Thus, it is imperative for clinicians to recognize CHS, even with negative UDS, to provide cost-effective care. We present a 38-year-old man with a 10-year history of cannabis, and 1-year history of K2 abuse admitted with 1-week history of episodes of nausea, vomiting of clear fluids, and epigastric discomfort. Symptoms are relieved only by hot showers. Extensive laboratory, radiologic, and endoscopic evaluation was unrevealing. CHS was diagnosed, based on proposed criteria by Simonetti et al.

  11. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds. PMID:26795018

  12. Characteristic Height Growth Pattern in Patients with Pseudohypoparathyroidism: Comparison between Type 1a and Type 1b

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Kaori; Minagawa, Masanori; Anzai, Michiko; Sato, Yumiko; Kazukawa, Itsuro; Shimohashi, Kyoko; Ota, Setsuo; Kohno, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is a metabolic disorder characterized by organ resistance to the action of parathyroid hormone. PHP type 1 is subclassified into two apparent disorders, type 1a (PHP1a) and type 1b (PHP1b). Patients with PHP1a show Albright hereditary osteodystrophy including short stature. Patients with PHP1b have no such skeletal defects, however, literature regarding the growth of PHP1b is not currently available. We evaluated growth charts of PHP patients, including four PHP...

  13. Cannabinoids as pharmacotherapies for neuropathic pain: from the bench to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(9)-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the clinical and preclinical literature. Neuropathic pain associated with nerve injury, diabetes, chemotherapeutic treatment, human immunodeficiency virus, multiple sclerosis, and herpes zoster infection is considered. In animals, cannabinoids attenuate neuropathic nociception produced by traumatic nerve injury, disease, and toxic insults. Effects of mixed cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) agonists, CB(2) selective agonists, and modulators of the endocannabinoid system (i.e., inhibitors of transport or degradation) are compared. Effects of genetic disruption of cannabinoid receptors or enzymes controlling endocannabinoid degradation on neuropathic nociception are described. Specific forms of allodynia and hyperalgesia modulated by cannabinoids are also considered. In humans, effects of smoked marijuana, synthetic Delta(9)-THC analogs (e.g., Marinol, Cesamet) and medicinal cannabis preparations containing both Delta(9)-THC and cannabidiol (e.g., Sativex, Cannador) in neuropathic pain states are reviewed. Clinical studies largely affirm that neuropathic pain patients derive benefits from cannabinoid treatment. Subjective (i.e., rating scales) and objective (i.e., stimulus-evoked) measures of pain and quality of life are considered. Finally, limitations of cannabinoid pharmacotherapies are discussed together with directions for future research. PMID:19789075

  14. Therapeutic Potentials and uses of Cannabinoid Agonists in Health and Disease Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Ibegbu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis and its derivatives have great therapeutic potential and have been used for centuries for medicinal purposes. The side effects of cannabinoids include euphoric mood changes, acute psychotic episodes, initiation and exacerbation of schizophrenic psychosis in predisposed persons, impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance, tachycardia and hypotension. The production of complex behavioural effects by cannabinoids are mediated by cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2 and by interactions with other neurochemical systems. It has been shown that the therapeutic and physiological effects of cannabinoids are dependent upon whether the administration is acute or chronic and on the route of administration. The physiological effects of cannabis and its derivatives include: reduction in psychomotor coordination and performance, alterations in thermoregulation, endocrine and reproductive functions and gut motility. There is also evidence of agonist selectivity for CB1 receptors coupled to different subtypes of Gi proteins or to Gi versus Go proteins. Cannabinoid-activated receptors distinct from CB1 or CB2 exist in the central nervous system. Cannabinoids are known to inhibit GABA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the hippocampus via a presynaptic action at CB1 receptors located on GABAergic terminals. CB1 receptors have also been implicated in the inhibition of glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents. The synthetic cannabinoid, Win 55,212-2, a mixed CB1-CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist, was found to attenuate hyperalgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain and suppress opioid-induced emesis in ferrets.

  15. Novelty-induced emotional arousal modulates cannabinoid effects on recognition memory and adrenocortical activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campolongo, P.; Morena, M.; Scaccianoce, S.; Trezza, V.; Chiarotti, F.; Schelling, G.; Cuomo, V.; Roozendaal, B.

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well established that cannabinoid drugs can influence cognitive performance, the findings-describing both enhancing and impairing effects-have been ambiguous. Here, we investigated the effects of posttraining systemic administration of the synthetic cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 (0.

  16. Evaluation of a radioimmunoassay (/sup 125/I) kit for cannabinoid metabolites in urine and whole blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, P.S.; McCurdy, H.H.

    The Abuscreen kit (Roche Diagnostics) for the analysis of 11-nor-..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid and other cannabinoids in urine was evaluated in terms of its accuracy, reproducibility, and sensitivity. A procedure is also presented for the analysis of total cannabinoids in whole blood using the RIA kit.

  17. The Antitumor Activity of Plant-Derived Non-Psychoactive Cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Sean D; Soroceanu, Liliana; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2015-06-01

    As a therapeutic agent, most people are familiar with the palliative effects of the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (CS), Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a molecule active at both the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor subtypes. Through the activation primarily of CB1 receptors in the central nervous system, THC can reduce nausea, emesis and pain in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. During the last decade, however, several studies have now shown that CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists can act as direct antitumor agents in a variety of aggressive cancers. In addition to THC, there are many other cannabinoids found in CS, and a majority produces little to no psychoactivity due to the inability to activate cannabinoid receptors. For example, the second most abundant cannabinoid in CS is the non-psychoactive cannabidiol (CBD). Using animal models, CBD has been shown to inhibit the progression of many types of cancer including glioblastoma (GBM), breast, lung, prostate and colon cancer. This review will center on mechanisms by which CBD, and other plant-derived cannabinoids inefficient at activating cannabinoid receptors, inhibit tumor cell viability, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and the stem-like potential of cancer cells. We will also discuss the ability of non-psychoactive cannabinoids to induce autophagy and apoptotic-mediated cancer cell death, and enhance the activity of first-line agents commonly used in cancer treatment. PMID:25916739

  18. Expresión de receptores cannabinoides en el desarrollo embrionario del pez cebra

    OpenAIRE

    Florido García, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    [ES]Este trabajo trata sobre la expresión de receptores cannabinoides en el desarrollo embrionario del pez cebra [EN]This paper deals with the expression of cannabinoid receptors in the embryonic development of zebrafish Trabajo de Fin de Máster del Máster en Neurociencias, curso 2008-2009.

  19. Involvement of cannabinoid-1 and cannabinoid-2 receptors in septic ileus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-Y; Li, Y-N; Ni, J-B; Chen, C-J; Lv, S; Chai, S-Y; Wu, R-H; Yüce, B; Storr, M

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are involved in the regulation of gastrointestinal (GI) motility under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. We aimed to characterize the possible influence of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors on motility impairment in a model of septic ileus. METHODS Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injections were used to mimic pathophysiological features of septic ileus. Spontaneous jejunal myoelectrical activity was measured in rats in vivo, and upper GI transit was measured in vivo by gavaging of a charcoal marker into the stomach of mice, in absence or presence of LPS, and CB(1) and CB(2) receptor agonists and antagonists. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6 levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Histology was performed with haematoxylin-eosin staining. KEY RESULTS Lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly reduced amplitude and frequency of myoelectric spiking activity and GI transit in vivo in a dose-dependent manner. TNF-alpha and IL-6 were increased in LPS-treated animals and histology showed oedema and cell infiltration. Both, the CB(1) agonist HU210 and the CB(2) agonist JWH133 reduced myoelectrical activity whereas the CB(1) antagonist AM251 caused an increase of myoelectrical activity. Pretreatment with AM251 or AM630 prevented against LPS-induced reduction of myoelectrical activity, and also against the delay of GI transit during septic ileus in vivo. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES The LPS model of septic ileus impairs jejunal myoelectrical activity and delays GI transit in vivo. Antagonists at the CB(1) receptor or the CB(2) receptor prevent the delay of GI transit and thus may be powerful tools in the future treatment of septic ileus. PMID:19840270

  20. ROLE OF NEUROSPECIFIC PROTEINS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Novosyolova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 (type 1 DM diabetes mellitus is one of the common chronic metabolic diseases, which currently is a significant problem due to disability at a young age and reduce life expectancy. Despite the fact that type 1 diabetes accounts for only 10% of all patients with diabetes, it occurs particularly hard, with a tendency to progression. One of the targets of type 1 diabetes is the central nervous system with the further formation of cognitive dysfunction in young age leads to diminished quality of life. Cognitive deficits may be the result not only of structural lesions of the brain, but it may be due to the development of metabolic disorders. In the case of timely diagnosis and treatment of cognitive impairment associated with metabolic changes that can partially or completely regress. The aim of this study was to identify biomarkers of the brain damage in young patients with type 1 diabetes. The study involved 58 patients with  type  1  diabetes,  the  control  group  comprised  29  healthy  controls.  The  complex  included a neuropsychological examination which was used for testing the Montreal scale (MoCA test rapid screening of cognitive impairment, assessment of quality of life using a common questionnaire Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (MOS SF-36 and the specific audit – dependent quality of life (ADDQoL. To evaluateearly markersin the developmentof cognitive dysfunctionwere identifiedneurospecific proteins – S100 protein and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, myelin basic protein (MBP. Found an increased level of neurospecific protein that was correlated with parameters of carbohydrate metabolism, poor quality of life and severe cognitive deficiency (MoCA test lower than 26 points.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Enable Javascript to ... and How They Work Educational Resources (4 links) Disease InfoSearch: Medullary cystic kidney disease 1 Merck Manual Consumer Version: ...

  2. Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Epilepsy Risk, Study Suggests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158067.html Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Epilepsy Risk, Study Suggests But the research did not prove ... an urban or rural area. In kids with type 1 diabetes, the risk of developing epilepsy, after adjusting for other factors ...

  3. Audit on stillbirths in women with pregestational type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth Reinhardt; Ovesen, Per Glud;

    2003-01-01

    To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment.......To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment....

  4. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    2009-01-01

    singularities but only change their nature. The familiar rule that the support of the argument is transported by the support of the distribution kernel is generalised to arbitrary type 1,1-operators. A similar spectral support rule is also proved. As no restrictions appear for classical type 1,0-operators, this...

  5. Decreased cortisol production in male type 1 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; Luik, PT; van der Kleij, FGH; Boonstra, AH; Breukelman, H; Sluiter, WJ; Navis, GJ; Dullaart, RPF

    2003-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether cortisol production and the 11betaHSD-mediated cortisol to cortisone interconversion are different between type 1 diabetic patients and healthy subjects. Materials and methods Fourteen male, nonobese, normotensive type 1 diabetic patients without severe complications

  6. Striatal but not frontal cortical up-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in rats exposed to immune activation in utero and cannabinoid treatment in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrizi, Rejhan; Malcolm, Peter; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Zavitsanou, Katerina; Suresh Sundram

    2016-06-30

    In utero maternal immune activation (MIA) and cannabinoid exposure during adolescence constitute environmental risk factors for schizophrenia. We investigated these risk factors alone and in combination ("two-hit") on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and neuregulin-1 receptor (ErbB4) levels in the rat brain. EGFR but not ErbB4 receptor protein levels were significantly increased in the nucleus accumbens and striatum of "two-hit" rats only, with no changes seen at the mRNA level. These findings support region specific EGF-system dysregulation as a plausible mechanism in this animal model of schizophrenia pathogenesis. PMID:27138815

  7. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Apoptosis by Activation of Phosphorylated CREB-Bcl-2 Pathway After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Hasegawa, Yu; Flores, Jerry; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) which comprises of vasogenic edema and apoptotic cell death is an important component of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) pathophysiology. This study evaluated whether Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) agonist, JWH133, attenuates EBI after SAH and whether CB2R stimulation reduces pro-apoptotic caspase-3 via up-regulation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-Bcl-2 signaling pathway. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=123) were subjected to SAH by endovascular perfora...

  8. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoids in counteracting chemotherapy-induced adverse effects: an exploratory review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Cannabinoids (the active constituents of Cannabis sativa) and their derivatives have got intense attention during recent years because of their extensive pharmacological properties. Cannabinoids first developed as successful agents for alleviating chemotherapy associated nausea and vomiting. Recent investigations revealed that cannabinoids have a wide range of therapeutic effects such as appetite stimulation, inhibition of nausea and emesis, suppression of chemotherapy or radiotherapy-associated bone loss, chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity, pain relief, mood amelioration, and last but not the least relief from insomnia. In this exploratory review, we scrutinize the potential of cannabinoids to counteract chemotherapy-induced side effects. Moreover, some novel and yet important pharmacological aspects of cannabinoids such as antitumoral effects will be discussed. PMID:25504799

  9. Stiffness of modified Type 1a linear external skeletal fixators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaugh, H F; Rochat, M C; Bruce, C W; Galloway, D S; Payton, M E

    2007-01-01

    Modifications of a Type 1a external skeletal fixator (ESF) frame were evaluated by alternately placing transfixation pins on opposite sides of the connecting rod (Type 1a-MOD) or by placing additional connecting rods on either of the two inside (Type 1a-INSIDE) or two outside (Type 1a-OUTSIDE) transfixation pins. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stiffness of these modifications in terms of axial compression (AC), cranial-caudal bending (CCB), and medial-lateral bending (MLB). We hypothesized that these designs would allow significant increase in unilateral frame stiffness, over Type 1a, without proportional increase in frame complexity or technical difficulty of application. All of the ESF frames were constructed using large IMEX SKtrade mark clamps, 3.2 mm threaded fixation pins, 9.5 mm carbon fibre connecting rods and Delrin rods as bone models. Nine, eight pin frames of each design were constructed, and subjected to repetitive non-destructive loading forces (AC, CCB, MLB) using a materials testing machine. Frame construct stiffness for each force (AC, CCB, MLB) was derived from load-deformation curve analysis and displayed in N/mm. Data revealed the 1a-MOD and 1a-OUTSIDE constructs had significantly increased stiffness in CCB and AC as compared to the Type 1a constructs while all of the modified constructs were significantly stiffer in MLB than the Type 1a constructs. PMID:18038001

  10. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) in early pregnancy is associated with development of preeclampsia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Boomsma, Frans; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive markers of cardiac overload Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) are elevated in preeclampsia. This study documents higher ANP concentrations as early as at 9 weeks in type 1 diabetic women subsequently developing preeclampsia suggesting that...

  11. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) in early pregnancy is associated with development of preeclampsia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Boomsma, Frans; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive markers of cardiac overload Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) are elevated in preeclampsia. This study documents higher ANP concentrations as early as at 9 weeks in type 1 diabetic women subsequently developing preeclampsia suggesting that...... preeclampsia is associated with cardiovascular changes in early pregnancy....

  12. [Cannabinoid drugs for neurological diseases: what is behind?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier

    2012-05-16

    In recent years progress has been made in the development of pharmaceuticals based on the plant Cannabis sativa or on synthetic molecules with a similar action. Some of these pharmaceuticals, such as the mouth spray Sativex, have recently been approved for the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, but they are not the first and others, such as Marinol or Cesamet for the treatment of vomiting and nausea, and anorexia-cachexia syndrome, had already been approved. This incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs confirms something that was already known from fairly ancient times up to practically the last century, which is the potential use of this plant for medicinal applications - something which was brought to a standstill by the abusive use of preparations of the plant for recreational purposes. In any case, this incipient clinical use of cannabinoid drugs is not backed just by the anecdote of the medicinal use of cannabis since ancient times, but instead the boost it has been given by scientific research, which has made it possible to identify the target molecules that are activated or inhibited by these substances. These targets are part of a new system of intercellular communication that is especially active in the central nervous system, which is called the 'endogenous cannabinoid system' and, like many other systems, can be manipulated pharmacologically. The aim of this review is to probe further into the scientific knowledge about this system generated in the last few years, as a necessary step to justify the development of pharmaceuticals based on its activation or inhibition and which can be useful in different neurological diseases. PMID:22573509

  13. Identification of Tetraspanin-7 as a Target of Autoantibodies in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Kerry A; Richardson, Carolyn C; Ravishankar, Aarthi; Brigatti, Cristina; Liberati, Daniela; Lampasona, Vito; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Morgan, Diana; Feltbower, Richard G; Christie, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    The presence of autoantibodies to multiple-islet autoantigens confers high risk for the development of type 1 diabetes. Four major autoantigens are established (insulin, glutamate decarboxylase, IA2, and zinc transporter-8), but the molecular identity of a fifth, a 38-kDa membrane glycoprotein (Glima), is unknown. Glima antibodies have been detectable only by immunoprecipitation from extracts of radiolabeled islet or neuronal cells. We sought to identify Glima to enable efficient assay of these autoantibodies. Mouse brain and lung were shown to express Glima. Membrane glycoproteins from extracts of these organs were enriched by detergent phase separation, lectin affinity chromatography, and SDS-PAGE. Proteins were also immunoaffinity purified from brain extracts using autoantibodies from the sera of patients with diabetes before SDS-PAGE. Eluates from gel regions equivalent to 38 kDa were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for protein identification. Three proteins were detected in samples from the brain and lung extracts, and in the immunoaffinity-purified sample, but not in the negative control. Only tetraspanin-7, a multipass transmembrane glycoprotein with neuroendocrine expression, had physical characteristics expected of Glima. Tetraspanin-7 was confirmed as an autoantigen by demonstrating binding to autoantibodies in type 1 diabetes. We identify tetraspanin-7 as a target of autoimmunity in diabetes, allowing its exploitation for diabetes prediction and immunotherapy. PMID:26953162

  14. Uso terapéutico de los cannabinoides

    OpenAIRE

    Capellà Hereu, Dolors; Duran Delmas, M.

    2004-01-01

    Actualmente hay dos cannabinoides comercializados en algunos países para uso terapéutico. El dronabinol o D9tetrahidrocannabinol (THC) y su análogo babilona para el tratamiento de las náuseas y vómitos secundarios a la quimioterapia antineoplásica que no responde a los tratamientos habituales; pero su lugar en terapéutica como antieméticos ha sido cuestionado porque no se dispone de ensayos clínicos comparativos con los tratamientos de referencia (inhibidores de la serotonina). El dronabinol ...

  15. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome and the onset of a manic episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoire, Phillip; Tau, Michael; Robertson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a rare, recently described, clinically diagnosed condition that is characterised by a chronic history of cannabis use, cyclic nausea and vomiting, symptomatic relief with hot water bathing, and resolution with cessation of use. We present a case of this syndrome concurrent in a patient with bipolar mania. We suggest that a 3-week period of vomiting in the context of this syndrome contributed to the precipitation of a manic episode by lowering mood stabiliser serum levels, and that this syndrome will have significant consequences for the patient's mental health. PMID:27122104

  16. Epidemiology of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    1999-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that more than 100,000 inhabitants in the Middle East suffer from type 1 diabetes and that about 6000 subjects in the region develop the disease each year. This paper illustrates how epidemiological principles and methods may assist in a rational assessment of the public...... health impact of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East. Making a series of assumptions, it is estimated that the future prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the region will increase slightly, but that the increase may be more pronounced if the disease incidence is increasing and the prognosis improved. It is...... recommended that more valid information is established on the basic epidemiological features of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East, as this will provide the basis of more rational planning of the current and future diabetes healthcare in the region....

  17. Experimental Therapy Shows Promise for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Promise for Type 1 Diabetes Complementary Approaches for Depression Featured Website: Prescription Drug Abuse Past Issues Most Viewed June 2016 Print RSS Find us on Facebook External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by mistake. In most cases, the signs and symptoms of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, type 1 begin in childhood or adolescence. This condition is characterized by three specific features: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison disease. Affected individuals typically have ...

  19. Neurofibromatosis type 1, pheochromocytoma with primary hyperparathyroidism: A rare association

    OpenAIRE

    Kishore Kumar Behera; Amrit Nanaiah; Ashumi Gupta; Simon Rajaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP) with pheochromocytoma and neurofibromatosis type 1 is a rare clinical association. We present a case of PHP and pheochromocytoma occurring in a 33-year-old male with familial cutaneous neurofibromatosis.

  20. Neurofibromatosis type 1, pheochromocytoma with primary hyperparathyroidism: A rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar Behera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHP with pheochromocytoma and neurofibromatosis type 1 is a rare clinical association. We present a case of PHP and pheochromocytoma occurring in a 33-year-old male with familial cutaneous neurofibromatosis.

  1. A Quasi-Type-1 Phase-Locked Loop Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Fernandez, Francisco Daniel Freijedo; Vidal, Ana;

    2014-01-01

    -error in the presence of frequency drifts. To overcome this drawback of type-1 PLLs, and at the same time, to achieve a fast dynamic response and high filtering capability, a modified PLL structure is proposed in this letter. The proposed PLL has a similar structure to a type-1 PLL, but from the control......The grid voltage phase and frequency are crucial information in control of most grid connected power electronic based equipment. Most often, a phase-locked loop (PLL) is employed for this purpose. A PLL is a closed-loop feedback control system that the phase of its output signal is related to the...... phase of its input signal. Arguably, the simplest PLL is a type-1 PLL. The type-1 PLLs are characterized by having only one integrator in their control loop and therefore having a high stability margin. However, they suffer from a serious drawback: they cannot achieve zero average steady-state phase...

  2. Interbirth interval is associated with childhood type 1 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Svensson, Jannet; Waldhoer, Thomas; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Sadauskaite-Kuehne, Vaiva; Roberts, Christine L; Parslow, Roger C; Wadsworth, Emma J K; Brigis, Girts; Urbonaite, Brone; Schober, Edith; Devoti, Gabriele; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; de Beaufort, Carine E; Soltesz, Gyula; Patterson, Chris C

    2012-01-01

    childhood type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. A secondary analysis of 14 published observational studies of perinatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes was conducted. Risk estimates of diabetes by category of interbirth interval were calculated for each study. Random effects models were used to...... calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Overall, 2,787 children with type 1 diabetes were included. There was a reduction in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals......Short interbirth interval has been associated with maternal complications and childhood autism and leukemia, possibly due to deficiencies in maternal micronutrients at conception or increased exposure to sibling infections. A possible association between interbirth interval and subsequent risk of...

  3. Omkostningseffektivitet ved behandling af type 1-diabetes med insulinpumpe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Sohlberg, Anna; Goodall, Gordan

    2010-01-01

    This study's aim was to project the long-term clinical and economic outcomes of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) in type 1 diabetes patients in Denmark....

  4. Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Researchers at Medical University Vienna, Austria, report the efficacy and safety of the ketogenic diet (KD) in treatment of epilepsy in a 3-year 6 month-old girl with diabetes type 1 followed for 15 months.

  5. Neural Degeneration in the Retina of the Streptozotocin-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Ozawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy, a vision-threatening disease, has been regarded as a vascular disorder. However, impaired oscillatory potentials (OPs in the electroretinogram (ERG and visual dysfunction are recorded before severe vascular lesions appear. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the retinal neural degeneration observed in the streptozotocin-(STZ- induced type 1 diabetes model. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS and reactive oxygen species (ROS both cause OP impairment and reduced levels of synaptophysin, a synaptic vesicle protein for neurotransmitter release, most likely through excessive protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ROS also decrease brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and inner retinal neuronal cells. The influence of both RAS and ROS on synaptophysin suggests that RAS-ROS crosstalk occurs in the diabetic retina. Therefore, suppressors of RAS or ROS, such as angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers or the antioxidant lutein, respectively, are potential candidates for neuroprotective and preventive therapies to improve the visual prognosis.

  6. Obstetric and Perinatal Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancies

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Martina; Norman, Mikael; Hanson, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To perform comparative analyses of obstetric and perinatal outcomes between type 1 diabetic pregnancies and the general obstetric population in Sweden between 1991 and 2003. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a population-based study. Data were obtained from the Medical Birth Registry, covering >98% of all pregnancies in Sweden. A total of 5,089 type 1 diabetic pregnancies and 1,260,207 control pregnancies were included. Odds ratios (ORs) were adjusted for group differences in mat...

  7. Prevalence of Sleep Disturbances in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Licis, Amy K.; Vallorani, Alicia; Gao, Feng; Chen, Cynthia; Lenox, Jason; Yamada, Kelvin A.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Children with neurodevelopmental disorders are at increased risk for sleep issues, which affect quality of life, cognitive function, and behavior. To determine the prevalence of sleep problems in children with the common neurodevelopmental disorder, neurofibromatosis type 1, a cross-sectional study was performed on 129 affected subjects and 89 unaffected siblings, age 2-17 years, using the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children questionnaire. Children with neurofibromatosis type 1 were signific...

  8. Adherence to Diet in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Patton, Susana R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviewed current findings on dietary adherence in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), discussed factors predicting dietary adherence, and presented directions for future research. The search terms were: type 1 diabetes mellitus; youth (0-22 years); diet; dietary adherence; nutrition; dietary intake; obesity; and complications. The studies involved youth with T1DM, presented dietary adherence data specifically, and/or described usual dietary patterns in youth. Articles that ...

  9. Fiber intake and inflammation in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Bernaud, Fernanda S R; Beretta, Mileni Vanti; do Nascimento, Cigléa; Escobar, Fabrícia; Gross, Jorge L.; Azevedo, Mirela J; Ticiana C. Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher intake of dietary fiber is associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of mortality among people with type 1 diabetes. The protective effect includes the anti-inflammatory properties of some foods. Population-based studies have shown an inverse association between some nutritional habits and high sensitive -C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). This study aimed to ascertain the association between fiber intake and hs-CPR levels in patients with type 1 diab...

  10. Interleukin-1 antagonism in type 1 diabetes of recent onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Antoinette; Bundy, Brian; Becker, Dorothy J;

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, but until now no randomised, controlled trials of blockade of the key innate immune mediator interleukin-1 have been done. We aimed to assess whether canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1...... antibody, or anakinra, a human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, improved β-cell function in recent-onset type 1 diabetes....

  11. Just add water: cannabinoid discrimination in a water T-maze with FAAH(-/-) and FAAH(+/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Jenny L; Lefever, Timothy W; Pulley, Nikita S; Marusich, Julie A; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Lichtman, Aron H

    2016-08-01

    Incomplete overlap in the discriminative stimulus effects of Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol has been reported in food-reinforced tasks. The aim of this study was to examine cannabinoid discriminative stimulus effects in a nonappetitive procedure. Adult male mice lacking the gene for AEA's major metabolic enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and FAAH mice were trained to discriminate THC or AEA in a water T-maze, in which the response was swimming to an escape platform on the injection-appropriate side. JZL184, a monoacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, was also tested. FAAH mice showed faster acquisition than FAAH mice. THC and AEA fully substituted, with only minor cross-procedure potency variations. Incomplete substitution of JZL184 was observed in THC-trained FAAH mice in the water-maze task, as contrasted with full substitution in a food-reinforced nose-poke procedure. Stress-induced changes in AEA and/or 2-arachidonoylglycerol concentrations in the brain may have mediated this attenuation. JZL184 also partially substituted in AEA-trained FAAH mice in the water maze, suggesting incomplete overlap in the stimulus effects of AEA and JZL184. Through the use of a novel water-maze procedure, the present study supports the work of previous behavioral pharmacologists in showing the robustness of the discrimination paradigm. PMID:27385208

  12. Preclinical evaluation of [11C]NE40, a type 2 cannabinoid receptor PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Up-regulation of the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) has been reported in (neuro)inflammatory diseases. In this study, we report the preclinical evaluation of [11C]NE40 as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand for visualization of the CB2R. Methods: The selectivity of NE40 for CB2R and its toxicity and mutagenicity were determined. [11C]NE40 was evaluated by biodistribution and autoradiography studies in normal rats and a microPET study in normal mice, rats and a rhesus monkey. Specific in vivo binding of [11C]NE40 to human CB2R (hCB2R) was studied in a rat model with hCB2R overexpression. Results: [11C]NE40 shows specific CB2R binding in the spleen and blood of normal rats and high brain uptake in rhesus monkey. [11C]NE40 showed specific and reversible binding to hCB2R in vivo in a rat model with local hCB2R overexpression. Conclusions: [11C]NE40 shows favorable characteristics as radioligand for in vivo visualization of the CB2R and is a promising candidate for hCB2R PET imaging.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the plant cannabinoids, delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and cannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, M A

    2005-01-01

    Increasing interest in the biology, chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of cannabinoids and in the development of cannabinoid medications necessitates an understanding of cannabinoid pharmacokinetics and disposition into biological fluids and tissues. A drug's pharmacokinetics determines the onset, magnitude, and duration of its pharmacodynamic effects. This review of cannabinoid pharmacokinetics encompasses absorption following diverse routes of administration and from different drug formulations, distribution of analytes throughout the body, metabolism by different tissues and organs, elimination from the body in the feces, urine, sweat, oral fluid, and hair, and how these processes change over time. Cannabinoid pharmacokinetic research has been especially challenging due to low analyte concentrations, rapid and extensive metabolism, and physicochemical characteristics that hinder the separation of drugs of interest from biological matrices--and from each other--and lower drug recovery due to adsorption of compounds of interest to multiple surfaces. delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, the primary psychoactive component of Cannabis sativa, and its metabolites 11-hydroxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol are the focus of this chapter, although cannabidiol and cannabinol, two other cannabinoids with an interesting array of activities, will also be reviewed. Additional material will be presented on the interpretation of cannabinoid concentrations in human biological tissues and fluids following controlled drug administration. PMID:16596792

  14. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. PMID:26092091

  15. Dual intracellular signaling pathways mediated by the human cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, B; Portier, M; Kernéis, A; Delpech, M; Carillon, C; Le Fur, G; Ferrara, P; Shire, D

    1999-06-25

    It has long been established that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor transduces signals through a pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/Go inhibitory pathway. Although there have been reports that the cannabinoid CB1 receptor can also mediate an increase in cyclic AMP levels, in most cases the presence of an adenylyl cyclase costimulant or the use of very high amounts of agonist was necessary. Here, we present evidence for dual coupling of the cannabinoid CB receptor to the classical pathway and to a pertussis toxin-insensitive adenylyl cyclase stimulatory pathway initiated with low quantities of agonist in the absence of any costimulant. Treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor with the cannabinoid CP 55,940, {(-)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hyd roxypropyl) cyclohexan-1-ol} resulted in cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-response manner, an accumulation blocked by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor-specific antagonist SR 141716A, {N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-me thyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide hydrochloride}. In CHO cells coexpressing the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and a cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-luciferase reporter gene system, CP 55,940 induced luciferase expression by a pathway blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide hydrochloride (H-89). Under the same conditions the peripheral cannabinoid CB2 receptor proved to be incapable of inducing cAMP accumulation or luciferase activity. This incapacity allowed us to study the luciferase activation mediated by CB /CB2 chimeric constructs, from which we determined that the first and second internal loop regions of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor were involved in transducing the pathway leading to luciferase gene expression. PMID:10422789

  16. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2, but Not Type 1, Is Up-Regulated in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Children Affected by Autistic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, Dario; Sapone, Anna; Giordano, Catia; Cirillo, Alessandra; de Magistris, Laura; Rossi, Francesco; Fasano, Alessio; Bradstreet, James Jeffrey; Maione, Sabatino; Antonucci, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Autistic disorders (ADs) are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders arised by the interaction of genes and environmental factors. Dysfunctions in social interaction and communication skills, repetitive and stereotypic verbal and non-verbal behaviours are common features of ADs. There are no defined mechanisms of pathogenesis, rendering…

  17. Is the origin of type 1 diabetes in the gut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaarala, Outi

    2012-03-01

    In type 1 diabetes, insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas are destroyed by immune-mediated mechanisms. The manifestation of the disease is preceded by the so-called pre-diabetic period that may last several years and is characterized by the appearance of circulating autoantibodies against beta-cell antigens. The role of the gut as a regulator of type 1 diabetes was suggested in animal studies, in which changes affecting the gut immune system modulated the incidence of diabetes. Dietary interventions, alterations in the intestinal microbiota and exposure to enteric pathogens, regulate the development of autoimmune diabetes in animal models. It has been demonstrated that these modulations affect the gut barrier mechanisms and intestinal immunity. Because the pancreas and the gut belong to the same intestinal immune system, the link between autoimmune diabetes and the gut is not unexpected. The gut hypothesis in the development of type 1 diabetes is also supported by the observations made in human type 1 diabetes. Early diet could modulate the development of beta-cell autoimmunity; weaning to hydrolysed casein formula decreased the risk of beta-cell autoimmunity by age 10 in the infants at genetic risk. Increased gut permeability, intestinal inflammation with impaired regulatory mechanisms and dysregulated oral tolerance have been observed in children with type 1 diabetes. The factors that contribute to these intestinal alterations are not known, but interest is focused on the microbial stimuli and function of innate immunity. It is likely that our microbial environment does not support the healthy maturation of the gut and tolerance in the gut, and this leads to the increasing type 1 diabetes as well as other immune-mediated diseases regulated by intestinal immune system. Thus, the interventions, aiming to prevent or treat type 1 diabetes in humans, should be targeting the gut immune system. PMID:22290506

  18. Evaluation of Preventive Studies in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müyesser Sayki Arslan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic autoimmune disease in which destruction of the beta cells in the islets of Langerhans results in insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia. We only definitely know that autoimmunity is the most important effector mechanism of type 1 DM. Type 1 DM precipitates in genetically susceptible individuals after an exposure to environmental trigger. According to current data, type 1 DM-associated genes are classified as susceptibility and protective genes. This insidious disease process evolves over a period of years. Prevention of type 1 DM requires detection of the earliest events in the process. Until now, autoantibodies are generally used as a serum biomarker, but current studies about T cell and metabolome might strengthen diagnostic view. Current preventive clinical studies usually focus on environmental factors. During the natural course of type 1 DM, many strategies have been tested at different stages in the form of primary, secondary and tertiary studies. The aim of the intervention studies for type 1 diabetes is to suppress pathogenic autoreactivity, restore/preserve beta cell mass and function to sufficient levels to provide good metabolic control, and to delay or prevent disease development. Therapeutic studies evaluate the effect of antigen specific and non-specific immune interventions, restoration of the damaged beta cells and also combination of these therapies. The results of intervention studies done till now are modulation of autoimmune process and partial prevention of loss of insulin release following the diagnosis. A single long-term effective prevention has not been identified yet. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 38-45

  19. The cannabinoid agonist HU-210: pseudo-irreversible discriminative stimulus effects in rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Hruba, Lenka; McMahon, Lance R.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic cannabinoid abuse and case reports of adverse effects have raised concerns about the pharmacologic mechanisms underlying in vivo effects. Here, a synthetic cannabinoid identified in abused products (HU-210) was compared to the effects of Δ9-THC and two other synthetic cannabinoid agonists used extensively in pre-clinical studies (CP 55,940 and WIN 55,212-2). One group of monkeys discriminated Δ9-THC (0.1 mg/kg i.v.); a separate group received chronic Δ9-THC (1 mg/kg/12 h s.c.) and d...

  20. Cannabinoids and centrak neuropathic pain. A review (Cannabinoidi e dolore neuropatico centrale. Una rassegna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Crestani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Only recently, the medical community highlighted the pharmacological scientific bases of the effects of Cannabis. The most important active principle, Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol was identified in the second half of the last century, and receptors were subsequently identified and endogenous ligands, called endocannabinoids, were characterized. The effectiveness of the cannabinoids in the treatment of nausea and vomit due to anti-neoplastic chemotherapy and in the wasting-syndrome during AIDS is recognized. Moreover, the cannabinoids have shown analgesic properties, particularly interesting with regard to the central neuropathic pain. This article will review the current knowledge and will give practical guidance on how to proceed in prescribing cannabinoids.

  1. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  2. Mosaic type-1 NF1 microdeletions as a cause of both generalized and segmental neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiaen, Ludwine; Vogt, Julia; Bengesser, Kathrin; Fu, Chuanhua; Mikhail, Fady; Serra, Eduard; Garcia-Linares, Carles; Cooper, David N; Lazaro, Conxi; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2011-02-01

    Mosaicism is an important feature of type-1 neurofibromatosis (NF1) on account of its impact upon both clinical manifestations and transmission risk. Using FISH and MLPA to screen 3500 NF1 patients, we identified 146 individuals harboring gross NF1 deletions, 14 of whom (9.6%) displayed somatic mosaicism. The high rate of mosaicism in patients with NF1 deletions supports the postulated idea of a direct relationship between the high new mutation rate in this cancer predisposition syndrome and the frequency of mosaicism. Seven of the 14 mosaic NF1 deletions were type-2, whereas four were putatively type-1, and three were atypical. Two of the four probable type-1 deletions were confirmed as such by breakpoint-spanning PCR or SNP analysis. Both deletions were associated with a generalized manifestation of NF1. Independently, we identified a third patient with a mosaic type-1 NF1 deletion who exhibited segmental NF1. Together, these three cases constitute the first proven mosaic type-1 deletions so far reported. In two of these three mosaic type-1 deletions, the breakpoints were located within PRS1 and PRS2, previously identified as hotspots for nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) during meiosis. Hence, NAHR within PRS1 and PRS2 is not confined to meiosis but may also occur during postzygotic mitotic cell cycles. PMID:21280148

  3. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. PMID:25813338

  4. TSH receptor antibodies in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Ambika G; Kumaravel, Velayutham; Nair, Vasantha; Rao, Ananth; Jayakumar, Rohini V; Kumar, Harish; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2006-10-01

    The research was undertaken to study the prevalence of TSH receptor antibody positivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. A total of 74 subjects with type 1 diabetes were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Thyroid function test and assessment of thyroid autoimmunity with anti-TPO and TSH receptor antibody were done in all patients. A total of 33 males and 41 females with type 1 diabetes were studied. The prevalence of TSH receptor antibody positivity alone was 18%. The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity with anti-TPO as a marker was 28%; the prevalence increased to 43% when TSH receptor antibody was also measured. Majority of the subjects with antithyroid antibody positivity were also positive for GAD65 antibodies. As a significant proportion of type 1 diabetic subjects have positivity to TSH receptor antibody, we suggest that larger studies should be conducted to study the benefits of TSH receptor antibody-based screening for thyroid dysfunction in type 1 diabetic subjects. As the TSH receptor antibodies could be of the stimulating or of the blocking type, subjects with antibody positivity could be at risk of developing hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. PMID:17130558

  5. Dietary factors in the development of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Suvi M

    2016-07-01

    There are several indicators concerning the putative importance of dietary factors during the fetal period lactation, infancy and childhood in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. Among foods, cow's milk consumption has been associated with an increased risk of preclinical and/or clinical type 1 diabetes and sugars with a progression from preclinical to clinical disease. Breast milk, on the other hand, may be protective. Processed foods may be related to a greater risk of type 1 diabetes because they contain higher amounts of advanced glycation end-products. Nitrites or N-nitroso compounds in processed meat products could increase the risk of this disease. Among nutrients, n-3 fatty acids, vitamins D and E, and zinc may protect from preclinical and/or clinical type 1 diabetes. The microbial composition of foods or food's other effects on gut microbiota are receiving increasing attention, also due to their putative role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Still the number of prospective studies in this research field is limited and most of the findings remain to be replicated. PMID:27411437

  6. New technologies in the treatment of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe

    2013-01-01

    how much insulin is needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and administer the insulin dose by pen injection or insulin pump infusion into the subcutaneous tissue. In recent years, several new technologies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes have been developed. This PhD thesis covers two......Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by insufficient production of insulin, a hormone needed for proper control of blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose throughout the day using a glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor, calculate...... studies of the effects of commercially available technologies--sensor-augmented pump therapy and automated insulin bolus calculators--when used in clinical practice. Both studies demonstrated that these technologies have the potential to improve diabetes care. In addition, two in-clinic studies related to...

  7. Type 1 Tyrosinemia with Hypophosphatemic Rickets; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Eshraghi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tyrosinemia type 1 is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder, which typically affects liver and kidneys. It is caused by a defect in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase or fumarylacetoacetase (FAH enzyme, the final enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. The disease typically manifests as early onset type in early infancy with acute hepatic crisis with hepatomegaly and bleeding tendency. In 1992, a new drug orfadin (NTBC, Nitisinone which is a potent inhibitor of 4 hydroxy phenyl pyrovate dioxygenase has revolutionized the treatment of tyrosinemia type 1 and is now the mainstry of therapy. Case presentation: Our case was a girl in midchidhood period with profound rickets and slowly progressing liver disease who presented with difficulty walking and weakness of muscles. She had an elevated serum tyrosine and urinary succinylacetone, which confirmed the diagnosis of tyrosinemia type 1 and after treatment with NTBC significant remission, was achieved.

  8. Physical Activity in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Carrie; Aronow, Laura; Mackey, Eleanor; Streisand, Randi

    2016-09-01

    Youth with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing cardiovascular disease, and regular physical activity is strongly recommended as one strategy for prevention, as well as for good glycemic control. Despite recommendations, families in this pediatric population face unique barriers to physical activity, including fear of hypoglycemia. Moreover, families are not routinely counseled in the specific health and psychosocial benefits of following physical activity recommendations for youth with type 1 diabetes. To bridge this gap, the recent literature regarding physical activity in children with type 1 diabetes is reviewed with particular focus on young children. A discussion of the limitations of the current body of research, and recommendations for objectively measured physical activity are provided. Specific recommendations for clinical practice are given, including provider endorsements for regular physical activity for longer than 60 minutes, at least three times a week. PMID:27475093

  9. [Eating disorders and type 1 diabetes: about 4 clinical reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Márcia; Rodrigues, Dírcea; Gouveia, José Pinto; Bastos, Margarida; Carvalheiro, Manuela

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, often diagnosed in youth and associated with important psychological, familial and social disorders. Its intensive treatment with insulin and dietary changes is an extra stress factor in a stage of life already complicated. This vulnerability, coupled with low self-esteem and psychological factors typical of the youth, makes eating disorders twice as common in young girls with type 1 diabetes. The omission of insulin is the sole purging behavior used to lose weight, culminating in a poor glycemic control and increased acute and chronic complications. The treatment seeks to achieve specific objectives, depending on the associated psychiatric pathology. Because of its frequency, the clinician should be alert to early manifestations of this association. We present four clinical cases of young people with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders, which show the complexity of the approach and monitoring of these patients. PMID:22856403

  10. Therapeutic management of type 1 diabetes before and during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy increases the risks of adverse outcomes for mother and infant in women with type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and maintaining adequate glycemic control during pregnancy is crucial for optimizing outcomes. Areas covered: The importance of prepregnancy planning and treatment during...... risk of malformations. Screening for diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and thyroid dysfunction is important, and indications for antihypertensive treatment and treatment of thyroid dysfunction need to be in focus before and during pregnancy.......Introduction: Pregnancy increases the risks of adverse outcomes for mother and infant in women with type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and maintaining adequate glycemic control during pregnancy is crucial for optimizing outcomes. Areas covered: The importance of prepregnancy planning and treatment during...... pregnancy is reviewed. The use of insulin analogues and antihypertensive drugs in diabetic pregnancy are in focus. The reader is presented with evidence discussing the importance of prepregnancy counseling and treatment during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes. Expert opinion: Tight glycemic control...

  11. Characterization of type 1 pili of Salmonella typhimurium LT2.

    OpenAIRE

    Korhonen, T K; Lounatmaa, K.; Ranta, H; Kuusi, N

    1980-01-01

    Type 1 pili from Salmonella typhimurium LT2 were purified and characterized. The pilus filaments were 6 nm in diameter and over 1 microns long. Estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the molecular weight of the pilin was 21,000. The isoelectric point of the filament was 4.1. Hydrophobic amino acids comprised 40.3% of the total amino acids of the pilin, which contained more proline, serine, and lysine than reported for the type 1 pilin of Escherichia coli. Puri...

  12. Microvascular Complications in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Demirel, Fatma; Tepe, Derya; Kara, Özlem; Esen, İhsan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Screening of complications is an important part of diabetes care. The aim of this study was to investigate diabetic complications and related risk factors in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on type 1 diabetics who were over 11 years of age or had a diabetes duration of 2 years and included 155 adolescents with T1DM (67 male, 88 female). The mean age of the patients was 14.4±2.1 years. Mean diabetes duration was 6.3...

  13. Becker′s nevus with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder which primarily affects the growth and development of neural cell tissues. It presents as multiple tumor-like growths over the skin that arises from the nerves and is associated with other abnormalities like pigmentation over the skin and bone deformities. Becker′s nevus or hairy pigmented epidermal nevus is a benign cutaneous hamartoma which is characterized by hyperpigmented macule with hypertrichosis. It is rarely associated with neurofibromatosis. We report a 22-years-old male with coexistent Becker′s nevus and type 1 neurofibromatosis.

  14. Early feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M; Becker, Dorothy;

    2011-01-01

    Short-term breastfeeding and early exposure to complex dietary proteins, such as cow milk proteins and cereals, or to fruit, berries, and roots have been implicated as risk factors for ß cell autoimmunity, clinical type 1 diabetes, or both. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in...... initially recruited 5606 newborn infants with a family member affected by type 1 diabetes and enrolled 2159 eligible subjects who carried a risk-conferring HLA genotype. All recruited mothers were encouraged to breastfeed. The intervention lasted for 6-8 mo with a minimum study formula exposure time of 2 mo...

  15. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D; Walker, N M; Stevens, Hanne; Yang, Jian; She, J-X; Eisenbarth, G S; Rewers, M; Todd, J A; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H A; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, Jørn; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Rich, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we, the...... Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study....

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Børglum, A D; Brandt, C A; Flint, T; Bisgaard, C

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy associated with a DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in the majority of cases. Most of the sporadic cases are due to a de novo duplication. We have screened for this duplication in 11 Danish patients...... with CMT type 1, using four different techniques, and identified a de novo duplication in a sporadic case. Analysis of the fully informative pVAW409R3a alleles in this family showed the duplication to be of paternal origin....

  17. Obesity and metabolic surgery in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Heike Raab; R. A. Weiner; Frenken, M.; K. Rett; Weiner, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity surgery is an effective method for treating obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2. This type of diabetes can be completely resolved in 78.1% of diabetic patients and can be improved or resolved in 86.6% of diabetic patients. But little is known about bariatric surgery in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: We report of 6 female obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 who had bariatric surgery. Two of them underwent Roux-en Y gastric bypass (RNYGB), one of them had sleev...

  18. Cannabinoid administration increases 5HT1A receptor binding and mRNA expression in the hippocampus of adult but not adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavitsanou, K; Wang, H; Dalton, V S; Nguyen, V

    2010-08-11

    The endocannabinoid and serotonin systems share a high level of overlap in terms of the physiological processes that they regulate, however, little is known about their functional interactions particularly during adolescence, a vulnerable period for both the development of psychosis and for initiation to substance use. In the present study, the effects of cannabinoid treatment on serotonin 5HT1A receptor density and mRNA expression were investigated in two age groups: Adolescent (postnatal day 35) and adult (postnatal day 70) rats were injected with the synthetic cannabinoid HU210 (25, 50 or 100 microg/kg) or vehicle for 1, 4 or 14 days and sacrificed 24 h after the last injection. 5HT1A receptor density was measured in different brain regions using [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT quantitative autoradiography whereas mRNA expression was measured in adjacent brain sections. Higher levels of both serotonin 5HT1A receptor binding and mRNA expression were observed in limbic regions in adolescent control animals compared to adults. 5HT1A receptor density was increased by 23% in the CA1 region of the hippocampus of adult rats treated with 100 microg/kg HU210 for 4 days compared to vehicle treated controls. The same treatment increased mRNA expression by 27% and by 14% in the CA1 region and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus respectively. 5HT1A receptor density was increased by 22% in the CA1 of adult animals treated with 50 microg HU210, by 26% in the dentate gurus of adult rats treated with 100 microg for 14 days. By contrast, 5HT1A receptor density or mRNA expression was not affected in the brain of adolescent animals in any of the brain regions examined. These results suggest that cannabinoid treatment has differential effects on serotonin-related neurochemistry in adolescent compared to adult rats. The effects in the adult brain may compromise hippocampal function and could account for the cognitive deficits seen in habitual heavy cannabis users. PMID:20438810

  19. Hemopressins and other hemoglobin-derived peptides in mouse brain: Comparison between brain, blood, and heart peptidome and regulation in Cpefat/fat mice

    OpenAIRE

    Gelman, Julia S.; Sironi, Juan; Castro, Leandro M.; Ferro, Emer S.; Fricker, Lloyd D.

    2010-01-01

    Many hemoglobin-derived peptides are present in mouse brain, and several of these have bioactive properties including the hemopressins, a related series of peptides that bind to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Although hemoglobin is a major component of red blood cells, it is also present in neurons and glia. To examine whether the hemoglobin-derived peptides in brain are similar to those present in blood and heart, we used a peptidomics approach involving mass spectrometry. Many hemoglobin-derive...

  20. Death Associated With the Use of the Synthetic Cannabinoid ADB-FUBINACA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Kevin G; Clark, William; Behonick, George

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids have been found in herbal incense products for the last several years. We report the rapid death of an individual that was certified as synthetic cannabinoid-associated. The autopsy blood specimen was extracted by a liquid-liquid extraction at pH 10.2 into a hexane-ethyl acetate mixture and analyzed by a generalized synthetic cannabinoid LC-MS-MS method. For this case report, we briefly describe the instrumental analysis and extraction methods for the detection of ADB-FUBINACA in postmortem blood, toxicological results for the postmortem blood specimen (ADB-FUBINACA, 7.3 ng/mL; THC, 1.1 ng/mL; THC-COOH, 4.7 ng/mL), case information and circumstances and pertinent findings at autopsy. The cause of death was certified as coronary arterial thrombosis in combination with synthetic cannabinoid use. Manner of death was accident. PMID:26755539

  1. Cannabinoids and Tremor Induced by Motor-related Disorders: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Shokouh; Vaziri, Zohreh; Behzadi, Mina; Abbassian, Hassan; Stephens, Gary J; Shabani, Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    Tremor arises from an involuntary, rhythmic muscle contraction/relaxation cycle and is a common disabling symptom of many motor-related diseases such as Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, Huntington disease, and forms of ataxia. In the wake of anecdotal, largely uncontrolled, observations claiming the amelioration of some symptoms among cannabis smokers, and the high density of cannabinoid receptors in the areas responsible for motor function, including basal ganglia and cerebellum, many researchers have pursued the question of whether cannabinoid-based compounds could be used therapeutically to alleviate tremor associated with central nervous system diseases. In this review, we focus on possible effects of cannabinoid-based medicines, in particular on Parkinsonian and multiple sclerosis-related tremors and the common probable molecular mechanisms. While, at present, inconclusive results have been obtained, future investigations should extend preclinical studies with different cannabinoids to controlled clinical trials to determine potential benefits in tremor. PMID:26152606

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.parolaro@uninsubria.it [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  4. Screening of Danish traffic cases for synthetic cannabinoids in whole blood by LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Pineda, Rebeca; Andersen, David Wederkinck; Rasmussen, Brian Schou; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Hoegberg, Lotte; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    A target screening method for the detection of 13 synthetic cannabinoids in whole blood was developed and validated. Samples underwent automated solid-phase extraction, and sample extracts were analyzed by liquid chromatography-positive electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry using two...... drugs. No synthetic cannabinoids were identified in these samples. Additionally, the method was applied to a clinical intoxication case, and the synthetic cannabinoid AM-2201 was identified in serum. We conclude that the prevalence of driving under the influence of synthetic cannabinoids in Denmark is...... transitions in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The limit of detection was between 0.1-2.5 ng/mL for the compounds except HU-210, and extraction recovery ranged from 59 to 78%. The method was used to screen 393 Danish traffic cases from 2012, where the driver was suspected of driving under the influence of...

  5. Gastric acid inhibitory and gastric protective effects of Cannabis and cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis sativa has long been known for its psychotropic effect. Only recently with the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous legends and the enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation, the role of this 'endocannabinoid system' in different pathophysiologic processes is beginning to be delineated. There is evidence that CB1 receptor stimulation with synthetic cannabinoids or Cannabis sativa extracts rich in Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibit gastric acid secretion in humans and experimental animals. This is specially seen when gastric acid secretion is stimulated by pentagastrin, carbachol or 2-deoxy-d-glucose. Cannabis and/or cannabinoids protect the gastric mucosa against noxious challenge with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, ethanol as well as against stress-induced mucosal damage. Cannabis/cannabinoids might protect the gastric mucosa by virtue of its antisecretory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and vasodilator properties. PMID:27261847

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Massi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  7. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology. PMID:26612422

  8. 2012 Division of Medicinal Chemistry Award Address: Trekking the Cannabinoid Road: A Personal Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    My involvement with the field of cannabinoids spans close to three decades, and covers a major part of my scientific career. It also reflects the robust progress in this initially largely unexplored area of biology. During this period of time, I have witnessed the growth of modern cannabinoid biology, starting from the discovery of its two receptors and followed by the characterization of its endogenous ligands and the identification of the enzyme systems involved in their biosynthesis and bi...

  9. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be presc...

  10. A synthetic cannabinoid agonist promotes oligodendrogliogenesis during viral encephalitis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Solbrig, Marylou V.; Fan, Yijun; Hermanowicz, Neal; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Chronic CNS infection by several families of viruses can produce deficits in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatal function. Cannabinoid drugs have been long known for their anti-inflammatory properties and their ability to modulate adult neuro and gliogenesis. Therefore, we explored the effects of systemic administration of the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2(WIN) on prefrontal cortex(PFC) and striatal cytogenesis in a viral model of CNS injury and inflammation based on Borna Disease (BD) vir...

  11. Cannabinoids as Pharmacotherapies for Neuropathic Pain: From the Bench to the Bedside

    OpenAIRE

    Rahn, Elizabeth J; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating form of chronic pain resulting from nerve injury, disease states, or toxic insults. Neuropathic pain is often refractory to conventional pharmacotherapies, necessitating validation of novel analgesics. Cannabinoids, drugs that share the same target as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, have the potential to address this unmet need. Here, we review studies evaluating cannabinoids for neuropathic pain management in the c...

  12. Opposing actions of chronic Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinoid antagonists on hippocampal long-term potentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Oz, Murat; Yang, Ruiqin; Lichtman, Aron H.; Carl R Lupica

    2007-01-01

    Memory deficits produced by marijuana arise partly via interaction of the psychoactive component, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), with cannabinoid receptors in the hippocampus. Although cannabinoids acutely reduce glutamate release and block hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a potential substrate for learning and memory, the consequences of prolonged exposure to Δ9-THC for hippocampal function are poorly understood. Rats were injected with Δ9-THC (10 mg/kg, i.p., q.d.) for 1, 3, or ...

  13. Feeding Induced by Cannabinoids Is Mediated Independently of the Melanocortin System

    OpenAIRE

    Sinnayah, Puspha; Jobst, Erin E.; Rathner, Joseph A.; Caldera-Siu, Angela D.; Tonelli-Lemos, Luciana; Eusterbrock, Aaron J.; Enriori, Pablo J.; Pothos, Emmanuel N.; Grove, Kevin L.; Cowley, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana, stimulate appetite, and cannabinoid receptor-1 (CB1-R) antagonists suppress appetite and promote weight loss. Little is known about how CB1-R antagonists affect the central neurocircuitry, specifically the melanocortin system that regulates energy balance. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we show that peripherally administered CB1-R antagonist (AM251) or agonist equally suppressed or stimulated feeding respectively in Ay , which...

  14. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of canna...

  15. The periaqueductal gray contributes to bidirectional enhancement of antinociception between morphine and cannabinoids

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson-Poe, Adrianne R.; Pocius, Edvinas; Herschbach, Melissa; Morgan, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    Co-administration of opioids and cannabinoids can enhance pain relief even when administered on different days. Repeated systemic administration of morphine has been shown to enhance the antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC) administered 12 hours later, and repeated microinjection of the cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-210 into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been shown to enhance the antinociceptive effect of morphine administered one day later. The primary obje...

  16. Inhibition of the production of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor by cannabinoid receptor agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, I.; Schermer, B; Popp, R; Busse, R.

    1999-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, has been reported to induce an 'endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-like' relaxation in vitro. We therefore investigated the effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists; HU 210, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and anandamide, and a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist, SR 141716A, on nitric oxide (NO) and EDHF-mediated relaxation in precontracted rings of porcine coronary, rabbit carotid and mesenteric arteries.In rings of mesenteric artery HU...

  17. Triphasic blood pressure responses to cannabinoids: do we understand the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, Barbara; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2012-04-01

    The cannabinoids comprise three major classes of substances, including compounds derived from the cannabis plant (e.g. Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and the chemically related substances CP55940 and HU210), endogenously formed (e.g. anandamide) and synthetic compounds (e.g. WIN55212-2). Beyond their psychotropic effects, cannabinoids have complex effects on blood pressure, including biphasic changes of Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol and WIN55212-2 and an even triphasic effect of anandamide. The differing pattern of blood pressure changes displayed by the three types of compounds is not really surprising since, although they share an agonistic effect at cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, some compounds have additional effects. In particular, anandamide is known for its pleiotropic effects, and there is overwhelming evidence that anandamide influences blood pressure via (i) CB(1) receptors, (ii) TRPV1 receptors, (iii) endothelial cannabinoid receptors and (iv) degradation products. This review is dedicated to the description of the effects of externally added cannabinoids on cardiovascular parameters in vivo. First, the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in anaesthetized animals will be highlighted since most data have been generated in experiments of that type. The text will follow the three phases of anandamide on blood pressure, and we will check to which extent cardiovascular changes elicited by other cannabinoids show overlap with those effects or differ. The second part will be dedicated to the cardiovascular effects of the cannabinoids in conscious animals. In the third part, cardiovascular effects in humans will be discussed, and similarities and differences with respect to the data from animals will be examined. PMID:22022923

  18. Promising cannabinoid-based therapies for Parkinson’s disease: motor symptoms to neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a slow insidious neurological disorder characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Although several recent preclinical advances have proposed to treat PD, there is hardly any clinically proved new therapeutic for its cure. Increasing evidence suggests a prominent modulatory function of the cannabinoid signaling system in the basal ganglia. Hence, use of cannabinoids as a new therapeutic target has been recommended as a promising therapy for PD....

  19. Triphasic blood pressure responses to cannabinoids: do we understand the mechanism?

    OpenAIRE

    Malinowska, Barbara; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoids comprise three major classes of substances, including compounds derived from the cannabis plant (e.g. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and the chemically related substances CP55940 and HU210), endogenously formed (e.g. anandamide) and synthetic compounds (e.g. WIN55212-2). Beyond their psychotropic effects, cannabinoids have complex effects on blood pressure, including biphasic changes of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and WIN55212-2 and an even triphasic effect of anandamide. The differing ...

  20. Cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata evokes cardiorespiratory effects in anaesthetised rats

    OpenAIRE

    Padley, James R; Li, Qun; Pilowsky, Paul M.; Goodchild, Ann K

    2003-01-01

    The nature of the cardiorespiratory effects mediated by cannabinoids in the hindbrain is poorly understood. In the present study we investigated whether cannabinoid receptor activation in the rostral ventrolateral medulla oblongata (RVLM) affects cardiovascular and/or respiratory function.Initially, we looked for evidence of CB1 receptor gene expression in rostral and caudal sections of the rat ventrolateral medulla (VLM) using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. Second, the pote...