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Sample records for brain barrier breakdown

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Possible Role in Posttraumatic Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Tomkins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent animal experiments indicate a critical role for opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in the pathogenesis of post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE. This study aimed to investigate the frequency, extent, and functional correlates of BBB disruption in epileptic patients following mild traumatic brain injury (TBI. Thirty-seven TBI patients were included in this study, 19 of whom suffered from PTE. All underwent electroencephalographic (EEG recordings and brain magnetic resonance imaging (bMRI. bMRIs were evaluated for BBB disruption using novel quantitative techniques. Cortical dysfunction was localized using standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA. TBI patients displayed significant EEG slowing compared to controls with no significant differences between PTE and nonepileptic patients. BBB disruption was found in 82.4% of PTE compared to 25% of non-epileptic patients (P=.001 and could be observed even years following the trauma. The volume of cerebral cortex with BBB disruption was significantly larger in PTE patients (P=.001. Slow wave EEG activity was localized to the same region of BBB disruption in 70% of patients and correlated to the volume of BBB disrupted cortex. We finally present a patient suffering from early cortical dysfunction and BBB breakdown with a gradual and parallel resolution of both pathologies. Our findings demonstrate that BBB pathology is frequently found following mild TBI. Lasting BBB breakdown is found with increased frequency and extent in PTE patients. Based on recent animal studies and the colocalization found between the region of disrupted BBB and abnormal EEG activity, we suggest a role for a vascular lesion in the pathogenesis of PTE.

  2. Evidences of endocytosis via caveolae following blood-brain barrier breakdown by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Edilene Siqueira; Mendonça, Monique Culturato Padilha; Irazusta, Silvia Pierre; Coope, Andressa; Stávale, Leila Miguel; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice

    2014-09-17

    Spider venoms contain neurotoxic peptides aimed at paralyzing prey or for defense against predators; that is why they represent valuable tools for studies in neuroscience field. The present study aimed at identifying the process of internalization that occurs during the increased trafficking of vesicles caused by Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom (PNV)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown. Herein, we found that caveolin-1α is up-regulated in the cerebellar capillaries and Purkinje neurons of PNV-administered P14 (neonate) and 8- to 10-week-old (adult) rats. The white matter and granular layers were regions where caveolin-1α showed major upregulation. The variable age played a role in this effect. Caveolin-1 is the central protein that controls caveolae formation. Caveolar-specialized cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane sub-domains are involved in endocytosis, transcytosis, mechano-sensing, synapse formation and stabilization, signal transduction, intercellular communication, apoptosis, and various signaling events, including those related to calcium handling. PNV is extremely rich in neurotoxic peptides that affect glutamate handling and interferes with ion channels physiology. We suggest that the PNV-induced BBB opening is associated with a high expression of caveolae frame-forming caveolin-1α, and therefore in the process of internalization and enhanced transcytosis. Caveolin-1α up-regulation in Purkinje neurons could be related to a way of neurons to preserve, restore, and enhance function following PNV-induced excitotoxicity. The findings disclose interesting perspectives for further molecular studies of the interaction between PNV and caveolar specialized membrane domains. It proves PNV to be excellent tool for studies of transcytosis, the most common form of BBB-enhanced permeability.

  3. Expression of Astrocytic Type 2 Angiotensin Receptor in Central Nervous System Inflammation Correlates With Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, Laila; Toft-Hansen, Henrik; Khorooshi, Reza;

    2010-01-01

    is involved during BBB breakdown. We studied the type 2 angiotensin receptor AT(2) because of its suggested neuroprotective role. Two models of brain inflammation were used to distinguish solute versus cellular barrier functions. Both leukocytes and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) accumulated in the perivascular...... space of transgenic mice expressing the chemokine CCL2 in the CNS, indicating selective endothelial effects. Cellular infiltration and HRP leakage across the glia limitans to the parenchyma were induced by pertussis toxin (PTx) treatment. By contrast, there was no detectable HRP leakage...

  4. Accelerated pericyte degeneration and blood-brain barrier breakdown in apolipoprotein E4 carriers with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Matthew R; Rege, Sanket V; Ma, Qingyi; Zhao, Zhen; Miller, Carol A; Winkler, Ethan A; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the entry of neurotoxic blood-derived products and cells into the brain that is required for normal neuronal functioning and information processing. Pericytes maintain the integrity of the BBB and degenerate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The BBB is damaged in AD, particularly in individuals carrying apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) gene, which is a major genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. The mechanisms underlying the BBB breakdown in AD remain, however, elusive. Here, we show accelerated pericyte degeneration in AD APOE4 carriers >AD APOE3 carriers >non-AD controls, which correlates with the magnitude of BBB breakdown to immunoglobulin G and fibrin. We also show accumulation of the proinflammatory cytokine cyclophilin A (CypA) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in pericytes and endothelial cells in AD (APOE4 >APOE3), previously shown to lead to BBB breakdown in transgenic APOE4 mice. The levels of the apoE lipoprotein receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), were similarly reduced in AD APOE4 and APOE3 carriers. Our data suggest that APOE4 leads to accelerated pericyte loss and enhanced activation of LRP1-dependent CypA–MMP-9 BBB-degrading pathway in pericytes and endothelial cells, which can mediate a greater BBB damage in AD APOE4 compared with AD APOE3 carriers.

  5. Air pollution and children: neural and tight junction antibodies and combustion metals, the role of barrier breakdown and brain immunity in neurodegeneration.

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    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Vojdani, Aristo; Blaurock-Busch, Eleonore; Busch, Yvette; Friedle, Albrecht; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Sarathi-Mukherjee, Partha; Martínez-Aguirre, Xavier; Park, Su-Bin; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    Millions of children are exposed to concentrations of air pollutants, including fine particulate matter (PM2.5), above safety standards. In the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) megacity, children show an early brain imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune response-associated genes, and blood-brain barrier breakdown. We investigated serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) antibodies to neural and tight junction proteins and environmental pollutants in 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 y with high versus low air pollution exposures. We also measured metals in serum and CSF. MCMA children showed significantly higher serum actin IgG, occludin/zonulin 1 IgA, IgG, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG and IgM (p brain barrier. Defining the air pollution linkage of the brain/immune system interactions and damage to physical and immunological barriers with short and long term neural detrimental effects to children's brains ought to be of pressing importance for public health.

  6. Pressure passive cerebral blood flow and breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in experimental fetal asphyxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, H C; Lassen, N A; Tweed, W A;

    1979-01-01

    reaching CBF values up to 6 times normal at normal MABP of about 60 to 70 mmHg, and severe ischemia reaching CBF values close to zero in large cortical areas at MABP of 30 mmHg. CVP remained essentially unchanged at 10--15 mmHg. The severe and prolonged asphyxia rendered the blood-brain barrier leaky...

  7. Circulating angiotensin II gains access to the hypothalamus and brain stem during hypertension via breakdown of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Vinicia Campana; Son, Sook Jin; Ahmadi, Sahra; Filosa, Jessica A; Stern, Javier E

    2014-03-01

    Angiotensin II-mediated vascular brain inflammation emerged as a novel pathophysiological mechanism in neurogenic hypertension. However, the precise underlying mechanisms and functional consequences in relation to blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and central angiotensin II actions mediating neurohumoral activation in hypertension are poorly understood. Here, we aimed to determine whether BBB permeability within critical hypothalamic and brain stem regions involved in neurohumoral regulation was altered during hypertension. Using digital imaging quantification after intravascularly injected fluorescent dyes and immunohistochemistry, we found increased BBB permeability, along with altered key BBB protein constituents, in spontaneously hypertensive rats within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the rostral ventrolateral medulla, all critical brain regions known to contribute to neurohumoral activation during hypertension. BBB disruption, including increased permeability and downregulation of constituent proteins, was prevented in spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with the AT1 receptor antagonist losartan, but not with hydralazine, a direct vasodilator. Importantly, we found circulating angiotensin II to extravasate into these brain regions, colocalizing with neurons and microglial cells. Taken together, our studies reveal a novel angiotensin II-mediated feed-forward mechanism during hypertension, by which circulating angiotensin II evokes increased BBB permeability, facilitating in turn its access to critical brain regions known to participate in blood pressure regulation.

  8. Sleep Deprivation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Brain Dysfunction are Exacerbated by Size-Related Exposure to Ag and Cu Nanoparticles. Neuroprotective Effects of a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron.

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    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Buzoianu, Anca D; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Military personnel are often subjected to sleep deprivation (SD) during combat operations. Since SD is a severe stress and alters neurochemical metabolism in the brain, a possibility exists that acute or long-term SD will influence blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and brain pathology. This hypothesis was examined in young adult rats (age 12 to 14 weeks) using an inverted flowerpot model. Rats were placed over an inverted flowerpot platform (6.5 cm diameter) in a water pool where the water levels are just 3 cm below the surface. In this model, animals can go to sleep for brief periods but cannot achieve deep sleep as they would fall into water and thus experience sleep interruption. These animals showed leakage of Evans blue in the cerebellum, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, parietal, temporal, occipital, cingulate cerebral cortices, and brain stem. The ventricular walls of the lateral and fourth ventricles were also stained blue, indicating disruption of the BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Breakdown of the BBB or the BCSFB fluid barrier was progressive in nature from 12 to 48 h but no apparent differences in BBB leakage were seen between 48 and 72 h of SD. Interestingly, rats treated with metal nanoparticles, e.g., Cu or Ag, showed profound exacerbation of BBB disruption by 1.5- to 4-fold, depending on the duration of SD. Measurement of plasma and brain serotonin showed a close correlation between BBB disruption and the amine level. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 and 8 h after SD markedly reduced BBB disruption and brain pathology after 12 to 24 h SD but not following 48 or 72 h after SD. However, TiO2-nanowired ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c) in an identical manner induced neuroprotection in rats following 48 or 72 h SD. However, plasma and serotonin levels were not affected by ondansetron treatment. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that (i) SD could induce BBB

  9. The blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeier, Birgit; Verma, Ajay; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    In autoimmune neurologic disorders, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a central role in immunopathogenesis, since this vascular interface is an entry path for cells and effector molecules of the peripheral immune system to reach the target organ, the central nervous system (CNS). The BBB's unique anatomic structure and the tightly regulated interplay of its cellular and acellular components allow for maintenance of brain homeostasis, regulation of influx and efflux, and protection from harm; these ensure an optimal environment for the neuronal network to function properly. In both health and disease, the BBB acts as mediator between the periphery and the CNS. For example, immune cell trafficking through the cerebral vasculature is essential to clear microbes or cell debris from neural tissues, while poorly regulated cellular transmigration can underlie or worsen CNS pathology. In this chapter, we focus on the specialized multicellular structure and function of the BBB/neurovascular unit and discuss how BBB breakdown can precede or be a consequence of neuroinflammation. We introduce the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and include a brief aside about evolutionary aspects of barrier formation and refinements. Lastly, since restoration of barrier function is considered key to ameliorate neurologic disease, we speculate about new therapeutic avenues to repair a damaged BBB. PMID:27112670

  10. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M Zehendner

    Full Text Available Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS and blood-brain barrier (BBB integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC. BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF, MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1 and claudin 5 (Cl5, decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role

  11. Moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation results in blood-brain barrier breakdown via oxidative stress-dependent tight-junction protein disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehendner, Christoph M; Librizzi, Laura; Hedrich, Jana; Bauer, Nina M; Angamo, Eskedar A; de Curtis, Marco; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2013-01-01

    Re-canalization of cerebral vessels in ischemic stroke is pivotal to rescue dysfunctional brain areas that are exposed to moderate hypoxia within the penumbra from irreversible cell death. Goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of moderate hypoxia followed by reoxygenation (MHR) on the evolution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity in brain endothelial cells (BEC). BBB integrity was assessed in BEC in vitro and in microvessels of the guinea pig whole brain in situ preparation. Probes were exposed to MHR (2 hours 67-70 mmHg O2, 3 hours reoxygenation, BEC) or towards occlusion of the arteria cerebri media (MCAO) with or without subsequent reperfusion in the whole brain preparation. In vitro BBB integrity was evaluated using trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transwell permeability assays. ROS in BEC were evaluated using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCF), MitoSox and immunostaining for nitrotyrosine. Tight-junction protein (TJ) integrity in BEC, stainings for nitrotyrosine and FITC-albumin extravasation in the guinea pig brain preparation were assessed by confocal microscopy. Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) was used to investigate NADPH oxidase dependent ROS evolution and its effect on BBB parameters in BEC. MHR impaired TJ proteins zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1) and claudin 5 (Cl5), decreased TEER, and significantly increased cytosolic ROS in BEC. These events were blocked by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor DPI. MCAO with or without subsequent reoxygenation resulted in extravasation of FITC-albumin and ROS generation in the penumbra region of the guinea pig brain preparation and confirmed BBB damage. BEC integrity may be impaired through ROS in MHR on the level of TJ and the BBB is also functionally impaired in moderate hypoxic conditions followed by reperfusion in a complex guinea pig brain preparation. These findings suggest that the BBB is susceptible towards MHR and that ROS play a key role in this

  12. Cerebral Oedema, Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and the Decrease in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in the Cerebral Cortex and Hippocampus are Prevented by Dexamethasone in an Animal Model of Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

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    Rosa, Luciana; Galant, Leticia S; Dall'Igna, Dhébora M; Kolling, Janaina; Siebert, Cassiana; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Wyse, Angela T S; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-08-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a rare metabolic disorder associated with acute and chronic brain dysfunction. This condition has been shown to lead to macroscopic cerebral alterations that are visible on imaging studies. Cerebral oedema is widely considered to be detrimental for MSUD patients; however, the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated whether acute administration of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) causes cerebral oedema, modifies the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, affects the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and alters the levels of cytokines in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 10-day-old rats. Additionally, we investigated the influence of concomitant administration of dexamethasone on the alterations caused by BCAA. Our results showed that the animals submitted to the model of MSUD exhibited an increase in the brain water content, both in the cerebral cortex and in the hippocampus. By investigating the mechanism of cerebral oedema, we discovered an association between H-BCAA and the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and the permeability of the BBB to small molecules. Moreover, the H-BCAA administration increases Il-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, whereas IL-10 levels were decreased in the hippocampus. Interestingly, we showed that the administration of dexamethasone successfully reduced cerebral oedema, preventing the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, BBB breakdown and the increase in the cytokines levels. In conclusion, these findings suggest that dexamethasone can improve the acute cerebral oedema and brain injury associated with high levels of BCAA, either through a direct effect on brain capillary Na(+),K(+)-ATPase or through a generalized effect on the permeability of the BBB to all compounds. PMID:26133302

  13. The Blood-Brain Barrier and Methamphetamine: Open Sesame?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric eTurowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical and electrical microenvironment of neurons within the central nervous system is protected and segregated from the circulation by the vascular blood–brain barrier. This barrier operates on the level of endothelial cells and includes regulatory crosstalk with neighbouring pericytes, astrocytes and neurons. Within this neurovascular unit, the endothelial cells form a formidable, highly regulated barrier through the presence of inter-endothelial tight junctions, the absence of fenestrations, and the almost complete absence of fluid-phase transcytosis. The potent psychostimulant drug methamphetamine transiently opens the vascular blood–brain barrier through either or both the modulation of inter-endothelial junctions and the induction of fluid-phase transcytosis. Direct action of methamphetamine on the vascular endothelium induces acute opening of the blood-brain barrier. In addition, striatal effects of methamphetamine and resultant neuroinflammatory signalling can indirectly lead to chronic dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier. Breakdown of the blood-brain barrier may exacerbate the neuronal damage that occurs during methamphetamine abuse. However, this process also constitutes a rare example of agonist-induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and the adjunctive use of methamphetamine may present an opportunity to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the underlying neural tissue.

  14. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

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    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  15. Electromechanical Breakdown of Barrier-Type Anodized Aluminum Oxide Thin Films Under High Electric Field Conditions

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    Chen, Jianwen; Yao, Manwen; Yao, Xi

    2016-02-01

    Barrier-type anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) thin films were formed on a polished aluminum substrate via electrochemical anodization in 0.1 mol/L aqueous solution of ammonium pentaborate. Electromechanical breakdown occurred under high electric field conditions as a result of the accumulation of mechanical stress in the film-substrate system by subjecting it to rapid thermal treatment. Before the breakdown event, the electricity of the films was transported in a highly nonlinear way. Immediately after the breakdown event, dramatic cracking of the films occurred, and the cracks expanded quickly to form a mesh-like dendrite network. The breakdown strength was significantly reduced because of the electromechanical coupling effect, and was only 34% of the self-healing breakdown strength of the AAO film.

  16. Fabrication of 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes with high breakdown voltages

    CERN Document Server

    Kum, B H; Shin, M W; Park, J D

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the fabrication and the breakdown characteristics of 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs). Optimal processing conditions for the ohmic contacts were extracted using the transmission-line method (TLM) and were applied to the device fabrication. The Ti/4H-SiC SBDs with Si sub x B sub y passivation showed a maximum reverse breakdown voltage of 268 V with a forward current density as high as 70 mA/cm sup 2 at a forward voltage of 2 V. The breakdown of the Pt. 4H-SiC SBDs without any passivation occurred at near 110 V. It is concluded that the breakdown enhancement in the Ti/4H-SiC SBDs can be attributed to the passivation; otherwise, excess surface charge near the edge of the Schottky contact would lead to electric fields of sufficient magnitude to cause field emission.

  17. A neurovascular blood-brain barrier in vitro model.

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    Zehendner, Christoph M; White, Robin; Hedrich, Jana; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral microvasculature possesses certain cellular features that constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB) (Abbott et al., Neurobiol Dis 37:13-25, 2010). This dynamic barrier separates the brain parenchyma from peripheral blood flow and is of tremendous clinical importance: for example, BBB breakdown as in stroke is associated with the development of brain edema (Rosenberg and Yang, Neurosurg Focus 22:E4, 2007), inflammation (Kuhlmann et al., Neurosci Lett 449:168-172, 2009; Coisne and Engelhardt, Antioxid Redox Signal 15:1285-1303, 2011), and increased mortality. In vivo, the BBB consists of brain endothelial cells (BEC) that are embedded within a precisely regulated environment containing astrocytes, pericytes, smooth muscle cells, and glial cells. These cells experience modulation by various pathways of intercellular communication and by pathophysiological processes, e.g., through neurovascular coupling (Attwell et al., Nature 468:232-243, 2010), cortical spreading depression (Gursoy-Ozdemir et al., J Clin Invest 113:1447-1455, 2004), or formation of oxidative stress (Yemisci et al., Nat Med 15:1031-1037, 2009). Hence, this interdependent assembly of cells is referred to as the neurovascular unit (NVU) (Zlokovic, Nat Med 16:1370-1371, 2010; Zlokovic, Neuron 57:178-201, 2008). Experimental approaches to investigate the BBB in vitro are highly desirable to study the cerebral endothelium in health and disease. However, due to the complex interactions taking place within the NVU in vivo, it is difficult to mimic this interplay in vitro.Here, we describe a murine blood-brain barrier coculture model consisting of cortical organotypic slice cultures and brain endothelial cells that includes most of the cellular components of the NVU including neurons, astrocytes, and brain endothelial cells. This model allows the experimental analysis of several crucial BBB parameters such as transendothelial electrical resistance or tight junction protein localization by

  18. Cerebrolysin attenuates blood-brain barrier and brain pathology following whole body hyperthermia in the rat.

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    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Sharma, Aruna; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-01-01

    The possibility that Cerebrolysin, a mixture of several neurotrophic factors, has some neuroprotective effects on whole body hyperthermia (WBH) induced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), brain edema formation and neuropathology were examined in a rat model. Rats subjected to a 4 h heat stress at 38 degrees C in a biological oxygen demand (BOD) incubator exhibited profound increases in BBB and BCSFB permeability to Evans blue and radioiodine tracers compared to controls. Hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and hypothalamus exhibited pronounced increase in water content and brain pathology following 4 h heat stress. Pretreatment with Cerebrolysin (1, 2 or 5 mL/kg i.v.) 24 h before WBH significantly attenuated breakdown of the BBB or BCSFB and brain edema formation. This effect was dose dependent. Interestingly, the cell and tissue injury following WBH in cerebrolysin-treated groups were also considerably reduced. These novel observations suggest that cerebrolysin can attenuate WBH induced BBB and BCSFB damage resulting in neuroprotection.

  19. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2016-01-01

    toxins, drugs, and other xenobiotics. In this review, we summarize these influx and efflux mechanisms in normal developing and adult brain, as well as indicating their likely involvement in a wide range of neuropathologies. There have been extensive attempts to overcome the barrier mechanisms...... that prevent the entry of many drugs of therapeutic potential into the brain. We outline those that have been tried and discuss why they may so far have been largely unsuccessful. Currently, a promising approach appears to be focal, reversible disruption of the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound......, but more work is required to evaluate the method before it can be tried in patients. Overall, our view is that much more fundamental knowledge of barrier mechanisms and development of new experimental methods will be required before drug targeting to the brain is likely to be a successful endeavor...

  20. Markers for blood-brain barrier integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of interest in brain barriers and various roles their intrinsic mechanisms may play in neurological disorders. Such studies require suitable models and markers to demonstrate integrity and functional changes at the interfaces between blood, brain...... known when first introduced, but seem to have been forgotten since. Understanding these limitations is important because Evans blue is still the most commonly used marker of brain barrier integrity and those using it seem oblivious to problems arising from its in vivo application. The introduction....... There is no single marker suitable for all purposes. A combination of different sized, visualizable dextrans and radiolabeled molecules currently seems to be the most appropriate approach for qualitative and quantitative assessment of barrier integrity....

  1. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2016-01-01

    cells, and tanycytes (specialized glial cells) in the circumventricular organs. In the ependyma lining the cerebral ventricles in the adult brain, the cells are joined by gap junctions, which are not restrictive for intercellular movement of molecules. But in the developing brain, the forerunners...... structures are physiological mechanisms as the cells of the interfaces contain various metabolic transporters and efflux pumps, often ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, that provide an important component of the barrier functions by either preventing entry of or expelling numerous molecules including......Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain's internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses...

  2. Impact of gas flow rate on breakdown of filamentary dielectric barrier discharges

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    Höft, H.; Becker, M. M.; Kettlitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of gas flow rate on breakdown properties and stability of pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in a single filament arrangement using a gas mixture of 0.1 vol. % O2 in N2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of electrical and optical diagnostics, accompanied by fluid dynamics and electrostatics simulations. A higher flow rate perpendicular to the electrode symmetry axis resulted in an increased breakdown voltage and DBD current maximum, a higher discharge inception jitter, and a larger emission diameter of the discharge channel. In addition, a shift of the filament position for low gas flow rates with respect to the electrode symmetry axis was observed. These effects can be explained by the change of the residence time of charge carriers in the discharge region—i.e., the volume pre-ionization—for changed flow conditions due to the convective transport of particles out of the center of the gap.

  3. Nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery: Overcoming blood-brain barrier to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Cláudia; Praça, Catarina; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-08-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital boundary between neural tissue and circulating blood. The BBB's unique and protective features control brain homeostasis as well as ion and molecule movement. Failure in maintaining any of these components results in the breakdown of this specialized multicellular structure and consequently promotes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In several high incidence pathologies such as stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) the BBB is impaired. However, even a damaged and more permeable BBB can pose serious challenges to drug delivery into the brain. The use of nanoparticle (NP) formulations able to encapsulate molecules with therapeutic value, while targeting specific transport processes in the brain vasculature, may enhance drug transport through the BBB in neurodegenerative/ischemic disorders and target relevant regions in the brain for regenerative processes. In this review, we will discuss BBB composition and characteristics and how these features are altered in pathology, namely in stroke, AD and PD. Additionally, factors influencing an efficient intravenous delivery of polymeric and inorganic NPs into the brain as well as NP-related delivery systems with the most promising functional outcomes will also be discussed. PMID:27208862

  4. MicroRNA-155 negatively affects blood-brain barrier function during neuroinflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel Alejandro; Wu, Dongsheng; Pryce, Gareth; Julie E Simpson; Reijerkerk, Arie; King-Robson, Josh; Kay, Oliver; de Vries, Helga E.; Hirst, Mark C; Sharrack, Basil; Baker, David; Male, David Kingsley; Michael, Gregory J.; Romero, Ignacio Andres

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is a hallmark of neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and stroke. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neurovascular dysfunction during BBB breakdown remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of pathogenic responses, although their role in central nervous system (CNS) microvascular disorders is largely unknown. We have identified miR-155 as a critical miRNA in neuroinflammation at the BBB. miR-15...

  5. Enteric glia cells attenuate cytomix-induced intestinal epithelial barrier breakdown.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald A Cheadle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intestinal barrier failure may lead to systemic inflammation and distant organ injury in patients following severe injury. Enteric glia cells (EGCs have been shown to play an important role in maintaining gut barrier integrity through secretion of S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO. We have recently shown than Vagal Nerve Stimulation (VNS increases EGC activation, which was associated with improved gut barrier integrity. Thus, we sought to further study the mechanism by which EGCs prevent intestinal barrier breakdown utilizing an in vitro model. We postulated that EGCs, through the secretion of GSNO, would improve intestinal barrier function through improved expression and localization of intestinal tight junction proteins. METHODS: Epithelial cells were co-cultured with EGCs or incubated with GSNO and exposed to Cytomix (TNF-α, INF-γ, IL-1β for 24 hours. Barrier function was assessed by permeability to 4kDa FITC-Dextran. Changes in tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and phospho-MLC (P-MLC were assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot. KEY RESULTS: Co-culture of Cytomix-stimulated epithelial monolayers with EGCs prevented increases in permeability and improved expression and localization of occludin, ZO-1, and P-MLC. Further, treatment of epithelial monolayers with GSNO also prevented Cytomix-induced increases in permeability and exhibited a similar improvement in expression and localization of occludin, ZO-1, and P-MLC. CONCLUSIONS & INFERENCES: The addition of EGCs, or their secreted mediator GSNO, prevents epithelial barrier failure after injury and improved expression of tight junction proteins. Thus, therapies that increase EGC activation, such as VNS, may be a novel strategy to limit barrier failure in patients following severe injury.

  6. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Avsenik Jernej; Bisdas Sotirios; Popovic Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with patholog...

  7. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsenik Jernej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. The blood-brain barrier in psychoneuroimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A

    2009-05-01

    The term ''psychoneuroimmunology'' connotes separate compartments that interact. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is both the dividing line, physical and physiologic, between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) and the locale for interaction. The BBB restricts unregulated mixing of immune substances in the blood with those in the CNS, directly transports neuroimmune-active substances between the blood and CNS, and itself secretes neuroimmune substances. These normal functions of the BBB can be altered by neuroimmune events. As such, the BBB is an important conduit in the communication between the immune system and the CNS.

  9. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  10. Blood-Brain Barrier Genomics, Proteomics, and New Transporter Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Shusta, Eric V.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an impermeable cellular interface that physically separates the blood from the interstices of the brain. The endothelial cells lining the brain blood vessels form the principle barrier, and their unique phenotype is a consequence of dynamic interactions with several perivascular cell types present in the brain parenchyma. In addition, BBB dysfunction has been observed in the large majority of neurological diseases, but the causes of aberrant vascular ...

  11. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  12. The Blood-Brain Barrier: An Engineering Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eWong

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been more than 100 years since Paul Ehrlich reported that various water-soluble dyes injected into the circulation did not enter the brain. Since Ehrlich’s first experiments, only a small number of molecules, such as alcohol and caffeine have been found to cross the blood-brain barrier, and it remains the major roadblock to treatment of many central nervous system diseases. At the same time, many central nervous system diseases are associated with disruption of the blood-brain barrier that can lead to changes in permeability, modulation of immune cell transport, and trafficking of pathogens into the brain. Therefore advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier are key to advances in treatment of a wide range of central nervous system diseases. Over the past 10 years it has become recognized that the blood-brain barrier is a complex dynamic system that involves biomechanical and biochemical signaling between the vascular system and the brain. Here we reconstruct the structure, function, and transport properties of the blood-brain barrier from an engineering perspective. New insight into the physics of the blood-brain barrier could ultimately lead to clinical advances in the treatment of central nervous system diseases.

  13. Breakdown characteristics in pulsed-driven dielectric barrier discharges: influence of the pre-breakdown phase due to volume memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höft, H.; Kettlitz, M.; Becker, M. M.; Hoder, T.; Loffhagen, D.; Brandenburg, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2014-11-01

    The pre-phase of the breakdown of pulsed-driven dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) was investigated by fast optical and electrical measurements on double-sided DBDs with a 1 mm gap in a gas mixture of 0.1 vol% O2 in N2 at atmospheric pressure. Depending on the pulse width (the pause time between subsequent DBDs), four different breakdown regimes of the following discharge were observed. By systematically reducing the pulse width, the breakdown characteristics could be changed from a single cathode-directed propagation (positive streamer) to simultaneous cathode- and anode-directed propagations (positive and negative streamer) and no propagation at all for sub-μs pulse times. For all cases, different spatio-temporal emission structures in the pre-phase were observed. The experimental results were compared with time-dependent, spatially one-dimensional fluid model calculations. The modelling results confirmed that different pre-ionisation conditions, i.e. considerably high space charges in the volume created by the residual electrons and ions from the previous discharge, are the reason for the observed phenomena.

  14. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong;

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G......-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed...

  15. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITC-Dextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). (paper)

  16. Controlling ferrofluid permeability across the blood–brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Sun, Linlin; Mi, Gujie; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, an in vitro blood–brain barrier model was developed using murine brain endothelioma cells (b.End3 cells). Confirmation of the blood–brain barrier model was completed by examining the permeability of FITCDextran at increasing exposure times up to 96 h in serum-free medium and comparing such values with values from the literature. After such confirmation, the permeability of five novel ferrofluid (FF) nanoparticle samples, GGB (ferrofluids synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid and BSA), GGC (glycine, glutamic acid and collagen), GGP (glycine, glutamic acid and PVA), BPC (BSA, PEG and collagen) and CPB (collagen, PVA and BSA), was determined using this blood–brain barrier model. All of the five FF samples were characterized by zeta potential to determine their charge as well as TEM and dynamic light scattering for determining their hydrodynamic diameter. Results showed that FF coated with collagen passed more easily through the blood–brain barrier than FF coated with glycine and glutamic acid based on an increase of 4.5% in permeability. Through such experiments, diverse magnetic nanomaterials (such as FF) were identified for: (1) MRI use since they were less permeable to penetrate the blood–brain barrier to avoid neural tissue toxicity (e.g. GGB) or (2) brain drug delivery since they were more permeable to the blood–brain barrier (e.g. CPB). PMID:24457539

  17. Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159124.html Money, Language Barriers Can Affect Kids' Brain Injury Care Those ... included providers of physical and occupational therapy; speech, language and cognitive therapy; and mental health services. The ...

  18. Mathematical modelling of blood-brain barrier failure and edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sarah; Lang, Georgina; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Injuries such as traumatic brain injury and stroke can result in increased blood-brain barrier permeability. This increase may lead to water accumulation in the brain tissue resulting in vasogenic edema. Although the initial injury may be localised, the resulting edema causes mechanical damage and compression of the vasculature beyond the original injury site. We employ a biphasic mixture model to investigate the consequences of blood-brain barrier permeability changes within a region of brain tissue and the onset of vasogenic edema. We find that such localised changes can indeed result in brain tissue swelling and that the type of damage that results (stress damage or strain damage) depends on the ability of the brain to clear edema fluid.

  19. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla Bjørnbak; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post...... of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present...... in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces...

  20. Blood–brain barrier: a real obstacle for therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiekh FA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Farooq A ShiekhAix-Marseille Université, URMITE, UMR, CNRS 7278, IRD 198, Marseille, FranceIn a recent report published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine, Gulati et al1 have described the most innovative study addressing an important issue of the "blood–brain barrier," which can act as a barrier to one of the fundamental goals of modern neurobiology that would have a direct impact on highly debated future therapeutics for both brain cancer and neurological disorders. Contrary to what has been the case with conventional therapy, the authors were able to completely bypass the blood–brain barrier (Figure 1 – a limiting factor for efficient drug delivery – by proposing a new, alternative approach using nanoengineered TNT/Ti implants for local delivery of chemotherapeutics such as doxorubicin into the brain. There must be millions of good drugs sitting in pharmaceutical company stores that cannot be delivered simply because they cannot get past the blood–brain barrier.2 This is an area that has been under-researched and its significance has not yet been recognized. Neuroscience textbooks bury this issue in the appendix, PhD programs give it a cursory treatment, and pharmaceutical companies have tried to ignore it. Despite the blood–brain barrier acting as a stubbornly real obstacle for potential drugs to be used against many disorders of the central nervous system, the field of drug delivery is advancing rapidly. View original paper by Gulati and colleagues.

  1. Targeted liposomes for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooy, I.

    2011-01-01

    Our brain is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This barrier is formed by specialized endothelial cells of the brain vasculature and prevents toxic substances from entering the brain. The downside of this barrier is that many drugs that have been developed to cure brain diseases cannot cros

  2. Improved reset breakdown strength in a HfOx-based resistive memory by introducing RuOx oxygen diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaesung; Woo, Jiyong; Prakash, Amit; Lee, Sangheon; Lim, Seokjae; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the reset breakdown phenomenon of HfOx-based resistive memory for reliable switching operation in a fully CMOS compatible stack. Through the understanding on the effect of electrode materials and device area, our findings show that observed failure is attributed to additional oxygen vacancies close to the electrode interface, where switching is occurred. Therefore, RuOx serving as an oxygen diffusion barrier was introduced to suppress the generation of unwanted oxygen vacancies by preventing out-diffusion of oxygen through the electrode. As a result, significantly enhanced breakdown strength in HfOx/RuOx stack is achieved and resulting in improved cycle endurance with larger on/off ratio.

  3. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott; Mellinger, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, "sandwiched" between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields.

  4. MicroRNA-155 negatively affects blood-brain barrier function during neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel Alejandro; Wu, Dongsheng; Pryce, Gareth; Simpson, Julie E; Reijerkerk, Arie; King-Robson, Josh; Kay, Oliver; de Vries, Helga E; Hirst, Mark C; Sharrack, Basil; Baker, David; Male, David Kingsley; Michael, Gregory J; Romero, Ignacio Andres

    2014-06-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction is a hallmark of neurological conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and stroke. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neurovascular dysfunction during BBB breakdown remain elusive. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as key regulators of pathogenic responses, although their role in central nervous system (CNS) microvascular disorders is largely unknown. We have identified miR-155 as a critical miRNA in neuroinflammation at the BBB. miR-155 is expressed at the neurovascular unit of individuals with MS and of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In mice, loss of miR-155 reduced CNS extravasation of systemic tracers, both in EAE and in an acute systemic inflammation model induced by lipopolysaccharide. In cultured human brain endothelium, miR-155 was strongly and rapidly upregulated by inflammatory cytokines. miR-155 up-regulation mimicked cytokine-induced alterations in junctional organization and permeability, whereas inhibition of endogenous miR-155 partially prevented a cytokine-induced increase in permeability. Furthermore, miR-155 modulated brain endothelial barrier function by targeting not only cell-cell complex molecules such as annexin-2 and claudin-1, but also focal adhesion components such as DOCK-1 and syntenin-1. We propose that brain endothelial miR-155 is a negative regulator of BBB function that may constitute a novel therapeutic target for CNS neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:24604078

  5. Blood-brain barrier transport of drugs for the treatment of brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabathuler, Reinhard

    2009-06-01

    The central nervous system is a sanctuary protected by barriers that regulate brain homeostasis and control the transport of endogenous compounds into the brain. The blood-brain barrier, formed by endothelial cells of the brain capillaries, restricts access to brain cells allowing entry only to amino acids, glucose and hormones needed for normal brain cell function and metabolism. This very tight regulation of brain cell access is essential for the survival of neurons which do not have a significant capacity to regenerate, but also prevents therapeutic compounds, small and large, from reaching the brain. As a result, various strategies are being developed to enhance access of drugs to the brain parenchyma at therapeutically meaningful concentrations to effectively manage disease.

  6. The inner CSF-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld;

    2015-01-01

    outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11......In the adult the interface between the cerebrospinal fluid and the brain is lined by the ependymal cells, which are joined by gap junctions. These intercellular connections do not provide a diffusional restrain between the two compartments. However, during development this interface, initially...... consisting of neuroepithelial cells and later radial glial cells, is characterized by "strap" junctions, which limit the exchange of different sized molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and the brain parenchyma. Here we provide a systematic study of permeability properties of this inner cerebrospinal fluid-brain...

  7. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (pradiation exposure was found more effective on the male animals (p0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of that breakdown.

  8. Matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and blood-brain barrier: Versatile breakers and makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempe, Ralf G; Hartz, Anika Ms; Bauer, Björn

    2016-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are versatile endopeptidases with many different functions in the body in health and disease. In the brain, matrix metalloproteinases are critical for tissue formation, neuronal network remodeling, and blood-brain barrier integrity. Many reviews have been published on matrix metalloproteinases before, most of which focus on the two best studied matrix metalloproteinases, the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their role in one or two diseases. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the role various matrix metalloproteinases play in brain disorders. We summarize and review current knowledge and understanding of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood-brain barrier in neuroinflammation, multiple sclerosis, cerebral aneurysms, stroke, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and brain cancer. We discuss the detrimental effects matrix metalloproteinases can have in these conditions, contributing to blood-brain barrier leakage, neuroinflammation, neurotoxicity, demyelination, tumor angiogenesis, and cancer metastasis. We also discuss the beneficial role matrix metalloproteinases can play in neuroprotection and anti-inflammation. Finally, we address matrix metalloproteinases as potential therapeutic targets. Together, in this comprehensive review, we summarize current understanding and knowledge of matrix metalloproteinases in the brain and at the blood-brain barrier in brain disorders.

  9. Blood-Brain Barrier Alterations Provide Evidence of Subacute Diaschisis in an Ischemic Stroke Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Rodrigues, Maria C. O.; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Tajiri, Naoki; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Abraham, Jerry V.; Pabon, Mibel; Wagner, Andrew; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Haller, Edward; Sanberg, Paul R.; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB) competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. Methodology/Principal Findings In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB) parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:23675488

  10. Blood-brain barrier alterations provide evidence of subacute diaschisis in an ischemic stroke rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Garbuzova-Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Comprehensive stroke studies reveal diaschisis, a loss of function due to pathological deficits in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion. However, blood-brain barrier (BBB competence in subacute diaschisis is uncertain. The present study investigated subacute diaschisis in a focal ischemic stroke rat model. Specific focuses were BBB integrity and related pathogenic processes in contralateral brain areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In ipsilateral hemisphere 7 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO, significant BBB alterations characterized by large Evans Blue (EB parenchymal extravasation, autophagosome accumulation, increased reactive astrocytes and activated microglia, demyelinization, and neuronal damage were detected in the striatum, motor and somatosensory cortices. Vascular damage identified by ultrastuctural and immunohistochemical analyses also occurred in the contralateral hemisphere. In contralateral striatum and motor cortex, major ultrastructural BBB changes included: swollen and vacuolated endothelial cells containing numerous autophagosomes, pericyte degeneration, and perivascular edema. Additionally, prominent EB extravasation, increased endothelial autophagosome formation, rampant astrogliosis, activated microglia, widespread neuronal pyknosis and decreased myelin were observed in contralateral striatum, and motor and somatosensory cortices. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate focal ischemic stroke-induced pathological disturbances in ipsilateral, as well as in contralateral brain areas, which were shown to be closely associated with BBB breakdown in remote brain microvessels and endothelial autophagosome accumulation. This microvascular damage in subacute phase likely revealed ischemic diaschisis and should be considered in development of treatment strategies for stroke.

  11. Peptide-Mediated Blood-Brain Barrier Transport of Polymersomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgieva, J.V.; Brinkhuis, R.P.; Stojanov, K.; Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Zuilhof, H.; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.; Hoekstra, D.; Hest, van J.C.M.; Zuhorn, I.S.

    2012-01-01

    A polymeric nanocarrier: Polymersomes tagged with a dodecamer peptide that recognizes gangliosides GM1 and GT1b are shown to cross the blood–brain barrier, both in an in vitro model and in vivo (see picture). The combination of polymeric vesicles with a small GM1-binding peptide and GM1/GT1b ganglio

  12. Blood-brain barrier disruption by continuous-wave radio frequency radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2009-01-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones and the increasing number of associated base stations are becoming a widespread source of non ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Some biological effects are likely to occur even at low-level EM fields. This study was designed to investigate the effects of 900 and 1,800 MHz Continuous Wave Radio Frequency Radiation (CW RFR) on the permeability of Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) of rats. Results have shown that 20 min RFR exposure of 900 and 1,800 MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of BBB of male rats. There was no change in female rats. The scientific evidence on RFR safety or harm remains inconclusive. More studies are needed to demonstrate the effects of RFR on the permeability of BBB and the mechanisms of that breakdown. PMID:19811403

  13. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo eDubois

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM, characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells, extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the blood brain barrier and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected.

  14. Src tyrosine kinase regulates the stem cell factor–induced breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Ji-Eun; Song, Sun-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Stem cell factor (SCF) has been recently acknowledged as a novel endothelial permeability factor. However, the mechanisms by which SCF-induced activation of the SCF cognate receptor, cKit, enhances endothelial permeability have not been fully elucidated. This study aimed to investigate the role of Src in SCF-induced breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier (BRB). Methods In vitro endothelial permeability and in vivo retinal vascular permeability assays were performed to investigate the role of Src in SCF-induced breakdown of the BRB. Immunofluorescence staining experiments were performed to analyze the cellular distribution of phosphorylated Src and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Results SCF markedly reduced electric resistance across the human retinal vascular endothelial monolayer in vitro and enhanced extravasation of dyes in murine retinal vasculature in vivo. Inhibition of cKit activation using cKit mutant mice and chemical inhibitor substantially diminished the ability of SCF to increase endothelial permeability and retinal vascular leakage. In human retinal vascular endothelial cells, SCF induced strong phosphorylation of Src and distinct localization of phosphorylated Src in the plasma membrane. Inhibition of Src activation using chemical inhibitors abolished the SCF-induced hyperpermeability of human retinal vascular endothelial cells and retinal vascular leakage in mice. In addition, treatment with Src inhibitors restored junctional expression of VE-cadherin that disappeared in SCF-treated retinal endothelial cells and retinal vasculature. Conclusions These results showed the important role of Src in mediating SCF-induced breakdown of the BRB and retinal vascular leakage. Given that increased retinal vascular permeability is a common manifestation of various ocular diseases, the SCF/cKit/Src signaling pathway may be involved in the development of the hyperpermeable retinal vasculature in many ocular disorders.

  15. Estrogen protects the blood-brain barrier from inflammation-induced disruption and increased lymphocyte trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioli, E; McArthur, S; Mauro, C; Kieswich, J; Kusters, D H M; Reutelingsperger, C P M; Yaqoob, M; Solito, E

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences have been widely reported in neuroinflammatory disorders, focusing on the contributory role of estrogen. The microvascular endothelium of the brain is a critical component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and it is recognized as a major interface for communication between the periphery and the brain. As such, the cerebral capillary endothelium represents an important target for the peripheral estrogen neuroprotective functions, leading us to hypothesize that estrogen can limit BBB breakdown following the onset of peripheral inflammation. Comparison of male and female murine responses to peripheral LPS challenge revealed a short-term inflammation-induced deficit in BBB integrity in males that was not apparent in young females, but was notable in older, reproductively senescent females. Importantly, ovariectomy and hence estrogen loss recapitulated an aged phenotype in young females, which was reversible upon estradiol replacement. Using a well-established model of human cerebrovascular endothelial cells we investigated the effects of estradiol upon key barrier features, namely paracellular permeability, transendothelial electrical resistance, tight junction integrity and lymphocyte transmigration under basal and inflammatory conditions, modeled by treatment with TNFα and IFNγ. In all cases estradiol prevented inflammation-induced defects in barrier function, action mediated in large part through up-regulation of the central coordinator of tight junction integrity, annexin A1. The key role of this protein was then further confirmed in studies of human or murine annexin A1 genetic ablation models. Together, our data provide novel mechanisms for the protective effects of estrogen, and enhance our understanding of the beneficial role it plays in neurovascular/neuroimmune disease.

  16. Vascular Pathology and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Cognitive and Psychiatric Complications of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Serlin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular pathology is recognized as a principle insult in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Co-morbidities such as structural brain abnormalities, cognitive, learning and memory deficits are also prevailing in T2DM patients. We previously suggested that microvascular pathologies involving blood-brain barrier (BBB breakdown results in leakage of serum-derived components into the brain parenchyma, leading to neuronal dysfunction manifested as psychiatric illnesses. The current postulate focuses on the molecular mechanisms controlling BBB permeability in T2DM, as key contributors to the pathogenesis of mental disorders in patients. Revealing the mechanisms underlying BBB dysfunction and inflammatory response in T2DM and their role in metabolic disturbances, abnormal neurovascular coupling and neuronal plasticity, would contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying psychopathologies in diabetic patients. Establishing this link would offer new targets for future therapeutic interventions.

  17. Cerebrolysin reduces blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier permeability change, brain pathology, and functional deficits following traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari Shanker; Zimmermann-Meinzingen, Sibilla; Johanson, Conrad E

    2010-06-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) induce profound breakdown of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers (BCSFB), brain pathology/edema, and sensory-motor disturbances. Because neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are neuroprotective in models of brain and spinal cord injuries, we hypothesized that a combination of neurotrophic factors would enhance neuroprotective efficacy. In the present investigation, we examined the effects of Cerebrolysin, a mixture of different neurotrophic factors (Ebewe Neuro Pharma, Austria) on the brain pathology and functional outcome in a rat model of TBI. TBI was produced under Equithesin (3 mL/kg, i.p.) anesthesia by making a longitudinal incision into the right parietal cerebral cortex. Untreated injured rats developed profound disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to proteins, edema/cell injury, and marked sensory-motor dysfunctions on rota-rod and grid-walking tests at 5 h TBI. Intracerebroventricular administration of Cerebrolysin (10 or 30 microL) either 5 min or 1 h after TBI significantly reduced leakage of Evans blue and radioiodine tracers across the BBB and BCSFB, and attenuated brain edema formation/neuronal damage in the cortex as well as underlying subcortical regions. Cerebrolysin-treated animals also had improved sensory-motor functions. However, administration of Cerebrolysin 2 h after TBI did not affect these parameters significantly. These observations in TBI demonstrate that early intervention with Cerebrolysin reduces BBB and BCSFB permeability changes, attenuates brain pathology and brain edema, and mitigates functional deficits. Taken together, our observations suggest that Cerebrolysin has potential therapeutic value in TBI.

  18. Role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in paclitaxel-induced intestinal barrier breakdown and bacterial translocation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chi; XU Yang-guang; DUAN Xue-ning; LIU Yin-hua; ZHAO Jian-xin; XU Ling; YE Jing-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy causes breakdown of the intestinal barrier, which may lead to bacterial translocation. Paclitaxel, an anti-tubulin agent, has many side effects; however, its effect on the intestinal barrier is unknown. Previous studies show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an important role in modulating intestinal barrier function, but these studies are not conclusive. Here, we investigated the effects of paclitaxel on the intestinal barrier, and whether G-CSF could prevent paclitaxel-induced bacterial translocation.Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group, paclitaxel group and paclitaxel + G-CSF group. Intestinal permeability was measured by the urinary excretion rates of lactulose and mannitol administered by gavage. The mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and liver were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture. Endotoxin levels and white blood cell (WBC) counts were measured and bacterial quantification performed using relative real-time PCR. Jejunum samples were also obtained for histological observation. Intestinal apoptosis was evaluated using a fragmented DNA assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP)-biotin nick end-labeling staining. One-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test were used to compare differences between groups.Results Paclitaxel induced apoptosis in 12.5% of jejunum villus cells, which was reduced to 3.8% by G-CSF treatment. Apoptosis in the control group was 0.6%. Paclitaxel treatment also resulted in villus atrophy, increased intestinal permeability and a reduction in the WBC count. G-CSF treatment resulted in increased villus height and returned WBC counts to normal levels. No bacterial translocation was detected in the control group, whereas 6/8,8/8, and 8/8 rats in the paclitaxel group were culture-positive in the liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, respectively. Bacterial translocation was

  19. Estrogen and insulin transport through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Aaron A; Bedel, Nicholas D; Shen, Ling; Woods, Stephen C; Liu, Min

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and reduced transport of insulin through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Reversal of high-fat diet-induced obesity (HFD-DIO) by dietary intervention improves the transport of insulin through the BBB and the sensitivity of insulin in the brain. Although both insulin and estrogen (E2), when given alone, reduce food intake and body weight via the brain, E2 actually renders the brain relatively insensitive to insulin's catabolic action. The objective of these studies was to determine if E2 influences the ability of insulin to be transported into the brain, since the receptors for both E2 and insulin are found in BBB endothelial cells. E2 (acute or chronic) was systemically administered to ovariectomized (OVX) female rats and male rats fed a chow or a high-fat diet. Food intake, body weight and other metabolic parameters were assessed along with insulin entry into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Acute E2 treatment in OVX female and male rats reduced body weight and food intake, and chronic E2 treatment prevented or partially reversed high-fat diet-induced obesity. However, none of these conditions increased insulin transport into the CNS; rather, chronic E2 treatment was associated less-effective insulin transport into the CNS relative to weight-matched controls. Thus, the reduction of brain insulin sensitivity by E2 is unlikely to be mediated by increasing the amount of insulin entering the CNS. PMID:27182046

  20. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic Acid and dihydrokainic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen Honoré;

    2015-01-01

    is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug...... tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion...... technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK...

  1. Effects of GSM modulated radio-frequency electromagnetic radiation on permeability of blood-brain barrier in male & female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sırav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-09-01

    With the increased use of mobile phones, their biological and health effects have become more important. Usage of mobile phones near the head increases the possibility of effects on brain tissue. This study was designed to investigate the possible effects of pulse modulated 900MHz and 1800MHz radio-frequency radiation on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of rats. Study was performed with 6 groups of young adult male and female wistar albino rats. The permeability of blood-brain barrier to intravenously injected evans blue dye was quantitatively examined for both control and radio-frequency radiarion exposed groups. For male groups; Evans blue content in the whole brain was found to be 0.08±0.01mg% in the control, 0.13±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.26±0.05mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. In both male radio-frequency radiation exposed groups, the permeability of blood-brain barrier found to be increased with respect to the controls (pmale animals (pfemale groups; dye contents in the whole brains were 0.14±0.01mg% in the control, 0.24±0.03mg% in 900MHz exposed and 0.14±0.02mg% in 1800MHz exposed animals. No statistical variance found between the control and 1800MHz exposed animals (p>0.01). However 900MHz pulse modulated radio-frequency exposure was found effective on the permeability of blood-brain barrier of female animals. Results have shown that 20min pulse modulated radio-frequency radiation exposure of 900MHz and 1800MHz induces an effect and increases the permeability of blood-brain barrier of male rats. For females, 900MHz was found effective and it could be concluded that this result may due to the physiological differences between female and male animals. The results of this study suggest that mobile phone radation could lead to increase the permeability of blood-brain barrier under non-thermal exposure levels. More studies are needed to demonstrate the mechanisms of that breakdown. PMID:26723545

  2. Cyclodextrins, blood-brain barrier, and treatment of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsernyés, Miklós; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Bácskay, Ildikó; Deli, Mária A; Szente, Lajos; Fenyvesi, Éva

    2014-11-01

    Biological barriers are the main defense systems of the homeostasis of the organism and protected organs. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by the endothelial cells of brain capillaries, not only provides nutrients and protection to the central nervous system but also restricts the entry of drugs, emphasizing its importance in the treatment of neurological diseases. Cyclodextrins are increasingly used in human pharmacotherapy. Due to their favorable profile to form hydrophilic inclusion complexes with poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients, they are present as excipients in many marketed drugs. Application of cyclodextrins is widespread in formulations for oral, parenteral, nasal, pulmonary, and skin delivery of drugs. Experimental and clinical data suggest that cyclodextrins can be used not only as excipients for centrally acting marketed drugs like antiepileptics, but also as active pharmaceutical ingredients to treat neurological diseases. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin received orphan drug designation for the treatment of Niemann-Pick type C disease. In addition to this rare lysosomal storage disease with neurological symptoms, experimental research revealed the potential therapeutic use of cyclodextrins and cyclodextrin nanoparticles in neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, neuroinfections and brain tumors. In this context, the biological effects of cyclodextrins, their interaction with plasma membranes and extraction of different lipids are highly relevant at the level of the BBB.

  3. Gliomas and the vascular fragility of the blood brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Campanati, Loraine; Righy, Cassia; D’Andrea-Meira, Isabella; Spohr, Tania Cristina Leite de Sampaio e; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Pereira, Claudia Maria; Balça-Silva, Joana; Kahn, Suzana Assad; DosSantos, Marcos F.; Oliveira, Marcela de Almeida Rabello; Ximenes-da-Silva, Adriana; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Faveret, Eduardo; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes, members of the glial family, interact through the exchange of soluble factors or by directly contacting neurons and other brain cells, such as microglia and endothelial cells. Astrocytic projections interact with vessels and act as additional elements of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB). By mechanisms not fully understood, astrocytes can undergo oncogenic transformation and give rise to gliomas. The tumors take advantage of the BBB to ensure survival and continuous growth. A glioma can develop into a very aggressive tumor, the glioblastoma (GBM), characterized by a highly heterogeneous cell population (including tumor stem cells), extensive proliferation and migration. Nevertheless, gliomas can also give rise to slow growing tumors and in both cases, the afflux of blood, via BBB is crucial. Glioma cells migrate to different regions of the brain guided by the extension of blood vessels, colonizing the healthy adjacent tissue. In the clinical context, GBM can lead to tumor-derived seizures, which represent a challenge to patients and clinicians, since drugs used for its treatment must be able to cross the BBB. Uncontrolled and fast growth also leads to the disruption of the chimeric and fragile vessels in the tumor mass resulting in peritumoral edema. Although hormonal therapy is currently used to control the edema, it is not always efficient. In this review we comment the points cited above, considering the importance of the BBB and the concerns that arise when this barrier is affected. PMID:25565956

  4. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26749497

  6. Stroke and Drug Delivery—In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood...

  7. Blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier in normal and pathological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Chiba, Yoichi; Murakami, Ryuta; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Blood-borne substances can invade into the extracellular spaces of the brain via endothelial cells in sites without the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and can travel through the interstitial fluid (ISF) of the brain parenchyma adjacent to non-BBB sites. It has been shown that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains directly into the blood via the arachnoid villi and also into lymph nodes via the subarachnoid spaces of the brain, while ISF drains into the cervical lymph nodes through perivascular drainage pathways. In addition, the glymphatic pathway of fluids, characterized by para-arterial pathways, aquaporin4-dependent passage through astroglial cytoplasm, interstitial spaces, and paravenous routes, has been established. Meningeal lymphatic vessels along the superior sagittal sinus were very recently discovered. It is known that, in mice, blood-borne substances can be transferred to areas with intact BBB function, such as the medial regions of the hippocampus, presumably through leaky vessels in non-BBB sites. In the present paper, we review the clearance mechanisms of interstitial substances, such as amyloid-β peptides, as well as summarize models of BBB deterioration in response to different types of insults, including acute ischemia followed by reperfusion, hypertension, and chronic hypoperfusion. Lastly, we discuss the relationship between perivascular clearance and brain disorders. PMID:26920424

  8. Perlecan and the Blood-Brain Barrier: Beneficial Proteolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill eRoberts

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The cerebral microvasculature is important for maintaining brain homeostasis. This is achieved via the blood-brain barrier (BBB, composed of endothelial cells with specialized tight junctions, astrocytes and a basement membrane. Prominent components of the basement membrane extracellular matrix (ECM include fibronectin, laminin, collagen IV and perlecan, all of which regulate cellular processes via signal transduction through various cell membrane bound ECM receptors. Expression and proteolysis of these ECM components can be rapidly altered during pathological states of the central nervous system. In particular, proteolysis of perlecan, a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, occurs within hours following ischemia induced by experimental stroke. Proteolysis of ECM components following stroke results in the degradation of the basement membrane and further disruption of the BBB. While it is clear that such proteolysis has negative consequences for the BBB, we propose that it also may lead to generation of ECM protein fragments, including the C-terminal domain V (DV of perlecan, that potentially have a positive influence on other aspects of CNS health. Indeed, perlecan DV has been shown to be persistently generated after stroke and beneficial as a neuroprotective molecule and promoter of post-stroke brain repair. This mini-review will discuss beneficial roles of perlecan protein fragment generation within the brain during stroke.

  9. Identification of blood-brain barrier function following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats at different stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongyi Xie; Weiwei Shen; Ying Ma; Yuan Cheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) significantly correlates with the development of brain injury and poor prognosis of patients subjected to SAH. OBJECTIVE: To investigate both functional and structural changes related to BBB in various phases after SAH in rats through quantitative and qualitative methods.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This experiment, a completely randomized design and controlled experiment, was performed at the Department of Neurosurgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing University of Medical Sciences from June 2006 to March 2007.MATERIALS: A total of 128 female, healthy, Sprague-Dawley rats were selected for this study. Main reagents and instruments: Evans Blue dye (Sigma Company, USA), fluorescence spectrophotometer (Shimadzu Company, Japan), and transmission electron microscope (Olympus Company, Japan). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain tissue water content was determined by the wet-dry method. BBB permeability in the cerebral cortex was determined by Evans Blue dye and fluorescent spectrophotometer. The ultrastructural changes in BBB were observed with transmission electron microscope.RESULTS: Compared with the sham-operated group, SAH induced a significant increase in brain water content between 24 and 60 hours (F = 888.32, P 0.05). Electron microscopy demonstrated only a mild perivascular edema at 24 hours after SAH. By 36 hours, a notable perivascular edema was associated with a collapse of the capillary. Astrocytic endfeet surrounding the capillary were prominently swollen in the edematous areas. The above-mentioned abnormal ultrastructural changes in the BBB were reversed by 72 hours after SAH. No obvious morphological changes in the BBB were detected in the sham-operated rats.CONCLUSION: These results directly suggest that SAH could induce rapid changes in BBB function and structure during the acute phases of BBB breakdown. Moreover, these dynamic

  10. BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER DYSFUNCTION IN DISORDERS OF THE DEVELOPING BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eMoretti

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTDisorders of the developing brain represent a major health problem. The neurological manifestations of brain lesions can range from severe clinical deficits to more subtle neurological signs or behavioral problems and learning disabilities, which often become evident many years after the initial damage. These long-term sequelae are due at least in part to central nervous system immaturity at the time of the insult.The blood brain barrier (BBB protects the brain and maintains homeostasis. BBB alterations are observed during both acute and chronic brain insults. After an insult, excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters are released, causing reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent changes in BBB permeability that allow immune cells to enter and stimulate an inflammatory response.The cytokines, chemokines and other molecules released as well as peripheral and local immune cells can activate an inflammatory cascade in the brain, leading to secondary neurodegeneration that can continue for months or even years and finally contribute to post-insult neuronal deficits. The role of the BBB in perinatal disorders is poorly understood. The inflammatory response, which can be either acute (e.g. perinatal stroke, traumatic brain injury or chronic (e.g. perinatal infectious diseases actively modulates the pathophysiological processes underlying brain injury. We present an overview of current knowledge about BBB dysfunction in the developing brain during acute and chronic insults, along with clinical and experimental data.

  11. Recent advances in the brain-to-blood efflux transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Ken-ichi; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2002-11-01

    Elucidating the details of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) transport mechanism is a very important step towards successful drug targeting to the brain and understanding what happens in the brain. Although several brain uptake methods have been developed to characterize transport at the BBB, these are mainly useful for investigating influx transport across the BBB. In 1992, P-glycoprotein was found to act as an efflux pump for anti-cancer drugs at the BBB using primary cultured bovine brain endothelial cells. In order to determine the direct efflux transport from the brain to the circulating blood of exogenous compounds in vivo, the Brain Efflux Index method was developed to characterize several BBB efflux transport systems. Recently, we have established conditionally immortalized rat (TR-BBB) and mouse (TM-BBB) brain capillary endothelial cell lines from transgenic rats and mice harboring temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 large T-antigen gene to characterize the transport mechanisms at the BBB in vitro. TR-BBB and TM-BBB cells possess certain in vivo transport functions and express mRNAs for the BBB. Using a combination of newly developed in vivo and in vitro methods, we have elucidated the efflux transport mechanism at the BBB for neurosteroids, excitatory neurotransmitters, suppressive neurotransmitters, amino acids, and other organic anions to understand the physiological role played by the BBB as a detoxifying organ for the brain. PMID:12429456

  12. Severity and patterns of blood-nerve barrier breakdown in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: correlations with clinical subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Shimizu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP is currently classified into clinical subtypes, including typical and atypical forms (multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy (MADSAM and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric neuropathy (DADS. The aim of this study was to elucidate the patterns and severity of breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB in each CIDP subtype. METHODS: We evaluated the effects of sera obtained from patients with typical CIDP, MADSAM and DADS and control subjects on the expression levels of tight junction proteins and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER value in human peripheral nerve microvascular endothelial cells (PnMECs. RESULTS: The sera obtained from the patients with the three clinical phenotypes of CIDP decreased the amount of claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs. In addition, the sera obtained from typical CIDP patients more prominently reduced claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in the PnMECs than did that obtained from the MADSAM and DADS patients. Furthermore, the severity of BNB disruption after exposure to the sera was associated with higher Hughes grade, lower MRC score, more pronounced slowing of motor nerve conduction in the median nerve and higher frequency of abnormal temporal dispersion. CONCLUSIONS: Sera derived from typical CIDP patients destroy the BNB more severely than those from MADSAM or DADS patients. The extent of BNB disruption in the setting of CIDP is associated with clinical disability and demyelination in the nerve trunk. These observations may explain the phenotypical differences between CIDP subtypes.

  13. Impact of migraine attacks on the blood-brain barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong-mei; LI Le; ZHANG Ke-ling; CHEN Xu-hui; TIAN Shu-qing; ZHANG Zhong-ling

    2010-01-01

    Background Cortical spreading depression can cause migraine attack, and up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression in animal. This study aimed to determine the impact on the structure and function of the blood-brain barrier by measuring plasma MMP-9 levels in patients at the acute and late stages of migraine attacks in order to elucidate the pathological mechanisms involved.Methods We recruited a case-control cohort of 38 adult migraine patients and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Five milliliter blood samples were collected at the acute and late stages of migraine (days 1-7), and also from the control subjects. Solid phase double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine plasma MMP-9 levels. Statistical analysis was performed using the SAS version 9.1.Results Initial plasma MMP-9 levels of migraine patients were significantly higher than those of controls ((12.612±0.016)μg/L vs. (6.069±0.023) μg/L, respectively, P 0.05); in addition, levels were not correlated with degree of headache pain (P >0.05).Conclusions We hypothesize that migraine could lead to increased plasma MMP-9 levels resulting in blood-brain barrier damage. MMP-9 levels increase during days 1-6 of migraine attacks, peaking on day 3. Therefore, MMP-9 could be used as a biological marker to guide treatment of migraine attacks.

  14. Mfsd2a is critical for the formation and function of the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Kur, Esther; Andreone, Benjamin J; Mayshar, Yoav; Yan, Han; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-05-22

    The central nervous system (CNS) requires a tightly controlled environment free of toxins and pathogens to provide the proper chemical composition for neural function. This environment is maintained by the 'blood-brain barrier' (BBB), which is composed of blood vessels whose endothelial cells display specialized tight junctions and extremely low rates of transcellular vesicular transport (transcytosis). In concert with pericytes and astrocytes, this unique brain endothelial physiological barrier seals the CNS and controls substance influx and efflux. Although BBB breakdown has recently been associated with initiation and perpetuation of various neurological disorders, an intact BBB is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the CNS. A limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control BBB formation has hindered our ability to manipulate the BBB in disease and therapy. Here we identify mechanisms governing the establishment of a functional BBB. First, using a novel tracer-injection method for embryos, we demonstrate spatiotemporal developmental profiles of BBB functionality and find that the mouse BBB becomes functional at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5). We then screen for BBB-specific genes expressed during BBB formation, and find that major facilitator super family domain containing 2a (Mfsd2a) is selectively expressed in BBB-containing blood vessels in the CNS. Genetic ablation of Mfsd2a results in a leaky BBB from embryonic stages through to adulthood, but the normal patterning of vascular networks is maintained. Electron microscopy examination reveals a dramatic increase in CNS-endothelial-cell vesicular transcytosis in Mfsd2a(-/-) mice, without obvious tight-junction defects. Finally we show that Mfsd2a endothelial expression is regulated by pericytes to facilitate BBB integrity. These findings identify Mfsd2a as a key regulator of BBB function that may act by suppressing transcytosis in CNS endothelial cells. Furthermore, our findings may aid in efforts

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticles Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier: When Physics Rises to a Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antònia Busquets

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a physical and physiological barrier that protects the brain from toxic substances within the bloodstream and helps maintain brain homeostasis. It also represents the main obstacle in the treatment of many diseases of the central nervous system. Among the different approaches employed to overcome this barrier, the use of nanoparticles as a tool to enhance delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain is particularly promising. There is special interest in the use of magnetic nanoparticles, as their physical characteristics endow them with additional potentially useful properties. Following systemic administration, a magnetic field applied externally can mediate the capacity of magnetic nanoparticles to permeate the blood-brain barrier. Meanwhile, thermal energy released by magnetic nanoparticles under the influence of radiofrequency radiation can modulate blood-brain barrier integrity, increasing its permeability. In this review, we present the strategies that use magnetic nanoparticles, specifically iron oxide nanoparticles, to enhance drug delivery to the brain.

  16. Blood-brain barrier permeability and brain uptake mechanism of kainic acid and dihydrokainic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gynther, Mikko; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Hansen, Steen H; Bunch, Lennart; Pickering, Darryl S

    2015-03-01

    The glutamatergic neurotransmitter system is involved in important neurophysiological processes and thus constitutes a promising target for the treatment of neurological diseases. The two ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists kainic acid (KA) and dihydrokainic acid (DHK) have been used as research tools in various in vivo central nervous system disease models in rodents, as well as being templates in the design of novel ligands affecting the glutamatergic system. Both molecules are highly polar but yet capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We used an in situ rat brain perfusion technique to determine the brain uptake mechanism and permeability across the BBB. To determine KA and DHK concentrations in the rat brain, simple and rapid sample preparation and liquid chromatography mass spectrometer methods were developed. According to our results the BBB permeability of KA and DHK is low, 0.25 × 10(-6) and 0.28 × 10(-6) cm/s for KA and DHK, respectively. In addition, the brain uptake is mediated by passive diffusion, and not by active transport. Furthermore, the non-specific plasma and brain protein binding of KA and DHK was determined to be low, which means that the unbound drug volume of distribution in brain is also low. Therefore, even though the total KA and DHK concentrations in the brain are low after systemic dosing, the concentrations in the vicinity of the glutamate receptors are sufficient for their activation and thus the observed efficacy.

  17. Blood-brain barrier shuttle peptides: an emerging paradigm for brain delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oller-Salvia, Benjamí; Sánchez-Navarro, Macarena; Giralt, Ernest; Teixidó, Meritxell

    2016-08-22

    Brain delivery is one of the major challenges in drug development because of the high number of patients suffering from neural diseases and the low efficiency of the treatments available. Although the blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents most drugs from reaching their targets, molecular vectors - known as BBB shuttles - offer great promise to safely overcome this formidable obstacle. In recent years, peptide shuttles have received growing attention because of their lower cost, reduced immunogenicity, and higher chemical versatility than traditional Trojan horse antibodies and other proteins. PMID:27188322

  18. Combined local blood–brain barrier opening and systemic methotrexate for the treatment of brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Itzik; Last, David; Guez, David; Sharabi, Shirley; Elhaik Goldman, Shirin; Lubitz, Irit; Daniels, Dianne; Salomon,Sharona; Tamar, Gregory; Tamir, Tzur; Mardor, Ronni; Fridkin, Mati; Shechter, Yoram; Mardor, Yael

    2015-01-01

    Despite aggressive therapy, existing treatments offer poor prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients, in part due to poor penetration of most drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). We propose a minimal-invasive combined treatment approach consisting of local BBB disruption in the tumor in parallel to systemic drug administration. Local BBB disruption is obtained by convection-enhanced delivery of a novel BBB disruption agent, enabling efficient/targeted delivery of the systemically ...

  19. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by hypercapnia during acute hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of hypercapnia on susceptibility of the blood-brain barrier to disruption during acute hypertension. Two methods were used to test the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia increases disruption of the blood-brain barrier. First, permeability of the blood-brain barrier was measured in anesthetized cats with 125I-labeled serum albumin. Severe hypertension markedly increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier during normocapnia, but not during hypercapnia. The protective effect of hypercapnia was not dependent on sympathetic nerves. Second, in anesthetized rats, permeability of the barrier was quantitated by clearance of fluorescent dextran. Disruption of the blood-brain barrier during hypertension was decreased by hypercapnia. Because disruption of the blood-brain barrier occurred primarily in pial venules, the authors also measured pial venular diameter and pressure. Acute hypertension increased pial venular pressure and diameter in normocapnic rats. Hypercapnia alone increased pial venular pressure and pial venular diameter, and acute hypertension during hypercapnia further increased venular pressure. The magnitude of increase in pial venular pressure during acute hypertension was significantly less in hypercapnic than in normocapnic rats. They conclude that hypercapnia protects the blood-brain barrier. Possible mechanisms of this effect include attenuation of the incremental increase in pial venular pressure by hypercapnia or a direct effect on the blood-brain barrier not related to venous pressure

  20. In vitro models of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans C; Abbott, N Joan; Burek, Malgorzata;

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial cells lining the brain capillaries separate the blood from the brain parenchyma. The endothelial monolayer of the brain capillaries serves both as a crucial interface for exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolites between blood and brain, and as a barrier for neurotoxic compone...

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier P-Glycoprotein Function in Neurodegenerative Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Protection of the brain is strengthened by active transport and ABC transporters. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) functions as an active efflux pump by extruding a substrate from the brain, which is important for maintaining loco-regional homeostasis in the brain and protectio

  2. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by pentosan against amyloid-β-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Csiszár, Boglárka; Tóth, Andrea; Kittel, Agnes; Csete, Mária; Sipos, Aron; Szalai, Anikó; Fülöp, Lívia; Penke, Botond; Abrahám, Csongor S; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells of brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are key pathological elements in the development of the disease. A blood-brain barrier model, based on primary rat brain endothelial cells was used in which the barrier properties were induced by glial cells. The effects of amyloid peptides have been tested on cell viability and barrier functions. Aβ showed toxic effects on primary rat brain endothelial cells measured by MTT dye conversion and the lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphologically cytoplasmic vacuolization, disruption of the structure of cytoplasmic organelles and tight junctions could be observed in brain endothelial cells. Treatment with Aβ1-42 decreased the electrical resistance, and increased the permeability of brain endothelial cell monolayers for both fluorescein and albumin. Serum amyloid P component which stabilizes Aβ fibrils in cortical amyloid plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits significantly potentiated the barrier-weakening effect of Aβ1-42. Sulfated polysaccharide pentosan could decrease the toxic effects of Aβ peptides in brain endothelial cells. It could also significantly protect the barrier integrity of monolayers from damaging actions of peptides. Pentosan modified the size, and significantly decreased the number of amyloid aggregates demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. The present data further support the toxic effects of amyloid peptides on brain endothelial cells, and can contribute to the development of molecules protecting the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood brain/nerve barrier dysfunction and leukocyte infiltration: closely related or discordant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Gesa; Stoll, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain barrier (BBB) or blood nerve barrier (BNB) preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf) allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and perfluorocarbons enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage) infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients.

  4. Stress does not increase blood-brain barrier permeability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Martin; Bohacek, Johannes

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have reported that exposure to acute psychophysiological stressors can lead to an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability, but these findings remain controversial and disputed. We thoroughly examined this issue by assessing the effect of several well-established paradigms of acute stress and chronic stress on blood-brain barrier permeability in several brain areas of adult mice. Using cerebral extraction ratio for the small molecule tracer sodium fluorescein (NaF, 376 Da) as a sensitive measure of blood-brain barrier permeability, we find that neither acute swim nor restraint stress lead to increased cerebral extraction ratio. Daily 6-h restraint stress for 21 days, a model for the severe detrimental impact of chronic stress on brain function, also does not alter cerebral extraction ratio. In contrast, we find that cold forced swim and cold restraint stress both lead to a transient, pronounced decrease of cerebral extraction ratio in hippocampus and cortex, suggesting that body temperature can be an important confounding factor in studies of blood-brain barrier permeability. To additionally assess if stress could change blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, we measured cerebral extraction ratio for fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (70 kDa). We find that neither acute restraint nor cold swim stress affected blood-brain barrier permeability for macromolecules, thus corroborating our findings that various stressors do not increase blood-brain barrier permeability. PMID:27146513

  5. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyautdin R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Renad Alyautdin,1 Igor Khalin,2 Mohd Ismail Nafeeza,1 Muhammad Huzaimi Haron,1 Dmitry Kuznetsov31Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia (NDUM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Medicinal Nanobiotechnologies, N. I. Pirogoff Russian State Medical University, Moscow, RussiaAbstract: The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS. As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review

  6. Neurosurgical Techniques for Disruption of the Blood–Brain Barrier for Glioblastoma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analiz Rodriguez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The blood–brain barrier remains a main hurdle to drug delivery to the brain. The prognosis of glioblastoma remains grim despite current multimodal medical management. We review neurosurgical technologies that disrupt the blood–brain barrier (BBB. We will review superselective intra-arterial mannitol infusion, focused ultrasound, laser interstitial thermotherapy, and non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE. These technologies can lead to transient BBB and blood–brain tumor barrier disruption and allow for the potential of more effective local drug delivery. Animal studies and preliminary clinical trials show promise for achieving this goal.

  7. MSFD2A is critical for the formation and function of the blood brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Ayal; Lacoste, Baptiste; Kur, Esther; Andreone, Benjamin J.; Mayshar, Yoav; Yan, Han; Gu, Chenghua

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) requires a tightly controlled environment free of toxins and pathogens to provide the proper chemical composition for neural function. This environment is maintained by the ‘blood brain barrier’ (BBB), which is composed of blood vessels whose endothelial cells display specialized tight junctions and extremely low rates of transcellular vesicular transport (transcytosis)1–3. In concert with pericytes and astrocytes, this unique brain endothelial physiological barrier seals the CNS and controls substance influx and efflux4–6. While BBB breakdown has recently been associated with initiation and perpetuation of various neurological disorders, an intact BBB is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the CNS7–10. A limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control BBB formation has hindered our ability to manipulate the BBB in disease and therapy. Here, we identify mechanisms governing the establishment of a functional BBB. First, using a novel embryonic tracer injection method, we demonstrate spatiotemporal developmental profiles of BBB functionality and find that the mouse BBB becomes functional at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5). We then screen for BBB-specific genes expressed during BBB formation, and find that major facilitator super family domain containing 2a (Mfsd2a) is selectively expressed in BBB-containing blood vessels in the CNS. Genetic ablation of Mfsd2a results in a leaky BBB from embryonic periods through adulthood, while maintaining the normal patterning of vascular networks. Electron microscopy examination reveals a dramatic increase in CNS endothelial cell vesicular transcytosis in Mfsd2a−/− mice, without obvious tight junction defects. Finally we show that MFSD2A endothelial expression is regulated by pericytes to facilitate BBB integrity. These findings identify MFSD2A as a key regulator of BBB function that may act by suppressing transcytosis in CNS endothelial cells. Further our findings may aid

  8. Aquaporin 4 expression and ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier following cerebral contusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinjun Li; Yangyun Han; Hong Xu; Zhongshu Sun; Zengjun Zhou; Xiaodong Long; Yumin Yang; Linbo Zou

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate aquaporin 4 expression and the ultrastructure of the blood-brain barrier at 2–72 hours following cerebral contusion injury, and correlate these changes to the formation of brain edema. Results revealed that at 2 hours after cerebral contusion and laceration injury, aquaporin 4 expression significantly increased, brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability increased, and the number of pinocytotic vesicles in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells increased. In addition, the mitochondrial accumulation was observed. As contusion and laceration injury became aggravated, aquaporin 4 expression continued to increase, brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability gradually increased, brain capillary endothelial cells and astrocytes swelled, and capillary basement membrane injury gradually increased. The above changes were most apparent at 12 hours after injury, after which they gradually attenuated. Aquaporin 4 expression positively correlated with brain water content and the blood-brain barrier index. Our experimental findings indicate that increasing aquaporin 4 expression and blood-brain barrier permeability after cerebral contusion and laceration injury in humans is involved in the formation of brain edema.

  9. Non-viral liposome-mediated transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor across the blood-brain barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xing; Chun-yan Wen; Song-tao Li; Zong-xin Xia

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the repair of central nervous system injury, but cannot directly tra-verse the blood-brain barrier. Liposomes are a new type of non-viral vector, able to carry macromolecules across the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Here, we investigate whether BDNF could be transported across the blood-brain barrier by tail-vein injection of lipo-somes conjugated to transferrin (Tf) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carrying BDNF modiifed with cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV) or glial ifbrillary acidic protein promoter (pGFAP) (Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG and Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, respectively). Both liposomes were able to traverse the blood-brain barrier, and BDNF was mainly expressed in the cerebral cortex. BDNF expression in the cerebral cortex was higher in the Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG group than in the Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG group. This study demonstrates the successful construction of a non-virus targeted liposome, Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and is distributed in the cerebral cortex. Our work provides an experimental basis for BDNF-related targeted drug delivery in the brain.

  10. In vivo interactions of magnetic nanoparticles with the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeted drug delivery to the brain parenchyma, i.e., in brain tumor patients, by means of magnetically supported carrier delivery through the tight vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier is of critical biomedical importance. We were interested in delineating the first steps in successful brain drug delivery, which focuses on the interactions between magnetically guided yet freely blood circulating nanoparticles and the blood-brain barrier. We employed an in vivo model to quantitatively determine changes in cerebrovascular flow rate and volume during magnetically guided exposure of circulating nanoparticles.

  11. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS.

  12. Penetrating the Blood-Brain Barrier: Promise of Novel Nanoplatforms and Delivery Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Iqbal Unnisa; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-27

    Multifunctional nanoplatforms combining versatile therapeutic modalities with a variety of imaging options have the potential to diagnose, monitor, and treat brain diseases. The promise of nanotechnology can only be realized by the simultaneous development of innovative brain-targeting delivery vehicles capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier without compromising its structural integrity.

  13. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics in

  14. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increases during Blood-Brain Barrier-Enhanced Permeability Caused by Phoneutria nigriventer Spider Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique C. P. Mendonça

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoneutria nigriventer spider accidental envenomation provokes neurotoxic manifestations, which when critical, results in epileptic-like episodes. In rats, P. nigriventer venom (PNV causes blood-brain barrier breakdown (BBBb. The PNV-induced excitotoxicity results from disturbances on Na+, K+ and Ca2+ channels and glutamate handling. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, beyond its angiogenic effect, also, interferes on synaptic physiology by affecting the same ion channels and protects neurons from excitotoxicity. However, it is unknown whether VEGF expression is altered following PNV envenomation. We found that adult and neonates rats injected with PNV showed immediate neurotoxic manifestations which paralleled with endothelial occludin, β-catenin, and laminin downregulation indicative of BBBb. In neonate rats, VEGF, VEGF mRNA, and Flt-1 receptors, glutamate decarboxylase, and calbindin-D28k increased in Purkinje neurons, while, in adult rats, the BBBb paralleled with VEGF mRNA, Flk-1, and calbindin-D28k increases and Flt-1 decreases. Statistically, the variable age had a role in such differences, which might be due to age-related unequal maturation of blood-brain barrier (BBB and thus differential cross-signaling among components of the glial neurovascular unit. The concurrent increases in the VEGF/Flt-1/Flk-1 system in the cerebellar neuron cells and the BBBb following PNV exposure might imply a cytokine modulation of neuronal excitability consequent to homeostatic perturbations induced by ion channels-acting PNV neuropeptides. Whether such modulation represents neuroprotection needs further investigation.

  15. Impairment of brain endothelial glucose transporter by methamphetamine causes blood-brain barrier dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murrin L Charles

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (METH, an addictive psycho-stimulant drug with euphoric effect is known to cause neurotoxicity due to oxidative stress, dopamine accumulation and glial cell activation. Here we hypothesized that METH-induced interference of glucose uptake and transport at the endothelium can disrupt the energy requirement of the blood-brain barrier (BBB function and integrity. We undertake this study because there is no report of METH effects on glucose uptake and transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB to date. Results In this study, we demonstrate that METH-induced disruption of glucose uptake by endothelium lead to BBB dysfunction. Our data indicate that a low concentration of METH (20 μM increased the expression of glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1 in primary human brain endothelial cell (hBEC, main component of BBB without affecting the glucose uptake. A high concentration of 200 μM of METH decreased both the glucose uptake and GLUT1 protein levels in hBEC culture. Transcription process appeared to regulate the changes in METH-induced GLUT1 expression. METH-induced decrease in GLUT1 protein level was associated with reduction in BBB tight junction protein occludin and zonula occludens-1. Functional assessment of the trans-endothelial electrical resistance of the cell monolayers and permeability of dye tracers in animal model validated the pharmacokinetics and molecular findings that inhibition of glucose uptake by GLUT1 inhibitor cytochalasin B (CB aggravated the METH-induced disruption of the BBB integrity. Application of acetyl-L-carnitine suppressed the effects of METH on glucose uptake and BBB function. Conclusion Our findings suggest that impairment of GLUT1 at the brain endothelium by METH may contribute to energy-associated disruption of tight junction assembly and loss of BBB integrity.

  16. Firocoxib on aqueous humor prostaglandin E 2 levels for controlling experimentally-induced breakdown of blood-aqueous barrier in healthy and Toxoplasma gondii -seropositive cats

    OpenAIRE

    Deise Cristine Schroder; Matias Bassinello Stocco; Deborah de Arruda Isoton; Carla Patricia Amarante e Silva; Ísis Assis Braga; Érica Pereira da Silva; Camila do Espírito Santo Maciel; Fernanda Harumi Maruyama; Luciano Nakazato; Daniel Moura de Aguiar; Adriane Jorge Mendonça; Alexandre Pinto Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of firocoxib for controlling experimentally-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy and Toxoplasma gondii -seropositive cats. Thirty two cats with no ocular abnormalities were used. Groups (n=8/each) were formed with healthy cats that received 5mg g-1 of oral firocoxib (FH) or no treatment (CH) on day 0; seropositive cats for anti -T. gondii specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were grouped (n=8/each) and treated in a similar fas...

  17. Dyslipidemia and Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gene L. Bowman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blood-brain barrier (BBB dysfunction may have a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Modifiable factors associated with BBB function may have therapeutic implication. This study tested the hypothesis that dyslipidemia is associated with BBB impairment in mild-to-moderate AD. Methods. Thirty-six subjects with AD were followed for 1 year. Fasting CSF and plasma were collected with clinical assessments at baseline and 12 months. BBB impairment was defined as CSF albumin index ≥9. Independent t-tests and linear regression assessed the relationship between plasma lipoproteins and BBB integrity. Results. Dyslipidemia was prevalent in 47% of the population, and in 75% of those with BBB impairment. Subjects with BBB impairment had significantly higher mean plasma triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol (TG, P=0.007; HDL, P=0.043. Plasma triglycerides explained 22% of the variance in BBB integrity and remained significant after controlling for age, gender, ApoE-4 genotype, blood pressure, and statin use. Conclusion. Dyslipidemia is more prevalent in AD subjects with BBB impairment. Plasma triglyceride and HDL cholesterol may have a role in maintaining BBB integrity in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of blood brain/nerve barrier dysfunction and leukocyte infiltration: closely related or discordant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesa eWeise

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other organs the nervous system is secluded from the rest of the organism by the blood brain (BBB or blood nerve barrier (BNB preventing passive influx of fluids from the circulation. Similarly, leukocyte entry to the nervous system is tightly controlled. Breakdown of these barriers and cellular inflammation are hallmarks of inflammatory as well as ischemic neurological diseases and thus represent potential therapeutic targets. The spatiotemporal relationship between BBB/BNB disruption and leukocyte infiltration has been a matter of debate. We here review contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive tool to depict barrier dysfunction and its relation to macrophage infiltration in the central and peripheral nervous system under pathological conditions. Novel experimental contrast agents like Gadofluorine M (Gf allow more sensitive assessment of BBB dysfunction than conventional Gadolinium (Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. In addition, Gf facilitates visualization of functional and transient alterations of the BBB remote from lesions. Cellular contrast agents such as superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO and perfluorocarbons (PFC enable assessment of leukocyte (mainly macrophage infiltration by MR technology. Combined use of these MR contrast agents disclosed that leukocytes can enter the nervous system independent from a disturbance of the BBB, and vice versa, a dysfunctional BBB/BNB by itself is not sufficient to attract inflammatory cells from the circulation. We will illustrate these basic imaging findings in animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS, cerebral ischemia and traumatic nerve injury and review corresponding findings in patients.

  19. Blood-Brain Barrier Effects of the Fusarium Mycotoxins Deoxynivalenol, 3 Acetyldeoxynivalenol, and Moniliformin and Their Transfer to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Matthias; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium fungi frequently contaminate food and feed and have adverse effects on human and animal health. Fusarium mycotoxins exhibit a wide structural and biosynthetic diversity leading to different toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics. Several studies investigated the toxicity of mycotoxins, focusing on very specific targets, like the brain. However, it still remains unclear how fast mycotoxins reach the brain and if they impair the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. This study investigated and compared the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxins deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol and moniliformin on the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the transfer properties to the brain were analyzed, which are required for risk assessment, including potential neurotoxic effects. Methods Primary porcine brain capillary endothelial cells were cultivated to study the effects of the examined mycotoxins on the blood-brain barrier in vitro. The barrier integrity was monitored by cellular impedance spectroscopy and 14C radiolabeled sucrose permeability measurements. The distribution of the applied toxins between blood and brain compartments of the cell monolayer was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to calculate transfer rates and permeability coefficients. Results Deoxynivalenol reduced the barrier integrity and caused cytotoxic effects at 10 μM concentrations. Slight alterations of the barrier integrity were also detected for 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol. The latter was transferred very quickly across the barrier and additionally cleaved to deoxynivalenol. The transfer of deoxynivalenol and moniliformin was slower, but clearly exceeded the permeability of the negative control. None of the compounds was enriched in one of the compartments, indicating that no efflux transport protein is involved in their transport. PMID:26600019

  20. Synergistic protective effects of escin and low‑dose glucocorticoids on blood‑retinal barrier breakdown in a rat model of retinal ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fenglan; Li, Yuanbin; Zhang, Leiming; Mu, Guoying

    2013-05-01

    Escin, a natural mixture of triterpenoid saponins isolated from the seed of the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), has been demonstrated to possess glucocorticoid (GC)‑like anti‑edematous and anti‑inflammatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether escin exhibits synergistic protective effects on blood‑retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown when combined with GCs in a rat model of retinal ischemia. Low concentrations of escin and triamcinolone acetonide (TA) alone did not affect BRB permeability. However, when administered together, low‑dose escin and TA significantly reduced BRB permeability following ischemia. Furthermore, low‑dose escin and TA alone did not affect the expression of occludin in the ischemic retina; however, when administered together, they significantly increased occludin expression in the ganglion cell layer of the ischemic retina. This indicates that escin and GCs have synergistic protective effects on BRB breakdown and the molecular mechanisms may be correlated with the upregulation of occludin. Therefore, the administration of escin may allow a reduction in the dose of GCs for the treatment of macular edema. The combination of escin with GCs is potentially a beneficial treatment method for BRB breakdown and warrants further investigation. PMID:23525122

  1. Blood-brain barrier permeability in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields used in wireless communication

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Bertil R.; Leif G Salford; Brun, Arne

    1997-01-01

    iological effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been studied in Fischer 344 rats of both sexes. The rats were not anaesthetised during the exposure. All animals were sacrificed by perfusion–fixation of the brains under chloralhydrate anaesthesia after the exposure. The brains were perfused with saline for 3–4 minutes, and thereafter perfusion fixed with 4% formaldehyde for 5–6 minutes. Whole coronal sections of the brains were d...

  2. P03.09PHARMACOLOGICAL MODULATION OF BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER: FUTURE STRATEGY FOR TREATMENT OF BRAIN TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Sardi, I.; Cardellicchio, S.; Iorio, A.L.; da Ros, M.; la Marca, G.; Giunti, L.; Massimino, M.; L. Genitori

    2014-01-01

    A prerequisite for the efficacy of chemotherapy is that it reaches the tumor mass at a therapeutic concentration. In brain tumors this phenomenon is hampered by the presence of the blood brain barrier (BBB) which limits the spread of chemotherapeutic agents within the brain. It is lately emerged as this Multi Drug Resistance (MDR) phenomenon is explained through the cooperation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2), two “gatekeeper" transporters th...

  3. Promising approaches to circumvent the blood-brain barrier: progress, pitfalls and clinical prospects in brain cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Papademetriou, Iason T.; Porter, Tyrone

    2015-01-01

    Brain drug delivery is a major challenge for therapy of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Biochemical modifications of drugs or drug nanocarriers, methods of local delivery, and blood–brain barrier (BBB) disruption with focused ultrasound and microbubbles are promising approaches which enhance transport or bypass the BBB. These approaches are discussed in the context of brain cancer as an example in CNS drug development. Targeting to receptors enabling transport across the BBB offers non...

  4. Tracer kinetic modelling for DCE-MRI quantification of subtle blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heye, Anna K; Thrippleton, Michael J; Armitage, Paul A; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C; Makin, Stephen D; Glatz, Andreas; Sakka, Eleni; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2016-01-15

    There is evidence that subtle breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a pathophysiological component of several diseases, including cerebral small vessel disease and some dementias. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) combined with tracer kinetic modelling is widely used for assessing permeability and perfusion in brain tumours and body tissues where contrast agents readily accumulate in the extracellular space. However, in diseases where leakage is subtle, the optimal approach for measuring BBB integrity is likely to differ since the magnitude and rate of enhancement caused by leakage are extremely low; several methods have been reported in the literature, yielding a wide range of parameters even in healthy subjects. We hypothesised that the Patlak model is a suitable approach for measuring low-level BBB permeability with low temporal resolution and high spatial resolution and brain coverage, and that normal levels of scanner instability would influence permeability measurements. DCE-MRI was performed in a cohort of mild stroke patients (n=201) with a range of cerebral small vessel disease severity. We fitted these data to a set of nested tracer kinetic models, ranking their performance according to the Akaike information criterion. To assess the influence of scanner drift, we scanned 15 healthy volunteers that underwent a "sham" DCE-MRI procedure without administration of contrast agent. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate model validity and the effect of scanner drift. The Patlak model was found to be most appropriate for fitting low-permeability data, and the simulations showed vp and K(Trans) estimates to be reasonably robust to the model assumptions. However, signal drift (measured at approximately 0.1% per minute and comparable to literature reports in other settings) led to systematic errors in calculated tracer kinetic parameters, particularly at low permeabilities. Our findings justify the growing use of the Patlak model in low

  5. A quantitative MRI method for imaging blood-brain barrier leakage in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE MRI can longitudinally measure the transport coefficient Ktrans which reflects BBB permeability. Ktrans measurements however are not widely used in TBI research because it is generally considered to be noisy and possesses low spatial resolution. We improved spatiotemporal resolution and signal sensitivity of Ktrans MRI in rats by using a high-sensitivity surface transceiver coil. To overcome the signal drop off profile of the surface coil, a pre-scan module was used to map the flip angle (B1 field and magnetization (M0 distributions. A series of T1-weighted gradient echo images were acquired and fitted to the extended Kety model with reversible or irreversible leakage, and the best model was selected using F-statistics. We applied this method to study the rat brain one hour following controlled cortical impact (mild to moderate TBI, and observed clear depiction of the BBB damage around the impact regions, which matched that outlined by Evans Blue extravasation. Unlike the relatively uniform T2 contrast showing cerebral edema, Ktrans shows a pronounced heterogeneous spatial profile in and around the impact regions, displaying a nonlinear relationship with T2. This improved Ktrans MRI method is also compatible with the use of high-sensitivity surface coil and the high-contrast two-coil arterial spin-labeling method for cerebral blood flow measurement, enabling more comprehensive investigation of the pathophysiology in TBI.

  6. Brain pericytes from stress-susceptible pigs increase blood-brain barrier permeability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandenhaute Elodie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The function of pericytes remains questionable but with improved cultured technique and the use of genetically modified animals, it has become increasingly clear that pericytes are an integral part of blood–brain barrier (BBB function, and the involvement of pericyte dysfunction in certain cerebrovascular diseases is now emerging. The porcine stress syndrome (PSS is the only confirmed, homologous model of malignant hyperthermia (MH in veterinary medicine. Affected animals can experience upon slaughter a range of symptoms, including skeletal muscle rigidity, metabolic acidosis, tachycardia and fever, similar to the human syndrome. Symptoms are due to an enhanced calcium release from intracellular stores. These conditions are associated with a point mutation in ryr1/hal gene, encoding the ryanodine receptor, a calcium channel. Important blood vessel wall muscle modifications have been described in PSS, but potential brain vessel changes have never been documented in this syndrome. Methods In the present work, histological and ultrastructural analyses of brain capillaries from wild type and ryr1 mutated pigs were conducted to investigate the potential impairment of pericytes, in this pathology. In addition, brain pericytes were isolated from the three porcine genotypes (wild-type NN pigs; Nn and nn pigs, bearing one or two (n mutant ryr1/hal alleles, respectively, and tested in vitro for their influence on the permeability of BBB endothelial monolayers. Results Enlarged perivascular spaces were observed in ryr1-mutant samples, corresponding to a partial or total detachment of the astrocytic endfeet. These spaces were electron lucent and sometimes filled with lipid deposits and swollen astrocytic feet. At the ultrastructural level, brain pericytes did not seem to be affected because they showed regular morphology and characteristics, so we aimed to check their ability to maintain BBB properties in vitro. Our results indicated

  7. Stroke and Drug Delivery--In Vitro Models of the Ischemic Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Brodin, Birger

    2016-01-01

    and Drug Administration-approved tissue plasminogen activator for treatment of acute ischemic stroke being the most prominent example. A large number of potential drug candidates for treatment of ischemic brain tissue have been developed and subsequently failed in clinical trials. A deeper understanding......Stroke is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Both cerebral hypoperfusion and focal cerebral infarcts are caused by a reduction of blood flow to the brain, leading to stroke and subsequent brain damage. At present, only few medical treatments of stroke are available, with the Food...... of permeation pathways across the barrier in ischemic and postischemic brain endothelium is important for development of new medical treatments. The blood-brain barrier, that is, the endothelial monolayer lining the brain capillaries, changes properties during an ischemic event. In vitro models of the blood-brain...

  8. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel Transferrin-embedded fluorescent magnetoliposome nanoformulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Raymond, Andrea; Thangavel, Samikkannu; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most of drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to brain is still a big challenge by now. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combining with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated together into ferrous magnet-based liposome for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with size of ~ 10 nm were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The c...

  9. Computational Prediction of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using Decision Tree Induction

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Huwyler; Felix Hammann; Claudia Suenderhauf

    2012-01-01

    Predicting blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is essential to drug development, as a molecule cannot exhibit pharmacological activity within the brain parenchyma without first transiting this barrier. Understanding the process of permeation, however, is complicated by a combination of both limited passive diffusion and active transport. Our aim here was to establish predictive models for BBB drug permeation that include both active and passive transport. A database of 153 compounds was co...

  10. Restraint Stress-Induced Morphological Changes at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Adult Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Petra eSántha; Szilvia eVeszelka; Zsófia eHoyk; Mária eMészáros; Walter, Fruzsina R.; Andrea E Tóth; Lóránd eKiss; András eKincses; Zita eOláh; György eSeprényi; Gabor eRakhely; András eDér; Magdolna ePákáski; Janos eKalman; Ágnes eKittel

    2016-01-01

    Stress is well-known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognized in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3, and 21 days) were investigated on the morphology of th...

  11. Understanding the rules of the road: proteomic approaches to interrogate the blood brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Torbett, Bruce E.; Baird, Andrew; Eliceiri, Brian P

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often regarded as a passive barrier that protects brain parenchyma from toxic substances, circulating leukocytes, while allowing the passage of selected molecules. Recently, a combination of molecular profiling techniques have characterized the constituents of the BBB based on in vitro models using isolated endothelial cells and ex vivo models analyzing isolated blood vessels. Characterization of gene expression profiles that are specific to the endothelium of...

  12. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Dan; Sheikh, Lubna; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) samples (eight fluids and three powders) was determined using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl) alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood-brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood-brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood-brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability). Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood-brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications. PMID:23426527

  13. Next generation of non-mammalian blood-brain barrier models to study parasitic infections of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Flynn, Robin; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Transmigration of neuropathogens across the blood-brain barrier is a key step in the development of central nervous system infections, making it a prime target for drug development. The ability of neuropathogens to traverse the blood-brain barrier continues to inspire researchers to understand the specific strategies and molecular mechanisms that allow them to enter the brain. The availability of models of the blood-brain barrier that closely mimic the situation in vivo offers unprecedented o...

  14. Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei, E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu

    2011-11-15

    Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

  15. Hyperammonemia,brain edema and blood-brain barrier alterations in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats and paravrtamol intoxication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Camila Scorticati; Juan P. Prestifilippo; Francisco X. Eizayaga; José L. Castro; Salvador Romay; Maria A. Fernández; Abraham Lemberg; Juan C. Perazzo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity, brain edema,animal behavior and ammonia plasma levels in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats with and without acute liver intoxication.METHODS: Adults male Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group Ⅰ: sham operation; Ⅱ: Prehepatic portal hypertension, produced by partial portal vein ligation; Ⅲ:Acetaminophen intoxication and Ⅳ: Prehepatic portal hypertension plus acetaminophen. Acetaminophen was administered to produce acute hepatic injury. Portal pressure, liver serum enzymes and ammonia plasma levels were determined. Brain cortex water content was registered and trypan blue was utilized to study blood brain barrier integrity. Reflexes and behavioral tests were recorded.RESULTS: Portal hypertension was significantly elevated in groups Ⅱ and Ⅳ. Liver enzymes and ammonia plasma levels were increased in groups Ⅱ, Ⅳ and Ⅳ. Prehepatic portal hypertension (group Ⅱ), acetaminophen intoxication (group Ⅲ) and both (group Ⅳ) had changes in the blood brain-barrier integrity (trypan blue) and hyperammonemia. Cortical edema was present in rats with acute hepatic injury in groups Ⅲ and Ⅳ. Behavioral test (rota rod) was altered in group Ⅳ.CONCLUSION: These results suggest the possibility of another pathway for cortical edema production because blood brain barrier was altered (vasogenic) and hyperammonemia was registered (cytotoxic). Group Ⅳ, with behavioral altered test, can be considered as a model for study at an early stage of portal-systemic encephalopathy.

  16. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential (ζ-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  17. The blood-brain barrier in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Salient aspects of the anatomy and function of the blood-barrier barrier (BBB) are reviewed in relation to migraine pathophysiology and treatment. The main function of the BBB is to limit the access of circulating substances to the neuropile. Smaller lipophilic substances have some access to the ...

  18. Longitudinal assessment of blood-brain barrier leakage during epileptogenesis in rats. A quantitative MRI study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. van Vliet; W.M. Otte; J.A. Gorter; R.M. Dijkhuizen; W.J. Wadman

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the homeostasis of the brain. BBB dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various neurological disorders, including epilepsy in which it may contribute to disease progression. Precise understanding of BBB dynamics during epil

  19. St. John's Wort constituents modulate P-glycoprotein transport activity at the blood-brain barrier.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.; Huls, M.; Cornelius, M.G.; Fricker, G.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term signaling effects of St. John's Wort (SJW) extract and selected SJW constituents on the blood-brain barrier transporter P-glycoprotein and to describe the role of PKC in the signaling. METHODS: Cultured porcine brain capillary endo

  20. The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolwig, T G; Lassen, N A

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion permeability to water of the rat blood-brain-barrier (BBB) was studied. Preliminary data obtained with the Oldendorf tissue uptake method (Oldendorf 1970) in seizure experiments suggested that the transfer from blood to brain of labelled water is diffusion-limited. More definite...

  1. PET tracers for imaging of ABC transporters at the blood-brain barrier : Principles and Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luurtsema, Gert; Elsinga, Philip; Dierckx, Rudi; Boellaard, Ronald; van Waarde, Aren

    2016-01-01

    ABC transporters at the human blood-brain barrier protect the brain against the entry of harmful compounds but may also limit (or prevent) the cerebral entry of therapeutic drugs (e.g. anti-epileptics, antidepressants and antipsychotics). The efflux function of these transporters may be impaired in

  2. Defense at the border : the blood-brain barrier versus bacterial foreigners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sorge, Nina M.; Doran, Kelly S.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is among the top ten causes of infectious disease-related deaths worldwide, with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), composed mainly of specialized brain microvascular endothelial cells, maintains biochemical home

  3. The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; Possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderWerf, YD; DeJongste, MJL; terHorst, GJ

    1995-01-01

    The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. In this investigation the effects of immune activation on the brain are characterized In order to study this, we used a model for chronic immune activation, the myocardial

  4. Blood-brain barrier permeability is positively correlated with cerebral microvascular perfusion in the early fluid percussion-injured brain of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Yaohua; Wang, Mingliang; Huang, Xianjian; Yin, Yuhua; Wang, Yu; Jia, Feng; Xiong, Wenhao; Zhang, Nu; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2012-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening following traumatic brain injury (TBI) provides a chance for therapeutic agents to cross the barrier, yet the reduction of the cerebral microvascular perfusion after TBI may limit the intervention. Meanwhile, optimizing the cerebral capillary perfusion by the strategies such as fluid administration may cause brain edema due to the BBB opening post trauma. To guide the TBI therapy, we characterized the relationship between the changes in the cerebral capillary perfusion and BBB permeability after TBI. First, we observed the changes of the cerebral capillary perfusion by the intracardiac perfusion of Evans Blue and the BBB disruption with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the rat subjected to lateral fluid percussion (FP) brain injury. The correlation between two variables was next evaluated with the correlation analysis. Since related to BBB breakdown, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was finally detected by gelatin zymography. We found that the ratios of the perfused microvessel numbers in the lesioned cortices were significantly reduced at 0 and 1 h post trauma compared with that in the normal cortex, which then dramatically recovered at 4 and 24 h after injury, and that the BBB permeability was greatly augmented in the ipsilateral parts at 4, 12, and 24 h, and in the contralateral area at 24 h after injury compared with that in the uninjured brain. The correlation analysis showed that the BBB permeability increase was related to the restoration of the cerebral capillary perfusion over a 24-h period post trauma. Moreover, the gelatin zymography analysis indicated that the MMP-9 activity in the injured brain increased at 4 h and significantly elevated at 12 and 24 h as compared to that at 0 or 1 h after TBI. Our findings demonstrate that the 4 h post trauma is a critical turning point during the development of TBI, and, importantly, the correlation analysis may guide us how to treat TBI.

  5. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Georgieva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex” is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain.

  6. The fibrinolytic system facilitates tumor cell migration across the blood-brain barrier in experimental melanoma brain metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with metastatic tumors to the brain have a very poor prognosis. Increased metastatic potential has been associated with the fibrinolytic system. We investigated the role of the fibrinolytic enzyme plasmin in tumor cell migration across brain endothelial cells and growth of brain metastases in an experimental metastatic melanoma model. Metastatic tumors to the brain were established by direct injection into the striatum or by intracarotid injection of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells in C57Bl mice. The role of plasminogen in the ability of human melanoma cells to cross a human blood-brain barrier model was studied on a transwell system. Wild type mice treated with the plasmin inhibitor epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) and plg-/- mice developed smaller tumors and survived longer than untreated wild type mice. Tumors metastasized to the brain of wild type mice treated with EACA and plg-/- less efficiently than in untreated wild type mice. No difference was observed in the tumor growth in any of the three groups of mice. Human melanoma cells were able to cross the human blood-brain barrier model in a plasmin dependent manner. Plasmin facilitates the development of tumor metastasis to the brain. Inhibition of the fibrinolytic system could be considered as means to prevent tumor metastasis to the brain

  7. Efflux transport of serum amyloid P component at the blood–brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Veszelka, Szilvia; Laszy, Judit; Pázmány, Tamás; Németh, László; Obál, Izabella; Fábián, László; Szabó, Gábor; Ábrahám, Csongor S.; Deli, Mária A.; Urbányi, Zoltán

    2013-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the innate immune system, does not penetrate the brain in physiological conditions; however, SAP is a stabilizing component of the amyloid plaques in neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated the cerebrovascular transport of human SAP in animal experiments and in culture blood–brain barrier (BBB) models. After intravenous injection, no SAP could be detected by immunohistochemistry or ELISA in healthy rat brains. Salmonella typhi...

  8. Selective permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier at sites of metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sibson, NR; Vallis, KA; Hamilton, A.; Seymour, L.; Anthony, DC; Connell, JJ; Chatain, G

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effective chemotherapeutics for primary systemic tumors have limited access to brain metastases because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to develop a strategy for specifically permeabilizing the BBB at sites of cerebral metastases. METHODS: BALB/c mice were injected intracardially to induce brain metastases. After metastasis induction, either tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lymphotoxin (LT) was administered intravenously, and 2 to 24 hours later gadoliniu...

  9. Blood-Brain Barrier Active Efflux Transporters: ATP-Binding Cassette Gene Family

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Potschka, Heidrun

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The blood-brain barrier (BBB) contributes to brain homeostasis by protecting the brain from potentially harmful endogenous and exogenous substances. BBB active drug efflux transporters of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene family are increasingly recognized as important determinants of drug distribution to, and elimination from, the CNS. The ABC efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has been demonstrated as a key element of the BBB that can actively transport a huge variety of lip...

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide modulates permeability of the blood–brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    BOHARA, Manoj; Kambe, Yuki; Nagayama, Tetsuya; TOKIMURA, Hiroshi; Arita, Kazunori; Miyata, Atsuro

    2014-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is abundant in brain and is reported to exert autocrine function in vascular cells, but its effect on blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability has not been clarified yet. Here, we examined this effect. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of in vitro BBB model, composed of bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells and astrocytes, was significantly dose dependently decreased by CNP (1, 10, and 100 nmol/L). C-type natriuretic peptide treatment reduced ...

  11. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Cheri X.

    2010-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical com...

  12. Glutamate Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg-Helms, Hans Christian; Uhd-Nielsen, Carsten; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    L-Glutamate is considered the most important excitatory amino acid in the mammalian brain. Strict control of its concentration in the brain interstitial fluid is important to maintain neurotransmission and avoid excitotoxicity. The role of astrocytes in handling L-glutamate transport and metabolism...... is well known, however endothelial cells may also play an important role through mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Expression of excitatory amino acid transporters has been demonstrated in brain endothelial cells of bovine, human, murine, rat and porcine origin. These can account for high......-glutamate, metabolism of L-glutamate and transport of metabolites or a combination of the two. However, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of L-glutamate, at least during pathological events. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux...

  13. Effects of Yishendaluo decoction on blood-brain barrier integrity in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanqing Wu; Ying Gao; Lingqun Zhu; Yonghong Gao; Dongmei Zhang; Lixia Lou; Yanfang Yan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Yishendaluo decoction on the loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in mice exhibiting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.To this end,we used real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR to measure the levels of mRNAs specific to the T cell markers CD4 and CD8,and the monocyte marker CD11b.In addition,we used Evans blue dye extravasation in the spinal cord and brain tissues to assess blood-brain barrier permeability.The results indicated that an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability was associated with an increase in CD4,CD8 and CD11b mRNA expression in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.Yishendaluo decoction administration significantly reversed inflammatory cell accumulation in cerebral tissues of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

  14. Comparison study of ferrofluid and powder iron oxide nanoparticle permeability across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoff D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dan Hoff,1 Lubna Sheikh,2 Soumya Bhattacharya,2 Suprabha Nayar,2 Thomas J Webster11School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 2Biomaterials Group, Materials Science and Technology Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Burmamines, Jamshedpur, IndiaAbstract: In the present study, the permeability of 11 different iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP samples (eight fluids and three powders was determined using an in vitro blood–brain barrier model. Importantly, the results showed that the ferrofluid formulations were statistically more permeable than the IONP powder formulations at the blood–brain barrier, suggesting a role for the presently studied in situ synthesized ferrofluid formulations using poly(vinyl alcohol, bovine serum albumin, collagen, glutamic acid, graphene, and their combinations as materials which can cross the blood–brain barrier to deliver drugs or have other neurological therapeutic efficacy. Conversely, the results showed the least permeability across the blood–brain barrier for the IONP with collagen formulation, suggesting a role as a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent but limiting IONP passage across the blood–brain barrier. Further analysis of the data yielded several trends of note, with little correlation between permeability and fluid zeta potential, but a larger correlation between permeability and fluid particle size (with the smaller particle sizes having larger permeability. Such results lay the foundation for simple modification of iron oxide nanoparticle formulations to either promote or inhibit passage across the blood–brain barrier, and deserve further investigation for a wide range of applications.Keywords: ferrofluids, iron oxide nanoparticles, permeability, blood–brain barrier

  15. Permeability of ergot alkaloids across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and influence on the barrier integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Mulac, Dennis; Hüwel, Sabine; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Scope Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites of Claviceps spp. and they have been in the focus of research for many years. Experiments focusing on ergotamine as a former migraine drug referring to the ability to reach the brain revealed controversial results. The question to which extent ergot alkaloids are able to cross the blood-brain barrier is still not answered. Methods and results In order to answer this question we have studied the ability of ergot alkaloids to penetrate the blood-b...

  16. Lack of IL-6 increases blood–brain barrier permeability in fungal meningitis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiang Li; Guiyang Liu; Jianli Ma; Liang Zhou; Qingzhe Zhang; Lei Gao

    2015-03-01

    The pathogenesis of increased blood–brain barrier permeability during Cryptococcus meningitis is still largely unknown. Interleukin (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine, and numerous studies have shown that IL‐6 influences the integrity of the blood–brain barrier. In this study we investigated the role of IL-6 in Cryptococcus meningitis. First, wild-type or IL-6−/− mice were injected with Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans) and the survival time in both groups was recorded. Second, the number of fungi was measured in the brains of IL-6−/− wild-type mice. Finally, the blood–brain barrier permeability index was detected in infected IL-6−/− mice treated with recombinant human IL-6. The blood–brain barrier permeability index was measured in infected wild-type mice treated with anti-IL-6 antibodies as well. The survival of IL-6−/− mice injected with C. neoformans was significantly lower than that of identically challenged wild-type mice. The infected IL-6−/− mice had significantly larger brain fungal burdens than wild-type mice. Furthermore, increased blood–brain barrier index was found in infected IL-6−/− mice when compared with that in infected control mice. Similar results were obtained when mice challenged with C. neoformans were treated systemically with neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies, resulting in an elevation of vascular permeability. Our data revealed that IL-6 reduced the blood–brain barrier permeability during Cryptococcus meningitis, and it might provide an explanation for the significantly lower survival of infected IL-6−/− mice.

  17. Consumption of Polyphenol-Rich Zingiber Zerumbet Rhizome Extracts Protects against the Breakdown of the Blood-Retinal Barrier and Retinal Inflammation Induced by Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thing-Fong Tzeng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the amelioration of diabetic retinopathy (DR by Zingiber zerumbet rhizome ethanol extracts (ZZRext in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats. ZZRext contains high phenolic and flavonoid contents. STZ-diabetic rats were treated orally with ZZRext (200, 300 mg/kg per day for three months. Blood-retinal barrier (BRB breakdown and increased vascular permeability were found in diabetic rats, with downregulation of occludin, and claudin-5. ZZRext treatment effectively preserved the expression of occludin, and claudin-5, leading to less BRB breakdown and less vascular permeability. Retinal histopathological observation showed that the disarrangement and reduction in thickness of retinal layers were reversed in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Retinal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 were all decreased in ZZRext-treated diabetic rats. Moreover, ZZRext treatment not only inhibited the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB activation, but also downregulated the protein expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in diabetic retina. In conclusion, the results suggest that the retinal protective effects of ZZRext occur through improved retinal structural change and inhibiting retinal inflammation. The antiretinopathy property of ZZRext might be related to the downregulation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB signal transduction induced by diabetes.

  18. Spillway-induced salmon head injury triggers the generation of brain alphaII-spectrin breakdown product biomarkers similar to mammalian traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Miracle

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomedical research have resulted in the development of specific biomarkers for diagnostic testing of disease condition or physiological risk. Of specific interest are alphaII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDPs, which are produced by proteolytic events in traumatic brain injury and have been used as biomarkers to predict the severity of injury in humans and other mammalian brain injury models. This study describes and demonstrates the successful use of antibody-based mammalian SBDP biomarkers to detect head injury in migrating juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that have been injured during passage through high-energy hydraulic environments present in spillways under different operational configurations. Mortality and injury assessment techniques currently measure only near-term direct mortality and easily observable acute injury. Injury-based biomarkers may serve as a quantitative indicator of subacute physical injury and recovery, and aid hydropower operators in evaluation of safest passage configuration and operation actions for migrating juvenile salmonids. We describe a novel application of SBDP biomarkers for head injury for migrating salmon. To our knowledge, this is the first documented cross-over use of a human molecular biomarker in a wildlife and operational risk management scenario.

  19. In vitro screening of nanomedicines through the blood brain barrier: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio-Blanco, Juan; Martín-Sabroso, Cristina; Torres-Suárez, Ana-Isabel

    2016-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier accounts for the high attrition rate of the treatments of most brain disorders, which therefore remain one of the greatest health-care challenges of the twenty first century. Against this background of hindrance to brain delivery, nanomedicine takes advantage of the assembly at the nanoscale of available biomaterials to provide a delivery platform with potential to raising brain levels of either imaging or therapeutic agents. Nevertheless, to prevent later failure due to ineffective drug levels at the target site, researchers have been endeavoring to develop a battery of in vitro screening procedures that can predict earlier in the drug discovery process the ability of these cutting-edge drug delivery platforms to cross the blood-brain barrier for biomedical purposes. This review provides an in-depth analysis of the currently available in vitro blood-brain barrier models (both cell-based and non-cell-based) with the focus on their suitability for understanding the biological brain distribution of forthcoming nanomedicines. The relationship between experimental factors and underlying physiological assumptions that would ultimately lead to a more predictive capacity of their in vivo performance, and those methods already assayed for the evaluation of the brain distribution of nanomedicines are comprehensively discussed. PMID:27392291

  20. MRI confirms loss of blood-brain barrier integrity in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarathna, Dhammika H M L P; Munasinghe, Jeeva; Lizak, Martin J; Nayak, Debasis; McGavern, Dorian B; Roberts, David D

    2013-09-01

    Disseminated candidiasis primarily targets the kidneys and brain in mice and humans. Damage to these critical organs leads to the high mortality associated with such infections, and invasion across the blood-brain barrier can result in fungal meningoencephalitis. Candida albicans can penetrate a brain endothelial cell barrier in vitro through transcellular migration, but this mechanism has not been confirmed in vivo. MRI using the extracellular vascular contrast agent gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid demonstrated that integrity of the blood-brain barrier is lost during C. albicans invasion. Intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy was used to provide the first real-time demonstration of C. albicans colonizing the living brain, where both yeast and filamentous forms of the pathogen were found. Furthermore, we adapted a previously described method utilizing MRI to monitor inflammatory cell recruitment into infected tissues in mice. Macrophages and other phagocytes were visualized in kidney and brain by the administration of ultrasmall iron oxide particles. In addition to obtaining new insights into the passage of C. albicans across the brain microvasculature, these imaging methods provide useful tools to study further the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections, to define the roles of Candida virulence genes in kidney versus brain infection and to assess new therapeutic measures for drug development.

  1. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Oxidative Stress in Guinea Pig after Systemic Exposure to Modified Cell-Free Hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Omer I.; Buehler, Paul W.; D'Agnillo, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Systemic exposure to cell-free hemoglobin (Hb) or its breakdown products after hemolysis or with the use of Hb-based oxygen therapeutics may alter the function and integrity of the blood-brain barrier. Using a guinea pig exchange transfusion model, we investigated the effect of a polymerized cell-free Hb (HbG) on the expression of endothelial tight junction proteins (zonula occludens 1, claudin-5, and occludin), astrocyte activation, IgG extravasation, heme oxygenase (HO), iron deposition, oxidative end products (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3). Reduced zonula occludens 1 expression was observed after HbG transfusion as evidenced by Western blot and confocal microscopy. Claudin-5 distribution was altered in small- to medium-sized vessels. However, total expression of claudin-5 and occludin remained unchanged except for a notable increase in occludin 72 hours after HbG transfusion. HbG-transfused animals also showed increased astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and IgG extravasation after 72 hours. Increased HO activity and HO-1 expression with prominent enhancement of HO-1 immunoreactivity in CD163-expressing perivascular cells and infiltrating monocytes/macrophages were also observed. Consistent with oxidative stress, HbG increased iron deposition, 4-hydroxynonenal and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine immunoreactivity, and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Systemic exposure to an extracellular Hb triggers blood-brain barrier disruption and oxidative stress, which may have important implications for the use of Hb-based therapeutics and may provide indirect insight on the central nervous system vasculopathies associated with excessive hemolysis. PMID:21356382

  2. Measurement of blood–brain barrier permeability in acute ischemic stroke using standard first-pass perfusion CT data ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Giang Truong; Coulthard, Alan; Wong, Andrew; Sheikh, Nabeel; Henderson, Robert; O'Sullivan, John D.; Reutens, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Increased blood–brain barrier permeability is believed to be associated with complications following acute ischemic stroke and with infarct expansion. Measurement of blood–brain barrier permeability requires a delayed image acquisition methodology, which prolongs examination time, increasing the likelihood of movement artefacts and radiation dose. Existing quantitative methods overestimate blood–brain barrier permeability when early phase CT perfusion data are used. The...

  3. The Trojan Horse Liposome Technology for Nonviral Gene Transfer across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2011-01-01

    The application of blood-borne gene therapy protocols to the brain is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Viruses have been extensively used as gene delivery systems. However, their efficacy in brain is limited by the lack of transport across the BBB following intravenous (IV) administration. Recent progress in the “Trojan Horse Liposome” (THL) technology applied to transvascular non-viral gene therapy of the brain presents a promising solution to the trans-vascular brai...

  4. Opiates Upregulate Adhesion Molecule Expression in Brain MicroVascular Endothelial Cells (BMVEC: Implications for Altered Blood Brain Barrier (BBB Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavan P.N. Nair

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is an intricate cellular system composed of vascular endothelial cells and perivascular astrocytes that restrict the passage of immunocompetent cells into the central nervous system (CNS. Expression of the adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 on brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC and their interaction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 viral proteins may help enhance viral adhesion and virus-cell fusion resulting in increased infectivity. Additionally, transmigration through the BBB is facilitated by both endothelial and monocyte/macrophage-derived nitric oxide (NO. Dysregulated production of NO by BMVEC due to opiates and HIV-1 viral protein interactions play a pivotal role in brain endothelial injury, resulting in the irreversible loss of BBB integrity, which may lead to enhanced infiltration of virus-carrying cells across the BBB. Opioids act as co-factors in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 by facilitating BBB dysfunction however, no studies have been done to investigate the role of opiates alone or in combination with HIV-1 viral proteins on adhesion molecule expression in BMVEC. We hypothesize that opiates such as heroin and morphine in conjunction with the HIV-1 viral protein gp120 increase the expression of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and these effects are mediated via the modulation of NO. Results show that opiates alone and in synergy with gp120 increase both the genotypic and phenotypic expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 by BMVEC, additionally, these opiate induced effects may be the result of increased NO production. These studies will provide a better understanding of how opiate abuse in conjunction with HIV-1 infection facilitates the breakdown of the BBB and exacerbates the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1. Elucidation of the mechanisms of BBB modulation will provide new therapeutic approaches to maintain BBB integrity

  5. Is viscosity important in the production of blood-brain barrier disruption by intracarotid contrast media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, J.; Sage, M.R.

    1984-11-01

    A canine model was used to investigate the effects of intracarotid methylglucamine iothalamate (280 mgI/ml) at different viscosities on the normal blood-brain barrier. To alter viscosity, without changing physicochemical parameters, injections were made at either 23/sup 0/C or 37/sup 0/C. The degree of blood-brain barrier damage was assessed using Evans' Blue dye as a visual marker and by contrast enhancement measured by a computed tomographic (CT) scanner. It was found that methylglucamine iothalamate caused more blood-brain barrier damage at 23/sup 0/C than at 37/sup 0/C (p<0.1). Control studies at each temperature using intracarotid injections of physiological saline showed no temperature effect (p>0.1). The implications of these findings are discussed.

  6. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik; Olsson, Roger

    2016-05-18

    The metabolism of drugs in the brain is difficult to study in most species because of enzymatic instability in vitro and interference from peripheral metabolism in vivo. A locust ex vivo model that combines brain barrier penetration, efflux, metabolism, and analysis of the unbound fraction in intact brains was evaluated using known drugs. Clozapine was analyzed, and its major metabolites, clozapine N-oxide (CNO) and N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC), were identified and quantified. The back-transformation of CNO into clozapine observed in humans was also observed in locusts. In addition, risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites, respectively, were identified. The unbound drug fraction of clozapine, NDMC, carbamazepine, and risperidone was analyzed. In addition, coadministration of drugs with verapamil or fluvoxamine was performed to evaluate drug-drug interactions in all setups. All findings correlated well with the data in the literature for mammals except for the stated fact that CNO is a highly blood-brain barrier permeant compound. Overall, the experiments indicated that invertebrates might be useful for screening of blood-brain barrier permeation, efflux, metabolism, and analysis of the unbound fraction of drugs in the brain in early drug discovery. PMID:26930271

  7. The effect of aging on brain barriers and the consequences for Alzheimer's disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlé, Nina; Van Cauwenberghe, Caroline; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-08-01

    Life expectancy has increased in most developed countries, which has led to an increase in the proportion of elderly people in the world's population. However, this increase in life expectancy is not accompanied by a lengthening of the health span since aging is characterized with progressive deterioration in cellular and organ functions. The brain is particularly vulnerable to disease, and this is reflected in the onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Research shows that dysfunction of two barriers in the central nervous system (CNS), the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier (BCSFB), plays an important role in the progression of these neurodegenerative diseases. The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells of the blood capillaries, whereas the BCSFB is formed by the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (CP), both of which are affected during aging. Here, we give an overview of how these barriers undergo changes during aging and in Alzheimer's disease, thereby disturbing brain homeostasis. Studying these changes is needed in order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of aging at the brain barriers, which might lead to the development of new therapies to lengthen the health span (including mental health) and reduce the chances of developing Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27143113

  8. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  9. Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazear, Helen M; Daniels, Brian P; Pinto, Amelia K; Huang, Albert C; Vick, Sarah C; Doyle, Sean E; Gale, Michael; Klein, Robyn S; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-04-22

    Although interferon-λ [also known as type III interferon or interleukin-28 (IL-28)/IL-29] restricts infection by several viruses, its inhibitory mechanism has remained uncertain. We used recombinant interferon-λ and mice lacking the interferon-λ receptor (IFNLR1) to evaluate the effect of interferon-λ on infection with West Nile virus, an encephalitic flavivirus. Cell culture studies in mouse keratinocytes and dendritic cells showed no direct antiviral effect of exogenous interferon-λ, even though expression of interferon-stimulated genes was induced. We observed no differences in West Nile virus burden between wild-type and Ifnlr1(-/-) mice in the draining lymph nodes, spleen, or blood. We detected increased West Nile virus infection in the brain and spinal cord of Ifnlr1(-/-) mice, yet this was not associated with a direct antiviral effect in mouse neurons. Instead, we observed an increase in blood-brain barrier permeability in Ifnlr1(-/-) mice. Treatment of mice with pegylated interferon-λ2 resulted in decreased blood-brain barrier permeability, reduced West Nile virus infection in the brain without affecting viremia, and improved survival against lethal virus challenge. An in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier showed that interferon-λ signaling in mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells increased transendothelial electrical resistance, decreased virus movement across the barrier, and modulated tight junction protein localization in a protein synthesis- and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1)-independent manner. Our data establish an indirect antiviral function of interferon-λ in which noncanonical signaling through IFNLR1 tightens the blood-brain barrier and restricts viral neuroinvasion and pathogenesis.

  10. The blood-brain barrier in migraine treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Tfelt-Hansen, P

    2008-01-01

    to the central nervous system by diffusion, whereas other substances can cross the BBB by carrier-mediated influx transport, receptor-mediated transcytosis and absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Studies of drugs relevant to migraine pathophysiology and treatment have been examined with the pressurized......Salient aspects of the anatomy and function of the blood-barrier barrier (BBB) are reviewed in relation to migraine pathophysiology and treatment. The main function of the BBB is to limit the access of circulating substances to the neuropile. Smaller lipophilic substances have some access...... with special emphasize on the triptans and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The human experimental headache model, especially the use of glycerol trinitrate (the nitric oxide model), and experiences with CGRP administrations utilize the systemic administration of the agonists with effects on other...

  11. The in vitro blood-brain barrier model under OGD condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornabene, Erica; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Berndt, Philipp;

    of therapies to treat this devastating disease. Materials and Methods - Primary cultures of endothelial cells from bovine brain microvessels were cocultured with rat astrocytes in transwell inserts. At day 11, cells were treated with 4h of OGD by changing the culture medium with glucose-free medium......Introduction - The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical, transport and metabolic barrier which plays a key role in preventing uncontrolled exchanges between blood and brain, ensuring an optimal environment for neurons activity. This extent interface is created by the endothelial cells forming...... the wall of brain capillaries. The restrictive nature of the BBB is due to the presence of tight junctions, which seal the paracellular space, a low number of endocytotic vesicles and the presence of efflux transporters, resulting in a very tight layer. Ischemic insult and the subsequent reperfusion...

  12. Blood-brain barrier permeability of bioactive withanamides present in Withania somnifera fruit extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareed, Shaiju K; Bauer, Alison K; Nair, Kavitha M; Liu, Yunbao; Jayaprakasam, Bolleddula; Nair, Muraleedharan G

    2014-08-01

    The neuroprotective effect of Withania somnifera L. Dunal fruit extract, in rodent models, is known. Withanamides, the primary active constituents in W.somnifera fruit extract exhibited neuroprotective effects against β-amyloid-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cell culture studies. Therefore, we investigated the blood-brain barrier permeability of withanamides in W.somnifera fruit extract in mice using HPLC coupled with high resolution quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer (Q-TOF/MS) detection. Mice were administered with 250 mg/kg of W.somnifera extract by intraperitoneal injection, and the blood and brain samples analyzed by Q-TOF/MS detection. Four major withanamides were detected in brain and blood of mice administered with W.somnifera extract. The results suggested that the withanamides crossed the blood-brain barrier. These results may help to develop W.somnifera fruit extract as a preventive or therapeutic botanical drug for stress-induced neurological disorders.

  13. Restraint stress-induced morphological changes at the blood-brain barrier in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eSántha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is well known to contribute to the development of both neurological and psychiatric diseases. While the role of the blood-brain barrier is increasingly recognised in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier has been linked to stress-related psychiatric diseases only recently. In the present study the effects of restraint stress with different duration (1, 3 and 21 days were investigated on the morphology of the blood-brain barrier in male adult Wistar rats. Frontal cortex and hippocampus sections were immunostained for markers of brain endothelial cells (claudin-5, occludin and glucose transporter-1 and astroglia (GFAP. Staining pattern and intensity were visualized by confocal microscopy and evaluated by several types of image analysis. The ultrastructure of brain capillaries was investigated by electron microscopy. Morphological changes and intensity alterations in brain endothelial tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin were induced by stress. Following restraint stress significant increases in the fluorescence intensity of glucose transporter-1 were detected in brain endothelial cells in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Significant reductions in GFAP fluorescence intensity were observed in the frontal cortex in all stress groups. As observed by electron microscopy, one-day acute stress induced morphological changes indicating damage in capillary endothelial cells in both brain regions. After 21 days of stress thicker and irregular capillary basal membranes in the hippocampus and edema in astrocytes in both regions were seen. These findings indicate that stress exerts time-dependent changes in the staining pattern of tight junction proteins occludin, claudin-5 and glucose transporter-1 at the level of brain capillaries and in the ultrastructure of brain endothelial cells and astroglial endfeet, which may contribute to neurodegenerative processes

  14. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharabi Shirley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT and irreversible electroporation (IRE are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This model can be used for individual treatment planning.

  15. A statistical model describing combined irreversible electroporation and electroporation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Sharabi Shirley; Kos Bor; Last David; Guez David; Daniels Dianne; Harnof Sagi; Mardor Yael; Miklavcic Damijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Electroporation-based therapies such as electrochemotherapy (ECT) and irreversible electroporation (IRE) are emerging as promising tools for treatment of tumors. When applied to the brain, electroporation can also induce transient blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption in volumes extending beyond IRE, thus enabling efficient drug penetration. The main objective of this study was to develop a statistical model predicting cell death and BBB disruption induced by electroporation. This m...

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Kirchgessner, Annette; Tepper, Deborah; Leonard, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke continues to be one of the most challenging diseases in translational neurology. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the only approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke, but its use is limited to the first hours after stroke onset due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic transformation over time resulting in enhanced brain injury. In this review we discuss the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption as a consequence of ischemic ...

  17. Increased blood–brain barrier permeability in type II diabetes demonstrated by gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, J; Wardlaw, J; Ferguson, K; MacLullich, A; Deary, I; Marshall, I

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with type II diabetes are at increased risk of cognitive impairment. The retinal and renal complications of diabetes follow microvascular damage permitting small arterioles to leak, hence the cerebral damage might also follow loss of blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Magnetic resonance (MR) brain imaging with intravenous gadolinium (Gd) diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) was used to identify increased BBB permeability.

  18. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  19. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  20. Neurological disorders and therapeutics targeted to surmount the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwar JR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jagat R Kanwar, Bhasker Sriramoju, Rupinder K KanwarNanomedicine Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biomedical Research, Centre for Biotechnology and Interdisciplinary Biosciences, Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: We are now in an aging population, so neurological disorders, particularly the neurodegenerative diseases, are becoming more prevalent in society. As per the epidemiological studies, Europe alone suffers 35% of the burden, indicating an alarming rate of disease progression. Further, treatment for these disorders is a challenging area due to the presence of the tightly regulated blood–brain barrier and its unique ability to protect the brain from xenobiotics. Conventional therapeutics, although effective, remain critically below levels of optimum therapeutic efficacy. Hence, methods to overcome the blood–brain barrier are currently a focus of research. Nanotechnological applications are gaining paramount importance in addressing this question, and yielding some promising results. This review addresses the pathophysiology of the more common neurological disorders and novel drug candidates, along with targeted nanoparticle applications for brain delivery.Keywords: blood–brain barrier, neurological diseases, brain delivery, targeted nanoparticles

  1. Regulation of brain endothelial barrier function by microRNAs in health and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ramirez, Miguel Alejandro; Reijerkerk, Arie; de Vries, Helga E; Romero, Ignacio Andres

    2016-08-01

    Brain endothelial cells constitute the major cellular element of the highly specialized blood-brain barrier (BBB) and thereby contribute to CNS homeostasis by restricting entry of circulating leukocytes and blood-borne molecules into the CNS. Therefore, compromised function of brain endothelial cells has serious consequences for BBB integrity. This has been associated with early events in the pathogenesis of several disorders that affect the CNS, such as multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurologic disorder, and stroke. Recent studies demonstrate that brain endothelial microRNAs play critical roles in the regulation of BBB function under normal and neuroinflammatory conditions. This review will focus on emerging evidence that indicates that brain endothelial microRNAs regulate barrier function and orchestrate various phases of the neuroinflammatory response, including endothelial activation in response to cytokines as well as restoration of inflamed endothelium into a quiescent state. In particular, we discuss novel microRNA regulatory mechanisms and their contribution to cellular interactions at the neurovascular unit that influence the overall function of the BBB in health and during neuroinflammation.-Lopez-Ramirez, M. A., Reijerkerk, A., de Vries, H. E., Romero, I. A. Regulation of brain endothelial barrier function by microRNAs in health and neuroinflammation. PMID:27118674

  2. P-glycoprotein activity in the blood-brain barrier is affected by virus-induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorduin, Janine; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Klein, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    A large percentage of schizophrenic patients respond poorly to antipsychotic treatment. This could be explained by inefficient drug transport across the blood-brain barrier due to P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. P-glycoprotein activity and expression in the blood-brain barrier can be affected by inf

  3. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  4. Polyploidization of glia in neural development links tissue growth to blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unhavaithaya, Yingdee; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Proper development requires coordination in growth of the cell types composing an organ. Many plant and animal cells are polyploid, but how these polyploid tissues contribute to organ growth is not well understood. We found the Drosophila melanogaster subperineurial glia (SPG) to be polyploid, and ploidy is coordinated with brain mass. Inhibition of SPG polyploidy caused rupture of the septate junctions necessary for the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the increased SPG cell size resulting from polyploidization is required to maintain the SPG envelope surrounding the growing brain. Polyploidization likely is a conserved strategy to coordinate tissue growth during organogenesis, with potential vertebrate examples.

  5. Blood-brain barrier properties in vitro depend on composition and assembly of endogenous extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobel, Kathrin; Hansen, Uwe; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells, which constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are enveloped by the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. The contribution of matrix components secreted by the various cell types at the neurovascular unit, however, remains unclear with respect to their effect on endothelial barrier function. In this study, a new in vitro model was established by growing endothelial cells on an ECM produced by pericytes, astrocytes or a serial combination of both. The last-mentioned was found to be more in vivo-like. We investigated the role of the composition and morphology of ECM supra-structures in maintaining BBB function. The composition was analysed by protein analysis (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and the ultrastructure of generated matrices was analysed by transmission electron microscopy including immunogold labelling. We could show by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements that pericytes and combined matrices significantly improved the barrier tightness of porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC). The increase of the resistance was verified by enhanced expression of tight junction proteins. Thus, for the first time, we have shown that barrier integrity is strictly controlled by the ECM, which is a product of all cells involved in the secretion of ECM components and their modification by corresponding cells. Moreover, we have demonstrated that complex matrices by the various cells of the BBB induce barrier marker enzymes in PBCEC, such as alkaline phosphatase. PMID:27053246

  6. Blood-brain barrier transport kinetics of the cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; Veryser, Lieselotte; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-09-01

    The cyclic depsipeptide mycotoxins beauvericin and enniatins are capable of reaching the systemic circulation through various routes of exposure and are hence capable of exerting central nervous system (CNS) effects, if they are able to pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which was the main objective of this study. Quantification of the mycotoxins was performed using an in-house developed and validated bio-analytical UHPLC-MS/MS method. Prior to the BBB experiments, the metabolic stability of the mycotoxins was evaluated in vitro in mouse serum and brain homogenate. The BBB permeation kinetics of beauvericin and enniatins were studied using an in vivo mice model, applying multiple time regression for studying the blood-to-brain influx. Additionally, capillary depletion was applied to obtain the fraction of the peptides really entering the brain parenchyma and the fraction loosely adhered to the brain capillary wall. Finally, also the brain-to-blood efflux transport kinetics was studied. Metabolic stability data indicated that the investigated mycotoxins were stable during the duration of the in vivo study. The brain influx study showed that beauvericin and enniatins are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in mice: using the Gjedde-Patlak biphasic model, it was shown that all investigated mycotoxins exert a high initial influx rate into the brain (K1 ranging from 11 to 53μL/(g×min)), rapidly reaching a plateau. After penetration, the mycotoxins reached the brain parenchyma (95%) with only a limited amount residing in the capillaries (5%). Negligible efflux (<0.005min(-1)) from the brain was observed in the 15min post-intracerebroventricular injection. PMID:27349679

  7. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II: Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A. van Vliet; W.M. Otte; W.J. Wadman; E. Aronica; G. Kooij; H.E. de Vries; R.M. Dijkhuizen; J.A. Gorter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure activit

  8. Blood-brain barrier leakage after status epilepticus in rapamycin-treated rats II : Potential mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Erwin A; Otte, Wim M; Wadman, Wytse J; Aronica, Eleonora; Kooij, Gijs; de Vries, Helga E; Dijkhuizen, Rick M; Gorter, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage may play a pro-epileptogenic role after status epilepticus. In the accompanying contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) study we showed that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin reduced BBB leakage and seizure activit

  9. Interactions between Blood-Borne Streptococcus pneumoniae and the Blood-Brain Barrier Preceding Meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iovino, Federico; Orihuela, Carlos J.; Moorlag, Henk E.; Molema, Grietje; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant cause of bacterial meningitis. Meningitis is thought to occur as the result of pneumococci crossing the blood-brain barrier to invade the Central Nervous System (CNS); yet little is known about the steps pre

  10. Blood-brain barrier P-glycoprotein function is not impaired in early Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, A. L.; van Berckel, B. N. M.; Lubberink, M.; Luurtsema, G.; Lammertsma, A. A.; Leenders, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) is unknown. Genetic susceptibility and exposure to environmental toxins contribute to specific neuronal loss in PD. Decreased blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux function has been proposed as a possible causative link between toxin exposure an

  11. Dynamic Perfusion CT Assessment of the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability : First Pass versus Delayed Acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankbaar, J. W.; Hom, J.; Schneider, T.; Cheng, S. -C.; Lau, B. C.; van der Schaaf, I.; Virmani, S.; Pohlman, S.; Dillon, W. P.; Wintermark, M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The Patlak model has been applied to first-pass perfusion CT (PCT) data to extract information on blood-brain barrier permeability (BBBP) to predict hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute stroke. However, the Patlak model was originally described for the delayed st

  12. Reproductive hormones regulate the selective permeability of the blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Andrea C.; Clemente, Luca; Liu, Tianbing; Bowen, Richard L.; Meethal, Sivan Vadakkadath; Atwood, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive hormones regulate the selective permeability of the blood-brain barrier : Current address: Department of Biochemistry, Colorado State University, CO, USA. (Clemente, Luca) correspondence: Corresponding author. University of Wisconsin-Madison Medical School, Wm S. Middleton Memorial VA (GRECC 11G), 2500 Overlook Terrace, Madison, WI 53705, USA. Tel.: +1 608 256 1901x11664; fax: +1 608 280 7291. (Atw...

  13. The Trojan Horse Liposome Technology for Nonviral Gene Transfer across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben J. Boado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of blood-borne gene therapy protocols to the brain is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Viruses have been extensively used as gene delivery systems. However, their efficacy in brain is limited by the lack of transport across the BBB following intravenous (IV administration. Recent progress in the “Trojan Horse Liposome” (THL technology applied to transvascular non-viral gene therapy of the brain presents a promising solution to the trans-vascular brain gene delivery problem. THLs are comprised of immunoliposomes carrying nonviral gene expression plasmids. The tissue target specificity of the THL is provided by peptidomimetic monoclonal antibody (MAb component of the THL, which binds to specific endogenous receptors located on both the BBB and on brain cellular membranes, for example, insulin receptor and transferrin receptor. These MAbs mediate (a receptor-mediated transcytosis of the THL complex through the BBB, (b endocytosis into brain cells and (c transport to the brain cell nuclear compartment. The expression of the transgene in brain may be restricted using tissue/cell specific gene promoters. This manuscript presents an overview on the THL transport technology applied to brain disorders, including lysosomal storage disorders and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Next generation of non-mammalian blood-brain barrier models to study parasitic infections of the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Edwards-Smallbone, James; Flynn, Robin; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Transmigration of neuropathogens across the blood-brain barrier is a key step in the development of central nervous system infections, making it a prime target for drug development. The ability of neuropathogens to traverse the blood-brain barrier continues to inspire researchers to understand the specific strategies and molecular mechanisms that allow them to enter the brain. The availability of models of the blood-brain barrier that closely mimic the situation in vivo offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics. PMID:21921682

  15. Blood-brain barrier proteomics: towards the understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Yannis; Gosselet, Fabien; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Cecchelli, Roméo

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the passage of endogenous and exogenous compounds and thus contributes to the brain homeostasis with the help of well-known proteins such as tight junction proteins, plasma membrane transporters and metabolic barrier proteins. In the last decade, proteomics have emerged as supplementary tools for BBB research. The development of proteomic technologies has provided several means to extend knowledge on the BBB and to investigate additional routes for the bypass of this barrier. Proteomics approaches have been used in vivo and also using in vitro BBB models to decipher the physiological characteristics and, under stress conditions, to understand the molecular mechanisms of brain diseases. This work has demonstrated that both quantitative global and targeted proteomics approaches are powerful and provide significant information on the brain microvessel endothelium. However, current knowledge is only partial and it is necessary to increase the studies using proteomics tools that will provide additional information concerning brain pathologies or BBB metabolism. Highly sensitive, accurate and specific protein quantification by quantitative targeted proteomics appears as an essential methodology for human BBB studies. PMID:25446619

  16. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods.

  17. Interactions between blood-borne Streptococcus pneumoniae and the blood-brain barrier preceding meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Iovino

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is a Gram-positive bacterium and the predominant cause of bacterial meningitis. Meningitis is thought to occur as the result of pneumococci crossing the blood-brain barrier to invade the Central Nervous System (CNS; yet little is known about the steps preceding immediate disease development. To study the interactions between pneumococci and the vascular endothelium of the blood-brain barrier prior to meningitis we used an established bacteremia-derived meningitis model in combination with immunofluorescent imaging. Brain tissue of mice infected with S. pneumoniae strain TIGR4, a clinical meningitis isolate, was investigated for the location of the bacteria in relation to the brain vasculature in various compartments. We observed that S. pneumoniae adhered preferentially to the subarachnoid vessels, and subsequently, over time, reached the more internal cerebral areas including the cerebral cortex, septum, and choroid plexus. Interestingly, pneumococci were not detected in the choroid plexus till 8 hours-post infection. In contrast to the lungs, little to no leukocyte recruitment to the brain was observed over time, though Iba-1 and GFAP staining showed that microglia and astrocytes were activated as soon as 1 hour post-infection. Our results imply that i the local immune system of the brain is activated immediately upon entry of bacteria into the bloodstream and that ii adhesion to the blood brain barrier is spatiotemporally controlled at different sites throughout the brain. These results provide new information on these two important steps towards the development of pneumococcal meningitis.

  18. Firocoxib on aqueous humor prostaglandin E 2 levels for controlling experimentally-induced breakdown of blood-aqueous barrier in healthy and Toxoplasma gondii -seropositive cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Cristine Schroder

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of firocoxib for controlling experimentally-induced breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier in healthy and Toxoplasma gondii -seropositive cats. Thirty two cats with no ocular abnormalities were used. Groups (n=8/each were formed with healthy cats that received 5mg g-1 of oral firocoxib (FH or no treatment (CH on day 0; seropositive cats for anti -T. gondii specific immunoglobulin G (IgG were grouped (n=8/each and treated in a similar fashion (FT and CT. On day 1, cats of all groups received the same treatment protocol, and 1h later, aqueocentesis was performed under general anesthesia (M0. Following 1h, the same procedure was repeated (M1. Quantitation of aqueous humor total protein and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 were determined. Aqueous samples of seropositive cats were tested for anti- T. gondii specific IgG. In M0, aqueous samples of CT showed a significantly higher concentration of PGE2 in comparison with other groups (P<0.05. In all groups, PGE2 concentration increased significantly from M0 to M1 (P=0.001. PGE2 values did not change significantly between groups in M1 (P=0.17. Anti- T. gondii specific IgG were reported only in samples of M1, and aqueous titers did not change significantly between FT and CT (P=0.11. Although we have observed that aqueous humor PGE2 levels were significantly higher in cats of CT group during M0, such increase was not able to break the blood-aqueous barrier and cause anterior uveitis. Firocoxib did not prevent intraocular inflammation after aqueocentesis, in healthy and toxoplasmosis-seropositive cats.

  19. The Role of P-Glycoprotein in Transport of Danshensu across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Fei Yu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Danshensu (3-(3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid, a water-soluble active component isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, is widely used for the treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. The present study aims to investigate the role of P-glycoprotein in transport of Danshensu across the blood-brain barrier. Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg kg−1 (verapamil group or the same volume of normal saline (control group. Ninety minutes later, the animals were administrated with Danshensu (15 mg kg−1 by intravenous injection. At 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min after Danshensu administration, the levels of Danshensu in the blood and brain were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that Danshensu concentrations in the brain of the rats pretreated with verapamil were significantly increased. In addition, the brain-plasma ratios of the group pretreated with verapamil were much higher than that of the control group. There was no difference in Danshensu level in plasma between the verapamil group and control group. The findings indicated that Danshensu can pass the blood-brain barrier, and P-glycoprotein plays an important role in Danshensu transportation in brain.

  20. Bypassing the blood-brain barrier: delivery of therapeutic agents by macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Kwon, Young Jik; Sun, Chung-Ho; Madsen, Steen J.

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood brain tumor barrier (BBTB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) to cross the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer agents such as nanoparticles to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: The infiltration of Mo/Ma into brain tumor spheroids in vitro was determined using fluorescent stained Mo/Ma. Tumors were also established in the brains of inbred rats and ALA-PDT was given 18 days following tumor induction. The degredation of the BBTB and quantification of the number of infiltrating Mo/Ma was examined on histological sections from removed brains. Results & Conclusion: PDT was highly effective in locally opening the BBTB and inducing macrophage migration into the irradiated portions of brain tumors.

  1. In vivo two-photon imaging measuring the blood-brain barrier permeability during early postnatal brain development in rodent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián.

    2016-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a unique structure between the cerebral blood circulation and the delicate neural environment that is important in regulating the movement of molecules and ions involved in brain development and function. However, little is known about the physiological permeability of molecules and ions across the BBB during brain development. In this study we applied an innovative approach to examine the development of BBB properties quantitatively. Two-photon microscopy was employed to measure BBB permeability in real time in vivo. Vascular growth and specific interactions between astrocyte end feet and microvessels were studied by using a combination of IB4 histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy and 3D analysis.

  2. Blood-brain barrier transport of short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Peremans, Kathelijne; Polis, Ingeborgh; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are becoming a great risk for human health, leading to an urgent need for new efficient antibacterial therapies. The short, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides from insects gained a lot of interest as a potential antibacterial treatment, having a low toxicity profile and being mainly active against Gram-negative bacteria. To know whether these antimicrobial peptides can be used for the treatment of cerebral infections, the blood-brain barrier transport characteristics of these peptides were investigated. This study describes the results of the in vivo blood-brain barrier experiments in mice, as well as the in vitro metabolic stability in mouse plasma and brain of apidaecin Api137, oncocin, drosocin and drosocin Pro5Hyp. The four investigated peptides showed a significant influx into the brain with a K(in) ranging between 0.37 and 0.86 µL/g x min and brain distribution volumes of 19.6 to 25.8 µL/g. Only for drosocin, a significant efflux was determined, with a k(out) of 0.22 min(-1). After entering the brain, oncocin was for approximately 80% trapped in the endothelial cells, while the other peptides reached the brain parenchyma for about 70%. All peptides were stable in plasma and brain during the experiments, with estimated metabolic half-lives ranging between 47 min and 637 min. We conclude that the investigated short, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides show an influx into the brain, which make them a promising antibacterial treatment of cerebral infections.

  3. Polymeric nanoparticles assembled with microfluidics for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, M. R.; de Menezes, L. R.; do Nascimento, D. F.; Souza, D. H. S.; Reynaud, F.; Marques, M. F. V.; Tavares, M. I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a challenge in the treatment of some diseases, since it prevents many drugs from reaching therapeutic concentrations in the brain. In this context, there is a growing interest in nanoparticles for drug delivery, since they are able to cross this barrier and target the brain. The use of polymeric materials in the development of these nanoparticles has been extensively studied. It has already been demonstrated that these nanosystems have the ability to cross the BBB, which allows effective drug release into the brain. Biodegradable polymers provide a great advantage in the development of nanosystems, but modifications of the nanoparticles' surface is essential. The traditional batch methods lack precise control over the processes of nucleation and growth, resulting in poor control over final properties of the nanoparticles. Therefore, microfluidics could be used to achieve a better production environment for the fabrication of nano- structured drug delivery systems. This study provides a brief review of: the BBB, the polymeric nanoparticles with the ability to overcome the barrier, the properties of the most used polymeric matrices, and the nanostructured drug delivery systems assembled with microfluidics.

  4. Novel models for studying the blood-brain and blood-eye barriers in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsonneault, Robert L; Mayer, Nasima; Mayer, Fahima; Tegegn, Nebiyu; Bainton, Roland J

    2011-01-01

    In species as varied as humans and flies, humoral/central nervous system barrier structures are a major obstacle to the passive penetration of small molecules including endogenous compounds, environmental toxins, and drugs. In vivo measurement of blood-brain physiologic function in vertebrate animal models is difficult and current ex vivo models for more rapid experimentation using, for example, cultured brain endothelial cells, only partially reconstitute the anatomy and physiology of a fully intact blood-brain barrier (BBB). To address these problems, we and others continue to develop in vivo assays for studying the complex physiologic function of central nervous system (CNS) barriers using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (Dm). These methods involve the introduction of small molecule reporters of BBB physiology into the fly humoral compartment by direct injection. Since these reporters must cross the Dm BBB in order to be visible in the eye, we can directly assess genetic or chemical modulators of BBB function by monitoring retinal fluorescence. This assay has the advantage of utilizing a physiologically intact BBB in a model organism that is economical and highly amenable to genetic manipulation. In combination with other approaches outlined here, such as brain dissection and behavioral assessment, one can produce a fuller picture of BBB biology and physiology. In this chapter, we provide detailed methods for examining BBB biology in the fly, including a Dm visual assay to screen for novel modulators of the BBB.

  5. Acute whole-body irradiation, even at moderate dose, induces alterations in blood-brain-barrier permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A radiation-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been evoked, but clearly demonstrated only at high doses of ionizing radiations. By using two protocols, we have searched an impairment in BBB integrity induced by moderate doses. First, the effects of irradiation on the permeability of striatal BBB to [3H]AIBA and [14C]sucrose were investigated in rats by using brain microdialysis. 32 rats, irradiated at 4.5Gy were serially experimented from 0 to 24 hours, from 24 to 48 hours and at later delays after exposure. 32 sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Second, the entry of pyridostigmine (PYR would not be expected to cross the BBB) into the brain was investigated in mice subjected to (neutron-g) exposure at 0.7Gy or 4Gy. For each dose 120 animals were irradiated and 120 sham-irradiated mice were included. At different delays after exposure, 10 mice were injected with 0.9% NaCl (control) or PYR bromide (0.1 mg/kg). Mice were killed 10min after injection and striatum, cortex and hippocampus were quickly dissected. Penetration of the drug into the brain was examined by measurement of AChE activity. Concerning microdialysis protocol, no late modification of the permeability of BBB was observed. But, in the course of the initial syndrome, we observed a transient increase of the permeability to the two markers, between the third and the 17th hour after exposure. A secondary transient 'opening' of the BBB to [14C] sucrose was noticed about 28 hours following irradiation with no modification of the permeability to [3H]AIBA. Concerning the BBB permeability to PYR, by comparing irradiated-PYR mice to sham-PYR mice, a decrease of AChE activity in the three cerebral areas was noted 48 hours after exposure at 4 Gy ; at 0.7 Gy this decrease is noted in the striatum only. In conclusion, our experiments by using two animal models, two types of radiations, and different tracers show modifications of the BBB permeability after moderate doses whole

  6. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods, which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery, is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents.

  7. An ex Vivo Model for Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability, Efflux, and Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Karin; Aadal Nielsen, Peter; Ek, Fredrik;

    2016-01-01

    The metabolism of drugs in the brain is difficult to study in most species because of enzymatic instability in vitro and interference from peripheral metabolism in vivo. A locust ex vivo model that combines brain barrier penetration, efflux, metabolism, and analysis of the unbound fraction...... in intact brains was evaluated using known drugs. Clozapine was analyzed, and its major metabolites, clozapine N-oxide (CNO) and N-desmethylclozapine (NDMC), were identified and quantified. The back-transformation of CNO into clozapine observed in humans was also observed in locusts. In addition......, risperidone, citalopram, fluoxetine, and haloperidol were studied, and one preselected metabolite for each drug was analyzed, identified, and quantified. Metabolite identification studies of clozapine and midazolam showed that the locust brain was highly metabolically active, and 18 and 14 metabolites...

  8. The Transferrin Receptor at the Blood-Brain Barrier - exploring the possibilities for brain drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Corine

    2005-01-01

    There are many diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), like Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, depression, schizophrenia, epilepsy, migraine headache, and HIV infection in the brain. However, treatment is difficult since many drugs cannot reach the brain in sufficient quantities due to

  9. Arginine-Vasopressin Receptor Blocker Conivaptan Reduces Brain Edema and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption after Experimental Stroke in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Zeynalov

    Full Text Available Stroke is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Stroke is complicated by brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, and is often accompanied by increased release of arginine-vasopressin (AVP. AVP acts through V1a and V2 receptors to trigger hyponatremia, vasospasm, and platelet aggregation which can exacerbate brain edema. The AVP receptor blockers conivaptan (V1a and V2 and tolvaptan (V2 are used to correct hyponatremia, but their effect on post-ischemic brain edema and BBB disruption remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate if these drugs can prevent brain edema and BBB disruption in mice after stroke.Experimental mice underwent the filament model of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO with reperfusion. Mice were treated with conivaptan, tolvaptan, or vehicle. Treatments were initiated immediately at reperfusion and administered IV (conivaptan or orally (tolvaptan for 48 hours. Physiological variables, neurological deficit scores (NDS, plasma and urine sodium and osmolality were recorded. Brain water content (BWC and Evans Blue (EB extravasation index were evaluated at the end point.Both conivaptan and tolvaptan produced aquaresis as indicated by changes in plasma and urine sodium levels. However plasma and urine osmolality was changed only by conivaptan. Unlike tolvaptan, conivaptan improved NDS and reduced BWC in the ipsilateral hemisphere: from 81.66 ± 0.43% (vehicle to 78.28 ± 0.48% (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05 vs vehicle. Conivaptan also attenuated the EB extravasation from 1.22 ± 0.08 (vehicle to 1.01 ± 0.02 (conivaptan, 0.2 mg, p < 0.05.Continuous IV infusion with conivaptan for 48 hours after experimental stroke reduces brain edema, and BBB disruption. Conivaptan but not tolvaptan may potentially be used in patients to prevent brain edema after stroke.

  10. Toward Eradicating HIV Reservoirs in the Brain: Inhibiting P-glycoprotein at the Blood-Brain Barrier with Prodrug Abacavir Dimers

    OpenAIRE

    Namanja, Hilda A.; Emmert, Dana; Davis, David A.; Campos, Christopher; Miller, David S.; Hrycyna, Christine A.; Chmielewski, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Eradication of HIV reservoirs in the brain necessitates penetration of antiviral agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a process limited by drug efflux proteins such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) at the membrane of brain capillary endothelial cells. We present an innovative chemical strategy toward the goal of therapeutic brain penetration of the P-gp substrate and anti-viral agent abacavir, in conjunction with a traceless tether. Dimeric prodrugs of abacavir were designed to have two funct...

  11. Examining the Uptake of Central Nervous System Drugs and Candidates across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Scott G; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Houfu

    2016-08-01

    Assessing the equilibration of the unbound drug concentrations across the blood-brain barrier (Kp,uu) has progressively replaced the partition coefficient based on the ratio of the total concentration in brain tissue to blood (Kp). Here, in vivo brain distribution studies were performed on a set of central nervous system (CNS)-targeted compounds in both rats and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) genetic knockout mice. Several CNS drugs are characterized by Kp,uu values greater than unity, inferring facilitated uptake across the rodent blood-brain barrier (BBB). Examples are shown in which Kp,uu also increases above unity on knockout of P-gp, highlighting the composite nature of this parameter with respect to facilitated BBB uptake, efflux, and passive diffusion. Several molecules with high Kp,uu values share common structural elements, whereas uptake across the BBB appears more prevalent in the CNS-targeted drug set than the chemical templates being generated within the current lead optimization paradigm. Challenges for identifying high Kp,uu compounds are discussed in the context of acute versus steady-state data and cross-species differences. Evidently, there is a need for better predictive models of human brain Kp,uu. PMID:27194478

  12. Nanoparticles and blood-brain barrier: the key to central nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Alazne; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Major central nervous system disorders represent a significant and worldwide public health problem. In fact, the therapeutic success of many pharmaceuticals developed to treat central nervous system diseases is still moderate, since the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the access of systemically administered compounds to the brain. Therefore, they require the application of a large total dose of a drug, and cause numerous toxic effects. The development of nanotechnological systems are useful tools to deliver therapeutics and/or diagnostic probes to the brain due to nanocarriers having the potential to improve the therapeutic effect of drugs and to reduce their side effects. This review provides a brief overview of the variety of carriers employed for central nervous system drug and diagnostic probes delivery. Further, this paper focuses on the novel nanocarriers developed to enhance brain delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Special attention is paid to liposomes, micelles, polymeric and lipid-based nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes. The recent developments in nanocarrier implementation through size/charge optimization and surface modifications (PEGylation, targeting delivery, and coating with surfactants) have been discussed. And a detailed description of the nanoscaled pharmaceutical delivery devices employed for the treatment of central nervous system disorders have also been defined. The aim of the review is to evaluate the nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategies to treat different central nervous system disorders.

  13. Mechanisms of restriction of viral neuroinvasion at the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Jonathan J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) consists of highly specialized cells including brain microvascular endothelial cells, astrocytes, microglia, pericytes, and neurons, which act in concert to restrict the entry of pathogens, immune cells, and soluble molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). If pathogens manage to cross the BBB and establish infection within the CNS, the BBB can open in a regulated manner to allow leukocyte transmigration into the CNS so that microbes, infected cells, and debris can be cleared. This review highlights how different inflammatory cytokines or signaling pathways disrupt or enhance BBB integrity in a way that regulates entry of neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  14. Insulin Detemir is Not Transported Across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, William A.; Morley, John E.; Lynch, Jessica L.; Lynch, Kristin M.; Mooradian, Arshag D.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin detemir has a different profile of action on the central nervous system (CNS) than human insulin. It has been hypothesized that this is caused by an altered ability of insulin detemir to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we measured the permeability of the BBB to insulin detemir. We labeled insulin detemir with radioactive iodine (I-Det) and examined its ability to cross the BBB of the mouse. Permeation was assessed after intravenous injection and by brain perfusion in the pr...

  15. In Situ Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of a C-10 Paclitaxel Carbamate

    OpenAIRE

    Ballatore, Carlo; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Smith, Amos B.

    2008-01-01

    We report the synthesis and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of 14C-CNDR-29, a paclitaxel C-10 carbamate derivative shown to be devoid of P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-interactions, in an in situ mouse brain perfusion model, in comparison with 14C-paclitaxel. The results presented reveal a 3–4 fold higher BBB-permeability for the C-10 modified taxane compared to paclitaxel. These results support the notion that circumvention of Pgp-mediated efflux can lead to higher BBB-permeability. Further stu...

  16. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle Juhl;

    2015-01-01

    Optic neuritis is an acute inflammatory condition that is highly associated with multiple sclerosis. Currently, the best predictor of future development of multiple sclerosis is the number of T2 lesions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging. Previous research has found abnormalities...... in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison...... as part of the diagnostic work-up at time of diagnosis. Eighteen healthy controls were included for comparison. Patients had magnetic resonance imaging and lumbar puncture performed within 4 weeks of onset of optic neuritis. Information on multiple sclerosis conversion was acquired from hospital records 2...

  17. Comparison of blood-brain barrier disruption by intracarotid iopamidol and methylglucamine iothalamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, M R; Wilcox, J; Evill, C A; Benness, G T

    1983-01-01

    Using a canine model, the effect of intracarotid injections of the ionic contrast medium methylglucamine iothalamate was compared with that of the nonionic contrast medium iopamidol of similar iodine concentration (280 mg 1/ml). The degree and distribution of blood-brain barrier disruption was assessed using Evans blue stain as a visual marker and by contrast enhancement measured by a computed tomographic (CT) scanner. In all studies with methylglucamine iothalamate, Evans blue staining was demonstrated, and CT enhancement demonstrated a significant mean difference (p less than 0.01) between the control and injected hemispheres. The absence of blood-brain barrier disruption with iopamidol is probably related to its lower osmolality (570 mosmol/kg) compared with methylglucamine iothalamate (1,424 mosmol/kg) and the absence of any cation.

  18. A novel transgenic zebrafish model for blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Masahiko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and maintenance of the blood-brain and blood-retinal barrier is critical for the homeostasis of brain and retinal tissue. Despite decades of research our knowledge of the formation and maintenance of the blood-brain (BBB and blood-retinal (BRB barrier is very limited. We have established an in vivo model to study the development and maintenance of these barriers by generating a transgenic zebrafish line that expresses a vitamin D-binding protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (DBP-EGFP in blood plasma, as an endogenous tracer. Results The temporal establishment of the BBB and BRB was examined using this transgenic line and the results were compared with that obtained by injection of fluorescent dyes into the sinus venosus of embryos at various stages of development. We also examined the expression of claudin-5, a component of tight junctions during the first 4 days of development. We observed that the BBB of zebrafish starts to develop by 3 dpf, with expression of claudin-5 in the central arteries preceding it at 2 dpf. The hyaloid vasculature in the zebrafish retina develops a barrier function at 3 dpf, which endows the zebrafish with unique advantages for studying the BRB. Conclusion Zebrafish embryos develop BBB and BRB function simultaneously by 3 dpf, which is regulated by tight junction proteins. The Tg(l-fabp:DBP-EGFP zebrafish will have great advantages in studying development and maintenance of the blood-neural barrier, which is a new application for the widely used vertebrate model.

  19. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    OpenAIRE

    Prachi Anand; Alison O’Neil; Emily Lin; Trevor Douglas; Mandë Holford

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocon...

  20. The Effects of Psychostimulant Drugs on Blood Brain Barrier Function and Neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Kousik, Sharanya M.; T. Celeste eNapier; Carvey, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a highly dynamic interface between the central nervous system (CNS) and periphery. The BBB is comprised of a number of components and is part of the larger neuro(glio)vascular unit. Current literature suggests that psychostimulant drugs of abuse alter the function of the BBB which likely contributes to the neurotoxicities associated with these drugs. In both preclinical and clinical studies, psychostimulants including methamphetamine, MDMA, cocaine, and nicoti...

  1. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Renée J Turner; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen...

  2. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants induce blood-brain barrier dysfunction in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Üllen

    Full Text Available Peripheral leukocytes can exacerbate brain damage by release of cytotoxic mediators that disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBB function. One of the oxidants released by activated leukocytes is hypochlorous acid (HOCl formed via the myeloperoxidase (MPO-H2O2-Cl(- system. In the present study we examined the role of leukocyte activation, leukocyte-derived MPO and MPO-generated oxidants on BBB function in vitro and in vivo. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced systemic inflammation, neutrophils that had become adherent released MPO into the cerebrovasculature. In vivo, LPS-induced BBB dysfunction was significantly lower in MPO-deficient mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Both, fMLP-activated leukocytes and the MPO-H2O2-Cl(- system inflicted barrier dysfunction of primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC that was partially rescued with the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. BMVEC treatment with the MPO-H2O2-Cl(- system or activated neutrophils resulted in the formation of plasmalogen-derived chlorinated fatty aldehydes. 2-chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA severely compromised BMVEC barrier function and induced morphological alterations in tight and adherens junctions. In situ perfusion of rat brain with 2-ClHDA increased BBB permeability in vivo. 2-ClHDA potently activated the MAPK cascade at physiological concentrations. An ERK1/2 and JNK antagonist (PD098059 and SP600125, respectively protected against 2-ClHDA-induced barrier dysfunction in vitro. The current data provide evidence that interference with the MPO pathway could protect against BBB dysfunction under (neuroinflammatory conditions.

  3. Endothelial barrier antigen-immunoreactivity is conversely associated with blood-brain barrier dysfunction after embolic stroke in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pelz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available While the concept of the Neurovascular Unit (NVU is increasingly recognized for exploring mechanisms of tissue damage in ischemic stroke, immunohistochemical analyses are of interest to specifically visualize constituents like the endothelium. Changes in immunoreactivity have also been discussed to reflect functional aspects, e.g., the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. This study aimed to characterize the endothelial barrier antigen (EBA as addressed by the antibody SMI-71 in a rat model of embolic stroke, considering FITC-albumin as BBB leakage marker and serum levels of BBB-associated matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs to explore its functional significance. Five and 25 h after ischemia onset, regions with decreased BBB integrity exhibited a reduction in number and area of EBA-immunopositive vessels, while the stained area per vessel was not affected. Surprisingly, EBA content of remaining vessels tended to be increased in areas of BBB dysfunction. Analyses addressing this interrelation resulted in a significant and inverse correlation between the vessels’ EBA content and degree of BBB permeability. In conclusion, these data provide evidence for a functional relationship between EBA-immunoreactivity and BBB dysfunction in experimental ischemic stroke. Further studies are required to explore the underlying mechanisms of altered EBA-immunoreactivity, which might help to identify novel neuroprotective strategies.

  4. The brain response to peripheral insulin declines with age: a contribution of the blood-brain barrier?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sartorius

    Full Text Available It is a matter of debate whether impaired insulin action originates from a defect at the neural level or impaired transport of the hormone into the brain. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of aging on insulin concentrations in the periphery and the central nervous system as well as its impact on insulin-dependent brain activity.Insulin, glucose and albumin concentrations were determined in 160 paired human serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples. Additionally, insulin was applied in young and aged mice by subcutaneous injection or intracerebroventricularly to circumvent the blood-brain barrier. Insulin action and cortical activity were assessed by Western blotting and electrocorticography radiotelemetric measurements.In humans, CSF glucose and insulin concentrations were tightly correlated with the respective serum/plasma concentrations. The CSF/serum ratio for insulin was reduced in older subjects while the CSF/serum ratio for albumin increased with age like for most other proteins. Western blot analysis in murine whole brain lysates revealed impaired phosphorylation of AKT (P-AKT in aged mice following peripheral insulin stimulation whereas P-AKT was comparable to levels in young mice after intracerebroventricular insulin application. As readout for insulin action in the brain, insulin-mediated cortical brain activity instantly increased in young mice subcutaneously injected with insulin but was significantly reduced and delayed in aged mice during the treatment period. When insulin was applied intracerebroventricularly into aged animals, brain activity was readily improved.This study discloses age-dependent changes in insulin CSF/serum ratios in humans. In the elderly, cerebral insulin resistance might be partially attributed to an impaired transport of insulin into the central nervous system.

  5. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ashok K; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  6. Blood Brain Barrier Dysfunction and Delayed Neurological Deficits in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Induced by Blast Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Shetty

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145-323 kPa causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred.

  7. AMYLOID BETA ACCUMULATION IN HIV-1-INFECTED BRAIN: THE ROLE OF THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER

    OpenAIRE

    András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    In recent years we face an increase in the aging of the HIV-1-infected population, which is not only due to effective antiretroviral therapy but also to new infections among older people. Even with the use of the antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders represent an increasing problem as the HIV-1-infected population ages. Increased amyloid beta (Aβ) deposition is characteristic of HIV-1-infected brains, and it has been hypothesized that brain vascular dysfunction contr...

  8. Astrocytic modulation of blood brain barrier: perspectives on Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas, Ricardo; Ávila, Marcos; Gonzalez, Janneth; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos; Báez, Eliana; García-Segura, Luis Miguel; Jurado Coronel, Juan Camilo; Capani, Francisco; Cardona-Gomez, Gloria Patricia; Barreto, George E.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System (CNS) that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells (ECs), pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit (NVU) with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson’s Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the ECs and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions. PMID:25136294

  9. Astrocytic modulation of Blood Brain Barrier: Perspectives on Parkinson´s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo eCabezas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available TThe blood–brain barrier (BBB is a tightly regulated interface in the Central Nervous System that regulates the exchange of molecules in and out from the brain thus maintaining the CNS homeostasis. It is mainly composed of endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes that create a neurovascular unit with the adjacent neurons. Astrocytes are essential for the formation and maintenance of the BBB by providing secreted factors that lead to the adequate association between the cells of the BBB and the formation of strong tight junctions. Under neurological disorders, such as chronic cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, Epilepsy, Alzheimer and Parkinson´s Diseases, a disruption of the BBB takes place, involving a lost in the permeability of the barrier and phenotypical changes in both the endothelial cells and astrocytes. In this aspect, it has been established that the process of reactive gliosis is a common feature of astrocytes during BBB disruption, which has a detrimental effect on the barrier function and a subsequent damage in neuronal survival. In this review we discuss the implications of astrocyte functions in the protection of the BBB, and in the development of Parkinson´s disease and related disorders. Additionally, we highlight the current and future strategies in astrocyte protection aimed at the development of restorative therapies for the BBB in pathological conditions.

  10. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  11. Cerebral circulation, metabolism, and blood-brain barrier of rats in hypocapnic hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, T.; Krieglstein, J.

    1987-03-01

    The effects of hypoxic hypoxia on physiological variables, cerebral circulation, cerebral metabolism, and blood-brain barrier were investigated in conscious, spontaneously breathing rats by exposing them to an atmosphere containing 7% O/sub 2/. Hypoxia affected a marked hypotension, hypocapnia and alkalosis. Cortical tissue high-energy phosphates and glucose content were not affected by hypoxia, glucose 6-phosphate lactate, and pyruvate levels were significantly increased. Blood-brain barrier permeability, regional brain glucose content and lumped constant were not changed by hypoxia. Local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) rose by 40-70% of control values in gray matter and by 80-90% in white matter. Under hypoxia, columns of increased and decreased LCGU and were detectable in cortical gray matter. Color-coded (/sup 14/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiograms of rat brain are shown. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) increased by 50-90% in gray matter and by up to 180% in white matter. Coupling between LCGU and LCBF in hypoxia remained unchanged. The data suggests a stimulation of glycolysis, increased glucose transport into the cell, and increased hexokinase activity. The physiological response of gray and white matter to hypoxia obviously differs. Uncoupling of the relation between LCGU and LCBF does not occur.

  12. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidan AS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Zidan,1,2 Hibah Aldawsari1 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Abstract: Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. Keywords: CNS delivery, sizing, lipid based formulations, quality by design, sertraline hydrochloride

  13. Disruption in the Blood-Brain Barrier: The Missing Link between Brain and Body Inflammation in Bipolar Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P. Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB regulates the transport of micro- and macromolecules between the peripheral blood and the central nervous system (CNS in order to maintain optimal levels of essential nutrients and neurotransmitters in the brain. In addition, the BBB plays a critical role protecting the CNS against neurotoxins. There has been growing evidence that BBB disruption is associated with brain inflammatory conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis. Considering the increasing role of inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD, here we propose a novel model wherein transient or persistent disruption of BBB integrity is associated with decreased CNS protection and increased permeability of proinflammatory (e.g., cytokines, reactive oxygen species substances from the peripheral blood into the brain. These events would trigger the activation of microglial cells and promote localized damage to oligodendrocytes and the myelin sheath, ultimately compromising myelination and the integrity of neural circuits. The potential implications for research in this area and directions for future studies are discussed.

  14. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01–0.03 min−1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20–60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration. (paper)

  15. Modeling localized delivery of Doxorubicin to the brain following focused ultrasound enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-10-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is a well-established chemotherapeutic agent, however it has limited efficacy in treating brain malignancies due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound induced BBB disruption (BBBD) enables efficient delivery of Dox to the brain. For future treatment planning of BBBD-based drug delivery, it is crucial to establish a mathematical framework to predict the effect of transient BBB permeability enhancement on the spatiotemporal distribution of Dox at the targeted area. The constructed model considers Dox concentrations within three compartments (plasma, extracellular, intracellular) that are governed by various transport processes (e.g. diffusion in interstitial space, exchange across vessel wall, clearance by cerebral spinal fluid, uptake by brain cells). By examining several clinical treatment aspects (e.g. sonication scheme, permeability enhancement, injection mode), our simulation results support the experimental findings of optimal interval delay between two consecutive sonications and therapeutically-sufficient intracellular concentration with respect to transfer constant Ktrans range of 0.01-0.03 min-1. Finally, the model suggests that infusion over a short duration (20-60 min) should be employed along with single-sonication or multiple-sonication at 10 min interval to ensure maximum delivery to the intracellular compartment while attaining minimal cardiotoxicity via suppressing peak plasma concentration.

  16. Compromised Blood-Brain Barrier Competence in Remote Brain Areas in Ischemic Stroke Rats at Chronic Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Williams, Stephanie N.; Haim, Eithan D.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a life threatening disease leading to long-term disability in stroke survivors. Cerebral functional insufficiency in chronic stroke might be due to pathological changes in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion, i.e. diaschisis. Previously, we showed that the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) was implicated in subacute diaschisis. The present study investigated BBB competence in chronic diaschisis using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) rat model. Our results demonstrated significant BBB damage mostly in the ipsilateral striatum and motor cortex in rats at 30 days after tMCAO. The BBB alterations were also determined in the contralateral hemisphere via ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses. Major BBB pathological changes in contralateral remote striatum and motor cortex areas included: (1) vacuolated endothelial cells containing large autophagosomes, (2) degenerated pericytes displaying mitochondria with cristae disruption, (3) degenerated astrocytes and perivascular edema, (4) Evans Blue extravasation, and (5) appearance of parenchymal astrogliosis. Importantly, discrete analyses of striatal and motor cortex areas revealed significantly higher autophagosome accumulation in capillaries of ventral striatum and astrogliosis in dorsal striatum in both cerebral hemispheres. These widespread microvascular alterations in ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres suggest persistent and/or continued BBB damage in chronic ischemia. The pathological changes in remote brain areas likely indicate chronic ischemic diaschisis, which should be considered in the development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:24610730

  17. Cellular response of the blood-brain barrier to injury: Potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for brain regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro, M M; Ferreira, R; Bernardino, L; Brito, M A

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells are the main component of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a vital structure for maintaining brain homeostasis that is seriously disrupted in various neurological pathologies. Therefore, vascular-targeted therapies may bring advantages for the prevention and treatment of brain disorders. In this sense, novel methods to identify and evaluate endothelial damage have been developed and include the detection of circulating endothelial cells, endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial microparticles and exosomes. These cells and cellular structures have been documented in numerous diseases, and increasingly in neurodegenerative disorders, which have led many to assume that they can either be possible biomarkers or tools of repair. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss available data on BBB endothelial damage occurring in two pathologies of the central nervous system, Alzheimer's disease and stroke, which exemplify conditions where chronic and acute vascular damage occur, respectively. The ultimate goal is to identify useful biomarkers and/or therapeutic tools in the healthy and diseased brain that can be used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases where BBB permeability and integrity are impaired. PMID:26996728

  18. Lycium barbarum extracts protect the brain from blood-brain barrier disruption and cerebral edema in experimental stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Ischemic stroke is a destructive cerebrovascular disease and a leading cause of death. Yet, no ideal neuroprotective agents are available, leaving prevention an attractive alternative. The extracts from the fruits of Lycium barbarum (LBP, a Chinese anti-aging medicine and food supplement, showed neuroprotective function in the retina when given prophylactically. We aim to evaluate the protective effects of LBP pre-treatment in an experimental stroke model. METHODS: C57BL/6N male mice were first fed with either vehicle (PBS or LBP (1 or 10 mg/kg daily for 7 days. Mice were then subjected to 2-hour transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO by the intraluminal method followed by 22-hour reperfusion upon filament removal. Mice were evaluated for neurological deficits just before sacrifice. Brains were harvested for infarct size estimation, water content measurement, immunohistochemical analysis, and Western blot experiments. Evans blue (EB extravasation was determined to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption after MCAO. RESULTS: LBP pre-treatment significantly improved neurological deficits as well as decreased infarct size, hemispheric swelling, and water content. Fewer apoptotic cells were identified in LBP-treated brains by TUNEL assay. Reduced EB extravasation, fewer IgG-leaky vessels, and up-regulation of occludin expression were also observed in LBP-treated brains. Moreover, immunoreactivity for aquaporin-4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly decreased in LBP-treated brains. CONCLUSIONS: Seven-day oral LBP pre-treatment effectively improved neurological deficits, decreased infarct size and cerebral edema as well as protected the brain from BBB disruption, aquaporin-4 up-regulation, and glial activation. The present study suggests that LBP may be used as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke.

  19. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Haskó

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2; therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1 and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2, GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma.

  20. Evaluation of blood-brain barrier-stealth nanocomposites for in situ glioblastoma theranostics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Yi; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Chen, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Fong-Yu

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy.The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological structure of the blood vessels in the brain. The BBB efficiently traps most therapeutic drugs in the blood vessels and stops them from entering the brain tissue, resulting in a decreased therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we developed BBB-stealth nanocomposites composed of iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) as a safe nanocarrier for glioblastoma therapy. We showed the antitumor activity of Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs using in vitro and in vivo tests. We demonstrated that G23-alg-Fe3O4 NPs crossed the BBB and entered the brain. In situ glioblastoma tumor-bearing mice were used to successfully evaluate the antitumor activity of G23-Dox/alg-Fe3O4 NPs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) confirmed the BBB crossing. The BBB-stealth nanocomposites show great potential for a proof-of-concept clinical trial as a theranostics platform for human brain tumor therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00280c

  1. Abnormal blood-brain barrier permeability in normal appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis investigated by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig Præstekær; Simonsen, Helle Juhl; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics.......To investigate whether blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability is disrupted in normal appearing white matter in MS patients, when compared to healthy controls and whether it is correlated with MS clinical characteristics....

  2. Theoretical Compartment Modeling of DCE-MRI Data Based on the Transport across Physiological Barriers in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fanea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders represent major causes of lost years of healthy life and mortality worldwide. Development of their quantitative interdisciplinary in vivo evaluation is required. Compartment modeling (CM of brain data acquired in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging techniques with clinically available contrast agents can be performed to quantitatively assess brain perfusion. Transport of 1H spins in water molecules across physiological compartmental brain barriers in three different pools was mathematically modeled and theoretically evaluated in this paper and the corresponding theoretical compartment modeling of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data was analyzed. The pools considered were blood, tissue, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. The blood and CSF data were mathematically modeled assuming continuous flow of the 1H spins in these pools. Tissue data was modeled using three CMs. Results in this paper show that transport across physiological brain barriers such as the blood to brain barrier, the extracellular space to the intracellular space barrier, or the blood to CSF barrier can be evaluated quantitatively. Statistical evaluations of this quantitative information may be performed to assess tissue perfusion, barriers' integrity, and CSF flow in vivo in the normal or disease-affected brain or to assess response to therapy.

  3. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, J L;

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per uni...

  4. Quantitation of blood-brain barrier defect by magnetic resonance imaging and gadolinium-DTPA in patients with multiple sclerosis and brain tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Stubgaard, M; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini;

    1990-01-01

    In this study quantitation of the degree of deficiency of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in patients with multiple sclerosis or brain tumors, by using MRI, is shown to be possible. As a measure of permeability of the BBB to Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) the flux per unit of distribution volume per unit...

  5. Compartmentalized coculture of rat brain endothelial cells and astrocytes: a syngenic model to study the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeuse, Ph; Kerkhofs, A; Struys-Ponsar, C; Knoops, B; Remacle, C; van den Bosch de Aguilar, Ph

    2002-11-15

    The specific structure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is based on the partnership of brain endothelial cells and astrocytes. In the last decade, cocultures of these two cell types have been developed as in vitro models. However, these studies did not allow close contacts between both cell types. We report here a syngenic coculture model using rat endothelial cells on one side of a polyethylene terephtalate filter and rat astrocytes on the other. Endothelial cells retain their typical morphology and are factor VIII and OX 26 positive. We optimized the diameter of the membrane pores to establish very close contacts between the cells through the membrane pores without mixing the two cell types. Transmission electron microscopy showed evidence of tight junction formation between the endothelial cells and few pinocytic vesicles. The cocultures reached high electrical resistances up to 1000 Omegacm(2) showing their ability to limit the passage of ions. A 15-fold increase in gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was measured in the endothelial cells in coculture compared to endothelial cell monoculture. Our syngenic coculture represents a useful in vitro model of the rat BBB that may prove to be valuable for studying the passage of substances across the barrier as well as other aspects of the BBB function. PMID:12393158

  6. Drugs developed to treat diabetes, liraglutide and lixisenatide, cross the blood brain barrier and enhance neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Kerry

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, most likely linked to an impairment of insulin signalling in the brain. Therefore, drugs that enhance insulin signalling may have therapeutic potential for AD. Liraglutide (Victoza and exenatide (Byetta are novel long-lasting analogues of the GLP-1 incretin hormone and are currently available to treat diabetes. They facilitate insulin signalling via the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that GLP-1 analogues have a range of neuroprotective properties. GLP-1Rs are expressed in the hippocampal area of the brain an important site of adult neurogenesis and maintenance of cognition and memory formation. Therefore, if GLP-1 analogues can cross the blood brain barrier, diffuse through the brain to reach the receptors and most importantly activate them, their neuroprotective effects may be realized. Results In the present study we profiled the GLP-1 receptor agonists liraglutide (Victoza and lixisenatide (Lyxumia. We measured the kinetics of crossing the blood brain barrier (BBB, activation of the GLP-1R by measuring cAMP levels, and physiological effects in the brain on neuronal stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Both drugs were able to cross the BBB. Lixisenatide crossed the BBB at all doses tested (2.5, 25, or 250 nmol/kg bw ip. when measured 30 min post-injection and at 2.5-25 nmol/kg bw ip. 3 h post-injection. Lixisenatide also enhanced neurogenesis in the brain. Liraglutide crossed the BBB at 25 and 250 nmol/kg ip. but no increase was detectable at 2.5 nmol/kg ip. 30 min post-injection, and at 250 nmol/kg ip. at 3 h post-injection. Liraglutide and lixisenatide enhanced cAMP levels in the brain, with lixisenatide being more effective. Conclusions Our results suggest that these novel incretin analogues cross the BBB and show physiological activity and neurogenesis in the brain, which may be of use as a treatment of

  7. Cellular Apoptosis and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in the Pre-Incubated Chicken Embryo’s Brain by Effect of Electromagnetic Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sima Kalantari; Mohammad Reza Bigdeli; Maryam Shams-Lahijani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electromagnetic fields (EMF) have teratogenic effects during the embryonic development. In current study, histopathological and physiological effects of sinusoidal EMF on the brain were investigated. We sought to determine the apoptosis level and changes in blood brain barrier permeability in brain tissue of pre-incubated white leghorn hen eggs in the field of EMF. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 300 healthy, fresh, and fertilized eggs (55-65 g) were divided ...

  8. Optically enhanced blood-brain-barrier crossing of plasmonic-active nanoparticles in preclinical brain tumor animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Wilson, Christy M.; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M.; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology provides tremendous biomedical opportunities for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. In contrast to conventional chemotherapeutic agents where their actual target delivery cannot be easily imaged, integrating imaging and therapeutic properties into one platform facilitates the understanding of pharmacokinetic profiles, and enables monitoring of the therapeutic process in each individual. Such a concept dubbed "theranostics" potentiates translational research and improves precision medicine. One particular challenging application of theranostics involves imaging and controlled delivery of nanoplatforms across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) into brain tissues. Typically, the BBB hinders paracellular flux of drug molecules into brain parenchyma. BBB disrupting agents (e.g. mannitol, focused ultrasound), however, suffer from poor spatial confinement. It has been a challenge to design a nanoplatform not only acts as a contrast agent but also improves the BBB permeation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of plasmonic gold nanoparticles as both high-resolution optical contrast agent and focalized tumor BBB permeation-inducing agent. We specifically examined the microscopic distribution of nanoparticles in tumor brain animal models. We observed that most nanoparticles accumulated at the tumor periphery or perivascular spaces. Nanoparticles were present in both endothelial cells and interstitial matrices. This study also demonstrated a novel photothermal-induced BBB permeation. Fine-tuning the irradiating energy induced gentle disruption of the vascular integrity, causing short-term extravasation of nanomaterials but without hemorrhage. We conclude that our gold nanoparticles are a powerful biocompatible contrast agent capable of inducing focal BBB permeation, and therefore envision a strong potential of plasmonic gold nanoparticle in future brain tumor imaging and therapy.

  9. Transcriptional profiling of human brain endothelial cells reveals key properties crucial for predictive in vitro blood-brain barrier models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Urich

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BEC constitute the blood-brain barrier (BBB which forms a dynamic interface between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS. This highly specialized interface restricts paracellular diffusion of fluids and solutes including chemicals, toxins and drugs from entering the brain. In this study we compared the transcriptome profiles of the human immortalized brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 and human primary BEC. We identified transcriptional differences in immune response genes which are directly related to the immortalization procedure of the hCMEC/D3 cells. Interestingly, astrocytic co-culturing reduced cell adhesion and migration molecules in both BECs, which possibly could be related to regulation of immune surveillance of the CNS controlled by astrocytic cells within the neurovascular unit. By matching the transcriptome data from these two cell lines with published transcriptional data from freshly isolated mouse BECs, we discovered striking differences that could explain some of the limitations of using cultured BECs to study BBB properties. Key protein classes such as tight junction proteins, transporters and cell surface receptors show differing expression profiles. For example, the claudin-5, occludin and JAM2 expression is dramatically reduced in the two human BEC lines, which likely explains their low transcellular electric resistance and paracellular leakiness. In addition, the human BEC lines express low levels of unique brain endothelial transporters such as Glut1 and Pgp. Cell surface receptors such as LRP1, RAGE and the insulin receptor that are involved in receptor-mediated transport are also expressed at very low levels. Taken together, these data illustrate that BECs lose their unique protein expression pattern outside of their native environment and display a more generic endothelial cell phenotype. A collection of key genes that seems to be highly regulated by the local

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factors enhance the permeability of the mouse blood-brain barrier.

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    Shize Jiang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB impedes entry of many drugs into the brain, limiting clinical efficacy. A safe and efficient method for reversibly increasing BBB permeability would greatly facilitate central nervous system (CNS drug delivery and expand the range of possible therapeutics to include water soluble compounds, proteins, nucleotides, and other large molecules. We examined the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF on BBB permeability in Kunming (KM mice. Human VEGF165 was administered to treatment groups at two concentrations (1.6 or 3.0 µg/mouse, while controls received equal-volume saline. Changes in BBB permeability were measured by parenchymal accumulation of the contrast agent Gd-DTPA as assessed by 7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Mice were then injected with Evans blue, sacrificed 0.5 h later, and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, fixed, and sectioned for histological study. Both VEGF groups exhibited a significantly greater signal intensity from the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia than controls (P<0.001. Evans blue fluorescence intensity was higher in the parenchyma and lower in the cerebrovasculature of VEGF-treated animals compared to controls. No significant brain edema was observed by diffusion weighted MRI (DWI or histological staining. Exogenous application of VEGF can increase the permeability of the BBB without causing brain edema. Pretreatment with VEGF may be a feasible method to facilitate drug delivery into the CNS.

  11. Changes in the permeability of blood brain barrier and endothelial cell damage after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Liu; Jiansheng Li

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of endothelial cells on the permeability of blood brain barrier (BBB) after brain injury and its effect mechanism.DATA SOURCES: We searched for the articles of permeability of BBB and endothelial cell injury after brain ischemia, which were published between January 1982 and December 2005, with the key words of "cerebral ischemia damage,blood brain barrier ( BBB),permeability,effect of endothelial cell (EC) and its variation mechanism"in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were primarily selected. The articles related to the changes in the permeability of BBB and the effect of endothelial cells as well as the change mechanism after cerebral ischemia damage were chosen. Repetitive studies or review articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 55 related articles were collected, and 35 were excluded due to repetitive or review articles, finally 20 articles were involved.DATA SYNTHESIS: The content or viewpoints of involved literatures were analyzed. Cerebral ischemia had damage for endothelial cells, such as the inflow of a lot of Ca2+, the production of nitrogen monoxide and oxygen free radical, and aggravated destruction of BBB. After acceptors of inflammatory mediators on cerebrovascular endothelial cell membrane, such as histamine, bradykinin , 5-hydroxytryptamine and so on are activated, endothelial cells shrink and the permeability of BBB increases. Its mechanism involves in the inflow of extracellular Ca2+and the release of intracellular Ca2+ in the cells. Glycocalyx molecule on the surface of endothelial cell, having structural polytropy, is the determinative factor of the permeability of BBB. VEGF, intensively increasing the vasopermeability and mainly effecting on postcapillary vein and veinlet, is the strongest known blood vessel permeation reagent. Its chronic overexpression in the brain can lead the destruction of BBB.CONCLUSION: The injury of endothelial cell participants in the pathological mechanism of BBB

  12. Tight junctions at the blood brain barrier: physiological architecture and disease-associated dysregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luissint Anny-Claude

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood–brain barrier (BBB, present at the level of the endothelium of cerebral blood vessels, selectively restricts the blood-to-brain paracellular diffusion of compounds; it is mandatory for cerebral homeostasis and proper neuronal function. The barrier properties of these specialized endothelial cells notably depend on tight junctions (TJs between adjacent cells: TJs are dynamic structures consisting of a number of transmembrane and membrane-associated cytoplasmic proteins, which are assembled in a multimolecular complex and acting as a platform for intracellular signaling. Although the structural composition of these complexes has been well described in the recent years, our knowledge about their functional regulation still remains fragmentary. Importantly, pericytes, embedded in the vascular basement membrane, and perivascular microglial cells, astrocytes and neurons contribute to the regulation of endothelial TJs and BBB function, altogether constituting the so-called neurovascular unit. The present review summarizes our current understanding of the structure and functional regulation of endothelial TJs at the BBB. Accumulating evidence points to a correlation between BBB dysfunction, alteration of TJ complexes and progression of a variety of CNS diseases, such as stroke, multiple sclerosis and brain tumors, as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Understanding how TJ integrity is controlled may thus help improve drug delivery across the BBB and the design of therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders.

  13. A unique carrier for delivery of therapeutic compounds beyond the blood-brain barrier.

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    Delara Karkan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic intervention in many neurological diseases is thwarted by the physical obstacle formed by the blood-brain barrier (BBB that excludes most drugs from entering the brain from the blood. Thus, identifying efficacious modes of drug delivery to the brain remains a "holy grail" in molecular medicine and nanobiotechnology. Brain capillaries, that comprise the BBB, possess an endogenous receptor that ferries an iron-transport protein, termed p97 (melanotransferrin, across the BBB. Here, we explored the hypothesis that therapeutic drugs "piggybacked" as conjugates of p97 can be shuttled across the BBB for treatment of otherwise inoperable brain tumors. APPROACH: Human p97 was covalently linked with the chemotherapeutic agents paclitaxel (PTAX or adriamycin (ADR and following intravenous injection, measured their penetration into brain tissue and other organs using radiolabeled and fluorescent derivatives of the drugs. In order to establish efficacy of the conjugates, we used nude mouse models to assess p97-drug conjugate activity towards glioma and mammary tumors growing subcutaneously compared to those growing intracranially. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bolus-injected p97-drug conjugates and unconjugated p97 traversed brain capillary endothelium within a few minutes and accumulated to 1-2% of the injected by 24 hours. Brain delivery with p97-drug conjugates was quantitatively 10 fold higher than with free drug controls. Furthermore, both free-ADR and p97-ADR conjugates equally inhibited the subcutaneous growth of gliomas growing outside the brain. Evocatively, only p97-ADR conjugates significantly prolonged the survival of animals bearing intracranial gliomas or mammary tumors when compared to similar cumulated doses of free-ADR. SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the initial proof of concept for p97 as a carrier capable of shuttling therapeutic levels of drugs from the blood to the brain for the treatment of neurological disorders

  14. Breaking the Blood-Brain Barrier With Mannitol to Aid Stem Cell Therapeutics in the Chronic Stroke Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Naoki; Lee, Jea Young; Acosta, Sandra; Sanberg, Paul R; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeabilizers, such as mannitol, can facilitate peripherally delivered stem cells to exert therapeutic benefits on the stroke brain. Although this BBB permeation-aided stem cell therapy has been demonstrated in the acute stage of stroke, such BBB permeation in the chronic stage of the disease remains to be examined. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats initially received sham surgery or experimental stroke via the 1-h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model. At 1 month after the MCAo surgery, stroke animals were randomly assigned to receive human umbilical cord stem cells only (2 million viable cells), mannitol only (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), combined human umbilical cord stem cells (200,000 viable cells) and mannitol (1.1 mol/L mannitol at 4°C), and vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) only. Stroke animals that received human umbilical cord blood cells alone or combined human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol exhibited significantly improved motor performance and significantly better brain cell survival in the peri-infarct area compared to stroke animals that received vehicle or mannitol alone, with mannitol treatment reducing the stem cell dose necessary to afford functional outcomes. Enhanced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone accompanied the combined treatment of human umbilical cord stem cells and mannitol. We showed that BBB permeation facilitates the therapeutic effects of a low dose of peripherally transplanted stem cells to effectively cause functional improvement and increase neurogenesis in chronic stroke.

  15. Spatiotemporal changes in blood-brain barrier permeability, cerebral blood flow, T2 and diffusion following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Watts, Lora; Long, Justin; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Qiang; Jiang, Zhao; Li, Yunxia; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be impaired following traumatic brain injury (TBI), however the spatiotemporal dynamics of BBB leakage remain incompletely understood. In this study, we evaluated the spatiotemporal evolution of BBB permeability using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and measured the volume transfer coefficient (K(trans)), a quantitative measure of contrast agent leakage across the blood and extravascular compartment. Measurements were made in a controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of mild TBI in rats from 1h to 7 days following TBI. The results were compared with cerebral blood flow, T2 and diffusion MRI from the same animal. Spatially, K(trans) changes were localized to superficial cortical layers within a 1mm thickness, which was dramatically different from the changes in cerebral blood flow, T2 and diffusion, which were localized to not only the superficial layers but also to brain regions up to 2.2mm from the cortical surface. Temporally, K(trans) changes peaked at day 3, similar to CBF and ADC changes, but differed from T2 and FA, whose changes peaked on day 2. The pattern of superficial cortical layer localization of K(trans) was consistent with patterns revealed by Evans Blue extravasation. Collectively, these results suggest that BBB disruption, edema formation, blood flow disturbance and diffusion changes are related to different components of the mechanical impact, and may play different roles in determining injury progression and tissue fate processes following TBI. PMID:27208495

  16. Alterations of intestinal mucosa structure and barrier function following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hua Hang; Ji-Xin Shi; Jie-Shou Li; Wei Wu; Hong-Xia Yin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Gastrointestinal dysfunction is a common complication in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the effect of traumatic brain injury on intestinal mucosa has not been studied previously. The aim of the current study was to explore the alterations of intestinal mucosa morphology and barrier function, and to determine how rapidly the impairment of gut barrier function occurs and how long it persists following traumatic brain injury.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups (6 rats each group) including controls without brain injury and traumatic brain injury groups at hours 3,12, 24, and 72, and on day 7. The intestinal mucosa structure was detected by histopathological examination and electron microscopy. Gut barrier dysfunction was evaluated by detecting serum endotoxin and intestinal permeability. The level of serum endotoxin and intestinal permeability was measured by using chromogenic limulus amebocyte lysate and lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratio, respectively.RESULTS: After traumatic brain injury, the histopathological alterations of gut mucosa occurred rapidly as early as 3 hours and progressed to a serious state, including shedding of epithelial cells, fracture of villi, focal ulcer, fusion of adjacent villi, dilation of central chyle duct, mucosal atrophy,and vascular dilation, congestion and edema in the villous interstitium and lamina propria. Apoptosis of epithelial cells,fracture and sparseness of microvilli, loss of tight junction between enterocytes, damage of mitochondria and endoplasm, were found by electron microscopy. The villous height, crypt depth and surface area in jejunum decreased progressively with the time of brain injury. As compared with that of control group (183.7±41.8 EU/L), serum endotoxin level was signnificantly increased at 3, 12, and 24 hours following TBI (434.8±54.9 EU/L, 324.2±61.7 EU/L and 303.3±60.2 EU/L, respectively), and peaked at 72 hours (560.5±76.2 EU/L), then declined on day 7

  17. Cell-Penetrating Peptides Selectively Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Stalmans

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are a group of peptides, which have the ability to cross cell membrane bilayers. CPPs themselves can exert biological activity and can be formed endogenously. Fragmentary studies demonstrate their ability to enhance transport of different cargoes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB. However, comparative, quantitative data on the BBB permeability of different CPPs are currently lacking. Therefore, the in vivo BBB transport characteristics of five chemically diverse CPPs, i.e. pVEC, SynB3, Tat 47-57, transportan 10 (TP10 and TP10-2, were determined. The results of the multiple time regression (MTR analysis revealed that CPPs show divergent BBB influx properties: Tat 47-57, SynB3, and especially pVEC showed very high unidirectional influx rates of 4.73 μl/(g × min, 5.63 μl/(g × min and 6.02 μl/(g × min, respectively, while the transportan analogs showed a negligible to low brain influx. Using capillary depletion, it was found that 80% of the influxed peptides effectively reached the brain parenchyma. Except for pVEC, all peptides showed a significant efflux out of the brain. Co-injection of pVEC with radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (BSA did not enhance the brain influx of radiodionated BSA, indicating that pVEC does not itself significantly alter the BBB properties. A saturable mechanism could not be demonstrated by co-injecting an excess dose of non-radiolabeled CPP. No significant regional differences in brain influx were observed, with the exception for pVEC, for which the regional variations were only marginal. The observed BBB influx transport properties cannot be correlated with their cell-penetrating ability, and therefore, good CPP properties do not imply efficient brain influx.

  18. Cell-Penetrating Peptides Selectively Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmans, Sofie; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; Polis, Ingeborgh; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of peptides, which have the ability to cross cell membrane bilayers. CPPs themselves can exert biological activity and can be formed endogenously. Fragmentary studies demonstrate their ability to enhance transport of different cargoes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, comparative, quantitative data on the BBB permeability of different CPPs are currently lacking. Therefore, the in vivo BBB transport characteristics of five chemically diverse CPPs, i.e. pVEC, SynB3, Tat 47-57, transportan 10 (TP10) and TP10-2, were determined. The results of the multiple time regression (MTR) analysis revealed that CPPs show divergent BBB influx properties: Tat 47-57, SynB3, and especially pVEC showed very high unidirectional influx rates of 4.73 μl/(g × min), 5.63 μl/(g × min) and 6.02 μl/(g × min), respectively, while the transportan analogs showed a negligible to low brain influx. Using capillary depletion, it was found that 80% of the influxed peptides effectively reached the brain parenchyma. Except for pVEC, all peptides showed a significant efflux out of the brain. Co-injection of pVEC with radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not enhance the brain influx of radiodionated BSA, indicating that pVEC does not itself significantly alter the BBB properties. A saturable mechanism could not be demonstrated by co-injecting an excess dose of non-radiolabeled CPP. No significant regional differences in brain influx were observed, with the exception for pVEC, for which the regional variations were only marginal. The observed BBB influx transport properties cannot be correlated with their cell-penetrating ability, and therefore, good CPP properties do not imply efficient brain influx.

  19. Blood-brain barrier transport of cationized immunoglobulin G: Enhanced delivery compared to native protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.B.; Yang, J.; Pardridge, W.M.

    1989-06-01

    IgG molecules are potential neuropharmaceuticals that may be used for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. However, IgG molecules are excluded from entering brain, owing to a lack of transport of these plasma proteins through the brain capillary wall, or blood-brain barrier (BBB). The possibility of enhanced IgG delivery through the BBB by cationization of the proteins was explored in the present studies. Native bovine IgG molecules were cationized by covalent coupling of hexamethylenediamine and the isoelectric point was raised to greater than 10.7 based on isoelectric focusing studies. Native and cationized IgG molecules were radiolabeled with /sup 125/I and chloramine T. Cationized IgG, but not native IgG, was rapidly taken up by isolated bovine brain microvessels, which were used as an in vitro model system of the BBB. Cationized IgG binding was time and temperature dependent and was saturated by increasing concentrations of unlabeled cationized IgG (dissociation constant of the high-affinity binding site, 0.90 +/- 0.37 microM; Bmax, 1.4 +/- 0.4 nmol per mg of protein). In vivo studies documented enhanced brain uptake of 125I-labeled cationized IgG relative to (3H)albumin, and complete transcytosis of the 125I-labeled cationized IgG molecule through the BBB and into brain parenchyma was demonstrated by thaw-mount autoradiography of frozen sections of rat brain obtained after carotid arterial infusions of 125I-labeled cationized IgG. These studies demonstrate that cationization of IgG molecules greatly facilitates the transport of these plasma proteins through the BBB in vivo, and this process may provide a new strategy for IgG delivery through the BBB.

  20. Dietary Virgin Olive Oil Reduces Blood Brain Barrier Permeability, Brain Edema, and Brain Injury in Rats Subjected to Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mohagheghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that dietary virgin olive oil (VOO reduces hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in rat brain slices. We sought to extend these observations in an in vivo study of rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Four groups, each consisting of 18 Wistar rats, were studied. One group (control received saline, while three treatment groups received oral VOO (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day, respectively. After 30 days, blood lipid profiles were determined, before a 60-min period of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. After 24-h reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, brain edema, and blood brain barrier permeability were each assessed in subgroups of six animals drawn from each main group. VOO reduced the LDL/HDL ratio in doses of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mL/kg/day in comparison to the control group (p < 0.05, and offered cerebroprotection from ischemia-reperfusion. For controls vs. doses of 0.25 vs. 0.5 vs. 0.75 mL/kg/day, attenuated corrected infarct volumes were 207.82 ± 34.29 vs. 206.41 ± 26.23 vs. 124.21 ± 14.73 vs. 108.46 ± 31.63 mm3; brain water content of the infarcted hemisphere was 82 ±± 0.25 vs. 81.5 ± 0.56 vs. 80.5 ± 0.22 vs. 80.5 ± 0.34%; and blood brain barrier permeability of the infarcted hemisphere was 11.31 ± 2.67 vs. 9.21 ± 2.28 vs. 5.83 ± 1.6 vs. 4.43 ± 0.93 µg/g tissue (p < 0.05 for measures in doses 0.5 and 0.75 mL/kg/day vs. controls. Oral administration of VOO reduces infarct volume, brain edema, blood brain barrier permeability, and improves neurologic deficit scores after transient MCAO in rats.

  1. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption And Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renee Jade Turner

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB, increased risk of hemorrhagic complications and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke.

  2. Implications of MMP9 for Blood Brain Barrier Disruption and Hemorrhagic Transformation Following Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Renée J.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), specifically MMP-9 levels following stroke, with such perturbations associated with disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB), increased risk of hemorrhagic complications, and worsened outcome. Despite this, controversy remains as to which cells release MMP-9 at the normal and pathological BBB, with even less clarity in the context of stroke. This may be further complicated by the influence of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment. The aim of the present review is to examine the relationship between neutrophils, MMP-9 and tPA following ischemic stroke to elucidate which cells are responsible for the increases in MMP-9 and resultant barrier changes and hemorrhage observed following stroke. PMID:26973468

  3. Dehydroascorbic acid, a blood–brain barrier transportable form of vitamin C, mediates potent cerebroprotection in experimental stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Judy; Agus, David B.; Winfree, Christopher J.; Kiss, Szilard; William J Mack; Ryan A McTaggart; Choudhri, Tanvir F.; Kim, Louis J.; Mocco, J; Pinsky, David J; Fox, William D.; Israel, Robert J.; Boyd, Thomas A.; Golde, David W.; Connolly, E Sander

    2001-01-01

    Neuronal injury in ischemic stroke is partly mediated by cytotoxic reactive oxygen species. Although the antioxidant ascorbic acid (AA) or vitamin C does not penetrate the blood–brain barrier (BBB), its oxidized form, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), enters the brain by means of facilitative transport. We hypothesized that i.v. DHA would improve outcome after stroke because of its ability to cross the BBB and augment brain antioxidant levels. Reversible or permanent focal ...

  4. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Noack; Sandra Noack; Manuela Buettner; Naim, Hassan Y.; Wolfgang Löscher

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not kno...

  5. Does sumatriptan cross the blood-brain barrier in animals and man?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2010-01-01

    Sumatriptan, a relatively hydrophilic triptan, based on several animal studies has been regarded to be unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In more recent animal studies there are strong indications that sumatriptan to some extent can cross the BBB. The CNS adverse events of sumatriptan...... in migraine patients and normal volunteers also indicate a more general effect of sumatriptan on CNS indicating that the drug can cross the BBB in man. It has been discussed whether a defect in the BBB during migraine attacks could be responsible for a possible central effect of sumatriptan in migraine...

  6. Estrogen provides neuroprotection against brain edema and blood brain barrier disruption through both estrogen receptors α and β following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Naderi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Estrogen (E2 has neuroprotective effects on blood-brain-barrier (BBB after traumatic brain injury (TBI. In order to investigate the roles of estrogen receptors (ERs in these effects, ER-α antagonist (MPP and, ER-β antagonist (PHTPP, or non-selective estrogen receptors antagonist (ICI 182780 were administered. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized rats were divided into 10 groups, as follows: Sham, TBI, E2, oil, MPP+E2, PHTPP+E2, MPP+PHTPP+E2, ICI+E2, MPP, and DMSO. E2 (33.3 µg/Kg or oil were administered 30 min after TBI. 1 dose (150 µg/Kg of each of MPP, PHTPP, and (4 mg/kg ICI182780 was injected two times, 24 hr apart, before TBI and estrogen treatment. BBB disruption (Evans blue content and brain edema (brain water content evaluated 5 hr and 24 hr after the TBI were evaluated, respectively. Results: The results showed that E2 reduced brain edema after TBI compared to vehicle (P

  7. Tailored delivery of analgesic ziconotide across a blood brain barrier model using viral nanocontainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Prachi; O'Neil, Alison; Lin, Emily; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-08-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is often an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of candidate drugs, including peptides, antibiotics, and chemotherapeutic agents. Devising an adroit delivery method to cross the BBB is essential to unlocking widespread application of peptide therapeutics. Presented here is an engineered nanocontainer for delivering peptidic drugs across the BBB encapsulating the analgesic marine snail peptide ziconotide (Prialt®). We developed a bi-functional viral nanocontainer based on the Salmonella typhimurium bacteriophage P22 capsid, genetically incorporating ziconotide in the interior cavity, and chemically attaching cell penetrating HIV-Tat peptide on the exterior of the capsid. Virus like particles (VLPs) of P22 containing ziconotide were successfully transported in several BBB models of rat and human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) using a recyclable noncytotoxic endocytic pathway. This work demonstrates proof in principle for developing a possible alternative to intrathecal injection of ziconotide using a tunable VLP drug delivery nanocontainer to cross the BBB.

  8. Blood-brain barrier disruption: mechanistic links between Western diet consumption and dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Menghsiung Hsu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Both obesity and Alzheimer’s disease are major health burdens in Western societies. While commonly viewed as having separate etiologies, this review highlights data suggesting that intake of Western diets, diets high in saturated fatty acids and simple carbohydrates, may pose a common environmental risk factor contributing to the development of both of these adverse pathologies. We discuss the effects of Western Diet intake on learning and memory processes that are dependent on the hippocampus, as well as the importance of this brain region in both obesity development and the onset of Alzheimer’s and other dementias. A putative mechanism is discussed that mechanistically links Western diet consumption, blood brain barrier degradation, and subsequent hippocampal damage and dementia pathology.

  9. Blood-brain barrier models and their relevance for a successful development of CNS drug delivery systems: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-01

    During the research and development of new drugs directed at the central nervous system, there is a considerable attrition rate caused by their hampered access to the brain by the blood-brain barrier. Throughout the years, several in vitro models have been developed in an attempt to mimic critical functionalities of the blood-brain barrier and reliably predict the permeability of drug candidates. However, the current challenge lies in developing a model that retains fundamental blood-brain barrier characteristics and simultaneously remains compatible with the high throughput demands of pharmaceutical industries. This review firstly describes the roles of all elements of the neurovascular unit and their influence on drug brain penetration. In vitro models, including non-cell based and cell-based models, and in vivo models are herein presented, with a particular emphasis on their methodological aspects. Lastly, their contribution to the improvement of brain drug delivery strategies and drug transport across the blood-brain barrier is also discussed.

  10. Development of an in vitro blood-brain barrier model-cytotoxicity of mercury and aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toimela, Tarja; Mäenpää, Hanna; Mannerström, Marika; Tähti, Hanna

    2004-02-15

    In this study, in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models composed of two different cell types were compared. The aim of our study was to find an alternative human cell line that could be used in BBB models. Inorganic and organic mercury and aluminum were studied as model chemicals in the testing of the system. BBB models were composed of endothelial RBE4 cell line or retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line ARPE-19 and neuronal SH-SY5Y cells as target cells. Glial U-373 MG cells were included in part of the tests to induce the formation of a tighter barrier. Millicell CM filter inserts were coated with rat-tail collagen, and RBE4 or ARPE-19 cells were placed on the filters at the density of 3.5-4 x 10(5) cells/filter. During culture, the state of confluency was microscopically observed and confirmed by the measurement of electrical resistance caused by the developing cell layer. The target cells, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, were plated on the bottom of cell culture wells at the density of 100000 cells/cm(2). In part of the studies, glial U-373 MG cells were placed on the under side of the membrane filter. When confluent filters with ARPE-19 or RBE4 cells were placed on top of the SH-SY5Y cells, different concentrations of mercuric chloride, methyl mercury chloride, and aluminum chloride were added into the filter cups along with a fluorescent tracer. Exposure time was 24 h, after which the cytotoxicity in the SH-SY5Y cell layer, as well as in the ARPE-19 or RBE4 cell layer, was evaluated by the luminescent measurement of total ATP. The leakage of the fluorescent tracer was also monitored. The results showed that both barrier cell types were induced by glial cells. Inorganic and organic mercury caused a leakage of the dye and cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Especially, methyl mercury chloride could exert an effect on target cells before any profound cytotoxicity in barrier cells could be seen. Aluminum did not cause any leakage in the barrier cell layer, and even

  11. Quantitative imaging assessment of blood-brain barrier permeability in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chassidim Yoash

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The blood–brain barrier (BBB is a functional and structural barrier separating the intravascular and neuropil compartments of the brain. It characterizes the vascular bed and is essential for normal brain functions. Dysfunction in the BBB properties have been described in most common neurological disorders, such as stroke, traumatic injuries, intracerebral hemorrhage, tumors, epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders. It is now obvious that the BBB plays an important role in normal brain activity, stressing the need for applicable imaging and assessment methods. Recent advancements in imaging techniques now make it possible to establish sensitive and quantitative methods for the assessment of BBB permeability. However, most of the existing techniques require complicated and demanding dynamic scanning protocols that are impractical and cannot be fulfilled in some cases. We review existing methods for the evaluation of BBB permeability, focusing on quantitative magnetic resonance-based approaches and discuss their drawbacks and limitations. In light of those limitations we propose two new approaches for BBB assessment with less demanding imaging sequences: the “post-pre” and the “linear dynamic” methods, both allow semi-quantitative permeability assessment and localization of dysfunctional BBB with simple/partial dynamic imaging protocols and easy-to-apply analysis algorithms. We present preliminary results and show an example which compares these new methods with the existing standard assessment method. We strongly believe that the establishment of such “easy to use” and reliable imaging methods is essential before BBB assessment can become a routine clinical tool. Large clinical trials are awaited to fully understand the significance of BBB permeability as a biomarker and target for treatment in neurological disorders.

  12. Anti-miR delivery strategies to bypass the blood-brain barrier in glioblastoma therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Geon; Kim, Kang Ho; Seo, Yun Jee; Yang, Heekyoung; Marcusson, Eric G.; Son, Eunju; Lee, Kyoungmin; Sa, Jason K.; Lee, Hye Won; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs called miRNAs are key regulators in various biological processes, including tumor initiation, propagation, and metastasis in glioblastoma as well as other cancers. Recent studies have shown the potential for oncogenic miRNAs as therapeutic targets in glioblastoma. However, the application of antisense oligomers, or anti-miRs, to the brain is limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), when administered in the traditional systemic manner. To induce a therapeutic effect in glioblastoma, anti-miR therapy requires a robust and effective delivery system to overcome this obstacle. To bypass the BBB, different delivery administration methods for anti-miRs were evaluated. Stereotaxic surgery was performed to administer anti-Let-7 through intratumoral (ITu), intrathecal (ITh), and intraventricular (ICV) routes, and each method's efficacy was determined by changes in the expression of anti-Let-7 target genes as well as by immunohistochemical analysis. ITu administration of anti-miRs led to a high rate of anti-miR delivery to tumors in the brain by both bolus and continuous administration. In addition, ICV administration, compared with ITu administration, showed a greater distribution of the miR across entire brain tissues. This study suggests that local administration methods are a promising strategy for anti-miR treatment and may overcome current limitations in the treatment of glioblastoma in preclinical animal models. PMID:27102443

  13. The effects of psychostimulant drugs on blood brain barrier function and neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharanya M Kousik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The blood brain barrier (BBB is a highly dynamic interface between the central nervous system and periphery. The BBB is comprised of a number of components and is part of the larger neuro(gliovascular unit. Current literature suggests that psychostimulant drugs of abuse alter the function of the BBB which likely contributes to the neurotoxicities associated with these drugs. In both preclinical and clinical studies, psychostimulants including methamphetamine, MDMA, cocaine, and nicotine, produce BBB dysfunction through alterations in tight junction protein expression and conformation, increased glial activation, increased enzyme activation related to BBB cytoskeleton remodeling, and induction of neuroinflammatory pathways. These detrimental changes lead to increased permeability of the BBB and subsequent vulnerability of the brain to peripheral toxins. In fact, abuse of these psychostimulants, notably methamphetamine and cocaine, has been shown to increase the invasion of peripheral bacteria and viruses into the brain. Much work in this field has focused on the co-morbidity of psychostimulant abuse and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. As psychostimulants alter BBB permeability, it is likely that this BBB dysfunction results in increased penetration of the HIV virus into the brain thus increasing the risk of and severity of neuroAIDS. This review will provide an overview of the specific changes in components within the BBB associated with psychostimulant abuse as well as the implications of these changes in exacerbating the neuropathology associated with psychostimulant drugs and HIV co-morbidity.

  14. Blood-Brain Barrier Abnormalities Caused by HIV-1 gp120: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Louboutin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB is compromised in many systemic and CNS diseases, including HIV-1 infection of the brain. We studied BBB disruption caused by HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120 as a model. Exposure to gp120, whether acute [by direct intra-caudate-putamen (CP injection] or chronic [using SV(gp120, an experimental model of ongoing production of gp120] disrupted the BBB, and led to leakage of vascular contents. Gp120 was directly toxic to brain endothelial cells. Abnormalities of the BBB reflect the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. These target laminin and attack the tight junctions between endothelial cells and BBB basal laminae. MMP-2 and MMP-9 were upregulated following gp120-injection. Gp120 reduced laminin and tight junction proteins. Reactive oxygen species (ROS activate MMPs. Injecting gp120 induced lipid peroxidation. Gene transfer of antioxidant enzymes protected against gp120-induced BBB abnormalities. NMDA upregulates the proform of MMP-9. Using the NMDA receptor (NMDAR-1 inhibitor, memantine, we observed partial protection from gp120-induced BBB injury. Thus, (1 HIV-envelope gp120 disrupts the BBB; (2 this occurs via lesions in brain microvessels, MMP activation and degradation of vascular basement membrane and vascular tight junctions; (3 NMDAR-1 activation plays a role in this BBB injury; and (4 antioxidant gene delivery as well as NMDAR-1 antagonists may protect the BBB.

  15. Evaluation of the Antidepressant Activity, Hepatotoxicity and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability of Methyl Genipin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Che

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Geniposide (GE is the main bioactive component of Gardeniae Fructus. The hepatotoxicity of geniposide limited clinical application. In order to get a new geniposide derivative that has less hepatotoxicity and still possesses the antidepressant activity, a new C-1 hydroxyl methylation derivative named methyl genipin (MG was synthesized from geniposide. In the present study, we demonstrated that MG did not increase the liver index, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspirate aminotransferase (AST. Histopathological examination suggested that no toxic damages were observed in rats treated orally with MG (0.72 mmol/kg. More importantly, a 7-day treatment with MG at 0.13, 0.26, and 0.52 mmol/kg/day could reduce the duration of immobility. It showed that the antidepressant-like effects of MG were similar to GE in the tail suspension test and the forced swim test. Furthermore, we found MG could be detected in the brain homogenate of mice treated orally with MG 0.52 mmol/kg/day for 1 day by HPLC. The area under the curve (AUC of MG in the brain homogenate was enhanced to 21.7 times that of GE. The brain amount and distribution speed of MG were improved significantly after oral administration. This study demonstrated that MG possessed the antidepressant effects and could cross the blood–brain barrier, but had less hepatotoxicity.

  16. Effect of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier in rats following traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Miao; SU Wei; XU Qiu-ping; HUANG Wei-dong

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effects of Xingnaojing injection on cerebral edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) in rats following traumatic brain injury (TBI).Methods: A total of 108 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were used as subjects and randomly assigned to three groups:sham-operation,TBI and Xingnaojing injection was set up by the improved device of Feeney's weightcontent and BBB permeability expressed as Evans blue content were measured at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after surgery.Results: In sham-operation group, brain water content and Evans blue content in brain tissue were 78.97%±1.22%and 5.13μg±0.71μg. Following TBI, water content in brain tissue was increased significantly at 1, 3, 5 and 7 days (83.49%±0.54%, 82.74%±0.72%, 80.22%±0.68%, 79.21%±0.60%), being significantly higher than that in sham operation group (P<0.05). Evans blue content was increased in TBI group (16.54 μg±0.60 μg, 14.92μg±0.71μg, 12.44 μg ±0.92μg, 10.14μg±0.52 μg) as compared with sham-operation group(P<0.05). After treatment with Xingnaojing injection, brain water content decreased as compared with TBI group (81.91%±1.04%, 80.38%±0.72%, 79.54%±0.58%,78.60%±0.77%, P<0.05). Xingnaojing injection also reduced the leakage of BBB as compared with TBI group (15.11 μg± 0.63 μg, 13.62 μg±0.85μg, 10.06 μg±0.67 μg, 9.54 μg±0.41 μg,P<0.05).Conclusion: Xingnaojing injection could alleviate cerebral edema following TBI via reducing permeability ofBBB.

  17. Separation methods that are capable of revealing blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Alekha K; Elmquist, William F

    2003-11-25

    The objective of this review is to emphasize the application of separation science in evaluating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to drugs and bioactive agents. Several techniques have been utilized to quantitate the BBB permeability. These methods can be classified into two major categories: in vitro or in vivo. The in vivo methods used include brain homogenization, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling, voltametry, autoradiography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, positron emission tomography (PET), intracerebral microdialysis, and brain uptake index (BUI) determination. The in vitro methods include tissue culture and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) technology. Separation methods have always played an important role as adjunct methods to the methods outlined above for the quantitation of BBB permeability and have been utilized the most with brain homogenization, in situ brain perfusion, CSF sampling, intracerebral microdialysis, in vitro tissue culture and IAM chromatography. However, the literature published to date indicates that the separation method has been used the most in conjunction with intracerebral microdialysis and CSF sampling methods. The major advantages of microdialysis sampling in BBB permeability studies is the possibility of online separation and quantitation as well as the need for only a small sample volume for such an analysis. Separation methods are preferred over non-separation methods in BBB permeability evaluation for two main reasons. First, when the selectivity of a determination method is insufficient, interfering substances must be separated from the analyte of interest prior to determination. Secondly, when large number of analytes is to be detected and quantitated by a single analytical procedure, the mixture must be separated to each individual component prior to determination. Chiral separation in particular can be essential to evaluate the stereo-selective permeation and distribution of agents into the

  18. Separation methods that are capable of revealing blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Alekha K; Elmquist, William F

    2003-11-25

    The objective of this review is to emphasize the application of separation science in evaluating the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to drugs and bioactive agents. Several techniques have been utilized to quantitate the BBB permeability. These methods can be classified into two major categories: in vitro or in vivo. The in vivo methods used include brain homogenization, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling, voltametry, autoradiography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, positron emission tomography (PET), intracerebral microdialysis, and brain uptake index (BUI) determination. The in vitro methods include tissue culture and immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) technology. Separation methods have always played an important role as adjunct methods to the methods outlined above for the quantitation of BBB permeability and have been utilized the most with brain homogenization, in situ brain perfusion, CSF sampling, intracerebral microdialysis, in vitro tissue culture and IAM chromatography. However, the literature published to date indicates that the separation method has been used the most in conjunction with intracerebral microdialysis and CSF sampling methods. The major advantages of microdialysis sampling in BBB permeability studies is the possibility of online separation and quantitation as well as the need for only a small sample volume for such an analysis. Separation methods are preferred over non-separation methods in BBB permeability evaluation for two main reasons. First, when the selectivity of a determination method is insufficient, interfering substances must be separated from the analyte of interest prior to determination. Secondly, when large number of analytes is to be detected and quantitated by a single analytical procedure, the mixture must be separated to each individual component prior to determination. Chiral separation in particular can be essential to evaluate the stereo-selective permeation and distribution of agents into the

  19. Human blood-brain barrier insulin-like growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 and IGF-2, may be important regulatory molecules in the CNS. Possible origins of IGFs in brain include either de novo synthesis or transport of circulating IGFs from blood into brain via receptor mediated transcytosis mechanisms at the brain capillary endothelial wall, ie, the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present studies, isolated human brain capillaries are used as an in vitro model system of the human BBB and the characteristics of IGF-1 or IGF-2 binding to this preparation were assessed. The total binding of IGF-2 at 37 degrees C exceeded 130% per mg protein and was threefold greater than the total binding for IGF-1. However, at 37 degrees C nonsaturable binding equaled total binding, suggesting that endocytosis is rate limiting at physiologic temperatures. Binding studies performed at 4 degrees C slowed endocytosis to a greater extent than membrane binding, and specific binding of either IGF-1 or IGF-2 was detectable. Scatchard plots for either peptide were linear and the molar dissociation constant of IGF-1 and IGF-2 binding was 2.1 +/- 0.4 and 1.1 +/- 0.1 nmol/L, respectively. Superphysiologic concentrations of porcine insulin inhibited the binding of both IGF-1 (ED50 = 2 micrograms/mL) and IGF-2 (ED50 = 0.5 microgram/mL). Affinity cross linking of 125I-IGF-1, 125I-IGF-2, and 125I-insulin to isolated human brain capillaries was performed using disuccinimidylsuberate (DSS). These studies revealed a 141 kd binding site for both IGF-1 and IGF-2, and a 133 kd binding site for insulin

  20. Disruption of the blood–brain barrier in pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium, untreated and after anthelmintic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; Marzal, Miguel; Cangalaya, Carla; Balboa, Diana; Orrego, Miguel Ángel; Paredes, Adriana; Gonzales-Gustavson, Eloy; Arroyo, Gianfranco; García, Hector H.; González, Armando E.; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is a widely prevalent disease in the tropics that causes seizures and a variety of neurological symptoms in most of the world. Experimental models are limited and do not allow assessment of the degree of inflammation around brain cysts. The vital dye Evans Blue (EB) was injected into 11 pigs naturally infected with Taenia solium cysts to visually identify the extent of disruption of the blood brain barrier. A total of 369 cysts were recovered from the 11 brains and classified according to the staining of their capsules as blue or unstained. The proportion of cysts with blue capsules was significantly higher in brains from pigs that had received anthelmintic treatment 48 and 120 h before the EB infusion, indicating a greater compromise of the blood brain barrier due to treatment. The model could be useful for understanding the pathology of treatment-induced inflammation in neurocysticercosis. PMID:23684909

  1. Altered blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with prehepatic portal hypertension turns to normal when portal pressure is lowered

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Eizayaga; Camila Scorticati; Juan P Prestifilippo; Salvador Romay; Maria A Fernandez; José L Castro; Abraham Lemberg; Juan C Perazzo

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the blood-brain barrier integrity in prehepatic portal hypertensive rats induced by partial portal vein ligation, at 14 and 40 d after ligation when portal pressure is spontaneously normalized.METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: Group Ⅰ: Sham14d, sham operated; Group Ⅱ: PH14d, portal vein stenosis; (both groups were used 14 days after surgery); Group Ⅲ: Sham40d, Sham operated and Group Ⅳ: PH40d Portal vein stenosis (Groups Ⅱ and Ⅳ used 40 d after surgery). Plasma ammonia,plasma and cerebrospinal fluid protein and liver enzymes concentrations were determined. Trypan and Evans blue dyes, systemically injected, were investigated in hippocampus to study blood-brain barrier integrity. Portal pressure was periodically recorded.RESULTS: Forty days after stricture, portal pressure was normalized, plasma ammonia was moderately high,and both dyes were absent in central nervous system parenchyma. All other parameters were reestablished.When portal pressure was normalized and ammonia level was lowered, but not normal, the altered integrity of blood-brain barrier becomes reestablished.CONCLUSION: The impairment of blood-brain barrier and subsequent normalization could be a mechanism involved in hepatic encephalopathy reversibility. Hemodynamic changes and ammonia could trigger blood-brain barrier alterations and its reestablishment.

  2. Transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol modified liposomes traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianhu Zhou; Chunyuan Wang; Shiqing Feng; Jin Chang; Xiaohong Kong; Yang Liu; Shijie Gao

    2012-01-01

    Naive liposomes can cross the blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier in small amounts. Liposomes modified by a transactivating-transduction protein can deliver antibiotics for the treatment of acute bacterial infection-induced brain inflammation. Liposomes conjugated with polyethylene glycol have the capability of long-term circulation. In this study we prepared transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol-modified liposomes labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate. Thus, liposomes were characterized by transmembrane, long-term circulation and fluorescence tracing. Uptake, cytotoxicity, and the ability of traversing blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers were observed following coculture with human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7). Results demonstrated that the liposomes had good biocompatibility, and low cytotoxicity when cocultured with human breast adenocarcinoma cells. Liposomes could traverse cell membranes and entered the central nervous system and neurocytes through the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers of rats via the systemic circulation. These results verified that fluorescein isothiocyanate-modified transactivating-transduction protein-polyethylene glycol liposomes have the ability to traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers.

  3. Agent based modeling of the effects of potential treatments over the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Motta, Santo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the central nervous system that involves the destruction of the insulating sheath of axons, causing severe disabilities. Since the etiology of the disease is not yet fully understood, the use of novel techniques that may help to understand the disease, to suggest potential therapies and to test the effects of candidate treatments is highly advisable. To this end we developed an agent based model that demonstrated its ability to reproduce the typical oscillatory behavior observed in the most common form of multiple sclerosis, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The model has then been used to test the potential beneficial effects of vitamin D over the disease. Many scientific studies underlined the importance of the blood-brain barrier and of the mechanisms that influence its permeability on the development of the disease. In the present paper we further extend our previously developed model with a mechanism that mimics the blood-brain barrier behavior. The goal of our work is to suggest the best strategies to follow for developing new potential treatments that intervene in the blood-brain barrier. Results suggest that the best treatments should potentially prevent the opening of the blood-brain barrier, as treatments that help in recovering the blood-brain barrier functionality could be less effective. PMID:26343337

  4. Serum Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Predicts Tissue Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Break-Down Products and Therapeutic Efficacy after Penetrating Ballistic-Like Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Angela M; Deng-Bryant, Ying; Johnson, David; Tortella, Frank C; Dave, Jitendra R; Shear, Deborah A; Schmid, Kara E

    2016-01-01

    Acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with neurological dysfunction, changes in brain proteins, and increased serum biomarkers. However, the relationship between these brain proteins and serum biomarkers, and the ability of these serum biomarkers to indicate a neuroprotective/therapeutic response, remains elusive. Penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI) was used to systematically analyze several key TBI biomarkers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its break-down products (BDPs)-ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), α-II spectrin, and α-II spectrin BDPs (SBDPs)-in brain tissues and serum during an extended acute-subacute time-frame. In addition, neurological improvement and serum GFAP theranostic value was evaluated after neuroprotective treatment. In brain tissues, total GFAP increased more than three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI. However, this change was primarily due to GFAP-BDPs which increased to 2.7-4.8 arbitrary units (AU). Alpha-II spectrin was nearly ablated 3 d after PBBI, but somewhat recovered after 7 d. In conjunction with α-II spectrin loss, SBDP-145/150 increased approximately three-fold 2 to 7 d after PBBI (vs. sham, p<0.05). UCH-L1 protein levels were slightly decreased 7 d after PBBI but otherwise were unaffected. Serum GFAP was elevated by 3.2- to 8.8-fold at 2 to 4 h (vs. sham; p<0.05) and the 4 h increase was strongly correlated to 3 d GFAP-BDP abundance (r=0.66; p<0.05). Serum GFAP showed such a strong injury effect that it also was evaluated after therapeutic intervention with cyclosporin A (CsA). Administration of 2.5 mg/kg CsA significantly reduced serum GFAP elevation by 22.4-fold 2 h after PBBI (vs. PBBI+vehicle; p<0.05) and improved neurological function 1 d post-injury. Serum biomarkers, particularly GFAP, may be correlative tools of brain protein changes and feasible theranostic markers of TBI progression and recovery. PMID:25789543

  5. Computational Prediction of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using Decision Tree Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Huwyler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Predicting blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability is essential to drug development, as a molecule cannot exhibit pharmacological activity within the brain parenchyma without first transiting this barrier. Understanding the process of permeation, however, is complicated by a combination of both limited passive diffusion and active transport. Our aim here was to establish predictive models for BBB drug permeation that include both active and passive transport. A database of 153 compounds was compiled using in vivo surface permeability product (logPS values in rats as a quantitative parameter for BBB permeability. The open source Chemical Development Kit (CDK was used to calculate physico-chemical properties and descriptors. Predictive computational models were implemented by machine learning paradigms (decision tree induction on both descriptor sets. Models with a corrected classification rate (CCR of 90% were established. Mechanistic insight into BBB transport was provided by an Ant Colony Optimization (ACO-based binary classifier analysis to identify the most predictive chemical substructures. Decision trees revealed descriptors of lipophilicity (aLogP and charge (polar surface area, which were also previously described in models of passive diffusion. However, measures of molecular geometry and connectivity were found to be related to an active drug transport component.

  6. Tight junction modulation of the blood brain barrier: CNS delivery of small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chris; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) represents a major obstacle for targeted drug delivery to the brain for the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Significant advances in barrier research over the past decade has led to the discovery of an increasing number of structural and regulatory proteins in tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ). These discoveries are providing the framework for the development of novel TJ modulators which can act specifically and temporarily to alter BBB function and regulate paracellular uptake of molecules. TJ modulators that have shown therapeutic potential in preclinical models include claudin-5 and occludin siRNAs, peptides derived from zonula occludens toxin as well as synthetic peptides targeting the extracellular loops of TJs. Adding to the array of modulating agents are novel mechanisms of BBB regulation such as focused ultrasound (FUS). This review will give a succinct overview of BBB biology and TJ modulation in general. Novel insights into BBB regulation in health and disease will also be summarized.

  7. A Novel Dynamic Neonatal Blood-Brain Barrier on a Chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir P Deosarkar

    Full Text Available Studies of neonatal neural pathologies and development of appropriate therapeutics are hampered by a lack of relevant in vitro models of neonatal blood-brain barrier (BBB. To establish such a model, we have developed a novel blood-brain barrier on a chip (B3C that comprises a tissue compartment and vascular channels placed side-by-side mimicking the three-dimensional morphology, size and flow characteristics of microvessels in vivo. Rat brain endothelial cells (RBEC isolated from neonatal rats were seeded in the vascular channels of B3C and maintained under shear flow conditions, while neonatal rat astrocytes were cultured under static conditions in the tissue compartment of the B3C. RBEC formed continuous endothelial lining with a central lumen along the length of the vascular channels of B3C and exhibited tight junction formation, as measured by the expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1. ZO-1 expression significantly increased with shear flow in the vascular channels and with the presence of astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM or astrocytes cultured in the tissue compartment. Consistent with in vivo BBB, B3C allowed endfeet-like astrocyte-endothelial cell interactions through a porous interface that separates the tissue compartment containing cultured astrocytes from the cultured RBEC in the vascular channels. The permeability of fluorescent 40 kDa dextran from vascular channel to the tissue compartment significantly decreased when RBEC were cultured in the presence of astrocytes or ACM (from 41.0 ± 0.9 x 10-6 cm/s to 2.9 ± 1.0 x 10-6 cm/s or 1.1±0.4 x 10-6 cm/s, respectively. Measurement of electrical resistance in B3C further supports that the addition of ACM significantly improves the barrier function in neonatal RBEC. Moreover, B3C exhibits significantly improved barrier characteristics compared to the transwell model and B3C permeability was not significantly different from the in vivo BBB permeability in neonatal rats. In summary, we

  8. Liposomes Coloaded with Elacridar and Tariquidar To Modulate the P-Glycoprotein at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Montesinos, Rita; Béduneau, Arnaud; Lamprecht, Alf; Pellequer, Yann

    2015-11-01

    This study prepared three liposomal formulations coloaded with elacridar and tariquidar to overcome the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux at the blood-brain barrier. Their pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and impact on the model P-glycoprotein substrate, loperamide, were compared to those for the coadministration of free elacridar plus free tariquidar. After intravenous administration in rats, elacridar and tariquidar in conventional liposomes were rapidly cleared from the bloodstream. Their low levels in the brain did not improve the loperamide brain distribution. Although elacridar and tariquidar in PEGylated liposomes exhibited 2.6 and 1.9 longer half-lives than free elacridar and free tariquidar, respectively, neither their Kp for the brain nor the loperamide brain distribution was improved. However, the conjugation of OX26 F(ab')2 fragments to PEGylated liposomes increased the Kps for the brain of elacridar and tariquidar by 1.4- and 2.1-fold, respectively, in comparison to both free P-gp modulators. Consequently, the Kp for the brain of loperamide increased by 2.7-fold. Moreover, the plasma pharmacokinetic parameters and liver distribution of loperamide were not modified by the PEGylated OX26 F(ab')2 immunoliposomes. Thus, this formulation represents a promising tool for modulating the P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux at the blood-brain barrier and could improve the brain uptake of any P-glycoprotein substrate that is intended to treat central nervous system diseases.

  9. Protective actions of des-acylated ghrelin on brain injury and blood-brain barrier disruption after stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jacqueline M; Taher, Mohammadali; Chin, Kai Yee; Barsby, Tom; Austin, Victoria; Wong, Connie H Y; Andrews, Zane B; Spencer, Sarah J; Miller, Alyson A

    2016-09-01

    The major ghrelin forms, acylated ghrelin and des-acylated ghrelin, are novel gastrointestinal hormones. Moreover, emerging evidence indicates that these peptides may have other functions including neuro- and vaso-protection. Here, we investigated whether post-stroke treatment with acylated ghrelin or des-acylated ghrelin could improve functional and histological endpoints of stroke outcome in mice after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo). We found that des-acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg) improved neurological and functional performance, reduced infarct and swelling, and decreased apoptosis. In addition, it reduced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in vivo and attenuated the hyper-permeability of mouse cerebral microvascular endothelial cells after oxygen glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD + RO). By contrast, acylated ghrelin (1 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg) had no significant effect on these endpoints of stroke outcome. Next we found that des-acylated ghrelin's vasoprotective actions were associated with increased expression of tight junction proteins (occludin and claudin-5), and decreased cell death. Moreover, it attenuated superoxide production, Nox activity and expression of 3-nitrotyrosine. Collectively, these results demonstrate that post-stroke treatment with des-acylated ghrelin, but not acylated ghrelin, protects against ischaemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury and swelling, and BBB disruption, by reducing oxidative and/or nitrosative damage. PMID:27303049

  10. Computing the blood brain barrier (BBB) diffusion coefficient: A molecular dynamics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Pedram, Maysam Z.; Heidari, Hossein; Alasty, Aria

    2016-07-01

    Various physical and biological aspects of the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) structure still remain unfolded. Therefore, among the several mechanisms of drug delivery, only a few have succeeded in breaching this barrier, one of which is the use of Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs). However, a quantitative characterization of the BBB permeability is desirable to find an optimal magnetic force-field. In the present study, a molecular model of the BBB is introduced that precisely represents the interactions between MNPs and the membranes of Endothelial Cells (ECs) that form the BBB. Steered Molecular Dynamics (SMD) simulations of the BBB crossing phenomenon have been carried out. Mathematical modeling of the BBB as an input-output system has been considered from a system dynamics modeling viewpoint, enabling us to analyze the BBB behavior based on a robust model. From this model, the force profile required to overcome the barrier has been extracted for a single NP from the SMD simulations at a range of velocities. Using this data a transfer function model has been obtained and the diffusion coefficient is evaluated. This study is a novel approach to bridge the gap between nanoscale models and microscale models of the BBB. The characteristic diffusion coefficient has the nano-scale molecular effects inherent, furthermore reducing the computational costs of a nano-scale simulation model and enabling much more complex studies to be conducted.

  11. Transport characteristics of guanidino compounds at the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier: relevance to neural disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tachikawa Masanori

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Guanidino compounds (GCs, such as creatine, phosphocreatine, guanidinoacetic acid, creatinine, methylguanidine, guanidinosuccinic acid, γ-guanidinobutyric acid, β-guanidinopropionic acid, guanidinoethane sulfonic acid and α-guanidinoglutaric acid, are present in the mammalian brain. Although creatine and phosphocreatine play important roles in energy homeostasis in the brain, accumulation of GCs may induce epileptic discharges and convulsions. This review focuses on how physiologically important and/or neurotoxic GCs are distributed in the brain under physiological and pathological conditions. Transporters for GCs at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB have emerged as substantial contributors to GCs distribution in the brain. Creatine transporter (CRT/solute carrier (SLC 6A8 expressed at the BBB regulates creatine concentration in the brain, and represents a major pathway for supply of creatine from the circulating blood to the brain. CRT may be a key factor facilitating blood-to-brain guanidinoacetate transport in patients deficient in S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase, the creatine biosynthetic enzyme, resulting in cerebral accumulation of guanidinoacetate. CRT, taurine transporter (TauT/SLC6A6 and organic cation transporter (OCT3/SLC22A3 expressed at the BCSFB are involved in guanidinoacetic acid or creatinine efflux transport from CSF. Interestingly, BBB efflux transport of GCs, including guanidinoacetate and creatinine, is negligible, though the BBB has a variety of efflux transport systems for synthetic precursors of GCs, such as amino acids and neurotransmitters. Instead, the BCSFB functions as a major cerebral clearance system for GCs. In conclusion, transport of GCs at the BBB and BCSFB appears to be the key determinant of the cerebral levels of GCs, and changes in the transport characteristics may cause the abnormal distribution of GCs in the brain seen

  12. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R; Habgood, Mark D; Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M

    2016-01-01

    Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain's internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addition, the appropriate and controlled supply of a wide range of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, monocarboxylates, and vitamins is also essential for normal development and function. These are all cellular functions across the interfaces that separate the brain from the rest of the internal environment of the body. An essential morphological component of all but one of the barriers is the presence of specialized intercellular tight junctions between the cells comprising the interface: endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier itself, cells of the arachnoid membrane, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and tanycytes (specialized glial cells) in the circumventricular organs. In the ependyma lining the cerebral ventricles in the adult brain, the cells are joined by gap junctions, which are not restrictive for intercellular movement of molecules. But in the developing brain, the forerunners of these cells form the neuroepithelium, which restricts exchange of all but the smallest molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and brain interstitial fluid because of the presence of strap junctions between the cells. The intercellular junctions in all these interfaces are the physical basis for their barrier properties. In the blood-brain barrier proper, this is combined with a paucity of vesicular transport that is a characteristic of other vascular beds. Without such a diffusional restrain, the cellular transport mechanisms in the barrier interfaces would be ineffective. Superimposed on these physical structures are physiological mechanisms as the cells of the interfaces contain various metabolic transporters and efflux pumps, often ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, that

  13. Melatonin promotes blood-brain barrier integrity in methamphetamine-induced inflammation in primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumnongprakhon, Pichaya; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Tocharus, Chainarong; Tocharus, Jiraporn

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone and has high potent of antioxidant that is widely reported to be active against methamphetamine (METH)-induced toxicity to neuron, glial cells, and brain endothelial cells. However, the role of melatonin on the inflammatory responses which are mostly caused by blood-brain barrier (BBB) impairment by METH administration has not been investigated. This study used the primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) to determine the protective mechanism of melatonin on METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB via nuclear factor-ĸB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling. Herein, we demonstrated that melatonin reduced the level of the inflammatory mediators, including intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM)-1, matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) caused by METH. These responses were related to the decrease of the expression and translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and the activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX)-2. In addition, melatonin promoted the antioxidant processes, modulated the expression and translocation of Nrf2, and also increased the level of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, NAD (P) H: quinone oxidoreductase (NQO)-1, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase (γ-GCLC), and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) through NOX2 mechanism. In addition, we found that the protective role of melatonin in METH-induced inflammatory responses in the BBB was mediated through melatonin receptors (MT1/2). We concluded that the interaction of melatonin with its receptor prevented METH-induced inflammatory responses by suppressing the NF-κB signaling and promoting the Nrf2 signaling before BBB impairment. PMID:27268413

  14. Review of Brain-Machine Interfaces Used in Neural Prosthetics with New Perspective on Somatosensory Feedback through Method of Signal Breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Gabriel W Vattendahl; Rynes, Mathew L; Kelliher, Zachary; Goodwin, Shikha Jain

    2016-01-01

    The brain-machine interface (BMI) used in neural prosthetics involves recording signals from neuron populations, decoding those signals using mathematical modeling algorithms, and translating the intended action into physical limb movement. Recently, somatosensory feedback has become the focus of many research groups given its ability in increased neural control by the patient and to provide a more natural sensation for the prosthetics. This process involves recording data from force sensitive locations on the prosthetics and encoding these signals to be sent to the brain in the form of electrical stimulation. Tactile sensation has been achieved through peripheral nerve stimulation and direct stimulation of the somatosensory cortex using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS). The initial focus of this paper is to review these principles and link them to modern day applications such as restoring limb use to those who lack such control. With regard to how far the research has come, a new perspective for the signal breakdown concludes the paper, offering ideas for more real somatosensory feedback using ICMS to stimulate particular sensations by differentiating touch sensors and filtering data based on unique frequencies. PMID:27313959

  15. A novel platform for engineering blood-brain barrier-crossing bispecific biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrington, Graham K; Caram-Salas, Nadia; Haqqani, Arsalan S; Brunette, Eric; Eldredge, John; Pepinsky, Blake; Antognetti, Giovanna; Baumann, Ewa; Ding, Wen; Garber, Ellen; Jiang, Susan; Delaney, Christie; Boileau, Eve; Sisk, William P; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2014-11-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the access of therapeutic antibodies to central nervous system (CNS) targets. The engineering of bispecific antibodies in which a therapeutic "arm" is combined with a BBB-transcytosing arm can significantly enhance their brain delivery. The BBB-permeable single-domain antibody FC5 was previously isolated by phenotypic panning of a naive llama single-domain antibody phage display library. In this study, FC5 was engineered as a mono- and bivalent fusion with the human Fc domain to optimize it as a modular brain delivery platform. In vitro studies demonstrated that the bivalent fusion of FC5 with Fc increased the rate of transcytosis (Papp) across brain endothelial monolayer by 25% compared with monovalent fusion. Up to a 30-fold enhanced apparent brain exposure (derived from serum and cerebrospinal fluid pharmacokinetic profiles) of FC5- compared with control domain antibody-Fc fusions after systemic dosing in rats was observed. Systemic pharmacological potency was evaluated in the Hargreaves model of inflammatory pain using the BBB-impermeable neuropeptides dalargin and neuropeptide Y chemically conjugated with FC5-Fc fusion proteins. Improved serum pharmacokinetics of Fc-fused FC5 contributed to a 60-fold increase in pharmacological potency compared with the single-domain version of FC5; bivalent and monovalent FC5 fusions with Fc exhibited similar systemic pharmacological potency. The study demonstrates that modular incorporation of FC5 as the BBB-carrier arm in bispecific antibodies or antibody-drug conjugates offers an avenue to develop pharmacologically active biotherapeutics for CNS indications. PMID:25070367

  16. Early CT perfusion changes and blood-brain barrier permeability after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Amanda; Bharatha, Aditya [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); De Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Kouzmina, Ekaterina [St. Michael' s Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Burgers, Kyle; Lee, Ting [Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Macdonald, R.L. [St. Michael' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Early brain injury (EBI) can occur within 72 h of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). The objective of this study was to determine if there are differences in early CTP parameters (<72 h) with respect to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), cerebral infarction, and functional outcome. We performed a prospective cohort study of aSAH patients admitted to a single tertiary care center. MTT, CBF and blood-brain barrier permeability (PS) were quantified with CTP within 72 h of aneurysm rupture. Primary outcomes were functional outcome by the Modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at 3 months and cerebral infarction. Secondary outcome was the development of DCI. Differences between early CTP parameters were determined with respect to primary and secondary outcomes. Fifty aSAH patients were included in the final analysis. MTT was significantly higher in patients who developed DCI (6.7 ± 1.2 vs 5.9 ± 1.0; p = 0.03) and cerebral infarction (7.0 ± 1.2 vs 5.9 ± 0.9; p = 0.007); however, no difference in MTT was found between patients with and without a poor outcome (mRS > 2). Early CBF and PS did not differ with respect to functional outcome, DCI, and cerebral infarction. Elevated MTT within 72 h of aneurysm rupture is associated with DCI and cerebral infarction but not with long-term functional outcome. Blood-brain barrier permeability, as assessed by CT perfusion, was not associated with DCI or worse outcome in this cohort. (orig.)

  17. Enhanced blood-brain barrier transmigration using a novel transferrin embedded fluorescent magneto-liposome nanoformulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hong; Sagar, Vidya; Agudelo, Marisela; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Subba Rao Atluri, Venkata; Raymond, Andrea; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P.

    2014-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered as the primary impediment barrier for most drugs. Delivering therapeutic agents to the brain is still a big challenge to date. In our study, a dual mechanism, receptor mediation combined with external non-invasive magnetic force, was incorporated into ferrous magnet-based liposomes for BBB transmigration enhancement. The homogenous magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), with a size of ˜10 nm, were synthesized and confirmed by TEM and XRD respectively. The classical magnetism assay showed the presence of the characteristic superparamagnetic property. These MNPs encapsulated in PEGylated fluorescent liposomes as magneto-liposomes (MLs) showed mono-dispersion, ˜130 ± 10 nm diameter, by dynamic laser scattering (DLS) using the lipid-extrusion technique. Remarkably, a magnetite encapsulation efficiency of nearly 60% was achieved. Moreover, the luminescence and hydrodynamic size of the MLs was stable for over two months at 4 ° C. Additionally, the integrity of the ML structure remained unaffected through 120 rounds of circulation mimicking human blood fluid. After biocompatibility confirmation by cytotoxicity evaluation, these fluorescent MLs were further embedded with transferrin and applied to an in vitro BBB transmigration study in the presence or absence of external magnetic force. Comparing with magnetic force- or transferrin receptor-mediated transportation alone, their synergy resulted in 50-100% increased transmigration without affecting the BBB integrity. Consequently, confocal microscopy and iron concentration in BBB-composed cells further confirmed the higher cellular uptake of ML particles due to the synergic effect. Thus, our multifunctional liposomal magnetic nanocarriers possess great potential in particle transmigration across the BBB and may have a bright future in drug delivery to the brain.

  18. Experimental studies on local radiation injuries of the brain as a result of sup(99m)Tc penetration through the blood-brain barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolotov, V.A.; Lomanov, M.F.; Luk' yashin, V.E.; Shimchuk, G.G.; Minakova, E.I.; Lundkvist, Kh.; Rozander, Ch. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Teoreticheskoj i Ehksperimental' noj Fiziki; Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Nevrologii)

    1982-07-01

    Studies on the blood-brain barrier have shown that disturbance of its permeability with reference to some dyes and radioactive tracers precedes histological changes found in the brain tissues. The paper is concerned with the techniques of detection of early changes in the blood-brain barrier during life-time after local irradiation of the brain with the proton beam, 5-7 mm in diameter. The use of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnate makes it possible to give a qualitative evaluation of the time course of radiation reactions in animals and to gain quite rapidly experimental data on the development of radiation injuries without killing large groups of experimental animals.

  19. Computational and in vitro studies of blast-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Del Razo, Mauricio J; Meabon, James S; Huber, B Russell; Peskind, Elaine R; Banks, William A; Mourad, Pierre D; Leveque, Randall J; Cook, David G

    2015-01-01

    There is growing concern that blast-exposed individuals are at risk of developing neurological disorders later in life. Therefore, it is important to understand the dynamic properties of blast forces on brain cells, including the endothelial cells that maintain the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates the passage of nutrients into the brain and protects it from toxins in the blood. To better understand the effect of shock waves on the BBB we have investigated an {\\em in vitro} model in which BBB endothelial cells are grown in transwell vessels and exposed in a shock tube, confirming that BBB integrity is directly related to shock wave intensity. It is difficult to directly measure the forces acting on these cells in the transwell container during the experiments, and so a computational tool has been developed and presented in this paper. Two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations with the Tammann equation of state were used to model the transwell materials, and a high-resolution finite volume method b...

  20. Molecular anatomy of interendothelial junctions in human blood-brain barrier microvessels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej W Vorbrodt

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Immunogold cytochemical procedure was used to study the localization at the ultrastructural level of interendothelial junction-associated protein molecules in the human brain blood microvessels, representing the anatomic site of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. Ultrathin sections of Lowicryl K4M-embedded biopsy specimens of human cerebral cortex obtained during surgical procedures were exposed to specific antibodies, followed by colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies. All tight junction-specific integral membrane (transmembrane proteins--occludin, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM-1, and claudin-5--as well as peripheral zonula occludens protein (ZO-1 were highly expressed. Immunoreactivity of the adherens junction-specific transmembrane protein VE-cadherin was of almost similar intensity. Immunolabeling of the adherens junction-associated peripheral proteins--alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and p120 catenin--although positive, was evidently less intense. The expression of gamma-catenin (plakoglobin was considered questionable because solitary immunosignals (gold particles appeared in only a few microvascular profiles. Double labeling of some sections made possible to observe strict colocalization of the junctional molecules, such as occludin and ZO-1 or JAM-1 and VE-cadherin, in the interendothelial junctions. We found that in human brain microvessels, the interendothelial junctional complexes contain molecular components specific for both tight and adherens junctions. It is assumed that the data obtained can help us find the immunodetectable junctional molecules that can serve as sensitive markers of normal or abnormal function of the BBB.

  1. Clinical trial of blood-brain barrier disruption by pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Alexandre; Canney, Michael; Vignot, Alexandre; Reina, Vincent; Beccaria, Kevin; Horodyckid, Catherine; Karachi, Carine; Leclercq, Delphine; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Capelle, Laurent; Cornu, Philippe; Sanson, Marc; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Idbaih, Ahmed

    2016-06-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the delivery of systemically administered drugs to the brain. Methods to circumvent the BBB have been developed, but none are used in standard clinical practice. The lack of adoption of existing methods is due to procedural invasiveness, serious adverse effects, and the complications associated with performing such techniques coincident with repeated drug administration, which is customary in chemotherapeutic protocols. Pulsed ultrasound, a method for disrupting the BBB, was shown to effectively increase drug concentrations and to slow tumor growth in preclinical studies. We now report the interim results of an ultrasound dose-escalating phase 1/2a clinical trial using an implantable ultrasound device system, SonoCloud, before treatment with carboplatin in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The BBB of each patient was disrupted monthly using pulsed ultrasound in combination with systemically injected microbubbles. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated that the BBB was disrupted at acoustic pressure levels up to 1.1 megapascals without detectable adverse effects on radiologic (MRI) or clinical examination. Our preliminary findings indicate that repeated opening of the BBB using our pulsed ultrasound system, in combination with systemic microbubble injection, is safe and well tolerated in patients with recurrent GBM and has the potential to optimize chemotherapy delivery in the brain. PMID:27306666

  2. Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction as a Hallmark Pathology in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Colin P; O'Keefe, Eoin; Wallace, Eugene; Loftus, Teresa; Keaney, James; Kealy, John; Humphries, Marian M; Molloy, Michael G; Meaney, James F; Farrell, Michael; Campbell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative condition associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. In recent years, attention has focused on emerging evidence linking the development of CTE to concussive injuries in athletes and military personnel; however, the underlying molecular pathobiology of CTE remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is disrupted in regions of dense perivascular p-Tau accumulation in a case of CTE. Immunoreactivity patterns of the BBB-associated tight junction components claudin-5 and zonula occludens-1 were markedly discontinuous or absent in regions of perivascular p-Tau deposition; there was also immunohistochemical evidence of a BBB in these foci. Because the patient was diagnosed premortem clinically as having progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), we also compromised that the CTE alterations appear to be distinct from those in the brain of a patient with PSP. This report represents the first description of BBB dysfunction in a pathologically proven CTE case and suggests a vascular component in the postconcussion cascade of events that may ultimately lead to development of a progressive degenerative disorder. BBB dysfunction may represent a correlate of neural dysfunction in live subjects suspected of being at risk for development of CTE. PMID:27245243

  3. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Urayama

    Full Text Available The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  4. Safety Validation of Repeated Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Focused Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Thiele; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Pilatou, Magdalini; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the brain of multiple sessions of blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption using focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with micro-bubbles over a range of acoustic exposure levels. Six weekly sessions of FUS, using acoustical pressures between 0.66 and 0.80 MPa, were performed under magnetic resonance guidance. The success and degree of BBB disruption was estimated by signal enhancement of post-contrast T1-weighted imaging of the treated area. Histopathological analysis was performed after the last treatment. The consequences of repeated BBB disruption varied from no indications of vascular damage to signs of micro-hemorrhages, macrophage infiltration, micro-scar formations and cystic cavities. The signal enhancement on the contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging had limited value for predicting small-vessel damage. T2-weighted imaging corresponded well with the effects on histopathology and could be used to study treatment effects over time. This study demonstrates that repeated BBB disruption by FUS can be performed with no or limited damage to the brain tissue.

  5. Study on permeability of the recombinant β-NGF through blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Study on the permeability of rhβ-nerve growth factors (NGF) through blood brain barrier (BBB) to provide scientific basis for research of β-NGF in clinical therapeutic application. Methods: to transfect the COS-7 cell line with recombination expressive vector, PcDNA3-β-NGF, by lipofectamine. The proteins, produced in the supernatant by the transfected cells, was isolated and purified by ion exchange chromatography on carboxymethyl cellulose. The biological activity of the purified protein was analyzed by the prospection of processes grow out from PC12 cell line; and the protein was labelled with 125I and injected i.v into rats, and then the radioactivity of rat brain tissue was analyzed by γ scintillometer. Results: The purified protein could stimulate the process growth of PC12 cell line and the results of γ scintigraphy analysis showed that the radioactivity achieved high level in rat brain tissue 30 min after the protein injection. Conclusion: Purified rhβ-NGF has good biological activity and it could partially penetrate the BBB

  6. Preparation of Silica Nanoparticles Loaded with Nootropics and Their In Vivo Permeation through Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Jampilek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of many drugs that target the central nervous system. This paper presents the preparation and characterization of silica-based nanocarriers loaded with piracetam, pentoxifylline, and pyridoxine (drugs from the class of nootropics, which are designed to enhance the permeation of the drugs from the circulatory system through the blood-brain barrier. Their permeation was compared with non-nanoparticle drug substances (bulk materials by means of an in vivo model of rat brain perfusion. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The content of the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers was analysed by elemental analysis and UV spectrometry. Microscopic analysis of visualized silica nanocarriers in the perfused brain tissue was performed. The concentration of the drug substances in the tissue was determined by means of UHPLC-DAD/HRMS LTQ Orbitrap XL. It was found that the drug substances in silica-based nanocarriers permeated through the blood brain barrier to the brain tissue, whereas bulk materials were not detected in the brain.

  7. The interaction of carbon nanotubes with an in vitro blood-brain barrier model and mouse brain in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kafa, Houmam; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Rubio, Noelia; Venner, Kerrie; Anderson, Glenn; Pach, Elzbieta; Ballesteros, Belén; Preston, Jane E.; Abbott, N. Joan; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel nanocarriers with interesting physical and chemical properties. Here we investigate the ability of amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-NH3(+)) to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) in vitro using a co-culture BBB model comprising primary porcine brain endothelial cells (PBEC) and primary rat astrocytes, and in vivo following a systemic administration of radiolabelled f-MWNTs. Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that MWNTs...

  8. MR-Guided Unfocused Ultrasound Disruption of the Rat Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Kelly A.; King, Randy L.; Zaharchuk, Greg; Pauly, Kim Butts

    2011-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound with microbubbles can temporarily disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for drug delivery. Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) can visualize gadolinium passage into the brain, indicating BBB opening. Previous studies used focused ultrasound, which is appropriate for the targeted delivery of drugs. The purpose of this study was to investigate unfocused ultrasound for BBB opening across the whole brain. In 10 rats, gadolinium-based MR contrast agent (Gd; 0.25 ml) was administered concurrent with ultrasound microbubbles (Optison, 0.25 ml) and circulated for 20 sec before sonication. A 753 kHz planar PZT transducer, diameter 1.8 cm, sonicated each rat brain with supplied voltage of 300, 400, or 500 mVpp for 10 sec in continuous wave mode, or at 500 mVpp at 20% duty cycle at 10 Hz for 30-300 sec. After sonication, coronal T1-weighted FSE CE-MRI images were acquired with a 3in surface coil. The imaging protocol was repeated 3-5 times after treatment. One control animal was given Gd and microbubbles, but not sonicated, and the other was given Gd and sonicated without microbubbles. Signal change in ROIs over the muscle, mesencephalon/ventricles, and the cortex/striatum were measured at 3-5 time points up to 36 min after sonication. Signal intensity was converted to % signal change compared to the initial image. In the controls, CE-MRI showed brightening of surrounding structures, but not the brain. In the continuous wave subjects, cortex/striatum signal did not increase, but ventricle/mesenchephalon signal did. Those that received pulsed sonications showed signal increases in both the cortex/striatum and ventricles/mesenchephalon. In conclusion, after pulsed unfocused ultrasound sonication, the BBB is disrupted across the whole brain, including cortex and deep grey matter, while continuous wave sonication affects only the ventricles and possibly deeper structures, without opening the cortex BBB. As time passes, the timeline of Gd passage into the brain

  9. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hongseok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-Ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-08-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs.

  10. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, HongSeok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs. PMID:27510760

  11. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shigehisa Yanagi; Hironobu Tsubouchi; Ayako Miura; Nobuhiro Matsumoto; Masamitsu Nakazato

    2015-01-01

    Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic ...

  12. Oxygen-glucose deprivation increases the enzymatic activity and the microvesicle-mediated release of ectonucleotidases in the cells composing the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceruti, Stefania; Colombo, Laura; Magni, Giulia; Viganò, Francesca; Boccazzi, Marta; Deli, Mária A; Sperlágh, Beáta; Abbracchio, Maria P; Kittel, Agnes

    2011-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), the dynamic interface between the nervous tissue and the blood, is composed by endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their receptors (the purinergic system) constitute a widely diffused signaling system involved in many pathophysiological processes. However, the role of this system in controlling BBB functions is still largely unknown. By using cultures of these three cell types grown separately and a BBB in vitro model consisting of triple co-cultures, we studied for the first time the expression and distribution of the ecto-enzymes nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases, the enzymes which hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides) under control and ischemic (oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro; OGD) conditions. NTPDase1 was detected in all three cell types, whereas NTPDase2 was expressed by astrocytes and pericytes and, to a lesser extent, by endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were extremely susceptible to cell death when OGD was applied to mimic in vitro the cytotoxicity induced by ischemia, whereas astrocytes and pericytes were more resistant. A semi-quantitative assay highlighted markedly increased e-ATPase activity following exposure to OGD in all three cell types, either when grown separately or when co-cultured together to resemble the composition of the BBB. Moreover, electron microscopy analysis showed that both endothelial cells and astrocytes shed microvesicles containing NTPDases from their membrane, which may suggest a novel mechanism to increase the breakdown of ATP released to toxic levels by damaged BBB cells. We hypothesize that this phenomenon could have a protective and/or modulatory effect for brain parenchymal cells. This in vitro model is therefore useful to study the role of extracellular nucleotides in modulating BBB responses to ischemic events, and to develop new effective purinergic-based approaches for brain ischemia.

  13. Permeability analysis of neuroactive drugs through a dynamic microfluidic in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, R; Kim, H

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the permeability analysis of neuroactive drugs and correlation with in vivo brain/plasma ratios in a dynamic microfluidic blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Permeability of seven neuroactive drugs (Ethosuximide, Gabapentin, Sertraline, Sunitinib, Traxoprodil, Varenicline, PF-304014) and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) were quantified in both dynamic (microfluidic) and static (transwell) BBB models, either with brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in monoculture, or in co-culture with glial cells (C6). Dynamic cultures were exposed to 15 dyn/cm(2) shear stress to mimic the in vivo environment. Dynamic models resulted in significantly higher average TEER (respective 5.9-fold and 8.9-fold increase for co-culture and monoculture models) and lower drug permeabilities (average respective decrease of 0.050 and 0.052 log(cm/s) for co-culture and monoculture) than static models; and co-culture models demonstrated higher average TEER (respective 90 and 25% increase for static and dynamic models) and lower drug permeability (average respective decrease of 0.063 and 0.061 log(cm/s) for static and dynamic models) than monoculture models. Correlation of the resultant logP e values [ranging from -4.06 to -3.63 log(cm/s)] with in vivo brain/plasma ratios (ranging from 0.42 to 26.8) showed highly linear correlation (R (2) > 0.85) for all model conditions, indicating the feasibility of the dynamic microfluidic BBB model for prediction of BBB clearance of pharmaceuticals.

  14. Hyperthermic Laser Ablation of Recurrent Glioblastoma Leads to Temporary Disruption of the Peritumoral Blood Brain Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Leuthardt

    Full Text Available Poor central nervous system penetration of cytotoxic drugs due to the blood brain barrier (BBB is a major limiting factor in the treatment of brain tumors. Most recurrent glioblastomas (GBM occur within the peritumoral region. In this study, we describe a hyperthemic method to induce temporary disruption of the peritumoral BBB that can potentially be used to enhance drug delivery.Twenty patients with probable recurrent GBM were enrolled in this study. Fourteen patients were evaluable. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy was applied to achieve both tumor cytoreduction and disruption of the peritumoral BBB. To determine the degree and timing of peritumoral BBB disruption, dynamic contrast-enhancement brain MRI was used to calculate the vascular transfer constant (Ktrans in the peritumoral region as direct measures of BBB permeability before and after laser ablation. Serum levels of brain-specific enolase, also known as neuron-specific enolase, were also measured and used as an independent quantification of BBB disruption.In all 14 evaluable patients, Ktrans levels peaked immediately post laser ablation, followed by a gradual decline over the following 4 weeks. Serum BSE concentrations increased shortly after laser ablation and peaked in 1-3 weeks before decreasing to baseline by 6 weeks.The data from our pilot research support that disruption of the peritumoral BBB was induced by hyperthemia with the peak of high permeability occurring within 1-2 weeks after laser ablation and resolving by 4-6 weeks. This provides a therapeutic window of opportunity during which delivery of BBB-impermeant therapeutic agents may be enhanced.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01851733.

  15. Spatio-temporal analysis of molecular delivery through the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition of gadolinium through ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) openings in the murine hippocampus was investigated. First, wave propagation simulations through the intact mouse skull revealed minimal beam distortion while thermal deposition simulations, at the same sonication parameters used to induce BBB opening in vivo, revealed temperature increases lower than 0.5 0C. The simulation results were validated experimentally in ex vivo skulls (m = 6) and in vitro tissue specimens. Then, in vivo mice (n = 9) were injected with microbubbles (Optison(TM); 25-50 μl) and sonicated (frequency: 1.525 MHz, pressure amplitudes: 0.5-1.1 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duty cycle: 20%, durations: 2-4 shots, 30 s per shot, 30 s interval) at the left hippocampus, through intact skin and skull. Sequential, high-resolution, T1-weighted MRI (9.4 Tesla, in-plane resolution: 75 μm, scan time: 45-180 min) with gadolinium (Omniscan(TM); 0.5 ml) injected intraperitoneally revealed a threshold of the BBB opening at 0.67 MPa and BBB closing within 28 h from opening. The contrast-enhancement area and gadolinium deposition path were monitored over time and the influence of vessel density, size and location was determined. Sonicated arteries, or their immediate surroundings, depicted greater contrast enhancement than sonicated homogeneous brain tissue regions. In conclusion, gadolinium was delivered through a transiently opened BBB and contained to a specific brain region (i.e., the hippocampus) using a single-element focused ultrasound transducer. It was also found that the amount of gadolinium deposited in the hippocampal region increased with the acoustic pressure and that the spatial distribution of the BBB opening was determined not only by the ultrasound beam, but also by the vasculature of the targeted brain region

  16. Blood-brain barrier transport kinetics of the neuromedin peptides NMU, NMN, NMB and NT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Wynendaele, Evelien; Stalmans, Sofie; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; Smolders, Ilse; van Eeckhaut, Ann; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-08-01

    The neuromedin peptides are peripherally and centrally produced, but until now, it is generally believed that they only function as locally acting compounds without any quantitative knowledge about their blood-brain barrier (BBB) passage. Here, we characterize the transport kinetics of four neuromedins (NMU, NMN, NMB and NT) across the BBB, as well as their metabolization profile, and evaluate if they can act as endocrine hormones. Using the in vivo mouse model, multiple time regression (MTR), capillary depletion (CD) and brain efflux studies were performed. Data was fitted using linear (NMU, NT and NMB) or biphasic modeling (NMU and NMN). Three of the four investigated peptides, i.e. NMU, NT and NMN, showed a significant influx into the brain with unidirectional influx rate constants of 1.31 and 0.75 μL/(g × min) for NMU and NT respectively and initial influx constants (K1) of 72.14 and 7.55 μL/(g × min) and net influx constants (K) of 1.28 and 1.36 × 10(-16) μL/(g×min) for NMU and NMN respectively. The influx of NMB was negligible. Only NMN and NT showed a significant efflux out of the brain with an efflux constant (kout) of 0.042 min(-1) and 0.053 min(-1) respectively. Our results indicate that locally produced neuromedin peptides and/or fragments can be transported through the whole body, including passing the BBB, and taken up by different organs/tissues, supporting the idea that the neuromedins could have a much bigger role in the regulation of biological processes than currently assumed. PMID:27040796

  17. Tempol modulates changes in xenobiotic permeability and occludin oligomeric assemblies at the blood-brain barrier during inflammatory pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lochhead, Jeffrey J; McCaffrey, Gwen; Sanchez-Covarrubias, Lucy; Finch, Jessica D.; DeMarco, Kristin M; Quigley, Colleen E.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ronaldson, Patrick T

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has shown that λ-carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammatory pain (CIP) can alter tight junction (TJ) protein expression and/or assembly leading to changes in blood-brain barrier xenobiotic permeability. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress during CIP is unknown. ROS (i.e., superoxide) are known to cause cellular damage in response to pain/inflammation. Therefore, we examined oxidative stress-associated effects at the blood-brain ba...

  18. STAT1 signaling modulates HIV-1–induced inflammatory responses and leukocyte transmigration across the blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Yang, Bo; Gendelman, Howard E; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship among neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, and progressive HIV-1 infection as they affect the onset and development of neuroAIDS is incompletely understood. One possible link is signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways. These respond to proinflammatory and regulatory factors and could affect neuroinflammatory responses induced from infected cells and disease-affected brain tissue. Our previous works demonstrated that HIV-1 activ...

  19. Impact of standing wave effects on transcranial focused ultrasound disruption of the blood-brain barrier in a rat model

    OpenAIRE

    O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    Microbubble mediated disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound shows great potential as a therapy for a wide range of brain disorders. This technique is currently at the pre-clinical stage and important work is being conducted in animal models. Measurements of standing waves in ex vivo rat skulls were conducted using an optical hydrophone and a geometry dependence was identified. Standing waves could not be eliminated through the use of sw...

  20. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete t...

  1. Blood-brain barrier delivery of protein and non-viral gene therapeutics with molecular Trojan horses

    OpenAIRE

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-01-01

    The products of biotechnology, recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies, antisense, RNA interference, or non-viral gene transfer, cannot be developed as pharmaceuticals for the brain, unless these molecules are re-formulated to enable transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Large molecule drugs, and plasmid DNA, can be delivered across the BBB with receptor-specific molecular Trojan horses. Trojan horse BBB delivery systems, coupled with one of 3 different technology platforms (fus...

  2. Carbenoxolone does not cross the blood brain barrier: an HPLC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnham William M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbenoxolone (CBX is a widely used gap junctional blocker. Considering several reports indicating that transient gap junctional blockade could be a favourable intervention following injuries to central nervous tissue, and some current enthusiasm in studies using systemic injections of CBX, it is imperative to consider the penetration of CBX into central nervous tissue after systemic administrations. So far, only very indirect evidence suggests that CBX penetrates into the central nervous system after systemic administrations. We thus determined the amounts of CBX present in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid of rats after intraperitoneal administration, using high performance liquid chromatography Results CBX was found in the blood of the animals, up to 90 minutes post-injection. However, the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of CBX was negligible. Conclusion Thus, we conclude that, most likely, CBX does not penetrate the blood brain barrier and therefore recommend careful consideration in the manner of administration, when a central effect is desired.

  3. Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability of Normal Appearing White Matter in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik; Krakauer, Martin; Skimminge, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Contrast-enhanced T1 weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used to characterize location and extent of BBB disruptions in focal MS lesions. We employed quantitative T1 measurements before...... and after the intravenous injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent to assess BBB permeability in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS). Methodology/Principal Findings: Fifty-nine patients (38 females) with RR-MS undergoing immunomodulatory treatment...... and nine healthy controls (4 females) underwent quantitative T1 measurements at 3 tesla before and after injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent (0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA). Mean T1 values were calculated for NAWM in patients and total cerebral white matter in healthy subjects for the T1 measurements before...

  4. Bicuculline methiodide in the blood-brain barrier-epileptogen model of epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remler, M.P.; Marcussen, W.H.

    Focal epilepsy can be produced by a blood-brain barrier (BBB)-excluded systemic convulsant (penicillin, folic acid, etc.) in the presence of a focal BBB lesion. Bicuculline methiodide, a gamma-aminobutyric acid blocking epileptogen, crosses the normal BBB of rats poorly and produces no consistent abnormality behaviorally or on EEG at 36 mg/kg. When the BBB is opened in 0.25 ml of cortex by 6,000 rad of alpha particles, by a pin trauma lesion, or by a heat lesion, the rats are normal clinically and on EEG. When these lesioned rats are challenged with bicuculline methiodide, 36 mg/kg, an intense, highly localized epileptiform discharge results that begins approximately 20 min after injection and lasts 30-90 min. The plausibility and experimental utility of the BBB-epileptogen model of epilepsy are enhanced by these observations.

  5. Melatonin Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Permeability via Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himakarnika Alluri

    Full Text Available Microvascular hyperpermeability that occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB often leads to vasogenic brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury (TBI. At a cellular level, tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells maintain the integrity of the BBB via TJ associated proteins particularly, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 that binds to the transmembrane TJPs and actin cytoskeleton intracellularly. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β as well as the proteolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are key mediators of trauma-associated brain edema. Recent studies indicate that melatonin a pineal hormone directly binds to MMP-9 and also might act as its endogenous inhibitor. We hypothesized that melatonin treatment will provide protection against TBI-induced BBB hyperpermeability via MMP-9 inhibition. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells grown as monolayers were used as an in vitro model of the BBB and a mouse model of TBI using a controlled cortical impactor was used for all in vivo studies. IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 2 hours-induced endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability was significantly attenuated by melatonin (10 μg/mL; 1 hour, GM6001 (broad spectrum MMP inhibitor; 10 μM; 1 hour, MMP-9 inhibitor-1 (MMP-9 specific inhibitor; 5 nM; 1 hour or MMP-9 siRNA transfection (48 hours in vitro. Melatonin and MMP-9 inhibitor-1 pretreatment attenuated IL-1β-induced MMP-9 activity, loss of ZO-1 junctional integrity and f-actin stress fiber formation. IL-1β treatment neither affected ZO-1 protein or mRNA expression or cell viability. Acute melatonin treatment attenuated BBB hyperpermeability in a mouse controlled cortical impact model of TBI in vivo. In conclusion, one of the protective effects of melatonin against BBB hyperpermeability occurs due to enhanced BBB integrity via MMP-9 inhibition. In addition, acute melatonin treatment provides protection against BBB

  6. Effect of X-irradiation on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in rats: alteration of the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was designed to evaluate the effects of brain irradiation on the permeability of the blood-brain barrier for methotrexate (MTX). Female WAG/Rij rats were cranially irradiated with a single dose of 20 gy of 300 kV X-rays. At different times (1-15 days) after the exposure the rats were injected intravenously with MTX (25 mg/kg body wt). Irradiation had hardly any effect on the MTX concentrations in the plasma, heart and kidneys as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. However, irradiation resulted in a significant increase of MTX (determined by 125I-radioimmunoassay) in brain tissue per gram wet weight (187.6 +- 17.9 pmol/g vs 46.4 +- 29.3 pmol/g in unirradiated brain). This change in permeability of the blood-brain barrier lasted for about 9 days. The MTX elimination from the irradiated brain was the same as that from the non-irradiated brain. This indicates that only the MTX uptake and not the elimination by the brain was affected by the irradiation treatment. (author)

  7. Metal Nanoparticles as Targeted Carriers Circumventing the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintov, A C; Velasco-Aguirre, C; Gallardo-Toledo, E; Araya, E; Kogan, M J

    2016-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles have been proposed as a carrier and a therapeutic agent in biomedical field because of their unique physiochemical properties. Due to these physicochemical properties, they can be used in different fields of biomedicine. In relation to this, plasmonic nanoparticles can be used for detection and photothermal destruction of tumor cells or toxic protein aggregates, and magnetic iron nanoparticles can be used for imaging and for hyperthermia of tumor cells. In addition, both therapy and imaging can be combined in one nanoparticle system, in a process called theranostics. Metal nanoparticles can be synthesized to modulate their size and shape, and conjugated with different ligands, which allow their application in drug delivery, diagnostics, and treatment of central nervous system diseases. This review is focused on the potential applications of metal nanoparticles and their capability to circumvent the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although many articles have demonstrated delivery of metal nanoparticles to the brain by crossing the BBB after systemic administration, the percentage of the injected dose that reaches this organ is low in comparison to others, especially the liver and spleen. In connection with this drawback, we elaborate the architecture of the BBB and review possible mechanisms to cross this barrier by engineered nanoparticles. The potential uses of metal nanoparticles for treatment of disorders as well as related neurotoxicological considerations are also discussed. Finally, we bring up for discussion a direct and relatively simpler solution to the problem. We discuss this in detail after having proposed the use of the intranasal administration route as a way to circumvent the BBB. This route has not been extensively studied yet for metal nanoparticles, although it could be used as a research tool for mechanistic understanding and toxicity as well as an added value for medical practice. PMID:27678178

  8. Comparison of immortalized bEnd5 and primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells as in vitro blood–brain barrier models for the study of T cell extravasation

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Oliver; Coisne, Caroline; Engelhardt, Britta; Lyck, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Important insights into the molecular mechanism of T cell extravasation across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) have already been obtained using immortalized mouse brain endothelioma cell lines (bEnd). However, compared with bEnd, primary brain endothelial cells have been shown to establish better barrier characteristics, including complex tight junctions and low permeability. In this study, we asked whether bEnd5 and primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells (pMBMECs) were equally sui...

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and blood brain barrier permeability in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang Lei; Xiaohong Zi; Qiuyun Tu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The integrity of the blood brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in the patho-physiological process of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. It has been recently observed that metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is closely related to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injuryOBJECTIVE: This study was designed to observe MMP-9 expression in the rat brain after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and to investigate its correlation to BBB permeability.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This study, a randomized controlled animal experiment, was performed at the Institute of Neurobiology, Central South University between September 2005 and March 2006.MATERIALS: Ninety healthy male SD rats, aged 3-4 months, weighing 200-280g, were used in the present study. Rabbit anti-rat MMP-9 polyclonal antibody (Boster, Wuhan, China) and Evans blue (Sigma, USA) were also used.METHODS: All rats were randomly divided into 9 groups with 10 rats in each group: normal control group, sham-operated group, and ischemia for 2 hours followed by reperfusion for 3,6,12 hours, 1,2,4 and 7 days groups. In the ischemia/reperfusion groups, rats were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury by suture occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. In the sham-operated group, rats were merely subjected to vessel dissociation. In the normal control group, rats were not modeled.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: BBB permeability was assessed by determining the level of effusion of Evans blue. MMP-9 expression was detected by an immunohistochemical method.RESULTS: All 90 rats were included in the final analysis. BBB permeability alteration was closely correlated to ischemia/reperfusion time. BBB permeability began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then it gradually reached a peak level at ischemia/reperfusion for 1 day, and thereafter it gradually decreased. MMP-9 expression began to increase at ischemia/reperfusion for 3 hours, then gradually reached its peak level 2 days after perfusion, and thereafter

  10. Measurement of brain perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability, using dynamic contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted MRI at 3 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B W; Courivaud, Frédéric; Rostrup, Egill;

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of vascular properties is essential to diagnosis and follow-up and basic understanding of pathogenesis in brain tumors. In this study, a procedure is presented that allows concurrent estimation of cerebral perfusion, blood volume, and blood-brain permeability from dynamic T(1)-weighted...... imaging of a bolus of a paramagnetic contrast agent passing through the brain. The methods are applied in patients with brain tumors and in healthy subjects. Perfusion was estimated by model-free deconvolution using Tikhonov's method (gray matter/white matter/tumor: 72 +/- 16/30 +/- 8/56 +/- 45 mL/100 g...... on a pixel-by-pixel basis of cerebral perfusion, cerebral blood volume, and blood-brain barrier permeability....

  11. Transgenic over-expression of slit2 enhances disruption of blood-brain barrier and increases cell death after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Li, Hang; He, Xiao-Fei; Li, Ge; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Feng-Ying; Jia, Huan-Huan; Li, Jiang-Chao; Huang, Ren; Pei, Zhong; Wang, Li-Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-09-19

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of mortality and disability among male adolescents and young adults; and mild traumatic brain injury is the most common type of traumatic brain injury. The disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in brain trauma. Previously, we have found that slit2, a member of slit protein family, increases permeability of BBB. In the present study, we examined the role of slit2 in the pathogenesis of mild TBI in a mouse model of micro TBI. Rhodamine BandPI (PropidiumIodide) staining were used to detect the permeability of BBB and cell death, respectively. The leakage of Rhodamine B and cell death were significantly increased in Slit2-Tg mice than in C57 control mice after micro TBI. The present results suggest that over expression of slit2 plays a detrimental role in the pathophysiology of mild TBI.

  12. Synthesis and deposition of basement membrane proteins by primary brain capillary endothelial cells in a murine model of the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maj Schneider; Birkelund, Svend; Burkhart, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    The brain vascular basement membrane is important for both blood-brain barrier (BBB) development, stability, and barrier integrity and the contribution hereto from brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), pericytes, and astrocytes of the BBB is probably significant. The aim of the present study......-culture, in co-culture with pericytes or mixed glial cells, or as a triple-culture with both pericytes and mixed glial cells. The integrity of the BBB models was validated by measures of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and passive permeability to mannitol. The expression of basement membrane...... proteins was analysed using RT-qPCR, mass spectrometry, and immunocytochemistry. Co-culturing mBCECs with pericytes, mixed glial cells, or both significantly increased the TEER compared to the mono-culture, and a low passive permeability was correlated with high TEER. The mBCECs expressed all major...

  13. Quantitative assessment of P-glycoprotein function in the rat blood-brain barrier by distribution volume of [C-11]verapamil measured with PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bart, J; Willemsen, ATM; Groen, HJM; van der Graaf, WTA; Wegman, TD; Vaalburg, W; de Vries, EGE; Hendrikse, NH

    2003-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a functional barrier that hampers the delivery of various drugs to the brain by its physicoanatomical properties and by the presence of ATP-driven drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The aims of this study were (1) to study whether the distribution volu

  14. Blood-brain barrier permeability mechanisms in view of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujak, Renata; Struck-Lewicka, Wiktoria; Kaliszan, Michał; Kaliszan, Roman; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2015-04-10

    The goal of the present paper was to develop a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method using a simple statistical approach, such as multiple linear regression (MLR) for predicting the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of chemical compounds. The "best" MLR models, comprised logP and either molecular mass (M) or isolated atomic energy (E(isol)), tested on a structurally diverse set of 66 compounds, is characterized the by correlation coefficients (R) around 0.8. The obtained models were validated using leave-one-out (LOO) cross-validation technique and the correlation coefficient of leave-one-out- R(LOO)(2) (Q(2)) was at least 0.6. Analysis of a case from legal medicine demonstrated informative value of our QSAR model. To best authors' knowledge the present study is a first application of the developed QSAR models of BBB permeability to case from the legal medicine. Our data indicate that molecular energy-related descriptors, in combination with the well-known descriptors of lipophilicity may have a supportive value in predicting blood-brain distribution, which is of utmost importance in drug development and toxicological studies.

  15. Role of Microfluidics in Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Cell Culture Modeling: Relevance to CNS Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, Alexander L; Luzgina, Natalia G; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2016-01-01

    In vitro modeling of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB) is critical for pre-clinical evaluation and predicting the permeability of newly developed potentially neurotoxic and neurotrophic drugs. Here we summarize the specific structural and functional features of endothelial cells as a key component of the BBB and compare analysis of different cell culture models in reflecting these features. Particular attention is paid to cellular models of the BBB in microfluidic devices capable of circulating nutrient media to simulate the blood flow of the brain. In these conditions, it is possible to reproduce a number of factors affecting endothelial cells under physiological conditions, including shear stress. In comparison with static cell models, concentration gradients, which determine the velocity of transport of substances, reproduce more accurately conditions of nutrient medium flow, since they eliminate the accumulation of substances near the basal membrane of cells, not typical for the situation in vivo. Co-cultivation of different types of cells forming the BBB, in separate cell chambers connected by microchannels, allows to evaluate the mutual influences of cells under normal conditions and when exposed to the test substance. New experimental possibilities that can be achieved through modeling of BBB in microfluidic devices determine the feasibility of their use in the practice for pre-clinical studies of novel drugs against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26831260

  16. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells support blood-brain barrier integrity via TGF-β signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hae Seo

    Full Text Available Trophic coupling between cerebral endothelium and their neighboring cells is required for the development and maintenance of blood-brain barrier (BBB function. Here we report that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs secrete soluble factor TGF-β1 to support BBB integrity. Firstly, we prepared conditioned media from OPC cultures and added them to cerebral endothelial cultures. Our pharmacological experiments showed that OPC-conditioned media increased expressions of tight-junction proteins and decreased in vitro BBB permeability by activating TGB-β-receptor-MEK/ERK signaling pathway. Secondly, our immuno-electron microscopic observation revealed that in neonatal mouse brains, OPCs attach to cerebral endothelial cells via basal lamina. And finally, we developed a novel transgenic mouse line that TGF-β1 is knocked down specifically in OPCs. Neonates of these OPC-specific TGF-β1 deficient mice (OPC-specific TGF-β1 partial KO mice: PdgfraCre/Tgfb1flox/wt mice or OPC-specific TGF-β1 total KO mice: PdgfraCre/Tgfb1flox/flox mice exhibited cerebral hemorrhage and loss of BBB function. Taken together, our current study demonstrates that OPCs increase BBB tightness by upregulating tight junction proteins via TGF-β signaling. Although astrocytes and pericytes are well-known regulators of BBB maturation and maintenance, these findings indicate that OPCs also play a pivotal role in promoting BBB integrity.

  17. Transport rankings of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs across blood-brain barrier in vitro models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Novakova

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to conduct a comprehensive study about the transport properties of NSAIDs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro. Transport studies with celecoxib, diclofenac, ibuprofen, meloxicam, piroxicam and tenoxicam were accomplished across Transwell models based on cell line PBMEC/C1-2, ECV304 or primary rat brain endothelial cells. Single as well as group substance studies were carried out. In group studies substance group compositions, transport medium and serum content were varied, transport inhibitors verapamil and probenecid were added. Resulted permeability coefficients were compared and normalized to internal standards diazepam and carboxyfluorescein. Transport rankings of NSAIDs across each model were obtained. Single substance studies showed similar rankings as corresponding group studies across PBMEC/C1-2 or ECV304 cell layers. Serum content, glioma conditioned medium and inhibitors probenecid and verapamil influenced resulted permeability significantly. Basic differences of transport properties of the investigated NSAIDs were similar comparing all three in vitro BBB models. Different substance combinations in the group studies and addition of probenecid and verapamil suggested that transporter proteins are involved in the transport of every tested NSAID. Results especially underlined the importance of same experimental conditions (transport medium, serum content, species origin, cell line for proper data comparison.

  18. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  19. Cellular Apoptosis and Blood Brain Barrier Permeability Changes in the Pre-Incubated Chicken Embryo’s Brain by Effect of Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Kalantari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electromagnetic fields (EMF have teratogenic effects during the embryonic development. In current study, histopathological and physiological effects of sinusoidal EMF on the brain were investigated. We sought to determine the apoptosis level and changes in blood brain barrier permeability in brain tissue of pre-incubated white leghorn hen eggs in the field of EMF. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 300 healthy, fresh, and fertilized eggs (55-65 g were divided into experimental (3 groups, N=50, control (N=75 and sham (N=75 groups. Experimental eggs (inside the coil were exposed to 3 different intensities of 1.33, 2.66 and 7.32 mT and sham groups were also located inside the same coil but with no exposure, for 24 hrs before incubation. Control, sham and experimental groups were incubated in an incubator (38±0.5ºC, 60% humidity. Brains of 14 day old chicken embryos of all groups were removed, fixed in formalin (10%, stained with H & E and TUNEL, apoptotic cells were studied under light microscope. Brains of other embryos were prepared for scanning electron microscope. By injections of Evans blue, any possible changes in brain vessels were also investigated. Results: Our results showed electromagnetic fields have toxic effects on cell organelles and cell membranes. EMF would increase the level of cellular apoptosis in the brain. They also would tear up the blood vessels. Thereafter, they would affect the permeability of blood brain barrier of exposed chicken embryos. Conclusion: These findings suggest that electromagnetic fields induce different degrees of brain damages in chicken embryos brain tissue.

  20. Blood-brain barrier transport and protein binding of flumazenil and iomazenil in the rat: implications for neuroreceptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbaek, C; Ott, P; Paulson, O B;

    1999-01-01

    The calculated fraction of receptor ligands available for blood-brain barrier passage in vivo (f(avail)) may differ from in vitro (f(eq)) measurements. This study evaluates the protein-ligand interaction for iomazenil and flumazenil in rats by comparing f(eq) and f(avail). Repeated measurements...

  1. Kinetic modeling of Fe-52/Mn-52m-citrate at the blood-brain barrier by positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonder, C; Wurtenberger, PI; Maguire, RP; Pellikka, R; Leenders, KL

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of iron at the blood-brain barrier of the monkey were studied in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) and the tracer Fe-52/Mn-52m-citrate. Mn-52m is the beta(+)-emitting daughter nuclide of Fe-52 and therefore contributes to the observed signal and background in the PET images

  2. Localization of CGRP, CGRP receptor, PACAP and glutamate in trigeminal ganglion. Relation to the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Salvatore, Christopher A; Johansson, Sara;

    2015-01-01

    ) and related this to the expression of CGRP and its receptor in rhesus trigeminal ganglion. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and glutamate were examined and related to the CGRP system. Furthermore, we examined if the trigeminal ganglion is protected by the blood-brain barrier...

  3. Measurement of blood-brain barrier permeability using dynamic Gd-DTPA scanning--a comparison of methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Tofts, P S

    1992-01-01

    Two recently published methods of blood-brain barrier permeability measurement using Gd-DTPA scanning are compared by authors representing each group. The physiological models are reconciled. Results from both groups agree. These show that the transfer constant (the permeability surface area prod...

  4. Optimal Duration of Acquisition for Dynamic Perfusion CT Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Using the Patlak Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hom, J.; Dankbaar, J. W.; Schneider, T.; Cheng, S. -C.; Bredno, J.; Wintermark, M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A previous study demonstrated the need to use delayed acquisition rather than first-pass data for accurate blood-brain barrier permeability surface product (BBBP) calculation from perfusion CT (PCT) according to the Patlak model, but the optimal duration of the delayed acquis

  5. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea; Smieško, Martin; Culot, Maxime; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Brodin, Birger; Wimmer, Laurin; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2016-06-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We here evaluated piperine and five selected analogs (SCT-66, SCT-64, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399) regarding their BBB permeability. Data were obtained in three in vitro BBB models, namely a recently established human model with immortalized hBMEC cells, a human brain-like endothelial cells (BLEC) model, and a primary animal (bovine endothelial/rat astrocytes co-culture) model. For each compound, quantitative UHPLC-MS/MS methods in the range of 5.00-500ng/mL in the corresponding matrix were developed, and permeability coefficients in the three BBB models were determined. In vitro predictions from the two human BBB models were in good agreement, while permeability data from the animal model differed to some extent, possibly due to protein binding of the screened compounds. In all three BBB models, piperine and SCT-64 displayed the highest BBB permeation potential. This was corroborated by data from in silico prediction. For the other piperine analogs (SCT-66, SCT-29, LAU397, and LAU399), BBB permeability was low to moderate in the two human BBB models, and moderate to high in the animal BBB model. Efflux ratios (ER) calculated from bidirectional permeability experiments indicated that the compounds were likely not substrates of active efflux transporters. PMID:27018328

  6. Assessment of blood–brain barrier disruption using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Heye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the importance of blood–brain barrier (BBB disruption in aging, dementia, stroke and multiple sclerosis in addition to more commonly-studied pathologies such as tumors. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI is a method for studying BBB disruption in vivo. We review pathologies studied, scanning protocols and data analysis procedures to determine the range of available methods and their suitability to different pathologies. We systematically review the existing literature up to February 2014, seeking studies that assessed BBB integrity using T1-weighted DCE-MRI techniques in animals and humans in normal or abnormal brain tissues. The literature search provided 70 studies that were eligible for inclusion, involving 417 animals and 1564 human subjects in total. The pathologies most studied are intracranial neoplasms and acute ischemic strokes. There are large variations in the type of DCE-MRI sequence, the imaging protocols and the contrast agents used. Moreover, studies use a variety of different methods for data analysis, mainly based on model-free measurements and on the Patlak and Tofts models. Consequently, estimated KTrans values varied widely. In conclusion, DCE-MRI is shown to provide valuable information in a large variety of applications, ranging from common applications, such as grading of primary brain tumors, to more recent applications, such as assessment of subtle BBB dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. Further research is required in order to establish consensus-based recommendations for data acquisition and analysis and, hence, improve inter-study comparability and promote wider use of DCE-MRI.

  7. Administration of sesamol improved blood-brain barrier function in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGilder, R L; Kelly, K A; Chua, M D; Ptachcinski, R L; Huber, Jason D

    2009-07-01

    Uncontrolled or poorly controlled blood glucose during diabetes is an important factor in worsened vascular function. While evidence suggests that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a prominent role in development of microangiopathy of the retina, kidney, and nerves, the role oxidative stress plays on blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and structure has lagged behind. In this study, a natural antioxidant, sesamol, was administered to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats to examine the role that oxidative stress plays on BBB structure and function. Experiments were conducted at 56 days after STZ injection. Male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly were divided into four treatment groups CON--control; STZ--STZ-induced diabetes; CON + S--control + sesamol; STZ + S--STZ-induced diabetes + sesamol. Functional and structural changes to the BBB were measured by in situ brain perfusion and western blot analysis of changes in tight junction protein expression. Oxidative stress markers were visualized by fluorescent confocal microscopy and assayed by spectrophotometric analysis. Results demonstrated that the increased BBB permeability observed in STZ-induced diabetic rats was attenuated in STZ + S rats to levels observed in CON. Sesamol treatment reduced the negative impact of STZ-induced diabetes on tight junction protein expression in isolated cerebral microvessels. Oxidative stress markers were elevated in STZ as compared to CON. STZ + S displayed an improved antioxidant capacity which led to a reduced expression of superoxide and peroxynitrite and reduced lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, this study showed that sesamol treatment enhanced antioxidant capacity of the diabetic brain and led to decreased perturbation of hyperglycemia-induced changes in BBB structure and function.

  8. ST6GALNAC5 Expression Decreases the Interactions between Breast Cancer Cells and the Human Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Delannoy, Clément Philippe; Dewald, Justine Hélène; Gosselet, Fabien; Cecchelli, Romeo; Julien, Sylvain; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Delannoy, Philippe; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ST6GALNAC5 gene that encodes an α2,6-sialyltransferase involved in the biosynthesis of α-series gangliosides, was previously identified as one of the genes that mediate breast cancer metastasis to the brain. We have shown that the expression of ST6GALNAC5 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells resulted in the expression of GD1α ganglioside at the cell surface. By using a human blood-brain barrier in vitro model recently developed, consisting in CD34+ derived endothelial cells co-cultivated with pericytes, we show that ST6GALNAC5 expression decreased the interactions between the breast cancer cells and the human blood-brain barrier. PMID:27529215

  9. Modulation of intercellular junctions by cyclic-ADT peptides as a method to reversibly increase blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laksitorini, Marlyn D; Kiptoo, Paul K; On, Ngoc H; Thliveris, James A; Miller, Donald W; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2015-03-01

    It is challenging to deliver molecules to the brain for diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. This is primarily because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts the entry of many molecules into the brain. In this study, cyclic-ADT peptides (ADTC1, ADTC5, and ADTC6) have been shown to modify the BBB to enhance the delivery of marker molecules [e.g., (14) C-mannitol, gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentacetate (Gd-DTPA)] to the brain via the paracellular pathways of the BBB. The hypothesis is that these peptides modulate cadherin interactions in the adherens junctions of the vascular endothelial cells forming the BBB to increase paracellular drug permeation. In vitro studies indicated that ADTC5 had the best profile to inhibit adherens junction resealing in Madin-Darby canine kidney cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 0.3 mM) with a maximal response at 0.4 mM. Under the current experimental conditions, ADTC5 improved the delivery of (14) C-mannitol to the brain about twofold compared with the negative control in the in situ rat brain perfusion model. Furthermore, ADTC5 peptide increased in vivo delivery of Gd-DTPA to the brain of Balb/c mice when administered intravenously. In conclusion, ADTC5 has the potential to improve delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the brain.

  10. Preventive administration of cromakalim reduces aquaporin-4 expression and blood-brain barrier permeability in a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shilei Wang; Yanting Wang; Yan Jiang; Qingxian Chang; Peng Wang; Shiduan Wang

    2011-01-01

    Cromakalim, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, exhibits protective effects on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, there is controversy as to whether this effect is associated with aquaporin-4 and blood-brain barrier permeability. Immunohistochemistry results show that preventive administration of cromakalim decreased aquaporin-4 and IgG protein expression in rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury; it also reduced blood-brain barrier permeability, and alleviated brain edema, ultimately providing neuroprotection.

  11. Breakdown of Epithelial Barrier Integrity and Overdrive Activation of Alveolar Epithelial Cells in the Pathogenesis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Lung Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehisa Yanagi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual alveolar epithelial cells (AECs collaboratively form a tight barrier between atmosphere and fluid-filled tissue to enable normal gas exchange. The tight junctions of AECs provide intercellular sealing and are integral to the maintenance of the AEC barrier integrity. Disruption and failure of reconstitution of AEC barrier result in catastrophic consequences, leading to alveolar flooding and subsequent devastating fibrotic scarring. Recent evidences reveal that many of the fibrotic lung diseases involve AECs both as a frequent target of injury and as a driver of ongoing pathological processes. Aberrantly activated AECs express most of the growth factors and chemokines responsible for the proliferation, migration, and activation of fibroblasts. Current evidences suggest that AECs may acquire overdrive activation in the initial step of fibrosis by several mechanisms, including abnormal recapitulation of the developmental pathway, defects of the molecules essential for epithelial integrity, and acceleration of aging-related properties. Among these initial triggering events, epithelial Pten, a multiple phosphatase that negatively regulates the PI3K/Akt pathway and is crucial for lung development, is essential for the prevention of alveolar flooding and lung fibrosis through the regulation of AEC barrier integrity after injury. Reestablishment of AEC barrier integrity also involves the deployment of specialized stem/progenitor cells.

  12. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas D Arvanitis

    Full Text Available The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001 larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2 = 0.78. Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  13. Angiotensin II AT1 receptor blockers as treatments for inflammatory brain disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra, Juan M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of brain AngII (angiotensin II) depend on AT1 receptor (AngII type 1 receptor) stimulation and include regulation of cerebrovascular flow, autonomic and hormonal systems, stress, innate immune response and behaviour. Excessive brain AT1 receptor activity associates with hypertension and heart failure, brain ischaemia, abnormal stress responses, blood–brain barrier breakdown and inflammation. These are risk factors leading to neuronal injury, the incidence and progression of neurod...

  14. Fingolimod prevents blood-brain barrier disruption induced by the sera from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Nishihara

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Effect of fingolimod in multiple sclerosis (MS is thought to involve the prevention of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid tissues, thereby reducing autoaggressive lymphocyte infiltration into the central nervous system across blood-brain barrier (BBB. However, brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs represent a possible additional target for fingolimod in MS patients by directly repairing the function of BBB, as S1P receptors are also expressed by BMECs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of fingolimod on BMECs and clarified whether fingolimod-phosphate restores the BBB function after exposure to MS sera. METHODS: Changes in tight junction proteins, adhesion molecules and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER in BMECs were evaluated following incubation in conditioned medium with or without fingolimod/fingolimod-phosphate. In addition, the effects of sera derived from MS patients, including those in the relapse phase of relapse-remitting (RR MS, stable phase of RRMS and secondary progressive MS (SPMS, on the function of BBB in the presence of fingolimod-phosphate were assessed. RESULTS: Incubation with fingolimod-phosphate increased the claudin-5 protein levels and TEER values in BMECs, although it did not change the amount of occludin, ICAM-1 or MelCAM proteins. Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate restored the changes in the claudin-5 and VCAM-1 protein/mRNA levels and TEER values in BMECs after exposure to MS sera. CONCLUSIONS: Pretreatment with fingolimod-phosphate prevents BBB disruption caused by both RRMS and SPMS sera via the upregulation of claudin-5 and downregulation of VCAM-1 in BMECs, suggesting that fingolimod-phosphate is capable of directly modifying the BBB. BMECs represent a possible therapeutic target for fingolimod in MS patients.

  15. Consequences of repeated blood-brain barrier disruption in football players.

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    Nicola Marchi

    Full Text Available The acknowledgement of risks for traumatic brain injury in American football players has prompted studies for sideline concussion diagnosis and testing for neurological deficits. While concussions are recognized etiological factors for a spectrum of neurological sequelae, the consequences of sub-concussive events are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD and the accompanying surge of the astrocytic protein S100B in blood may cause an immune response associated with production of auto-antibodies. We also wished to determine whether these events result in disrupted white matter on diffusion tensor imaging (DT scans. Players from three college football teams were enrolled (total of 67 volunteers. None of the players experienced a concussion. Blood samples were collected before and after games (n = 57; the number of head hits in all players was monitored by movie review and post-game interviews. S100B serum levels and auto-antibodies against S100B were measured and correlated by direct and reverse immunoassays (n = 15 players; 5 games. A subset of players underwent DTI scans pre- and post-season and after a 6-month interval (n = 10. Cognitive and functional assessments were also performed. After a game, transient BBB damage measured by serum S100B was detected only in players experiencing the greatest number of sub-concussive head hits. Elevated levels of auto-antibodies against S100B were elevated only after repeated sub-concussive events characterized by BBBD. Serum levels of S100B auto-antibodies also predicted persistence of MRI-DTI abnormalities which in turn correlated with cognitive changes. Even in the absence of concussion, football players may experience repeated BBBD and serum surges of the potential auto-antigen S100B. The correlation of serum S100B, auto-antibodies and DTI changes support a link between repeated BBBD and future risk for cognitive changes.

  16. Candida albicans infection leads to barrier breakdown and a MAPK/NF-κB mediated stress response in the intestinal epithelial cell line C2BBe1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Michael; Pohlers, Susann; Schulze, Sylvie; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Piegsa, Judith; Weber, Michael; Martin, Ronny; Hünniger, Kerstin; Linde, Jörg; Guthke, Reinhard; Kurzai, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) form a tight barrier to the gut lumen. Paracellular permeability of the intestinal barrier is regulated by tight junction proteins and can be modulated by microorganisms and other stimuli. The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, a frequent commensal of the human mucosa, has the capacity of traversing this barrier and establishing systemic disease within the host. Infection of polarized C2BBe1 IEC with wild-type C. albicans led to a transient increase of transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) before subsequent barrier disruption, accompanied by a strong decline of junctional protein levels and substantial, but considerably delayed cytotoxicity. Time-resolved microarray-based transcriptome analysis of C. albicans challenged IEC revealed a prominent role of NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways in the response to infection. Hence, we inferred a gene regulatory network based on differentially expressed NF-κB and MAPK pathway components and their predicted transcriptional targets. The network model predicted activation of GDF15 by NF-κB was experimentally validated. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in C. albicans infected C2BBe1 cells led to enhanced cytotoxicity in the epithelial cells. Taken together our study identifies NF-κB activation as an important protective signalling pathway in the response of epithelial cells to C. albicans. PMID:26752615

  17. Molecular biology of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers: similarities and differences

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    Redzic Zoran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient processing of information by the central nervous system (CNS represents an important evolutionary advantage. Thus, homeostatic mechanisms have developed that provide appropriate circumstances for neuronal signaling, including a highly controlled and stable microenvironment. To provide such a milieu for neurons, extracellular fluids of the CNS are separated from the changeable environment of blood at three major interfaces: at the brain capillaries by the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which is localized at the level of the endothelial cells and separates brain interstitial fluid (ISF from blood; at the epithelial layer of four choroid plexuses, the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier (BCSFB, which separates CSF from the CP ISF, and at the arachnoid barrier. The two barriers that represent the largest interface between blood and brain extracellular fluids, the BBB and the BCSFB, prevent the free paracellular diffusion of polar molecules by complex morphological features, including tight junctions (TJs that interconnect the endothelial and epithelial cells, respectively. The first part of this review focuses on the molecular biology of TJs and adherens junctions in the brain capillary endothelial cells and in the CP epithelial cells. However, normal function of the CNS depends on a constant supply of essential molecules, like glucose and amino acids from the blood, exchange of electrolytes between brain extracellular fluids and blood, as well as on efficient removal of metabolic waste products and excess neurotransmitters from the brain ISF. Therefore, a number of specific transport proteins are expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells and CP epithelial cells that provide transport of nutrients and ions into the CNS and removal of waste products and ions from the CSF. The second part of this review concentrates on the molecular biology of various solute carrier (SLC transport proteins at those two barriers and underlines

  18. Blood-brain barrier permeability after gamma whole-body irradiation: an in vivo microdialysis study

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    Diserbo, M.; Agin, A.; Lamproglou, I.; Mauris, J.; Staali, F.; Multon, E.; Amourette, C

    2002-07-01

    The effects of total-body irradiation on the permeability of rat striatal blood-brain barrier (BBB) to [{sup 3}H]{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid (AIBA) and [{sup 14}C] sucrose were investigated using the microdialysis technique. Seven days, 3 and 6 weeks, and 3, 5, and 8 months after gamma exposure at a dose of 4.5 Gy, no modification of the permeability to both [{sup 3}H]AIBA and [{sup 14}C] sucrose was observed. But, in the course of the initial syndrome, we observed a significant but transient increase in the BBB permeability to the two markers between 3 and 17 h after exposure. A secondary transient 'opening' of the BBB to [{sup 14}C] sucrose was noticed about 28 h following irradiation without the corresponding increase in BBB permeability to [{sup 3}H]AIBA. On the contrary, the transport of [{sup 3}H]AIBA through the BBB was decreased between 33 and 47 h postradiation. In conclusion, our experiments showed early modifications of BBB permeability after a moderate-dose whole-body exposure. Confirmation of these results with other tracers, in another experimental model or in humans, would have clinical applications for designing appropriate pharmacotherapy in radiotherapy and treatment of accidental overexposure. (author)

  19. MMP-independent role of TIMP-1 at the blood brain barrier during viral encephalomyelitis

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    Carine Savarin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the CNS (central nervous system with a sublethal neurotropic coronavirus (JHMV induces a vigorous inflammatory response. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are essential to control infectious virus but at the cost of tissue damage. An enigma in understanding the contribution of T cell subsets in pathogenesis resides in their distinct migration pattern across the BBB (blood brain barrier. CD4+ T cells transiently accumulate within the perivascular space, whereas CD8+ T cells migrate directly into the CNS parenchyma. As MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases facilitate migration across the glia limitans, specific expression of the TIMP (tissue inhibitor of MMPs-1 by CD4+ T cells present in the perivascular cuffs suggested that TIMP-1 is responsible for stalling CD4+ T cell migration into the CNS parenchyma. Using TIMP-1 deficient mice, the present data demonstrate an increase rather than a decrease in CD4+ T cell accumulation within the perivascular space during JHMV infection. Whereas virus control was not affected by perivascular retention of CD4+ T cells, disease severity was decreased and associated with reduced IFNγ (interferon γ production. Moreover, decreased CD4+ T cell recruitment into the CNS parenchyma of TIMP-1 deficient mice was not associated with impaired T cell recruiting chemokines or MMP expression, and no compensation by other TIMP molecules was identified. These data suggest an MMP-independent role of TIMP-1 in regulating CD4+ T cell access into the CNS parenchyma during acute JHMV encephalitis.

  20. The effect on the blood-brain barrier of intracarotid contrast media--iopamidol and diatrizoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, K; Nakamura, R; Ishii, Y

    1988-02-01

    The effect on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was assessed following intracarotid injection of iopamidol (300 mgI/ml.), meglumine diatrizoate (305 mgI/ml.) and isotonic saline. Four ml/kg of 2% Evans blue solution and 0.1 mCi 99m Technetium-DTPA (Tc-DTPA) were used as tracers. No blue staining was observed in the saline group. Three out of 10 animals showed blue staining in the iopamidol group. All ten animals showed blue staining in the diatrizoate group. There were statistical differences between the diatrizoate and the other two groups. Tc-DTPA extravasation was 0.37 +/- 0.13 (mean +/- SD) in the saline group, 1.29 +/- 0.77 in the iopamidol group and 3.88 +/- 1.67 in the diatrizoate group. Statistical differences were observed among three groups. These observations suggest that Tc-DTPA is very sensitive in detecting a subtle BBB injury and that iopamidol had a significantly smaller effect on the BBB than did meglumine diatrizoate.

  1. Caffeine blocks disruption of blood brain barrier in a rabbit model of Alzheimer's disease

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    Ghribi Othman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High levels of serum cholesterol and disruptions of the blood brain barrier (BBB have all been implicated as underlying mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from studies conducted in animals and humans suggest that caffeine might be protective against Alzheimer's disease but by poorly understood mechanisms. Using rabbits fed a cholesterol-enriched diet, we tested our hypothesis that chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced disruptions of the BBB. New Zealand rabbits were fed a 2% cholesterol-enriched diet, and 3 mg caffeine was administered daily in drinking water for 12 weeks. Total cholesterol and caffeine concentrations from blood were measured. Olfactory bulbs (and for some studies hippocampus and cerebral cortex as well were evaluated for BBB leakage, BBB tight junction protein expression levels, activation of astrocytes, and microglia density using histological, immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. We found that caffeine blocked high cholesterol diet-induced increases in extravasation of IgG and fibrinogen, increases in leakage of Evan's blue dye, decreases in levels of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, increases in astrocytes activation and microglia density where IgG extravasation was present. Chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced increases in disruptions of the BBB, and caffeine and drugs similar to caffeine might be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Crossing the blood-brain-barrier with transferrin conjugated carbon dots: A zebrafish model study.

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    Li, Shanghao; Peng, Zhili; Dallman, Julia; Baker, James; Othman, Abdelhameed M; Blackwelder, Patrica L; Leblanc, Roger M

    2016-09-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) in biological systems remains a major medical challenge due to the tight junctions between endothelial cells known as the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Here we use a zebrafish model to explore the possibility of using transferrin-conjugated carbon dots (C-Dots) to ferry compounds across the BBB. C-Dots have previously been reported to inhibit protein fibrillation, and they are also used to deliver drugs for disease treatment. In terms of the potential medical application of C-Dots for the treatment of CNS diseases, one of the most formidable challenges is how to deliver them inside the CNS. To achieve this in this study, human transferrin was covalently conjugated to C-Dots. The conjugates were then injected into the vasculature of zebrafish to examine the possibility of crossing the BBB in vivo via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. The experimental observations suggest that the transferrin-C-Dots can enter the CNS while C-Dots alone cannot. PMID:27187189

  3. Three-Dimensional Blood-Brain Barrier Model for in vitro Studies of Neurovascular Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hansang; Seo, Ji Hae; Wong, Keith H. K.; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Park, Joseph; Bong, Kiwan; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Irimia, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) pathology leads to neurovascular disorders and is an important target for therapies. However, the study of BBB pathology is difficult in the absence of models that are simple and relevant. In vivo animal models are highly relevant, however they are hampered by complex, multi-cellular interactions that are difficult to decouple. In vitro models of BBB are simpler, however they have limited functionality and relevance to disease processes. To address these limitations, we developed a 3-dimensional (3D) model of BBB on a microfluidic platform. We verified the tightness of the BBB by showing its ability to reduce the leakage of dyes and to block the transmigration of immune cells towards chemoattractants. Moreover, we verified the localization at endothelial cell boundaries of ZO-1 and VE-Cadherin, two components of tight and adherens junctions. To validate the functionality of the BBB model, we probed its disruption by neuro-inflammation mediators and ischemic conditions and measured the protective function of antioxidant and ROCK-inhibitor treatments. Overall, our 3D BBB model provides a robust platform, adequate for detailed functional studies of BBB and for the screening of BBB-targeting drugs in neurological diseases.

  4. Predictive model of blood-brain barrier penetration of organic compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-lei MA; Cheng CHEN; Jie YANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To build up a theoretical model of organic compounds for the prediction of the activity of small molecules through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in drug design. Methods: A training set of 37 structurally diverse compounds was used to construct quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models. Intermolecular and intramolecular solute descriptors were calculated using molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics simulations, quantum chemistry and so on. The QSAR models were optimized using multidimensional linear regression fitting and stepwise method. A test set of 8 compounds was evaluated using the models as part of a validation process. Results: Significant QSAR models (R=0.955, s=0.232) of the BBB penetration of organic compounds were constructed. BBB penetrationwas found to depend upon the polar surface area, the octanol/water partition coefficient, Balaban Index, the strength of a small molecule to combine with the membrane-water complex, and the changeability of the structure of a solute-membrane-water complex. Conclusion: The QSAR models indicate that the distribution of organic molecules through BBB is not only influenced by organic solutes themselves, but also relates to the properties of the solute-membrane-water complex, that is, interactions of the molecule with the phospholipid-rich regions of cellular membranes.

  5. Transporter protein and drug-conjugated gold nanoparticles capable of bypassing the blood-brain barrier.

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    Zhang, Yanhua; Walker, Janelle Buttry; Minic, Zeljka; Liu, Fangchao; Goshgarian, Harry; Mao, Guangzhao

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) is challenging due to the inability of many drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we show that wheat germ agglutinin horse radish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) chemically conjugated to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can be transported to the spinal cord and brainstem following intramuscular injection into the diaphragm of rats. We synthesized and determined the size and chemical composition of a three-part nanoconjugate consisting of WGA-HRP, AuNPs, and drugs for the treatment of diaphragm paralysis associated with high cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Upon injection into the diaphragm muscle of rats, we show that the nanoconjugate is capable of delivering the drug at a much lower dose than the unconjugated drug injected systemically to effectively induce respiratory recovery in rats following SCI. This study not only demonstrates a promising strategy to deliver drugs to the CNS bypassing the BBB but also contributes a potential nanotherapy for the treatment of respiratory muscle paralysis resulted from cervical SCI. PMID:27180729

  6. The effect of regadenoson-induced transient disruption of the blood–brain barrier on temozolomide delivery to normal rat brain

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    Jackson, Sadhana; Anders, Nicole M.; Mangraviti, Antonella; Wanjiku, Teresia M.; Sankey, Eric W.; Liu, Ann; Brem, Henry; Tyler, Betty; Rudek, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) significantly reduces the delivery of many systemically administered agents to the central nervous system. Although temozolomide is the only chemotherapy to improve survival in patients with glioblastoma, its concentration in brain is only 20 % of that in blood. Regadenoson, an FDA approved adenosine receptor agonist used for cardiac stress testing, transiently disrupts rodent BBB allowing high molecular weight dextran (70 kD) to enter the brain. This study was conducted to determine if regadenoson could facilitate entry of temozolomide into normal rodent brain. Temozolomide (50 mg/kg) was administered by oral gavage to non-tumor bearing F344 rats. Two-thirds of the animals received a single dose of intravenous regadenoson 60–90 min later. All animals were sacrificed 120 or 360 min after temozolomide administration. Brain and plasma temozolomide concentrations were determined using HPLC/MS/MS. Brain temozolomide concentrations were significantly higher at 120 min when it was given with regadenoson versus alone (8.1 ± 2.7 and 5.1 ± 3.5 μg/g, P <0.05). A similar trend was noted in brain:plasma ratios (0.45 ± 0.08 and 0.29 ± 0.09, P < 0.05). Brain concentrations and brain:plasma ratios were not significantly different 360 min after temozolomide administration. No differences were seen in plasma temozolomide concentrations with or without regadenoson. These results suggest co-administration of regadenoson with temozolomide results in 60 % higher temozolomide levels in normal brain without affecting plasma concentrations. This novel approach to increasing intracranial concentrations of systemically administered agents has potential to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy in neuro-oncologic disorders. PMID:26626489

  7. Correlation of aquaporin-4 expression to blood-brain barrier permeability in rats with focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengcheng Xu; Haorong Feng; Jinbu Xu; Yongping Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic cerebrovascular disease causes injury to the blood-brain barrier. The occurrence of brain edema is associated with aquaporin expression following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the correlation of aquaporin-4 expression to brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability in brain tissues of rat models of ischemia/reperfusion. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized control experiment was performed at the Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Anesthesiology, Xuzhou Medical College, China from December 2006 to October 2007. MATERIALS: A total of 112 adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 220-250 g, were used to establish rat models of middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion by the suture method. Rabbit anti-aquaporin-4 (Santa Cruz, USA) and Evans blue (Sigma, USA) were used to analyze the tissue. METHODS: The rats were randomized into sham-operated (n = 16) and ischemia/reperfusion (n = 96) groups. There were 6 time points in the ischemia/reperfusion group, comprising 4, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after reperfusion, with 16 rats for each time point. Rat models in the sham-operated group at 4 hours after surgery and rat models in the ischemia/reperfusion group at different time points were equally and randomly assigned into 4 different subgroups. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Brain water content on the ischemic side and the control side was measured using the dry-wet weight method. Blood-brain barrier function was determined by Evans Blue. Aquaporin-4 expression surrounding the ischemic focus, as well as the correlation of aquaporin-4 expression with brain water content and Evans blue staining, were measured using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Brain water content on the ischemic side significantly increased at 12 hours after reperfusion, reached a peak at 48 hours, and was still high at 72 hours. Brain water content was greater on the ischemic hemispheres, compared with the control hemispheres

  8. Efficiency of drug delivery enhanced by acoustic pressure during blood–brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Feng-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Feng-Yi Yang, Pei-Yi LeeDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanPurpose: We evaluated the delivery efficiency of intravenously injected large molecular agents, before and after disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB-D), induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) using various acoustic parameters.Materials and methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue (EB) before or after BBB-D induction...

  9. Mechanism of blood-brain barrier impairment after mild traumatic brain injury caused by blast shock waves and its relationship with delayed nerve dysfunction

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    Zhao-xi XU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI caused by blast shock waves (BSWs is one of the most common injuries among soldiers in the war. Such mTBI can also happen in civilians if exposed to shock waves of accidental explosion disasters, bomb attacks by terrorists and so on. This injury often results in cognitive problems, memory dysfunction and emotional disorder, and these neurological deficits are closely related to the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The present paper discusses mainly the relationship between dysfunction or disruption of BBB and inflammatory reaction in mild brain injury associated with explosive shock wave and effects of early intervention of oxidative stress injury, repairing the BBB and blocking inflammation on relieving delayed neurological deficits. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.05.15

  10. Development of a solvent-free analytical method for paracetamol quantitative determination in Blood Brain Barrier in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Marie-Hélène; Vekris, Antonios; Bousses, Christine; Mordelet, Elodie; Buhannic, Nathalie; Séguard, Céline; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Weksler, Babette B; Petry, Klaus G; Gaudin, Karen

    2015-04-15

    A Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography/Diode Array Detection method was developed and validated for paracetamol quantification in cell culture fluid from an in vitro Blood Brain Barrier model. The chromatographic method and sample preparation were developed using only aqueous solvents. The column was a XTerra RP18 150 × 4.6mm, 3.5 μm with a guard column XTerra RP18 20 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 μm at 35 °C and the mobile phase was composed by 100% formate buffer 20 mM at pH 4 and flow rate was set at 1 mL/min. The detection was at 242 nm. The sample was injected at 10 μL. Validation was performed using the accuracy profile approach. The analytical procedure was validated with the acceptance limits at ± 10% over a range of concentration from 1 to 58 mg L(-1). The procedure was then used in routine to determine paracetamol concentration in a brain blood barrier in vitro model. Application of the Unither paracetamol formulation in Blood Brain Barrier model allowed the determination and comparison of the transcellular passage of paracetamol at 37 °C and 4 °C, that excludes paracellular or non specific leakage.

  11. Prolonged Morphine Exposure Induces Increased Firm Adhesion in an in Vitro Model of the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazza, Marianne; Pirrone, Vanessa; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, Will; Lin, Wei; Feng, Rui; Maubert, Monique E.; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Nonnemacher, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) has been defined as a critically important protective barrier that is involved in providing essential biologic, physiologic, and immunologic separation between the central nervous system (CNS) and the periphery. Insults to the BBB can cause overall barrier damage or deregulation of the careful homeostasis maintained between the periphery and the CNS. These insults can, therefore, yield numerous phenotypes including increased overall permeability, interendothelial gap formation, alterations in cytokine and chemokine secretion, and accelerated cellular passage. The current studies expose the human brain microvascular endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3, to prolonged morphine exposure and aim to uncover the mechanisms underlying alterations in barrier function in vitro. These studies show alterations in the mRNA and protein levels of the cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule that correlate with an increased firm adhesion of the CD3+ subpopulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overall, these studies suggest that prolonged morphine exposure may result in increased cell migration into the CNS, which may accelerate pathological processes in many diseases that involve the BBB. PMID:27294916

  12. A Novel Algorithm for the Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Suggests That Brain Topical Application of Endothelin-1 Does Not Cause Early Opening of the Barrier in Rats

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    D. Jorks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of different experimental methods for ex vivo assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB opening based on Evans blue dye extravasation. However, these methods require many different steps to prepare the brain and need special equipment for quantification. We here report a novel, simple, and fast semiquantitative algorithm to assess BBB integrity ex vivo. The method is particularly suitable for cranial window experiments, since it keeps the spatial information about where the BBB opened. We validated the algorithm using sham controls and the established model of brain topical application of the bile salt dehydrocholate for early BBB disruption. We then studied spreading depolarizations in the presence and the absence of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and found no evidence of early BBB opening (three-hour time window. The algorithm can be used, for example, to assess BBB permeability ex vivo in combination with dynamic in vivo studies of BBB opening.

  13. The role of shear stress in Blood-Brain Barrier endothelial physiology

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    Puvenna Vikram

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most important and often neglected physiological stimuli contributing to the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs into a blood-brain barrier (BBB phenotype is shear stress (SS. With the use of a well established humanized dynamic in vitro BBB model and cDNA microarrays, we have profiled the effect of SS in the induction/suppression of ECs genes and related functions. Results Specifically, we found a significant upregulation of tight and adherens junctions proteins and genes. Trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER and permeability measurements to know substances have shown that SS promoted the formation of a tight and highly selective BBB. SS also increased the RNA level of multidrug resistance transporters, ion channels, and several p450 enzymes. The RNA level of a number of specialized carrier-mediated transport systems (e.g., glucose, monocarboxylic acid, etc. was also upregulated. RNA levels of modulatory enzymes of the glycolytic pathway (e.g., lactate dehydrogenase were downregulated by SS while those involved in the Krebs cycle (e.g., lactate and other dehydrogenases were upregulated. Measurements of glucose consumption versus lactate production showed that SS negatively modulated the glycolytic bioenergetic pathways of glucose metabolism in favor of the more efficient aerobic respiration. BBB ECs are responsive to inflammatory stimuli. Our data showed that SS increased the RNA levels of integrins and vascular adhesion molecules. SS also inhibited endothelial cell cycle via regulation of BTG family proteins encoding genes. This was paralleled by significant increase in the cytoskeletal protein content while that of membrane, cytosol, and nuclear sub-cellular fractions decreased. Furthermore, analysis of 2D gel electrophoresis (which allows identifying a large number of proteins per sample of EC proteins extracted from membrane sub-cellular endothelial fractions showed that SS increased

  14. MRI study on reversible and irreversible electroporation induced blood brain barrier disruption.

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    Mohammad Hjouj

    Full Text Available Electroporation, is known to induce cell membrane permeabilization in the reversible (RE mode and cell death in the irreversible (IRE mode. Using an experimental system designed to produce a continuum of IRE followed by RE around a single electrode we used MRI to study the effects of electroporation on the brain. Fifty-four rats were injected with Gd-DOTA and treated with a G25 electrode implanted 5.5 mm deep into the striata. MRI was acquired immediately after treatment, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min, and up to three weeks following the treatment using: T1W, T2W, Gradient echo (GE, serial SPGR (DCE-MRI with flip angles ranging over 5-25°, and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWMRI. Blood brain barrier (BBB disruption was depicted as clear enhancement on T1W images. The average signal intensity in the regions of T1-enhancement, representing BBB disruption, increased from 1887±83 (arbitrary units immediately post treatment to 2246±94 20 min post treatment, then reached a plateau towards the 30 min scan where it reached 2289±87. DWMRI at 30 min showed no significant effects. Early treatment effects and late irreversible damage were clearly depicted on T2W. The enhancing volume on T2W has increased by an average of 2.27±0.27 in the first 24-48 hours post treatment, suggesting an inflammatory tissue response. The permanent tissue damage, depicted as an enhancing region on T2W, 3 weeks post treatment, decreased to an average of 50±10% of the T2W enhancing volumes on the day of the treatment which was 33±5% of the BBB disruption volume. Permanent tissue damage was significantly smaller than the volume of BBB disruption, suggesting, that BBB disruption is associated with RE while tissue damage with IRE. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying reversible and irreversible electroporation for transient BBB disruption or permanent damage, respectively, and applying MRI for planning/monitoring disruption volume/shape by optimizing electrode positions

  15. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, H. A. S.; Wang, S.; Wu, S.-Y.; Karakatsani, M. E.; Acosta, C.; Carneiro, A. A. O.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n  =  15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38+/- 5.71 mm3, 8.91+/- 3.91 mm3and 35.47+/- 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40+/- 28.43 V.s, 63.87+/- 29.97 V.s and 356.52+/- 257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue.

  16. Chirp- and random-based coded ultrasonic excitation for localized blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, HAS; Wang, S; Wu, S-Y; Karakatsani, ME; Acosta, C; Carneiro, AAO; Konofagou, EE

    2015-01-01

    Chirp- and random-based coded excitation methods have been proposed to reduce standing wave formation and improve focusing of transcranial ultrasound. However, no clear evidence has been shown to support the benefits of these ultrasonic excitation sequences in vivo. This study evaluates the chirp and periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF) coded-excitation methods for opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in mice. Three groups of mice (n=15) were injected with polydisperse microbubbles and sonicated in the caudate putamen using the chirp/PSRF coded (bandwidth: 1.5-1.9 MHz, peak negative pressure: 0.52 MPa, duration: 30 s) or standard ultrasound (frequency: 1.5 MHz, pressure: 0.52 MPa, burst duration: 20 ms, duration: 5 min) sequences. T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI scans were performed to quantitatively analyze focused ultrasound induced BBB opening. The mean opening volumes evaluated from the MRI were 9.38±5.71 mm3, 8.91±3.91 mm3 and 35.47 ± 5.10 mm3 for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The mean cavitation levels were 55.40±28.43 V.s, 63.87±29.97 V.s and 356.52±257.15 V.s for the chirp, random and regular sonications, respectively. The chirp and PSRF coded pulsing sequences improved the BBB opening localization by inducing lower cavitation levels and smaller opening volumes compared to results of the regular sonication technique. Larger bandwidths were associated with more focused targeting but were limited by the frequency response of the transducer, the skull attenuation and the microbubbles optimal frequency range. The coded methods could therefore facilitate highly localized drug delivery as well as benefit other transcranial ultrasound techniques that use higher pressure levels and higher precision to induce the necessary bioeffects in a brain region while avoiding damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. PMID:26394091

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  18. Selective disruption of the blood-brain barrier by photochemical internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Zhang, Michelle J.; Gach, Michael H.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Chighvinadze, David; Madsen, Steen J.

    2009-02-01

    Introduction: Failure to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells using conventional treatment regimens results in tumor recurrence and is responsible for the dismal prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This is due to the fact that these migratory cells are protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which prevents the delivery of most anti-cancer agents. We have evaluated the ability of photochemical internalization (PCI) to selectively disrupt the BBB in rats. This will permit access of anti-cancer drugs to effectively target the infiltrating tumor cells, and potentially improve the treatment effectiveness for malignant gliomas. Materials and Methods: PCI treatment, coupling a macromolecule therapy of Clostridium perfringens (Cl p) epsilon prototoxin with AlPcS2a-PDT, was performed on non-tumor bearing inbred Fisher rats. T1-weighted post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were used to evaluate the extent of BBB disruption which can be inferred from the volume contrast enhancement. Results: The synergistic effect of PCI to disrupt the BBB was observed at a fluence level of 1 J with an intraperitoneal injection of Cl p prototoxin. At the fluence level of 2.5J, the extent of BBB opening induced by PCI was similar to the result of PDT suggesting no synergistic effect evoked under these conditions. Conclusion: PCI was found to be highly effective and efficient for inducing selective and localized disruption of the BBB. The extent of BBB opening peaked on day 3 and the BBB was completed restored by day 18 post treatment.

  19. [11C]befloxatone brain kinetics is not influenced by Bcrp function at the blood-brain barrier: A PET study using Bcrp TGEM knockout rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knockout (KO) animals are useful tools with which to assess the interplay between P-glycoprotein (P-gp; Abcb1) and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp, Abcg2), two major ABC-transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, one major drawback of such deficient models is the possible involvement of compensation between transporters. In the present study, P-gp and Bcrp distribution in the brain as well as P-gp expression levels at the BBB were compared between the Bcrp TGEM KO rat model and the wild-type (WT) strain. Therefore, we used confocal microscopy of brain slices and western blot analysis of the isolated brain microvessels forming the BBB. This deficient rat model was used to assess the influence of Bcrp on the brain and peripheral kinetics of its substrate [11C]befloxatone using positron emission tomography (PET). The influence of additional P-gp inhibition was tested using elacridar (GF120918) 2 mg/kg in Bcrp KO rats. The distribution pattern of P-gp in the brain as well as P-gp expression levels at the BBB was similar in Bcrp-deficient and WT rats. Brain and peripheral kinetics of [11C]befloxatone were not influenced by the lack of Bcrp. Neither was the brain uptake of [11C]befloxatone in Bcrp-deficient rats influenced by the inhibition of P-gp. In conclusion, the Bcrp-deficient rat strain, in which we detected no compensatory mechanism or modification of P-gp expression as compared to WT rats, is a suitable model to study Bcrp function separately from that of P-gp at the BBB. However, although selectively transported by BCRP in vitro, our results suggest that [11C]befloxatone PET imaging might not be biased by impaired function of this transporter in vivo. (authors)

  20. {sup 26}Al incorporation into the brain of rat fetuses through the placental barrier and subsequent metabolism in postnatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, Sakae, E-mail: yumoto-s@viola.ocn.ne.j [Yumoto Institute of Neurology, Kawadacho 6-11, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0054 (Japan); Nagai, Hisao [College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Kakimi, Shigeo [Faculty of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Aluminium (Al) inhibits prenatal and postnatal development of the brain. We used {sup 26}Al as a tracer, and measured {sup 26}Al incorporation into rat fetuses through the placental barrier by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). From day 15 to day 18 of gestation, {sup 26}AlCl{sub 3} was subcutaneously injected into pregnant rats. Considerable amounts of {sup 26}Al were measured in the tissues of newborn rats immediately after birth. The amounts of {sup 26}Al in the liver and kidneys decreased rapidly during postnatal development. However, approximately 15% of {sup 26}Al incorporated into the brain of fetuses remained in the brain of adult rats 730 days after birth.

  1. Blood-brain barrier permeation in the rat during exposure to low-power 1.7-GHz microwave radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of the blood-brain barrier to high-and low-molecular-weight compounds has been measured as a function of continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-microwave radiation. Adult rats, anesthetized with pentobarbital and injected intravenously with a mixture of [14C] sucrose and [3H] inulin, were exposed for 30 min at a specific absorption rate of 0.1 W/kg to 1.7-GHz CW and pulsed (0.5-microseconds pulse width, 1,000 pps) microwaves. After exposure, the brain was perfused and sectioned into nine regions, and the radioactivity in each region was counted. During identical exposure conditions, temperatures of rats were measured in eight of the brain regions by a thermistor probe that did not perturb the field. No change in uptake of either tracer was found in any of the eight regions as compared with those of sham-exposed animals

  2. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chen Wei

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI, animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide impairs amyloid beta efflux from brain: altered vascular sequestration, cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption, peripheral clearance and transporter function at the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erickson Michelle A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defects in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1 and p-glycoprotein (Pgp clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ from brain are thought to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. We have recently shown that induction of systemic inflammation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS results in impaired efflux of Aβ from the brain. The same treatment also impairs Pgp function. Here, our aim is to determine which physiological routes of Aβ clearance are affected following systemic inflammation, including those relying on LRP-1 and Pgp function at the blood–brain barrier. Methods CD-1 mice aged between 6 and 8 weeks were treated with 3 intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg LPS at 0, 6, and 24 hours and studied at 28 hours. 125I-Aβ1-42 or 125I-alpha-2-macroglobulin injected into the lateral ventricle of the brain (intracerebroventricular (ICV or into the jugular vein (intravenous (IV was used to quantify LRP-1-dependent partitioning between the brain vasculature and parenchyma and peripheral clearance, respectively. Disappearance of ICV-injected 14 C-inulin from brain was measured to quantify bulk flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Brain microvascular protein expression of LRP-1 and Pgp was measured by immunoblotting. Endothelial cell localization of LRP-1 was measured by immunofluorescence microscopy. Oxidative modifications to LRP-1 at the brain microvasculature were measured by immunoprecipitation of LRP-1 followed by immunoblotting for 4-hydroxynonenal and 3-nitrotyrosine. Results We found that LPS: caused an LRP-1-dependent redistribution of ICV-injected Aβ from brain parenchyma to brain vasculature and decreased entry into blood; impaired peripheral clearance of IV-injected Aβ; inhibited reabsorption of CSF; did not significantly alter brain microvascular protein levels of LRP-1 or Pgp, or oxidative modifications to LRP-1; and downregulated LRP-1 protein levels and caused LRP-1 mislocalization in cultured brain

  4. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Raymond F.; Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; Winfrey, Virginia P.; Kurokawa, Suguru; Mitchell, Stuart L.; Zhang, Wanqi

    2014-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and its receptor, apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (apoER2), account for brain retaining selenium better than other tissues. The primary sources of Sepp1 in plasma and brain are hepatocytes and astrocytes, respectively. ApoER2 is expressed in varying amounts by tissues; within the brain it is expressed primarily by neurons. Knockout of Sepp1 or apoER2 lowers brain selenium from ∼120 to ∼50 ng/g and leads to severe neurodegeneration and death in mild selenium deficiency. Interactions of Sepp1 and apoER2 that protect against this injury have not been characterized. We studied Sepp1, apoER2, and brain selenium in knockout mice. Immunocytochemistry showed that apoER2 mediates Sepp1 uptake at the blood-brain barrier. When Sepp1−/− or apoER2−/− mice developed severe neurodegeneration caused by mild selenium deficiency, brain selenium was ∼35 ng/g. In extreme selenium deficiency, however, brain selenium of ∼12 ng/g was tolerated when both Sepp1 and apoER2 were intact in the brain. These findings indicate that tandem Sepp1-apoER2 interactions supply selenium for maintenance of brain neurons. One interaction is at the blood-brain barrier, and the other is within the brain. We postulate that Sepp1 inside the blood-brain barrier is taken up by neurons via apoER2, concentrating brain selenium in them.—Burk, R. F., Hill, K. E., Motley, A. K., Winfrey, V. P., Kurokawa, S., Mitchell, S. L., Zhang, W. Selenoprotein P and apolipoprotein E receptor-2 interact at the blood-brain barrier and also within the brain to maintain an essential selenium pool that protects against neurodegeneration. PMID:24760755

  5. Magnetic nanoformulation of azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate for targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainulabedin M Saiyed

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Zainulabedin M Saiyed, Nimisha H Gandhi, Madhavan PN Nair1Department of Immunology, College of Medicine, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USAAbstract: Despite significant advances in highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, the prevalence of neuroAIDS remains high. This is mainly attributed to inability of antiretroviral therapy (ART to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB, thus resulting in insufficient drug concentration within the brain. Therefore, development of an active drug targeting system is an attractive strategy to increase the efficacy and delivery of ART to the brain. We report herein development of magnetic azidothymidine 5’-triphosphate (AZTTP liposomal nanoformulation and its ability to transmigrate across an in vitro BBB model by application of an external magnetic field. We hypothesize that this magnetically guided nanoformulation can transverse the BBB by direct transport or via monocyte-mediated transport. Magnetic AZTTP liposomes were prepared using a mixture of phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol. The average size of prepared liposomes was about 150 nm with maximum drug and magnetite loading efficiency of 54.5% and 45.3%, respectively. Further, magnetic AZTTP liposomes were checked for transmigration across an in vitro BBB model using direct or monocyte-mediated transport by application of an external magnetic field. The results show that apparent permeability of magnetic AZTTP liposomes was 3-fold higher than free AZTTP. Also, the magnetic AZTTP liposomes were efficiently taken up by monocytes and these magnetic monocytes showed enhanced transendothelial migration compared to normal/non-magnetic monocytes in presence of an external magnetic field. Thus, we anticipate that the developed magnetic nanoformulation can be used for targeting active nucleotide analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors to the brain by application of an external magnetic force and thereby eliminate the brain HIV reservoir and help

  6. Drug-loaded bubbles with matched focused ultrasound excitation for concurrent blood-brain barrier opening and brain-tumor drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been used to achieve local blood-brain barrier opening (BBB opening) and increase the penetration of therapeutic drugs into brain tumors. However, inertial cavitation of microbubbles during FUS-induced BBB opening causes intracerebral hemorrhaging (ICH), leading to acute and chronic brain injury and limiting the efficiency of drug delivery. Here we investigated whether induction of drug (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, BCNU)-loaded bubbles (BCNU bubbles) to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB opening, thereby eliminating ICH and enhancing drug delivery in a rat brain model. FUS was tested at 1 and 10 MHz, over a wide range of pressure (mechanical index ranging from 0.16 to 1.42) in the presence of BCNU bubbles. Excitation of BCNU bubbles by resonance frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) resulted in predominantly stable cavitation and significantly reduced the occurrence of potential hazards of exposure to biological tissues during the BBB opening process. In addition, the drug release process could be monitored by acoustic emission obtained from ultrasound imaging. In tumor-bearing animals, BCNU bubbles with FUS showed significant control of tumor progression and improved maximum survival from 26 to 35 days. This study provides useful advancements toward the goal of successfully translating FUS theranostic bubble-enhanced brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  7. [3H]Methotrexate loss from the rat brain following enhanced uptake by osmotic opening of the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Right brain regions of anesthetized rats were loaded with [3,5,7-3H]methotrexate ([3H]MTX) or with [14C]sucrose by infusing the tracers into the right carotid artery, after the blood-brain barrier had been opened by right carotid infusion of a hypertonic arabinose solution. During the 6 hr following the procedure, the [3H]MTX concentration in 7 right-sided brain regions, when normalized to the plasma concentration integral during tracer infusion, fell, with an average half-time of 4.8 hr as compared to less than 20 min for the initial rate of loss [14C]sucrose. Right-left brain concentration differences 3 hr after treatment were statistically significant (p less than 0.05) for [3H]MTX but not for [14C]sucrose. The results indicate that intracerebral [3H]MTX is lost more slowly than is intracerebral [14C]sucrose, possibly because [3H]MTX enters brain cells, whereas [14C]sucrose remains largely extracellular

  8. Effects of fractionated radiation on the brain vasculature in a murine model: Blood-brain barrier permeability, astrocyte proliferation, and ultrastructural changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Radiation therapy of CNS tumors damages the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and normal brain tissue. Our aims were to characterize the short- and long-term effects of fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) on cerebral microvasculature in mice and to investigate the mechanism of change in BBB permeability in mice. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy and a cranial window technique were used to measure BBB permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and leukocyte endothelial interactions before and after cranial irradiation. Daily doses of 2 Gy were delivered 5 days/week (total, 40 Gy). We immunostained the molecules to detect the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and to demonstrate astrocyte activity in brain parenchyma. To relate the permeability changes to endothelial ultrastructural changes, we used electron microscopy. Results: Blood-brain barrier permeability did not increase significantly until 90 days after FRT, at which point it increased continuously until 180 days post-FRT. The number of adherent leukocytes did not increase during the study. The number of astrocytes in the cerebral cortex increased significantly; vesicular activity in endothelial cells increased beginning 90 days after irradiation, and most tight junctions stayed intact, although some were shorter and less dense at 120 and 180 days. Conclusions: The cellular and microvasculature response of the brain to FRT is mediated through astrogliosis and ultrastructural changes, accompanied by an increase in BBB permeability. The response to FRT is delayed as compared with single-dose irradiation treatment, and does not involve leukocyte adhesion. However, FRT induces an increase in the BBB permeability, as in the case of single-dose irradiation

  9. Drug delivery strategies to enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier for treatment of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Chun-Lei; Liu, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are amongst the most insidious and destructive types of brain cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis, frequent recurrences, and extremely high lethality despite combination treatment of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the delivery of therapeutic molecules into the brain and offers the clinical efficacy of many pharmaceuticals that have been demonstrated to be effective for other kinds of tumors. This challenge emphasizes the need to be able to deliver drugs effectively across the BBB to reach the brain parenchyma. Enhancement of the permeability of the BBB and being able to transport drugs across it has been shown to be a promising strategy to improve drug absorption and treatment efficacy. This review highlights the innovative technologies that have been introduced to enhance the permeability of the BBB and to obtain an optimal distribution and concentration of drugs in the brain to treat gliomas, such as nanotechniques, hyperthermia techniques, receptor-mediated transport, cell-penetrating peptides, and cell-mediated delivery.

  10. Feasibility Study of the Permeability and Uptake of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghirov, Habib; Karaman, Didem; Viitala, Tapani; Duchanoy, Alain; Lou, Yan-Ru; Mamaeva, Veronika; Pryazhnikov, Evgeny; Khiroug, Leonard; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rosenholm, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery into the brain is impeded by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) that filters out the vast majority of drugs after systemic administration. In this work, we assessed the transport, uptake and cytotoxicity of promising drug nanocarriers, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), in in vitro models of the BBB. RBE4 rat brain endothelial cells and Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells, strain II, were used as BBB models. We studied spherical and rod-shaped MSNs with the following modifications: bare MSNs and MSNs coated with a poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ethylene imine) (PEG-PEI) block copolymer. In transport studies, MSNs showed low permeability, whereas the results of the cellular uptake studies suggest robust uptake of PEG-PEI-coated MSNs. None of the MSNs showed significant toxic effects in the cell viability studies. While the shape effect was detectable but small, especially in the real-time surface plasmon resonance measurements, coating with PEG-PEI copolymers clearly facilitated the uptake of MSNs. Finally, we evaluated the in vivo detectability of one of the best candidates, i.e. the copolymer-coated rod-shaped MSNs, by two-photon in vivo imaging in the brain vasculature. The particles were clearly detectable after intravenous injection and caused no damage to the BBB. Thus, when properly designed, the uptake of MSNs could potentially be utilized for the delivery of drugs into the brain via transcellular transport. PMID:27547955

  11. Enolase of Streptococcus Suis Serotype 2 Enhances Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability by Inducing IL-8 Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yingying; Li, Na; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Hongtao; Liu, Jianfang; Xia, Xiaojing; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Gu, Jingmin; Du, Chongtao; Han, Wenyu; Lei, Liancheng

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an emerging zoonosis, and meningitis is the most frequent clinical manifestation, but mechanism of its virulent factor, enolase (Eno), is unknown in meningitis. In this study, Eno was inducibly expressed and added to an in vitro Transwell co-culture model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) consisted of porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells (PBMECs) and astrocytes (ACs), the results showed that Eno induces a significant increase in BBB permeability and promotes the release of IL-8 et al. cytokines. Furthermore, IL-8 could significantly destroy the integrity of the BBB model in vitro. In mice models administered Eno for 24 h, Eno could significantly promote Evans blue (EB) moving from the blood to the brain and significantly increased the serum and brain levels of IL-8, as detected by ELISA. While G31P (IL-8 receptor antagonist) significantly decreased the concentration of EB in the brains of mice injected with Eno. The present study demonstrated that SS2 Eno may play an important role in disrupting BBB integrity by prompting IL-8 release. PMID:26732390

  12. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of Three Novel Fluorine-18 Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals for P-Glycoprotein PET Imaging at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savolainen, Heli; Cantore, Mariangela; Colabufo, Nicola A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Windhorst, Albert D.; Luurtsema, Gert

    2015-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein (P-gp), along with other transporter proteins at the blood brain barrier (BBB), limits the entry of many pharmaceuticals into the brain. Altered P-gp function has been found in several neurological diseases. To study the P-gp function, many positron emission tomography (PET) radiophar

  13. PET studies on P-glycoprotein function in the blood-brain barrier : How it affects uptake and binding of drugs within the CNS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH; Hendrikse, Nelis; Bart, J; Vaalburg, W; van Waarde, A

    2004-01-01

    Permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the factors determining the bioavailability of therapeutic drugs. The BBB only allows entry of lipophilic compounds with low molecular weights by passive diffusion. However, many lipophilic drugs show negligible brain uptake. They are substrate

  14. Acanthamoeba produces disseminated infection in locusts and traverses the locust blood-brain barrier to invade the central nervous system

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    Kirk Ruth

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many aspects of Acanthamoeba granulomatous encephalitis remain poorly understood, including host susceptibility and chronic colonization which represent important features of the spectrum of host-pathogen interactions. Previous studies have suggested locusts as a tractable model in which to study Acanthamoeba pathogenesis. Here we determined the mode of parasite invasion of the central nervous system (CNS. Results Using Acanthamoeba isolates belonging to the T1 and T4 genotypes, the findings revealed that amoebae induced sickness behaviour in locusts, as evidenced by reduced faecal output and weight loss and, eventually, leading to 100% mortality. Significant degenerative changes of various tissues were observed by histological sectioning. Both isolates produced disseminated infection, with viable amoebae being recovered from various tissues. Histological examination of the CNS showed that Acanthamoeba invaded the locust CNS, and this is associated with disruption of the perineurium cell/glial cell complex, which constitutes the locust blood-brain barrier. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate that Acanthamoeba invades locust brain by modulating the integrity of the insect's blood-brain barrier, a finding that is consistent with the human infection. These observations support the idea that locusts provide a tractable model to study Acanthamoeba encephalitis in vivo. In this way the locust model may generate potentially useful leads that can be tested subsequently in mammalian systems, thus replacing the use of vertebrates at an early stage, and reducing the numbers of mammals required overall.

  15. Treatment with the NK1 antagonist emend reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction and edema formation in an experimental model of brain tumors.

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    Elizabeth Harford-Wright

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide substance P (SP has been implicated in the disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and development of cerebral edema in acute brain injury. Cerebral edema accumulates rapidly around brain tumors and has been linked to several tumor-associated deficits. Currently, the standard treatment for peritumoral edema is the corticosteroid dexamethasone, prolonged use of which is associated with a number of deleterious side effects. As SP is reported to increase in many cancer types, this study examined whether SP plays a role in the genesis of brain peritumoral edema. A-375 human melanoma cells were injected into the right striatum of male Balb/c nude mice to induce brain tumor growth, with culture medium injected in animals serving as controls. At 2, 3 or 4 weeks following tumor cell inoculation, non-treated animals were perfusion fixed for immunohistochemical detection of Albumin, SP and NK1 receptor. A further subgroup of animals was treated with a daily injection of the NK1 antagonist Emend (3 mg/kg, dexamethasone (8 mg/kg or saline vehicle at 3 weeks post-inoculation. Animals were sacrificed a week later to determine BBB permeability using Evan's Blue and brain water content. Non-treated animals demonstrated a significant increase in albumin, SP and NK1 receptor immunoreactivity in the peritumoral area as well as increased perivascular staining in the surrounding brain tissue. Brain water content and BBB permeability was significantly increased in tumor-inoculated animals when compared to controls (p<0.05. Treatment with Emend and dexamethasone reduced BBB permeability and brain water content when compared to vehicle-treated tumor-inoculated mice. The increase in peritumoral staining for both SP and the NK1 receptor, coupled with the reduction in brain water content and BBB permeability seen following treatment with the NK1 antagonist Emend, suggests that SP plays a role in the genesis of peritumoral edema, and thus warrants

  16. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  17. Cilostazol reduces blood brain barrier dysfunction, white matter lesion formation and motor deficits following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrissi, Hamidreza; Schock, Sarah C; Cadonic, Robert; Hakim, Antoine M; Thompson, Charlie S

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a pathological process leading to lacunar infarcts, leukoaraiosis and cerebral microbleeds. Dysfunction of the blood brain barrier (BBB) has been proposed as a mechanism in the progression cerebral small vessel disease. A rodent model commonly used to study some aspects of CSVD is bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in the rat. In the present study it was determined that gait impairment, as determined by a tapered beam test, and BBB permeability increased following BCCAO. Cilostazol, a type III phosphodiesterase inhibitor, has been shown to have anti-apoptotic effects and prevent white matter vacuolation and rarefaction induced by BCCAO in rats. In this study the protective effect of cilostazol administration on the increase BBB permeability following BCCAO was determined as well as the effect on plasma levels of circulating microparticles (MPs), cerebral white matter rarefaction, glial activation and gait disturbance. The effect of cilostazol on in vitro endothelial barriers was also evaluated. Cilostazol treatment improved BBB permeability and reduced gait disturbance, visual impairment and microglial activation in optic tract following BCCAO in vivo. It also reduced the degree of cell death and the reduction in trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in artificial endothelial barriers in vitro induced by MP treatment of in vitro barriers. PMID:27350079

  18. Early Exercise Protects the Blood-Brain Barrier from Ischemic Brain Injury via the Regulation of MMP-9 and Occludin in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Early exercise within 24 h after stroke can reduce neurological deficits after ischemic brain injury. However, the mechanisms underlying this neuroprotection remain poorly understood. Ischemic brain injury disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB and then triggers a cascade of events, leading to secondary brain injury and poor long-term outcomes. This study verified the hypothesis that early exercise protected the BBB after ischemia. Adult rats were randomly assigned to sham, early exercise (EE or non-exercise (NE groups. The EE and NE groups were subjected to ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. The EE group ran on a treadmill beginning 24 h after ischemia, 30 min per day for three days. After three-days’ exercise, EB extravasation and electron microscopy were used to evaluate the integrity of the BBB. Neurological deficits, cerebral infarct volume and the expression of MMP-9, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, and occludin were determined. The data indicated that early exercise significantly inhibited the ischemia-induced reduction of occludin, and an increase in MMP-9 promoted TIMP-1 expression (p < 0.01, attenuated the BBB disruption (p < 0.05 and neurological deficits (p < 0.01 and diminished the infarct volume (p < 0.01. Our results suggest that the neuroprotection conferred by early exercise was likely achieved by improving the function of the BBB via the regulation of MMP-9 and occludin.

  19. A new PAMPA model using an in-house brain lipid extract for screening the blood-brain barrier permeability of drug candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Falcão, Amílcar

    2016-03-30

    The determination of the permeability of drug candidates across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a fundamental step during drug discovery programs. The parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) is a high throughput screening tool applied to evaluate the passive permeability and adapted to predict BBB penetration. Herein, a new PAMPA model was developed using an in-house brain lipid extract capable of discriminating BBB permeable from non-permeable compounds. The apparent permeability (Papp) of 18 reference molecules and 10 test compounds was assessed and compared with phosphatidylcholine and commercial porcine polar brain lipid (PBL). The physicochemical selectivity of the in-house brain lipid extract was demonstrated by correlating Papp values with physicochemical properties and its predictive capacity estimated by establishing in vitro-in vivo correlations. The strong correlations achieved between 2% (w/v) in-house lipid extract and PBL for reference (r(2)=0.77) and test compounds (r(2)=0.94) support an equivalent discriminatory capacity and validate the presented model. Moreover, PAMPA studies performed with PBL and in-house lipid extract exhibited a higher correlation with the in vivo parameter logBB (r(2)=0.76 and r(2)=0.72, respectively) than phosphatidylcholine (r(2)=0.51). Overall, the applied lipid extraction process was reproducible, economical and provided lipid extracts that can be used to reliably assess BBB permeation.

  20. Neuropsychiatric disease relevance of circulating anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies depends on blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Schneider, A; Papiol, S; Tantra, M; Begemann, M; Sirén, A-L; Pardo, L A; Sperling, S; Mohd Jofrry, S; Gurvich, A; Jensen, N; Ostmeier, K; Lühder, F; Probst, C; Martens, H; Gillis, M; Saher, G; Assogna, F; Spalletta, G; Stöcker, W; Schulz, T F; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a multifaceted syndrome, associated with anti-NMDA receptor autoantibodies (NMDAR-AB) of immunoglobulin-G isotype, has been described, which variably consists of psychosis, epilepsy, cognitive decline and extrapyramidal symptoms. Prevalence and significance of NMDAR-AB in complex neuropsychiatric disease versus health, however, have remained unclear. We tested sera of 2817 subjects (1325 healthy, 1081 schizophrenic, 263 Parkinson and 148 affective-disorder subjects) for presence of NMDAR-AB, conducted a genome-wide genetic association study, comparing AB carriers versus non-carriers, and assessed their influenza AB status. For mechanistic insight and documentation of AB functionality, in vivo experiments involving mice with deficient blood-brain barrier (ApoE(-/-)) and in vitro endocytosis assays in primary cortical neurons were performed. In 10.5% of subjects, NMDAR-AB (NR1 subunit) of any immunoglobulin isotype were detected, with no difference in seroprevalence, titer or in vitro functionality between patients and healthy controls. Administration of extracted human serum to mice influenced basal and MK-801-induced activity in the open field only in ApoE(-/-) mice injected with NMDAR-AB-positive serum but not in respective controls. Seropositive schizophrenic patients with a history of neurotrauma or birth complications, indicating an at least temporarily compromised blood-brain barrier, had more neurological abnormalities than seronegative patients with comparable history. A common genetic variant (rs524991, P=6.15E-08) as well as past influenza A (P=0.024) or B (P=0.006) infection were identified as predisposing factors for NMDAR-AB seropositivity. The >10% overall seroprevalence of NMDAR-AB of both healthy individuals and patients is unexpectedly high. Clinical significance, however, apparently depends on association with past or present perturbations of blood-brain barrier function. PMID:23999527

  1. Transport of paclitaxel (Taxol) across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Fellner, Stephan; Bauer, Björn; Miller, David S.; Schaffrick, Martina; Fankhänel, Martina; Spruß, Thilo; Bernhardt, Günther; Graeff, Claudia; Färber, Lothar; Gschaidmeier, Harald; Buschauer, Armin; Fricker, Gert

    2002-01-01

    Paclitaxel concentrations in the brain are very low after intravenous injection. Since paclitaxel is excluded from some tumors by p-glycoprotein (p-gp), the same mechanism may prevent entry into the brain. In vitro, paclitaxel transport was examined in capillaries from rat brains by confocal microscopy using BODIPY Fl-paclitaxel. Western blots and immunostaining demonstrated apical expression of p-gp in isolated endothelial cells, vessels, and tissue. Secretion of BODIPY Fl-paclitaxel into ca...

  2. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting ...

  3. Relationship between AQP4 expression and structural damage to the blood-brain barrier at early stages of traumatic brain injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Hong; LEI Xiao-yan; HU Hui; HE Zhan-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Although some studies have reported that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) plays an important role in the brain edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI),little is known about the AQP4 expression in the early stage of TBI,or about the correlation between the structural damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and angioedema.The aim of this project was to investigate the relationship between AQP4 expression and damage to the BBB at early stages of TBI.Methods One hundred and twenty healthy adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into two greups:sham operation group (SO) and TBI group.The TBI group was divided into five sub-groups according to the different time intervals:1,3,6,12,and 24 hours.The brains of the animals were taken out at different time points after TBI to measure brain water content.The cerebral edema and BBB changes in structure were examined with an optical microscopy (OM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and the IgG content and AQP4 protein expression in traumatic brain tissue were determined by means of immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.The data were analyzed with SPSS 13.0statistical software.Results In the SO greup,tissue was negative for IgG,and there were no abnormalities in brain water content or AQP4 expression.In the TBI group,brain water content significantly increased at 6 hours and peaked at 24 hours following injury.IgG expression significantly increased from 1 to 6 hours following injury,and remained at a high level at 24 hours.Pathological observation revealed BBB damage at 1 hour following injury.Angioedema appeared at 1 hour,was gradually aggravated,and became obvious at 6 hours.Intracellular edema occurred at 3 hours,with the presence of large glial cell bodies and mitochondrial swelling.These phenomena were aggravated with time and became obvious at 12 hours.In addition,microglial proliferation was visible at 24 hours.AQP4 protein expression were reduced at 1 hour,lowest at 6 hours,and began to increase at 12 hours

  4. Accurate determination of blood–brain barrier permeability using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is increasingly used to estimate permeability in situations with subtle blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the method's ability to differentiate such low values from zero is unknown, and no consensus exists on optimal selection...... of total measurement duration, temporal resolution, and modeling approach under varying physiologic circumstances. To estimate accuracy and precision of the DCE-MRI method we generated simulated data using a two-compartment model and progressively down-sampled and truncated the data to mimic low...

  5. Non-thermal" Effects on the Blood-Brain Barrier in Fischer rats by exposure to microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Bertil R; Malmgren, Lars; Brun, Arne; Eberhardt, Jacob; Nittby, Henrietta; Salford, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Effect of 915 MHz electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the blood brain-barrier (BBB) permeability has been studied in Fischer 344 rats of both sexes. Male and female Fischer 344 rats were exposed in a Transverse Electromagnetic Transmission line chamber to microwaves of 915 MHz as continuous wave (CW) and pulse-modulated with different pulse power and at various time intervals. The CW-pulse power varied from 0.001W to 10 W and the exposure time from 2 min. to 960 min. In each experi...

  6. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E;

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...... developed clinical AMS (AMS+) and were more hypoxaemic relative to subjects without AMS (AMS-). A more marked increase in the venous concentration of the ascorbate radical (A(*-)), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and increased susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation was observed during...

  7. Optimal Magnetic Field for Crossing Super-Para-Magnetic Nanoparticles through the Brain Blood Barrier: A Computational Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysam Z. Pedram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper scrutinizes the magnetic field effect to deliver the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNs through the Blood Brain Barrier (BBB. Herein we study the interaction between the nanoparticle (NP and BBB membrane using Molecular Dynamic (MD techniques. The MD model is used to enhance our understanding of the dynamic behavior of SPMNs crossing the endothelial cells in the presence of a gradient magnetic field. Actuation of NPs under weak magnetic field offers the great advantage of a non-invasive drug delivery without the risk of causing injury to the brain. Furthermore, a weak magnetic portable stimulator can be developed using low complexity prototyping techniques. Based on MD simulation results in this paper, SPMNs can cross the cell membrane while experiencing very weak mechanical forces in the range of pN. This study also derives guidelines for the design of the SPMNs dedicated to crossing the BBB using external magnetic fields.

  8. In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter-Mediated Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Wei, Bih-Rong; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, R Mark; Gottesman, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    We provide a detailed protocol for imaging ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) function at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of transgenic mice. D-Luciferin is specifically transported by ABCG2 found on the apical side of endothelial cells at the BBB. The luciferase-luciferin enzymatic reaction produces bioluminescence, which allows a direct measurement of ABCG2 function at the BBB. Therefore bioluminescence imaging (BLI) correlates with ABCG2 function at the BBB and this can be measured by administering luciferin in a mouse model that expresses luciferase in the brain parenchyma. BLI allows for a relatively low-cost alternative for studying transporter function in vivo compared to other strategies such as positron emission tomography. This method for imaging ABCG2 function at the BBB can be used to investigate pharmacokinetic inhibition of the transporter. PMID:27424909

  9. Microbubbles coupled to methotrexate-loaded liposomes for ultrasound-mediated delivery of methotrexate across the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Wang,1 Ping Liu,1 Weixiao Yang,1 Lu Li,1 Peijing Li,2 Zheng Liu,1 Zhongxiong Zhuo,1 Yunhua Gao1 1Department of Ultrasound, Xinqiao Hospital of the Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 2Department of Ultrasound, General Hospital of the Jinan Military Area, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Methotrexate (MTX is the single most effective agent for the treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma. Currently, the delivery of MTX to the brain is achieved by high systemic doses, which cause severe long-term neurotoxicity, or intrathecal administration, which is highly invasive and may lead to infections or hemorrhagic complications. Acoustically active microbubbles have been developed as drug carriers for the noninvasive and brain-targeted delivery of therapeutics. However, their application is limited by their low drug-loading capacity. To overcome this limitation, we prepared microbubbles coupled to MTX-loaded liposomes using ZHIFUXIAN, a novel type of microbubbles with a superior safety profile and long circulation time. MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles had a high drug-loading capacity of 8.91%±0.86%, and their size (2.64±0.93 µm in diameter was suitable for intravenous injection. When used with ultrasound, they showed more potent in vitro cytotoxicity against Walker-256 cancer cells than MTX alone or MTX-loaded liposomes. When Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to sonication, administration of these MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles via the tail vein led to targeted disruption of the blood–brain barrier without noticeable tissue or capillary damage. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the brain MTX concentration showed that MTX delivery to the brain followed the order of MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles + ultrasound (25.3±2.4 µg/g > unmodified ZHIFUXIAN + MTX + ultrasound (18.6±2.2 µg/g > MTX alone (6.97±0.75 µg/g > MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles (2.92±0.39 µg/g. Therefore

  10. P-glycoprotein activity in the blood-brain barrier is affected by virus-induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduin, Janine; de Vries, Erik F J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Klein, Hans C

    2014-10-01

    A large percentage of schizophrenic patients respond poorly to antipsychotic treatment. This could be explained by inefficient drug transport across the blood-brain barrier due to P-glycoprotein mediated efflux. P-glycoprotein activity and expression in the blood-brain barrier can be affected by inflammation and pharmacotherapy. We therefore investigated the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induced neuroinflammation and antipsychotic treatment on P-glycoprotein activity. Rats were inoculated with HSV-1 or PBS (control) on day 0 and treated with saline, clozapine or risperidone from day 0 up until day 4 post-inoculation. Positron emission tomography with the P-glycoprotein substrate [11C]verapamil was used to assess P-glycoprotein activity at day 6 post-inoculation. Disease symptoms in HSV-1 inoculated rats increased over time and were not significantly affected by treatment. The volume of distribution (VT) of [11C]verapamil was significantly lower (10-22%) in HSV-1 inoculated rats than in control rats. In addition, antipsychotic treatment significantly affected the VT of [11C]verapamil in all brain regions, although this effect was drug dependent. In fact, VT of [11C]verapamil was significantly increased (22-39%) in risperidone treated rats in most brain regions when compared to clozapine treated rats and in midbrain when compared to saline treated rats. No interaction between HSV-1 inoculation and antipsychotic treatment on VT of [11C]verapamil was found. In this study we demonstrated that HSV-1 induced neuroinflammation increased and risperidone treatment decreased P-glycoprotein activity. This finding is of importance for the understanding of treatment resistance in schizophrenia, and warrants further investigation of the underlying mechanism and the importance in clinical practice.

  11. Possible involvement of cationic-drug sensitive transport systems in the blood-to-brain influx and brain-to-blood efflux of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Fukami, Toshiro; Tomono, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the brain-to-blood efflux transport of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The apparent in vivo efflux rate constant for [(3) H]amantadine from the rat brain (keff ) was found to be 1.53 × 10(-2) min(-1) after intracerebral microinjection using the brain efflux index method. The efflux of [(3) H]amantadine was inhibited by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) ), a cationic neurotoxin, suggesting that amantadine transport from the brain to the blood across the BBB potentially involves the rat plasma membrane monoamine transporter (rPMAT). On the other hand, other selected substrates for organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic anion transporters (OATs), as well as inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), did not affect the efflux transport of [(3) H]amantadine. In addition, in vitro studies using an immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line (GPNT) showed that the uptake and retention of [(3) H]amantadine by the cells was not changed by the addition of cyclosporin, which is an inhibitor of P-gp. However, cyclosporin affected the uptake and retention of rhodamine123. Finally, the initial brain uptake of [(3) H]amantadine was determined using an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique. Notably, the brain uptake clearance for [(3) H]amantadine was significantly decreased with the co-perfusion of quinidine or verapamil, which are cationic P-gp inhibitors, while MPP(+) did not have a significant effect. It is thus concluded that while P-gp is not involved, it is possible that rPMAT and the cationic drug-sensitive transport system participate in the brain-to-blood efflux and the blood-to-brain influx of amantadine across the BBB, respectively.

  12. Characterization of a novel brain barrier ex vivo insect-based P-glycoprotein screening model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, O.; Badisco, L.; Hansen, A. H.;

    2014-01-01

    locust brains demonstrated differences in permeation of high and low permeability compounds. The vertebrate Pgp inhibitor verapamil did not affect the uptake of passively diffusing compounds but significantly increased the brain uptake of Pgp substrates in the ex vivo model. In addition, studies at 2°C...

  13. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Buettner, Manuela; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not known. A human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) was used to study whether cell-to-cell Pgp transfer occurs during co-culturing with Pgp-EGFP expressing hCMEC/D3 cells. The Pgp-EGFP fusion protein was transferred from donor to recipient cells by cell-to-cell contact and Pgp-EGFP enriched vesicles, which were exocytosed by donor cells and endocytosed by adherent recipient cells. Flow cytometry experiments with the Pgp substrate eFLUXX-ID Gold demonstrated that the transferred Pgp is functional in the recipient cells. Exposure of the donor cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) resulted in an enhanced intercellular Pgp transfer. Non-genetic transfer of a resistance phenotype and its regulation by HDACs is a novel mechanism of altering BBB functionality. This mechanism may have important implications for understanding drug-induced alterations in Pgp expression and activity. PMID:27375084

  14. A retinoic acid-enhanced, multicellular human blood-brain barrier model derived from stem cell sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Ethan S.; Al-Ahmad, Abraham; Azarin, Samira M.; Palecek, Sean P.; Shusta, Eric V.

    2014-02-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) models are often used to investigate BBB function and screen brain-penetrating therapeutics, but it has been difficult to construct a human model that possesses an optimal BBB phenotype and is readily scalable. To address this challenge, we developed a human in vitro BBB model comprising brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), pericytes, astrocytes and neurons derived from renewable cell sources. First, retinoic acid (RA) was used to substantially enhance BBB phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived BMECs, particularly through adherens junction, tight junction, and multidrug resistance protein regulation. RA-treated hPSC-derived BMECs were subsequently co-cultured with primary human brain pericytes and human astrocytes and neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to yield a fully human BBB model that possessed significant tightness as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance (~5,000 Ωxcm2). Overall, this scalable human BBB model may enable a wide range of neuroscience studies.

  15. Beta-Amyloid Downregulates MDR1-P-Glycoprotein (Abcb1 Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular dysfunction is an important component of Alzheimer's disease, leading to reduced clearance across the blood-brain barrier and accumulation of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been shown that the ABC transport protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1 is involved in the export of Aβ from the brain into the blood. To determine whether Aβ influences the expression of key Aβ transporters, we studied the effects of 1-day subcutaneous Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 administration via Alzet mini-osmotic pumps on P-gp, BCRP, LRP1, and RAGE expression in the brain of 90-day-old male FVB mice. Our results demonstrate significantly reduced P-gp, LRP1, and RAGE mRNA expression in mice treated with Aβ1-42 compared to controls, while BCRP expression was not affected. The expression of the four proteins was unchanged in mice treated with Aβ1-40 or reverse-sequence peptides. These findings indicate that, in addition to the age-related decrease of P-gp expression, Aβ1-42 itself downregulates the expression of P-gp and other Aβ-transporters, which could exacerbate the intracerebral accumulation of Aβ and thereby accelerate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral β-amyloid angiopathy.

  16. Prevention of Escherichia coli K1 Penetration of the Blood-Brain Barrier by Counteracting the Host Cell Receptor and Signaling Molecule Involved in E. coli Invasion of Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Longkun; Pearce, Donna; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity, and a key contributing factor is our incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of E. coli meningitis. We have shown that E. coli penetration into the brain requires E. coli invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of HBMEC involves its interaction with HBMEC receptors, such as E. coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) interacti...

  17. The interaction of carbon nanotubes with an in vitro blood-brain barrier model and mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafa, Houmam; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Rubio, Noelia; Venner, Kerrie; Anderson, Glenn; Pach, Elzbieta; Ballesteros, Belén; Preston, Jane E.; Abbott, N. Joan; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a novel nanocarriers with interesting physical and chemical properties. Here we investigate the ability of amino-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs-NH3+) to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) in vitro using a co-culture BBB model comprising primary porcine brain endothelial cells (PBEC) and primary rat astrocytes, and in vivo following a systemic administration of radiolabelled f-MWNTs. Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed that MWNTs-NH3+ crossed the PBEC monolayer via energy-dependent transcytosis. MWNTs-NH3+ were observed within endocytic vesicles and multi-vesicular bodies after 4 and 24 h. A complete crossing of the in vitro BBB model was observed after 48 h, which was further confirmed by the presence of MWNTs-NH3+ within the astrocytes. MWNT-NH3+ that crossed the PBEC layer was quantitatively assessed using radioactive tracers. A maximum transport of 13.0 ± 1.1% after 72 h was achieved using the co-culture model. f-MWNT exhibited significant brain uptake (1.1  ±  0.3% injected dose/g) at 5 min after intravenous injection in mice, after whole body perfusion with heparinized saline. Capillary depletion confirmed presence of f-MWNT in both brain capillaries and parenchyma fractions. These results could pave the way for use of CNTs as nanocarriers for delivery of drugs and biologics to the brain, after systemic administration. PMID:25890741

  18. Systemic inflammatory challenges compromise survival after experimental stroke via augmenting brain inflammation, blood- brain barrier damage and brain oedema independently of infarct size

    OpenAIRE

    Dénes Ádám; Ferenczi Szilamér; Kovács Krisztina J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Systemic inflammation impairs outcome in stroke patients and experimental animals via mechanisms which are poorly understood. Circulating inflammatory mediators can activate cerebrovascular endothelium or glial cells in the brain and impact on ischaemic brain injury. One of the most serious early clinical complications of cerebral ischaemia is brain oedema, which compromises survival in the first 24-48 h. It is not understood whether systemic inflammatory challenges impair...

  19. Efficiency of drug delivery enhanced by acoustic pressure during blood–brain barrier disruption induced by focused ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang FY

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Feng-Yi Yang, Pei-Yi LeeDepartment of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, TaiwanPurpose: We evaluated the delivery efficiency of intravenously injected large molecular agents, before and after disruption of the blood–brain barrier (BBB-D, induced by focused ultrasound (FUS using various acoustic parameters.Materials and methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue (EB before or after BBB-D induction by pulsed FUS. We used a 1.0 MHz pulsed FUS with four acoustic power settings and an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA at four different doses to induce BBB-D resulting from cavitation. The permeability of the BBB was assessed quantitatively based on the extravasation of EB. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used to monitor the gadolinium deposition associated with FUS. Histological analysis was performed to examine tissue damage.Results: The accumulation of EB in rat brain was found to be dependent on acoustic power and UCA dosage, regardless of whether EB administration occurred before or after FUS-induced BBB-D. Administration of EB followed by sonication resulted in greater EB extravasation than that for rats subjected to sonication prior to EB injection. To reduce tissue damage, EB extravasation was enhanced by first administering EB by intravenous injection, followed by sonication at reduced acoustic power or UCA dosage. The normalized signal intensity change in rat brains that received the same dose of UCA and sonicated after gadolinium injection was significantly greater than in rats undergoing sonication followed by gadolinium administration. Moreover, contrast enhanced MRI showed a more precise distribution of gadolinium in the brain when gadolinium was administered before sonication.Conclusion: We demonstrated that a compound administered prior to sonication treatment promotes extravasation of the sonicated region. Thus, it is possible to

  20. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Aloe; Patrizia Bianchi; Alberto De Bellis; Marzia Soligo; Maria Luisa Rocco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an in-creased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deifcits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells.

  1. Maternal Obesity in the Mouse Compromises the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Arcuate Nucleus of Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Won; Glendining, Kelly A; Grattan, David R; Jasoni, Christine L

    2016-06-01

    The arcuate nucleus (ARC) regulates body weight in response to blood-borne signals of energy balance. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the ARC is determined by capillary endothelial cells (ECs) and tanycytes. Tight junctions between ECs limit paracellular entry of blood-borne molecules into the brain, whereas EC transporters and fenestrations regulate transcellular entry. Tanycytes appear to form a barrier that prevents free diffusion of blood-borne molecules. Here we tested the hypothesis that gestation in an obese mother alters BBB permeability in the ARC of offspring. A maternal high-fat diet model was used to generate offspring from normal-weight (control) and obese dams (OffOb). Evans Blue diffusion into the ARC was higher in OffOb compared with controls, indicating that ARC BBB permeability was altered. Vessels investing the ARC in OffOb had more fenestrations than controls, although the total number of vessels was not changed. A reduced number of tanycytic processes in the ARC of OffOb was also observed. The putative transporters, Lrp1 and dysferlin, were up-regulated and tight junction components were differentially expressed in OffOb compared with controls. These data suggest that maternal obesity during pregnancy can compromise BBB formation in the fetus, leading to altered BBB function in the ARC after birth. PMID:27054554

  2. The age-related deficit in LTP is associated with changes in perfusion and blood-brain barrier permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Christoph W; Cowley, Thelma R; O'Sullivan, Joan; Grehan, Belinda; Browne, Tara C; Kelly, Laura; Birch, Amy; Murphy, Niamh; Kelly, Aine M; Kerskens, Christian M; Lynch, Marina A

    2012-05-01

    In view of the increase in the aging population and the unavoidable parallel increase in the incidence of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, a key challenge in neuroscience is the identification of clinical signatures which change with age and impact on neuronal and cognitive function. Early diagnosis offers the possibility of early therapeutic intervention, thus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is potentially a powerful diagnostic tool. We evaluated age-related changes in relaxometry, blood flow, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the rat by magnetic resonance imaging and assessed these changes in the context of the age-related decrease in synaptic plasticity. We report that T2 relaxation time was decreased with age; this was coupled with a decrease in gray matter perfusion, suggesting that the observed microglial activation, as identified by increased expression of CD11b, MHCII, and CD68 by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, or polymerase chain reaction (PCR), might be a downstream consequence of these changes. Increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier was observed in the perivascular area and the hippocampus of aged, compared with young, rats. Similarly there was an age-related increase in CD45-positive cells by flow cytometry, which are most likely infiltrating macrophages, with a parallel increase in the messenger mRNA expression of chemokines IP-10 and MCP-1. These combined changes may contribute to the deficit in long-term potentiation (LTP) in perforant path-granule cell synapses of aged animals.

  3. The role of the blood-brain barrier in the development and treatment of migraine and other pain disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB related to chronic pain has been explored by its classical role in regulating the transcellular and paracellular transport, thus controlling the flow of drugs that act at the central nervous system, such as the opioid analgesics (e.g., morphine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Nonetheless, recent studies have raised the possibility that changes in the BBB permeability might be associated with chronic pain. For instance, changes in the relative amounts of occludin isoforms, resulting in significant increases in the BBB permeability, have been demonstrated after inflammatory hyperalgesia. Furthermore, inflammatory pain produces structural changes in the P-glycoprotein (P-gp, the major efflux transporter at the BBB. One possible explanation for these findings is the action of substances typically released at the site of peripheral injuries that could lead to changes in the brain endothelial permeability, including: substance P, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and IL- 1β. Interestingly, inflammatory pain also results in microglial activation, which potentiates the BBB damage. In fact, astrocytes and microglia play a critical role in maintaining the BBB integrity and the activation of those cells is considered a key mechanism underlying chronic pain. Despite the recent advances in the understanding of BBB function in pain development as well as its interference in the efficacy of analgesic drugs, there remain unknowns regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. In this review, we explore the connection between the BBB as well as the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB and blood-nerve barrier (BNB and pain, focusing on cellular and molecular mechanisms of BBB permeabilization induced by inflammatory or neuropathic pain and migraine.

  4. Effect of photon irradiation on blood--brain barrier permeability to methotrexate in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methotrexate was administered by intraperitoneal injection (100 mg/kg) to unirradiated mice, and to mice receiving varying doses of cranial irradiation. The animals were sacrificed 24 hours after injection, and methotrexate assays were performed on brain tissue. No methotrexate was detected in the brains of the unirradiated animals. Detectable levels of methotrexate were present after 2000 rad cranial irradiation, but not after 500 rad, 1000 rad, or 1500 rad. The implications of these findings are discussed

  5. Effects of matrix metalloproteinase 9 inhibition on the blood brain barrier and inflammation in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhi-jie; HUANG Zi-tong; CHEN Xiao-tong; ZOU Zi-jun

    2009-01-01

    resuscitation control group (P<0.05). Conclusions Expression of MMP9 protein and mRNA, water content, Evans blue content, TNF-a, IL-1, and IL-6 increased in rat brain tissue after CPR, indicating disruption of the blood-brain barrier and excess inflammatory reaction. MMP9 expression was reduced with SB-3CT, resulting in reduced brain injury.

  6. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system? [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman R. Saunders

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Barrier mechanisms in the brain are important for its normal functioning and development. Stability of the brain’s internal environment, particularly with respect to its ionic composition, is a prerequisite for the fundamental basis of its function, namely transmission of nerve impulses. In addition, the appropriate and controlled supply of a wide range of nutrients such as glucose, amino acids, monocarboxylates, and vitamins is also essential for normal development and function. These are all cellular functions across the interfaces that separate the brain from the rest of the internal environment of the body. An essential morphological component of all but one of the barriers is the presence of specialized intercellular tight junctions between the cells comprising the interface: endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier itself, cells of the arachnoid membrane, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and tanycytes (specialized glial cells in the circumventricular organs. In the ependyma lining the cerebral ventricles in the adult brain, the cells are joined by gap junctions, which are not restrictive for intercellular movement of molecules. But in the developing brain, the forerunners of these cells form the neuroepithelium, which restricts exchange of all but the smallest molecules between cerebrospinal fluid and brain interstitial fluid because of the presence of strap junctions between the cells. The intercellular junctions in all these interfaces are the physical basis for their barrier properties. In the blood-brain barrier proper, this is combined with a paucity of vesicular transport that is a characteristic of other vascular beds. Without such a diffusional restrain, the cellular transport mechanisms in the barrier interfaces would be ineffective. Superimposed on these physical structures are physiological mechanisms as the cells of the interfaces contain various metabolic transporters and efflux pumps, often ATP-binding cassette (ABC

  7. Oleocanthal enhances amyloid-β clearance from the brains of TgSwDI mice and in vitro across a human blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; Batarseh, Yazan S; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; El Sayed, Khalid A; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2015-11-18

    Numerous clinical and preclinical studies have suggested several health promoting effects for the dietary consumption of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) that could protect and decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, recent studies have linked this protective effect to oleocanthal, a phenolic secoiridoid component of EVOO. This protective effect of oleocanthal against AD has been related to its ability to prevent amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau aggregation in vitro, and enhance Aβ clearance from the brains of wild type mice in vivo; however, its effect in a mouse model of AD is not known. In the current study, we investigated the effect of oleocanthal on pathological hallmarks of AD in TgSwDI, an animal model of AD. Mice treatment for 4 weeks with oleocanthal significantly decreased amyloid load in the hippocampal parenchyma and microvessels. This reduction was associated with enhanced cerebral clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Further mechanistic studies demonstrated oleocanthal to increase the expression of important amyloid clearance proteins at the BBB including P-glycoprotein and LRP1, and to activate the ApoE-dependent amyloid clearance pathway in the mice brains. The anti-inflammatory effect of oleocanthal in the brains of these mice was also obvious where it was able to reduce astrocytes activation and IL-1β levels. Finally, we could recapitulate the observed protective effect of oleocanthal in an in vitro human-based model, which could argue against species difference in response to oleocanthal. In conclusion, findings from in vivo and in vitro studies provide further support for the protective effect of oleocanthal against the progression of AD. PMID:26348065

  8. Wnt activation of immortalized brain endothelial cells as a tool for generating a standardized model of the blood brain barrier in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Paolinelli

    Full Text Available Reproducing the characteristics and the functional responses of the blood-brain barrier (BBB in vitro represents an important task for the research community, and would be a critical biotechnological breakthrough. Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries provide strong demand for inexpensive and easy-to-handle in vitro BBB models to screen novel drug candidates. Recently, it was shown that canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for the induction of the BBB properties in the neonatal brain microvasculature in vivo. In the present study, following on from earlier observations, we have developed a novel model of the BBB in vitro that may be suitable for large scale screening assays. This model is based on immortalized endothelial cell lines derived from murine and human brain, with no need for co-culture with astrocytes. To maintain the BBB endothelial cell properties, the cell lines are cultured in the presence of Wnt3a or drugs that stabilize β-catenin, or they are infected with a transcriptionally active form of β-catenin. Upon these treatments, the cell lines maintain expression of BBB-specific markers, which results in elevated transendothelial electrical resistance and reduced cell permeability. Importantly, these properties are retained for several passages in culture, and they can be reproduced and maintained in different laboratories over time. We conclude that the brain-derived endothelial cell lines that we have investigated gain their specialized characteristics upon activation of the canonical Wnt pathway. This model may be thus suitable to test the BBB permeability to chemicals or large molecular weight proteins, transmigration of inflammatory cells, treatments with cytokines, and genetic manipulation.

  9. Comparison of Linear and Cyclic His-Ala-Val Peptides in Modulating the Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability: Impact on Delivery of Molecules to the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaofi, Ahmed; On, Ngoc; Kiptoo, Paul; Williams, Todd D; Miller, Donald W; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of peptide cyclization on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) modulatory activity and plasma stability of His-Ala-Val peptides, which are derived from the extracellular 1 domain of human E-cadherin. The activities to modulate the intercellular junctions by linear HAV4 (Ac-SHAVAS-NH2), cyclic cHAVc1 (Cyclo(1,8)Ac-CSHAVASC-NH2), and cyclic cHAVc3 (Cyclo(1,6)Ac-CSHAVC-NH2) were compared in in vitro and in vivo BBB models. Linear HAV4 and cyclic cHAVc1 have the same junction modulatory activities as assessed by in vitro MDCK monolayer model and in situ rat brain perfusion model. In contrast, cyclic cHAVc3 was more effective than linear HAV4 in modulating MDCK cell monolayers and in improving in vivo brain delivery of Gd-DTPA on i.v. administration in Balb/c mice. Cyclic cHAVc3 (t1/2 = 12.95 h) has better plasma stability compared with linear HAV4 (t1/2 = 2.4 h). The duration of the BBB modulation was longer using cHAVc3 (2-4 h) compared with HAV4 (<1 h). Both HAV4 and cHAVc3 peptides also enhanced the in vivo brain delivery of IRdye800cw-PEG (25 kDa) as detected by near IR imaging. The result showed that cyclic cHAVc3 peptide had better activity and plasma stability than linear HAV4 peptide.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in Gliomas with Ultrasound Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption as Measured by Microdialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption. PMID:24936788

  11. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption.

  12. Peptide transport through the blood-brain barrier. Final report 1 Jul 87-31 Dec 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partridge, W.M.

    1991-01-15

    Most neuropeptides are incapable of entering the brain from blood owing to the presence of unique anatomical structures in the brain capillary wall, which makes up the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Such neuropeptides could be introduced into the bloodstream by intranasal insufflation and, thus, could have powerful medicinal properties (e.g., Beta-endorphin for the treatment of pain, vasopressin analogues for treatment of memory, ACTH analogues for treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy), should these peptides be capable of traversing the BBB. One such strategy for peptide delivery through the BBB is the development of chimeric peptides, which is the basis of the present contract. The production of chimeric peptides involves the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide (e.g., Beta-endorphin, vasopressin) to a transportable vector peptide (e.g., insulin, transferrin, cationized albumin, histone). The transportable peptide is capable of penetrating the BBB via receptor-mediated or absorptive-mediated transcytosis. Therefore, the introduction of chimeric peptides allows the nontransportable peptide to traverse the BBB via a physiologic piggy back mechanism.

  13. Optimizing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug carriers using an in vitro blood–brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Di; Mi, Gujie; Bhattacharya, Soumya; Nayar, Suprabha; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, an optimized in vitro blood–brain barrier (BBB) model was established using mouse brain endothelial cells (b.End3) and astrocytes (C8-D1A). Before measuring the permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) samples, the BBB was first examined and confirmed by an immunofluorescent stain and evaluating the transendothelial electrical resistance. After such confirmation, the permeability of the following five previously synthesized SPIONs was determined using this optimized BBB model: 1) GGB (synthesized using glycine, glutamic acid, and bovine serum albumin [BSA]), 2) GGC (glycine, glutamic acid, and collagen), 3) GGP (glycine, glutamic acid, and polyvinyl alcohol), 4) BPC (BSA, polyethylene glycol, and collagen), and 5) CPB (collagen, polyvinyl alcohol, and BSA). More importantly, after the permeability test, transmission electron microscopy thin section technology was used to investigate the mechanism behind this process. Transmission electron microscopy thin section images supported the hypothesis that collagen-coated CPB SPIONs displayed better cellular uptake than glycine and glutamine acid-coated GGB SPIONs. Such experimental data demonstrated how one can modify SPIONs to better deliver drugs to the brain to treat a wide range of neurological disorders.

  14. Inhibition of chemokine-like factor 1 improves blood-brain barrier dysfunction in rats following focal cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling-Lei; Wang, Zhi-Yuan; Hu, Jin-Feng; Yuan, Yu-He; Li, Hua; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and subsequent edema are major contributors to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke, and the current clinical therapy remains unsatisfied. Chemokine-like factor 1 (CKLF1), as a novel C-C chemokine, plays important roles in immune response. The expression of CKLF1 increased after focal cerebral ischemia and inhibition of CKLF1 activity showed neuroprotective effect by alleviating infiltration of neutrophil and neuron apoptosis in cerebral ischemia. However, few studies have focused on the role of CKLF1 on BBB integrity. The objective of present study was to investigate the role of CKLF1 on BBB integrity by applying anti-CKLF1 antibodies in rat focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion model. Brain water content, Evans blue leakage and the expression of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Occludin were measured. After treatment with anti-CKLF1 antibody, brain water content and Evans blue leakage in ipsilateral hemisphere were decreased in a dose-dependent manner at 24h after reperfusion, but not changed in contralateral hemisphere. Anti-CKLF1 antibody reduced the expression of AQP-4 and MMP-9, and upregulated the expression of ZO-1 and Occludin. These results suggest that CKLF1 is involved in BBB disruption after reperfusion. Inhibition of CKLF1 protects against cerebral ischemia by maintaining BBB integrity, possibly via inhibiting the expression of AQP-4 and MMP-9, and increasing the expression of tight junction protein. PMID:27283776

  15. Initial contact of glioblastoma cells with existing normal brain endothelial cells strengthen the barrier function via fibroblast growth factor 2 secretion: a new in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Thuy, Dinh Ha Duy; Ujifuku, Kenta; Kamada, Kensaku; Hayashi, Kentaro; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Niwa, Masami

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells invade along the existing normal capillaries in brain. Normal capillary endothelial cells function as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that limits permeability of chemicals into the brain. To investigate whether GBM cells modulate the BBB function of normal endothelial cells, we developed a new in vitro BBB model with primary cultures of rat brain endothelial cells (RBECs), pericytes, and astrocytes. Cells were plated on a membrane with 8 μm pores, either as a monolayer or as a BBB model with triple layer culture. The BBB model consisted of RBEC on the luminal side as a bottom, and pericytes and astrocytes on the abluminal side as a top of the chamber. Human GBM cell line, LN-18 cells, or lung cancer cell line, NCI-H1299 cells, placed on either the RBEC monolayer or the BBB model increased the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) values against the model, which peaked within 72 h after the tumor cell application. The TEER value gradually returned to baseline with LN-18 cells, whereas the value quickly dropped to the baseline in 24 h with NCI-H1299 cells. NCI-H1299 cells invaded into the RBEC layer through the membrane, but LN-18 cells did not. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) strengthens the endothelial cell BBB function by increased occludin and ZO-1 expression. In our model, LN-18 and NCI-H1299 cells secreted FGF-2, and a neutralization antibody to FGF-2 inhibited LN-18 cells enhanced BBB function. These results suggest that FGF-2 would be a novel therapeutic target for GBM in the perivascular invasive front.

  16. PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF THE BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER: P-glycoprotein and occludin trafficking as therapeutic targets to optimize CNS drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    McCaffrey, Gwen; Davis, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical and metabolic barrier that separates the CNS from the peripheral circulation. CNS drug delivery across the BBB is challenging, primarily due to the physical restriction of paracellular diffusion between the endothelial cells that comprise the microvessels of the BBB and the activity of efflux transporters that quickly expel back into the capillary lumen a wide variety of xenobiotics. Therapeutic manipulation of protein trafficking is emerging as a n...

  17. Numerical Study on Atmospheric Pressure DBD in Helium: Single-breakdown and Multi-breakdown Discharges%Numerical Study on Atmospheric Pressure DBD in Helium: Single-breakdown and Multi-breakdown Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王小华; 杨爱军; 荣命哲; 刘定新

    2011-01-01

    A 1-D fluid model for homogeneous dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in helium is presented, aimed at unraveling the spatial-temporal characteristics of two basic discharge regimes: single-breakdown and multi-breakdown discharges. Discharge currents, gap voltages, charge densities, electron temperature and electric field profiles of the two regimes make it clear that these two regimes are qualitatively different. It is found that the multi-breakdown discharge has a more homogeneous flux on dielectrics compared to the single-breakdown discharge.

  18. Nanoparticle mediated P-glycoprotein silencing for improved drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier: a siRNA-chitosan approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jostein Malmo

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, composed of tightly organized endothelial cells, limits the availability of drugs to therapeutic targets in the central nervous system. The barrier is maintained by membrane bound efflux pumps efficiently transporting specific xenobiotics back into the blood. The efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed at high levels in brain endothelial cells, has several drug substrates. Consequently, siRNA mediated silencing of the P-gp gene is one possible strategy how to improve the delivery of drugs to the brain. Herein, we investigated the potential of siRNA-chitosan nanoparticles in silencing P-gp in a BBB model. We show that the transfection of rat brain endothelial cells mediated effective knockdown of P-gp with subsequent decrease in P-gp substrate efflux. This resulted in increased cellular delivery and efficacy of the model drug doxorubicin.

  19. 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging characterization of acute blood-brain-barrier disruption achieved with intracranial irreversible electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A Garcia

    Full Text Available The blood-brain-barrier (BBB presents a significant obstacle to the delivery of systemically administered chemotherapeutics for the treatment of brain cancer. Irreversible electroporation (IRE is an emerging technology that uses pulsed electric fields for the non-thermal ablation of tumors. We hypothesized that there is a minimal electric field at which BBB disruption occurs surrounding an IRE-induced zone of ablation and that this transient response can be measured using gadolinium (Gd uptake as a surrogate marker for BBB disruption. The study was performed in a Good Laboratory Practices (GLP compliant facility and had Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC approval. IRE ablations were performed in vivo in normal rat brain (n = 21 with 1-mm electrodes (0.45 mm diameter separated by an edge-to-edge distance of 4 mm. We used an ECM830 pulse generator to deliver ninety 50-μs pulse treatments (0, 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 V/cm at 1 Hz. The effects of applied electric fields and timing of Gd administration (-5, +5, +15, and +30 min was assessed by systematically characterizing IRE-induced regions of cell death and BBB disruption with 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histopathologic evaluations. Statistical analysis on the effect of applied electric field and Gd timing was conducted via Fit of Least Squares with α = 0.05 and linear regression analysis. The focal nature of IRE treatment was confirmed with 3D MRI reconstructions with linear correlations between volume of ablation and electric field. Our results also demonstrated that IRE is an ablation technique that kills brain tissue in a focal manner depicted by MRI (n = 16 and transiently disrupts the BBB adjacent to the ablated area in a voltage-dependent manner as seen with Evan's Blue (n = 5 and Gd administration.

  20. Cerebrovascular and blood-brain barrier morphology in spontaneously hypertensive rats: effect of treatment with choline alphoscerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Amenta, Francesco; Tomassoni, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic precursors increasing choline availability and acetylcholine synthesis/release may represent a therapeutic approach for countering cognitive impairment occurring in adult-onset dementia disorders. Choline alphoscerate (alpha-gliceryl-phosphoryl-choline, GPC) is among cholinergic precursors the most effective in enhancing acetylcholine biosynthesis and release in animal models. This study was designed to assess if a long-term treatment with GPC modify cerebrovascular components [perivascular astrocytes, blood-brain barrier (BBB) and microvessels] and endothelial inflammatory markers expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) used as a model of brain vascular injury. Male SHR aged 32 weeks and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats were treated for 4 weeks with GPC (150 mg/kg/day) or a vehicle. Intracerebral arteries of different brain areas, perivascular astrocytes, BBB and endothelial inflammatory markers were assessed by quantitative morphological and immunohistochemical techniques. No significant changes in the size of perivascular astrocytes were observed in SHR versus normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats, whereas the expression of the BBB marker aquaporin-4 increased in SHR. This phenomenon was countered by GPC treatment. On the contrary, GPC has no vasodilator effect on brain micro-vessels. Endothelial markers and vascular adhesion molecules expression were not homogeneously affected by hypertension and GPC treatment in intracerebral vessels. The observation that treatment with GPC reversed BBB changes and countered to some extent micro-vessels changes occurring in SHR could explain data of clinical trials reporting an improvement of cognitive function in subjects suffering from cerebrovascular disorders and treated with GPC. These preclinical data suggest that the compound could have a cerebrovascular protective effect deserving a further characterization. PMID:25714975

  1. In vitro blood-brain barrier permeability predictions for GABAA receptor modulating piperine analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigenmann, Daniela Elisabeth; Dürig, Carmen; Jähne, Evelyn Andrea;

    2016-01-01

    The alkaloid piperine from black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) and several synthetic piperine analogs were recently identified as positive allosteric modulators of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors. In order to reach their target sites of action, these compounds need to enter the brain by c...

  2. Unexpected effects of peripherally administered kynurenic acid on cortical spreading depression and related blood–brain barrier permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oláh G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gáspár Oláh,1 Judit Herédi,1 Ákos Menyhárt,1 Zsolt Czinege,2 Dávid Nagy,1 János Fuzik,1 Kitti Kocsis,1 Levente Knapp,1 Erika Krucsó,1 Levente Gellért,1 Zsolt Kis,1 Tamás Farkas,1 Ferenc Fülöp,3 Árpád Párdutz,4 János Tajti,4 László Vécsei,4 József Toldi1 1Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Neuroscience, 2Department of Software Engineering, 3Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and MTA-SZTE Research Group for Stereochemistry, 4Department of Neurology and MTA-SZTE Neuroscience Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Cortical spreading depression (CSD involves a slowly-propagating depolarization wave in the cortex, which can appear in numerous pathophysiological conditions, such as migraine with aura, stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Neurons and glial cells are also depolarized transiently during the phenomena. CSD is followed by a massive increase in glutamate release and by changes in the brain microcirculation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, endogenous kynurenic acid (KYNA and dizocilpine, on CSD and the related blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability in rats. In intact animals, KYNA hardly crosses the BBB but has some positive features as compared with its precursor L-Kynurenine, which is frequently used in animal studies (KYNA cannot be metabolized to excitotoxic agents such as 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenine and quinolinic acid. We therefore investigated the possible effects of peripherally administered KYNA. Repetitive CSD waves were elicited by the application of 1 M KCl solution to the cortex. Direct current-electrocorticograms were measured for 1 hour. Four parameters of the waves were compared. Evans blue dye and fluorescent microscopy were used to study the possible changes in the permeability of the BBB. The results demonstrated that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists can reduce the number of CSD waves and decrease

  3. Enhanced delivery of etoposide across the blood-brain barrier to restrain brain tumor growth using melanotransferrin antibody- and tamoxifen-conjugated solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Wang, I-Hsin

    2016-08-01

    Melanotransferrin antibody (MA) and tamoxifen (TX) were conjugated on etoposide (ETP)-entrapped solid lipid nanoparticles (ETP-SLNs) to target the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioblastom multiforme (GBM). MA- and TX-conjugated ETP-SLNs (MA-TX-ETP-SLNs) were used to infiltrate the BBB comprising a monolayer of human astrocyte-regulated human brain-microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and to restrain the proliferation of malignant U87MG cells. TX-grafted ETP-SLNs (TX-ETP-SLNs) significantly enhanced the BBB permeability coefficient for ETP and raised the fluorescent intensity of calcein-AM when compared with ETP-SLNs. In addition, surface MA could increase the BBB permeability coefficient for ETP about twofold. The viability of HBMECs was higher than 86%, suggesting a high biocompatibility of MA-TX-ETP-SLNs. Moreover, the efficiency in antiproliferation against U87MG cells was in the order of MA-TX-ETP-SLNs  >  TX-ETP-SLNs  >  ETP-SLNs  >  SLNs. The capability of MA-TX-ETP-SLNs to target HBMECs and U87MG cells during internalization was verified by immunochemical staining of expressed melanotransferrin. MA-TX-ETP-SLNs can be a potent pharmacotherapy to deliver ETP across the BBB to GBM. PMID:26768307

  4. Cell-Based in Vitro Blood–Brain Barrier Model Can Rapidly Evaluate Nanoparticles’ Brain Permeability in Association with Particle Size and Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanshiro Hanada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of nanoparticle (NP uptake to the human central nervous system is a major concern. Recent reports showed that in animal models, nanoparticles (NPs passed through the blood–brain barrier (BBB. For the safe use of NPs, it is imperative to evaluate the permeability of NPs through the BBB. Here we used a commercially available in vitro BBB model to evaluate the permeability of NPs for a rapid, easy and reproducible assay. The model is reconstructed by culturing both primary rat brain endothelial cells and pericytes to support the tight junctions of endothelial cells. We used the permeability coefficient (Papp to determine the permeability of NPs. The size dependency results, using fluorescent silica NPs (30, 100, and 400 nm, revealed that the Papp for the 30 nm NPs was higher than those of the larger silica. The surface charge dependency results using Qdots® (amino-, carboxyl-, and PEGylated-Qdots, showed that more amino-Qdots passed through the model than the other Qdots. Usage of serum-containing buffer in the model resulted in an overall reduction of permeability. In conclusion, although additional developments are desired to elucidate the NPs transportation, we showed that the BBB model could be useful as a tool to test the permeability of nanoparticles.

  5. Targeted brain derived neurotropic factors (BDNF delivery across the blood-brain barrier for neuro-protection using magnetic nano carriers: an in-vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheesh Pilakka-Kanthikeel

    Full Text Available Parenteral use of drugs; such as opiates exert immunomodulatory effects and serve as a cofactor in the progression of HIV-1 infection, thereby potentiating HIV related neurotoxicity ultimately leading to progression of NeuroAIDS. Morphine exposure is known to induce apoptosis, down regulate cAMP response element-binding (CREB expression and decrease in dendritic branching and spine density in cultured cells. Use of neuroprotective agent; brain derived neurotropic factor (BDNF, which protects neurons against these effects, could be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of opiate addiction. Previous studies have shown that BDNF was not transported through the blood brain barrier (BBB in-vivo.; and hence it is not effective in-vivo. Therefore development of a drug delivery system that can cross BBB may have significant therapeutic advantage. In the present study, we hypothesized that magnetically guided nanocarrier may provide a viable approach for targeting BDNF across the BBB. We developed a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP based carrier bound to BDNF and evaluated its efficacy and ability to transmigrate across the BBB using an in-vitro BBB model. The end point determinations of BDNF that crossed BBB were apoptosis, CREB expression and dendritic spine density measurement. We found that transmigrated BDNF was effective in suppressing the morphine induced apoptosis, inducing CREB expression and restoring the spine density. Our results suggest that the developed nanocarrier will provide a potential therapeutic approach to treat opiate addiction, protect neurotoxicity and synaptic density degeneration.

  6. In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Models-An Overview of Established Models and New Microfluidic Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Anette; Antfolk, Maria; Brodin, Birger;

    2015-01-01

    The societal need for new central nervous system (CNS) medicines is substantial, because of the global increase in life expectancy and the accompanying increase in age-related CNS diseases. Low blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability has been one of the major causes of failure for new CNS drug...... candidates. There has therefore been a great interest in cell models, which mimic BBB permeation properties. In this review, we present an overview of the performance of monocultured, cocultured, and triple-cultured primary cells and immortalized cell lines, including key parameters such as transendothelial......-of-the-art models and it was noted that, although they show great promise, these systems have not yet reached beyond the proof-of-concept stage. In general, it was found that there were large variations in experimental protocols, BBB phenotype markers, and paracellular flux markers used. It is the author's opinion...

  7. Development of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeable Nitrocatechol-Based Catechol O-Methyltransferase Inhibitors with Reduced Potential for Hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago; Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N; Martínez-González, Loreto; Pérez, Daniel I; Martínez, Ana; Valente, Maria João; Garrido, Jorge; Uriarte, Eugenio; Serrão, Paula; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Remião, Fernando; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-08-25

    Recent efforts have been focused on the development of centrally active COMT inhibitors, which can be valuable assets for neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, due to the severe hepatotoxicity risk associated with tolcapone. New nitrocatechol COMT inhibitors based on naturally occurring caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester were developed. All nitrocatechol derivatives displayed potent inhibition of peripheral and cerebral COMT within the nanomolar range. Druglike derivatives 13, 15, and 16 were predicted to cross the blood-brain barrier in vitro and were significantly less toxic than tolcapone and entacapone when incubated at 50 μM with rat primary hepatocytes. Moreover, their unique acidity and electrochemical properties decreased the chances of formation of reactive quinone-imines and, as such, the potential for hepatotoxicity. The binding mode of 16 confirmed that the major interactions with COMT were established via the nitrocatechol ring, allowing derivatization of the side chain for future lead optimization efforts.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of post-ischemic blood-brain barrier damage with PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong-Fang; Qian, Cheng; An, Yan-Li; Chang, Di; Ju, Sheng-Hong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage during ischemia may induce devastating consequences like cerebral edema and hemorrhagic transformation. This study presents a novel strategy for dynamically imaging of BBB damage with PEGylated supermagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents. The employment of SPIONs as contrast agents made it possible to dynamically image the BBB permeability alterations and ischemic lesions simultaneously with T2-weighted MRI, and the monitoring could last up to 24 h with a single administration of PEGylated SPIONs in vivo. The ability of the PEGylated SPIONs to highlight BBB damage by MRI was demonstrated by the colocalization of PEGylated SPIONs with Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection of SPION-PEG/Gd-DTPA into a mouse. The immunohistochemical staining also confirmed the leakage of SPION-PEG from cerebral vessels into parenchyma. This study provides a novel and convenient route for imaging BBB alteration in the experimental ischemic stroke model.

  9. Microbubbles coupled to methotrexate-loaded liposomes for ultrasound-mediated delivery of methotrexate across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Ping; Yang, Weixiao; Li, Lu; Li, Peijing; Liu, Zheng; Zhuo, Zhongxiong; Gao, Yunhua

    2014-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the single most effective agent for the treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma. Currently, the delivery of MTX to the brain is achieved by high systemic doses, which cause severe long-term neurotoxicity, or intrathecal administration, which is highly invasive and may lead to infections or hemorrhagic complications. Acoustically active microbubbles have been developed as drug carriers for the noninvasive and brain-targeted delivery of therapeutics. However, their application is limited by their low drug-loading capacity. To overcome this limitation, we prepared microbubbles coupled to MTX-loaded liposomes using ZHIFUXIAN, a novel type of microbubbles with a superior safety profile and long circulation time. MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles had a high drug-loading capacity of 8.91%± 0.86%, and their size (2.64 ± 0.93 μm in diameter) was suitable for intravenous injection. When used with ultrasound, they showed more potent in vitro cytotoxicity against Walker-256 cancer cells than MTX alone or MTX-loaded liposomes. When Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to sonication, administration of these MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles via the tail vein led to targeted disruption of the blood-brain barrier without noticeable tissue or capillary damage. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the brain MTX concentration showed that MTX delivery to the brain followed the order of MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles + ultrasound (25.3 ± 2.4 μg/g) > unmodified ZHIFUXIAN + MTX + ultrasound (18.6 ± 2.2 μg/g) > MTX alone (6.97 ± 0.75 μg/g) > MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles (2.92 ± 0.39 μg/g). Therefore, treatment with MTX-liposome-coupled microbubbles and ultrasound resulted in a significantly higher brain MTX concentration than all other treatments (Pliposome-coupled microbubbles may hold great promise as new and effective therapies for primary central nervous system lymphoma and other central nervous system malignancies.

  10. Magnetic-resonance imaging for kinetic analysis of permeability changes during focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and brain drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wen-Yen; Chu, Po-Chun; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wai, Yau-Yau; Liu, Hao-Li

    2014-10-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with the presence of microbubbles has been shown to induce transient and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules which normally cannot penetrate into the brain. The success of FUS brain-drug delivery relies on its integration with in-vivo imaging to monitor kinetic change of therapeutic molecules into the brain. In this study, we developed a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) technique for kinetic analysis of delivered molecules during FUS-BBB opening. Three kinetic parameters (Ktrans, Ve, Kep) were characterized dynamically to describe BBB-permeability at two FUS exposure conditions (0.4 or 0.8MPa) over 24h. Ktrans, defined as the influx volume transfer constant from plasma to EES, and Ve, the EES volume fraction, were both found to be pressure-dependent. Ktrans and Ve showed a peak increase of 0.0086-0.0131min(-1) (for 0.4-0.8MPa pressure), and 0.0431-0.0692, respectively, immediately after FUS exposure. Both parameters subsequently decreased exponentially as a function of time, with estimated half-lives of decay of 2.89-5.3 and 2.2-4.93h, respectively. The kinetics of Kep, defined as the efflux rate constant from the extracellular extravascular space (EES) to the plasma, were complementary to Ktrans, with an initial decrease from 0.2010 to 0.1901min(-1) followed by a significantly longer recovery time (half-life of 17.39-99.92h). Our observations strongly supported the existence of imbalanced and mismatched kinetics of influx (Ktrans) and efflux (Kep) between the plasma and EES, indicating the existence of directional permeability during FUS-BBB opening. We further showed that kinetic change determined by DCE-MRI correlated well with the concentration of Evans Blue (EB)-albumin (coefficient of 0.74-0.89). These findings suggest that MRI kinetic monitoring may serve as an alternative method for in-vivo monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK

  11. JNK signaling is the shared pathway linking neuroinflammation, blood–brain barrier disruption, and oligodendroglial apoptosis in the white matter injury of the immature brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lan-Wan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White matter injury is the major form of brain damage in very preterm infants. Selective white matter injury in the immature brain can be induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-sensitized hypoxic-ischemia (HI in the postpartum (P day 2 rat pups whose brain maturation status is equivalent to that in preterm infants less than 30 weeks of gestation. Neuroinflammation, blood–brain barrier (BBB damage and oligodendrocyte progenitor apoptosis may affect the susceptibility of LPS-sensitized HI in white matter injury. c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK are important stress-responsive kinases in various forms of insults. We hypothesized that LPS-sensitized HI causes white matter injury through JNK activation-mediated neuroinflammation, BBB leakage and oligodendroglial apoptosis in the white matter of P2 rat pups. Methods P2 pups received LPS (0.05 mg/kg or normal saline injection followed by 90-min HI. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were used to determine microglia activation, TNF-α, BBB damage, cleaved caspase-3, JNK and phospho-JNK (p-JNK, myelin basic protein (MBP, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP expression. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the cellular distribution of p-JNK. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to inhibit JNK activity. Results P2 pups had selective white matter injury associated with upregulation of activated microglia, TNF-α, IgG extravasation and oligodendroglial progenitor apoptosis after LPS-sensitized HI. Immunohistochemical analyses showed early and sustained JNK activation in the white matter at 6 and 24 h post-insult. Immunofluorescence demonstrated upregulation of p-JNK in activated microglia, vascular endothelial cells and oligodendrocyte progenitors, and also showed perivascular aggregation of p-JNK-positive cells around the vessels 24 h post-insult. JNK inhibition by AS601245 or by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN significantly reduced microglial

  12. Blood-brain barrier penetration of novel pyridinealdoxime methiodide (PAM)-type oximes examined by brain microdialysis with LC-MS/MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a new reactivator of inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that can easily penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB), BBB penetration of 6 known and novel pyridinealdoxime methiodide (PAM)-type oximes (alkylPAMs) with relatively high reactivation activities was examined by in vivo rat brain microdialysis with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of alkylPAMs was intravenously determined for Wistar rats, then the limit of detection, quantification range and linearity of the calibration curve of the alkylPAMs in dialysate and blood were determined by LC-MS/MS. Following 10% LD50 intravenous administration of the alkylPAMs, 4-[(hydroxyimino) methyl]-1-(2-phenylethyl) pyridinium bromide (4-PAPE) and 4-[(hydroxyimino) methyl]-1-octylpyridinium bromide (4-PAO) appeared in the dialysate. Striatal extracellular fluid/blood concentration ratios were 0.039 ± 0.018 and 0.301 ± 0.183 (mean ± SEM), respectively, 1 h after treatment. This is the first report of BBB penetration of 4-PAPE, and the concentration ratio was smaller than that of 2-PAM.The mean BBB penetration of 4-PAO was approximately 30%, indicating that intravenous administration of 4-PAO may be effective for the reactivation of blocked cholinesterase in the brain. However, the toxicity of 4-PAO (LD50; 8.89 mg/kg) was greater than that of 2-PAM. Further investigation is required to determine the effects of these alkylPAMs in organophosphate poisoning

  13. Vitamin D prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption via vitamin D receptor-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonmi Won

    Full Text Available Maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity and minimizing neuronal injury are critical components of any therapeutic intervention following ischemic stroke. However, a low level of vitamin D hormone is a risk factor for many vascular diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 (vitamin D after ischemic stroke have been studied, but it is not known whether it prevents ischemic injury to brain endothelial cells, a key component of the neurovascular unit. We analyzed the effect of 1,25(OH2D3 on brain endothelial cell barrier integrity and tight junction proteins after hypoxia/reoxygenation in a mouse brain endothelial cell culture model that closely mimics many of the features of the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Following hypoxic injury in bEnd.3 cells, 1,25(OH2D3 treatment prevented the decrease in barrier function as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability of FITC-dextran (40 kDa, the decrease in the expression of the tight junction proteins zonula occludin-1, claudin-5, and occludin, the activation of NF-kB, and the increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. These responses were blocked when the interaction of 1,25(OH 2D3 with the vitamin D receptor (VDR was inhibited by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate treatment. Our findings show a direct, VDR-mediated, protective effect of 1,25(OH 2D3 against ischemic injury-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction in cerebral endothelial cells.

  14. Brain-resident memory T cells represent an autonomous cytotoxic barrier to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Karin; Vincenti, Ilena; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Page, Nicolas; Muschaweckh, Andreas; Wagner, Ingrid; Drexler, Ingo; Pinschewer, Daniel; Korn, Thomas; Merkler, Doron

    2016-07-25

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) persist at sites of prior infection and have been shown to enhance pathogen clearance by recruiting circulating immune cells and providing bystander activation. Here, we characterize the functioning of brain-resident memory T cells (bTRM) in an animal model of viral infection. bTRM were subject to spontaneous homeostatic proliferation and were largely refractory to systemic immune cell depletion. After viral reinfection in mice, bTRM rapidly acquired cytotoxic effector function and prevented fatal brain infection, even in the absence of circulating CD8(+) memory T cells. Presentation of cognate antigen on MHC-I was essential for bTRM-mediated protective immunity, which involved perforin- and IFN-γ-dependent effector mechanisms. These findings identify bTRM as an organ-autonomous defense system serving as a paradigm for TRM functioning as a self-sufficient first line of adaptive immunity. PMID:27377586

  15. The rights and wrongs of blood-brain barrier permeability studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dreifuss, Jean-Jacques; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M;

    2014-01-01

    . The first person to use this term seems to be Stern in the early 1920s. Studies in embryos by Stern and colleagues, Weed and Wislocki showed results similar to those in adult animals. These were well-conducted experiments made a century ago, thus the persistence of a belief in barrier immaturity is puzzling...... the evidence and assessing its quality, rather than selecting papers that supports a preconceived notion or intuitive belief. This review attempts to right the wrongs. Based on careful translation of original papers, some published a century ago, as well as providing discussion of studies claiming to show...

  16. Mannitol in Amanita muscaria--an osmotic blood-brain barrier disruptor enhancing its hallucinogenic action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejczyk, E; Kafarski, P

    2013-11-01

    Hypothesis have been made that relatively high level of mannitol present in the tissues of fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) enables more efficient transportation of these active substances into the brain and thus enhance their total activity. It may have been supported by the fact that hallucinogenic effect after A. muscaria consumption is greater than after ingestion of an active substance quantity which the eaten fungi dose contain. PMID:23932733

  17. Recruitment of neutrophils across the blood-brain barrier: the role of posttraumatic hepatic ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantovani Mario

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the effects of total hepatic ischemia, and reperfusion on the accumulation of neutrophils in the brain of rats submitted to normovolemic conditions as well as to controlled hemorrhagic shock state. METHODS: Thirty two adult male Wistar rats, were divided into four groups: the Control group, was submitted to the standard procedures for a period of 60 min of observation; Shock group, was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock (mean arterial blood pressure=40mmHg, 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1 and reperfusion for 60min; Pringle group, was submitted to total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. The total group was submitted to controlled hemorrhagic shock for 20min followed by volemic resuscitation (lactated Ringer's solution + blood, 3:1, total hepatic ischemia for 15min and reperfusion for 60min. Measurements of serum lactate and base excess were used to characterize the hemorrhagic shock state with low tissue perfusion. The counting of neutrophils on the brain was performed after the euthanasia of animals. RESULTS: The values for the counting of neutrophils on the brain indicate that did not occur difference among studied groups (p=0.196 (Control 0.12± 0.11, Shock 0.12± 0.13, Pringle 0.02± 0.04, Total 0.14± 0.16. CONCLUSION: Hemorrhagic shock associated to total hepatic ischemia for 15 minutes, followed by 60 minutes of reperfusion, did not causes significant neutrophils accumulation in the brain of rats.

  18. Blood-Brain Barrier and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: A Limit to the Therapy of CNS Tumors and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Anna Lisa; da Ros, Martina; Fantappiè, Ornella; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Facchini, Ludovica; Stival, Alessia; Becciani, Sabrina; Guidi, Milena; Favre, Claudio; de Martino, Maurizio; Genitori, Lorenzo; Sardi, Iacopo

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of brain tumors and neurodegenerative diseases, represents an ongoing challenge. In Central Nervous System (CNS) the achievement of therapeutic concentration of chemical agents is complicated by the presence of distinct set of efflux proteins, such as ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) transporters localized on the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). The activity of ABC transporters seems to be a common mechanism that underlies the poor response of CNS diseases to therapies. The molecular characterization of Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP/ABCG2), as an ABC transporter conferring multidrug resistance (MDR), has stimulated many studies to investigate its activity on the BBB, its involvement in physiology and CNS diseases and its role in limiting the delivery of drugs in CNS. In this review, we highlight the activity and localization of BCRP on the BBB and the action that this efflux pump has on many conventional drugs or latest generation molecules used for the treatment of CNS tumors and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26584727

  19. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Shityakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV, a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp. In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind value of −1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol−1 and an average binding constant (Kb of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity.

  20. Sevoflurane-Sulfobutylether-β-Cyclodextrin Complex: Preparation, Characterization, Cellular Toxicity, Molecular Modeling and Blood-Brain Barrier Transport Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Puskás, István; Pápai, Katalin; Salvador, Ellaine; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola; Broscheit, Jens-Albert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to study the ability of sulfobutylether-β-cyclodextrin (SBEβCD) to form an inclusion complex with sevoflurane (SEV), a volatile anesthetic with poor water solubility. The inclusion complex was prepared, characterized and its cellular toxicity and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeation potential of the formulated SEV have also been examined for the purpose of controlled drug delivery. The SEV-SBEβCD complex was nontoxic to the primary brain microvascular endothelial (pEND) cells at a clinically relevant concentration of sevoflurane. The inclusion complex exhibited significantly higher BBB permeation profiles as compared with the reference substance (propranolol) concerning calculated apparent permeability values (Papp). In addition, SEV binding affinity to SBEβCD was confirmed by a minimal Gibbs free energy of binding (ΔGbind) value of -1.727 ± 0.042 kcal·mol-1 and an average binding constant (Kb) of 53.66 ± 9.24 mM indicating rapid drug liberation from the cyclodextrin amphiphilic cavity. PMID:26046323

  1. Inhibition of prolactin with bromocriptine for 28days increases blood-brain barrier permeability in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Hernandez, H; Ramirez, M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Ali, S F; Gonzalez, C

    2015-08-20

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is necessary for the proper function of the brain. Its maintenance is regulated by endogenous factors. Recent evidences suggest prolactin (PRL) regulates the BBB properties in vitro, nevertheless no evidence of these effects have been reported in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of PRL in the maintenance of the BBB in the rat. Male Wistar rats were treated with Bromocriptine (Bromo) to inhibit PRL production for 28days in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). BBB permeability was evaluated through the Evans Blue dye and fluorescein-dextran extravasation as well as through edema formation. The expression of claudin-5, occludin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and the PRL receptor (PRLR) was evaluated through western blot. Bromo reduced the physiological levels of PRL at 28days. At the same time, Bromo increased BBB permeability and edema formation associated with a decrement in claudin-5 and occludin and potentiated the increase in BBB permeability induced by LPS. However, no neuroinflammation was detected, since the expression of GFAP was unchanged, as well as the expression of the PRLR. These data provide the first evidence that inhibition of PRL with Bromo affects the maintenance of the BBB through modulating the expression of tight junction proteins in vivo.

  2. Apolipoprotein E Regulates the Integrity of Tight Junctions in an Isoform-dependent Manner in an in Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Hosono, Takashi; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Bu, Guojun; Michikawa, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a major apolipoprotein in the brain. The ϵ4 allele of apoE is a major risk factor for Alzheimer disease, and apoE deficiency in mice leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the effect of apoE isoforms on BBB properties are as yet unknown. Here, using an in vitro BBB model consisting of brain endothelial cells and pericytes prepared from wild-type (WT) mice, and primary astrocytes prepared from human apoE3- and apoE4-knock-in mice, we show that the barri...

  3. A hematopoietic contribution to microhemorrhage formation during antiviral CD8 T cell-initiated blood-brain barrier disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Holly L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which susceptibility to brain hemorrhage is derived from blood-derived factors or stromal tissue remains largely unknown. We have developed an inducible model of CD8 T cell-initiated blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption using a variation of the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV model of multiple sclerosis. This peptide-induced fatal syndrome (PIFS model results in severe central nervous system (CNS vascular permeability and death in the C57BL/6 mouse strain, but not in the 129 SvIm mouse strain, despite the two strains' having indistinguishable CD8 T-cell responses. Therefore, we hypothesize that hematopoietic factors contribute to susceptibility to brain hemorrhage, CNS vascular permeability and death following induction of PIFS. Methods PIFS was induced by intravenous injection of VP2121-130 peptide at 7 days post-TMEV infection. We then investigated brain inflammation, astrocyte activation, vascular permeability, functional deficit and microhemorrhage formation using T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in C57BL/6 and 129 SvIm mice. To investigate the contribution of hematopoietic cells in this model, hemorrhage-resistant 129 SvIm mice were reconstituted with C57BL/6 or autologous 129 SvIm bone marrow. Gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted MRI was used to visualize the extent of CNS vascular permeability after bone marrow transfer. Results C57BL/6 and 129 SvIm mice had similar inflammation in the CNS during acute infection. After administration of VP2121-130 peptide, however, C57BL/6 mice had increased astrocyte activation, CNS vascular permeability, microhemorrhage formation and functional deficits compared to 129 SvIm mice. The 129 SvIm mice reconstituted with C57BL/6 but not autologous bone marrow had increased microhemorrhage formation as measured by T2*-weighted MRI, exhibited a profound increase in CNS vascular permeability as measured by three-dimensional volumetric analysis of

  4. What are the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during rehabilitation for stroke and other acquired brain injuries? A systematic review and meta-synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Sarah E; Tyson, Sarah F; Kirk, Susan; Parsons, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during rehabilitation for stroke and other acquired brain injuries. Data sources: AMED, Proquest, CINAHL and MEDLINE. Review methods: Two reviewers independently screened, extracted data and assessed study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and undertook thematic content analysis for papers examining the barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during stroke/neurological rehabilitation (any design). Last searches were completed in May 2016. Results: Nine qualitative papers were selected, involving 202 participants in total: 88 patients, 89 health care professionals and 25 relatives of participating patients. Main barriers were: Differences in staff and patients perspectives of goal-setting; patient-related barriers; staff-related barriers, and organisational level barriers. Main facilitators were: individually tailored goal-setting processes, strategies to promote communication and understanding, and strategies to avoid disappointment and unrealistic goals. In addition, patients’ and staff’s knowledge, experience, skill, and engagement with goal-setting could be either a barrier (if these aspects were absent) or a facilitator (if they were present). Conclusion: The main barriers and facilitators to goal-setting during stroke rehabilitation have been identified. They suggest that current methods of goal-setting during inpatient/early stage stroke or neurological rehabilitation are not fit for purpose. PMID:27496701

  5. Peripheral nerve injury and TRPV1-expressing primary afferent C-fibers cause opening of the blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salter Michael W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood-brain barrier (BBB plays the crucial role of limiting exposure of the central nervous system (CNS to damaging molecules and cells. Dysfunction of the BBB is critical in a broad range of CNS disorders including neurodegeneration, inflammatory or traumatic injury to the CNS, and stroke. In peripheral tissues, the vascular-tissue permeability is normally greater than BBB permeability, but vascular leakage can be induced by efferent discharge activity in primary sensory neurons leading to plasma extravasation into the extravascular space. Whether discharge activity of sensory afferents entering the CNS may open the BBB or blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB remains an open question. Results Here we show that peripheral nerve injury (PNI produced by either sciatic nerve constriction or transecting two of its main branches causes an increase in BSCB permeability, as assessed by using Evans Blue dye or horseradish peroxidase. The increase in BSCB permeability was not observed 6 hours after the PNI but was apparent 24 hours after the injury. The increase in BSCB permeability was transient, peaking about 24-48 hrs after PNI with BSCB integrity returning to normal levels by 7 days. The increase in BSCB permeability was prevented by administering the local anaesthetic lidocaine at the site of the nerve injury. BSCB permeability was also increased 24 hours after electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at intensity sufficient to activate C-fibers, but not when A-fibers only were activated. Likewise, BSCB permeability increased following application of capsaicin to the nerve. The increase in permeability caused by C-fiber stimulation or by PNI was not anatomically limited to the site of central termination of primary afferents from the sciatic nerve in the lumbar cord, but rather extended throughout the spinal cord and into the brain. Conclusions We have discovered that injury to a peripheral nerve and electrical stimulation of C

  6. Nanoparticulate flurbiprofen reduces amyloid-β42 generation in an in vitro blood–brain barrier model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common neurodegenerative disorder affecting the elderly. Over the past years, several approaches and compounds developed for the treatment of AD have failed in clinical studies, likely in part due to their low penetration of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Since nanotechnology-based strategies offer new possibilities for the delivery of drugs to the brain, this technique is studied intensively for the treatment of AD and other neurological disorders. Methods The Aβ42 lowering drug flurbiprofen was embedded in polylactide (PLA) nanoparticles by emulsification-diffusion technique and their potential as drug carriers in an in vitro BBB model was examined. First, the cytotoxic potential of the PLA-flurbiprofen nanoparticles on endothelial cells and the cellular binding and uptake by endothelial cells was studied. Furthermore, the biological activity of the nanoparticulate flurbiprofen on γ-secretase modulation as well as its in vitro release was examined. Furthermore, the protein corona of the nanoparticles was studied as well as their ability to transport flurbiprofen across an in vitro BBB model. Results PLA-flurbiprofen nanoparticles were endocytosed by endothelial cells and neither affected the vitality nor barrier function of the endothelial cell monolayer. The exposure of the PLA-flurbiprofen nanoparticles to human plasma occurred in a rapid protein corona formation, resulting in their decoration with bioactive proteins, including apolipoprotein E. Furthermore, luminally administered PLA-flurbiprofen nanoparticles in contrast to free flurbiprofen were able to modulate γ-secretase activity by selectively decreasing Aβ42 levels in the abluminal compartment of the BBB model. Conclusions In this study, we were able to show that flurbiprofen can be transported by PLA nanoparticles across an in vitro BBB model and most importantly, the

  7. Nutri-epigenetics ameliorates blood-brain barrier damage and neurodegeneration in hyperhomocysteinemia: role of folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Anuradha; Kamat, Pradip K; Givvimani, Srikanth; Brown, Kasey; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C; Tyagi, Neetu

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms underlying nutrition (nutrition epigenetics) are important in understanding human health. Nutritional supplements, for example folic acid, a cofactor in one-carbon metabolism, regulate epigenetic alterations and may play an important role in the maintenance of neuronal integrity. Folic acid also ameliorates hyperhomocysteinemia, which is a consequence of elevated levels of homocysteine. Hyperhomocysteinemia induces oxidative stress that may epigenetically mediate cerebrovascular remodeling and leads to neurodegeneration; however, the mechanisms behind such alterations remain unclear. Therefore, the present study was designed to observe the protective effects of folic acid against hyperhomocysteinemia-induced epigenetic and molecular alterations leading to neurotoxic cascades. To test this hypothesis, we employed 8-weeks-old male wild-type (WT) cystathionine-beta-synthase heterozygote knockout methionine-fed (CBS+/− + Met), WT, and CBS+/− + Met mice supplemented with folic acid (FA) [WT + FA and CBS+/− + Met + FA, respectively, 0.0057-μg g−1 day−1 dose in drinking water/4 weeks]. Hyperhomocysteinemia in CBS+/− + Met mouse brain was accompanied by a decrease in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and an increase in S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase expression, symptoms of oxidative stress, upregulation of DNA methyltransferases, rise in matrix metalloproteinases, a drop in the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, decreased expression of tight junction proteins, increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier, neurodegeneration, and synaptotoxicity. Supplementation of folic acid to CBS+/− + Met mouse brain led to a decrease in the homocysteine level and rescued pathogenic and epigenetic alterations, showing its protective efficacy against homocysteine-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  drug circulation time. In addition, avoiding adverse effects in the brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions.

  9. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  10. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat after local proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, H.; Rosander, K. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Gustaf Werner Inst.); Lomanov, M.; Lukjashin, V.; Shimchuk, G.; Zolotov, V.; Minakova, E. (Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, USSR)

    1982-01-01

    Rats were irradiated laterally through the brain with 200 MeV protons. The beam was of circular cross-section with a diameter of 5 or 7 mm. The doses were 50, 70, 100 and 150 Gy. After irradiation the rats were examined several times by use of injected /sup 99/Tcsup(m) pertechnetate. The uptake of the substance increased to a maximum after 20 to 30 days and then decreased to a normal level. Differences in maximum uptake with respect to dose were significant only for the smaller beam diameter.

  11. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coisne Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. Methods and design An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of

  12. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijboer, F

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an analysis of perspectives from different stakeholders on the state-of-the-art of BCI. Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed. Second, the potential target group, which could benefit from BCIs as access technologies is expected to be very small. Development costs are therefore high, while reimbursements are expected to be low, which challenges the commercial viability. Third, potential target users should be much more included in the design process of BCIs to ensure that the end-products meet technical, ethical, legal and social requirements. These three issues need to be urgently addressed so that target users may benefit from this promising technology.

  13. Time-to-breakdown characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the reliability of the MTJs on the roughness of insulating tunnel barrier, we prepared two MTJs with the different uniformity of barrier thickness. Namely, the one has uniform insulating barrier thickness; the other has non-uniform insulating barrier thickness as compared to different thing. As to depositing amorphous layer CoZrNb under the pinning layer IrMn, we achieved MTJ with uniform barrier thickness. First of all, we performed the breakdown-voltage measurement of two junctions and obtained the result having a similar breakdown-voltage about 1.4 V at two all junctions. And then, the time dependence dielectric breakdown (TDDB) measurements of two junctions are carried out under constant voltage stresses. The Weibull fit of our data shows clearly that time to breakdown (tBD) scales with the thickness uniformity of tunnel barrier. And also, Assuming a linear dependence of log(tBD) on stress voltages, we meet with result about the different lifetime of the two MTJs with uniform barrier thickness or non-uniform barrier thickness. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Time-to-breakdown characteristics of magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Rhee, Jang Roh [Department of Physics, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea); Kim, Taewan; Park, Wanjun [Materials and Devices Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea); Jang, YoungMan; Cho, B.K. [Superconducting and Magnetic Materials Laboratory, GwangJu Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea)

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the reliability of the MTJs on the roughness of insulating tunnel barrier, we prepared two MTJs with the different uniformity of barrier thickness. Namely, the one has uniform insulating barrier thickness; the other has non-uniform insulating barrier thickness as compared to different thing. As to depositing amorphous layer CoZrNb under the pinning layer IrMn, we achieved MTJ with uniform barrier thickness. First of all, we performed the breakdown-voltage measurement of two junctions and obtained the result having a similar breakdown-voltage about 1.4 V at two all junctions. And then, the time dependence dielectric breakdown (TDDB) measurements of two junctions are carried out under constant voltage stresses. The Weibull fit of our data shows clearly that time to breakdown (t{sub BD}) scales with the thickness uniformity of tunnel barrier. And also, Assuming a linear dependence of log(t{sub BD}) on stress voltages, we meet with result about the different lifetime of the two MTJs with uniform barrier thickness or non-uniform barrier thickness. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Application of nanomedicine for crossing the blood-brain barrier: Theranostic opportunities in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalamfarsa, Ghasem; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Mohammadnia-Afrouzi, Mousa; Anvari, Enayat; Farhadi, Shohreh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurodegenerative disease characterized with immunopathobiological events, including lymphocytic infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS), microglia activation, demyelination and axonal degeneration. Although several neuroprotective drugs have been designed for the treatment of MS, complete remission is yet matter of debate. Therefore, development of novel therapeutic approaches for MS is of a high priority in immunological research. Nanomedicine is a recently developed novel medical field, which is applicable in both diagnosis and treatment of several cancers and autoimmune diseases. Although there is a marked progress in neuroimaging through using nanoparticles, little is known regarding the therapeutic potential of nanomedicine in neurological disorders, particularly MS. Moreover, the majority of data is limited to the MS related animal models. In this review, we will discuss about the brain targeting potential of different nanoparticles as well as the role of nanomedicine in the diagnosis and treatment of MS and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. PMID:27416019

  16. Quantification of transient increase of the blood–brain barrier permeability to macromolecules by optimized focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingyan Shi,1 Paolo Palacio-Mancheno,1 Joseph Badami,2 Da Wi Shin,1 Min Zeng,1 Luis Cardoso,1 Raymond Tu,2 Bingmei M Fu11Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Chemical Engineering, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Radioimmunotherapy using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody that targets tumor cells has been shown to be efficient for the treatment of many malignant cancers, with reduced side effects. However, the blood–brain barrier (BBB inhibits the transport of intravenous antibodies to tumors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated that focused ultrasound (FUS combined with microbubbles (MBs is a promising method to transiently disrupt the BBB for the drug delivery to the central nervous system. To find the optimal FUS and MBs that can induce reversible increase in the BBB permeability, we employed minimally invasive multiphoton microscopy to quantify the BBB permeability to dextran-155 kDa with similar molecular weight to an antibody by applying different doses of FUS in the presence of MBs with an optimal size and concentration. The cerebral microcirculation was observed through a section of frontoparietal bone thinned with a micro-grinder. About 5 minutes after applying the FUS on the thinned skull in the presence of MBs for 1 minute, TRITC (tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-dextran-155 kDa in 1% bovine serum albumin in mammalian Ringer’s solution was injected into the cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump. Simultaneously, the temporal images were collected from the brain parenchyma ~100–200 µm below the pia mater. Permeability was determined from the rate of tissue solute accumulation around individual microvessels. After several trials, we found the optimal dose of FUS. At the optimal dose, permeability increased by ~14-fold after 5 minutes post-FUS, and permeability returned to the control level after 25 minutes. FUS without

  17. Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  18. Cellular immune surveillance of central nervous system bypasses blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier: revealed with the New Marburg cerebrospinal-fluid model in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Tilmann O

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human brain/spinal cord, blood capillaries and venules are locked differently with junctions and basement membrane (blood-brain barrier, blood-venule barrier). In choroid plexus, epithelial tight junctions and basement membrane lock blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier. Lymphocytic cell data, quantified with multicolour flow-cytometry or immuno-cytochemical methods in sample pairs of lumbar CSF, ventrictricular CSF and peripheral venous blood, are taken from references; similarly, data of thoracic duct chyle and blood sample pairs. Through three circumventricular organs (median eminence, organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, area postrema), 15-30 μl blood are pressed by blood pressure through fenestrated capillaries, matrix/basement membrane spaces and ependyma cell lacks into ventricular/suboccipital CSF to generate CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) , CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) , CD16(+) 56(+) 3(-) NK, CD19(+) 3(-) B subsets; some B, few NK cells adhere in circumventricular organs. Into lumbar CSF, 10-15 μl thoracic chyle with five lymphocyte subsets (without CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) cells) reflux, when CSF drains out with to-and-fro movements of chyle/CSF along nerve roots. Lymphocytes in lumbar CSF represent a mixture of blood and lymph lymphocytic cells with similar HLA-DR(+) CD3(+) cell counts in ventricular and lumbar CSF, higher CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) subsets in lumbar CSF, and few NK and B cells due to absorption in circumventricular organs. The Marburg CSF Model reflects origin and turnover of lymphatic cells in CSF realistically; the model differs from ligand-multistep processes of activated lymphocytes through blood-brain-, blood-venule-, and blood-CSF-barriers; because transfer of inactivated native lymphocytes through the barriers is not found with healthy humans, although described so in literature. PMID:25641944

  19. Drug delivery strategies to enhance the permeability of the blood–brain barrier for treatment of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang F

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fang Zhang, Chun-Lei Xu, Chun-Mei Liu School of Pharmacy, National First-Class Key Discipline for Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Gliomas are amongst the most insidious and destructive types of brain cancer and are associated with a poor prognosis, frequent recurrences, and extremely high lethality despite combination treatment of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The existence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB restricts the delivery of therapeutic molecules into the brain and offers the clinical efficacy of many pharmaceuticals that have been demonstrated to be effective for other kinds of tumors. This challenge emphasizes the need to be able to deliver drugs effectively across the BBB to reach the brain parenchyma. Enhancement of the permeability of the BBB and being able to transport drugs across it has been shown to be a promising strategy to improve drug absorption and treatment efficacy. This review highlights the innovative technologies that have been introduced to enhance the permeability of the BBB and to obtain an optimal distribution and concentration of drugs in the brain to treat gliomas, such as nanotechniques, hyperthermia techniques, receptor-mediated transport, cell-penetrating peptides, and cell-mediated delivery. Keywords: glioma, blood–brain barrier, drug delivery, nanotechnology, hyperthermia, receptor-mediated transport, cell-penetrating peptides, cell-mediated delivery

  20. Monitoring stroke progression: in vivo imaging of cortical perfusion, blood-brain barrier permeability and cellular damage in the rat photothrombosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoknecht, Karl; Prager, Ofer; Vazana, Udi; Kamintsky, Lyn; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Figge, Lena; Chassidim, Yoash; Schellenberger, Eyk; Kovács, Richard; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2014-11-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia is among the main causes of death and disability worldwide. The ischemic core often progresses, invading the peri-ischemic brain; however, assessing the propensity of the peri-ischemic brain to undergo secondary damage, understanding the underlying mechanisms, and adjusting treatment accordingly remain clinically unmet challenges. A significant hallmark of the peri-ischemic brain is dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), yet the role of disturbed vascular permeability in stroke progression is unclear. Here we describe a longitudinal in vivo fluorescence imaging approach for the evaluation of cortical perfusion, BBB dysfunction, free radical formation and cellular injury using the photothrombosis vascular occlusion model in male Sprague Dawley rats. Blood-brain barrier dysfunction propagated within the peri-ischemic brain in the first hours after photothrombosis and was associated with free radical formation and cellular injury. Inhibiting free radical signaling significantly reduced progressive cellular damage after photothrombosis, with no significant effect on blood flow and BBB permeability. Our approach allows a dynamic follow-up of cellular events and their response to therapeutics in the acutely injured cerebral cortex.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging indicators of blood-brain barrier and brain water changes in young rats with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Bigio Marc R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrocephalus is associated with enlargement of cerebral ventricles. We hypothesized that magnetic resonance (MR imaging parameters known to be influenced by tissue water content would change in parallel with ventricle size in young rats and that changes in blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability would be detected. Methods Hydrocephalus was induced by injection of kaolin into the cisterna magna of 4-week-old rats, which were studied 1 or 3 weeks later. MR was used to measure longitudinal and transverse relaxation times (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficients in several regions. Brain tissue water content was measured by the wet-dry weight method, and tissue density was measured in Percoll gradient columns. BBB permeability was measured by quantitative imaging of changes on T1-weighted images following injection of gadolinium diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (Gd-DTPA tracer and microscopically by detection of fluorescent dextran conjugates. Results In nonhydrocephalic rats, water content decreased progressively from age 3 to 7 weeks. T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficients did not exhibit parallel changes and there was no evidence of BBB permeability to tracers. The cerebral ventricles enlarged progressively in the weeks following kaolin injection. In hydrocephalic rats, the dorsal cortex was more dense and the white matter less so, indicating that the increased water content was largely confined to white matter. Hydrocephalus was associated with transient elevation of T1 in gray and white matter and persistent elevation of T2 in white matter. Changes in the apparent diffusion coefficients were significant only in white matter. Ventricle size correlated significantly with dorsal water content, T1, T2, and apparent diffusion coefficients. MR imaging showed evidence of Gd-DTPA leakage in periventricular tissue foci but not diffusely. These correlated with microscopic leak of larger dextran tracers. Conclusions MR

  2. Generation of a High Resistance in vitro Blood-Brain-Barrier Model and Investigations of Brain-to-Blood Glutamate Efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian

    Blod-hjernebarrieren (blood-brain barrier, BBB) opretholder den generelle homeostase i hjernens væsker. BBB kan også spille en rolle i homeostasen for den eksitatoriske aminosyre, L-glutamat. In vitro modeller kan være effektive værktøjer til at få mekanistiske informationer om transcellulær...... polariseret transport i blod-til-hjerne-retningen med en KM på 138 ± 49 µM og Jmax på 28 ± 3.1 pmol • min-1 • cm-2 for L-glutamat. D-aspartat akkumuleredes i co-kulturerne, når det blev tilsat den basolaterale side. EAAT-1 ekspression var konstant og ensartet i modellen og i friskt isolerede kapillærer, mens...... ekspressionen af EAAT-2 og -3 var uklar. L-glutamat blev opkoncentreret i endothelcellerne indenfor 5 minutter af basolateral tilsætning. Optaget blev hæmmet af en generel EAAT-hæmmer og udviste Michaelis-Menten kinetik med Vmax på 31 ± 6 pmol • cm-2 • min-1 og KM på 36 ± 25 µM. Resultaterne viser, at BBB kan...

  3. Behavioral alterations following blood-brain barrier disruption stimulated by focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Cheng, Irene Han-Juo

    2016-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavioral alterations and histological changes of the brain after FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD). Rats were behaviorally tested using the open field, hole-board, and grip strength tests from day 1 through day 32 after undergoing BBBD induced by FUS with either a mild or heavy parameter. In the open field test, we found an increase in center entries on day 1 and day 9 following heavy FUS treatment and a decrease in center entries at day 18 following mild FUS treatment. With regard to memory-related alterations, rats subjected to heavy FUS treatment exhibited longer latency to start exploring and to find the first baited hole. However, rats subjected to mild FUS treatment exhibited no significant differences in terms of memory performance or grip force. The obtained data suggest that heavy FUS treatment might induce hyperactivity, spatial memory impairment, and forelimb gripping deficits. Furthermore, while mild FUS treatment may have an impact on anxiety-related behaviors, the data suggested it had no impact on locomotor activity, memory, or grip force. Thus, the behavioral alterations following FUS-induced BBBD require further investigation before clinical application. PMID:27034007

  4. P-glycoprotein alters blood–brain barrier penetration of antiepileptic drugs in rats with medically intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aimei Ma,1,* Cuicui Wang,2,3,* Yinghui Chen,2,3 Weien Yuan4 1Department of Neurology, The People's Hospital of Shanxi Province, Taiyuan, 2Department of Neurology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, 3Department of Neurology, Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai, 4School of Pharmacy, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: P-glycoprotein is one of the earliest known multidrug transporters and plays an important role in resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, we detected levels of P-glycoprotein and its mRNA expression in a rat brain model of medically intractable epilepsy established by amygdala kindling and drug selection. We investigated whether inhibition of P-glycoprotein affects the concentration of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid. We found that levels of P-glycoprotein and its mRNA expression were upregulated in epileptic cerebral tissue compared with cerebral tissue from normal rats. The concentrations of two antiepileptic drugs, carbamazepine and phenytoin, were very low in the cortical extracellular fluid of rats with medically intractable epilepsy, and were restored after blockade of P-glycoprotein by verapamil. These results show that increased P-glycoprotein levels alter the ability of carbamazepine and phenytoin to penetrate the blood–brain barrier and reduce the concentrations of these agents in extracellular cortical fluid. High P-glycoprotein levels may be involved in resistance to antiepileptic drugs in medically intractable epilepsy. Keywords: P-glycoprotein, medically intractable epilepsy, antiepileptic drugs, amygdala kindling, verapamil

  5. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna C Davidson

    Full Text Available Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND, indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1 positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  6. Excess soluble CD40L contributes to blood brain barrier permeability in vivo: implications for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Donna C; Hirschman, Michael P; Sun, Anita; Singh, Meera V; Kasischke, Karl; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of anti-retroviral therapies, a majority of HIV-infected individuals still develop HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), indicating that host inflammatory mediators, in addition to viral proteins, may be contributing to these disorders. Consistently, we have previously shown that levels of the inflammatory mediator soluble CD40L (sCD40L) are elevated in the circulation of HIV-infected, cognitively impaired individuals as compared to their infected, non-impaired counterparts. Recent studies from our group suggest a role for the CD40/CD40L dyad in blood brain barrier (BBB) permeability and interestingly, sCD40L is thought to regulate BBB permeability in other inflammatory disorders of the CNS. Using complementary multiphoton microscopy and quantitative analyses in wild-type and CD40L deficient mice, we now reveal that the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) can induce BBB permeability in a CD40L-dependent manner. This permeability of the BBB was found to be the result of aberrant platelet activation induced by Tat, since depletion of platelets prior to treatment reversed Tat-induced BBB permeability. Furthermore, Tat treatment led to an increase in granulocyte antigen 1 (Gr1) positive monocytes, indicating an expansion of the inflammatory subset of cells in these mice, which were found to adhere more readily to the brain microvasculature in Tat treated animals. Exploring the mechanisms by which the BBB becomes compromised during HIV infection has the potential to reveal novel therapeutic targets, thereby aiding in the development of adjunct therapies for the management of HAND, which are currently lacking.

  7. Blood-brain barrier in vitro models as tools in drug discovery: assessment of the transport ranking of antihistaminic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, W; Mandikova, J; Pawlowitsch, R; Linz, B; Bennani-Baiti, B; Lauer, R; Lachmann, B; Noe, C R

    2012-05-01

    In the course of our validation program testing blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models for their usability as tools in drug discovery it was evaluated whether an established Transwell model based on porcine cell line PBMEC/C1-2 was able to differentiate between the transport properties of first and second generation antihistaminic drugs. First generation antihistamines can permeate the BBB and act in the central nervous system (CNS), whereas entry to the CNS of second generation antihistamines is restricted by efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gP) located in brain endothelial cells. P-gP functionality of PBMEC/C1-2 cells grown on Transwell filter inserts was proven by transport studies with P-gP substrate rhodamine 123 and P-gP blocker verapamil. Subsequent drug transport studies with the first generation antihistamines promethazine, diphenhydramine and pheniramine and the second generation antihistamines astemizole, ceterizine, fexofenadine and loratadine were accomplished in single substance as well as in group studies. Results were normalised to diazepam, an internal standard for the transcellular transport route. Moreover, effects after addition of P-gP inhibitor verapamil were investigated. First generation antihistamine pheniramine permeated as fastest followed by diphenhydramine, diazepam, promethazine and second generation antihistaminic drugs ceterizine, fexofenadine, astemizole and loratadine reflecting the BBB in vivo permeability ranking well. Verapamil increased the transport rates of all second generation antihistamines, which suggested involvement of P-gP during their permeation across the BBB model. The ranking after addition of verapamil was significantly changed, only fexofenadine and ceterizine penetrated slower than internal standard diazepam in the presence of verapamil. In summary, permeability data showed that the BBB model based on porcine cell line PBMEC/C1-2 was able to reflect the BBB in vivo situation for the transport of

  8. Restoration of dietary-fat induced blood–brain barrier dysfunction by anti-inflammatory lipid-modulating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallebage-Gamarallage Menuka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified use of non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs and statins for prevention of dementia, but their efficacy in slowing progression is not well understood. Cerebrovascular disturbances are common pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported chronic ingestion of saturated fatty acids (SFA compromises blood–brain barrier (BBB integrity resulting in cerebral extravasation of plasma proteins and inflammation. However, the SFA-induced parenchymal accumulation of plasma proteins could be prevented by co-administration of some cholesterol lowering agents. Restoration of BBB dysfunction is clinically relevant, so the purpose of this study was to explore lipid-lowering agents could reverse BBB disturbances induced by chronic ingestion of SFA’s. Methods Wild-type mice were fed an SFA diet for 12 weeks to induce BBB dysfunction, and then randomised to receive atorvastatin, pravastatin or ibuprofen in combination with the SFA-rich diet for 2 or 8 weeks. Abundance of plasma-derived immunoglobulin-G (IgG and amyloid-β enriched apolipoprotein (apo-B lipoproteins within brain parenchyme were quantified utilising immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Atorvastatin treatment for 2 and 8 weeks restored BBB integrity, indicated by a substantial reduction of IgG and apo B, particularly within the hippocampus. Pravastatin, a water-soluble statin was less effective than atorvastatin (lipid-soluble. Statin effects were independent of changes in plasma lipid homeostasis. Ibuprofen, a lipid-soluble cyclooxygenase inhibitor attenuated cerebral accumulation of IgG and apo B as effectively as atorvastatin. Our findings are consistent with the drug effects being independent of plasma lipid homeostasis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that BBB dysfunction induced by chronic ingestion of SFA is reversible with timely introduction and sustained treatment with agents that suppress inflammation.

  9. Passage of Magnetic Tat-Conjugated Fe3O4@SiO2 Nanoparticles Across In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqin; Shang, Ting; Zhang, Xiaodan; Ye, Ting; Wang, Dajin; Rei, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Delivery of diagnostic or therapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge of brain disease treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles are actively being developed as drug carriers due to magnetic targeting and subsequently reduced off-target effects. In this paper, we developed a magnetic SiO2@Fe3O4 nanoparticle-based carrier bound to cell-penetrating peptide Tat (SiO2@Fe3O4 -Tat) and studied its fates in accessing BBB. SiO2@Fe3O4-Tat nanoparticles (NPs) exhibited suitable magnetism and good biocompatibility. NPs adding to the apical chamber of in vitro BBB model were found in the U251 glioma cells co-cultured at the bottom of the Transwell, indicating that particles passed through the barrier and taken up by glioma cells. Moreover, the synergistic effects of Tat and magnetic field could promote the efficient cellular internalization and the permeability across the barrier. Besides, functionalization with Tat peptide allowed particles to locate into the nucleus of U251 cells than the non-conjugated NPs. These results suggest that SiO2@Fe3O4-Tat NPs could penetrate the BBB through the transcytosis of brain endothelial cells and magnetically mediated dragging. Therefore, SiO2@Fe3O4-Tat NPs could be exploited as a potential drug delivery system for chemotherapy and gene therapy of brain disease.

  10. Targeting accuracy and closing timeline of the microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Teichert, Tobias; Wu, Shih-Ying; Wang, Shutao; Downs, Matthew; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    The delivery of drugs to specific neural targets faces two fundamental problems: Most drugs do not cross the blood-brain barrier and those that do spread to all parts of the brain. To date there exists only one non-invasive methodology with the potential to solve these problems: selective blood-brain barrier disruption using micro-bubble enhanced focused ultrasound. We have recently developed a single-element 500 kHz spherical transducer ultrasound setup for use in the non-human primate. Using this system for selective blood-brain barrier disruption is technically no more challenging than positioning a TMS coil, and does not rely on MRI-guided targeting or expensive phased array ultrasound systems. So far, however, the targeting accuracy that can be achieved with this system has not been quantified systematically. Here we tested the accuracy of the system by targeting the caudate nucleus of the basal ganglia in two macaque monkeys. Our results show that average in-plane error of the system is on the order of 2 mm and targeting error in depth, i.e., along the ultrasound path, is even smaller and averaged 1.2 mm. In summary, targeting accuracy of our system is good enough to enable the selective delivery of drugs to specific sub-structures of the basal ganglia.

  11. Expression of Iron-Related Proteins at the Neurovascular Unit Supports Reduction and Reoxidation of Iron for Transport Through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkhart, Annette; Skjørringe, Tina; Johnsen, Kasper Bendix;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms for iron transport through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remain a controversy. We analyzed for expression of mRNA and proteins involved in oxidation and transport of iron in isolated brain capillaries from dietary normal, iron-deficient, and iron-reverted rats. The expression...... cells provide the machinery for receptor-mediated uptake of ferric iron-containing transferrin. Ferric iron can then undergo reduction to ferrous iron by ferrireductases inside endosomes followed by DMT1-mediated pumping into the cytosol and subsequently cellular export by ferroportin. The expression...... of soluble ceruloplasmin by brain endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes that together form the neurovascular unit (NVU) provides the ferroxidase activity necessary to reoxidize ferrous iron once released inside the brain....

  12. Investigation of Functionalized Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-block-polystyrene Nanoparticles As Novel Drug Delivery System to Overcome the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Maria; Bertani, Daniela; Cazzaniga, Emanuela; Orlando, Antonina; Mauri, Michele; Bianchi, Alberto; Re, Francesca; Sesana, Silvia; Minniti, Stefania; Francolini, Maura; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Salmona, Mario; Nardo, Luca; Salerno, Domenico; Mantegazza, Francesco; Masserini, Massimo; Simonutti, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In the search of new drug delivery carriers for the brain, self-assembled nanoparticles (NP) were prepared from poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-block-polystyrene polymer. NP displayed biocompatibility on cultured endothelial cells, macrophages and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells. The surface-functionalization of NP with a modified fragment of human Apolipoprotein E (mApoE) enhanced the uptake of NP by cultured human brain capillary endothelial cells, as assessed by confocal microscopy, and their permeability through a Transwell Blood Brain Barrier model made with the same cells, as assessed by fluorescence. Finally, mApoE-NP embedding doxorubicin displayed an enhanced release of drug at low pH, suggesting the potential use of these NP for the treatment of brain tumors.

  13. On ultrasound-induced microbubble oscillation in a capillary blood vessel and its implications for the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemair, W.; Tuković, Ž.; Jasak, H.; Poulikakos, D.; Kurtcuoglu, V.

    2012-02-01

    The complex interaction between an ultrasound-driven microbubble and an enclosing capillary microvessel is investigated by means of a coupled, multi-domain numerical model using the finite volume formulation. This system is of interest in the study of transient blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) for drug delivery applications. The compliant vessel structure is incorporated explicitly as a distinct domain described by a dedicated physical model. Red blood cells (RBCs) are taken into account as elastic solids in the blood plasma. We report the temporal and spatial development of transmural pressure (Ptm) and wall shear stress (WSS) at the luminal endothelial interface, both of which are candidates for the yet unknown mediator of BBBD. The explicit introduction of RBCs shapes the Ptm and WSS distributions and their derivatives markedly. While the peak values of these mechanical wall parameters are not affected considerably by the presence of RBCs, a pronounced increase in their spatial gradients is observed compared to a configuration with blood plasma alone. The novelty of our work lies in the explicit treatment of the vessel wall, and in the modelling of blood as a composite fluid, which we show to be relevant for the mechanical processes at the endothelium.

  14. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Letitia D; Jackson, Joseph W; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND.

  15. Inhibitory Effect of Matrine on Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption for the Treatment of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is a primary characteristic of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an experimental model of multiple sclerosis (MS. Matrine (MAT, a quinolizidine alkaloid derived from the herb Radix Sophorae Flave, has been recently found to suppress clinical EAE and CNS inflammation. However, whether this effect of MAT is through protecting the integrity and function of the BBB is not known. In the present study, we show that MAT treatment had a therapeutic effect comparable to dexamethasone (DEX in EAE rats, with reduced Evans Blue extravasation, increased expression of collagen IV, the major component of the basement membrane, and the structure of tight junction (TJ adaptor protein Zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1. Furthermore, MAT treatment attenuated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -2 (MMP-9/-2, while it increased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 and -2 (TIMP-1/-2. Our findings demonstrate that MAT reduces BBB leakage by strengthening basement membrane, inhibiting activities of MMP-2 and -9, and upregulating their inhibitors. Taken together, our results identify a novel mechanism underlying the effect of MAT, a natural compound that could be a novel therapy for MS.

  16. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letitia D Jones

    Full Text Available The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1. As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND.

  17. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  18. Transcranial Cavitation Detection in Primates during Blood-Brain Barrier Opening – A Performance Assessment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Downs, Matthew Eric; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Chen, Cherry Chen; Ferrera, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been shown promise in treating the brain locally and noninvasively. Transcranial passive cavitation detection (PCD) provides methodology of monitoring the treatment in real time, while the skull effects remain a major challenge for its translation to the clinic. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity, reliability, and limitations of PCD through primate (macaque and human) skulls in vitro. The results were further correlated with the in vivo macaque studies including the transcranial PCD calibration and real-time monitoring of BBB opening, with magnetic resonance imaging assessing the opening and safety. The stable cavitation doses using harmonics (SCDh) and ultraharmonics (SCDu), the inertial cavitation dose (ICD), and the cavitation signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were quantified based on the PCD signals. Results showed that through the macaque skull the pressure threshold for detecting the SCDh remained the same as without the skull in place, while it increased for the SCDu and ICD; through the human skull, it increased for all cavitation doses. The transcranial PCD was found reliable both in vitro and in vivo when the transcranial cavitation SNR exceeded the 1-dB detection limit through the in vitro macaque (attenuation: 4.92 dB/mm) and human (attenuation: 7.33 dB/mm) skull. In addition, using long pulses enabled reliable PCD monitoring and facilitate BBB opening at low pressures. The in vivo results showed that the SCDh became detectable at pressures as low as 100 kPa; the ICD, at 250 kPa while it could occur at lower pressures; the SCDu, at 700 kPa and was less reliable at lower pressures. Real-time monitoring of PCD was further implemented during BBB opening, with successful and safe opening achieved at 250–600 kPa in both the thalamus and the putamen. In conclusion, this study shows that transcranial PCD in macaques in vitro and in vivo as well as humans in vitro is reliable by improving the cavitation SNR beyond the 1-d

  19. Silver nanoparticles induce tight junction disruption and astrocyte neurotoxicity in a rat blood–brain barrier primary triple coculture model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu L

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Liming Xu,1,2,* Mo Dan,1,* Anliang Shao,1 Xiang Cheng,1,3 Cuiping Zhang,4 Robert A Yokel,5 Taro Takemura,6 Nobutaka Hanagata,6 Masami Niwa,7,8 Daisuke Watanabe7,81National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, No 2, Temple of Heaven, Beijing, 2School of Information and Engineering, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 4Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 5College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA; 6Nanotechnology Innovation Station for Nanoscale Science and Technology, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 7Department of Pharmacology, Nagasaki University, 8BBB Laboratory, PharmaCo-Cell Company, Ltd., Nagasaki, Japan*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs can enter the brain and induce neurotoxicity. However, the toxicity of Ag-NPs on the blood–brain barrier (BBB and the underlying mechanism(s of action on the BBB and the brain are not well understood.Method: To investigate Ag-NP suspension (Ag-NPS-induced toxicity, a triple coculture BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established. The BBB permeability and tight junction protein expression in response to Ag-NPS, NP-released Ag ions, and polystyrene-NP exposure were investigated. Ultrastructural changes of the microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Global gene expression of astrocytes was measured using a DNA microarray.Results: A triple coculture BBB model of primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established, with the transendothelial electrical resistance values >200 Ω·cm2. After Ag-NPS exposure for 24 hours, the BBB permeability was significantly increased and expression of the

  20. Assessing blood brain barrier dynamics or identifying or measuring selected substances, including ethanol or toxins, in a subject by analyzing Raman spectrum signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L. (Inventor); Borchert, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A non-invasive method for analyzing the blood-brain barrier includes obtaining a Raman spectrum of a selected portion of the eye and monitoring the Raman spectrum to ascertain a change to the dynamics of the blood brain barrier.Also, non-invasive methods for determining the brain or blood level of an analyte of interest, such as glucose, drugs, alcohol, poisons, and the like, comprises: generating an excitation laser beam at a selected wavelength (e.g., at a wavelength of about 400 to 900 nanometers); focusing the excitation laser beam into the anterior chamber of an eye of the subject so that aqueous humor, vitreous humor, or one or more conjunctiva vessels in the eye is illuminated; detecting (preferably confocally detecting) a Raman spectrum from the illuminated portion of the eye; and then determining the blood level or brain level (intracranial or cerebral spinal fluid level) of an analyte of interest for the subject from the Raman spectrum. In certain embodiments, the detecting step may be followed by the step of subtracting a confounding fluorescence spectrum from the Raman spectrum to produce a difference spectrum; and determining the blood level and/or brain level of the analyte of interest for the subject from that difference spectrum, preferably using linear or nonlinear multivariate analysis such as partial least squares analysis. Apparatus for carrying out the foregoing methods are also disclosed.

  1. Improved survival in rats with glioma using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and microbubbles to disrupt the blood-brain barrier and deliver Doxil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Muna; Zhi Zhang, Yong; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Park, Juyoung; Power, Chanikarn; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-02-01

    Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) limits the transportation of most neuropeptides, proteins (enzymes, antibodies), chemotherapeutic agents, and genes that have therapeutic potential for the treatment of brain diseases. Different methods have been used to overcome this limitation, but they are invasive, non-targeted, or require the development of new drugs. We have developed a method that uses MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with circulating microbubbles to temporarily open BBB in and around brain tumors to deliver chemotherapy agents. Here, we tested whether this noninvasive technique could enhance the effectiveness of a chemotherapy agent (Doxil). Using 690 kHz FUS transducer and microbubble (Definity), we induced BBB disruption in intracranially-implanted 9L glioma tumors in rat's brain in three weekly sessions. Animals who received BBB disruption and Doxil had a median survival time of 34.5 days, which was significantly longer than that found in control animals which is 16, 18.5, 21 days who received no treatment, BBB disruption only and Doxil only respectively This work demonstrates that FUS technique has promise in overcoming barriers to drug delivery, which are particularly stark in the brain due to the BBB.

  2. Diesel exhaust particles induce oxidative stress, proinflammatory signaling, and P-glycoprotein up-regulation at the blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Hartz, Anika M.S.; Bauer, Björn; Block, Michelle L.; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Miller, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we report that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major constituent of urban air pollution, affect blood-brain barrier function at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Isolated rat brain capillaries exposed to DEPs showed increased expression and transport activity of the key drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (6 h EC50 was ∼5 μg/ml). Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein was abolished by blocking transcription or protein synthesis. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or pretreatment of c...

  3. Large germinoma in basal ganglia treated by intraarterial chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagami, Mitsusuke; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Makio.

    1988-10-01

    A rare case of large germinoma in the basal ganglia is reported which was effectively treated by intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption using 20 % mannitol and radiation therapy. A 19-year-old man displayed slowly progressive right hemiparesis, motor aphasia and predementia on admission. Plain CT demonstrated a tumor which had a slightly high density with intratumoral calcification and a small cyst, and slight to moderate enhancement was observed following intravenous injection of contrast medium, but there was no unilateral ventricular enlargement. Cerebral angiography revealed hypervascular tumor staining with early draining veins. After biopsy, and as a result of intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following osmotic blood-brain barrier disruption and radiation therapy, the tumor decreased rapidly to about 20 % of its original mass. After discharge, tumor progression was observed. However, the enlarged tumor mass almost disappeared (except for calcification) on CT with clinical improvement in response to intracarotid chemotherapy with ACNU following 20 % mannitol.

  4. Pharmacokinetic analysis of 111 in-labeled liposomal Doxorubicin in murine glioblastoma after blood-brain barrier disruption by focused ultrasound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Yi Yang

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of targeted and untargeted (111In-doxorubicin liposomes after these have been intravenously administrated to tumor-bearing mice in the presence of blood-brain barrier disruption (BBB-D induced by focused ultrasound (FUS. An intracranial brain tumor model in NOD-scid mice using human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM 8401 cells was developed in this study. (111In-labeled human atherosclerotic plaque-specific peptide-1 (AP-1-conjugated liposomes containing doxorubicin (Lipo-Dox; AP-1 Lipo-Dox were used as a microSPECT probe for radioactivity measurements in the GBM-bearing mice. Compared to the control tumors treated with an injection of (111In-AP-1 Lipo-Dox or (111In-Lipo-Dox, the animals receiving the drugs followed by FUS exhibited enhanced accumulation of the drug in the brain tumors (p<0.05. Combining sonication with drugs significantly increased the tumor-to-normal brain doxorubicin ratio of the target tumors compared to the control tumors. The tumor-to-normal brain ratio was highest after the injection of (111In-AP-1 Lipo-Dox with sonication. The (111In-liposomes micro-SPECT/CT should be able to provide important information about the optimum therapeutic window for the chemotherapy of brain tumors using sonication.

  5. Suppression of fibrotic scar formation promotes axonal regeneration without disturbing blood-brain barrier repair and withdrawal of leukocytes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Nozomu; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Kawano, Hitoshi

    2010-09-15

    The fibrotic scar containing type IV collagen (Col IV) formed in a lesion site is considered as an obstacle to axonal regeneration, because intracerebral injection of 2,2'-dipyridyl (DPY), an inhibitor of Col IV triple-helix formation, suppresses fibrotic scar formation in the lesion site and promotes axonal regeneration. To determine the role of the fibrotic scar on the healing process of injured central nervous system (CNS), the restoration of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and withdrawal of inflammatory leukocytes were examined in mice subjected to unilateral transection of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway and intracerebral DPY injection. At 5 days after injury, destruction of BBB represented by leakage of Evans blue (EB) and widespread infiltration of CD45-immunoreactive leukocytes was observed around the lesion site, whereas reactive astrocyt