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Sample records for brain atrophy rate

  1. Pattern of brain atrophy rates in autopsy-confirmed dementia with Lewy bodies.

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    Nedelska, Zuzana; Ferman, Tanis J; Boeve, Bradley F; Przybelski, Scott A; Lesnick, Timothy G; Murray, Melissa E; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Vemuri, Prashanti; Smith, Glenn E; Geda, Yonas E; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Parisi, Joseph E; Dickson, Dennis W; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is characterized by preserved whole brain and medial temporal lobe volumes compared with Alzheimer's disease dementia (AD) on magnetic resonance imaging. However, frequently coexistent AD-type pathology may influence the pattern of regional brain atrophy rates in DLB patients. We investigated the pattern and magnitude of the atrophy rates from 2 serial MRIs in autopsy-confirmed DLB patients (n = 20) and mixed DLB/AD patients (n = 22), compared with AD (n = 30) and elderly nondemented control subjects (n = 15), followed antemortem. DLB patients without significant AD-type pathology were characterized by lower global and regional rates of atrophy, similar to control subjects. The mixed DLB/AD patients displayed greater atrophy rates in the whole brain, temporoparietal cortices, hippocampus and amygdala, and ventricle expansion, similar to AD patients. In the DLB and DLB/AD patients, the atrophy rates correlated with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage, cognitive decline, and progression of motor symptoms. Global and regional atrophy rates are associated with AD-type pathology in DLB, and these rates can be used as biomarkers of AD progression in patients with LB pathology.

  2. Elevated plasma homocysteine is associated with increased brain atrophy rates in older subjects with mild hypertension.

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    Narayan, Sunil K; Firbank, Michael J; Saxby, Brian K; Stansby, Gerard; Hansrani, Monica; O'Brien, John T; Ford, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    We determined using serial MR imaging whether raised plasma homocysteine levels are associated with increased brain atrophy, white matter lesion (WML) progression or incidence of silent brain infarcts (SBIs) in older hypertensive subjects. Brain atrophy rates (0.58 ± 0.48% per year, mean ± SD) were significantly correlated with homocysteine (β = 0.46, p = 0.001 homocysteine; β = 0.44, p = 0.007 homocysteine/folate/B12 models) but not with folate or B12 levels. Progression of WML (0.08 ± 0.16%) was not associated with homocysteine level (B = 0.01, p = 0.29). New SBIs were uncommon. In older hypertensive individuals, plasma homocysteine levels are associated with increased rates of whole-brain atrophy but not WML progression.

  3. Pattern of Brain Atrophy Rates in Autopsy-Confirmed Dementia with Lewy Bodies

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    Nedelska, Zuzana; Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Lesnick, Timothy L.; Murray, Melissa E.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Vemuri, Prashanti; Smith, Glenn E.; Geda, Yonas E.; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kantarci, Kejal

    2014-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is characterized by preserved whole brain and medial temporal lobe volumes compared to Alzheimer’s disease dementia (AD) on MRI. However, frequently coexistent AD-type pathology may influence the pattern of regional brain atrophy rates in DLB patients. We investigated the pattern and magnitude of the atrophy rates from two serial MRIs in autopsy-confirmed DLB (n=20) and mixed DLB/AD patients (n=22), compared to AD (n=30) and elderly non-demented controls (n=15), followed antemortem. DLB patients without significant AD-type pathology were characterized by lower global and regional rates of atrophy, similar to controls. The mixed DLB/AD patients displayed greater rates in the whole brain, temporo-parietal cortices, hippocampus and amygdala, and ventricle expansion, similar to AD patients. In the DLB and DLB/AD patients, the atrophy rates correlated with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage, cognitive decline and progression of motor symptoms. Global and regional atrophy rates are associated with AD-type pathology in DLB, and can be used as biomarkers of AD progression in patients with LB pathology. PMID:25128280

  4. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

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    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W

    2011-04-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of

  5. Effects of cerebrospinal fluid proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults.

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Jack, Clifford R; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy individuals may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N = 70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity, and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides the effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including apolipoprotein CIII, apolipoprotein D, and apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and matrix metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy persons. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, whereas proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms.

  6. Effects of CSF proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy people may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N=70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including Apolipoprotein CIII, Apolipoprotein D and Apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and Matrix Metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and Apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy people. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, while proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms. PMID:24094581

  7. Brain atrophy rates in first degree relatives at risk for Alzheimer's.

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    Lampert, Erika J; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hostage, Christopher A; Rathakrishnan, Bharath; Weiner, Michael; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-01-01

    A positive family history (FH) raises the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease though, other than the known risk conferred by apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE4), much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. We examined the effect of family history on longitudinal regional brain atrophy rates in 184 subjects (42% FH+, mean age 79.9) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) enrolled in a national biomarker study. An automated image analysis method was applied to T1-weighted MR images to measure atrophy rates for 20 cortical and subcortical regions. Mixed-effects linear regression models incorporating repeated-measures to control for within-subject variation over multiple time points tested the effect of FH over a follow-up of up to 48 months. Most of the 20 regions showed significant atrophy over time. Adjusting for age and gender, subjects with a positive FH had greater atrophy of the amygdala (p atrophy rates was numerically greater in ε3 homozygotes than in E4 carriers, but this difference was not significant. FH+ subjects had numerically greater 4-year cognitive decline and conversion rates than FH- subjects but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for ApoE and other variables. We conclude that a positive family history of AD may influence cortical and temporal lobe atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, but it does not have a significant additional effect beyond the known effect of the E4 genotype.

  8. Brain atrophy rates in first degree relatives at risk for Alzheimer's

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    Erika J. Lampert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive family history (FH raises the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease though, other than the known risk conferred by apolipoprotein ε4 (ApoE4, much of the genetic variance remains unexplained. We examined the effect of family history on longitudinal regional brain atrophy rates in 184 subjects (42% FH+, mean age 79.9 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI enrolled in a national biomarker study. An automated image analysis method was applied to T1-weighted MR images to measure atrophy rates for 20 cortical and subcortical regions. Mixed-effects linear regression models incorporating repeated-measures to control for within-subject variation over multiple time points tested the effect of FH over a follow-up of up to 48 months. Most of the 20 regions showed significant atrophy over time. Adjusting for age and gender, subjects with a positive FH had greater atrophy of the amygdala (p < 0.01, entorhinal cortex (p < 0.01, hippocampus (p < 0.053 and cortical gray matter (p < 0.009. However, when E4 genotype was added as a covariate, none of the FH effects remained significant. Analyses by ApoE genotype showed that the effect of FH on amygdala atrophy rates was numerically greater in ε3 homozygotes than in E4 carriers, but this difference was not significant. FH+ subjects had numerically greater 4-year cognitive decline and conversion rates than FH− subjects but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for ApoE and other variables. We conclude that a positive family history of AD may influence cortical and temporal lobe atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment, but it does not have a significant additional effect beyond the known effect of the E4 genotype.

  9. Hippocampal atrophy rates in Alzheimer disease

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    Henneman, W J.P.; Sluimer, J D.; Barnes, J; van der Flier, W M.; Sluimer, I C.; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Vrenken, H; Barkhof, F

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the added value of hippocampal atrophy rates over whole brain volume measurements on MRI in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls. Methods: We included 64 patients with AD (67 ± 9 years; F/M 38/26), 44 patients with MCI (71 ± 6 years; 21/23), and 34 controls (67 ± 9 years; 16/18). Two MR scans were performed (scan interval: 1.8 ± 0.7 years; 1.0 T), using a coronal three-dimensional T1-weighted gradient echo sequence. At follow-up, 3 controls and 23 patients with MCI had progressed to AD. Hippocampi were manually delineated at baseline. Hippocampal atrophy rates were calculated using regional, nonlinear fluid registration. Whole brain baseline volumes and atrophy rates were determined using automated segmentation and registration tools. Results: All MRI measures differed between groups (p < 0.005). For the distinction of MCI from controls, larger effect sizes of hippocampal measures were found compared to whole brain measures. Between MCI and AD, only whole brain atrophy rate differed significantly. Cox proportional hazards models (variables dichotomized by median) showed that within all patients without dementia, hippocampal baseline volume (hazard ratio [HR]: 5.7 [95% confidence interval: 1.5–22.2]), hippocampal atrophy rate (5.2 [1.9–14.3]), and whole brain atrophy rate (2.8 [1.1–7.2]) independently predicted progression to AD; the combination of low hippocampal volume and high atrophy rate yielded a HR of 61.1 (6.1–606.8). Within patients with MCI, only hippocampal baseline volume and atrophy rate predicted progression. Conclusion: Hippocampal measures, especially hippocampal atrophy rate, best discriminate mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from controls. Whole brain atrophy rate discriminates Alzheimer disease (AD) from MCI. Regional measures of hippocampal atrophy are the strongest predictors of progression to AD. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; BET = brain

  10. Vascular and Alzheimer's disease markers independently predict brain atrophy rate in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative controls.

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    Barnes, Josephine; Carmichael, Owen T; Leung, Kelvin K; Schwarz, Christopher; Ridgway, Gerard R; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Malone, Ian B; Schott, Jonathan M; Rossor, Martin N; Biessels, Geert Jan; DeCarli, Charlie; Fox, Nick C

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed relationships among white matter hyperintensities (WMH), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain volume loss. Subjects included 197 controls, 331 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 146 individuals with AD with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ1-42 (n = 351) and tau (n = 346) were measured. Brain volume change was quantified using the boundary shift integral (BSI). We assessed the association between baseline WMH volume and annualized BSI, adjusting for intracranial volume. We also performed multiple regression analyses in the CSF subset, assessing the relationships of WMH and Aβ1-42 and/or tau with BSI. WMH burden was positively associated with BSI in controls (p = 0.02) but not MCI or AD. In multivariable models, WMH (p = 0.003) and Aβ1-42 (p = 0.001) were independently associated with BSI in controls; in MCI Aβ1-42 (p brain atrophy in the context of AD pathology in pre-dementia stages.

  11. Homocysteine-lowering by B vitamins slows the rate of accelerated brain atrophy in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial.

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    A David Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An increased rate of brain atrophy is often observed in older subjects, in particular those who suffer from cognitive decline. Homocysteine is a risk factor for brain atrophy, cognitive impairment and dementia. Plasma concentrations of homocysteine can be lowered by dietary administration of B vitamins. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether supplementation with B vitamins that lower levels of plasma total homocysteine can slow the rate of brain atrophy in subjects with mild cognitive impairment in a randomised controlled trial (VITACOG, ISRCTN 94410159. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Single-center, randomized, double-blind controlled trial of high-dose folic acid, vitamins B(6 and B(12 in 271 individuals (of 646 screened over 70 y old with mild cognitive impairment. A subset (187 volunteered to have cranial MRI scans at the start and finish of the study. Participants were randomly assigned to two groups of equal size, one treated with folic acid (0.8 mg/d, vitamin B(12 (0.5 mg/d and vitamin B(6 (20 mg/d, the other with placebo; treatment was for 24 months. The main outcome measure was the change in the rate of atrophy of the whole brain assessed by serial volumetric MRI scans. RESULTS: A total of 168 participants (85 in active treatment group; 83 receiving placebo completed the MRI section of the trial. The mean rate of brain atrophy per year was 0.76% [95% CI, 0.63-0.90] in the active treatment group and 1.08% [0.94-1.22] in the placebo group (P =  0.001. The treatment response was related to baseline homocysteine levels: the rate of atrophy in participants with homocysteine >13 µmol/L was 53% lower in the active treatment group (P =  0.001. A greater rate of atrophy was associated with a lower final cognitive test scores. There was no difference in serious adverse events according to treatment category. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The accelerated rate of brain atrophy in elderly with mild cognitive impairment can be slowed by treatment

  12. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional brain atrophy rates in healthy elders, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

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    Niklas Mattsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF α-synuclein is reduced in synucleinopathies, including dementia with Lewy bodies, and some studies have found increased CSF α-synuclein in Alzheimer's disease (AD. No study has explored effects of CSF α-synuclein on brain atrophy. Here we tested if baseline CSF α-synuclein affects brain atrophy rates and if these effects vary across brain regions, and across the cognitive spectrum from healthy elders (NL, to patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD. METHODS: Baseline CSF α-synuclein measurements and longitudinal structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 74 NL, 118 MCI patients and 55 AD patients. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional atrophy rates were tested in 1 four pre-hoc defined regions possibly associated with Lewy body and/or AD pathology (amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, brainstem, and 2 all available regions of interest. Differences across diagnoses were tested by assessing the interaction of CSF α-synuclein and diagnosis (testing NL versus MCI, and NL versus AD. RESULTS: The effects of CSF α-synuclein on longitudinal atrophy rates were not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. There were tendencies for effects in AD in caudate (higher atrophy rates in subjects with higher CSF α-synuclein, P=0.046 and brainstem (higher atrophy rates in subjects with lower CSF α-synuclein, P=0.063. CSF α-synuclein had significantly different effects on atrophy rates in NL and AD in brainstem (P=0.037 and caudate (P=0.006. DISCUSSION: With the possible exception of caudate and brainstem, the overall weak effects of CSF α-synuclein on atrophy rates in NL, MCI and AD argues against CSF α-synuclein as a biomarker related to longitudinal brain atrophy in these diagnostic groups. Any effects of CSF α-synuclein may be attenuated by possible simultaneous occurrence of AD-related neuronal injury and concomitant Lewy body pathology, which may elevate and

  13. MRI-based brain atrophy rates in ADNI phase 2: acceleration and enrichment considerations for clinical trials.

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    Hua, Xue; Ching, Christopher R K; Mezher, Adam; Gutman, Boris A; Hibar, Derrek P; Bhatt, Priya; Leow, Alex D; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to assess statistical power to detect treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain biomarkers. We used unbiased tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to analyze n = 5,738 scans, from Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2 participants scanned with both accelerated and nonaccelerated T1-weighted MRI at 3T. The study cohort included 198 healthy controls, 111 participants with significant memory complaint, 182 with early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI) and 177 late mild cognitive impairment (LMCI), and 155 AD patients, scanned at screening and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The statistical power to track brain change in TBM-based imaging biomarkers depends on the interscan interval, disease stage, and methods used to extract numerical summaries. To achieve reasonable sample size estimates for potential clinical trials, the minimal scan interval was 6 months for LMCI and AD and 12 months for EMCI. TBM-based imaging biomarkers were not sensitive to MRI scan acceleration, which gave results comparable with nonaccelerated sequences. ApoE status and baseline amyloid-beta positron emission tomography data improved statistical power. Among healthy, EMCI, and LMCI participants, sample size requirements were significantly lower in the amyloid+/ApoE4+ group than for the amyloid-/ApoE4- group. ApoE4 strongly predicted atrophy rates across brain regions most affected by AD, but the remaining 9 of the top 10 AD risk genes offered no added predictive value in this cohort.

  14. Acceleration of hippocampal atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis.

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    Andrews, K Abigail; Frost, Chris; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Rowe, Chris C; Villemagne, Victor; Fox, Nick C; Ourselin, Sebastien; Schott, Jonathan M

    2016-03-01

    Increased rates of brain atrophy measured from serial magnetic resonance imaging precede symptom onset in Alzheimer's disease and may be useful outcome measures for prodromal clinical trials. Appropriate trial design requires a detailed understanding of the relationships between β-amyloid load and accumulation, and rate of brain change at this stage of the disease. Fifty-two healthy individuals (72.3 ± 6.9 years) from Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle Study of Aging had serial (0, 18 m, 36 m) magnetic resonance imaging, (0, 18 m) Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography, and clinical assessments. We calculated rates of whole brain and hippocampal atrophy, ventricular enlargement, amyloid accumulation, and cognitive decline. Over 3 years, rates of whole brain atrophy (p atrophy (p = 0.001, p = 0.023), and ventricular expansion (p atrophy rates were also independently associated with β-amyloid accumulation over the first 18 months (p = 0.003). Acceleration of left hippocampal atrophy rate was associated with baseline β-amyloid load across the cohort (p atrophy are associated with both baseline β-amyloid load and accumulation, and that there is presymptomatic, amyloid-mediated acceleration of hippocampal atrophy. Clinical trials using rate of hippocampal atrophy as an outcome measure should not assume linear decline in the presymptomatic phase.

  15. A longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy rate reflecting four decades of multiple sclerosis: a comparison of serial 1D, 2D, and volumetric measurements from MRI images

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    Martola, Juha; Zhang, Yi; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen Wiberg, Maria [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Radiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstroem, Jakob [Karolinska Institutet, The Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Stockholm (Sweden); Fredrikson, Sten; Stawiarz, Leszek; Hillert, Jan [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Flodmark, Olof; Lilja, Anders [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekbom, Anders [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a variable progression with an early onset of atrophy. Individual longitudinal radiological evaluations (over decades) are difficult to perform due to the limited availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the past, patients lost in follow-up, and the continuous updating of scanners. We studied a cohort with widespread disease duration at baseline. The observed individual atrophy rates over time of 10 years represented four decades of disease span. Thirty-seven MS patients (age range 24-65 years with disease duration 1-33 years) were consecutively selected and evaluated with MRI at baseline 1995 and in 1996. They were followed up for a decade (mean of 9.25 years, range 7.3-10 years) up to 2003-2005. Brain parenchymal volume and volumes of the supratentorial ventricles were analyzed with semi-automated volumetric measurements at three time points (1995, 1996, and 2003-2005). Volumetric differences were found over shorter periods of time (1-7 months); however, differences vanished by the end of follow-up. A uniform longitudinal decrease in brain volume and increase in ventricle volumes were found. Frontal horn width (1D) correlated strongest to 3D measures. No statistical differences of atrophy rates between MS courses were found. Supratentorial ventricular volumes were associated with disability and this association persisted during follow-up. Despite variable clinical courses, the degenerative effects of MS progression expressed in brain atrophy seem to uniformly progress over longer periods of time. These volumetric changes can be detected using 1D and 2D measurements performed on a routine PACS workstation. (orig.)

  16. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune

    2013-01-01

    or localization of atrophy and subsequent summing to an ROI measure of atrophy. ST and SF only offer whole ROI atrophy measures. JI and SF suffer from a lack of precision originating from respectively approximating a space and a time integral by a finite sum. VM suffers from a high computational burden and the ST......Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  17. Longitudinal assessment of global and regional atrophy rates in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

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    Elijah Mak

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: AD showed a faster rate of global brain atrophy compared to DLB, which had similar rates of atrophy to HC. Among dementia subjects, younger age was associated with accelerated atrophy, reflecting more aggressive disease in younger people. PBVC could aid in differentiating between DLB and AD, however its utility as an outcome marker in DLB is limited.

  18. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

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    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  19. Brain atrophy in patients with arterial disease. The SMART-MR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelman, A.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Brain atrophy is often observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elderly. This is of clinical importance since the extent and rate of progression of brain atrophy are associated with future cognitive deterioration and conversion to Alzheimer’s dementia. The overall aim of this thesis was t

  20. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

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    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  1. β-amyloid, hippocampal atrophy and their relation to longitudinal brain change in cognitively normal individuals.

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    Fletcher, Evan; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Maillard, Pauline; Harvey, Danielle; Reed, Bruce; Jagust, William; DeCarli, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Recent literature has examined baseline hippocampal volume and extent of brain amyloidosis to test potential synergistic effects on worsening cognition and extent of brain atrophy. Use of hippocampal volume in prior studies was based on the notion that limbic circuit degeneration is an early manifestation of the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) pathophysiology. To clarify these interactions early in the AD process, we tested the effects of amyloid and baseline normalized hippocampal volume on longitudinal brain atrophy rates in a group of cognitively normal individuals. Results showed that the combination of elevated β-amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy is associated with increased rates specific to the limbic circuit and splenium. Importantly, this atrophy pattern emerged from a voxelwise analysis, corroborated by regression models over region of interests in native space. The results are broadly consistent with previous studies of the effects of amyloid and baseline hippocampal atrophy in normals, while pointing to accelerated atrophy of AD-vulnerable regions detectable at the preclinical stage.

  2. Global brain atrophy but not hippocampal atrophy is related to type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, L.E.; Bresser, J. de; Geerlings, M.I.; Reijmer, Y.D.; Portegies, M.L.; Brundel, M.; Kappelle, L.J.; Graaf, Y. van der; Biessels, G.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: It has been suggested that in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), brain atrophy is most pronounced in the hippocampus, but this has not been investigated systematically. The present pooled analysis of three studies examined if hippocampal atrophy is more prominent than global brain

  3. Correlation of Brain Atrophy, Disability, and Spinal Cord Atrophy in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz Soldán, M Mateo; Raman, Mekala R; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Lohrey, Anne K; Chen, Yi; Pirko, Istvan; Johnson, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) remains incompletely understood. Unlike lesional measures, central nervous system atrophy has a strong correlation with disability. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection in SJL/J mice is an established model of progressive MS. We utilized in vivo MRI to quantify brain and spinal cord atrophy in this model and analyzed the temporal relationship between atrophy and disability. Infected and control mice were followed for 12 months. Disability was assessed periodically using rotarod assay. Volumetric MRI datasets were acquired at 7 Tesla. Ventricular volume and C4-5 spinal cord cross-sectional area measurements were performed using Analyze 10. At 3 months, brain atrophy reached statistical significance (P = .005). In contrast, disability did not differ until 4 months post-infection (P = .0005). Cord atrophy reached significance by 9 months (P = 0.009). By 12 months, brain atrophy resulted in 111.8% increased ventricular volume (P = .00003), while spinal cord cross-sectional area was 25.6% reduced (P = .001) among cases. Our results suggest that significant brain atrophy precedes and predicts the development of disability, while spinal cord atrophy occurs late and correlates with severe disability. The observed temporal relationship establishes a framework for mechanisms of disability progression and enables further investigations of their underlying substrate. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  4. Factors Associated with Changes in Brain Atrophy during a Three-Year Observation in Elderly Diabetic Patients: Effect of Renal Impairment on Hippocampal Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kawamura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study concerning factors associated with changes in brain atrophy in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: We evaluated hippocampal and global brain atrophy using automatic voxel-based morphometry of structural magnetic resonance images, 4 cognitive function tests, and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD in 66 diabetic patients. Results: During the 3-year follow-up, hippocampal and global brain atrophy advanced, and cognitive functions worsened. For changes in hippocampal atrophy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, albuminuria, and being an ApoE ε4 carrier were independent factors; change in the number of silent brain infarctions was an independent factor for changes in global brain atrophy. A significant association of changes in eGFR and albuminuria with hippocampal atrophy remained after adjusting for confounders including SVD. Both types of brain atrophy at baseline were significantly correlated with cognitive impairment at baseline and especially associated with changes in delayed word recall during the follow-up after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Changes in eGFR and albuminuria during follow-up were independent risk factors for hippocampal atrophy, which was associated with decline in delayed word recall, suggesting that management of chronic kidney disease may prevent the progression of hippocampal atrophy.

  5. Indices of Regional Brain Atrophy: Formulae and Nomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of brain atrophy helps to discriminate normal age-related changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Albeit indices of regional brain atrophy have proven to be a parameter useful in the early diagnosis and differential diagnosis of some neurodegenerative diseases, indices of absolute regional atrophy still have some important limitations. We propose using indices of relative atrophy for representing how the volume of a given region of interest (ROI) changes over time in comparison to changes in global brain measures over the same time. A second problem in morphometric studies is terminology. There is a lack of systematization naming indices and the same measure can be named with different terms by different research groups or imaging softwares. This limits the understanding and discussion of studies. In this technological report, we provide a general description on how to compute indices of absolute and relative regional brain atrophy and propose a standardized nomenclature. PMID:26261753

  6. Network structure of brain atrophy in de novo Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeighami, Yashar; Ulla, Miguel; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Dadar, Mahsa; Zhang, Yu; Larcher, Kevin Michel-Herve; Fonov, Vladimir; Evans, Alan C; Collins, D Louis; Dagher, Alain

    2015-09-07

    We mapped the distribution of atrophy in Parkinson's disease (PD) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical data from 232 PD patients and 117 controls from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative. Deformation-based morphometry and independent component analysis identified PD-specific atrophy in the midbrain, basal ganglia, basal forebrain, medial temporal lobe, and discrete cortical regions. The degree of atrophy reflected clinical measures of disease severity. The spatial pattern of atrophy demonstrated overlap with intrinsic networks present in healthy brain, as derived from functional MRI. Moreover, the degree of atrophy in each brain region reflected its functional and anatomical proximity to a presumed disease epicenter in the substantia nigra, compatible with a trans-neuronal spread of the disease. These results support a network-spread mechanism in PD. Finally, the atrophy pattern in PD was also seen in healthy aging, where it also correlated with the loss of striatal dopaminergic innervation.

  7. Reversible "brain atrophy" in patients with Cushing's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gnjidić, Živko; Sajko, Tomislav; Kudelić, Nenad; Malenica, Maša; Vizner, Branka; Vrkljan, Milan; Hat, Josip; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    During the past 25 years, we came across 60 patients with corticotroph pituitary adenomas and Cushing’s disease. Neuroradiological examination showed prominent volume loss of the brain parenchyma, unexpected for the patient’s age. This »brain atrophy« appeared to regress after surgical removal of pituitary adenoma and normalization of cortisol level. Observed difference between degree of »brain atrophy« in the Cushing’s disease group and in the control group was statistically sign...

  8. Longitudinal patterns of leukoaraiosis and brain atrophy in symptomatic small vessel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Christian; Benjamin, Philip; Zeestraten, Eva; Lawrence, Andrew J; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is a common condition associated with lacunar stroke, cognitive impairment and significant functional morbidity. White matter hyperintensities and brain atrophy, seen on magnetic resonance imaging, are correlated with increasing disease severity. However, how the two are related remains an open question. To better define the relationship between white matter hyperintensity growth and brain atrophy, we applied a semi-automated magnetic resonance imaging segmentation analysis pipeline to a 3-year longitudinal cohort of 99 subjects with symptomatic small vessel disease, who were followed-up for ≥1 years. Using a novel two-stage warping pipeline with tissue repair step, voxel-by-voxel rate of change maps were calculated for each tissue class (grey matter, white matter, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes) for each individual. These maps capture both the distribution of disease and spatial information showing local rates of growth and atrophy. These were analysed to answer three primary questions: first, is there a relationship between whole brain atrophy and magnetic resonance imaging markers of small vessel disease (white matter hyperintensities or lacune volume)? Second, is there regional variation within the cerebral white matter in the rate of white matter hyperintensity progression? Finally, are there regionally specific relationships between the rates of white matter hyperintensity progression and cortical grey matter atrophy? We demonstrate that the rates of white matter hyperintensity expansion and grey matter atrophy are strongly correlated (Pearson's R = -0.69, P atrophy occurs annually (P atrophy rates, in the medial-frontal, orbito-frontal, parietal and occipital regions. Conversely, increased rates of global grey matter atrophy are significantly associated with faster white matter hyperintensity growth in the frontal and parietal regions. Together, these results link the progression of white matter hyperintensities

  9. Relation of cerebral small-vessel disease and brain atrophy to mild Parkinsonism in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Christiane; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Kretzschmar, Konrad; Roesler, Andreas; V Eckardstein, Arnold; Berger, Klaus

    2006-11-01

    The association between cerebral small-vessel disease, brain atrophy, and the risk and severity of mild parkinsonian signs (MPS) remains unclear. The objective of this study is to examine the effect of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs), and cortical atrophy on the risk and severity of MPS. This study is a cross-sectional community-based cohort study comprising 268 subjects, 65 to 83 years of age, residing in the Augsburg region of southern Germany, and without contraindications for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Main outcome measures. Subcortical and periventricular WMLs, lacunar brain infarcts, and cortical atrophy determined using a standardized MRI protocol developed for the Rotterdam Scan Study and an established rating scale. MPS, assessed in a standardized neurological examination and based on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scale. Lacunar brain infarcts and large subcortical white matter lesions were associated with an elevated risk of resting tremor. More severe cortical atrophy was related to an increased risk of rigidity and bradykinesia. In a linear regression analysis relating each individual MRI measurement with the severity of MPS, the number of lacunar brain infarcts and the degree of brain atrophy were correlated with the severity of resting tremor, whereas the size of subcortical and periventricular WMLs was correlated with the severity of rigidity. A higher degree of brain atrophy was associated with increased severity of either cardinal sign. In our study, presence and volume of lacunar brain infarcts, cerebral WMLs, and cortical atrophy were associated with the risk as well as severity of MPS. Determining the presence of these brain changes using brain imaging might contribute to identify persons at risk for MPS.

  10. Severe brain atrophy in the elderly as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rieko Okada,1 Takashi Okada,2 Akira Okada,2 Hideyuki Muramoto,3 Masahisa Katsuno,4 Gen Sobue,4 Nobuyuki Hamajima11Department of Preventive Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 2Okada Medical Clinic, 3Muramoto Clinic, 4Department of Neurology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, JapanBackground: The purpose of this study is to determine whether elderly subjects with severe brain atrophy, which is associated with neurodegeneration and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia, are more susceptible to lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, including pneumonia.Methods: The severity of brain atrophy was assessed by computed tomography in 51 nursing home residents aged 60–96 years. The incidence of LRTI, defined by body temperature ≥ 38.0°C, presence of two or more respiratory symptoms, and use of antibiotics, was determined over 4 years. The incidence of LRTI was compared according to the severity and type of brain atrophy.Results: The incidence rate ratio of LRTI was significantly higher (odds ratio 4.60, 95% confidence interval 1.18–17.93, fully adjusted P = 0.028 and the time to the first episode of LRTI was significantly shorter (log-rank test, P = 0.019 in subjects with severe brain atrophy in any lobe. Frontal and parietal lobe atrophy was associated with a significantly increased risk of LRTI, while temporal lobe atrophy, ventricular dilatation, and diffuse white matter lesions did not influence the risk of LRTI.Conclusion: Elderly subjects with severe brain atrophy are more susceptible to LRTI, possibly as a result of neurodegeneration causing dysphagia and silent aspiration. Assessing the severity of brain atrophy might be useful to identify subjects at increased risk of respiratory infections in a prospective manner.Keywords: brain atrophy, dysphagia, elderly, pneumonia, respiratory infection, white matter lesions

  11. Atrophy rates in asymptomatic amyloidosis: implications for Alzheimer prevention trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Abigail Andrews

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in designing therapeutic studies of individuals at risk of Alzheimer disease (AD to prevent the onset of symptoms. Cortical β-amyloid plaques, the first stage of AD pathology, can be detected in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET, and several studies have shown that ~1/3 of healthy elderly have significant β-amyloid deposition. Here we assessed whether asymptomatic amyloid-PET-positive controls have increased rates of brain atrophy, which could be harnessed as an outcome measure for AD prevention trials. We assessed 66 control subjects (age = 73.5±7.3 yrs; MMSE = 29±1.3 from the Australian Imaging Biomarkers & Lifestyle study who had a baseline Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB PET scan and two 3T MRI scans ~18-months apart. We calculated PET standard uptake value ratios (SUVR, and classified individuals as amyloid-positive/negative. Baseline and 18-month MRI scans were registered, and brain, hippocampal, and ventricular volumes and annualized volume changes calculated. Increasing baseline PiB-PET measures of β-amyloid load correlated with hippocampal atrophy rate independent of age (p = 0.014. Twenty-two (1/3 were PiB-positive (SUVR>1.40, the remaining 44 PiB-negative (SUVR≤1.31. Compared to PiB-negatives, PiB-positive individuals were older (76.8±7.5 vs. 71.7±7.5, p<0.05 and more were APOE4 positive (63.6% vs. 19.2%, p<0.01 but there were no differences in baseline brain, ventricle or hippocampal volumes, either with or without correction for total intracranial volume, once age and gender were accounted for. The PiB-positive group had greater total hippocampal loss (0.06±0.08 vs. 0.02±0.05 ml/yr, p = 0.02, independent of age and gender, with non-significantly higher rates of whole brain (7.1±9.4 vs. 4.7±5.5 ml/yr and ventricular (2.0±3.0 vs. 1.1±1.0 ml/yr change. Based on the observed effect size, recruiting 384 (95%CI 195-1080 amyloid-positive subjects/arm will provide 80% power to detect 25

  12. Associations of Cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology with Brain Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, Howard A.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.; Leurgans, Sue; Levine, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical atrophy and brain vascular disease are both associated with dementia, but there are only limited pathological data on the association of brain vascular disease with cortical atrophy. We studied pathological material from the Rush Memory and Aging Project (MAP, N = 445). Cortical and hippocampal atrophy, and atherosclerosis at the circle of Willis (large vessel disease, LVD) and arteriolosclerosis (small vessel disease, SVD) were rated by neuropathologists unaware of this study’s hypothesis. Quantitative measures of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology, specifically neuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and amyloid–beta (Aβ) burden, were also obtained. Chronic micro and macroscopic infarcts were noted. In ordinal logistic regression models that included age at death, sex, apoE genotype, statin-use, Aβ and NFT, more severe LVD was significantly associated with more severe cortical and hippocampal atrophy. The odds ratio for the association of the most severe LVD (compared to the least) with cortical atrophy was 2.7 (CI: 1.5–4.7) p = 0.001; for hippocampal atrophy the odds ratio was 2.8 (CI: 1.5–5.2), p = 0.001. The association of SVD with atrophy did not follow a consistent pattern. Neither macroscopic infarcts nor microscopic infarcts were associated with cortical or hippocampal atrophy (p’s > 0.15). Tangle density was associated with cortical (p = 0.014) and hippocampal atrophy (p atrophy. In this large autopsy study LVD was associated with cortical and hippocampal atrophy. The relationship between SVD and atrophy requires further study. PMID:24597507

  13. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  14. Homocysteine, Liver Function Derangement and Brain Atrophy in Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, Camino; González-Reimers, Emilio; Quintero-Platt, Geraldine; de la Vega-Prieto, María José; Pérez-Hernández, Onán; Martín-González, Candelaria; Espelosín-Ortega, Elisa; Romero-Acevedo, Lucía; Santolaria-Fernández, Francisco

    2016-11-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia may be involved in the development of brain atrophy in alcoholics. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In the present study, we analyse the relationship between homocysteine levels and brain atrophy, and the relative weight of co-existing factors such as liver function impairment, the amount of ethanol consumed, serum vitamin B12, B6, and folic acid levels on homocysteine levels and brain alterations in alcoholic patients. We included 59 patients admitted to this hospital for major withdrawal symptoms and 24 controls. The mini-mental state examination test and a brain computed tomography (CT) scan were performed and several indices were calculated. Serum levels of homocysteine, folic acid, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12 were determined. Liver function was assessed by Child-Pugh score. The daily consumption of ethanol in grams per day and years of addiction were recorded. A total of 83.6% and 80% of the patients showed cerebellar or frontal atrophy, respectively. Patients showed altered values of brain indices, higher levels of homocysteine and vitamin B12, but lower levels of folic acid, compared with controls. Homocysteine, B12 and liver function variables showed significant correlations with brain CT indices. Multivariate analyses disclosed that Pugh's score, albumin and bilirubin were independently related to cerebellar atrophy, frontal atrophy, cella index or ventricular index. Serum vitamin B12 was the only factor independently related to Evans index. It was also related to cella index, but after bilirubin. Homocysteine levels were independently related to ventricular index, but after bilirubin. Vitamin B12 and homocysteine levels are higher among alcoholics. Liver function derangement, vitamin B12 and homocysteine are all independently related to brain atrophy, although not to cognitive alterations. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been described in alcoholics and may be related to brain atrophy, a reversible condition with an obscure pathogenesis

  15. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  16. Man Versus Machine Part 2: Comparison of Radiologists' Interpretations and NeuroQuant Measures of Brain Asymmetry and Progressive Atrophy in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David E; Ochs, Alfred L; DeSmit, Megan E; Seabaugh, Jan M; Havranek, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    This study is an expanded version of an earlier study, which compared NeuroQuant measures of MRI brain volume with the radiologist's traditional approach in outpatients with mild or moderate traumatic brain injury. NeuroQuant volumetric analyses were compared with the radiologists' interpretations. NeuroQuant found significantly higher rates of atrophy (50.0%), abnormal asymmetry (83.3%), and progressive atrophy (70.0%) than the radiologists (12.5%, 0% and 0%, respectively). Overall, NeuroQuant was more sensitive for detecting at least one sign of atrophy, abnormal asymmetry, or progressive atrophy (95.8%) than the traditional radiologist's approach (12.5%).

  17. A regional consensus recommendation on brain atrophy as an outcome measure in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroughani, Raed; Deleu, Dirk; El Salem, Khalid; Al-Hashel, Jasem; Alexander, K John; Abdelrazek, Mohamed Assem; Aljishi, Adel; Alkhaboori, Jaber; Al Azri, Faisal; Al Zadjali, Nahida; Hbahbih, Majed; Sokrab, Tag Eldin; Said, Mohamed; Rovira, Àlex

    2016-11-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes leading to irreversible neurological impairment. Brain atrophy occurs early in the course of the disease at a rate greater than the general population. Brain volume loss (BVL) is associated with disability progression and cognitive impairment in patients with MS; hence its value as a potential target in monitoring and treating MS is discussed. A group of MS neurologists and neuro-radiologists reviewed the current literature on brain atrophy and discussed the challenges in assessing and implementing brain atrophy measurements in clinical practice. The panel used a voting system to reach a consensus and the votes were counted for the proposed set of questions for cognitive and brain atrophy assessments. The panel of experts was able to identify recent studies, which demonstrated the correlation between BVL and future worsening of disability and cognition. The current evidence revealed that reduction of BVL could be achieved with different disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). BVL provided a better treatment and monitoring strategy when it is combined to the composite measures of "no evidence of disease activity" (NEDA). The panel recommended a set of cognitive assessment tools and MRI methods and software applications that may help in capturing and measuring the underlying MS pathology with high degree of specificity. BVL was considered to be a useful measurement to longitudinally assess disease progression and cognitive function in patients with MS. Brain atrophy measurement was recommended to be incorporated into the concept of NEDA. Consequently, a consensus recommendation was reached in anticipation for implementation of the use of cognitive assessment and brain atrophy measurements on a regional level.

  18. Reversible Altered Consciousness and Brain Atrophy Induced by Valproic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5-year-old female child with valproic acid (VPA-related alteration of consciousness and brain atrophy that progressed over a 3 day period and resolved within 12 hours of discontinuing VPA is reported from Dokkyo University School of Medicine and Shimotsuga General Hospital, Tochigi, Japan.

  19. Nano LC MS-MS peptide matches from article: Free serum haemoglobin is associated with brain atrophy in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lewin, Alex; Hamilton, Shea; Witkover, Aviva; Langford, PAUL; Nicholas, Richard; Chataway, Jeremy; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein peaks associated with brain atrophy: identification by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry Relative molecular mass, protein score and identity of the genes with sequence matches to peptide fragments from the protein peaks that were significantly correlated with the rate of brain atrophy. The common contaminant keratin and partial matches to contaminating bacterial sequences were excluded.

  20. No evidence of disease activity in multiple sclerosis: Implications on cognition and brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Alfredo; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The concept of no evidence of disease activity (NEDA) has emerged as an important outcome measure for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it is not known if maintaining NEDA has a positive impact on cognition or brain atrophy. To evaluate NEDA status after two years, addressing its implications on cognition and brain atrophy. Forty-two relapsing-remitting MS patients and 30 controls underwent MRI (3T) and cognitive evaluation (BRB-N). Forty patients performed additional evaluations, after 12 and 24 months. NEDA was defined as the absence of clinical (relapses/disability progression) and MRI activity (new T2/gadolinium-enhancing lesions). Repeated measures and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the contribution of NEDA criteria to GM atrophy. After two years, 30.8% of the cohort had NEDA. From these, 58.3% still had worsening in ⩾2 cognitive domains. Patients with MRI activity had more cortical thinning and slightly more thalamus volume decrease. Absence of new/enlarging T2 lesions was the only predictor of cortical thinning, subcortical GM and thalamic atrophy rates. NEDA status was achieved in a small proportion of our cohort, and did not preclude cognitive deterioration. Absence of MRI activity and especially of new/enlarging T2 lesions was associated with less cortical and subcortical GM atrophy. © The Author(s), 2015.

  1. Calculation of brain atrophy using computed tomography and a new atrophy measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Zahid, Abdullah; Mikheev, Artem; Yang, Andrew Il; Samadani, Uzma; Rusinek, Henry

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To determine if brain atrophy can be calculated by performing volumetric analysis on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans in spite of relatively low contrast for this modality. Materials & Method: CTs for 73 patients from the local Veteran Affairs database were selected. Exclusion criteria: AD, NPH, tumor, and alcohol abuse. Protocol: conventional clinical acquisition (Toshiba; helical, 120 kVp, X-ray tube current 300mA, slice thickness 3-5mm). Locally developed, automatic algorithm was used to segment intracranial cavity (ICC) using (a) white matter seed (b) constrained growth, limited by inner skull layer and (c) topological connectivity. ICC was further segmented into CSF and brain parenchyma using a threshold of 16 Hu. Results: Age distribution: 25-95yrs; (Mean 67+/-17.5yrs.). Significant correlation was found between age and CSF/ICC(r=0.695, patrophy among elderly VA patients is attributable to the presence of other comorbidities. Conclusion: Brain atrophy can be reliably calculated using automated software and conventional CT. Compared to MRI, CT is more widely available, cheaper, and less affected by head motion due to ~100 times shorter scan time. Work is in progress to improve the precision of the measurements, possibly leading to assessment of longitudinal changes within the patient.

  2. Progressive Brain Atrophy in Super-refractory Status Epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocker, Sara; Nagarajan, Elanagan; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Hanson, Dennis; Britton, Jeffrey W

    2016-10-01

    Prolonged seizures in super-refractory status epilepticus (SRSE) have been shown to cause neuronal death and reorganization, and visual inspection in individual case studies has demonstrated progressive cortical and subcortical atrophy. At present, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies that evaluate brain atrophy in SRSE are lacking. To document and quantify the development of atrophy over time in SRSE. This retrospective medical record review included all patients with SRSE who were admitted to a tertiary referral campus of the Mayo Clinic Hospital with SRSE from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2013. Patients with (1) an initial MRI scan performed within 2 weeks of SRSE onset, (2) a second MRI scan within 6 months of SRSE resolution, and (3) a minimum duration of 1 week between MRI scans were included. The ventricular brain ratio (VBR) was measured on T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images at disease onset and during follow-up. Measurements were performed on axial FLAIR images with section thickness of less than 5 mm. The plane immediately superior to the caudate head was chosen for analysis. The hypothesis that atrophy develops during SRSE despite seizure control (electroencephalogram background suppression with anesthetic drugs) was tested. Data were analyzed from June 1 to December 31, 2015. Change in VBR (ΔVBR) as a percentage of the starting measure. Nineteen patients met the inclusion criteria; these included 10 men (53%) and 9 women (47%) with a median age of 41 (interquartile range [IQR], 25-68) years. Anesthetic agents were required for a median of 13 (IQR, 5-37) days. Initial MRI was performed a median of 2 (IQR, 1-7.5) days from the onset of SRSE, and the second MRI was performed a median of 11 (IQR, 5-15.5) days from the resolution of SRSE, with a median of 40 (IQR, 15-65) days between MRI scans. Median ΔVBR was 23.3% (IQR, 10.5%-70.3%). A significant correlation between the duration of anesthetic agent use and ΔVBR was

  3. The relationship between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy in natalizumab treated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magraner, M., E-mail: majomagbe@ono.com [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain); Coret, F., E-mail: coret_fra@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Clinic de Valencia, Avda Blasco Ibanez 17, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Casanova, B., E-mail: Casanova_bon@gva.es [Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Service, Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Bulevar Sur s/n, 46026 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To assess the evolution of brain atrophy and its relationship with inflammatory activity in RRMS patients treated with natalizumab. Methods: Eighteen RRMS patients were prospectively followed up for 18 months after starting natalizumab therapy. Patients were monitored monthly and assessed for signs of relapses, adverse events or disability increase. MRI scans were performed before starting natalizumab and every six months. Cross-sectional T2 lesion volume (T2LV) and the normalized brain volume (NBV) at baseline and 18 months MRI scans were calculated using the Steronauta{sup Registered-Sign} and SIENAx softwares, respectively. Longitudinal Percentage of Brain Volume Change (PBVC) was estimated with SIENA. Linkage between inflammatory activity and brain atrophy was studied. Results: Natalizumab reduced ARR by 67% and cumulative CEL by 87.5%. T2 lesion volume decreased from 1000 mm{sup 3}, to 960 mm{sup 3} (p = 0.006) and NBV decreased from 1.55 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} to 1.42 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} mm{sup 3} (p = 0.025). Global PBVC from baseline to 18 months was -2.5%, predominantly during the first six months (0-6 months PBVC -1.7%; 6-12 months PBVC -0.74%; 12-18 months PBVC -0.50%). The number of relapses before treatment was correlated to the PBVC during the first semester (Pearson's coefficient -0.520, p = 0.003), while the number of basal CEL or baseline T2LV did not correlate with brain atrophy rate. During follow-up, nine patients had clinical or radiological inflammatory activity. Their PBVC was significantly higher in the first semester (-2.3% to -1.1%, p = 0.002). Conclusions: Natalizumab reduced relapse rate and CEL in MRI. Brain atrophy predominated in the first semester and was related to previous inflammatory activity.

  4. Normalized regional brain atrophy measurements in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zivadinov, Robert; Locatelli, Laura; Stival, Barbara; Bratina, Alessio; Nasuelli, Davide; Zorzon, Marino [Department of Clinical Medicine and Neurology, Cattinara Hospital, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume, 447-34149, Trieste (Italy); Grop, Attilio [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Science, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Brnabic-Razmilic, Ozana [Statistical Analysis Centre, Heilbronn (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    There is still a controversy regarding the best regional brain atrophy measurements in multiple sclerosis (MS) studies. The aim of this study was to establish whether, in a cross-sectional study, the normalized measurements of regional brain atrophy correlate better with the MRI-defined regional brain lesions than the absolute measurements of regional brain atrophy. We assessed 45 patients with clinically definite relapsing-remitting (RR) MS (median disease duration 12 years), and measured T1-lesion load (LL) and T2-LL of frontal lobes and pons, using a reproducible semi-automated technique. The regional brain parenchymal volume (RBPV) of frontal lobes and pons was obtained by use of a computerized interactive program, which incorporates semi-automated and automated segmentation processes. A normalized measurement, the regional brain parenchymal fraction (RBPF), was calculated as the ratio of RBPV to the total volume of the parenchyma and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the frontal lobes and in the region of the pons. The total regional brain volume fraction (TRBVF) was obtained after we had corrected for the total volume of the parenchyma and the CSF in the frontal lobes and in the region of the pons for the total intracranial volume. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for RBPF of the pons was 1% for intra-observer reproducibility and 1.4% for inter-observer reproducibility. Generally, the normalized measurements of regional brain atrophy correlated with regional brain volumes and disability better than did the absolute measurements. RBPF and TRBVF correlated with T2-LL of the pons (r=-0.37, P=0.011, and r= -0.40, P=0.0005 respectively) and with T1-LL of the pons (r=-0.27, P=0.046, and r=-0.31, P=0.04, respectively), whereas RBPV did not (r=-0.18, P = NS). T1-LL of the frontal lobes was related to RBPF (r=-0.32, P=0.033) and TRBVF (r=-0.29, P=0.05), but not to RBPV (R=-0.27, P= NS). There was only a trend of correlation between T2-LL of the frontal lobes and

  5. Longitudinal assessment of global and regional atrophy rates in Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Elijah; Su, Li; Williams, Guy B.; Watson, Rosie; Firbank, Michael; Blamire, Andrew M.; O'Brien, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objective Percent whole brain volume change (PBVC) measured from serial MRI scans is widely accepted as a sensitive marker of disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the utility of PBVC in the differential diagnosis of dementia remains to be established. We compared PBVC in AD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and investigated associations with clinical measures. Methods 72 participants (14 DLBs, 25 ADs, and 33 healthy controls (HCs)) underwent clinical assessment and 3 Tesla T1-weighted MRI at baseline and repeated at 12 months. We used FSL-SIENA to estimate PBVC for each subject. Voxelwise analyses and ANCOVA compared PBVC between DLB and AD, while correlational tests examined associations of PBVC with clinical measures. Results AD had significantly greater atrophy over 1 year (1.8%) compared to DLB (1.0%; p = 0.01) and HC (0.9%; p atrophy rates (r = 0.49, p atrophy compared to DLB, which had similar rates of atrophy to HC. Among dementia subjects, younger age was associated with accelerated atrophy, reflecting more aggressive disease in younger people. PBVC could aid in differentiating between DLB and AD, however its utility as an outcome marker in DLB is limited. PMID:25685712

  6. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

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    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/290473683; van der Kleij, L A; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; Hendrikse, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/266590268; Petersen, E T

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. METHODS: Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were perform

  8. Voxel-based morphometry to detect brain atrophy in progressive mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, Anne; Tervo, Susanna; Grau-Olivares, Marta; Niskanen, Eini; Pennanen, Corina; Huuskonen, Jari; Kivipelto, Miia; Hänninen, Tuomo; Tapiola, Mia; Vanhanen, Matti; Hallikainen, Merja; Helkala, Eeva-Liisa; Nissinen, Aulikki; Vanninen, Ritva; Soininen, Hilkka

    2007-10-01

    Recent research has shown an increased rate of conversion to dementia in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to controls. However, there are no specific methods to predict who will later develop dementia. In the present study, 22 controls and 56 MCI subjects were followed on average for 37 months (max. 60 months) and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at baseline to assess changes in brain structure associated to later progression to dementia. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to investigate gray matter atrophy. During the follow-up, 13 subjects progressed to dementia. At baseline, no differences were detected in age or education between the control and MCI subjects, but they differed by several neuropsychological tests. The stable and progressive MCI subjects differed only by CDR sum of boxes scores and delayed verbal recall, which were also significant predictors of conversion to dementia. At the baseline imaging, the MCI subjects showed reduced gray matter density in medial temporal, temporoparietal as well as in frontal cortical areas compared to controls. Interestingly, the progressive MCI subjects showed atrophy in the left temporoparietal and posterior cingulate cortices and in the precuneus bilaterally, and a trend for hippocampal atrophy when compared to the stable MCI subjects. We conclude that widespread cortical atrophy is present already two and a half years before a clinical diagnosis of dementia can be set.

  9. The yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA: a simple 2D/3D method for estimating deep gray matter atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite a strong correlation to outcome, the measurement of gray matter (GM atrophy is not being used in daily clinical practice as a prognostic factor and monitor the effect of treatments in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. This is mainly because the volumetric methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In addition, the meaning of raw results from volumetric studies on regions of interest are not always easy to understand. Thus, there is a huge need of a methodology suitable to be applied in daily clinical practice in order to estimate GM atrophy in a convenient and comprehensive way. Given the thalamus is the brain structure found to be more consistently implied in MS both in terms of extent of atrophy and in terms of prognostic value, we propose a solution based in this structure. In particular, we propose to compare the extent of thalamus atrophy (TA with the extent of unspecific, global brain atrophy, represented by ventricular enlargement. We name this ratio the yearly rate of Relative Thalamic Atrophy (yrRTA. In this report we aim to describe the concept of yrRTA and the guidelines for computing it under 2D and 3D approaches and explain the rationale behind this method. We have also conducted a very short crossectional retrospective study to proof the concept of yrRTA. However, we do not seek to describe here the validity of this parameter since these researches are being conducted currently and results will be addressed in future publications.

  10. Quantitative regional validation of the visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Christiane; Benedictus, Marije R.; Koedam, Esther L.G.M.; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Center, Alzheimer Center and Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Versteeg, Adriaan; Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Validate the four-point visual rating scale for posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) on magnetic resonance images (MRI) through quantitative grey matter (GM) volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to justify its use in clinical practice. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 128 with subjective memory complaints underwent 3T MRI. PCA was rated according to the visual rating scale. GM volumes of six posterior structures and the total posterior region were extracted using IBASPM and compared among PCA groups. To determine which anatomical regions contributed most to the visual scores, we used binary logistic regression. VBM compared local GM density among groups. Patients were categorised according to their PCA scores: PCA-0 (n = 122), PCA-1 (n = 143), PCA-2 (n = 79), and PCA-3 (n = 13). All structures except the posterior cingulate differed significantly among groups. The inferior parietal gyrus volume discriminated the most between rating scale levels. VBM showed that PCA-1 had a lower GM volume than PCA-0 in the parietal region and other brain regions, whereas between PCA-1 and PCA-2/3 GM atrophy was mostly restricted to posterior regions. The visual PCA rating scale is quantitatively validated and reliably reflects GM atrophy in parietal regions, making it a valuable tool for the daily radiological assessment of dementia. (orig.)

  11. Brain atrophy in cognitively impaired elderly: the importance of long-chain ω-3 fatty acids and B vitamin status in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernerén, Fredrik; Elshorbagy, Amany K; Oulhaj, Abderrahim; Smith, Stephen M; Refsum, Helga; Smith, A David

    2015-07-01

    Increased brain atrophy rates are common in older people with cognitive impairment, particularly in those who eventually convert to Alzheimer disease. Plasma concentrations of omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids and homocysteine are associated with the development of brain atrophy and dementia. We investigated whether plasma ω-3 fatty acid concentrations (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) modify the treatment effect of homocysteine-lowering B vitamins on brain atrophy rates in a placebo-controlled trial (VITACOG). This retrospective analysis included 168 elderly people (≥70 y) with mild cognitive impairment, randomly assigned either to placebo (n = 83) or to daily high-dose B vitamin supplementation (folic acid, 0.8 mg; vitamin B-6, 20 mg; vitamin B-12, 0.5 mg) (n = 85). The subjects underwent cranial magnetic resonance imaging scans at baseline and 2 y later. The effect of the intervention was analyzed according to tertiles of baseline ω-3 fatty acid concentrations. There was a significant interaction (P = 0.024) between B vitamin treatment and plasma combined ω-3 fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid) on brain atrophy rates. In subjects with high baseline ω-3 fatty acids (>590 μmol/L), B vitamin treatment slowed the mean atrophy rate by 40.0% compared with placebo (P = 0.023). B vitamin treatment had no significant effect on the rate of atrophy among subjects with low baseline ω-3 fatty acids (atrophy in the B vitamin group but not in the placebo group. The beneficial effect of B vitamin treatment on brain atrophy was observed only in subjects with high plasma ω-3 fatty acids. It is also suggested that the beneficial effect of ω-3 fatty acids on brain atrophy may be confined to subjects with good B vitamin status. The results highlight the importance of identifying subgroups likely to benefit in clinical trials. This trial was registered at www.controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN94410159. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Plasma clusterin concentration is associated with longitudinal brain atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thambisetty, Madhav; An, Yang; Kinsey, Anna; Koka, Deepthi; Saleem, Muzamil; Güntert, Andreas; Kraut, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Davatzikos, Christos; Lovestone, Simon; Resnick, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Recent genetic and proteomic studies demonstrate that clusterin/apolipoprotein-J is associated with risk, pathology, and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our main aim was to examine associations between plasma clusterin concentration and longitudinal changes in brain volume in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). A secondary objective was to examine associations between peripheral concentration of clusterin and its concentration in the brain within regions that undergo neuropathological changes in AD. Non-demented individuals (N=139; mean baseline age 70.5 years) received annual volumetric MRI (912 MRI scans in total) over a mean six-year interval. Sixteen participants (92 MRI scans in total) were diagnosed during the course of the study with amnestic MCI. Clusterin concentration was assayed by ELISA in plasma samples collected within a year of the baseline MRI. Mixed effects regression models investigated whether plasma clusterin concentration was associated with rates of brain atrophy for control and MCI groups and whether these associations differed between groups. In a separate autopsy sample of individuals with AD (N=17) and healthy controls (N=4), we examined the association between antemortem clusterin concentration in plasma and postmortem levels in the superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus and cerebellum. The associations of plasma clusterin concentration with rates of change in brain volume were significantly different between MCI and control groups in several volumes including whole brain, ventricular CSF, temporal gray matter as well as parahippocampal, superior temporal and cingulate gyri. Within the MCI but not control group, higher baseline concentration of plasma clusterin was associated with slower rates of brain atrophy in these regions. In the combined autopsy sample of AD and control cases, representing a range of severity in AD pathology, we observed a significant association between clusterin concentration in the plasma and

  13. Brain MRI atrophy quantification in MS: From methods to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Battaglini, Marco; Benedict, Ralph H B; De Stefano, Nicola; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Henry, Roland G; Horsfield, Mark A; Jenkinson, Mark; Pagani, Elisabetta; Filippi, Massimo

    2017-01-24

    Patients with the main clinical phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) manifest varying degrees of brain atrophy beyond that of normal aging. Assessment of atrophy helps to distinguish clinically and cognitively deteriorating patients and predicts those who will have a less-favorable clinical outcome over the long term. Atrophy can be measured from brain MRI scans, and many technological improvements have been made over the last few years. Several software tools, with differing requirements on technical ability and levels of operator intervention, are currently available and have already been applied in research or clinical trial settings. Despite this, the measurement of atrophy in routine clinical practice remains an unmet need. After a short summary of the pathologic substrates of brain atrophy in MS, this review attempts to guide the clinician towards a better understanding of the methods currently used for quantifying brain atrophy in this condition. Important physiologic factors that affect brain volume measures are also considered. Finally, the most recent research on brain atrophy in MS is summarized, including whole brain and various compartments thereof (i.e., white matter, gray matter, selected CNS structures). Current methods provide sufficient precision for cohort studies, but are not adequate for confidently assessing changes in individual patients over the scale of months or a few years. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Effects of changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI for follow-up in brain atrophy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Malone, Ian M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Fox, Nick C

    2015-02-15

    Stable MR acquisition is essential for reliable measurement of brain atrophy in longitudinal studies. One attractive recent advance in MRI is to speed up acquisition using parallel imaging (e.g. reducing volumetric T1-weighted acquisition scan times from around 9 to 5 min). In some studies, a decision to change to an accelerated acquisition may have been deliberately taken, while in others repeat scans may occasionally be accidentally acquired with an accelerated acquisition. In ADNI, non-accelerated and accelerated scans were acquired in the same scanning session on each individual. We investigated the impact on brain atrophy as measured by k-means normalized boundary shift integral (KN-BSI) and deformation-based morphometry when changing from non-accelerated to accelerated MRI acquisitions over a 12-month interval using scans of 422 subjects from ADNI. KN-BSIs were calculated using both a non-accelerated baseline scan and non-accelerated 12-month scans (i.e. consistent acquisition), and a non-accelerated baseline scan and an accelerated 12-month scan (i.e. changed acquisition). Fluid-based non-rigid registration was also performed on those scans to estimate the brain atrophy rate. We found that the effect on KN-BSI and fluid-based non-rigid registration depended on the scanner manufacturer. For KN-BSI, in Philips and Siemens scanners, the change had very little impact on the measured atrophy rate (increase of 0.051% in Philips and -0.035% in Siemens from consistent acquisition to changed acquisition), whereas, in GE, the change caused a mean reduction of 0.65% in the brain atrophy rate. This is likely due to the difference in tissue contrast between gray matter and cerebrospinal fluid in the non-accelerated and accelerated scans in GE, which uses IR-FSPGR instead of MP-RAGE. For fluid-based non-rigid registration, the change caused a mean increase of 0.29% in the brain atrophy rate in the changed acquisition compared with consistent acquisition in Philips

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A; Spijkerman, J M; Biessels, G J; Hendrikse, J; Petersen, E T

    2016-05-01

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T2 of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T1-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (VCSF) and the T2 of CSF (T2,CSF) was calculated. The correlation between VCSF/T2,CSF and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular VCSF increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T2 of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. • A 1:11 min CSF MRI volumetric sequence can evaluate brain atrophy. • CSF MRI provides accurate atrophy assessment without partial volume effects. • CSF MRI data can be processed quickly without user interaction. • The measured T 2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy.

  16. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, T.; Skoog, I.; Oudkerk, M.; Leeuw, H.F. de; Groot, J.C. de; Hofman, A.W.I.M.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  17. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Skoog, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  18. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, T.; Skoog, I.; Oudkerk, M.; Leeuw, H.F. de; Groot, J.C. de; Hofman, A.W.I.M.; Breteler, M.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  19. Association between blood pressure levels over time and brain atrophy in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, T; Skoog, [No Value; Oudkerk, M; de Leeuw, FE; de Groot, JC; Hofman, A; Breteler, MMB

    2003-01-01

    The relation between blood pressure level and degree of global brain atrophy is equivocal. We evaluated past and present blood pressure levels and change in blood pressure over 20 years in relation to the degree of cortical atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 1995-1996, we measured blood

  20. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: a longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Mascalchi

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM to investigate volume changes and the Inherited Ataxia Clinical Rating Scale to assess the clinical deficit. With respect to controls, SCA2 patients showed significant higher atrophy rates in the midbrain, including substantia nigra, basis pontis, middle cerebellar peduncles and posterior medulla corresponding to the gracilis and cuneatus tracts and nuclei, cerebellar white matter (WM and cortical gray matter (GM in the inferior portions of the cerebellar hemisphers. No differences in WM or GM volume loss were observed in the supratentorial compartment. TBM findings did not correlate with modifications of the neurological deficit. In conclusion, MRI volumetry using TBM is capable of demonstrating the progression of pontocerebellar atrophy in SCA2, supporting a possible role of MRI as biomarker in future trials.

  1. Significance and usefulness of heart rate variability in patients with multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furushima, Hiroshi; Shimohata, Takayoshi; Nakayama, Hideaki; Ozawa, Tetsutaro; Chinushi, Masaomi; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Nishizawa, Masatoyo

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether heart rate variability parameters can be useful for evaluating cardiac autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy patients. Both the time and frequency domains of heart rate variability were investigated among 17 multiple system atrophy patients and 27 normal control subjects. All time- and frequency-domain measures, except the low- to high-frequency ratio, were significantly lower in multiple system atrophy patients than in controls. In multiple system atrophy patients, there were significant inverse correlations between heart rate variability parameters and disease duration, as well as disease severity, but heart rate variability parameters were not affected by other autonomic dysfunctions. The cardiac autonomic state of multiple system atrophy was characterized by decreases in both sympathetic and parasympathetic tones. Because heart rate variability parameters were not affected by other autonomic dysfunctions, this may be a useful method for evaluating cardiac autonomic dysfunction in multiple system atrophy. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, J.B. de; Zwanenburg, J.J.; Kleij, L.A. van der; Spijkerman, J.M.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Biessels, G.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, E.T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hvidovre Hospital, Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Hvidovre (Denmark)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether volumetric cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) MRI can be used as a surrogate for brain atrophy assessment and to evaluate how the T{sub 2} of the CSF relates to brain atrophy. Twenty-eight subjects [mean age 64 (sd 2) years] were included; T{sub 1}-weighted and CSF MRI were performed. The first echo data of the CSF MRI sequence was used to obtain intracranial volume, CSF partial volume was measured voxel-wise to obtain CSF volume (V{sub CSF}) and the T{sub 2} of CSF (T{sub 2,CSF}) was calculated. The correlation between V{sub CSF} / T{sub 2,CSF} and brain atrophy scores [global cortical atrophy (GCA) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular V{sub CSF} increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T{sub 2} of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T{sub 2} of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus be a marker of neurodegenerative disease. (orig.)

  3. Alois Alzheimer and vascular brain disease: Arteriosclerotic atrophy of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available Alois Alzheimer is best known for his description of neurofibrillary changes in brain neurons of a demented patient, identifying a novel disease, soon named after him by Kraepelin. However, the range of his studies was broad, including vascular brain diseases, published between 1894 and 1902. Alzheimer described the clinical picture of Arteriosclerotic atrophy of the brain, differentiating it from other similar disorders. He stated that autopsy allowed pathological distinction between arteriosclerosis and syphilis, thereby achieving some of his objectives of segregating disorders and separating them from syphilis. His studies contributed greatly to establishing the key information on vascular brain diseases, predating the present state of knowledge on the issue, while providing early descriptions of what would be later regarded as the dimensional presentation of the now called "Vascular cognitive impairment", constituted by a spectrum that includes a stage of "Vascular cognitive impairment not dementia" and another of "Vascular dementia".

  4. Sequential relationships between grey matter and white matter atrophy and brain metabolic abnormalities in early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villain, Nicolas; Fouquet, Marine; Baron, Jean-Claude; Mézenge, Florence; Landeau, Brigitte; de La Sayette, Vincent; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Chételat, Gaël

    2010-11-01

    Hippocampal atrophy, posterior cingulate and frontal glucose hypometabolism, and white-matter tract disruption are well described early macroscopic events in Alzheimer's disease. The relationships between these three types of alterations have been documented in previous studies, but their chronology still remains to be established. The present study used multi-modal fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging longitudinal data to address this question in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. We found unidirectional, specific sequential relationships between: (i) baseline hippocampal atrophy and both cingulum bundle (r = 0.70; P = 3 × 10⁻³) and uncinate fasciculus (r = 0.75; P = 7 × 10⁻⁴) rate of atrophy; (ii) baseline cingulum bundle atrophy and rate of decline of posterior (r = 0.72; P = 2 × 10⁻³); and anterior (r = 0.74; P = 1 × 10⁻³) cingulate metabolism; and (iii) baseline uncinate white matter atrophy and subgenual metabolism rate of change (r = 0.65; P = 6 × 10⁻³). Baseline local grey matter atrophy was not found to contribute to hypometabolism progression within the posterior and anterior cingulate as well as subgenual cortices. These findings suggest that hippocampal atrophy progressively leads to disruption of the cingulum bundle and uncinate fasciculus, which in turn leads to glucose hypometabolism of the cingulate and subgenual cortices, respectively. This study reinforces the relevance of remote mechanisms above local interactions to account for the pattern of metabolic brain alteration observed in amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and provides new avenues to assess the sequence of events in complex diseases characterized by multiple manifestations.

  5. Stroke and brain atrophy in chronic Chagas disease patients: A new theory proposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamary Oliveira-Filho

    Full Text Available Abstract Chagas disease (CD remains a major cause of cardiomyopathy and stroke in developing countries. Brain damage in CD has been attributed exclusively to the effects of structural heart disease on the brain, including cardioembolism and low cardiac output symptoms. However, CD patients also develop stroke and brain atrophy independently of cardiac disease severity. Chronic inflammation directed against T. cruzi may act as a trigger for endothelial damage, platelet activation, acceleration of atherosclerosis and apoptosis, all of which lead to stroke and brain atrophy. In the present article, evidence supporting this new theory is presented, along with considerations towards mechanistically-based targeted treatment.

  6. The transitional association between β-amyloid pathology and regional brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insel, Philip S; Mattsson, Niklas; Donohue, Michael C; Mackin, R Scott; Aisen, Paul S; Jack, Clifford R; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. The functional form to model the association between Aβ and regional brain atrophy has not been well defined. To determine the relationship between Aβ and atrophy, we compared the performance of the usual dichotomization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ to identify subjects as Aβ+ and Aβ- with a trilinear spline model of CSF Aβ. One hundred and eighty-three subjects with mild cognitive impairment and 108 cognitively normal controls with baseline CSF Aβ and up to 4 years of longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative were analyzed using mixed-effects regression. Piecewise-linear splines were used to evaluate the nonlinear nature of the association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy and to identify points of acceleration of atrophy with respect to Aβ. Several parameterizations of CSF Aβ were compared using likelihood ratio tests and the Akaike information criterion. Periods of acceleration of atrophy in which subjects transition from CSF Aβ negativity to CSF Aβ positivity were estimated from the spline models and tested for significance. Spline models resulted in better fits for many temporal and parietal regions compared with the dichotomous models. The trilinear model showed that periods of acceleration of atrophy varied greatly by region with early changes seen in the insula, amygdala, precuneus, hippocampus, and other temporal regions, occurring before the clinical threshold for CSF Aβ positivity. The use of piecewise-linear splines provides an improved model of the nonlinear association between CSF Aβ and regional atrophy in regions implicated in the progression of AD. The important biological finding of this work is that some brain regions show periods of accelerated volume loss well before the CSF Aβ42 threshold. This implies that signs of brain atrophy

  7. Consistent multi-time-point brain atrophy estimation from the boundary shift integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kelvin K; Ridgway, Gerard R; Ourselin, Sébastien; Fox, Nick C

    2012-02-15

    Brain atrophy measurement is increasingly important in studies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), with particular relevance to trials of potential disease-modifying drugs. Automated registration-based methods such as the boundary shift integral (BSI) have been developed to provide more precise measures of change from a pair of serial MR scans. However, when a method treats one image of the pair (typically the baseline) as the reference to which the other is compared, this systematic asymmetry risks introducing bias into the measurement. Recent concern about potential biases in longitudinal studies has led to several suggestions to use symmetric image registration, though some of these methods are limited to two time-points per subject. Therapeutic trials and natural history studies increasingly involve several serial scans, it would therefore be useful to have a method that can consistently estimate brain atrophy over multiple time-points. Here, we use the log-Euclidean concept of a within-subject average to develop affine registration and differential bias correction methods suitable for any number of time-points, yielding a longitudinally consistent multi-time-point BSI technique. Baseline, 12-month and 24-month MR scans of healthy controls, subjects with mild cognitive impairment and AD patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative are used for testing the bias in processing scans with different amounts of atrophy. Four tests are used to assess bias in brain volume loss from BSI: (a) inverse consistency with respect to ordering of pairs of scans 12 months apart; (b) transitivity consistency over three time-points; (c) randomly ordered back-to-back scans, expected to show no consistent change over subjects; and (d) linear regression of the atrophy rates calculated from the baseline and 12-month scans and the baseline and 24-month scans, where any additive bias should be indicated by a non-zero intercept. Results

  8. Combining the boundary shift integral and tensor-based morphometry for brain atrophy estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalkiewicz, Mateusz; Pai, Akshay; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sommer, Stefan; Darkner, Sune; Sørensen, Lauge; Sporring, Jon; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-03-01

    Brain atrophy from structural magnetic resonance images (MRIs) is widely used as an imaging surrogate marker for Alzheimers disease. Their utility has been limited due to the large degree of variance and subsequently high sample size estimates. The only consistent and reasonably powerful atrophy estimation methods has been the boundary shift integral (BSI). In this paper, we first propose a tensor-based morphometry (TBM) method to measure voxel-wise atrophy that we combine with BSI. The combined model decreases the sample size estimates significantly when compared to BSI and TBM alone.

  9. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  10. Evaluating Alzheimer’s Disease Progression Using Rate of Regional Hippocampal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankó, Edit; Joly, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangle and neuropil thread deposition, which ultimately results in neuronal loss. A large number of magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported a smaller hippocampus in AD patients as compared to healthy elderlies. Even though this difference is often interpreted as atrophy, it is only an indirect measurement. A more direct way of measuring the atrophy is to use repeated MRIs within the same individual. Even though several groups have used this appropriate approach, the pattern of hippocampal atrophy still remains unclear and difficult to relate to underlying pathophysiology. Here, in this longitudinal study, we aimed to map hippocampal atrophy rates in patients with AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and elderly controls. Data consisted of two MRI scans for each subject. The symmetric deformation field between the first and the second MRI was computed and mapped onto the three-dimensional hippocampal surface. The pattern of atrophy rate was similar in all three groups, but the rate was significantly higher in patients with AD than in control subjects. We also found higher atrophy rates in progressive MCI patients as compared to stable MCI, particularly in the antero-lateral portion of the right hippocampus. Importantly, the regions showing the highest atrophy rate correspond to those that were described to have the highest burden of tau deposition. Our results show that local hippocampal atrophy rate is a reliable biomarker of disease stage and progression and could also be considered as a method to objectively evaluate treatment effects. PMID:23951142

  11. A cross-sectional MRI study of brain regional atrophy and clinical characteristics of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Applying a cross-sectional design, we set out to further characterize the significance of extrahippocampal brain atrophy in a large sample of \\'sporadic\\' mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE+HS). By evaluating the influence of epilepsy chronicity on structural atrophy, this work represents an important step towards the characterization of MRI-based volumetric measurements as genetic endophenotypes for this condition. METHODS: Using an automated brain segmentation technique, MRI-based volume measurements of several brain regions were compared between 75 patients with \\'sporadic\\' MTLE+HS and 50 healthy controls. Applying linear regression models, we examined the relationship between structural atrophy and important clinical features of MTLE+HS, including disease duration, lifetime number of partial and generalized seizures, and history of initial precipitating insults (IPIs). RESULTS: Significant volume loss was detected in ipsilateral hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, and cerebral white matter (WM). In addition, contralateral hippocampal and bilateral cerebellar grey matter (GM) volume loss was observed in left MTLE+HS patients. Hippocampal, amygdalar, and cerebral WM volume loss correlated with duration of epilepsy. This correlation was stronger in patients with prior IPIs history. Further, cerebral WM, cerebellar GM, and contralateral hippocampal volume loss correlated with lifetime number of generalized seizures. CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm that multiple brain regions beyond the hippocampus are involved in the pathogenesis of MTLE+HS. IPIs are an important factor influencing the rate of regional atrophy but our results also support a role for processes related to epilepsy chronicity. The consequence of epilepsy chronicity on candidate brain regions has important implications on their application as genetic endophenotypes.

  12. Whole-brain atrophy differences between progressive supranuclear palsy and idiopathic Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Guevara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The absence of markers for ante-mortem diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP results in this disorder’s being commonly mistaken for other conditions, such as idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD. Such mistakes occur particularly in the initial stages, when ‘plus syndrome’ has not yet clinically emerged.Objective. To investigate global brain volume and tissue loss in patients with PSP relative to patients with IPD and healthy controls and correlations between clinical parameters and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-derived brain volume estimates.Methods: T1-weighted images were obtained from three groups of Chilean Latin American adults: 21 patients with IPD, 18 patients with PSP and 14 healthy controls. We used Structural Imaging Evaluation with Normalization of Atrophy (SIENAX to assess white matter, gray matter and whole-brain volumes (normalized to cranial volume. Imaging data were used to analyze putative correlations with the clinical status of PSP and IPD patients using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III, Hoehn and Yahr, the Clinical Global Impression for Disease Severity Scale and the Frontal Assessment Battery.Results: PSP patients had significantly lower whole brain volume than both IPD patients and controls. Whole brain volume reduction in PSP patients was primarily attributable to gray matter volume reduction. We found a significant correlation between brain volume reduction and clinical status in the PSP group.Conclusions: At the group level, whole brain and gray matter volumes differentiated patients with PSP from patients with IPD. There was also significant clinical-imaging correlations with motor disturbances in PSP.

  13. Whole-Brain Atrophy Differences between Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Carlos; Bulatova, Katherina; Barker, Gareth J.; Gonzalez, Guido; Crossley, Nicolas A.; Kempton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The absence of markers for ante-mortem diagnosis of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), results in this disorder being commonly mistaken for other conditions, such as idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Such mistakes occur particularly in the initial stages, when “plus syndrome” has not yet clinically emerged. Objective: To investigate the global brain volume and tissue loss in patients with PSP relative to patients with IPD and healthy controls and correlations between clinical parameters and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived brain volume estimates. Methods: T1-weighted images were obtained from three groups of Chilean Latin American adults: 21 patients with IPD, 18 patients with PSP and 14 healthy controls. We used Structural Imaging Evaluation with Normalization of Atrophy (SIENAX) to assess white matter, gray matter and whole-brain volumes (normalized to cranial volume). Imaging data were used to analyze putative correlations with the clinical status of PSP and IPD patients using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS III), Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y), the Clinical Global Impression for Disease Severity Scale (CGI-S) and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). Results: PSP patients had significantly lower whole brain volume than both IPD patients and controls. Whole brain volume reduction in PSP patients was primarily attributable to gray matter volume reduction. We found a significant correlation between brain volume reduction and clinical status in the PSP group. Conclusions: At the group level, the whole brain and gray matter volumes differentiated patients with PSP from patients with IPD. There was also significant clinical-imaging correlations with motor disturbances in PSP. PMID:27679572

  14. Resuscitating the heart but losing the brain: brain atrophy in the aftermath of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, A; Frisch, S; Jentzsch, R T; Müller, K; Villringer, A; Schroeter, M L

    2010-01-26

    Many survivors of cardiac arrest are left with considerable long-term impairments due to a transient ischemic state of the brain. Neuropsychologists identified a wide range of neuropsychological deficits in these patients besides the well-known amnesic syndrome. To date, there is no complete and unbiased documentation of the affected brain areas in vivo. We aimed to identify the brain tissue atrophy underlying the observed neuropsychological deficits in a case-control study. We measured gray matter loss by voxel-based morphometry of 3-T structural magnetic resonance images in a sample of 12 patients who had had cardiac arrest with successful subsequent resuscitation in comparison with 12 individually age- and sex-matched control subjects. Such data are rare because many of these patients wear cardiac pacemakers. We found extensive reductions of gray matter volumes in the anterior, medial, and posterior cingulate cortex, the precuneus, the insular cortex, the posterior hippocampus, and the dorsomedial thalamus in tight correlation with neuropsychological impairments, namely, amnestic deficits and apathy. The identified neuroanatomical pattern of brain tissue loss substantiates the reports of wide-ranging neuropsychological impairments in patients after cardiac arrest.

  15. Bilingualism as a contributor to cognitive reserve: evidence from brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Ware, Jenna; Fischer, Corinne E; Craik, Fergus I M; Bialystok, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    Much of the research on delaying the onset of symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has focused on pharmacotherapy, but environmental factors have also been acknowledged to play a significant role. Bilingualism may be one factor contributing to 'cognitive reserve' (CR) and therefore to a delay in symptom onset. If bilingualism is protective, then the brains of bilinguals should show greater atrophy in relevant areas, since their enhanced CR enables them to function at a higher level than would be predicted from their level of disease. We analyzed a number of linear measurements of brain atrophy from the computed tomography (CT) scans of monolingual and bilingual patients diagnosed with probable AD who were matched on level of cognitive performance and years of education. Bilingual patients with AD exhibited substantially greater amounts of brain atrophy than monolingual patients in areas traditionally used to distinguish AD patients from healthy controls, specifically, the radial width of the temporal horn and the temporal horn ratio. Other measures of brain atrophy were comparable for the two groups. Bilingualism appears to contribute to increased CR, thereby delaying the onset of AD and requiring the presence of greater amounts of neuropathology before the disease is manifest.

  16. Differential effects of ischemic vascular disease and Alzheimer's disease on brain atrophy and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Vinters, Harry V; Mack, Wendy J; Weiner, Michael W; Chui, Helena C

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that pathologic measures of arteriosclerosis (AS), cerebral infarction, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are independently correlated with cortical gray matter (CGM) atrophy measured by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we use path analyses to model the associations between these three pathology measures and cognitive impairment, as mediated by CGM atrophy, after controlling for age and education. In this sample of 116 elderly persons followed longitudinally to autopsy (ischemic vascular disease (IVD) program project), differential patterns were observed between AS and atrophy/cognition versus AD and atrophy/cognition. The total effect of AD pathology on global cognition (β = -0.61, s.e. = 0.06) was four times stronger than that of AS (β = -0.15, s.e. = 0.08). The effect of AS on cognition appears to occur through cerebral infarction and CGM atrophy (β = -0.13, s.e. = 0.04). In contrast, the effects of AD pathology on global cognition (β = -0.50, s.e. = 0.07) occur through a direct pathway that is five times stronger than the indirect pathway acting through CGM atrophy (β = -0.09, s.e. = 0.03). The strength of this direct AD pathway was not significantly mitigated by adding hippocampal volume to the model. AD pathology affects cognition not only through brain atrophy, but also via an unmeasured pathway that could be related to synaptic dysfunction before the development of cortical atrophy.

  17. Impaired cerebral autoregulation is associated with brain atrophy and worse functional status in chronic ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio C Aoi

    Full Text Available Dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA is impaired following stroke. However, the relationship between dCA, brain atrophy, and functional outcomes following stroke remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether impairment of dCA is associated with atrophy in specific regions or globally, thereby affecting daily functions in stroke patients.We performed a retrospective analysis of 33 subjects with chronic infarctions in the middle cerebral artery territory, and 109 age-matched non-stroke subjects. dCA was assessed via the phase relationship between arterial blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity. Brain tissue volumes were quantified from MRI. Functional status was assessed by gait speed, instrumental activities of daily living (IADL, modified Rankin Scale, and NIH Stroke Score.Compared to the non-stroke group, stroke subjects showed degraded dCA bilaterally, and showed gray matter atrophy in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes ipsilateral to infarct. In stroke subjects, better dCA was associated with less temporal lobe gray matter atrophy on the infracted side ([Formula: see text] = 0.029, faster gait speed ([Formula: see text] = 0.018 and lower IADL score ([Formula: see text]0.002. Our results indicate that better dynamic cerebral perfusion regulation is associated with less atrophy and better long-term functional status in older adults with chronic ischemic infarctions.

  18. MRI patterns of atrophy and hypoperfusion associations across brain regions in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Duygu; Rosen, Howard; Miller, Bruce L; Weiner, Michael W; Schuff, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides various imaging modes to study the brain. We tested the benefits of a joint analysis of multimodality MRI data in combination with a large-scale analysis that involved simultaneously all image voxels using joint independent components analysis (jICA) and compared the outcome to results using conventional voxel-by-voxel unimodality tests. Specifically, we designed a jICA to decompose multimodality MRI data into independent components that explain joint variations between the image modalities as well as variations across brain regions. We tested the jICA design on structural and perfusion-weighted MRI data from 12 patients diagnosed with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and 12 cognitively normal elderly individuals. While unimodality analyses showed widespread brain atrophy and hypoperfusion in the patients, jICA further revealed two significant joint components of variations between atrophy and hypoperfusion across brain regions. The 1st joint component revealed associated brain atrophy and hypoperfusion predominantly in the right brain hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia, and the 2nd joint component revealed greater atrophy relative to hypoperfusion affecting predominantly the left hemisphere in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia. The patterns are consistent with the clinical symptoms of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia that relate to asymmetric compromises of the left and right brain hemispheres. The joint components also revealed that that structural alterations can be associated with physiological alterations in spatially separated but potentially connected brain regions. Finally, jICA outperformed voxel-by-voxel unimodal tests significantly in terms of an effect size, separating the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia patients from the controls. Taken together, the results demonstrate the benefit of multimodality MRI in conjunction with jICA for mapping

  19. 3D characterization of brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment using tensor-based morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xue; Leow, Alex D; Lee, Suh; Klunder, Andrea D; Toga, Arthur W; Lepore, Natasha; Chou, Yi-Yu; Brun, Caroline; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Barysheva, Marina; Jack, Clifford R; Bernstein, Matt A; Britson, Paula J; Ward, Chadwick P; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Borowski, Bret; Fleisher, Adam S; Fox, Nick C; Boyes, Richard G; Barnes, Josephine; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Schuff, Norbert; Boreta, Lauren; Alexander, Gene E; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2008-05-15

    Tensor-based morphometry (TBM) creates three-dimensional maps of disease-related differences in brain structure, based on nonlinearly registering brain MRI scans to a common image template. Using two different TBM designs (averaging individual differences versus aligning group average templates), we compared the anatomical distribution of brain atrophy in 40 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), 40 healthy elderly controls, and 40 individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a condition conferring increased risk for AD. We created an unbiased geometrical average image template for each of the three groups, which were matched for sex and age (mean age: 76.1 years+/-7.7 SD). We warped each individual brain image (N=120) to the control group average template to create Jacobian maps, which show the local expansion or compression factor at each point in the image, reflecting individual volumetric differences. Statistical maps of group differences revealed widespread medial temporal and limbic atrophy in AD, with a lesser, more restricted distribution in MCI. Atrophy and CSF space expansion both correlated strongly with Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Using cumulative p-value plots, we investigated how detection sensitivity was influenced by the sample size, the choice of search region (whole brain, temporal lobe, hippocampus), the initial linear registration method (9- versus 12-parameter), and the type of TBM design. In the future, TBM may help to (1) identify factors that resist or accelerate the disease process, and (2) measure disease burden in treatment trials.

  20. The Effect of Disease-Modifying Drugs on Brain Atrophy in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Branger; Jean-Jacques Parienti; Maria Pia Sormani; Gilles Defer

    2016-01-01

    Background The quantification of brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) may serve as a marker of disease progression and treatment response. We compared the association between first-line (FL) or second-line (SL) disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) and brain volume changes over time in RRMS. Materials and Methods We reviewed clinical trials in RRMS between January 1, 1995 and June 1, 2014 that assessed the effect of DMDs and reported data on brain atrophy in Medline, Embase...

  1. Presymptomatic generalized brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia caused by CHMP2B mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrer, Jonathan D; Ahsan, R Laila; Isaacs, Adrian M;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The clinical syndrome is dominated by personality change and behavioural symptoms, but language, memory, calculation and praxis impairments are also seen early in the course of the disease. There are no ......BACKGROUND/AIMS: CHMP2B mutations are a rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The clinical syndrome is dominated by personality change and behavioural symptoms, but language, memory, calculation and praxis impairments are also seen early in the course of the disease....... There are no detailed studies of brain imaging in CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. This study aimed to investigate whether there were early or presymptomatic changes in this group of patients. METHODS: Subjects comprised 16 members of a Danish family with CHMP2B mutation-associated FTD. Nine subjects were presymptomatic...... mutation carriers with a control group of 7 mutation-negative family members. Volumetric MRI brain scans were performed on all subjects at two time points, and rates of volume change were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: We demonstrate that generalized atrophy occurs presymptomatically in CHMP2B...

  2. Advanced brain aging: relationship with epidemiologic and genetic risk factors, and overlap with Alzheimer disease atrophy patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, M; Janowitz, D; Erus, G; Toledo, J B; Resnick, S M; Doshi, J; Van der Auwera, S; Wittfeld, K; Hegenscheid, K; Hosten, N; Biffar, R; Homuth, G; Völzke, H; Grabe, H J; Hoffmann, W; Davatzikos, C

    2016-04-05

    We systematically compared structural imaging patterns of advanced brain aging (ABA) in the general-population, herein defined as significant deviation from typical BA to those found in Alzheimer disease (AD). The hypothesis that ABA would show different patterns of structural change compared with those found in AD was tested via advanced pattern analysis methods. In particular, magnetic resonance images of 2705 participants from the Study of Health in Pomerania (aged 20-90 years) were analyzed using an index that captures aging atrophy patterns (Spatial Pattern of Atrophy for Recognition of BA (SPARE-BA)), and an index previously shown to capture atrophy patterns found in clinical AD (Spatial Patterns of Abnormality for Recognition of Early Alzheimer's Disease (SPARE-AD)). We studied the association between these indices and risk factors, including an AD polygenic risk score. Finally, we compared the ABA-associated atrophy with typical AD-like patterns. We observed that SPARE-BA had significant association with: smoking (P<0.05), anti-hypertensive (P<0.05), anti-diabetic drug use (men P<0.05, women P=0.06) and waist circumference for the male cohort (P<0.05), after adjusting for age. Subjects with ABA had spatially extensive gray matter loss in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes (false-discovery-rate-corrected q<0.001). ABA patterns of atrophy were partially overlapping with, but notably deviating from those typically found in AD. Subjects with ABA had higher SPARE-AD values; largely due to the partial spatial overlap of associated patterns in temporal regions. The AD polygenic risk score was significantly associated with SPARE-AD but not with SPARE-BA. Our findings suggest that ABA is likely characterized by pathophysiologic mechanisms that are distinct from, or only partially overlapping with those of AD.

  3. Brain atrophy and lesion load are related to CSF lipid-specific IgM oligoclonal bands in clinically isolated syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magraner, Maria Jose; Bosca, Isabel; Simo-Castello, Maria; Casanova, Bonaventura [Hospital La Fe, Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Department, Valencia (Spain); Garcia-Marti, Gracian [Hospital Quiron, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Valencia (Spain); CIBER Mental Health Network, ISCIII, Valencia (Spain); Alberich-Bayarri, Angel; Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Hospital Quiron, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Valencia (Spain); Coret, Francisco [Hospital Clinic Universitari, Multiple Sclerosis Unit, Neurology Department, Valencia (Spain); Alvarez-Cermeno, Jose C. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Neurology Department, Madrid (Spain); Villar, Luisa M. [Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Immunology Department, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    The objective of this work is to study the relationship between the presence of lipid-specific oligoclonal IgM bands (LS-OCMB) in CSF, with both T2 lesion volume (T2LV) accumulation and brain atrophy (percentage change of brain volume-PCBV-and brain parenchyma fraction-BPF) in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggestive of demyelination. Twenty-four CIS patients were included in this prospective study. IgG oligoclonal bands (OCGB) and LS-OCMB were determined in paired serum and CSF samples within 3 months since clinical onset. Brain MRI studies were scheduled at baseline, 3 months, first and second years after CIS onset. Differences in T2LV, PCBV and BPF between CIS patients according to the type of OCB were studied. Nine patients had no OCB; 15 had only OCGB, and seven had OCGB + LS-OCMB present in the CSF. LS-OCMB were associated with greater T2LV in all scheduled MRI studies. At the end of follow-up (year 2), it was threefold higher in patients with these antibodies than in those without LS-OCMB (3.95 cm{sup 3} vs. 1.36 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.001). At that point, brain atrophy was also higher in patients with LS-OCMB (BPF, 0.73 in LS-OCMB+ patients vs. 0.76 in negative ones, p = 0.03). The rate in brain atrophy was higher in the first group of patients as well. Considering only patients with OCGB, the presence of LS-OCMB was also related to greater T2LV, T2LV increase and a trend towards higher atrophy rate. The presence of LS-OCMB in the first event suggestive of demyelination is related to an early increase in lesion load and brain atrophy. These data are in line with prospective studies showing the clinical prognostic value of LS-OCMB. (orig.)

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid volumetric MRI mapping as a simple measurement for evaluating brain atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Vis, J B; Zwanenburg, J J; van der Kleij, L A;

    2016-01-01

    ) and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA)] was evaluated. RESULTS: Relative total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular VCSF increased significantly with increased scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.83, 0.78 and 0.78 and R = 0.72, 0.62 and 0.86). Total, peripheral subarachnoidal, and ventricular T2...... of the CSF increased significantly with higher scores on the GCA and MTA (R = 0.72, 0.70 and 0.49 and R = 0.60, 0.57 and 0.41). CONCLUSION: A fast, fully automated CSF MRI volumetric sequence is an alternative for qualitative atrophy scales. The T2 of the CSF is related to brain atrophy and could thus...

  5. Neurosyphilis with dementia and bilateral hippocampal atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrabian Shima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article reports a rare case of active neurosyphilis in a man with mild to moderate dementia and marked hippocampal atrophy, mimicking early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Few cases have so far described bilateral hippocampal atrophy mimicking Alzheimer’s disease in neurosyphilis. Case presentation The patient presented here is a 33 year old Bulgarian male, whose clinical features include progressive cognitive decline and behavioral changes over the last 18 months. Neuropsychological examination revealed mild to moderate dementia (Mini Mental State Examination score was 16/30 with impaired memory and attention, and executive dysfunction. Pyramidal, and extrapyramidal signs, as well as dysarthria and impairment in coordination, were documented. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical atrophy with noticeable bilateral hippocampal atrophy. The diagnosis of active neurosyphilis was based on positive results of the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test/Treponema pallidum hemagglutination reactions in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. In addition, cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and elevated protein levels. High-dose intravenous penicillin therapy was administered. At 6 month follow up, improvements were noted clinically, on neuropsychological examinations, and in cerebrospinal fluid samples. Conclusion This case underlines the importance of early diagnosis of neurosyphilis. The results suggest that neurosyphilis should be considered when magnetic resonance imaging results indicate mesiotemporal abnormalities and hippocampal atrophy. Neurosyphilis is a treatable condition which requires early aggressive antibiotic therapy.

  6. Global brain atrophy and metabolic dysfunction in LGI1 encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szots, Monika; Blaabjerg, Morten; Orsi, Gergely

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic cognitive deficits are frequent in leucin-rich glioma-inactivated 1 protein (LGI1) encephalitis. We examined structural and metabolic brain abnormalities following LGI1 encephalitis and correlated findings with acute and follow-up clinical outcomes. METHODS: Nine patients unde...

  7. A meta-analysis on progressive atrophy in intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: Time is brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciagli, Lorenzo; Bernasconi, Andrea; Wiebe, Samuel; Koepp, Matthias J; Bernasconi, Neda; Bernhardt, Boris C

    2017-08-01

    It remains unclear whether drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with cumulative brain damage, with no expert consensus and no quantitative syntheses of the available evidence. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of MRI studies on progressive atrophy, searching PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE databases for cross-sectional and longitudinal quantitative MRI studies on drug-resistant TLE. We screened 2,976 records and assessed eligibility of 248 full-text articles. Forty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for quantitative evaluation. We observed a predominance of cross-sectional studies, use of different clinical indices of progression, and high heterogeneity in age-control procedures. Meta-analysis of 18/1 cross-sectional/longitudinal studies on hippocampal atrophy (n = 979 patients) yielded a pooled effect size of r = -0.42 for ipsilateral atrophy related to epilepsy duration (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.51 to -0.32; p atrophy (n = 1,504 patients) indicated that >80% of articles reported duration-related progression in extratemporal cortical and subcortical regions. Detailed analysis of study design features yielded low to moderate levels of evidence for progressive atrophy across studies, mainly due to dominance of cross-sectional over longitudinal investigations, use of diverse measures of seizure estimates, and absence of consistent age control procedures. While the neuroimaging literature is overall suggestive of progressive atrophy in drug-resistant TLE, published studies have employed rather weak designs to directly demonstrate it. Longitudinal multicohort studies are needed to unequivocally differentiate aging from disease progression. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Association of amyloid burden, brain atrophy and memory deficits in aged apolipoprotein ε4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junxiang; Turner, Gregory H; Coons, Stephen W; Maalouf, Marwan; Reiman, Eric M; Shi, Jiong

    2014-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (ApoE4) has been associated with increased risk of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. But the underlying mechanism of ApoE4 affecting brain atrophy and cognition is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of ApoE4 on amyloid beta (Aβ) protein burden and its correlation with the structure change of hippocampus and cortex, cognitive and behavioral changes in ApoE4 transgenic mice. Male ApoE4 transgenic mice and age-matched control mice at age 12 months and 24 months were tested in the Morris Water Maze (MWM). Brain volume changes (including whole brain, hippocampus, cortex, total ventricles and caudate putamen) were assessed by using small animal 7T-MRI. Aβ level was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunoprecipitation/western blot. In MWM, escape latency was longer and time spent in the target quadrant was shorter in aged ApoE4 mice (12- and 24-month-old), suggesting age- and ApoE4-dependent visuospatial deficits. Atrophy on MRI was prominent in the hippocampus (p=0.039) and cortex (p=0.013) of ApoE4 mice (24-month-old) as compared to age-matched control mice. IHC revealed elevated Aβ deposition in the hippocampus. Consistently, both soluble and insoluble Aβ aggregates were increased in aged ApoE4 mice. This increase was correlated inversely with hippocampal atrophy and cognitive deficits. These data give further evidence that ApoE4 plays an important role in brain atrophy and memory impairment by modulating amyloid production and deposition.

  9. NSAIDs may protect against age-related brain atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara B Bendlin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in humans is associated with brain differences including decreased number of activated microglia. In animals, NSAIDs are associated with reduced microglia, decreased amyloid burden, and neuronal preservation. Several studies suggest NSAIDs protect brain regions affected in the earliest stages of AD, including hippocampal and parahippocampal regions. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the protective effect of NSAID use on gray matter volume in a group of middle-aged and older NSAID users (n = 25 compared to non-user controls (n = 50. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Non-user controls showed smaller volume in portions of the left hippocampus compared to NSAID users. Age-related loss of volume differed between groups, with controls showing greater medial temporal lobe volume loss with age compared to NSAID users. These results should be considered preliminary, but support previous reports that NSAIDs may modulate age-related loss of brain volume.

  10. Relapsing Polychondritis Presented with Encephalitis Followed by Brain Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moo-Seok; Jeong, Hae-Bong; Kwon, Oh-Sang; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Kim, Hee Sung; Choi, Sang Tae

    2017-01-01

    Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is a rare autoimmune disease that is characterized by inflammatory reaction of unknown etiology and destruction of cartilaginous structures. Characteristic symptoms of this disease include cartilage inflammation of the ear, nose, larynx, trachea, bronchi, joints, eyes, heart and skin. Concomitance with neurologic symptom is very rare in RP, and the detailed underlying mechanism of neurological involvement associated with RP is not fully understood. We herein described an unusual recurrent case of inflammatory brain lesions associated with RP, with attention to clinical manifestations, autoimmune disease involvement, and therapeutic effects. PMID:28243168

  11. Tideglusib reduces progression of brain atrophy in progressive supranuclear palsy in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Günter U; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Andrés, María V; Belloch, Vincente; León, Teresa; Del Ser, Teodoro

    2014-04-01

    It is believed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 hyperphosphorylates tau protein in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The Tau Restoration on PSP (TAUROS) trial assessed the glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor tideglusib as potential treatment. For the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) substudy reported here, we assessed the progression of brain atrophy. TAUROS was a multinational, phase 2, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with mild-to-moderate PSP who were treated with oral tideglusib (600 mg or 800 mg daily) or with placebo for 1 year. A subset of patients underwent baseline and 52-week MRI. Automated, observer-independent, atlas-based, and mask-based volumetry was done on high-resolution, T1-weighted, three-dimensional data. For primary outcomes, progression of atrophy was compared both globally (brain, cerebrum) and regionally (third ventricle, midbrain, pons) between the active and placebo groups (Bonferroni correction). For secondary outcomes, 15 additional brain structures were explored (Benjamini & Yekutieli correction). In total, MRIs from 37 patient were studied (placebo group, N = 9; tideglusib 600 mg group, N = 19; tideglusib 800 mg group, N = 9). The groups compared well in their demographic characteristics. Clinical results showed no effect of tideglusib over placebo. Progression of atrophy was significantly lower in the active group than in the placebo group for the brain (mean ± standard error of the mean: -1.3% ± 1.4% vs. -3.1% ± 2.3%, respectively), cerebrum (-1.3% ± 1.5% vs. -3.2% ± 2.1%, respectively), parietal lobe (-1.6% ± 1.9% vs. -4.1% ± 3.0%, respectively), and occipital lobe (-0.3% ± 1.8% vs. -2.7% ± 3.2%, respectively). A trend toward reduced atrophy also was observed in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and brainstem. In patients with PSP, tideglusib reduced the progression of atrophy in the whole brain, particularly in the parietal and occipital lobes.

  12. Progression of brain atrophy in PSP and CBS over 6 months and 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Shubir; Binney, Richard J; Heuer, Hilary W; Luong, Phi; Attygalle, Suneth; Bhatt, Priyanka; Marx, Gabe A; Elofson, Jonathan; Tartaglia, Maria C; Litvan, Irene; McGinnis, Scott M; Dickerson, Bradford C; Kornak, John; Waltzman, Dana; Voltarelli, Lisa; Schuff, Norbert; Rabinovici, Gil D; Kramer, Joel H; Jack, Clifford R; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Boxer, Adam L

    2016-11-08

    To examine the utility and reliability of volumetric MRI in measuring disease progression in the 4 repeat tauopathies, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS), to support clinical development of new tau-directed therapeutic agents. Six- and 12-month changes in regional MRI volumes and PSP Rating Scale scores were examined in 55 patients with PSP and 33 patients with CBS (78% amyloid PET negative) compared to 30 normal controls from a multicenter natural history study. Longitudinal voxel-based morphometric analyses identified patterns of volume loss, and region-of-interest analyses examined rates of volume loss in brainstem (midbrain, pons, superior cerebellar peduncle), cortical, and subcortical regions based on previously validated atlases. Results were compared to those in a replication cohort of 226 patients with PSP with MRI data from the AL-108-231 clinical trial. Patients with CBS exhibited greater baseline atrophy and greater longitudinal atrophy rates in cortical and basal ganglia regions than patients with PSP; however, midbrain and pontine atrophy rates were similar. Voxel-wise analyses showed distinct patterns of regional longitudinal atrophy in each group as compared to normal controls. The midbrain/pons volumetric ratio differed between diagnoses but remained stable over time. In both patient groups, brainstem atrophy rates were correlated with disease progression measured using the PSP Rating Scale. Volume loss is quantifiable over a period of 6 months in CBS and PSP. Future clinical trials may be able to combine CBS and PSP to measure therapeutic effects. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  13. Clinical study on eating disorders. Brain atrophy revealed by cranial computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Shinichi

    1988-06-01

    Cranial computed tomography (CT) scans were reviewed in 34 patients with anorexia nervosa (Group I) and 22 with bulimia (Group II) to elucidate the cause and pathological significance of morphological brain alterations. The findings were compared with those from 47 normal women. The incidence of brain atrophy was significantly higher in Group I (17/34, 50%) and Group II (11/22, 50%) than the control group (3/47, 6%). In Group I, there was a significant increase in the left septum-caudate distance, the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure, the width of the both-side Sylvian fissures adjacent to the skull, and the maximum width of the third ventricle. A significant increase in the maximum width of interhemispheric fissure and the width of the left-side Sylvian fissure adjacent to the skull were noted as well in Group II. Ventricular brain ratios were significantly higher in Groups I and II than the control group (6.76 and 7.29 vs 4.55). Brain atrophy did not correlate with age, body weight, malnutrition, eating behavior, depression, thyroid function, EEG findings, or intelligence scale. In Group I, serum cortisol levels after the administration of dexamethasone were correlated with ventricular brain ratio. (Namekawa, K) 51 refs.

  14. Neuroinflammation and brain atrophy in former NFL players: An in vivo multimodal imaging pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jennifer M; Wang, Yuchuan; Munro, Cynthia A; Ma, Shuangchao; Yue, Chen; Chen, Shaojie; Airan, Raag; Kim, Pearl K; Adams, Ashley V; Garcia, Cinthya; Higgs, Cecilia; Sair, Haris I; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Caffo, Brian; Kassiou, Michael; Guilarte, Tomas R; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-02-01

    There are growing concerns about potential delayed, neuropsychiatric consequences (e.g, cognitive decline, mood or anxiety disorders) of sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI). Autopsy studies of brains from a limited number of former athletes have described characteristic, pathologic changes of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) leading to questions about the relationship between these pathologic and the neuropsychiatric disturbances seen in former athletes. Research in this area will depend on in vivo methods that characterize molecular changes in the brain, linking CTE and other sports-related pathologies with delayed emergence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In this pilot project we studied former National Football League (NFL) players using new neuroimaging techniques and clinical measures of cognitive functioning. We hypothesized that former NFL players would show molecular and structural changes in medial temporal and parietal lobe structures as well as specific cognitive deficits, namely those of verbal learning and memory. We observed a significant increase in binding of [(11)C]DPA-713 to the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of brain injury and repair, in several brain regions, such as the supramarginal gyrus and right amygdala, in 9 former NFL players compared to 9 age-matched, healthy controls. We also observed significant atrophy of the right hippocampus. Finally, we report that these same former players had varied performance on a test of verbal learning and memory, suggesting that these molecular and pathologic changes may play a role in cognitive decline. These results suggest that localized brain injury and repair, indicated by increased [(11)C]DPA-713 binding to TSPO, may be linked to history of NFL play. [(11)C]DPA-713 PET is a promising new tool that can be used in future study design to examine further the relationship between TSPO expression in brain injury and repair, selective regional brain atrophy, and the potential link to

  15. Clinical significance of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in computed tomography of the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busse, O.; Agnoli, A.L.; Lippmann, R.; Schuetz, H.J.

    1981-02-01

    The diagnosis of atrophy of the brain based on the visual interpretation of CT findings appears questionable. In 56 patients there was no correlation between the CT findings of enlarged ventricles and sulci and clinical findings of psychoorganic syndromes. Only the group of 60 to 80 year old patients showed a statistically significant correlation between psychoorganic findings and the area of the lateral ventricles - measured planimetrically - and the diameter of the cella medica, but not the group of the 40 to 60 year old. There was no relationship between the number of cortical sulci and psychopathology. The morphological findings of ventricular enlargement and cortical atrophy in CT - even with exact measurements - do not allow any conclusions in regard to psychoorganic findings.

  16. Children experience cognitive decline despite reversal of brain atrophy one year after resolution of Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merke, Deborah P; Giedd, Jay N; Keil, Margaret F; Mehlinger, Sarah L; Wiggs, E A; Holzer, Stuart; Rawson, Erin; Vaituzis, A Catherine; Stratakis, Constantine A; Chrousos, George P

    2005-05-01

    Adults with Cushing syndrome frequently develop brain atrophy, memory impairment, and depression, with partial to complete resolution after cure. The effect of excess glucocorticoid exposure on the brain of children has not been systematically studied. Eleven children (six girls, five boys; ages, 8-16 yr) with endogenous Cushing syndrome seen at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center from 1999-2000 and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects were studied. Cognitive and psychological evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were done before and 1 yr after cure for patients with Cushing syndrome and once for controls. The estimated duration of Cushing syndrome was 4.4 +/- 1.2 yr. When compared with control subjects, children with Cushing syndrome had significantly smaller cerebral volumes (P Cushing syndrome experienced a significant (P brain of children appears to be different from adults. Despite rapid reversibility of cerebral atrophy, children experience a significant decline in cognitive function 1 yr after correction of hypercortisolism.

  17. Hippocampal Sclerosis of Aging, a Common Alzheimer's Disease 'Mimic': Risk Genotypes are Associated with Brain Atrophy Outside the Temporal Lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Saykin, Andrew J; Nelson, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a common brain disease in older adults with a clinical course that is similar to Alzheimer's disease. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have previously shown association with HS-Aging. The present study investigated structural brain changes associated with these SNPs using surface-based analysis. Participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort (ADNI; n = 1,239), with both MRI scans and genotype data, were used to assess the association between brain atrophy and previously identified HS-Aging risk SNPs in the following genes: GRN, TMEM106B, ABCC9, and KCNMB2 (minor allele frequency for each is >30%). A fifth SNP (near the ABCC9 gene) was evaluated in post-hoc analysis. The GRN risk SNP (rs5848_T) was associated with a pattern of atrophy in the dorsomedial frontal lobes bilaterally, remarkable since GRN is a risk factor for frontotemporal dementia. The ABCC9 risk SNP (rs704180_A) was associated with multifocal atrophy whereas a SNP (rs7488080_A) nearby (∼50 kb upstream) ABCC9 was associated with atrophy in the right entorhinal cortex. Neither TMEM106B (rs1990622_T), KCNMB2 (rs9637454_A), nor any of the non-risk alleles were associated with brain atrophy. When all four previously identified HS-Aging risk SNPs were summed into a polygenic risk score, there was a pattern of associated multifocal brain atrophy in a predominately frontal pattern. We conclude that common SNPs previously linked to HS-Aging pathology were associated with a distinct pattern of anterior cortical atrophy. Genetic variation associated with HS-Aging pathology may represent a non-Alzheimer's disease contribution to atrophy outside of the hippocampus in older adults.

  18. Screening of Toll-like receptors expression in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Agander, Tina Klitmøller

    2013-01-01

    their deregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) together with Parkinson's disease belongs to a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions termed α-synucleinopathies. MSA is a fatal late onset disease characterized by the presence of α-synuclein positive glial cytoplasmic...... inclusions in oligodendrocytes. α-Synuclein can act as a danger-associated molecular pattern and alter TLR expression thereby activating inflammatory responses in the brain. In this study, using real-time PCR, we assessed the expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) in selected areas of MSA brains (substantia nigra......, striatum, cerebral cortex, and nucleus dentatus) in comparison with normal controls. We show evidence for increased levels of mRNA-encoding hTLR-3, hTLR-4, and hTLR-5 in substantia nigra, striatum, cerebral cortex, and nucleus dentatus from MSA brains versus normal controls. The levels of expression of h...

  19. Protein synthesis rates in atrophied gastrocnemius muscles after limb immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, K. R.; Seider, M. J.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Noting that protein synthesis declines in the gastrocnemius 6 hr after immobilization, the study sought to detect an increase of protein synthesis when the limb was freed, and to examine the effects of exercise on the rate of increase. Rats were used as subjects, with their hind legs in plaster of Paris in plantar flexion to eliminate strain on the gastrocnemius. Periods of immobilization were varied and samples of blood from the muscle were taken to track protein synthesis rates for different groups in immobilization and exercise regimens (running and weightlifting). Synthesis rates declined 3.6% during time in the cast, then increased 6.3%/day after the casts were removed. Both running and weightlifting were found to increase the fractional rate of protein formation in the gastrocnemius muscle when compared with contralateral muscles that were not exercised and were used as controls, suggesting that the mechanism controlling protein synthesis in skeletal muscles is rapidly responsive to changes in muscular contractile activity.

  20. The effect of disease modifying therapies on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Tsivgoulis

    Full Text Available The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the effect of disease-modifying drugs (DMD on brain atrophy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS using available randomized-controlled trial (RCT data.We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis according to PRISMA guidelines of all available RCTs of patients with RRMS that reported data on brain volume measurements during the study period.We identified 4 eligible studies, including a total of 1819 RRMS patients (71% women, mean age 36.5 years, mean baseline EDSS-score: 2.4. The mean percentage change in brain volume was found to be significantly lower in DMD versus placebo subgroup (standardized mean difference: -0.19; 95%CI: -0.27--0.11; p<0.001. We detected no evidence of heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 30%, p = 0.19 nor publication bias in the Funnel plots. Sensitivity analyses stratifying studies according to brain atrophy neuroimaging protocol disclosed no evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.16. In meta-regression analyses, the percentage change in brain volume was found to be inversely related with duration of observation period in both DMD (meta-regression slope = -0.03; 95% CI: -0.04--0.02; p<0.001 and placebo subgroups (meta-regression slope = -0.05; 95% CI: -0.06--0.04; p<0.001. However, the rate of percentage brain volume loss over time was greater in placebo than in DMD subgroup (p = 0.017, ANCOVA.DMD appear to be effective in attenuating brain atrophy in comparison to placebo and their benefit in delaying the rate of brain volume loss increases linearly with longer treatment duration.

  1. Progression of brain atrophy in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2: A longitudinal tensor-based morphometry study

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Mascalchi; Stefano Diciotti; Marco Giannelli; Andrea Ginestroni; Andrea Soricelli; Emanuele Nicolai; Marco Aiello; Carlo Tessa; Lucia Galli; Maria Teresa Dotti; Silvia Piacentini; Elena Salvatore; Nicola Toschi

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is the second most frequent autosomal dominant inherited ataxia worldwide. We investigated the capability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track in vivo progression of brain atrophy in SCA2 by examining twice 10 SCA2 patients (mean interval 3.6 years) and 16 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (mean interval 3.3 years) on the same 1.5 T MRI scanner. We used T1-weighted images and tensor-based morphometry (TBM) to investigate volume changes and t...

  2. "THE RELATION OF HYPERHOMOCYSTEINEMIA TO COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND BRAIN ATROPHY IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaffarpour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment may be a common even at the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS. In this case-control study, we tried to find out the probable relationship between homocysteine levels and cerebral atrophy or cognitive impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis. One hundred fifty six patients who had MS according to McDonald diagnostic criteria were included in this study. Patients’ age, gender, and educational level, MS duration and clinical type, disability, cognitive function state based on minimental state examination (MMSE, presence of hyperhomocysteinemia, and brain atrophy were evaluated. There was no statistically significant relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and cognitive status. Total homocysteine levels had a significant correlation with MMSE score only in those patients with elementary level of education. Also total homocysteine levels and overall cerebral atrophy did not indicate significant relationship according to those independent variables mentioned above except in the patients with EDSS less than 6. When intercaudate ratio > 0.10 was applied as a criterion for cerebral atrophy, we found that hyperhomocysteinemia related significantly to intercaudate ratio > 0.10 in females, aged between 21 and 30 years, MS duration ≤ 5 years, primary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS clinical types, EDSS ≤ 3 and elementary level of education. We suggest applying MMSE only for the first step of cognitive function survey. In the next steps, much more exact test must be used (e.g. MSNQ. Also we can not suggest measuring plasma homocysteine level as criterion for monitoring the cognitive function in patients with MS.

  3. Objectively measured physical activity, brain atrophy, and white matter lesions in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takehiko; Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-02-01

    Physical activity may help to prevent or delay brain atrophy. Numerous studies have shown associations between physical activity and age-related changes in the brain. However, most of these studies involved self-reported physical activity, not objectively measured physical activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the association between objectively measured physical activity, as determined using accelerometers, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We analyzed 323 older subjects with MCI (mean age 71.4 years) who were recruited from the participants of the Obu Study of Health Promotion for the Elderly. We recorded demographic data and measured physical activity using a tri-axial accelerometer. Physical activity was classified as light-intensity physical activity (LPA) or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Brain atrophy and the severity of white matter lesions (WML) were determined by MRI. Low levels of LPA and MVPA were associated with severe WML. Subjects with severe WML were older, had lower mobility, and had greater brain atrophy than subjects with mild WML (all Pphysical activity, especially MVPA, was associated with brain atrophy in MCI subjects, even after adjusting for WML. These findings support the hypothesis that physical activity plays a crucial role in maintaining brain health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optic atrophy 1 mediates coenzyme Q-responsive regulation of respiratory complex IV activity in brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhide; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Shirasawa, Takuji; Takahashi, Mayumi

    2017-11-01

    The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in brain mitochondria is significantly lower in aged mice than in young mice, and the reduced OCR is rescued by administration of water-solubilized CoQ10 to aged mice via drinking water. However, the mechanism behind this remains unclear. Here, we show that the activity of respiratory complex IV (CIV) in brain mitochondria declined in aged mice than in young mice, with no significant change in individual respiratory complex levels and their supercomplex assembly. Reduced CIV activity in the aged mice coincided with reduced binding of optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) to CIV. Both reduced activity and OPA1 binding of CIV were rescued by water-solubilized CoQ10 administration to aged mice via drinking water. OCR and the activity and OPA1 binding of CIV in isolated brain mitochondria from aged mice were restored by incubation with CoQ10, but not in the presence of 15-deoxy-prostaglandin J2, an inhibitor of a GTPase effector domain-containing GTPase such as OPA1 and DRP1. By contrast, the CoQ10-responsive restoration of OCR in the isolated mitochondria was not inhibited by Mdivi-1, a selective inhibitor of DRP1. Thus, we propose a novel function of OPA1 in regulating the CIV activity in brain mitochondria in response to CoQ10. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neither retinal nor brain atrophy can be shown in patients with isolated unilateral optic neuritis at the time of presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Sander, Birgit; Tsakiri, Anna;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) may be the earliest manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Atrophy has been shown to be a prominent feature of MS with great impact on disability. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate retinal and brain atrophy and possi......BACKGROUND: Acute monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) may be the earliest manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Atrophy has been shown to be a prominent feature of MS with great impact on disability. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate retinal and brain atrophy...... and possible associations at the earliest possible stages of MS. METHODS: In a prospective observational cohort study we included 60 untreated patients with monosymptomatic ON and 19 healthy volunteers. Unaffected fellow eyes were examined with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and normalized brain volumes...... were calculated based on MRI. Additionally, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded. RESULTS: Neither OCT measurements nor brain volume measures revealed signs of localized or generalized atrophy in patients compared with healthy volunteers. Stratification of patients into high risk based...

  6. Progressive brain atrophy in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome with a SETBP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akihito; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Fujinaga, Shoko; Morita, Hirosuke; Shimizu, Junya; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Kubo, Toshihide

    2015-08-01

    Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare congenital malformation syndrome. Recently, SETBP1 was identified as the causative gene. Herein, we present a Japanese boy with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome resulting from a novel mutation in SETBP1 in order to establish the clinical features and serial MRI findings associated with the syndrome. On the third day of life, the boy was referred to our hospital because of facial abnormalities and feeding difficulty. Midfacial retraction, frontal bossing, deep groove under the eyes, upturned nose, low-set ears, bilateral cryptorchidism, and generalized hypertrichosis were identified on admission. At the age of 7 months, epileptic spasms in series occurred. Based on characteristic facial and skeletal abnormalities and severe developmental delay, we clinically diagnosed him with Schinzel-Giedion syndrome. Direct sequencing of the SETBP1 gene revealed a heterozygous mutation (p.Ile871Ser) in exon 4. Although neither cardiac defect nor choanal stenosis were present in our case, the phenotype of our case was nearly identical to those of previously reported cases confirmed by genetic analysis. Serial MRI from the age of 1 month-3 years revealed progressive brain atrophy, especially in the white matter and basal ganglia. However, myelination was age-appropriate and no obvious abnormal signals in the white matter were seen. Diffusion weighted imaging revealed no abnormal findings. Accumulation of MRI data including diffusion weighted imaging from Schinzel-Giedion syndrome cases is needed to understand the mechanism underlying progressive brain atrophy in this syndrome.

  7. Critical levels of brain atrophy associated with homocysteine and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Celeste A

    2014-09-01

    Few B-vitamin trials to lower homocysteine (Hcy) have reported evidence of beneficial effects on cognition in older adults with cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. This article reviews the role of Hcy in cognitive decline. It also considers some reasons why meta-analyses have failed to find effects of B-vitamin treatment. Findings from the successful VITACOG trial are examined from a new perspective of critical levels of Hcy and brain atrophy that may impact on the efficacy of B-vitamin treatment. It appears that there is a critical level of brain shrinkage, possibly mediated by elevated Hcy, which when reached, results in cognitive decline, especially in episodic memory performance. Supplements, food sources, and effects of folic acid fortification are discussed in relation to B12 deficiency.

  8. Increased brain iron deposition is a risk factor for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis: a combined study of quantitative susceptibility mapping and whole brain volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chao; Zhang, Mengjie; Long, Miaomiao; Chu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Tong; Wang, Lijun; Guo, Yu; Yan, Shuo; Haacke, E Mark; Shen, Wen; Xia, Shuang

    2015-08-01

    To explore the correlation between increased brain iron deposition and brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis and their correlation with clinical biomarkers and neuropsychological test. Forty two patients with haemodialysis and forty one age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this prospective study. 3D whole brain high resolution T1WI and susceptibility weighted imaging were scanned on a 3 T MRI system. The brain volume was analyzed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in patients and to compare with that of healthy controls. Quantitative susceptibility mapping was used to measure and compare the susceptibility of different structures between patients and healthy controls. Correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationship between the brain volume, iron deposition and neuropsychological scores. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to explore the effect of clinical biomarkers on the brain volumes in patients. Compared with healthy controls, patients with haemodialysis showed decreased volume of bilateral putamen and left insular lobe (All P putamen, substantia nigra, red nucleus and dentate nucleus were significantly higher (All P putamen (P putamen (P < 0.05). Our study indicated increased brain iron deposition and dialysis duration was risk factors for brain atrophy in patients with haemodialysis. The decreased gray matter volume of the left insular lobe was correlated with neurocognitive impairment.

  9. Association of white-matter lesions with brain atrophy markers: the three-city Dijon MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [Inserm U708 ' Neuroepidemiology' , Paris (France); Godin, O.; Alperovitch, A.; Tzourio, Ch.; Dufouil, C. [UPMC University Paris 6 (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CNRS, CI-NAPS UMR6232 (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [CEA, DSV/I2BM/CI-NAPS (France); Maillard, P.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B. [Universite de Caen Basse-Normande (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier et Universitaire de Caen, Caen (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: Brain atrophy and white-matter lesions (WML) are common features at cerebral MRI of both normal and demented elderly people. In a population-based study of 1, 792 elderly subjects aged 65-80 years, free of dementia, who had a cerebral MRI at entry, we investigated the relationship between WML volume and brain atrophy markers estimated by hippocampal, gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. Methods: An automated algorithm of detection and quantification of WML was developed, and voxel-based morphometry methods were used to estimate GM, CSF and hippocampal volumes. To evaluate the relation between those volumes and WML load, we used analysis of covariance and multiple linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders and total intracranial volumes. Results: Age was highly correlated with WML load and all brain atrophy markers. Total WML volume was negatively associated with both GM ({beta} = -0.03, p {<=} 0.0001) and hippocampal volumes ({beta} = -0.75, p = 0.0009) and positively with CSF volumes (beta 0.008, p = 0.02) after controlling for sex, age, education level, hypertension and apolipoprotein E genotype. Evidence for a relationship between brain atrophy markers and WML was stronger for periventricular WML. We found that the relationship between WML and hippocampal volumes was independent of other brain tissue volumes. Conclusion: These results suggest that, in the brain of non demented elderly subjects, degenerative processes and vascular changes co-occur and are related independently of vascular risk factors. (authors)

  10. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print ... treatment for the disease's most troubling symptoms. About SMA Normally, healthy nerve cells in the brain called ...

  11. Brain Gray Matter Atrophy after Spinal Cord Injury: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore possible changes in whole brain gray matter volume (GMV after spinal cord injury (SCI using voxel-based morphometry (VBM, and to study their associations with the injury duration, severity, and clinical variables. In total, 21 patients with SCI (10 with complete and 11 with incomplete SCI and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs were recruited. The 3D high-resolution T1-weighted structural images of all subjects were obtained using a 3.0 Tesla MRI system. Disease duration and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA Scale scores were also obtained from each patient. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was carried out to investigate the differences in GMV between patients with SCI and HCs, and between the SCI sub-groups. Associations between GMV and clinical variables were also analyzed. Compared with HCs, patients with SCI showed significant GMV decrease in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral anterior insular cortex, bilateral orbital frontal cortex (OFC, and right superior temporal gyrus. No significant difference in GMV in these areas was found either between the complete and incomplete SCI sub-groups, or between the sub-acute (duration <1 year and chronic (duration >1 year sub-groups. Finally, the GMV of the right OFC was correlated with the clinical motor scores of left extremities in not only all SCI patients, but especially the CSCI subgroup. In the sub-acute subgroup, we found a significant positive correlation between the dACC GMV and the total clinical motor scores, and a significant negative correlation between right OFC GMV and the injury duration. These findings indicate that SCI can cause remote atrophy of brain gray matter, especially in the salient network. In general, the duration and severity of SCI may be not associated with the degree of brain atrophy in total SCI patients, but there may be associations between them in subgroups.

  12. Recommendations to improve imaging and analysis of brain lesion load and atrophy in longitudinal studies of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrenken, H; Jenkinson, M; Horsfield, M A;

    2013-01-01

    Focal lesions and brain atrophy are the most extensively studied aspects of multiple sclerosis (MS), but the image acquisition and analysis techniques used can be further improved, especially those for studying within-patient changes of lesion load and atrophy longitudinally. Improved accuracy...... and sensitivity will reduce the numbers of patients required to detect a given treatment effect in a trial, and ultimately, will allow reliable characterization of individual patients for personalized treatment. Based on open issues in the field of MS research, and the current state of the art in magnetic...... resonance image analysis methods for assessing brain lesion load and atrophy, this paper makes recommendations to improve these measures for longitudinal studies of MS. Briefly, they are (1) images should be acquired using 3D pulse sequences, with near-isotropic spatial resolution and multiple image...

  13. Altered α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin isoform levels in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease-specific transcript......Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease......-specific transcription patterns in frontal cortex in PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and MSA, and thus may mediate the development of α-synucleinopathies. In this study, the differential expression of α-synuclein isoforms on transcriptional and translational levels was ascertained in MSA patients in comparison with PD...... for parkin and synphilin-1 isoforms. In MSA brains, α-synuclein140 and α-synuclein 112 isoform levels were significantly increased, whereas levels of the α-synuclein 126 isoform were decreased in the substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus versus controls. Moreover, in MSA cases...

  14. Healthy brain connectivity predicts atrophy progression in non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Vilaplana, Eduard; Brown, Jesse A; Hubbard, H Isabel; Binney, Richard J; Attygalle, Suneth; Santos-Santos, Miguel A; Miller, Zachary A; Pakvasa, Mikhail; Henry, Maya L; Rosen, Howard J; Henry, Roland G; Rabinovici, Gil D; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-10-01

    Neurodegeneration has been hypothesized to follow predetermined large-scale networks through the trans-synaptic spread of toxic proteins from a syndrome-specific epicentre. To date, no longitudinal neuroimaging study has tested this hypothesis in vivo in frontotemporal dementia spectrum disorders. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that longitudinal progression of atrophy in non-fluent/agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia spreads over time from a syndrome-specific epicentre to additional regions, based on their connectivity to the epicentre in healthy control subjects. The syndrome-specific epicentre of the non-fluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia was derived in a group of 10 mildly affected patients (clinical dementia rating equal to 0) using voxel-based morphometry. From this region, the inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis), we derived functional and structural connectivity maps in healthy controls (n = 30) using functional magnetic resonance imaging at rest and diffusion-weighted imaging tractography. Graph theory analysis was applied to derive functional network features. Atrophy progression was calculated using voxel-based morphometry longitudinal analysis on 34 non-fluent/agrammatic patients. Correlation analyses were performed to compare volume changes in patients with connectivity measures of the healthy functional and structural speech/language network. The default mode network was used as a control network. From the epicentre, the healthy functional connectivity network included the left supplementary motor area and the prefrontal, inferior parietal and temporal regions, which were connected through the aslant, superior longitudinal and arcuate fasciculi. Longitudinal grey and white matter changes were found in the left language-related regions and in the right inferior frontal gyrus. Functional connectivity strength in the healthy speech/language network, but not in the default network, correlated with

  15. Visual assessment of posterior atrophy development of a MRI rating scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koedam, Esther L.G.E.; Scheltens, Philip; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lehmann, Manja; Fox, Nick [UCL Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Flier, Wiesje M. van der [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department Epidemiology and Biostatistics, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barkhof, Frederik; Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, PO Box 7057, MB, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-12-15

    To develop a visual rating scale for posterior atrophy (PA) assessment and to analyse whether this scale aids in the discrimination between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. Magnetic resonance imaging of 118 memory clinic patients were analysed for PA (range 0-3), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (range 0-4) and global cortical atrophy (range 0-3) by different raters. Weighted-kappas were calculated for inter- and intra-rater agreement. Relationships between PA and MTA with the MMSE and age were estimated with linear-regression analysis. Intra-rater agreement ranged between 0.93 and 0.95 and inter-rater agreement between 0.65 and 0.84. Mean PA scores were higher in AD compared to controls (1.6 {+-} 0.9 and 0.6 {+-} 0.7, p < 0.01), and other dementias (0.8 {+-} 0.8, p < 0.01). PA was not associated with age compared to MTA (B = 1.1 (0.8) versus B = 3.1 (0.7), p < 0.01). PA and MTA were independently negatively associated with the MMSE (B = -1.6 (0.5), p < 0.01 versus B = -1.4 (0.5), p < 0.01). This robust and reproducible scale for PA assessment conveys independent information in a clinical setting and may be useful in the discrimination of AD from other dementias. (orig.)

  16. Atrophy-specific MRI brain template for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonov, Vladimir; Coupe, Pierrick; Eskildsen, Simon Fristed

    all subjects (CN, MCI and AD) were selected with uniform distribution of RLVV from 1.0 to 6.0% , resulting in a total of 160 subjects. Our algorithm [3] was modified to perform simultaneous 1) creation of the template and 2) linear regression of image intensity and shape versus RLVV. Results The ratio...... between LVV and ICC yielded values of mean(sd) 2.13(0.72)% for NC, 2.45(0.84)% for MCI and 2.84(0.91)% for AD. The continuous, four dimensional anatomical template was created. For a given RLVV, an appropriate three dimensional anatomical template may be constructed, reflecting the average shape......Background Rapid brain loss is characteristic for the patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer disease (AD) [1]. Increase of the lateral ventricular volume is strongly correlated with the progression of the disease. High variability in the degree of atrophy for subjects with AD...

  17. Longitudinal Assessment of Global and Regional Rate of Grey Matter Atrophy in 1,172 Healthy Older Adults: Modulation by Sex and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crivello, Fabrice; Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie; Tzourio, Christophe; Mazoyer, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the neuroanatomical changes in healthy older adults is important to differentiate pathological from normal brain structural aging. The present study investigated the annualized rate of GM atrophy in a large sample of older participants, focusing on the hippocampus, and searching for modulation by age and sex. In this 4-year longitudinal community cohort study, we used a VBM analysis to estimate the annualized rate of GM loss, at both the global and regional levels, in 1,172 healthy older adults (65–82 years) scanned at 1.5T. The global annualized rate of GM was −4.0 cm3/year (−0.83%/year). The highest rates of regional GM loss were found in the frontal and parietal cortices, middle occipital gyri, temporal cortex and hippocampus. The rate of GM atrophy was higher in women (−4.7 cm3/year, −0.91%/year) than men (−3.3 cm3/year, −0.65%/year). The global annualized rate of GM atrophy remained constant throughout the age range of the cohort, in both sexes. This pattern was replicated at the regional level, with the exception of the hippocampi, which showed a rate of GM atrophy that accelerated with age (2.8%/year per year of age) similarly for men and women. The present study reports a global and regional description of the annualized rate of grey matter loss and its evolution after the age of 65. Our results suggest greater anatomical vulnerability of women in late life and highlight a specific vulnerability of the hippocampus to the aging processes after 65 years of age. PMID:25469789

  18. Brain docosahexaenoic acid [DHA] incorporation and blood flow are increased in chronic alcoholics: a positron emission tomography study corrected for cerebral atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Umhau

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chronic alcohol dependence has been associated with disturbed behavior, cerebral atrophy and a low plasma concentration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22∶6n-3, particularly if liver disease is present. In animal models, excessive alcohol consumption is reported to reduce brain DHA concentration, suggesting disturbed brain DHA metabolism. We hypothesized that brain DHA metabolism also is abnormal in chronic alcoholics. METHODS: We compared 15 non-smoking chronic alcoholics, studied within 7 days of their last drink, with 22 non-smoking healthy controls. Using published neuroimaging methods with positron emission tomography (PET, we measured regional coefficients (K* and rates (J(in of DHA incorporation from plasma into the brain of each group using [1-(11C]DHA, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF using [(15O]water. Data were partial volume error corrected for brain atrophy. Plasma unesterified DHA concentration also was quantified. RESULTS: Mean K* for DHA was significantly and widely elevated by 10-20%, and rCBF was elevated by 7%-34%, in alcoholics compared with controls. Unesterified plasma DHA did not differ significantly between groups nor did whole brain J(in, the product of K* and unesterified plasma DHA concentration. DISCUSSION: Significantly higher values of K* for DHA in alcoholics indicate increased brain avidity for DHA, thus a brain DHA metabolic deficit vis-à-vis plasma DHA availability. Higher rCBF in alcoholics suggests increased energy consumption. These changes may reflect a hypermetabolic state related to early alcohol withdrawal, or a general brain metabolic change in chronic alcoholics.

  19. Reversible brain atrophy and cognitive impairment in an adolescent Japanese patient with primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohara N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nobumasa Ohara,1 Hiroshi Suzuki,1 Akiko Suzuki,1 Masanori Kaneko,1 Masahiro Ishizawa,1 Kazuo Furukawa,1 Takahiro Abe,1 Yasuhiro Matsubayashi,1 Takaho Yamada,1 Osamu Hanyu,1 Takayoshi Shimohata,2 Hirohito Sone1 1Department of Hematology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan; 2Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan Abstract: Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is an endocrine disease resulting from chronic exposure to excessive glucocorticoids produced in the adrenal cortex. Although the ultimate outcome remains uncertain, functional and morphological brain changes are not uncommon in patients with this syndrome, and generally persist even after resolution of hypercortisolemia. We present an adolescent patient with Cushing’s syndrome who exhibited cognitive impairment with brain atrophy. A 19-year-old Japanese male visited a local hospital following 5 days of behavioral abnormalities, such as money wasting or nighttime wandering. He had hypertension and a 1-year history of a rounded face. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed apparently diffuse brain atrophy. Because of high random plasma cortisol levels (28.7 µg/dL at 10 AM, he was referred to our hospital in August 2011. Endocrinological testing showed adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent hypercortisolemia, and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a 2.7 cm tumor in the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent left adrenalectomy in September 2011, and the diagnosis of cortisol-secreting adenoma was confirmed histologically. His hypertension and Cushingoid features regressed. Behavioral abnormalities were no longer observed, and he was classified as cured of his cognitive disturbance caused by Cushing’s syndrome in February 2012. MRI performed 8 months after surgery revealed reversal of brain atrophy, and his subsequent course has been uneventful. In summary, the young age at onset and the

  20. Brain atrophy and neuropsychological outcome after treatment of ruptured anterior cerebral artery aneurysms: a voxel-based morphometric study

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    Bendel, Paula; Koskenkorva, Paeivi; Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koivisto, Timo; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurosurgery, Kuopio (Finland); Niskanen, Eini [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Haenninen, Tuomo [Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Cognitive impairment after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is frequently detected. Here, we describe the pattern of cerebral (gray matter) atrophy and its clinical relevance after treatment of aSAH caused by a ruptured anterior cerebral artery (ACA) aneurysm. Thirty-seven aSAH patients with ACA aneurysm (17 surgical, 20 endovascular treatment) and a good or moderate clinical outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale V or IV) and 30 controls underwent brain MRI. Voxel-based morphometric analysis was applied to compare the patients and controls. Patients also underwent a detailed neuropsychological assessment. The comparisons between controls and either all patients (n=37) or the subgroup of surgically treated patients (n=17) revealed bilateral cortical atrophy in the frontal lobes, mainly in the basal areas. The brainstem, bilateral thalamic and hypothalamic areas, and ipsilateral caudate nucleus were also involved. Small areas of atrophy were detected in temporal lobes. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus showed atrophy ipsilateral to the surgical approach. In the subgroup of endovascularly treated patients (n = 15), small areas of atrophy were detected in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex and in the thalamic region. Twenty patients (54%) showed cognitive deficits in neuropsychological assessment. Group analysis after aSAH and treatment of the ruptured ACA aneurysm revealed gray matter atrophy, principally involving the frontobasal cortical areas and hippocampus ipsilateral to the surgical approach. Areas of reduced gray matter were more pronounced after surgical than endovascular treatment. Together with possible focal cortical infarctions and brain retraction deficits in individual patients, this finding may explain the neuropsychological disturbances commonly detected after treatment of ruptured ACA aneurysms. (orig.)

  1. Ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy in patients with Parkinson's disease with incipient dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camicioli, Richard; Sabino, Jennifer; Gee, Myrlene; Bouchard, Thomas; Fisher, Nancy; Hanstock, Chris; Emery, Derek; Martin, W R Wayne

    2011-07-01

    Age-related ventricular enlargement is accelerated in Alzheimer's disease, but its relationship to cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease is less clear, even though dementia is common in Parkinson's disease. Our goals were to determine if greater enlargement of the ventricles and gray or white matter atrophy occurred in Parkinson's disease patients developing cognitive decline. Older nondemented patients with Parkinson's disease (33) and age- and sex-matched controls (39) were recruited and prospectively assessed for the development of significant cognitive decline over 36 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was obtained every 18 months, and ventricular volume and total brain gray and white matter volumes were measured using reliable segmentation of T1-weighted volumetric scans. Subjects with incidental intracranial abnormalities, an atypical course, and stroke as well as dropouts were excluded from a cohort of 52 patients and 50 controls. Among 33 patients and 39 controls, 10 patients and 3 controls developed significant cognitive impairment or dementia. Ventricular change and Parkinson's disease status were significantly associated with dementia. Ventricular change was significantly correlated with change in Mini-Mental Status Examination in the Parkinson's disease with dementia group (r = 0.87, P = .001). Gray matter atrophy was greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia, with similar change over time in both Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia. White matter volumes were not significantly different between Parkinson's disease and Parkinson's disease with dementia; however, the decrease over time might be greater in Parkinson's disease with dementia. Ventricular dilatation occurs early in the course of significant cognitive decline in patients with Parkinson's disease, possibly reflecting both cortical gray and white matter loss.

  2. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  3. Post-mortem Findings in Huntington’s Deep Brain Stimulation: A Moving Target Due to Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Hilliard, Justin D.; Carbunaru, Samuel; Yachnis, Anthony T.; Bloom, Joshua; Keeling, Peyton; Awe, Lisa; Foote, Kelly D.; Okun, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to be effective for Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and primary dystonia. However, mixed results have been reported in Huntington’s disease (HD). Case Report A single case of HD DBS was identified from the University of Florida DBS Brain Tissue Network. The clinical presentation, evolution, surgical planning, DBS parameters, clinical outcomes, and brain pathological changes are summarized. Discussion This case of HD DBS revealed that chorea may improve and be sustained. Minimal histopathological changes were noted around the DBS leads. Severe atrophy due to HD likely changed the DBS lead position relative to the internal capsule. PMID:27127722

  4. Effect of the cognitive rehabilitation in patients with mild cognitive impairment and identified brain atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Nilius

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objective of this study was to analyse the development of cognitive functions and effect of cognitive rehabilitation on patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, as a result of brain atrophy. Design: A quantitative non-randomized intervention study on a control sample of patients. Methods: The effect was observed in a group of patients ranging 59-91 years of age (N = 36. Only patients fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of mild cognitive disorder diagnosed by tomography (CT that had undergone 22 sessions, were involved in the clinical sample (n = 21. The control sample (n = 15 consisted of patients without any neurological diagnosis and who did not undergo cognitive sessions. Results: The effect of cognitive rehabilitation was measured by Addenbrooke's cognitive test, revised in 2010 (ACE-R; affective changes were measured by Beck´s scale of depression BDI-2 and by a scale used to detect anxiety and depression: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Subjective change and improvement were observed using the Clinical Global Impression (CGI psychiatric scale. Changes in the functional state of patients were measured by means of the activities of daily living scale (ADL, including the instrumental version (IADL. The effect was examined in the form of entry and output tests, which were verified by statistical analysis, a significant level being p > 0.05. Conclusions: Significant differences in verbal tests and ACE-R were observed in the clinical sample of patients. Some significant changes were observed in the field of affective symptoms, according to the HADS and BDI-2. The clinical sample showed a significant improvement in subjective clinical state (CGI. The ADL and IADL questionnaires seem to have been inadequate for purpose due to their low sensitivity. The effect of cognitive rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with mild cognitive disorder can be seen and verified in comparison with the control sample

  5. Association of retinal and macular damage with brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dörr

    Full Text Available Neuroaxonal degeneration in the central nervous system contributes substantially to the long term disability in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. However, in vivo determination and monitoring of neurodegeneration remain difficult. As the widely used MRI-based approaches, including the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF have some limitations, complementary in vivo measures for neurodegeneration are necessary. Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a potent tool for the detection of MS-related retinal neurodegeneration. However, crucial aspects including the association between OCT- and MRI-based atrophy measures or the impact of MS-related parameters on OCT parameters are still unclear. In this large prospective cross-sectional study on 104 relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients we evaluated the associations of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT and total macular volume (TMV with BPF and addressed the impact of disease-determining parameters on RNFLT, TMV or BPF. BPF, normalized for subject head size, was estimated with SIENAX. Relations were analyzed primarily by Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE models considering within-patient inter-eye relations. We found that both RNFLT (p = 0.019, GEE and TMV (p = 0.004, GEE associate with BPF. RNFLT was furthermore linked to the disease duration (p<0.001, GEE but neither to disease severity nor patients' age. Contrarily, BPF was rather associated with severity (p<0.001, GEE than disease duration and was confounded by age (p<0.001, GEE. TMV was not associated with any of these parameters. Thus, we conclude that in RRMS patients with relatively short disease duration and rather mild disability RNFLT and TMV reflect brain atrophy and are thus promising parameters to evaluate neurodegeneration in MS. Furthermore, our data suggest that RNFLT and BPF reflect different aspects of MS. Whereas BPF best reflects disease severity, RNFLT might be the better parameter for monitoring axonal

  6. Multiple sclerosis patients lacking oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid have less global and regional brain atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Voevodskaya, Olga; Imrell, Kerstin; Stawiarz, Leszek; Spulber, Gabriela; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Hillert, Jan; Westman, Eric; Karrenbauer, Virginija Danylaité

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with and without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCB) differ in brain atrophy. Twenty-eight OCB-negative and thirty-five OCB-positive patients were included. Larger volumes of total CSF and white matter (WM) lesions; smaller gray matter (GM) volume in the basal ganglia, diencephalon, cerebellum, and hippocampus; and smaller WM volume in corpus callosum, periventricular-deep WM, brainstem, and cerebellum, were observed in OCB-positives. OCB-negative patients, known to differ genetically from OCB-positives, are characterized by less global and regional brain atrophy. This finding supports the notion that OCB-negative MS patients may represent a clinically relevant MS subgroup. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Emily N.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Cash, David M.; Malone, Ian B.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K.; Sudre, Carole H.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T.; Fox, Nick C.; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5‐T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27933676

  8. White matter hyperintensities are associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiford, Cassidy M; Manning, Emily N; Bartlett, Jonathan W; Cash, David M; Malone, Ian B; Ridgway, Gerard R; Lehmann, Manja; Leung, Kelvin K; Sudre, Carole H; Ourselin, Sebastien; Biessels, Geert Jan; Carmichael, Owen T; Fox, Nick C; Cardoso, M Jorge; Barnes, Josephine

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates relationships between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology markers, and brain and hippocampal volume loss. Subjects included 198 controls, 345 mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 154 AD subjects with serial volumetric 1.5-T MRI. CSF Aβ42 and total tau were measured (n = 353). Brain and hippocampal loss were quantified from serial MRI using the boundary shift integral (BSI). Multiple linear regression models assessed the relationships between WMHs and hippocampal and brain atrophy rates. Models were refitted adjusting for (a) concurrent brain/hippocampal atrophy rates and (b) CSF Aβ42 and tau in subjects with CSF data. WMH burden was positively associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.002) and MCI subjects (P = 0.03), and with brain atrophy rate in controls (P = 0.03). The associations with hippocampal atrophy rate remained following adjustment for concurrent brain atrophy rate in controls and MCIs, and for CSF biomarkers in controls (P = 0.007). These novel results suggest that vascular damage alongside AD pathology is associated with disproportionately greater hippocampal atrophy in nondemented older adults. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cortical volumes and atrophy rates in FTD-3 CHMP2B mutation carriers and related non-carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon F; Østergaard, Lasse R; Rodell, Anders B;

    2008-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia constitutes the third most prevalent neurodegenerative disease with dementia. We compared cortical structural changes in nine presymptomatic CHMP2B frontotemporal dementia mutation positive individuals with seven mutation negative family members. Using serial MRI scans...... with a mean interval of 16 months and surface based cortical segmentation we measured cortical thickness and volume, and quantified atrophy rates. Cortical thickness and atrophy rates were averaged within major lobes and focal effects were determined by parametric statistical maps. The volumetric atrophy...... rates in the presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers were statistically significant, though of a lower magnitude than those previously reported in patients of other types of frontotemporal dementia. Cortical thickness measurements revealed cortical thinning in mutation carriers bilaterally...

  10. Maximum (prior brain size, not atrophy, correlates with cognition in community-dwelling older people: a cross-sectional neuroimaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deary Ian J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain size is associated with cognitive ability in adulthood (correlation ~ .3, but few studies have investigated the relationship in normal ageing, particularly beyond age 75 years. With age both brain size and fluid-type intelligence decline, and regional atrophy is often suggested as causing decline in specific cognitive abilities. However, an association between brain size and intelligence may be due to the persistence of this relationship from earlier life. Methods We recruited 107 community-dwelling volunteers (29% male aged 75–81 years for cognitive testing and neuroimaging. We used principal components analysis to derived a 'general cognitive factor' (g from tests of fluid-type ability. Using semi-automated analysis, we measured whole brain volume, intracranial area (ICA (an estimate of maximal brain volume, and volume of frontal and temporal lobes, amygdalo-hippocampal complex, and ventricles. Brain atrophy was estimated by correcting WBV for ICA. Results Whole brain volume (WBV correlated with general cognitive ability (g (r = .21, P Conclusion The association between brain regions and specific cognitive abilities in community dwelling people of older age is due to the life-long association between whole brain size and general cognitive ability, rather than atrophy of specific regions. Researchers and clinicians should therefore be cautious of interpreting global or regional brain atrophy on neuroimaging as contributing to cognitive status in older age without taking into account prior mental ability and brain size.

  11. Simulating effects of brain atrophy in longitudinal PET imaging with an anthropomorphic brain phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, L. S.; Axelsson, J.; Riklund, K.; Boraxbekk, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET), the presence of volumetric changes over time can lead to an overestimation or underestimation of the true changes in the quantified PET signal due to the partial volume effect (PVE) introduced by the limited spatial resolution of existing PET cameras and reconstruction algorithms. Here, a 3D-printed anthropomorphic brain phantom with attachable striata in three sizes was designed to enable controlled volumetric changes. Using a method to eliminate the non-radioactive plastic wall, and manipulating BP levels by adding different number of events from list-mode acquisitions, we investigated the artificial volume dependence of BP due to PVE, and potential bias arising from varying BP. Comparing multiple reconstruction algorithms we found that a high-resolution ordered-subsets maximization algorithm with spatially variant point-spread function resolution modeling provided the most accurate data. For striatum, the BP changed by 0.08% for every 1% volume change, but for smaller volumes such as the posterior caudate the artificial change in BP was as high as 0.7% per 1% volume change. A simple gross correction for striatal volume is unsatisfactory, as the amplitude of the PVE on the BP differs depending on where in the striatum the change occurred. Therefore, to correctly interpret age-related longitudinal changes in the BP, we must account for volumetric changes also within a structure, rather than across the whole volume. The present 3D-printing technology, combined with the wall removal method, can be implemented to gain knowledge about the predictable bias introduced by the PVE differences in uptake regions of varying shape.

  12. APOE ε4 is associated with disproportionate progressive hippocampal atrophy in AD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily N Manning

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether APOE ε4 carriers have higher hippocampal atrophy rates than non-carriers in Alzheimer's disease (AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI and controls, and if so, whether higher hippocampal atrophy rates are still observed after adjusting for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rates. METHODS: MRI scans from all available visits in ADNI (148 AD, 307 MCI, 167 controls were used. MCI subjects were divided into "progressors" (MCI-P if diagnosed with AD within 36 months or "stable" (MCI-S if a diagnosis of MCI was maintained. A joint multi-level mixed-effect linear regression model was used to analyse the effect of ε4 carrier-status on hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy rates, adjusting for age, gender, MMSE and brain-to-intracranial volume ratio. The difference in hippocampal rates between ε4 carriers and non-carriers after adjustment for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rate was then calculated. RESULTS: Mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rates in ε4 carriers were significantly higher in AD, MCI-P and MCI-S (p≤0.011, all tests compared with ε4 non-carriers. After adjustment for whole-brain atrophy rate, the difference in mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rate between ε4 carriers and non-carriers was reduced but remained statistically significant in AD and MCI-P. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the APOE ε4 allele drives atrophy to the medial-temporal lobe region in AD.

  13. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Stephen J Sawiak

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala. Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  14. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Perumal, Sunthara Rajan; Rudiger, Skye R; Matthews, Loren; Mitchell, Nadia L; McLaughlan, Clive J; Bawden, C Simon; Palmer, David N; Kuchel, Timothy; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala). Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions multiple system atrophy multiple system atrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Multiple system atrophy is a progressive brain disorder that affects movement ...

  16. Cortical atrophy rates in Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment from the AddNeuroMed data collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Westman, Eric; Gwadry-Sridhar, Femida;

    Background: The AddNeuroMed project is a multi-centre European project which aims to identify biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study we measured the rate of cortical atrophy in AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and healthy controls (HC) using MRI. Methods:...

  17. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body in Balance › Vaginal Atrophy Fact Sheet Vaginal Atrophy November, 2011 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors JoAnn ... MD Richard J. Santen, MD What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy is a condition in which the ...

  18. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Braverman

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54, 57.14% central atrophy (N=88, and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69. A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740 was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115. Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787. In the centrum semiovale (CS, reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622. Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002. Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064. Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165. Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087. In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740; high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417; and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166. Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294: the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  19. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Eric R.; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L.; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19–90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  20. Evoked Potentials and Memory/Cognition Tests Validate Brain Atrophy as Measured by 3T MRI (NeuroQuant) in Cognitively Impaired Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Eric R; Blum, Kenneth; Hussman, Karl L; Han, David; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Marin, Gabriela; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smayda, Richard; Gold, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this is the largest study evaluating relationships between 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and P300 and memory/cognitive tests in the literature. The 3T MRI using NeuroQuant has an increased resolution 15 times that of 1.5T MRI. Utilizing NeuroQuant 3T MRI as a diagnostic tool in primary care, subjects (N=169; 19-90 years) displayed increased areas of anatomical atrophy: 34.62% hippocampal atrophy (N=54), 57.14% central atrophy (N=88), and 44.52% temporal atrophy (N=69). A majority of these patients exhibited overlap in measured areas of atrophy and were cognitively impaired. These results positively correlated with decreased P300 values and WMS-III (WMS-III) scores differentially across various brain loci. Delayed latency (p=0.0740) was marginally associated with temporal atrophy; reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in frontal lobes correlated with aging, delayed P300 latency, and decreased visual and working memory (p=0.0115). Aging and delayed P300 latency correlated with lower FA. The correlation between working memory and reduced FA in frontal lobes is marginally significant (p=0.0787). In the centrum semiovale (CS), reduced FA correlated with visual memory (p=0.0622). Lower demyelination correlated with higher P300 amplitude (p=0.0002). Compared to males, females have higher demyelination (p=0.0064). Along these lines, the higher the P300 amplitude, the lower the bilateral atrophy (p=0.0165). Hippocampal atrophy correlated with increased auditory memory and gender, especially in males (p=0.0087). In considering temporal lobe atrophy correlations: delayed P300 latency and high temporal atrophy (p=0.0740); high auditory memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0417); and high working memory and low temporal atrophy (p=0.0166). Central atrophy correlated with aging and immediate memory (p=0.0294): the higher the immediate memory, the lower the central atrophy. Generally, the validation of brain atrophy by P300 and WMS-III could lead to cost

  1. Amyloid-β deposition and regional grey matter atrophy rates in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarro, Lidia; Senjem, Matthew L; Lundt, Emily S; Przybelski, Scott A; Lesnick, Timothy G; Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Boeve, Bradley F; Lowe, Val J; Ferman, Tanis J; Knopman, David S; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Kantarci, Kejal

    2016-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease pathology frequently coexists with Lewy body disease at autopsy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. More than half of patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies have high amyloid-β deposition as measured with (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography. Biomarkers of amyloid-β deposition precede neurodegeneration on magnetic resonance imaging during the progression of Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about how amyloid-β deposition relates to longitudinal progression of atrophy in patients with probable dementia with Lewy bodies. We investigated the associations between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B binding on positron emission tomography and the longitudinal rates of grey matter atrophy in a cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 20), who were consecutively recruited to the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Centre. All patients underwent (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examinations at baseline. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging was performed after a mean (standard deviation) interval of 2.5 (1.1) years. Regional grey matter loss was determined on three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with the tensor-based morphometry-symmetric normalization technique. Linear regression was performed between baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and longitudinal change in regional grey matter volumes from an in-house modified atlas. We identified significant associations between greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio and greater grey matter loss over time in the posterior cingulate gyrus, lateral and medial temporal lobe, and occipital lobe as well as caudate and putamen nuclei, after adjusting for age (P < 0.05). Greater baseline (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B standard unit value ratio was also associated with greater

  2. Evaluation of the progression rate of atrophy lesions in punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) based on autofluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rui; Liu, Limin; Chen, Lei

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the autofluorescence (AF) characteristics of punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) and to evaluate the progression rate of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy lesions in PIC using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Twenty-two eyes of 14 PIC cases and 21 eyes of 21 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) cases which received retinal coagulation as a control group were enrolled in this study. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) and AF were recorded from all patients at 18 months follow-up. The RPE atrophy areas of PIC and laser scars in NPDR were analyzed using the Region Finder software of the Heidelberg Eye Explorer. This software allows direct export of AF images from the database and semi-automated detection of atrophic areas by shadow correction, vessel detection, and selection of seed points. At baseline, both hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescence were observed in the lesions of PIC eyes with a focal elevation of RPE and corresponding disruption of the ellipsoid region of the inner segment ellipsoid zone (EZ). In contrast, hypo-AF was detected when there was a lack of RPE. The mean progression rate of RPE atrophy in PIC and NPDR were 3.735 mm(2)/year (0.056-0.545) and 0.127 mm(2)/year (0.015-0.466), respectively. Compared with the atrophy area in the last visit, the progression rate in PIC was significantly greater than that in NPDR (Z=5.615, P<0.0001). The results of AF reflect the status of PIC and the progression rate of RPE atrophy in PIC, which can be used to predict the progress of PIC noninvasively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Correlation between brain volume change and T2 relaxation time induced by dehydration and rehydration: Implications for monitoring atrophy in clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    Our results show that pseudo-T2 may be used in conjunction with the measures of brain volume to distinguish reversible water fluctuations and irreversible brain tissue loss (atrophy and to investigate disease mechanisms related to neuro-inflammation, e.g., in multiple sclerosis, where edema-related water fluctuations may occur with disease activity and anti-inflammatory treatment.

  4. Variables associated with hippocampal atrophy rate in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosheny, Rachel L; Insel, Philip S; Truran, Diana; Schuff, Norbert; Jack, Clifford R; Aisen, Paul S; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors contributing to hippocampal atrophy rate (HAR) in clinically normal older adults (NC) and participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Longitudinal HAR was measured on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and the contribution of age, gender, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 status, intracranial volume, white matter lesions, and β-amyloid (Aβ) levels to HAR was determined using linear regression. Age-related effects of HAR were compared in Aβ positive (Aβ+) and Aβ negative (Aβ-) participants. Age and Aβ levels had independent effects on HAR in NC, whereas gender, ApoE ε4 status, and Aβ levels were associated with HAR in MCI. In multivariable models, Aβ levels were associated with HAR in NC; ApoE ε4 and Aβ levels were associated with HAR in MCI. In MCI, age was a stronger predictor of HAR in Aβ- versus Aβ+ participants. HAR was higher in Aβ+ participants, but most of the HAR was because of factors other than Aβ status. Age-related effects on HAR did not differ between NC versus MCI participants with the same Aβ status. Therefore, we conclude that even when accounting for other covariates, Aβ status, and not age, is a significant predictor of HAR; and that most of the HAR is not accounted for by Aβ status in either NC or MCI.

  5. The Effect of Disease-Modifying Drugs on Brain Atrophy in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Branger

    Full Text Available The quantification of brain atrophy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS may serve as a marker of disease progression and treatment response. We compared the association between first-line (FL or second-line (SL disease-modifying drugs (DMDs and brain volume changes over time in RRMS.We reviewed clinical trials in RRMS between January 1, 1995 and June 1, 2014 that assessed the effect of DMDs and reported data on brain atrophy in Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database and meeting abstracts. First, we designed a meta-analysis to directly compare the percentage brain volume change (PBVC between FLDMDs and SLDMDs at 24 months. Second, we conducted an observational and longitudinal linear regression analysis of a 48-month follow-up period. Sensitivity analyses considering PBVC between 12 and 48 months were also performed.Among the 272 studies identified, 117 were analyzed and 35 (18,140 patients were included in the analysis. Based on the meta-analysis, atrophy was greater for the use of an FLDMD than that of an SLDMD at 24 months (primary endpoint mean difference, -0.86; 95% confidence interval: -1.57--0.15; P = 0.02. Based on the linear regression analysis, the annual PBVC significantly differed between SLDMDs and placebo (-0.27%/y and -0.50%/y, respectively, P = 0.046 but not between FLDMDs (-0.33%/y and placebo (P = 0.11 or between FLDMDs and SLDMDs (P = 0.49. Based on sensitivity analysis, the annual PBVC was reduced for SLDMDs compared with placebo (-0.14%/y and -0.56%/y, respectively, P<0.001 and FLDMDs (-0.46%/y, P<0.005, but no difference was detected between FLDMDs and placebo (P = 0.12.SLDMDs were associated with reduced PBVC slope over time in RRMS, regardless of the period considered. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying atrophy progression in RRMS.

  6. Relationship between brain atrophy estimated by a longitudinal computed tomography study and blood pressure control in patients with essential hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamano, Shigeru; Sawai, Fuyuki; Yamamoto, Yuta [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)] [and others

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between blood pressure control and the progression of brain atrophy in the elderly, patients with essential hypertension and brain atrophy were longitudinally evaluated using computerized tomography (CT). The study evaluated 48 patients with essential hypertension aged 46-78 years, and 30 sex- and age-matched normotensive control subjects. The extent of brain atrophy as determined by caudate head index (CHI), the inverse cella media index (iCMI), and Evans` ratio (ER) was estimated twice at an interval of 5-9 years (mean, 6.9 years). The mean annual increases in CHI ({Delta}CHI), iCMI ({Delta}iCMI), and ER ({Delta}ER) were evaluated. Mean blood volume in the common carotid artery (BF) and the decrease in BF per year ({Delta}BF) were also determined. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER increased with age in the hypertensive subjects as well as the control group across all age groups evaluated. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly greater in the patients with essential hypertension in their 50s as compared with the controls. In patients with essential hypertension aged 65 years or older, the {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly lower in the group in whom the blood pressure was controlled within the range of borderline hypertension than the groups in which it was controlled in the range of normal or mild hypertension. In the younger patients under the age of 65 with essential hypertension, blood pressure control did not affect the {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER. The {Delta}CHI, {Delta}iCMI, and {Delta}ER were significantly correlated with {Delta}BF in both groups. These findings indicate that control of systolic blood pressure within the range of borderline hypertension may delay the progression of brain atrophy in elderly patients with essential hypertension. (author)

  7. Regional brain atrophy and functional connectivity changes related to fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Javier Cruz Gómez

    Full Text Available Fatigue is one of the most frequent symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS, and recent studies have described a relationship between the sensorimotor cortex and its afferent and efferent pathways as a substrate of fatigue. The objectives of this study were to assess the neural correlates of fatigue in MS through gray matter (GM and white matter (WM atrophy, and resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC of the sensorimotor network (SMN. Eighteen healthy controls (HCs and 60 relapsing-remitting patients were assessed with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS. Patients were classified as fatigued (F or nonfatigued (NF. We investigated GM and WM atrophy using voxel-based morphometry, and rs-FC changes with a seed-based method and independent component analysis (ICA. F patients showed extended GM and WM atrophy focused on areas related to the SMN. High FSS scores were associated with reductions of WM in the supplementary motor area. Seed analysis of GM atrophy in the SMN showed that HCs presented increased rs-FC between the primary motor and somatosensory cortices while patients with high FSS scores were associated with decreased rs-FC between the supplementary motor area and associative somatosensory cortex. ICA results showed that NF patients presented higher rs-FC in the primary motor cortex compared to HCs and in the premotor cortex compared to F patients. Atrophy reduced functional connectivity in SMN pathways and MS patients consequently experienced high levels of fatigue. On the contrary, NF patients experienced high synchronization in this network that could be interpreted as a compensatory mechanism to reduce fatigue sensation.

  8. Heart rate circadian profile in the differential diagnosis between Parkinson disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilleri, Manuela; Levedianos, Giorgio; Weis, Luca; Gasparoli, Elisabetta; Facchini, Silvia; Biundo, Roberta; Formento-Dojot, Patrizia; Antonini, Angelo

    2014-02-01

    Clinical diagnostic criteria indicate presence of autonomic features as the primary hallmark of Multiple System Atrophy (MSA). However involvement of the autonomic system is also a recognized feature of Parkinson's Disease (PD), yielding a broad clinical overlap between the two diseases. Laboratory assessments may help in the differential diagnosis between PD and MSA. Ambulatory Monitoring of Blood Pressure (AMBP) is a suitable tool to study the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Different studies reported a reduction of physiological BP nocturnal dipping in PD and MSA patients, but failed to identify a distinctive pattern discriminating the two diseases. On the other hand, HR nocturnal behavior has not been exhaustively analyzed. In the present study we compared the profiles of HR circadian rhythm in 61 PD and 19 MSA patients who underwent 24 h AMBP. We found higher nocturnal HR (nHR) (71.5 beats/min ± 7.4) in MSA compared with PD (63.8 beats/min ± 9.6) as well as significantly lower nocturnal decline of HR (ndHR) in MSA (7.3% ± 8.2) vs. PD (14% ± 7.5). At a Receiver Operating Curve analysis nHR and ndHR significantly discriminated MSA from PD. nHR showed a sensitivity of 84.2% and a specificity of 62.3% (AUC 0.76; 95% IC 0.65-0.85); ndHR showed a sensitivity of 68% of and a specificity of 77% (AUC 0.72; 95% IC 0.61-0.82). According to our findings, nHR is increased and ndHR is reduced in MSA compared to PD. Moreover, these two indices discriminate between the two diseases with acceptable accuracy.

  9. 'Timed up and go' and brain atrophy: a preliminary MRI study to assess functional mobility performance in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorefice, Lorena; Coghe, G; Fenu, G; Porta, M; Pilloni, G; Frau, J; Corona, F; Sechi, V; Barracciu, M A; Marrosu, M G; Pau, M; Cocco, E

    2017-09-11

    Motor and cognitive disabilities are related to brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS). 'Timed up and go' (TUG) has been recently tested in MS as functional mobility test, as it is able to evaluate ambulation/coordination-related tasks, as well as cognitive function related to mobility. The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain volumes and TUG performances. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of MS and the ability to walk at least 20 m. TUG was performed using a wearable inertial sensor. Times and velocities of TUG sub-phases were calculated by processing trunk acceleration data. Patients underwent to a brain MRI, and volumes of whole brain, white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), and cortical GM (C) were estimated with SIENAX. Sixty patients were enrolled. Mean age was 41.5 ± 11.6 years and mean EDSS 2.3 ± 1.2. Total TUG duration was correlated to lower WM (ρ = 0.358, p = 0.005) and GM (ρ = 0.309, p = 0.017) volumes. A stronger association with lower GM volume was observed for intermediate (ρ = 0.427, p = 0.001) and final turning (ρ = 0.390, p = 0.002). TUG is a useful tool in a clinical setting as it can not only evaluate patients' disability in terms of impaired functional mobility, but also estimate pathological features, such as grey atrophy.

  10. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal atrophy Overview Vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis) is thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls due to your body having less estrogen. Vaginal atrophy occurs most often after ...

  11. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; van Schijndel, R.; Barnes, J.; Boyes, R.G.; Cover, K.S.; Olabarriaga, S.D.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Vrenken, H.; Barkhof, F.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 +/- 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate a

  12. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; van Schijndel, R.; Barnes, J.; Boyes, R.G.; Cover, K.S.; Olabarriaga, S.D.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Vrenken, H.; Barkhof, F.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 +/- 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate a

  13. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluimer, J.D.; van der Flier, W.M.; Karas, G.B.; van Schijndel, R.; Barnes, J.; Boyes, R.G.; Cover, K.S.; Olabarriaga, S.D.; Fox, N.C.; Scheltens, P.; Vrenken, H.; Barkhof, F.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 +/- 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate

  14. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubault, Thomas; Brambati, Simona M; Degroot, Clotilde; Kullmann, Benoît; Strafella, Antonio P; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Chouinard, Sylvain; Monchi, Oury

    2009-12-10

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia). Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC) matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution) and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3) in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  15. Regional brain stem atrophy in idiopathic Parkinson's disease detected by anatomical MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jubault

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the dysfunction of dopaminergic dependent cortico-basal ganglia loops and diagnosed on the basis of motor symptoms (tremors and/or rigidity and bradykinesia. Post-mortem studies tend to show that the destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra constitutes an intermediate step in a broader neurodegenerative process rather than a unique feature of Parkinson's disease, as a consistent pattern of progression would exist, originating from the medulla oblongata/pontine tegmentum. To date, neuroimaging techniques have been unable to characterize the pre-symptomatic stages of PD. However, if such a regular neurodegenerative pattern were to exist, consistent damages would be found in the brain stem, even at early stages of the disease. We recruited 23 PD patients at Hoenn and Yahr stages I to II of the disease and 18 healthy controls (HC matched for age. T1-weighted anatomical scans were acquired (MPRAGE, 1 mm3 resolution and analyzed using an optimized VBM protocol to detect white and grey matter volume reduction without spatial a priori. When the HC group was compared to the PD group, a single cluster exhibited statistical difference (p<0.05 corrected for false detection rate, 4287 mm3 in the brain stem, between the pons and the medulla oblongata. The present study provides in-vivo evidence that brain stem damage may be the first identifiable stage of PD neuropathology, and that the identification of this consistent damage along with other factors could help with earlier diagnosis in the future. This damage could also explain some non-motor symptoms in PD that often precede diagnosis, such as autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders.

  16. Selective brain gray matter atrophy associated with APOE ε4 and MAPT H1 in subjects with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goñi, Joaquín; Cervantes, Sebastián; Arrondo, Gonzalo; Lamet, Isabel; Pastor, Pau; Pastor, María A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our study was to elucidate whether specific patterns of gray matter loss were associated with apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE ε4) and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)-H1) genetic variants in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) at a baseline visit. Gray matter voxel-based morphometry analysis of T1 magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed in 65 amnestic-MCI subjects. MCI APOE ε4 carriers compared with non-carriers showed increased brain atrophy in right hippocampus and rostral amygdala, superior and middle temporal gyrus, and right parietal operculum, including inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal, and supramarginal gyrus. MAPT-H1/H1 MCI carriers showed an increased bilateral atrophy in superior frontal gyri (including frontal eye fields and left prefrontal cortex) and precentral gyrus but also unilateral left atrophy in the inferior temporal gyrus and calcarine gyrus. In addition, MCI subjects carrying both APOE ε4 and MAPT-H1/H1 variants showed gray matter loss in the supplementary motor area and right pre- and postcentral gyri. The effect of APOE ε4 on gray matter loss in right hippocampus suggests that, at least in some AD sub-types, the neuronal vulnerability could be increased in the right hemisphere. The pattern of frontal gray matter loss observed among MCI MAPT H1/H1 carriers has also been found in other tauopathies, suggesting that MCI may share etiological factors with other tauopathies. Frontal and parietal cortex vulnerability was found when adding MAPT H1/H1 and APOE ε4 effects, suggesting a synergistic effect of these variants. These results could be due to changes in APOE ε4 and MAPT expression.

  17. The Risk Factors of Symptomatic Communicating Hydrocephalus After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: The Implication of Brain Atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jung Ho [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Gyu, E-mail: gknife@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chae-Yong [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seung-Sik [Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Hoon [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Song, Sang Woo; Kim, In Kyung; Jung, Hee-Won [Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the effect of brain atrophy on the development of symptomatic communicating hydrocephalus (SCHCP) after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for sporadic unilateral vestibular schwannomas (VS). Methods and Materials: A total of 444 patients with VS were treated with SRS as a primary treatment. One hundred eighty-one patients (40.8%) were male, and the mean age of the patients was 53 {+-} 13 years (range, 11-81 years). The mean follow-up duration was 56.8 {+-} 35.8 months (range, 12-160 months). The mean tumor volume was 2.78 {+-} 3.33 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.03-23.30 cm{sup 3}). The cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricles (CALV), defined as the combined area of the lateral ventricles at the level of the mammillary body, was measured on coronal T1-weighted magnetic resonance images as an indicator of brain atrophy. Results: At distant follow-up, a total of 25 (5.6%) patients had SCHCP. The median time to symptom development was 7 months (range, 1-48 months). The mean CALV was 334.0 {+-} 194.0 mm{sup 2} (range, 44.70-1170 mm{sup 2}). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.988 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.976-0.994; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the CALV had a significant relationship with the development of SCHCP (p < 0.001; odds ration [OR] = 1.005; 95% CI, 1.002-1.007). Tumor volume and female sex also had a significant association (p < 0.001; OR = 1.246; 95% CI, 1.103-1.409; p < 0.009; OR = 7.256; 95% CI, 1.656-31.797, respectively). However, age failed to show any relationship with the development of SCHCP (p = 0.364). Conclusion: Brain atrophy may be related to de novo SCHCP after SRS, especially in female patients with a large VS. Follow-up surveillance should be individualized, considering the risk factors involved for each patient, for prompt diagnosis of SCHCP.

  18. Comparing brain amyloid deposition, glucose metabolism, and atrophy in mild cognitive impairment with and without a family history of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Lisa; Andrews, Randolph D; Matthews, Dawn C

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the degree of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, glucose metabolism, and grey matter volume (GMV) reductions in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients overall and as a function of their parental history of dementia. Ten MCI with maternal history (MH), 8 with paternal history (PH), and 24 with negative family history (NH) received 11C-PiB and 18F-FDG PET and T1-MRI as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Statistical parametric mapping, voxel based morphometry, and Z-score mapping were used to compare biomarkers across MCI groups, and relative to 12 normal controls. MCI had higher PiB retention, hypometabolism, and GMV reductions in Alzheimer-vulnerable regions compared to controls. Biomarker abnormalities were more pronounced in MCI with MH than those with PH and NH. After partial volume correction of PET, Aβ load exceeded hypometabolism and atrophy with regard to the number of regions affected and magnitude of impairment in those regions. Hypometabolism exceeded atrophy in all MCI groups and exceeded Aβ load in medial temporal and posterior cingulate regions of MCI MH. While all three biomarkers were abnormal in MCI compared to controls, Aβ deposition was the most prominent abnormality, with MCI MH having the greatest degree of co-occurring hypometabolism.

  19. Acute onset of brain atrophy and dementia in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Michiko; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Wada, Sae; Ono, Katsuichiro; Ozaki, Shinji; Adachi, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2011-03-01

    A 59-year-old man who was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), achieved a complete response to the induction chemoradiotherapy and received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) (25 Gy at 250 cGy per fraction) in October 2008. Three months later, he complained of anorexia, weight loss, fatigue, and short-term memory loss and developed dementia and systemic muscle weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging in April and July 2009 revealed the progression of the diffuse brain atrophy without evidence of the metastasis of SCLC. Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome was suspected because anti-Hu antibody was detected in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid, but the adverse effects of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy were also suspected as the cause of his neurological disorder.

  20. Physical activity, body mass index, and brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christina P; Raji, Cyrus A; Erickson, Kirk I; Lopez, Oscar L; Becker, James T; Gach, H Michael; Longstreth, W T; Teverovskiy, Leonid; Kuller, Lewis H; Carmichael, Owen T; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a novel imaging biomarker to assess associations between physical activity (PA), body mass index (BMI), and brain structure in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's dementia. We studied 963 participants (mean age: 74.1 ± 4.4 years) from the multisite Cardiovascular Health Study including healthy controls (n = 724), Alzheimer's dementia patients (n = 104), and people with mild cognitive impairment (n = 135). Volumetric brain images were processed using tensor-based morphometry to analyze regional brain volumes. We regressed the local brain tissue volume on reported PA and computed BMI, and performed conjunction analyses using both variables. Covariates included age, sex, and study site. PA was independently associated with greater whole brain and regional brain volumes and reduced ventricular dilation. People with higher BMI had lower whole brain and regional brain volumes. A PA-BMI conjunction analysis showed brain preservation with PA and volume loss with increased BMI in overlapping brain regions. In one of the largest voxel-based cross-sectional studies to date, PA and lower BMI may be beneficial to the brain across the spectrum of aging and neurodegeneration.

  1. 颈动脉狭窄伴局限性皮质脑萎缩22例临床观察%Carotid Stenosis with Limitations of Cortical Brain Atrophy of 22 Cases of Clinical Observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常晓侠

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过回顾22例局限性皮质脑萎缩患者临床病例,探讨颈动脉狭窄和局限性皮质脑萎缩的关联性。方法研究选取发生轻度脑梗死患者22例,对其颈动脉血管狭窄情况进行检查评价。结果患者颈动脉正常侧狭窄率正常的比例为22.7%,发生局限性皮质脑萎缩侧均不同程度存在动脉粥样硬化斑块,血管狭窄程度均在中度以上,显著高于正常侧。结论研究显示颈动脉狭窄和脑部局限性皮质脑萎缩之间存在关联性,临床上应重视对局限性皮质脑萎缩患者的颈动脉血管情况检查,及时掌握病情。%Objective Through the review of 22 patients with localized cortical brain atrophy clinical cases, to explore the correlation of carotid stenosis and limitations of cortical brain atrophy.Methods To study the selection of 22 patients with mild cerebral infarction, to evaluate check its carotid artery stenosis. Results The patients with carotid artery stenosis rate is 22.7% of normal, normal side in limitations of cortical brain atrophy side are different degree of atherosclerosis plaques, vascular stenosis degree above moderate, is significantly higher than the normal side.Conclusion The study shows that carotid stenosis and limitations of cortical brain atrophy, and correlation between clinical should pay attention to the limitations of the carotid artery in patients with cortical brain atrophy inspection, timely grasp the condition.

  2. HIV DNA in CD14+ Reservoirs is Associated with Regional Brain Atrophy in cART-Naïve Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Valcour, Victor G.; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Busovaca, Edgar; Agsalda, Melissa; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Chalermchai, Thep; Fletcher, James L.K.; Tipsuk, Somporn; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Shiramizu, Bruce T.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between regional brain volumes and HIV DNA in peripheral CD14+ cells (monocytes) among HIV-infected individuals naïve to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Design A prospective study of HIV-infected Thai individuals who met Thai national criteria for cART initiation. Enrollment was stratified by HIV DNA in a blinded fashion. Methods CD14+ cells were isolated from peripheral mononuclear cells to high purity (median 91.4% monocytes by flow cytometry), and HIV DNA was quantified by multiplex real-time PCR. Baseline regional brain volumes obtained by T1-weighted 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging were compared between HIV DNA groups using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results We studied 60 subjects with mean (SD) age of 34.7 (7.0) years, CD4 T-lymphocyte count of 232 (137) cells/mm3, and log10 plasma HIV RNA of 4.8 (0.73). Median (IQR) HIV DNA copy number per 106 CD14+ cells was 54 (102). Using our previously determined optimal cut-point of 45 copies/106 cells for this cohort, a threshold value above which CD14+ HIV DNA identified HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), we found that CD14+ HIV DNA ≥ 45 copies/106 cells was associated with reduced volumes of the nucleus accumbens (p = 0.021), brainstem (p = 0.033) and total gray matter (p = 0.045) independently of age, CD4 count and intracranial volume. Conclusion HIV DNA burden in CD14+ monocytes is directly linked to brain volumetric loss. Our findings implicate peripheral viral reservoirs in HIV-associated brain atrophy and support their involvement in the neuropathogenesis of HAND, underscoring the need for therapies that target these cells. PMID:25232899

  3. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and increased brain atrophy in early stages of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of oligoclonal bands (OB at early stages of multiple sclerosis was associated with higher brain atrophy, when compared with patients without OB. METHODS: Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS patients with less than two years of disease onset and OB detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were included. SIENAX was used for total brain volume (TBV, gray matter volume (GMV, and white matter volume (WMV. RESULTS: Forty patients were included, 29 had positive IgG-OB. No differences were found between positive and negative patients in gender, expanded disability status scale (EDSS, treatment received, and T2/T1 lesion load. TBV in positive IgG-OB patients was 1.5 mm³ x 10(6 compared with 1.64 mm³ x 10(6 in the negative ones (p=0.02. GMV was 0.51 mm³ x 10(6 in positive IgG-OB compared with 0.62 mm³ x 10(6 in negative ones (p=0.002. No differences in WMV (p=0.09 were seen. CONCLUSIONS: IgG-OB in the CSF was related to neurodegeneration magnetic resonance (MR markers in early RRMS.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kennedy spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Kennedy's disease SBMA X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Related ... Natural history of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): a study of 223 Japanese patients. Brain. 2006 ...

  5. Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Brain Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boyle, Christina P.; Raji, Cyrus A.; Erickson, Kirk I.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Becker, James T.; Gach, H. Michael; Longstreth, W T; Teverovskiy, Leonid; Lewis H Kuller; Carmichael, Owen T.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize a novel imaging biomarker to assess the associations between physical activity (PA), body mass index (BMI), and brain structure in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD). We studied 963 participants (mean age: 74.1 ± 4.4) from the multi-site Cardiovascular Health Study including healthy controls (n=724), AD (n=104), and MCI (n=135). Volumetric brain images were processed using tensor-based morphometry for analyzing ...

  6. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy. Exercises may include ones done in a swimming pool to reduce the muscle workload, and other types ... a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the muscle atrophy ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions DRPLA dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy , commonly known as DRPLA , is a progressive brain ...

  8. Olfaction evaluation and correlation with brain atrophy in Bardet-Biedl syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J-J; Noblet, V; Durand, M; Scheidecker, S; Zinetti-Bertschy, A; Foucher, J; Marion, V; Muller, J; Riehm, S; Dollfus, H; Kremer, S

    2014-12-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a well-recognized ciliopathy characterized by cardinal features namely: early onset retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, obesity, hypogonadism, renal and cognitive impairment. Recently, disorders of olfaction (anosmia, hyposmia) have been also described in BBS patients. Moreover, morphological brain anomalies have been reported and prompt for further investigations to determine whether they are primary or secondary to peripheral organ involvement (i.e. visual or olfactory neuronal tissue). The objective of this article is to evaluate olfactory disorders in BBS patients and to investigate putative correlation with morphological cerebral anomalies. To this end, 20 BBS patients were recruited and evaluated for olfaction using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). All of them underwent a structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. We first investigated brain morphological differences between BBS subjects and 14 healthy volunteers. Then, we showed objective olfaction disorders in BBS patients and highlight correlation between gray matter volume reduction and olfaction dysfunction in several brain areas.

  9. Causes and Correlates of Brain Atrophy: A population-based MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. den Heijer (Tom)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In 1906, Alois Alzheimer described for the first time a form of dementia that later became known as Alzheimer’s disease. At necropsy, he had observed that the brain of a 51-year-old woman with progressive cognitive decline was filled with –at that time still anonymous–

  10. Automated detection of brain atrophy patterns based on MRI for the prediction of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Claudia; Teipel, Stefan J.; Oswald, Annahita; Böhm, Christian; Meindl, Thomas; Mourao-Miranda, Janaina; Bokde, Arun W.; Hampel, Harald; Ewers, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have an increased risk to develop Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-based MRI studies have demonstrated that widely distributed cortical and subcortical brain areas show atrophic changes in MCI, preceding the onset of AD-type dementia. Here we developed a novel data mining framework in combination with three different classifiers including support vector machine (SVM), Bayes statistics, and voting feature intervals (VFI) to derive a quantitative index of pattern matching for the prediction of the conversion from MCI to AD. MRI was collected in 32 AD patients, 24 MCI subjects and 18 healthy controls (HC). Nine out of 24 MCI subjects converted to AD after an average follow-up interval of 2.5 years. Using feature selection algorithms, brain regions showing the highest accuracy for the discrimination between AD and HC were identified, reaching a classification accuracy of up to 92%. The extracted AD clusters were used as a search region to extract those brain areas that are predictive of conversion to AD within MCI subjects. The most predictive brain areas included the anterior cingulate gyrus and orbitofrontal cortex. The best prediction accuracy, which was cross-validated via train-and-test, was 75% for the prediction of the conversion from MCI to AD. The present results suggest that novel multivariate methods of pattern matching reach a clinically relevant accuracy for the a priori prediction of the progression from MCI to AD. PMID:19961938

  11. APOE ε4 Is Associated with Disproportionate Progressive Hippocampal Atrophy in AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Emily N.; Barnes, Josephine; Cash, David M.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Leung, Kelvin K.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether APOE ε4 carriers have higher hippocampal atrophy rates than non-carriers in Alzheimer's disease (AD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and controls, and if so, whether higher hippocampal atrophy rates are still observed after adjusting for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rates. Methods MRI scans from all available visits in ADNI (148 AD, 307 MCI, 167 controls) were used. MCI subjects were divided into “progressors” (MCI-P) if diagnosed with AD within 36 months or “stable” (MCI-S) if a diagnosis of MCI was maintained. A joint multi-level mixed-effect linear regression model was used to analyse the effect of ε4 carrier-status on hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy rates, adjusting for age, gender, MMSE and brain-to-intracranial volume ratio. The difference in hippocampal rates between ε4 carriers and non-carriers after adjustment for concurrent whole-brain atrophy rate was then calculated. Results Mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rates in ε4 carriers were significantly higher in AD, MCI-P and MCI-S (p≤0.011, all tests) compared with ε4 non-carriers. After adjustment for whole-brain atrophy rate, the difference in mean adjusted hippocampal atrophy rate between ε4 carriers and non-carriers was reduced but remained statistically significant in AD and MCI-P. Conclusions These results suggest that the APOE ε4 allele drives atrophy to the medial-temporal lobe region in AD. PMID:24878738

  12. Presymptomatic atrophy in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease: A serial MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnunen, Kirsi M; Cash, David M; Poole, Teresa; Frost, Chris; Benzinger, Tammie L S; Ahsan, R Laila; Leung, Kelvin K; Cardoso, M Jorge; Modat, Marc; Malone, Ian B; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J; Marcus, Daniel S; Goate, Alison; Salloway, Stephen P; Correia, Stephen; Sperling, Reisa A; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Mayeux, Richard P; Brickman, Adam M; Martins, Ralph N; Farlow, Martin R; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J; Jack, Clifford R; Schofield, Peter R; McDade, Eric; Weiner, Michael W; Ringman, John M; Thompson, Paul M; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Rossor, Martin N; Ourselin, Sebastien; Fox, Nick C

    2017-07-22

    Identifying at what point atrophy rates first change in Alzheimer's disease is important for informing design of presymptomatic trials. Serial T1-weighed magnetic resonance imaging scans of 94 participants (28 noncarriers, 66 carriers) from the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network were used to measure brain, ventricular, and hippocampal atrophy rates. For each structure, nonlinear mixed-effects models estimated the change-points when atrophy rates deviate from normal and the rates of change before and after this point. Atrophy increased after the change-point, which occurred 1-1.5 years (assuming a single step change in atrophy rate) or 3-8 years (assuming gradual acceleration of atrophy) before expected symptom onset. At expected symptom onset, estimated atrophy rates were at least 3.6 times than those before the change-point. Atrophy rates are pathologically increased up to seven years before "expected onset". During this period, atrophy rates may be useful for inclusion and tracking of disease progression. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Severe brain atrophy after long-term survival seen in siblings with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a mutation in the optineurin gene: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueno Hiroki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Previous studies have shown widespread multisystem degeneration in patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who develop a total locked-in state and survive under mechanical ventilation for a prolonged period of time. However, the disease progressions reported in these studies were several years after disease onset. There have been no reports of long-term follow-up with brain imaging of patients with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at an advanced stage of the disease. We report the cases of siblings with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with homozygous deletions of the exon 5 mutation of the gene encoding optineurin, in whom brain computed tomography scans were followed up for more than 20 years. Case presentation The patients were a Japanese brother and sister. The elder sister was 33 years of age at the onset of disease, which began with muscle weakness of her left lower limb. Two years later she required mechanical ventilation. She became bedridden at the age of 34, and died at the age of 57. A computed tomography scan of her brain at the age of 36 revealed no abnormality. Atrophy of her brain gradually progressed. Ten years after the onset of mechanical ventilation, atrophy of her whole brain, including the cerebral cortex, brain stem and cerebellum, markedly progressed. Her younger brother was 36 years of age at the onset of disease, which presented as muscle weakness of his left upper limb. One year later, he showed dysphagia and dysarthria, and tracheostomy ventilation was performed. He became bedridden at the age of 37 and died at the age of 55. There were no abnormal intracranial findings on brain computed tomography scans obtained at the age of 37 years. At the age of 48 years, computed tomography scans showed marked brain atrophy with ventricular dilatation. Subsequently, atrophy of the whole brain rapidly progressed as in his elder sister. Conclusion We conclude that a homozygous deletion

  14. IVIG treatment of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease: a randomised double-blinded exploratory study of the effect on brain atrophy, cognition and conversion to dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kile, Shawn; Au, William; Parise, Carol; Rose, Kimberley; Donnel, Tammy; Hankins, Andrea; Chan, Matthew; Ghassemi, Azad

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) on brain atrophy and cognitive function in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). 50 participant 50-84 years of age with amnestic MCI were administered 0.4 g/kg 10% IVIG or 0.9% saline every 2 weeks for a total of 5 infusions (2 g/kg total dose) in a randomised double-blinded design. MRI brain was completed at baseline, 12  and 24 months. Cognitive testing was completed at baseline and every 4 months. Participants were stratified into early and late (LMCI) MCI stages. Average annualised per cent change in ventricular volume was computed as a measure of brain atrophy. There was significantly less brain atrophy (p=0.037, adjusted for MCI status) in the IVIG group (5.87%) when compared with placebo (8.14%) at 12 months; at 24 months, the reduction in brain atrophy no longer reached statistical significance. The LMCI participants who received IVIG performed better on Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog; p=0.011) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE; p=0.004) at 1 year; these differences were not present after 2 years. There was no difference in conversion to AD dementia between the treatment and control groups after 2 years; however, at 1 year, there were fewer conversions from LMCI to AD dementia in the IVIG group (33.3%) when compared with control group (58.3%). This exploratory study provides limited evidence that a short course of IVIG administered in the MCI stage of AD reduces brain atrophy, prevents cognitive decline in LMCI and delays conversion to AD dementia for at least 1 year; however, this effect of IVIG appears to wane by 2 years. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01300728. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. On Shapley ratings in brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Musegaas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of computing the influence of a neuronal structure in abrain network. Abraham, Kotter, Krumnack, and Wanke (2006 computed this influence by using the Shapley value of a coalitional game corresponding to a directednetwork as a rating. Kotter, Reid, Krumnack, Wanke, and Sporns (2007 appliedthis rating to large-scale brain networks, in particular to the macaque visual cortexand the macaque prefrontal cortex. Our aim is to improve upon the above techniqueby measuring the importance of subgroups of neuronal structures in a different way.This new modelling technique not only leads to a more intuitive coalitional game,but also allows for specifying the relative influence of neuronal structures and adirect extension to a setting with missing information on the existence of certainconnections.

  16. Research and Analysis of CT Images in 100 Cases of Mental Patients of Brain Atrophy%100例精神患者脑萎缩CT图像的分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘炳华; 汪爱妩

    2013-01-01

    目的:找出精神患者脑萎缩的特点及其与精神症状的相关性。方法分析100例精神患者脑萎缩和100例正常人脑萎缩的CT图像,从病因、性别、年龄以及脑萎缩发生部位等方面加以对比。结果研究组主要表现为局限性性脑皮质萎缩,青少年开始发病,性别差异不明显。对照组萎缩年龄主要发生在60岁以上的男性,男性的发病率是女性的两倍[5]。萎缩范围主要是脑皮质和脑白质同时萎缩。结论精神患者的脑萎缩程度与精神病史和精神症状成正比。%Objective to find out the mentallpatient brain atrophy and its correlation with psychiatric symptoms. Methods 100 cases of mentallpatients brain atrophy and 100 cases of normallbrain atrophy of CT image,compared from etiology,gender,age and brain atrophy areas. Results the study group mainly for the cortexes of brain atrophy,juvenile onset,gender dif erence.The controllgroup atrophy age occurs mainly in men over the age of 60,the incidence of male was two times of[5] women. Atrophy is mainly cerebrallcortex and white mat er atrophy at. Conclusion the mentallpatient's degree of brain atrophy and spirituallhistory and mentallsymptoms is proportionallto.

  17. [Slowing down the rate of irreversible age-related atrophy of the thymus gland by atopic autotransplantation of its tissue, subjected to long-term cryoconservation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, A V; Arkhipova, L V; Smirnova, G N; Novoselova, E G; Shpurova, N A; Shishova, N V; Sukhikh, G T

    2010-01-01

    An experimental procedure has been developed enabling to slow down the rate of irreversible atrophy of the thymus gland. The atopic autotransplantation of its tissue subjected to prolonged cryoconservation enables one to inhibit the aging of the organism with respect to several biochemical and immunological indicators.

  18. 脑萎缩对皮质下缺血性血管病患者认知功能的影响%Effect of brain atrophy on the cognition in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童宣霞; 王龙; 周霞; 张超; 方良; 周雅婕; 孙中武

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of brain atrophy on the cognition in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD).Methods A total of 116 SIVD patients were enrolled from the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital, Anhui Medical University between September 2013 and December 2014.Lobar atrophy, leukoaraiosis (LA), lacunar infarcts (LI) and vascular risk factors were analyzed in the 116 SIVD patients who were divided into three groups according to the diagnostic criteria: non-cognitive impairment group (SIVD-NCI) , mild cognitive impairment group (SIVD-MCI) and dement group (SIVD-VaD).All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 3.0-T system.The cognitive functions were evaluated by mini-metal state examination (MMSE), the Cambridge cognitive examination-Chinese version (CAMCOG-C), etc.A widely used visual atrophy rating method (0 to 3) was adopted to rate the severity of frontal, parietal and temporal lobe atrophy.The degree of LA and the numbers of LI in 4 brain regions (frontal, parieto-occipital, temporal, and basal ganglia) were evaluated meanwhile.Results Firstly, both the SIVD-MCI and SIVD-VaD groups showed significantly higher total scores of atrophy, higher frontal lobe atrophy scores, higher LA scores and larger LI numbers than SIVD-NCI (H=6.138, P=0.013;H=45.845, P=0.000;H=36.818, P=0.000;H=37.46, P =0.000).There were no significant differences in temporal lobe atrophy scores between SIVD-NCI group and SIVD-MCI group.Parietal lobe atrophy scores also showed no differences among the three groups.Secondly, as well as total numbers of LI, total scores of atrophy and LA were negatively correlated with SIVD cognition,especially frontal lobe atrophy scores, parieto-occipital LA scores and basal ganglia LI numbers had a remarkable negative correlation with MMSE scores, CAMCOG-C scores and partial subitems in CAMCOG-C scores (P < 0.005).However temporal LI numbers was absence of correlation with MMSE scores

  19. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141-150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Fronto-striatal atrophy correlates of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia (FTD and Alzheimer's disease (AD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Seok Yi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Behavioural disturbances in frontotemporal dementia (FTD are thought to reflect mainly atrophy of cortical regions. Recent studies suggest that subcortical brain regions, in particular the striatum, are also significantly affected and this pathology might play a role in the generation of behavioural symptoms. Objective: To investigate prefrontal cortical and striatal atrophy contributions to behavioural symptoms in FTD. Methods: One hundred and eighty-two participants (87 FTD patients, 39 AD patients and 56 controls were included. Behavioural profiles were established using the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory Revised (CBI-R and Frontal System Behaviour Scale (FrSBe. Atrophy in prefrontal (VMPFC, DLPFC and striatal (caudate, putamen regions was established via a 5-point visual rating scale of the MRI scans. Behavioural scores were correlated with atrophy rating scores. Results: Behavioural and atrophy ratings demonstrated that patients were significantly impaired compared to controls, with bvFTD being most severely affected. Behavioural-anatomical correlations revealed that VMPFC atrophy was closely related to abnormal behaviour and motivation disturbances. Stereotypical behaviours were associated with both VMPFC and striatal atrophy. By contrast, disturbance of eating was found to be related to striatal atrophy only. Conclusion: Frontal and striatal atrophy contributed to the behavioural disturbances seen in FTD, with some behaviours related to frontal, striatal or combined fronto-striatal pathology. Consideration of striatal contributions to the generation of behavioural disturbances should be taken into account when assessing patients with potential FTD.

  1. Prevalence of brain atrophy in dogs submitted to cranial tomography in FMVZ - UNESP Botucatu: retrospective study; Prevalencia de atrofia cerebral em caes submetidos a tomografia craniana na FMVZ - UNESP Botucatu: estudo retrospectivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babicsak, Viviam Rocco; Belotta, Alexandra Frey; Oliveira, Hugo Salvador de; Zardo, Karen Maciel; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Mamprim, Maria Jaqueline; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos, E-mail: viviam.babicsak@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMVZ/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia . Dept. de Reproducao Animal e Radiologia Veterinaria

    2012-07-01

    Brain atrophy is diagnosed by imaging methods that allow the verification of the widening of cerebral sulci and ventricular dilatation. In this retrospective study, in which the cranial CT scans of 150 dogs were evaluated, brain atrophy was identified in 16 animals. Mixed breed dogs were the most affected, followed by poodles, maltese, dachshunds, yorkshires, pinschers and cockers. Brain atrophy was observed in animals of all age groups, being more prevalent in middle aged dogs followed by elderly animals, in which this alteration can be commonly found. The identification of reduced brain volume, however, may not be the cause of neurological signs expressed by animals since in some dogs of this study it was considered a finding. (author)

  2. Neuropsychiatric Symptom Clusters in Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack by Cognitive Status and Stroke Subtype: Frequency and Relationships with Vascular Lesions, Brain Atrophy and Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian; Lau, Alexander Y. L.; Yang, Jie; Wang, Zhaolu; Liu, Wenyan; Lam, Bonnie Y. K.; Au, Lisa; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Xiong, Yun-yun; Lo, Eugene S. K.; Law, Lorraine S. N.; Leung, Thomas W. H.; Lam, Linda C. W.; Chan, Anne Y. Y.; Soo, Yannie O. Y.; Leung, Eric Y. L.; Wong, Lawrence K. S.; Mok, Vincent C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The objectives of this study are 1) to examine the frequencies of neuropsychiatric symptom clusters in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) by cognitive level and stroke subtype; and 2) to evaluate effect of demographic, clinical, and neuroimaging measures of chronic brain changes and amyloid upon neuropsychiatric symptom clusters. Methods Hospital-based, cross-sectional study. 518 patients were administered the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) 3–6 months post index admission. NPI symptoms were classified into four symptom clusters (Behavioral Problems, Psychosis, Mood Disturbance & Euphoria) derived from a confirmatory factor analysis of the 12 NPI items. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine independent associations between demographic, clinical and neuroimaging measures of chronic brain changes (white matter changes, old infarcts, whole brain atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy [MTLA] and frontal lobe atrophy [FLA]) with the presence of NPI symptoms and all symptom clusters except euphoria. 11C-Pittsburg Compound B Positron Emission Tomography (11C-PiB PET) was performed in 24 patients to measure amyloid retention for Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) pathology. Results 50.6% of the whole sample, including 28.7% cognitively normal and 66.7% of patients with mild cognitive symptoms, had ≥1 NPI symptoms. Frequencies of symptom clusters were largely similar between stroke subtypes. Compared to patients with cardioembolic stroke and intracranial haemorrhage, those with TIA had less frequent mood disturbance. Stroke severity at admission and MTLA were the most robust correlates of symptoms. FLA was associated with behavioral problems cluster only. Frequency of symptom clusters did not differ between patients with and without significant amyloid retention. Conclusion Frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms increased with level of cognitive impairment but was largely similar between stroke subtypes. Stroke severity and MTLA

  3. 精神分裂症智能损害与脑萎缩的关系探讨%A Clinical Study on Relationship between Intelligence Impairment and Brain Atrophy in Schixophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高镇松; 林和文

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between intelligence impairment and brain atro-phy in schixophrenia. Methods 34 cases with schizophrenia were tested intelligence with WAIS-RC andwere examined brain CT. Then, according to CT results, all the subjects were classified into two grups-the brain atrophy group with 28 patients (about 82%) and the non-brain atrophy group with 6 cases(about 18%). The intelligence of the two groups were compared with each other with the control ofnorms. At the same time, the conditions of brain atrophy in different levels were analyzed. Results Thebrain atrophy group showed obviously more intelligence impairment. The lower the intelligent level was ,the higher the incidence of brain atrophy showed, and the severer and broader the brain atrophy was suchas ventricle broadenness, fissure widenness, sulci deeepenness, even the whole brain atrophy.Conclusions There was close relationship between intelligence impairment and brain atrophy in schixo-phrenia. This suggested that the schizophrenics with intelligence impairment existed the basis of brainorganic impairment.%目的探讨精神分裂症智能损害与脑萎缩的关系.方法应用WAIS-RC对34例精神分裂症患者进行智力测验,然后按CT结果分为脑萎缩组28例(82%)和非脑萎缩组6例(18%),分别进行智力测验比较并与常模对照,同时分析不同智力水平脑萎缩的情况.结果脑萎缩组的智能损害更明显、智力水平越低、脑萎缩的发生率越高、程度越重、分布越广(如脑室扩大、脑裂增宽、脑沟加深、甚至全脑萎缩).结论精神分裂症智能损害与脑萎缩关系密切,提示精神分裂症智能损害者存在脑器质损害基础.

  4. Usefulness of medial temporal lobe atrophy visual rating scale in detecting Alzheimer′s disease: Preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyeok Heo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Korean version of Mini-Mental Status Examination (K-MMSE and the Korean version of Addenbrooke Cognitive Examination (K-ACE have been validated as quick neuropsychological tests for screening dementia in various clinical settings. Medial temporal atrophy (MTA is an early pathological characteristic of Alzheimer′s disease (AD. We aimed to assess the diagnostic validity of the fusion of the neuropsychological test and visual rating scale (VRS of MTA in AD. Materials and Methods: A total of fifty subjects (25 AD, 25 controls were included. The neuropsychological tests used were the K-MMSE and the K-ACE. T1 axial imaging visual rating scale (VRS was applied for assessing the grade of MTA. We calculated the fusion score with the difference of neuropsychological test and VRS of MTA. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve was used to determine optimal cut-off score, sensitivity and specificity of the fusion scores in screening AD. Results: No significant differences in age, gender and education were found between AD and control group. The values of K-MMSE, K-ACE, CDR, VRS and cognitive function test minus VRS were significantly lower in the AD group than control group. The AUC (Area under the curve, sensitivity and specificity for K-MMSE minus VRS were 0.857, 84% and 80% and for K-ACE minus VRS were 0.884, 80% and 88%, respectively. Those for K-MMSE only were 0.842, 76% and 72% and for K-ACE only were 0.868, 80% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions: The fusion of the neuropsychological test and VRS suggested clinical usefulness in their easy and superiority over neuropsychological test only. However, this study failed to find any difference. This may be because of small numbers in the study or because there is no true difference.

  5. Brain beta-amyloid measures and magnetic resonance imaging atrophy both predict time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Wiste, Heather J; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Weigand, Stephen D; Senjem, Matthew L; Zeng, Guang; Bernstein, Matt A; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Pankratz, Vernon S; Aisen, Paul S; Weiner, Michael W; Petersen, Ronald C; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Knopman, David S

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers of brain Aβ amyloid deposition can be measured either by cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 or Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. Our objective was to evaluate the ability of Aβ load and neurodegenerative atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging to predict shorter time-to-progression from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's dementia and to characterize the effect of these biomarkers on the risk of progression as they become increasingly abnormal. A total of 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment were identified from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The primary outcome was time-to-progression to Alzheimer's dementia. Hippocampal volumes were measured and adjusted for intracranial volume. We used a new method of pooling cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 and Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures to produce equivalent measures of brain Aβ load from either source and analysed the results using multiple imputation methods. We performed our analyses in two phases. First, we grouped our subjects into those who were 'amyloid positive' (n = 165, with the assumption that Alzheimer's pathology is dominant in this group) and those who were 'amyloid negative' (n = 53). In the second phase, we included all 218 subjects with mild cognitive impairment to evaluate the biomarkers in a sample that we assumed to contain a full spectrum of expected pathologies. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment were much more likely to progress to dementia within 2 years than amyloid negative subjects with mild cognitive impairment (50 versus 19%). Among amyloid positive subjects with mild cognitive impairment only, hippocampal atrophy predicted shorter time-to-progression (P mild cognitive impairment were combined (amyloid positive and negative), hippocampal atrophy and Aβ load predicted shorter time-to-progression with comparable power (hazard ratio for an inter

  6. Pain Measurement and Brain Activity: Will Neuroimages Replace Pain Ratings?

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Michael E; Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D.

    2013-01-01

    Arguments made for the advantages of replacing pain ratings with brain imaging data include assumptions that pain ratings are less reliable and objective and that brain image data would greatly benefit the measurement of treatment efficacy. None of these assumptions are supported by available evidence. Self-report of pain is predictable and does not necessarily reflect unreliability or error. Since pain is defined as an experience, magnitudes of its dimensions can be estimated by well establi...

  7. A Subset of Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins from a Multi-Analyte Panel Associated with Brain Atrophy, Disease Classification and Prediction in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Wasim; Aguilar, Carlos; Kiddle, Steven J; Doyle, Orla; Thambisetty, Madhav; Muehlboeck, Sebastian; Sattlecker, Martina; Newhouse, Stephen; Lovestone, Simon; Dobson, Richard; Giampietro, Vincent; Westman, Eric; Simmons, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this exploratory neuroimaging-proteomic study, we aimed to identify CSF proteins associated with AD and test their prognostic ability for disease classification and MCI to AD conversion prediction. Our study sample consisted of 295 subjects with CSF multi-analyte panel data and MRI at baseline downloaded from ADNI. Firstly, we tested the statistical effects of CSF proteins (n = 83) to measures of brain atrophy, CSF biomarkers, ApoE genotype and cognitive decline. We found that several proteins (primarily CgA and FABP) were related to either brain atrophy or CSF biomarkers. In relation to ApoE genotype, a unique biochemical profile characterised by low CSF levels of Apo E was evident in ε4 carriers compared to ε3 carriers. In an exploratory analysis, 3/83 proteins (SGOT, MCP-1, IL6r) were also found to be mildly associated with cognitive decline in MCI subjects over a 4-year period. Future studies are warranted to establish the validity of these proteins as prognostic factors for cognitive decline. For disease classification, a subset of proteins (n = 24) combined with MRI measurements and CSF biomarkers achieved an accuracy of 95.1% (Sensitivity 87.7%; Specificity 94.3%; AUC 0.95) and accurately detected 94.1% of MCI subjects progressing to AD at 12 months. The subset of proteins included FABP, CgA, MMP-2, and PPP as strong predictors in the model. Our findings suggest that the marker of panel of proteins identified here may be important candidates for improving the earlier detection of AD. Further targeted proteomic and longitudinal studies would be required to validate these findings with more generalisability.

  8. Intellectual impairment and brain MRI findings in myotonic dystrophy. With a special reference to hippocampal atrophy and white matter lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Etsuko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yonezawa, Hisashi [Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-08-01

    We performed a correlative study between intellectual impairment, CTG repeat expansion and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including hippocampal atrophy, white matter lesions and ventricular dilatation in 15 patients with myotonic dystrophy (MD). They included 4 males and 11 females aged from 20 to 66 years, averaging 43 years of age and 15 years of duration of illness. Nine patients had intellectual impairment (WAIS-R<80). Negative correlations were found between full scale IQ (FSIQ), duration of illness (p<0.05) and CTG repeat expansion (p<0.05). Compared with normal controls, the patients with MD showed a significant reduction in size of the hippocampal head (p<0.01), which was positively correlated to FSIQ, verbal IQ and performance IQ levels (p<0.05). Ten patients had white matter lesions. Severer white matter lesions tended to be recognized in patients with longer duration of illness and with decreased FSIQ level. These results suggest that hippocampal atrophy and white matter lesions are related to intellectual impairment in patients with MD. (author).

  9. Practical cut-offs for visual rating scales of medial temporal, frontal and posterior atrophy in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, D; Cavallin, L; Larsson, E-M; Muehlboeck, J-S; Mecocci, P; Vellas, B; Tsolaki, M; Kłoszewska, I; Soininen, H; Lovestone, S; Simmons, A; Wahlund, L-O; Westman, E

    2015-09-01

    Atrophy in the medial temporal lobe, frontal lobe and posterior cortex can be measured with visual rating scales such as the medial temporal atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy - frontal subscale (GCA-F) and posterior atrophy (PA) scales, respectively. However, practical cut-offs are urgently needed, especially now that different presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are included in the revised diagnostic criteria. The aim of this study was to generate a list of practical cut-offs for the MTA, GCA-F and PA scales, for both diagnosis of AD and determining prognosis in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and to evaluate the influence of key demographic and clinical factors on these cut-offs. AddNeuroMed and ADNI cohorts were combined giving a total of 1147 participants (322 patients with AD, 480 patients with MCI and 345 control subjects). The MTA, GCA-F and PA scales were applied and a broad range of cut-offs was evaluated. The MTA scale showed better diagnostic and predictive performances than the GCA-F and PA scales. Age, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 status and age at disease onset influenced all three scales. For the age ranges 45-64, 65-74, 75-84 and 85-94 years, the following cut-offs should be used. MTA: ≥1.5, ≥1.5, ≥2 and ≥2.5; GCA-F, ≥1, ≥1, ≥1 and ≥1; and PA, ≥1, ≥1, ≥1 and ≥1, respectively, with an adjustment for early-onset ApoE ε4 noncarrier AD patients (MTA: ≥2, ≥2, ≥3 and ≥3; and GCA-F: ≥1, ≥1, ≥2 and ≥2, respectively). If successfully validated in clinical settings, the list of practical cut-offs proposed here might be useful in clinical practice. Their use might also (i) promote research on atrophy subtypes, (ii) increase the understanding of different presentations of AD, (iii) improve diagnosis and prognosis and (iv) aid population selection and enrichment for clinical trials. © 2015 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  10. Cardiac and Carotid Markers Link With Accelerated Brain Atrophy: The AGES-Reykjavik Study (Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabayan, Behnam; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Zhang, Qian; Meirelles, Osorio; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Arai, Andrew E; Launer, Lenore J

    2016-11-01

    Pathologies in the heart-brain axis might, independently or in combination, accelerate the process of brain parenchymal loss. We aimed to investigate the association of serum N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as a marker of cardiac dysfunction, and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), as a marker of carotid atherosclerosis burden, with structural brain changes. In the longitudinal population-based AGES-Reykjavik study (Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik), we included 2430 subjects (mean age, 74.6 years; 41.4% men) with baseline data on NT-proBNP and CITM (assessed by ultrasound imaging). Participants underwent a high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and 5 years later to assess total brain (TBV), gray matter, and white matter volumes. Each unit higher log-transformed NT-proBNP was associated with 3.6 mL (95% confidence interval [CI], -6.0 to -1.1) decline in TBV and 3.5 mL (95% CI, -5.7 to -1.3) decline in gray matter volume. Likewise, each millimeter higher CIMT was associated with 10.8 mL (95% CI, -17.3 to -4.2) decline in TBV and 8.6 mL (95% CI, -14.4 to -2.8) decline in gray matter volume. There was no association between NT-proBNP and CIMT and changes in white matter volume. Compared with participants with low NT-proBNP and CIMT, participants with both high NT-proBNP and CIMT had 3.8 mL (95% CI, -6.0 to -1.6) greater decline in their TBV and 4 mL (95% CI, -6.0 to -2.0) greater decline in GMW. These associations were independent of sociodemographic and cardiovascular factors. Older subjects with both cardiac dysfunction and carotid atherosclerosis are at an increased risk for brain parenchymal loss. Accumulated pathologies in the heart-brain axis might accelerate brain atrophy. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Enhanced neurofibrillary tangle formation, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive deficits induced by repetitive mild brain injury in a transgenic tauopathy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Uryu, Kunihiro; Higuchi, Makoto; Longhi, Luca; Hoover, Rachel; Fujimoto, Scott; McIntosh, Tracy; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2005-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and repetitive TBI (rTBI) may culminate in dementia pugilistica (DP), a syndrome characterized by progressive dementia, parkinsonism, and the hallmark brain lesions of AD, including neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by abnormal tau filaments and senile plaques (SPs) composed of Abeta fibrils. Previous study showed that mild rTBI (mrTBI) accelerated the deposition of Abeta in the brains of transgenic (Tg) mice (Tg2576) that over-express human Abeta precursor proteins with the familial AD Swedish mutations (APP695swe) and model of AD-like amyloidosis. Here, we report studies of the effects of mrTBI on AD-like tau pathologies in Tg mice expressing the shortest human tau isoform (T44) subjected to mrTBI, causing brain concussion without structural brain damage to simulate injuries linked to DP. Twelve-month-old Tg T44 (n = 18) and wild-type (WT; n = 24) mice were subjected to mrTBI (four times a day, 1 day per week, for 4 weeks; n = 24) or sham treatment (n = 18). Histopathological analysis of mice at 9 months after mrTBI revealed that one of the Tg T44 mice showed extensive telencephalic NFT and cerebral atrophy. Although statistical analysis of neurobehavioral tests at 6 months after mrTBI did not show any significant difference in any of groups of mice, the Tg T44 mouse with extensive NFT had an exceptionally low neurobehavioral score. The reasons for the augmentation of tau pathologies in only one T44 tau Tg mouse subjected to mrTBI remain to be elucidated.

  12. 老年人脑萎缩与颈内动脉虹吸部钙化积分的相关性研究%Study of correlation between the elder brain atrophy and calcification score at siphon segment of internal carotid artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡志刚; 李丽新

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between the elder brain atrophy and calcification score at siphon segment of internal carotid artery.Methods The brain CT examination was detected in 327 elders.The brain atrophy occurrence were observed, and the calcification score at siphon segment of internal carotid artery were determined and calculated.Accroding to the calcification score, all the cases were divided into calcification 0 score group, calcification 1-199 score group, calcification 200-399 score group, calcification 400-599 score group and calcification ≥600 score group.The situation of brain atrophy were compared among these groups.And the correlation between the brain atrophy and calcification score were analyzed.Results Accroding to the calcification score, there were 63 cases in calcification 0 score group, 133 cases in calcification 1-199 score group, 72 cases in calcification 200-399 score group, 28 cases in calcification 400-599 score group and 31 cases in calcification ≥600 score group.There were 13 cases ( 20.63%) of brain atrophy in calcification 0 score group, 64 cases (48.12%) in calcification 1 -199 score group, 51 cases (70.83%) in calcification 200 -399 score group, 23 cases (82.14%) in calcification 400-599 score group and 28 cases (90.32%) in calcification≥600 score group;the differences of the brain atrophy rate among these groups were statistical significant ( all P<0.05 ) .The brain atrophy was mainly mild-moderate in calcification 0 score group and calcification 1 -199 score group;which was mainly severe in calcification 200 -399 score group;and mainly moderate-severe in calcification 400 -599 score group and calcification≥600 score group (all P<0.05).Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that the degree of brain atrophy were positive correlated with calcification score at siphon segment of internal carotid artery ( r=0.717, P<0.05) .Conclusions The elder brain atrophy is significantly correlated with calcification score at

  13. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, David M.; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O.; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K.; Gunter, Jeffrey L.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Jack, Clifford R.; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S.; Collins, D. Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K.; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R.; Yushkevich, Paul A.; Malone, Ian B.; Fox, Nick C.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated “direct” measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  14. Assessing atrophy measurement techniques in dementia: Results from the MIRIAD atrophy challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, David M; Frost, Chris; Iheme, Leonardo O; Ünay, Devrim; Kandemir, Melek; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Reuter, Martin; Fischl, Bruce; Lorenzi, Marco; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Pennec, Xavier; Pierson, Ronald K; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Jack, Clifford R; Guizard, Nicolas; Fonov, Vladimir S; Collins, D Louis; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Leung, Kelvin K; Wang, Hongzhi; Das, Sandhitsu R; Yushkevich, Paul A; Malone, Ian B; Fox, Nick C; Schott, Jonathan M; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-12-01

    Structural MRI is widely used for investigating brain atrophy in many neurodegenerative disorders, with several research groups developing and publishing techniques to provide quantitative assessments of this longitudinal change. Often techniques are compared through computation of required sample size estimates for future clinical trials. However interpretation of such comparisons is rendered complex because, despite using the same publicly available cohorts, the various techniques have been assessed with different data exclusions and different statistical analysis models. We created the MIRIAD atrophy challenge in order to test various capabilities of atrophy measurement techniques. The data consisted of 69 subjects (46 Alzheimer's disease, 23 control) who were scanned multiple (up to twelve) times at nine visits over a follow-up period of one to two years, resulting in 708 total image sets. Nine participating groups from 6 countries completed the challenge by providing volumetric measurements of key structures (whole brain, lateral ventricle, left and right hippocampi) for each dataset and atrophy measurements of these structures for each time point pair (both forward and backward) of a given subject. From these results, we formally compared techniques using exactly the same dataset. First, we assessed the repeatability of each technique using rates obtained from short intervals where no measurable atrophy is expected. For those measures that provided direct measures of atrophy between pairs of images, we also assessed symmetry and transitivity. Then, we performed a statistical analysis in a consistent manner using linear mixed effect models. The models, one for repeated measures of volume made at multiple time-points and a second for repeated "direct" measures of change in brain volume, appropriately allowed for the correlation between measures made on the same subject and were shown to fit the data well. From these models, we obtained estimates of the

  15. 基于VBM-DARTEL的AD脑萎缩特征检测方法%Detection of brain atrophy in AD based on VBM-DARTEL method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卓芝政; 苑桂红; 李海云

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the brain grey matter atrophy in Alzheimer disease (AD)and mild cognitive impairment (MCI ), and provide a detective method for exploring the evolution mechanism of AD.Methods By combining voxel based morphometry (VBM) and diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra (DARTEL),we firstly register and segment three T1 structural MRI datasets of 58 normal control (NC),40 AD patients,72 MCI patients including 26 progressive MCI (PMCI)patients and 46 stable MCI (SMCI ) patients.Then a specific template is built by using DARTEL method.Through deformation fields,the grey matter images are registered to MNI space with preserving the total amount of voxels by applying modulation method.Finally,statistical analysis is made on the processed datasets with two sample t test (P≤0.005,uncorrected).Results Compared to NC,the atrophy regions in AD mainly locate in the bilateral temporal lobe, the bilateral hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus,the bilateral amygdala,the bilateral insula,the left middle occipital gyrus,the left precuneus,the left posterior cingulate gyrus.The atrophy regions in MCI locate in the bilateral putamen,the left amygdale and the left hippocampus.The atrophy regions in PMCI locate in the left putamen,the left amygdala and the left hippocampus.There is no atrophy region found in SMCI. Compared to MCI,the atrophy regions in AD are the bilateral temporal lobe,the bilateral hippocampus,the bilateral precuneus,the bilateral middle frontal gyrus,the left cingulate gyrus,the left insula,the right amygdala,the right parahippocampal gyrus,the right superior parietal gyrus.There is no atrophy region in MCI compared to AD. Compared to SMCI, the atrophy region in PMCI is in left inferior temporal gyrus,yet there is no atrophy region found in SMCI compared to PMCI. Conclusions VBM-DARTEL based method can achieve a more accurate registration of MRI images and detect subtle volume changes of cerebral grey matter

  16. How to test brain and brain simulant at ballistic and blast strain rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Song, Bo; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Chen, Weinong; Gennarelli, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical properties of brain tissue and brain simulant at strain rate in the range of 1000 s-1 are essential for computational simulation of intracranial responses for ballistic and blast traumatic brain injury. Testing these ultra-soft materials at high strain rates is a challenge to most conventional material testing methods. The current study developed a modified split Hopkinson bar techniques using the combination of a few improvements to conventional split Hopkinson bar including: using low impedance aluminum bar, semiconductor strain gauge, pulse shaping technique and annular specimen. Feasibility tests were conducted using a brain stimulant, Sylgard 527. Stress-strain curves of the simulant were successfully obtained at strain rates of 2600 and 2700 s-1 for strain levels up to 60%. This confirmed the applicability of Hopkinson bar for mechanical properties testing of brain tissue in the ballistic and blast domain.

  17. Heart rate variability: a tool to explore the sleeping brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eChouchou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is divided into two main sleep stages: 1 non-rapid eye movement sleep (non-REMS, characterized among others by reduced global brain activity; and 2 rapid eye movement sleep (REMS, characterized by global brain activity similar to that of wakefulness. Results of heart rate variability (HRV analysis, which is widely used to explore autonomic modulation, have revealed higher parasympathetic tone during normal non-REMS and a shift toward sympathetic predominance during normal REMS. Moreover, HRV analysis combined with brain imaging has identified close connectivity between autonomic cardiac modulation and activity in brain areas such as the amygdala and insular cortex during REMS, but no connectivity between brain and cardiac activity during non-REMS. There is also some evidence for an association between HRV and dream intensity and emotionality. Following some technical considerations, this review addresses how brain activity during sleep contributes to changes in autonomic cardiac activity, organized into three parts: 1 the knowledge on autonomic cardiac control, 2 differences in brain and autonomic activity between non-REMS and REMS, and 3 the potential of HRV analysis to explore the sleeping brain, and the implications for psychiatric disorders.

  18. A High Rate Tension Device for Characterizing Brain Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1177/1754337112436900

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical characterization of brain tissue at high loading velocities is vital for understanding and modeling Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). The most severe form of TBI is diffuse axonal injury (DAI) which involves damage to individual nerve cells (neurons). DAI in animals and humans occurs at strains > 10% and strain rates > 10/s. The mechanical properties of brain tissues at these strains and strain rates are of particular significance, as they can be used in finite element human head models to accurately predict brain injuries under different impact conditions. Existing conventional tensile testing machines can only achieve maximum loading velocities of 500 mm/min, whereas the Kolsky bar apparatus is more suitable for strain rates > 100/s. In this study, a custom-designed high rate tension device is developed and calibrated to estimate the mechanical properties of brain tissue in tension at strain rates < 90/s, while maintaining a uniform velocity. The range of strain can also be extended to 100% de...

  19. 伴有脑干萎缩的肝豆状核变性的临床特征%Clinical features in patient with Wilson’s disease plus brain stem atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨颖; 吴中亮; 王康军; 刘学东; 王衡; 马磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence and clinical features of patients with Wilson’s disease (WD) plus brain stem atrophy. Methods Reviewing clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and neuroimaging data of WD patients admitted in our department and analyzing the clinical features in patient with WD plus brain stem atrophy. Results Cranial MRI or CT showed intracranial abnormal signal in 50 cases with WD, mainly involving the bilateral lenticular nucleus, caudate nucleus, thalamus, cerebel um and brain stem.12 cases with generalized brain atrophy, 6 cases associated with cerebel ar atrophy, 6 cases with brain stem atrophy (pons was more evident), and 2 case meet the imaging criterion of cerebel opontine olive atrophy. The incidence of bulbar palsy (25%), pyramidal tract signs (50%), and nystagmus (25%) in patients with brain stem atrophy has a elevated tendency. However, no significant differences in the course of the disease, ceruloplasmin, serum copper are observed WD patients in with brain stem atrophy. Conclusion Brain stem atrophy is not uncommon in WD patients. These patients are more associated with signs and symptoms of brain stem damage. Some patients maybe frequently misdiagnosed.%目的:探讨肝豆状核变性(WD)患者脑干萎缩的发生率及其临床特征。方法:回顾我科收治的WD患者的临床表现、实验室检查及神经影像学等资料,分析伴有脑干萎缩的WD患者的临床特征。结果:50例患者的头颅MRI或CT均提示颅内出现异常信号,主要累及双侧豆状核、尾状核、丘脑、小脑和脑干。12例伴有广泛大脑萎缩,6例伴有小脑萎缩,6例伴有脑干萎缩(均以桥脑为著),2例影像学符合桥脑小脑橄榄萎缩。伴有脑干萎缩的患者球麻痹(25%)、锥体束征(50%)、眼震(25%)的发生率有升高的趋势,而病程、铜蓝蛋白、血清铜与不伴有脑干萎缩的患者无明显差异(P>0.05)。结论:脑干萎缩在WD患者

  20. Gray matter atrophy correlates with MS disability progression measured with MSFC but not EDSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudick, Richard A; Lee, Jar-Chi; Nakamura, Kunio; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2009-07-15

    Gray matter (GM) pathology is an important component of the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease process. Accelerated gray matter atrophy has been observed in MS patients, but its relationship to neurological disability is not defined. This study was done to determine the relationship between whole brain, GM, and white matter (WM) atrophy and MS disability progression. Patients with MS and Clinically Isolated Syndromes (CIS), and age- and gender-matched healthy controls were entered into an observational protocol. Baseline brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), GM fraction, and WM fraction, and change over 4 years were correlated with sustained disability progression over the entire study duration. Disability progression was measured using the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Seventy MS and CIS patients and 17 HCs were studied for an average of 6.6 years (range, 3.6-7.8 years). At the final visit, 7 patients were classified as CIS, 36 as relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), and 27 as secondary progressive MS (SPMS). Baseline whole brain, GM, and WM atrophy predicted EDSS >6.0 at the last study visit. Twenty-one (33%) patients worsened using the EDSS to define disability progression; 29 (46%) worsened using MSFC to define disability progression. Patients with MSFC progression had significantly higher GM atrophy rates compared with patients who were stable on MSFC. White matter atrophy was similar in patients with and without disability progression. Atrophy rates were not different in patients with or without disability progression defined using EDSS. Whole brain, GM, and WM atrophy predicted MS disability progression observed over the next 6.6 years. Gray matter atrophy rates over 4 years correlated with disability progression measured with the MSFC, but not EDSS. This indicates that MSFC defined disability progression is more closely linked to brain atrophy than EDSS defined disability progression, and provides

  1. Expensive brains: ‘brainy’ rodents have higher metabolic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl eSobrero

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Brains are the centers of the nervous system of animals, controlling the organ systems of the body and coordinating responses to changes in the ecological and social environment. The evolution traits that correlate with cognitive ability, such as relative brain size is thus of broad interest. Brain mass relative to body mass varies among mammals, and diverse factors have been proposed to explain this variation. A recent study provided evidence that energetics play an important role in brain evolution (Isler and van Schaik, 2006. Using composite phylogenies and data drawn from multiple sources, these authors showed that basal metabolic rate (BMR correlates with brain mass across mammals. However, no such relationship was found within rodents. Here we re-examined the relationship between BMR and brain mass within Rodentia using a novel species-level phylogeny. Our results are sensitive to parameter evaluation; in particular how species mass is estimated. We detect no pattern when applying an approach used by previous studies, where each species body mass is represented by two different numbers, one being the individual that happened to be used for BMR estimates of that species. However, this approach may compromise the analysis. When using a single value of body mass for each species, whether representing a single individual, or available species mean, our findings provide evidence that brain mass (independent of body mass and BMR are correlated. These findings are thus consistent with the hypothesis that large brains evolve when the payoff for increased brain mass is greater than the energetic cost they incur.

  2. Improving survival rates after civilian gunshot wounds to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Aziz, Hassan; Pandit, Viraj; Kulvatunyou, Narong; O'Keeffe, Terence; Wynne, Julie; Tang, Andrew; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Gunshot wounds to the brain are the most lethal of all firearm injuries, with reported survival rates of 10% to 15%. The aim of this study was to determine outcomes in patients with gunshot wounds to the brain, presenting to our institution over time. We hypothesized that aggressive management can increase survival and the rate of organ donation in patients with gunshot wounds to the brain. We analyzed all patients with gunshot wounds to the brain presenting to our level 1 trauma center over a 5-year period. Aggressive management was defined as resuscitation with blood products, hyperosmolar therapy, and/or prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC). The primary outcome was survival and the secondary outcome was organ donation. There were 132 patients with gunshot wounds to the brain, and the survival rates increased incrementally every year, from 10% in 2008 to 46% in 2011, with the adoption of aggressive management. Among survivors, 40% (16 of 40) of the patients had bi-hemispheric injuries. Aggressive management with blood products (p = 0.02) and hyperosmolar therapy (p = 0.01) was independently associated with survival. Of the survivors, 20% had a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≥ 13 at hospital discharge. In patients who died (n = 92), 56% patients were eligible for organ donation, and they donated 60 organs. Aggressive management is associated with significant improvement in survival and organ procurement in patients with gunshot wounds to the brain. The bias of resource use can no longer be used to preclude trauma surgeons from abandoning aggressive attempts to save patients with gunshot wound to the brain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A Note on Shapley Ratings in Brain Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Musegaas, Marieke; Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of computing the in uence of a neuronal structure in a brain network. Abraham, Kotter, Krumnack, and Wanke (2006) computed this influence by using the Shapley value of a coalitional game corresponding to a directed network as a rating. Kotter, Reid, Krumnack, Wanke, and Spo

  4. Grey matter atrophy in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincses, Zsigmond Tamás; Tóth, Eszter; Bankó, Nóra; Veréb, Dániel; Szabó, Nikoletta; Csete, Gergő; Faragó, Péter; Király, András; Bencsik, Krisztina; Vécsei, László

    2014-09-30

    White matter lesions are defining characteristics of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas grey matter involvement is a less recognised attribute. Recent investigations using dedicated imaging approaches have made it possible to depict cortical lesions. Additionally, grey matter atrophy may be estimated using various methods. Several studies have suggested that grey matter atrophy closely correlates to clinical disability. In this review we have collected information on grey matter atrophy in MS and the effect of disease modifying therapies upon brain atrophy.

  5. Atrophy patterns in early clinical stages across distinct phenotypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Cohn-Sheehy, Brendan I; La Joie, Renaud; Vogel, Jacob W; Möller, Christiane; Lehmann, Manja; van Berckel, Bart N M; Seeley, William W; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Gorno-Tempini, Maria L; Kramer, Joel H; Barkhof, Frederik; Rosen, Howard J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Jagust, William J; Miller, Bruce L; Scheltens, Philip; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) can present with distinct clinical variants. Identifying the earliest neurodegenerative changes associated with each variant has implications for early diagnosis, and for understanding the mechanisms that underlie regional vulnerability and disease progression in AD. We performed voxel-based morphometry to detect atrophy patterns in early clinical stages of four AD phenotypes: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, "visual variant," n=93), logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA, "language variant," n=74), and memory-predominant AD categorized as early age-of-onset (EOAD, 65 years, n=114). Patients with each syndrome were stratified based on: (1) degree of functional impairment, as measured by the clinical dementia rating (CDR) scale, and (2) overall extent of brain atrophy, as measured by a neuroimaging approach that sums the number of brain voxels showing significantly lower gray matter volume than cognitively normal controls (n=80). Even at the earliest clinical stage (CDR=0.5 or bottom quartile of overall atrophy), patients with each syndrome showed both common and variant-specific atrophy. Common atrophy across variants was found in temporoparietal regions that comprise the posterior default mode network (DMN). Early syndrome-specific atrophy mirrored functional brain networks underlying functions that are uniquely affected in each variant: Language network in lvPPA, posterior cingulate cortex-hippocampal circuit in amnestic EOAD and LOAD, and visual networks in PCA. At more advanced stages, atrophy patterns largely converged across AD variants. These findings support a model in which neurodegeneration selectively targets both the DMN and syndrome-specific vulnerable networks at the earliest clinical stages of AD.

  6. A comprehensive visual rating scale of brain magnetic resonance imaging: application in elderly subjects with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, and normal cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Won; Park, So Young; Park, Young Ho; Baek, Min Jae; Lim, Jae-Sung; Youn, Young Chul; Kim, SangYun

    2015-01-01

    Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebral structural changes. However, a unified comprehensive visual rating scale (CVRS) has seldom been studied. Thus, we combined brain atrophy and small vessel disease scales and used an MRI template as a CVRS. The aims of this study were to design a simple and reliable CVRS, validate it by investigating cerebral structural changes in clinical groups, and made comparison to the volumetric measurements. Elderly subjects (n = 260) with normal cognition (NC, n = 65), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 101), or Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 94) were evaluated with brain MRI according to the CVRS of brain atrophy and small vessel disease. Validation of the CVRS with structural changes, neuropsychological tests, and volumetric analyses was performed. The CVRS revealed a high intra-rater and inter-rater agreement and it reflected the structural changes of subjects with NC, MCI, and AD better than volumetric measures (CVRS-coronal: F = 13.5, p brain. It reflected cerebral structural changes of clinical groups and correlated with the age better than volumetric measures.

  7. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Release Fischbeck Group Learning About Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? What are the ... for Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of inherited ...

  8. Reversible brain atrophy and cognitive impairment in an adolescent Japanese patient with primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ohara N; Suzuki H; Suzuki A.; Kaneko M; Ishizawa M; Furukawa K; Abe T; Matsubayashi Y; Yamada T.; Hanyu O; Shimohata T; Sone H

    2014-01-01

    Nobumasa Ohara,1 Hiroshi Suzuki,1 Akiko Suzuki,1 Masanori Kaneko,1 Masahiro Ishizawa,1 Kazuo Furukawa,1 Takahiro Abe,1 Yasuhiro Matsubayashi,1 Takaho Yamada,1 Osamu Hanyu,1 Takayoshi Shimohata,2 Hirohito Sone1 1Department of Hematology, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan; 2Department of Neurology, Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata, Japan Abstract: Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is an endocrine disease resulting ...

  9. Increased cortical atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biessels, G J; De Leeuw, F‐E; Lindeboom, J; Barkhof, F; Scheltens, P

    2006-01-01

    Background The risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increased in type 2 diabetes (DM2). This increased risk has been attributed to vascular comorbidity, but other mechanisms, such as accelerated ageing of the brain, have also been implicated. Objective To determine whether AD in patients with DM2 is associated with an increased occurrence of vascular lesions in the brain, by increased cerebral atrophy, or a combination of both. Methods In total, 29 patients with AD and DM2 and 58 patients with AD and without DM2 were included in the study. Clinical characteristics were recorded, and a neuropsychological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan were performed. MRI scans were rated for cortical and subcortical atrophy, medial temporal lobe atrophy, white matter lesions, and infarcts. Results The neuropsychological profiles of the two groups were identical. Patients with AD and DM2 had increased cortical atrophy on MRI (p<0.05) compared with the non‐DM2 group. In addition, infarcts were more common (odds ratio 2.4; 95% CI 0.8 to 7.8), but this effect did not account for the increased atrophy. The other MR measures did not differ between the groups. Conclusion The results suggest that non‐vascular mechanisms, leading to increased cortical atrophy, are also involved in the increased risk of AD in DM2. PMID:16484636

  10. Measurement of hippocampal atrophy using 4D graph-cut segmentation: application to ADNI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolz, Robin; Heckemann, Rolf A; Aljabar, Paul; Hajnal, Joseph V; Hammers, Alexander; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Rueckert, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    We propose a new method of measuring atrophy of brain structures by simultaneously segmenting longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this approach a 4D graph is used to represent the longitudinal data: edges are weighted based on spatial and intensity priors and connect spatially and temporally neighboring voxels represented by vertices in the graph. Solving the min-cut/max-flow problem on this graph yields the segmentation for all timepoints in a single step. By segmenting all timepoints simultaneously, a consistent and atrophy-sensitive segmentation is obtained. The application to hippocampal atrophy measurement in 568 image pairs (Baseline and Month 12 follow-up) as well as 362 image triplets (Baseline, Month 12, and Month 24) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) confirms previous findings for atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy aging. Highly significant correlations between hippocampal atrophy and clinical variables (Mini Mental State Examination, MMSE and Clinical Dementia Rating, CDR) were found and atrophy rates differ significantly according to subjects' ApoE genotype. Based on one year atrophy rates, a correct classification rate of 82% between AD and control subjects is achieved. Subjects that converted from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) to AD after the period for which atrophy was measured (i.e., after the first 12 months) and subjects for whom conversion is yet to be identified were discriminated with a rate of 64%, a promising result with a view to clinical application. Power analysis shows that 67 and 206 subjects are needed for the AD and MCI groups respectively to detect a 25% change in volume loss with 80% power and 5% significance.

  11. Reduced oxygen due to high-altitude exposure relates to atrophy in motor-function brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, M; Paola, M D; Bozzali, M; Fadda, L; Musicco, M; Sabatini, U; Caltagirone, C

    2008-10-01

    At high altitudes barometric pressure is reduced and, thus, less oxygen is inhaled. Reduced oxygen concentration in brain tissue can lead to cerebral damage and neurological and cognitive deficits. The present study was designed to explore the effects of high-altitude exposure using a quantitative MRI technique, voxel-based morphometry. We studied nine world-class mountain climbers before (baseline) and after (follow-up) an extremely high-altitude ascent of Everest and K2. We investigated the effects of repeated extremely high-altitude exposures by comparing mountain climbers' scans at baseline with scans of 19 controls. In addition, we measured the effects of a single extremely high-altitude expedition by comparing mountain climbers' scans at baseline and follow-up. A region of reduced white matter density/volume was found in the left pyramidal tract near the primary (BA 4) and supplementary (BA 6) motor cortex when mountain climbers at baseline were compared with controls. Further, when mountain climbers' scans before and after the expedition were compared, a region of reduced grey matter density/volume was found in the left angular gyrus (BA 39). These findings suggest that extremely high-altitude exposures may cause subtle white and grey matter changes that mainly affect brain regions involved in motor activity.

  12. Local specific absorption rate in brain tumors at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Matthew C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Polders, Daniël L; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-01-01

    MR safety at 7 Tesla relies on accurate numerical simulations of transmit electromagnetic fields to fully assess local specific absorption rate (SAR) safety. Numerical simulations for SAR safety are currently performed using models of healthy patients. These simulations might not be useful for estimating SAR in patients who have large lesions with potentially abnormal dielectric properties, e.g., brain tumors. In this study, brain tumor patient models are constructed based on scans of four patients with high grade brain tumors. Dielectric properties for the modeled tumors are assigned based on electrical properties tomography data for the same patients. Simulations were performed to determine SAR. Local SAR increases in the tumors by as much as 30%. However, the location of the maximum 10-gram averaged SAR typically occurs outside of the tumor, and thus does not increase. In the worst case, if the tumor model is moved to the location of maximum electric field intensity, then we do observe an increase in the estimated peak 10-gram SAR directly related to the tumor. Peak local SAR estimation made on the results of a healthy patient model simulation may underestimate the true peak local SAR in a brain tumor patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cerebral atrophy as outcome measure in short-term phase 2 clinical trials in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elskamp, I.J. van den; Boden, B.; Barkhof, F. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dattola, V. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Messina, Department of Neurosciences, Psychiatric and Anaesthesiological Sciences, Messina (Italy); Knol, D.L. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute and University Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Kappos, L. [University Hospital, University of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); Fazekas, F. [Medical University of Graz, Department of Neurology, Graz (Austria); Wagner, K. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Pohl, C. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Bonn, Department of Neurology, Bonn (Germany); Sandbrink, R. [Bayer-Schering Pharma, Berlin (Germany); Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf, Department of Neurology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Polman, C.H. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uitdehaag, B.M.J. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, MS Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-10-15

    Cerebral atrophy is a compound measure of the neurodegenerative component of multiple sclerosis (MS) and a conceivable outcome measure for clinical trials monitoring the effect of neuroprotective agents. In this study, we evaluate the rate of cerebral atrophy in a 6-month period, investigate the predictive and explanatory value of other magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in relation to cerebral atrophy, and determine sample sizes for future short-term clinical trials using cerebral atrophy as primary outcome measure. One hundred thirty-five relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients underwent six monthly MRI scans from which the percentage brain volume change (PBVC) and the number and volume of gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing lesions, T2 lesions, and persistent black holes (PBH) were determined. By means of multiple linear regression analysis, the relationship between focal MRI variables and PBVC was assessed. Sample size calculations were performed for all patients and subgroups selected for enhancement or a high T2 lesion load at baseline. A significant atrophy occurred over 6 months (PBVC = -0.33%, SE = 0.061, p < 0.0001). The number of baseline T2 lesions (p = 0.024), the on-study Gd-enhancing lesion volume (p = 0.044), and the number of on-study PBHs (p = 0.003) were associated with an increased rate of atrophy. For a 50% decrease in rate of atrophy, the sample size calculations showed that approximately 283 patients per arm are required in an unselected sampled population and 185 patients per arm are required in a selected population. Within a 6-month period, significant atrophy can be detected and on-study associations of PBVC and PBHs emphasizes axonal loss to be a driving mechanism. Application as primary outcome measure in short-term clinical trials with feasible sample size requires a potent drug to obtain sufficient power. (orig.)

  14. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: Spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Da

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1. SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN subjects (AUC = 0.98. Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile. In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1–42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  15. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  16. Direct measurement of fluence rate in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Denisov, Nikolay A.; Dets, Sergiy M.; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Rozumenko, Vladimir D.

    1996-01-01

    Fluence rate was measured in normal and cancerous (glioma) human brain samples using a multichannel detector. Detector consisted of 8 isotrope fiber probes positioned around the central irradiating probe. Detecting probes were displaced one from other at a step 0.5 mm along the central irradiating fiber. Bare ends of detecting fibers were coupled with photodiode array. He-Ne (633 nm) or Nd:YAG (1064 nm) lasers were coupled with irradiating probe. Fluence rate was measured in each of 8 points in the depth range 5 mm. Measured mean penetration depths of 633 nm light were 0.70 mm, 0.50 mm and 0.40 mm for white matter, grey matter and glioma, respectively. For Nd:YAG laser, penetration depth was about 2.3 mm for normal tissue and glioma. Multichannel computerized detector allows to provide a small invasive real-time measurements of fluence rate in different tissues.

  17. Non-gaussianity of low frequency heart rate variability and sympathetic activation: lack of increases in multiple system atrophy and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyono, Ken; Hayano, Junichiro; Kwak, Shin; Watanabe, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2012-01-01

    The correlates of indices of long-term ambulatory heart rate variability (HRV) of the autonomic nervous system have not been completely understood. In this study, we evaluated conventional HRV indices, obtained from the daytime (12:00-18:00) Holter recording, and a recently proposed non-Gaussianity index (λ; Kiyono et al., 2008) in 12 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and 10 patients with Parkinson disease (PD), known to have varying degrees of cardiac vagal and sympathetic dysfunction. Compared with the age-matched healthy control group, the MSA patients showed significantly decreased HRV, most probably reflecting impaired vagal heart rate control, but the PD patients did not show such reduced variability. In both MSA and PD patients, the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF) ratio and the short-term fractal exponent α(1), suggested to reflect the sympathovagal balance, were significantly decreased, as observed in congestive heart failure (CHF) patients with sympathetic overdrive. In contrast, the analysis of the non-Gaussianity index λ showed that a marked increase in intermittent and non-Gaussian HRV observed in the CHF patients was not observed in the MSA and PD patients with sympathetic dysfunction. These findings provide additional evidence for the relation between the non-Gaussian intermittency of HRV and increased sympathetic activity.

  18. Non-Gaussianity of low frequency heart rate variability and sympathetic activation: lack of increases in multiple system atrophy and Parkinson disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eKiyono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlates of indices of long-term ambulatory heart rate variability (HRV of the autonomic nervous system have not been completely understood. In this study, we evaluated conventional HRV indices, obtained from the daytime (12:00–18:00 Holter recording, and a recently proposed non-Gaussianity index (λ (Kiyono et al., 2008 in 12 patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA and 10 patients with Parkinson disease (PD, known to have varying degrees of cardiac vagal and sympathetic dysfunction. Compared with the age-matched healthy control group, the MSA patients showed significantly decreased HRV, most probably reflecting impaired vagal heart rate control, but the PD patients did not show such reduced variability. In both MSA and PD patients, the low-to-high frequency (LF/HF ratio and the short-term fractal exponent alpha_1, suggested to reflect the sympathovagal balance, were significantly decreased, as observed in congestive heart failure (CHF patients with sympathetic overdrive. In contrast, the analysis of the non-Gaussianity index λ showed that a marked increase in intermittent and non-Gaussian HRV observed in the CHF patients was not observed in the MSA and PD patients with sympathetic dysfunction. These findings provide additional evidence for the relation between the non-Gaussian intermittency of HRV and increased sympathetic activity.

  19. Optic nerve atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. The optic ...

  20. Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Multiple system atrophy (MSA) By Mayo Clinic Staff Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurological disorder that impairs your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood ...

  1. Regional gray matter atrophy and neuropsychologcal problems in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiyu Lin; Fuyong Chen; Fang Liu; Zhiwen Li; Ying Liu; Shifang Lin; Xiaoyi Wang; Jiting Zhu

    2013-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis, gray matter atrophy is extensive, and cognitive deficits and mood disorders are frequently encountered. It has been conjectured that focal atrophy is associated with emotional de-cline. However, conventional MRI has revealed that the pathological characteristics cannot ful y account for the mood disorders. Moreover, there is no correlation between cognitive disorders and MRI results in clinical y isolated syndromes or in cases of definite multiple sclerosis. In this case-control study, voxel-based morphometric analysis was performed on 11 subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and the results show that these patients exhibit gray matter atrophy. Moreover, the gray matter atrophy in the superior and middle gyri of the right frontal lobe in patients with multiple sclerosis was correlated with scores from the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. The scores obtained with the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status were associated with gray matter atrophy in the middle gyrus of the left frontal lobe, the superior and middle gyrus of the right frontal lobe, the middle gyrus of the left cingulate, the superior and middle gyri of the left frontal lobe, and the triangular area of the left frontal lobe. However, there was no statistical significance. These findings suggest that the cingulate and frontal cortices of the nant hemisphere are the most severely atrophic regions of the brain, and this atrophy is correlated with cognitive decline and emotional abnormalities.

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) A A A What's in this article? ... Outlook en español Atrofia muscular espinal Spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, is an inherited condition that causes ...

  3. Hemispherical dominance of glucose metabolic rate in the brain of the 'normal' ageing population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutts, DA; Maguire, RP; Leenders, KL; Spyrou, NM

    2004-01-01

    In the 'normal' ageing brain a decrease in the cerebral metabolic rate has been determined across many brain regions. This study determines whether age differences would affect metabolic rates in regions and different hemispheres of the brain. The regional metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRGlu) was exa

  4. CLADA: cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kunio; Fox, Robert; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of changes in brain cortical thickness is useful for the assessment of regional gray matter atrophy in neurodegenerative conditions. A new longitudinal method, called CLADA (cortical longitudinal atrophy detection algorithm), has been developed for the measurement of changes in cortical thickness in magnetic resonance images (MRI) acquired over time. CLADA creates a subject-specific cortical model which is longitudinally deformed to match images from individual time points. The algorithm was designed to work reliably for lower resolution images, such as the MRIs with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels previously acquired for many clinical trials in multiple sclerosis (MS). CLADA was evaluated to determine reproducibility, accuracy, and sensitivity. Scan-rescan variability was 0.45% for images with 1mm(3) isotropic voxels and 0.77% for images with 1×1×5 mm(3) voxels. The mean absolute accuracy error was 0.43 mm, as determined by comparison of CLADA measurements to cortical thickness measured directly in post-mortem tissue. CLADA's sensitivity for correctly detecting at least 0.1mm change was 86% in a simulation study. A comparison to FreeSurfer showed good agreement (Pearson correlation=0.73 for global mean thickness). CLADA was also applied to MRIs acquired over 18 months in secondary progressive MS patients who were imaged at two different resolutions. Cortical thinning was detected in this group in both the lower and higher resolution images. CLADA detected a higher rate of cortical thinning in MS patients compared to healthy controls over 2 years. These results show that CLADA can be used for reliable measurement of cortical atrophy in longitudinal studies, even in lower resolution images.

  5. Visualizing stages of cortical atrophy in progressive MCI from the ADNI cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Fonov, Vladimir; Coupé, Pierrick;

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered a condition where patients are at risk of developing clinically definite Alzheimer’s disease (AD) with an annual conversion rate of approximately 15%[1]. AD is characterized by progressive brain atrophy with major impact on the cerebral cortex...... and medial temporal lobe structures such as hippocampus. Understanding the structural pattern of cortical atrophy at different stages of MCI, before AD can be diagnosed, may help in patient monitoring and prognosis. We used data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to calculate...... and visualize the cortical atrophy at different stages in patients who eventually converted to clinically definite AD. We selected patients with a diagnosis of MCI from the ADNI database who converted to AD during the follow-up period. T1-weighted MRI scans were collected at time of conversion(n=140...

  6. Dominant optic atrophy in Denmark – report of 15 novel mutations in OPA1, using a strategy with a detection rate of 90%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almind Gitte J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of the OPA1 mutation spectrum in autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA in Denmark. Methods Index patients from 93 unrelated ADOA families were assessed for a common Danish founder mutation (c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA inOPA1. If negative, direct DNA sequencing of the coding sequence and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA were performed. Results from MLPA analysis have been previously reported. Haplotype analysis was carried out analysing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. Retrospective clinical data were retrieved from medical files. Results Probably causative mutations were identified in 84 out of 93 families (90% including 15 novel mutations. Three mutations c.983A > G, c.2708_2711delTTAG and c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA, were responsible for ADOA in10, 11 and 28 families, respectively, corresponding to 11%, 12% and 30%. A common haplotype in nine of ten c.983A > G families suggests that they descend from a single founder. The c.2708_2711delTTAG mutation was present on at least two haplotypes and has been repeatedly reported in various ethnic groups,thus represents a mutational hotspot. Clinical examinations of index patients with the two latter mutations demonstrated large inter- and intra-familial variations apparently. Conclusions Genetic testing for OPA1mutations assist in the diagnosis. We have identified mutations in OPA1 in 90% of families including 15 novel mutations. Both DNA sequencing and MLPA analysis are necessary to achieve a high detection rate. More than half of the affected families in Denmark are represented by three common mutations, at least two of which are due to a founder effect, which may account for the high prevalence of ADOA in Denmark.

  7. White matter hyperintensities and medial temporal lobe atrophy in clinical subtypes of mild cognitive impairment: the DESCRIPA study

    OpenAIRE

    Pol, van de, Jaco; Verhey, F.; Frisoni, G.B.; Tsolaki, M; Papapostolou, P.; Nobili, F.; Wahlund, L. O.; Minthon, L.; Frolich, L.; Hampel, H.; Soininen, H.; Knol, D.L.; Barkhof, F; Scheltens, P.; Visser, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Clinical subtypes of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may represent different underlying aetiologies. In a European, multi-center, memory-clinic based study (DESCRIPA) of non-demented subjects we investigated whether MCI subtypes have different brain correlates on MRI and whether the relation between subtypes and brain pathology is modified by age. Using visual rating scales medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) (0-4) and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) (0-30) were assesse...

  8. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain......, such as age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) and progression of the disease....

  9. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  10. Genetics Home Reference: gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy may also cause disturbances in the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and ... Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  11. Individual Assessment of Brain Tissue Changes in MS and the Effect of Focal Lesions on Short-Term Focal Atrophy Development in MS: A Voxel-Guided Morphometry Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jan; Kraemer, Matthias; Schormann, Thorsten; Dabringhaus, Andreas; Hirsch, Jochen; Eisele, Philipp; Szabo, Kristina; Weiss, Christel; Amann, Michael; Weier, Katrin; Naegelin, Yvonne; Kappos, Ludwig; Gass, Achim

    2016-01-01

    We performed voxel-guided morphometry (VGM) investigating the mechanisms of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) related to focal lesions. VGM maps detect regional brain changes when comparing 2 time points on high resolution T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonace imaging (MRI). Two T1w MR datasets from 92 relapsing-remitting MS patients obtained 12 months apart were analysed with VGM. New lesions and volume changes of focal MS lesions as well as in the surrounding tissue were identified by visual inspection on colour coded VGM maps. Lesions were dichotomized in active and inactive lesions. Active lesions, defined by either new lesions (NL) (volume increase > 5% in VGM), chronic enlarging lesions (CEL) (pre-existent T1w lesions with volume increase > 5%), or chronic shrinking lesions (CSL) (pre-existent T1w lesions with volume reduction > 5%) in VGM, were accompanied by tissue shrinkage in surrounding and/or functionally related regions. Volume loss within the corpus callosum was highly correlated with the number of lesions in its close proximity. Volume loss in the lateral geniculate nucleus was correlated with lesions along the optic radiation. VGM analysis provides strong evidence that all active lesion types (NL, CEL, and CSL) contribute to brain volume reduction in the vicinity of lesions and/or in anatomically and functionally related areas of the brain. PMID:27043553

  12. Individual Assessment of Brain Tissue Changes in MS and the Effect of Focal Lesions on Short-Term Focal Atrophy Development in MS: A Voxel-Guided Morphometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fox

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We performed voxel-guided morphometry (VGM investigating the mechanisms of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS related to focal lesions. VGM maps detect regional brain changes when comparing 2 time points on high resolution T1-weighted (T1w magnetic resonace imaging (MRI. Two T1w MR datasets from 92 relapsing-remitting MS patients obtained 12 months apart were analysed with VGM. New lesions and volume changes of focal MS lesions as well as in the surrounding tissue were identified by visual inspection on colour coded VGM maps. Lesions were dichotomized in active and inactive lesions. Active lesions, defined by either new lesions (NL (volume increase > 5% in VGM, chronic enlarging lesions (CEL (pre-existent T1w lesions with volume increase > 5%, or chronic shrinking lesions (CSL (pre-existent T1w lesions with volume reduction > 5% in VGM, were accompanied by tissue shrinkage in surrounding and/or functionally related regions. Volume loss within the corpus callosum was highly correlated with the number of lesions in its close proximity. Volume loss in the lateral geniculate nucleus was correlated with lesions along the optic radiation. VGM analysis provides strong evidence that all active lesion types (NL, CEL, and CSL contribute to brain volume reduction in the vicinity of lesions and/or in anatomically and functionally related areas of the brain.

  13. MRI评估脑萎缩NL个体发生阿尔茨海默氏症的风险%MRI Assessment of Brain Atrophy NL Individual Risk of Alzheimer's Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂中; 王健

    2015-01-01

    Objective MRI assessment cognitively normal brain atrophy (NL) individual risk of alzheimer's disease.Methods From January 2009 to January 2010, the neurology department a total of 520 cases of hospital NL individual line longitudinal brain MRI imaging. 320 cases of brain atrophy NL, NL is 200 cases. At the end of the study of two groups of entorhinal cortex, back in under the roof, temporal lobe, orbitofrontal cortex and cingulate cortex and after intracranial volume by MRI study.Results The research at the end of the AD NL group a total of 70 cases of brain atrophy, and NL group only 10 cases of AD (chi-square=16.2, P=16.2). The most obvious difference in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 9%, p=0.004), the left hemisphere of the entorhinal cortex (EC, 6%, p=0.028), and after the cingulate cortex (PCC), 4%, p=0.05) is also very significant difference, the right hemisphere linear trend of PCC (3%, p=0.11). In the left OFC (8%, p=0.001), EC (7%, p=0.034) and the PCC (4%, p=0.041), and the right trend of PCC (4%, p=0.10) the most obvious difference between the groups.Conclusion Brain atrophy NL significantly increased risk of AD, in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere, OFC, EC and PCC is most significant.%目的: MRI评估脑萎缩认知正常(NL)个体发生阿尔茨海默氏症的风险。方法2009年1月到2010年1月医院神经内科共计520例NL个体行纵向脑MRI成像。其中脑萎缩NL者320例,NL者200例。对两组的研究结束时内嗅皮层、顶下小叶、颞中回、眶额皮质、后扣带回皮质和颅内总体积进行MRI研究。结果研究结束时,脑萎缩NL组共计70例发生AD,而NL组仅10例发生AD(χ2=16.2, P=0.000)。在眶额皮质差异最为明显(OFC,9%,p=0.004),左半球的内嗅皮层(EC、6%,p=0.028)和后扣带回皮层(PCC),4%,p=0.05)差异也十分显著,右半球PCC的线性趋势(3%,p=0.11)。在左OFC(8%,p=0.001),EC(7%,p=0.034)和PCC(4%,p=0.041),和右PCC趋势(4%

  14. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  15. Gestation length, metabolic rate, and body and brain weights in primates: epigenetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, B B

    1989-10-01

    The relationship of brain and body weights can be expressed in log-log regression: log (brain weight) = log (A) + B log (body weight). To investigate further the weights' similarity, gestation length and brain and body weights were determined from the literature for 46 primate genera. The results of allometric and path regression analyses suggest that the relationship between brain and body weights may not be mainly pleiotropic in the order Primates. The correlation between brain and body weights appears to be due to epigenetic factors in hyperplastic growth related to time constraint by gestation length and to energy utilization limitations imposed by metabolic rate.

  16. Progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet Sande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy, also known as Parry-Romberg Syndrome, is an uncommon degenerative and poorly understood condition. It is characterized by a slow and progressive but self-limited atrophy affecting one side of the face. The incidence and the cause of this alteration are unknown. A cerebral disturbance of fat metabolism has been proposed as a primary cause. Possible factors that are involved in the pathogenesis include trauma, viral infections, heredity, endocrine disturbances and auto-immunity. The most common complications that appear in association to this disorder are: trigeminal neuralgia, facial paresthesia, severe headache and epilepsy. Characteristically, the atrophy progresses slowly for several years and, it becomes stable. The objective of this work is, through the presentation of a clinical case, to accomplish a literature review concerning general characteristics, etiology, physiopathology and treatment of progressive hemifacial atrophy.

  17. Spinal muscular atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amico, Adele; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tiziano, Francesco D; Bertini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis...

  18. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  19. No relevant midbrain atrophy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, E; Joutsa, J; Isotalo, J; Kaasinen, V

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether significant midbrain atrophy is present in Parkinson's disease (PD), and if so, whether it can be used as a marker of striatal dopaminergic degeneration. In total, 150 PD patients and 155 controls were scanned with both brain dopamine transporter (DAT) [(123) I]FP-CIT SPECT and 1.5T MRI. Midbrain atrophy was measured from sagittal MRIs using the midbrain-to-pons ratios. Both striatal region-of-interest-based (Brass) and striatal and extrastriatal voxel-by-voxel-based DAT binding (SPM8) were investigated in relation to midbrain atrophy. The midbrain-to-pons ratios in PD patients were slightly lower than those in the controls (mean 0.59 vs 0.61, P atrophy is present in PD and can be detected with MRI. However, the midbrain atrophy in PD is not associated with the level of striatal dopaminergic dysfunction, and midbrain measurements therefore cannot be used as a clinically useful predictor of dopamine function. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Can antioxidants protect against disuse muscle atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K

    2014-11-01

    Long periods of skeletal muscle inactivity (e.g. prolonged bed rest or limb immobilization) results in a loss of muscle protein and fibre atrophy. This disuse-induced muscle atrophy is due to both a decrease in protein synthesis and increased protein breakdown. Although numerous factors contribute to the regulation of the rates of protein breakdown and synthesis in skeletal muscle, it has been established that prolonged muscle inactivity results in increased radical production in the inactive muscle fibres. Further, this increase in radical production plays an important role in the regulation of redox-sensitive signalling pathways that regulate both protein synthesis and proteolysis in skeletal muscle. Indeed, it was suggested over 20 years ago that antioxidant supplementation has the potential to protect skeletal muscles against inactivity-induced fibre atrophy. Since this original proposal, experimental evidence has implied that a few compounds with antioxidant properties are capable of delaying inactivity-induced muscle atrophy. The objective of this review is to discuss the role that radicals play in the regulation of inactivity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and to provide an analysis of the recent literature indicating that specific antioxidants have the potential to defer disuse muscle atrophy.

  1. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  2. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  3. Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Retardation and Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haier, Richard J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Brain size and cerebral glucose metabolic rate were determined for 10 individuals with mild mental retardation (MR), 7 individuals with Down syndrome (DS), and 10 matched controls. MR and DS groups both had brain volumes of about 80% compared to controls, with variance greatest within the MR group. (SLD)

  4. Thermodynamic constraints on neural dimensions, firing rates, brain temperature and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowski, Jan

    2009-12-01

    There have been suggestions that heat caused by cerebral metabolic activity may constrain mammalian brain evolution, architecture, and function. This article investigates physical limits on brain wiring and corresponding changes in brain temperature that are imposed by thermodynamics of heat balance determined mainly by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, cerebral blood flow, and heat conduction. It is found that even moderate firing rates cause significant intracellular Na(+) build-up, and the ATP consumption rate associated with pumping out these ions grows nonlinearly with frequency. Surprisingly, the power dissipated by the Na(+)/K(+) pump depends biphasically on frequency, which can lead to the biphasic dependence of brain temperature on frequency as well. Both the total power of sodium pumps and brain temperature diverge for very small fiber diameters, indicating that too thin fibers are not beneficial for thermal balance. For very small brains blood flow is not a sufficient cooling mechanism deep in the brain. The theoretical lower bound on fiber diameter above which brain temperature is in the operational regime is strongly frequency dependent but finite due to synaptic depression. For normal neurophysiological conditions this bound is at least an order of magnitude smaller than average values of empirical fiber diameters, suggesting that neuroanatomy of the mammalian brains operates in the thermodynamically safe regime. Analytical formulas presented can be used to estimate average firing rates in mammals, and relate their changes to changes in brain temperature, which can have important practical applications. In general, activity in larger brains is found to be slower than in smaller brains.

  5. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C.V.; Davis, Stephen M.; Bivard, Andrew [Melbourne Brain Centre rate at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Moffat, Bradford A.; Steward, Christopher; Desmond, Patricia M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Radiology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Churilov, Leonid; Donnan, Geoffrey A. [The University of Melbourne, Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville (Australia); Parsons, Mark W. [University of Newcastle and Hunter Medical Research Institute, Priority Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience and Mental Health, Newcastle (Australia)

    2016-01-15

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies. (orig.)

  6. Association between baseline peri-infarct magnetic resonance spectroscopy and regional white matter atrophy after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassi, Nawaf; Campbell, Bruce C V; Moffat, Bradford A; Steward, Christopher; Churilov, Leonid; Parsons, Mark W; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Desmond, Patricia M; Davis, Stephen M; Bivard, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral atrophy after stroke is associated with poor functional outcome. The prediction and prevention of post-stroke brain atrophy could therefore represent a target for neurorestorative therapies. We investigated the associations between peri-infarct metabolite concentrations measured by quantitative MRS and brain volume change in the infarct hemisphere after stroke. Twenty patients with ischemic stroke were enrolled. Patients underwent 3T-MRI within 1 week of onset, and at 1 and 3 months. At the baseline scan, an MRS voxel was placed manually in the peri-infarct area and another in the corresponding contralateral region. Volumetric analysis of T1 images was performed using two automated processing packages. Changes in gray and white matter volume were assessed as percentage change between 1 and 3 months. Mean concentrations (institutional units) of N-acetylaspartic acid (NAA) (6.1 vs 7.0, p = 0.039), total creatine (Cr+PCr) (5.4 vs 5.8, p = 0.043), and inositol (4.5 vs 5.0, p = 0.014), were significantly lower in the peri-infarct region compared with the contralateral hemisphere. There was a significant correlation between baseline peri-infarct NAA and white matter volume change in the infarct hemisphere between 1 and 3 months, with lower NAA being associated with subsequent white matter atrophy (Spearman's rho = 0.66, p = 0.010). The baseline concentration of Cr+PCr was also significantly correlated with white matter atrophy in the infarct hemisphere (Spearman's rho = 0.59, p = 0.027). Both of these associations were significant after adjustment for the false discovery rate and were validated using the secondary volumetric method. MRS may be useful in the prediction of white matter atrophy post-stroke and in the testing of novel neurorestorative therapies.

  7. Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Jens F; Sunde, Niels A; Bergholt, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation......Increasing infection rate in multiple implanted pulse generator changes in movement disorder patients treated with deep brain stimulation...

  8. Rate of evolution in brain-expressed genes in humans and other primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurng-Yi Wang

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain-expressed genes are known to evolve slowly in mammals. Nevertheless, since brains of higher primates have evolved rapidly, one might expect acceleration in DNA sequence evolution in their brain-expressed genes. In this study, we carried out full-length cDNA sequencing on the brain transcriptome of an Old World monkey (OWM and then conducted three-way comparisons among (i mouse, OWM, and human, and (ii OWM, chimpanzee, and human. Although brain-expressed genes indeed appear to evolve more rapidly in species with more advanced brains (apes > OWM > mouse, a similar lineage effect is observable for most other genes. The broad inclusion of genes in the reference set to represent the genomic average is therefore critical to this type of analysis. Calibrated against the genomic average, the rate of evolution among brain-expressed genes is probably lower (or at most equal in humans than in chimpanzee and OWM. Interestingly, the trend of slow evolution in coding sequence is no less pronounced among brain-specific genes, vis-à-vis brain-expressed genes in general. The human brain may thus differ from those of our close relatives in two opposite directions: (i faster evolution in gene expression, and (ii a likely slowdown in the evolution of protein sequences. Possible explanations and hypotheses are discussed.

  9. Rate of Evolution in Brain-Expressed Genes in Humans and Other Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hurng-Yi; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Osada, Naoki; Hashimoto, Katsuyuki; Sugano, Sumio; Gojobori, Takashi; Chou, Chen-Kung; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wu, Chung-I; Shen, C.-K. James

    2007-01-01

    Brain-expressed genes are known to evolve slowly in mammals. Nevertheless, since brains of higher primates have evolved rapidly, one might expect acceleration in DNA sequence evolution in their brain-expressed genes. In this study, we carried out full-length cDNA sequencing on the brain transcriptome of an Old World monkey (OWM) and then conducted three-way comparisons among (i) mouse, OWM, and human, and (ii) OWM, chimpanzee, and human. Although brain-expressed genes indeed appear to evolve more rapidly in species with more advanced brains (apes > OWM > mouse), a similar lineage effect is observable for most other genes. The broad inclusion of genes in the reference set to represent the genomic average is therefore critical to this type of analysis. Calibrated against the genomic average, the rate of evolution among brain-expressed genes is probably lower (or at most equal) in humans than in chimpanzee and OWM. Interestingly, the trend of slow evolution in coding sequence is no less pronounced among brain-specific genes, vis-à-vis brain-expressed genes in general. The human brain may thus differ from those of our close relatives in two opposite directions: (i) faster evolution in gene expression, and (ii) a likely slowdown in the evolution of protein sequences. Possible explanations and hypotheses are discussed. PMID:17194215

  10. Brain cancer mortality rates increase with Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittecoq, Marion; Elguero, Eric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Roche, Benjamin; Brodeur, Jacques; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée; Thomas, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of adult brain cancer was previously shown to be higher in countries where the parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common, suggesting that this brain protozoan could potentially increase the risk of tumor formation. Using countries as replicates has, however, several potential confounding factors, particularly because detection rates vary with country wealth. Using an independent dataset entirely within France, we further establish the significance of the association between T. gondii and brain cancer and find additional demographic resolution. In adult age classes 55 years and older, regional mortality rates due to brain cancer correlated positively with the local seroprevalence of T. gondii. This effect was particularly strong for men. While this novel evidence of a significant statistical association between T. gondii infection and brain cancer does not demonstrate causation, these results suggest that investigations at the scale of the individual are merited.

  11. Posterior cortical atrophy: an atypical variant of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Aida; Henley, Susie M; Walton, Jill; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-06-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by striking progressive visual impairment and a pattern of atrophy mainly involving posterior cortices. PCA is the most frequent atypical presentation of Alzheimer disease. The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of PCA's neuropsychiatric manifestations. Emotional and psychotic symptoms are discussed in the context of signal characteristic features of the PCA syndrome (the early onset, focal loss of visual perception, focal posterior brain atrophy) and the underlying cause of the disease. The authors' experience with psychotherapeutic intervention and PCA support groups is shared in detail.

  12. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  13. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  14. Imaging of olfactory bulb and gray matter volumes in brain areas associated with olfactory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shun, E-mail: shchen_2013@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Tan, Hong-yu, E-mail: honhyutan@21cn.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Wu, Zhuo-hua, E-mail: zhh88@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Sun, Chong-peng, E-mail: Suncp2002@gmail.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); He, Jian-xun, E-mail: xundog@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Li, Xin-chun, E-mail: xinchunli@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Shao, Ming, E-mail: yimshao@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China)

    2014-03-15

    We explored if magnetic resonance imaging sequences might aid in the clinical differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). We measured the volumes of the olfactory bulb, the olfactory tract, and olfaction-associated cortical gray matter in 20 IPD patients, 14 MSA patients, and 12 normal subjects, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging sequences in combination with voxel-based statistical analysis. We found that, compared to normal subjects and MSA patients, the volumes of the olfactory bulb and tract were significantly reduced in IPD patients. The gray matter volume of IPD patients decreased in the following order: the olfactory area to the right of the piriform cortex, the right amygdala, the left entorhinal cortex, and the left occipital lobe. Further, the total olfactory bulb volume of IPD patients was associated with the duration of disease. The entorhinal cortical gray matter volume was negatively associated with the UPDRS III score. Conclusion: Structural volumes measured by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may potentially be used for differential diagnosis of IPD from MSA.

  15. The Pattern of Brain Amyloid Load in Posterior Cortical Atrophy Using 18F-AV45: Is Amyloid the Principal Actor in the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Beaufils

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is characterized by progressive higher-order visuoperceptual dysfunction and praxis declines. This syndrome is related to a number of underlying diseases, including, in most cases, Alzheimer's disease (AD. The aim of this study was to compare the amyloid load with 18F-AV45 positron emission tomography (PET between PCA and AD subjects. Methods: We performed 18F-AV45 PET, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker analysis and a neuropsychological assessment in 11 PCA patients and 12 AD patients. Results: The global and regional 18F-AV45 uptake was similar in the PCA and AD groups. No significant correlation was observed between global 18F-AV45 uptake and CSF biomarkers or between regional 18F-AV45 uptake and cognitive and affective symptoms. Conclusion: This 18F-AV45 PET amyloid imaging study showed no specific regional pattern of cortical 18F-AV45 binding in PCA patients. These results confirm that a distinct clinical phenotype in amnestic AD and PCA is not related to amyloid distribution.

  16. Bilateral cortical atrophy after severe brain trauma and extradural homatoma Atrofia cortical bilateral após traumatismo cranioencefálico grave e hematoma extradural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Louzada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a severe head injured 43-year old male patient with a large extradural hematoma, Glasgow Coma Scale 3 and dilated fixed pupils. Patient was promptly submitted to surgical evacuation of the lesion, but remained in persistent vegetative state in the post-operative time. Head computed tomography scans performed before surgery, and at early and late post-operative periods comparatively revealed extreme bilateral cortical atrophy. Late consequences of severe head trauma drastically affect the prognosis of patients, being its prevention, and neuroprotection against secondary injury still a therapeutical challenge for neurosurgeons.Relatamos o caso de um paciente de 43 anos, com traumatismo cranioencefálico grave, com grande hematoma extradural, Escala de Coma de Glasgow 3 e pupilas fixas e dilatadas. O paciente foi prontamente submetido à evacuação cirúrgica da lesão mas permaneceu em estado vegetativo persistente no período pós-operatório. As TC de crânio realizadas antes da cirurgia e nos períodos pós-operatórios precoce e tardio revelaram comparativamente extrema atrofia cerebral bilateral. As conseqüências tardias do traumatismo craniano grave afetam drasticamente o prognóstico dos pacientes, sendo sua prevenção, e a neuroproteção contra a injúria secundária ainda um desafio terapêutico para os neurocirurgiões.

  17. Fossil skulls reveal that blood flow rate to the brain increased faster than brain volume during human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Roger S.; Bosiocic, Vanya; Snelling, Edward P.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of human cognition has been inferred from anthropological discoveries and estimates of brain size from fossil skulls. A more direct measure of cognition would be cerebral metabolic rate, which is proportional to cerebral blood flow rate (perfusion). The hominin cerebrum is supplied almost exclusively by the internal carotid arteries. The sizes of the foramina that transmitted these vessels in life can be measured in hominin fossil skulls and used to calculate cerebral perfusion rate. Perfusion in 11 species of hominin ancestors, from Australopithecus to archaic Homo sapiens, increases disproportionately when scaled against brain volume (the allometric exponent is 1.41). The high exponent indicates an increase in the metabolic intensity of cerebral tissue in later Homo species, rather than remaining constant (1.0) as expected by a linear increase in neuron number, or decreasing according to Kleiber's Law (0.75). During 3 Myr of hominin evolution, cerebral tissue perfusion increased 1.7-fold, which, when multiplied by a 3.5-fold increase in brain size, indicates a 6.0-fold increase in total cerebral blood flow rate. This is probably associated with increased interneuron connectivity, synaptic activity and cognitive function, which all ultimately depend on cerebral metabolic rate.

  18. Temporal and spatial evolution of grey matter atrophy in primary progressive multiple sclerosis☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Bodini, Benedetta; Ridgway, Gerard R.; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Tozer, Daniel J.; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Thompson, Alan J.; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Grey matter (GM) atrophy occurs early in primary progressive MS (PPMS), but it is unknown whether its progression involves different brain regions at different rates, as is seen in other neurodegenerative diseases. We aimed to investigate the temporal and regional evolution of GM volume loss over 5 years and its relationship with disability progression in early PPMS. We studied 36 patients with PPMS within five years from onset and 19 age and gender-matched healthy controls with clinical and imaging assessments at study entry and yearly for 3 years and then at 5 years. Patients were scored on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and MS Functional Composite (MSFC) at each time-point. An unbiased longitudinal voxel-based morphometry approach, based on high-dimensional spatial alignment within-subject, was applied to the serial imaging data. The rate of local (voxel-wise) volume change per year was compared between groups and its relationship with clinical outcomes was assessed. Patients deteriorated significantly during the five years follow-up. Patients showed a greater decline of GM volume (p < 0.05, FWE-corrected) bilaterally in the cingulate cortex, thalamus, putamen, precentral gyrus, insula and cerebellum when compared to healthy controls over five years, although the rate of volume loss varied across the brain, and was the fastest in the cingulate cortex. Significant (p < 0.05, FWE-corrected) volume loss was detected in the left insula, left precuneus, and right cingulate cortex in patients at three years, as compared to baseline, whilst the bilateral putamen and the left superior temporal gyrus showed volume loss at five years. In patients, there was a relationship between a higher rate of volume loss in the bilateral cingulate cortex and greater clinical disability, as measured by the MSFC, at five years (Pearson's r = 0.49, p = 0.003). Longitudinal VBM demonstrated that the progression of GM atrophy in PPMS occurs at different rates in

  19. Temporal and spatial evolution of grey matter atrophy in primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Bodini, Benedetta; Ridgway, Gerard R; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Tozer, Daniel J; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Thompson, Alan J; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2014-02-01

    Grey matter (GM) atrophy occurs early in primary progressive MS (PPMS), but it is unknown whether its progression involves different brain regions at different rates, as is seen in other neurodegenerative diseases. We aimed to investigate the temporal and regional evolution of GM volume loss over 5years and its relationship with disability progression in early PPMS. We studied 36 patients with PPMS within five years from onset and 19 age and gender-matched healthy controls with clinical and imaging assessments at study entry and yearly for 3years and then at 5years. Patients were scored on the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and MS Functional Composite (MSFC) at each time-point. An unbiased longitudinal voxel-based morphometry approach, based on high-dimensional spatial alignment within-subject, was applied to the serial imaging data. The rate of local (voxel-wise) volume change per year was compared between groups and its relationship with clinical outcomes was assessed. Patients deteriorated significantly during the five years follow-up. Patients showed a greater decline of GM volume (p<0.05, FWE-corrected) bilaterally in the cingulate cortex, thalamus, putamen, precentral gyrus, insula and cerebellum when compared to healthy controls over five years, although the rate of volume loss varied across the brain, and was the fastest in the cingulate cortex. Significant (p<0.05, FWE-corrected) volume loss was detected in the left insula, left precuneus, and right cingulate cortex in patients at three years, as compared to baseline, whilst the bilateral putamen and the left superior temporal gyrus showed volume loss at five years. In patients, there was a relationship between a higher rate of volume loss in the bilateral cingulate cortex and greater clinical disability, as measured by the MSFC, at five years (Pearson's r=0.49, p=0.003). Longitudinal VBM demonstrated that the progression of GM atrophy in PPMS occurs at different rates in different regions across

  20. Somatic mosaicism of expanded CAG repeats in brains of patients with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy: Cellular populaton-dependent dynamics of mitotic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hiroki; Onodera, Osamu; Igarashi, Shuichi; Oyake, Mutsuo [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the DRPLA gene. We performed detailed quantitative analysis of the size and the size distribution (range) of the expanded CAG repeats in various regions of the CNS of eight autopsied patients with DRPLA. Expanded alleles (AE) showed considerable variations in size, as well as in range, depending on the region of the CNS, whereas normal alleles did not show such variations, which indicates the occurrence of somatic mosaicism of AE in the CNS. The AE in the cerebellar cortex were consistently smaller by two to five repeat units than those in the cerebellar white matter. Moreover, the AE in the cerebral cortex were smaller by one to four repeat units than those in the cerebral white matter. These results suggest that the smaller AE in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices represent those of neuronal cells. The ranges of the AE in the cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, and cerebellar white matter showed considerable variation ranging from 9 to 23 repeat units, whereas those in the cerebellar cortex showed little variance and were {approximately}7 repeat units. The ranges of the AE in the cerebral cortex, cerebral white matter, and cerebellar white matter were much broader in patients with higher ages at death than they were in patients with lower ages at death, raising the possibility that the range of AE increases with time, as the result of mitotic instability of AE. 41 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Research opportunities in muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbison, G. J. (Editor); Talbot, J. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Muscle atrophy in a weightless environment is studied. Topics of investigation include physiological factors of muscle atrophy in space flight, biochemistry, countermeasures, modelling of atrophied muscle tissue, and various methods of measurement of muscle strength and endurance. A review of the current literature and suggestions for future research are included.

  2. Correlation of hippocampal atrophy with hyperhomocysteinemia in hemodialysis patients: An exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesato, Kyoko; Ohtake, Takayasu; Mochida, Yasuhiro; Ishioka, Kunihiro; Oka, Machiko; Moriya, Hidekazu; Hidaka, Sumi; Kobayashi, Shuzo

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is one of the important critical issues in hemodialysis (HD) patients. However, the associating factors of brain atrophy in HD patients have not been fully elucidated. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 34 of total 72 HD outpatients in our dialysis center. These MRI images were analyzed by an application software; Voxel-based Specific Regional Analysis System for Alzheimer's Disease (VSRAD). VSRAD quantitatively calculates the extent of brain atrophy (percent of volume reduction) comparing with a MRI imaging database of 80 age-matched healthy controls. The extent of both hippocampal and whole-brain atrophy was evaluated with possible contributing factors. In all patients, the mean extent of hippocampal atrophy was 27.3%, and the mean extent of whole-brain atrophy was 11.2%. The extent of hippocampal atrophy was significantly correlated with low body mass index (BMI), total serum homocysteine (tHcy) levels, and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The extent of whole-brain atrophy showed significant correlations with age, hypoalbuminemia, and baPWV. Based on the multiple regression analysis, tHcy was an independent determinant of hippocampal atrophy (β = 0.460, R2 = 0.189, Patrophy (β = 0.594, R2 = 0.333, Patrophy was significantly correlated with hyperhomocysteinemia in HD patients.

  3. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC...

  4. Midlife exercise blood pressure, heart rate, and fitness relate to brain volume 2 decades later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartano, Nicole L; Himali, Jayandra J; Beiser, Alexa S; Lewis, Gregory D; DeCarli, Charles; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Seshadri, Sudha

    2016-04-05

    To determine whether poor cardiovascular (CV) fitness and exaggerated exercise blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were associated with worse brain morphology in later life. Framingham Offspring participants (n = 1,094, 53.9% female) free from dementia and CV disease (CVD) underwent an exercise treadmill test at a mean age of 40 ± 9 years. A second treadmill test and MRI scans of the brain were administered 2 decades later at mean age of 58 ± 8 years. Poor CV fitness and greater diastolic BP and HR response to exercise at baseline were associated with a smaller total cerebral brain volume (TCBV) almost 2 decades later (all p exercise systolic BP was also associated with smaller TCBV (p exercise BP and HR responses in middle-aged adults are associated with smaller brain volume nearly 2 decades later. Promotion of midlife CV fitness may be an important step towards ensuring healthy brain aging. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Cardiac Atrophy and Heart Failure In Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Mark; Yiu, Angela; Lyon, Alexander R

    2017-04-01

    Functional changes in the heart in patients with cancer can be a result of both the disease itself and various cancer therapies, and limiting cardiac damage has become an increasingly important issue as survival rates in patients with cancer have improved. Processes involved in cancer-induced cardiac atrophy may include cardiomyocyte atrophy and apoptosis, decreased protein synthesis, increased autophagy and proteolysis via the ubiquitin-proteosome system. Further to direct effects of malignancy on the heart, several chemotherapeutic agents are known to affect the myocardium, in particular the anthracyclines. The aim of this report is to review the effects of cancer and cancer treatment on the heart and what is known about the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, clinical strategies to limit and treat cancer-associated cardiac atrophy are discussed, emphasising the benefit of a multidisciplinary approach by cardiologists and oncologists to optimise models of care to improve outcomes for patients with cancer.

  6. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties.

  7. Structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the first 3 months of infant brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Dominic; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Curran, Megan; Buchthal, Steven D; Alicata, Daniel; Skranes, Jon; Johansen, Heather; Hernandez, Antonette; Yamakawa, Robyn; Kuperman, Joshua M; Dale, Anders M

    2014-10-01

    The very early postnatal period witnesses extraordinary rates of growth, but structural brain development in this period has largely not been explored longitudinally. Such assessment may be key in detecting and treating the earliest signs of neurodevelopmental disorders. To assess structural growth trajectories and rates of change in the whole brain and regions of interest in infants during the first 3 months after birth. Serial structural T1-weighted and/or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images were obtained for 211 time points from 87 healthy term-born or term-equivalent preterm-born infants, aged 2 to 90 days, between October 5, 2007, and June 12, 2013. We segmented whole-brain and multiple subcortical regions of interest using a novel application of Bayesian-based methods. We modeled growth and rate of growth trajectories nonparametrically and assessed left-right asymmetries and sexual dimorphisms. Whole-brain volume at birth was approximately one-third of healthy elderly brain volume, and did not differ significantly between male and female infants (347 388 mm3 and 335 509 mm3, respectively, P = .12). The growth rate was approximately 1%/d, slowing to 0.4%/d by the end of the first 3 months, when the brain reached just more than half of elderly adult brain volume. Overall growth in the first 90 days was 64%. There was a significant age-by-sex effect leading to widening separation in brain sizes with age between male and female infants (with male infants growing faster than females by 200.4 mm3/d, SE = 67.2, P = .003). Longer gestation was associated with larger brain size (2215 mm3/d, SE = 284, P = 4×10-13). The expected brain size of an infant born one week earlier than average was 5% smaller than average; at 90 days it will not have caught up, being 2% smaller than average. The cerebellum grew at the highest rate, more than doubling in 90 days, and the hippocampus grew at the slowest rate, increasing by 47% in 90 days. There was left

  8. Dysarthria Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury: Speaking Rate and Emphatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.T.; Kent, R.D.; Duffy, J.R.; Thomas, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    Prosodic abnormality is common in the dysarthria associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and adjustments of speaking rate and emphatic stress are often used as steps in treating the speech disorder in patients with TBI-induced dysarthria. However, studies to date do not present a clear and detailed picture of how speaking rate and emphatic…

  9. Geographic atrophy phenotype identification by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monés, Jordi; Biarnés, Marc

    2017-07-20

    To identify ocular phenotypes in patients with geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular degeneration (GA) using a data-driven cluster analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, natural history study of patients with GA who were followed for ≥6 months. Cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups within the population based on the presence of several phenotypic features: soft drusen, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD), primary foveal atrophy, increased fundus autofluorescence (FAF), greyish FAF appearance and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT). A comparison of features between the subgroups was conducted, and a qualitative description of the new phenotypes was proposed. The atrophy growth rate between phenotypes was then compared. Data were analysed from 77 eyes of 77 patients with GA. Cluster analysis identified three groups: phenotype 1 was characterised by high soft drusen load, foveal atrophy and slow growth; phenotype 3 showed high RPD load, extrafoveal and greyish FAF appearance and thin SFCT; the characteristics of phenotype 2 were midway between phenotypes 1 and 3. Phenotypes differed in all measured features (p≤0.013), with decreases in the presence of soft drusen, foveal atrophy and SFCT seen from phenotypes 1 to 3 and corresponding increases in high RPD load, high FAF and greyish FAF appearance. Atrophy growth rate differed between phenotypes 1, 2 and 3 (0.63, 1.91 and 1.73 mm(2)/year, respectively, p=0.0005). Cluster analysis identified three distinct phenotypes in GA. One of them showed a particularly slow growth pattern. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The predictive value of resting heart rate following osmotherapy in brain injury: back to basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanpour Mir Mahsa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of resting heart rate as a prognostic factor was described in several studies. An elevated heart rate is an independent risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events and total mortality in patients with coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, and the general population. Also heart rate is elevated in the Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS and the mortality due to MODS is highly correlated with inadequate sinus tachycardia. To evaluate the value of resting heart rate in predicting mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury along scoring systems like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation(APACHE II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS. Method By analyzing data which was collected from an open labeled randomized clinical trial that compared the different means of osmotherapy (mannitol vs bolus or infusion hypertonic saline, heart rate, GCS, APACHE II and SOFA score were measured at baseline and daily for 7 days up to 60 days and the relationship between elevated heart rate and mortality during the first 7 days and 60th day were assessed. Results After adjustments for confounding factors, although there was no difference in mean heart rate between either groups of alive and expired patients, however, we have found a relative correlation between 60th day mortality rate and resting heart rate (P=0.07. Conclusion Heart rate can be a prognostic factor for estimating mortality rate in brain injury patients along with APACHE II and SOFA scores in patients with brain injury.

  11. Neural correlates of cognitive impairment in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Aurélie; de Souza, Leonardo Cruz; Samri, Dalila; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Lacomblez, Lucette; Kalafat, Michel; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Cohen, Laurent; Dubois, Bruno; Habert, Marie-Odile; Sarazin, Marie

    2011-05-01

    With the prospect of disease-modifying drugs that will target the physiopathological process of Alzheimer's disease, it is now crucial to increase the understanding of the atypical focal presentations of Alzheimer's disease, such as posterior cortical atrophy. This study aimed to (i) characterize the brain perfusion profile in posterior cortical atrophy using regions of interest and a voxel-based approach; (ii) study the influence of the disease duration on the clinical and imaging profiles; and (iii) explore the correlations between brain perfusion and cognitive deficits. Thirty-nine patients with posterior cortical atrophy underwent a specific battery of neuropsychological tests, mainly targeting visuospatial functions, and a brain perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-ethyl cysteinate dimer. The imaging analysis included a comparison with a group of 24 patients with Alzheimer's disease, matched for age, disease duration and Mini-Mental State Examination, and 24 healthy controls. The single-photon emission computed tomography profile in patients with posterior cortical atrophy was characterized by extensive and severe hypoperfusion in the occipital, parietal, posterior temporal cortices and in a smaller cortical area corresponding to the frontal eye fields (Brodmann areas 6/8). Compared with patients with Alzheimer's disease, the group with posterior cortical atrophy showed more severe occipitoparietal hypoperfusion and higher perfusion in the frontal, anterior cingulate and mesiotemporal regions. When considering the disease duration, the functional changes began and remained centred on the posterior lobes, even in the late stage. Correlation analyses of brain perfusion and neuropsychological scores in posterior cortical atrophy highlighted the prominent role of left inferior parietal damage in acalculia, Gerstmann's syndrome, left-right indistinction and limb apraxia, whereas damage to the bilateral dorsal occipitoparietal regions appeared to be involved in B

  12. Idiopathic atrophie blanche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Lauretta; Chiarini, Caterina; Berti, Samantha; Massi, Daniela; Fabbri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of purpuric lesions followed by superficial, painful ulcers and development of lesions on the lower legs and on the dorsa of the feet, particularly in the summer. The patient was asymptomatic during the winter months. On physical examination she had irregular, scleroatrophic, white-ivory, coalescent lesions on a livedoid basis, with purpuric and, in some lesions, pigmented borders with numerous telangiectatic capillaries. These lesions were localized on the medial sides of the lower legs and on the dorsa of the feet (Figure 1). Laboratory investigations were normal or negative, including complete blood cell count, platelets, coagulation indexes, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, serum immunoglobulins, antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anticardiolipin, antiphospholipids, antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies, circulating immunocomplexes, complement fractions (C3, C4), cryoglobulins, rheumatoid factor, and Rose-Waaler reaction. The only laboratory abnormality was an elevated fibrinogen level (472 mg/dL). Doppler velocimetry excluded a chronic venous insufficiency. Thoracic x-ray and abdominal ultrasound were normal. A digital photoplethysmograph revealed functional Raynaud's phenomenon. A biopsy specimen taken from a purpuric lesion showed an atrophic epidermis with parakeratosis and focal spongiosis. An increased number of small-sized vessels were observed within a sclerotic dermis. Most of the vessels in the upper dermis were dilated and showed endothelial swelling; some were occluded due to amorphous hyaline microthrombi (Figure 2). There were fibrinoid deposits around the vessels with thickening of the vessel walls. Extravasated erythrocytes were found throughout the upper and mid-dermis. There was a sparse perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate but no vasculitis. Direct immunofluorescence showed a perivascular microgranular deposit of IgM (+), C3 (++), and fibrinogen/fibrin (+++). On the basis of

  13. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  14. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  15. Bone and muscle atrophy with suspension of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Marsh, C.; Evans, H.; Johnson, P.; Schneider, V.; Jhingran, S.

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify a suitable model for the study of muscle atrophy due to suspension in space, a modified version of the Morey tail suspension model was used to measure the atrophic responses of rat bone and muscle to 14-30 days of unloading of the hindlimbs. The progress of atrophy was measured by increases in methylene diphosphonate (MDP) uptake. It is found that bone uptake of methylene diphosphonate followed a phasic pattern similar to changes in the bone formation rate of immobilized dogs and cats. Increased MDP uptake after a period of 60 days indicated an accelerated bone metabolism. Maximum muscle atrophy in the suspended rats was distinctly different from immobilization atrophy. On the basis of the experimental results, it is concluded that the tail suspension model is an adequate simulation of bone atrophy due to suspension.

  16. Forecasting Age-Specific Brain Cancer Mortality Rates Using Functional Data Analysis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav P. Pokhrel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence and mortality rates are considered as a guideline for planning public health strategies and allocating resources. We apply functional data analysis techniques to model age-specific brain cancer mortality trend and forecast entire age-specific functions using exponential smoothing state-space models. The age-specific mortality curves are decomposed using principal component analysis and fit functional time series model with basis functions. Nonparametric smoothing methods are used to mitigate the existing randomness in the observed data. We use functional time series model on age-specific brain cancer mortality rates and forecast mortality curves with prediction intervals using exponential smoothing state-space model. We also present a disparity of brain cancer mortality rates among the age groups together with the rate of change of mortality rates. The data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER program of the United States. The brain cancer mortality rates, classified under International Classification Disease code ICD-O-3, were extracted from SEER*Stat software.

  17. [Posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyga, Volker Moræus; Western, Elin; Solheim, Hanne; Hassel, Bjørnar; Kerty, Emilia

    2015-06-02

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a neurodegenerative condition with atrophy of posterior parts of the cerebral cortex, including the visual cortex and parts of the parietal and temporal cortices. It presents early, in the 50s or 60s, with nonspecific visual disturbances that are often misinterpreted as ophthalmological, which can delay the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to present current knowledge about symptoms, diagnostics and treatment of this condition. The review is based on a selection of relevant articles in PubMed and on the authors' own experience with the patient group. Posterior cortical atrophy causes gradually increasing impairment in reading, distance judgement, and the ability to perceive complex images. Examination of higher visual functions, neuropsychological testing, and neuroimaging contribute to diagnosis. In the early stages, patients do not have problems with memory or insight, but cognitive impairment and dementia can develop. It is unclear whether the condition is a variant of Alzheimer's disease, or whether it is a separate disease entity. There is no established treatment, but practical measures such as the aid of social care workers, telephones with large keypads, computers with voice recognition software and audiobooks can be useful. Currently available treatment has very limited effect on the disease itself. Nevertheless it is important to identify and diagnose the condition in its early stages in order to be able to offer patients practical assistance in their daily lives.

  18. Endogenous Sensory Discrimination and Selection by a Fast Brain Switch for a High Transfer Rate Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Jiang, Ning; Dosen, Strahinja; Lin, Chuang; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Dremstrup, Kim; Farina, Dario

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we present a novel multi-class brain-computer interface (BCI) for communication and control. In this system, the information processing is shared by the algorithm (computer) and the user (human). Specifically, an electro-tactile cycle was presented to the user, providing the choice (class) by delivering timely sensory input. The user discriminated these choices by his/her endogenous sensory ability and selected the desired choice with an intuitive motor task. This selection was detected by a fast brain switch based on real-time detection of movement-related cortical potentials from scalp EEG. We demonstrated the feasibility of such a system with a four-class BCI, yielding a true positive rate of  ∼ 80% and  ∼ 70%, and an information transfer rate of  ∼ 7 bits/min and  ∼ 5 bits/min, for the movement and imagination selection command, respectively. Furthermore, when the system was extended to eight classes, the throughput of the system was improved, demonstrating the capability of accommodating a large number of classes. Combining the endogenous sensory discrimination with the fast brain switch, the proposed system could be an effective, multi-class, gaze-independent BCI system for communication and control applications.

  19. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  20. A longitudinal study of atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and normal aging revealed by cortical thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Yao

    Full Text Available In recent years, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI has attracted significant attention as an indicator of high risk for Alzheimer's disease. An understanding of the pathology of aMCI may benefit the development of effective clinical treatments for dementia. In this work, we measured the cortical thickness of 109 aMCI subjects and 99 normal controls (NC twice over two years. The longitudinal changes and the cross-sectional differences between the two types of participants were explored using the vertex thickness values. The thickness of the cortex in aMCI was found significantly reduced in both longitudinal and between-group comparisons, mainly in the temporal lobe, superolateral parietal lobe and some regions of the frontal cortices. Compared to NC, the aMCI showed a significantly high atrophy rate in the left lateral temporal lobe and left parahippocampal gyrus over two years. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between brain atrophy and the decline of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores was also found in the left superior and left middle temporal gyrus in aMCI. These findings demonstrated specific longitudinal spatial patterns of cortical atrophy in aMCI and NC. The higher atrophy rate in aMCI might be responsible for the accelerated functional decline in the aMCI progression process.

  1. A longitudinal study of atrophy in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and normal aging revealed by cortical thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhijun; Hu, Bin; Liang, Chuanjiang; Zhao, Lina; Jackson, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) has attracted significant attention as an indicator of high risk for Alzheimer's disease. An understanding of the pathology of aMCI may benefit the development of effective clinical treatments for dementia. In this work, we measured the cortical thickness of 109 aMCI subjects and 99 normal controls (NC) twice over two years. The longitudinal changes and the cross-sectional differences between the two types of participants were explored using the vertex thickness values. The thickness of the cortex in aMCI was found significantly reduced in both longitudinal and between-group comparisons, mainly in the temporal lobe, superolateral parietal lobe and some regions of the frontal cortices. Compared to NC, the aMCI showed a significantly high atrophy rate in the left lateral temporal lobe and left parahippocampal gyrus over two years. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between brain atrophy and the decline of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores was also found in the left superior and left middle temporal gyrus in aMCI. These findings demonstrated specific longitudinal spatial patterns of cortical atrophy in aMCI and NC. The higher atrophy rate in aMCI might be responsible for the accelerated functional decline in the aMCI progression process.

  2. Cerebellar Atrophy in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cerebellar Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailion, Alyssa S; King, Tricia Z; Wang, Liya; Fox, Michelle E; Mao, Hui; Morris, Robin M; Crosson, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    The cerebellum (CB) is known for its role in supporting processing speed (PS) and cognitive efficiencies. The CB often sustains damage from treatment and resection in pediatric patients with posterior fossa tumors. Limited research suggests that CB atrophy may be associated with the radiation treatment experienced during childhood. The purpose of the study was to measure cerebellar atrophy to determine its neurobehavioral correlates. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 25 adult survivors of CB tumors and age- and gender-matched controls (M age= 24 years (SD=5), 52% female). Average age at diagnosis was 9 years (SD=5) and average time since diagnosis was 15 years (SD=5). PS was measured by the Symbol Digit Modality Test. To quantify atrophy, an objective formula was developed based on prior literature, in which Atrophy=[(CB White+CB Gray Volume)/Intracranial Vault (ICV)]controls-[(CB White+CB Gray+Lesion Size Volume)/ICV]survivors. Regression analyses found that the interaction term (age at diagnosis*radiation) predicts CB atrophy; regression equations included the Neurological Predictor Scale, lesion size, atrophy, and the interaction term and accounted for 33% of the variance in oral PS and 48% of the variance in written PS. Both interactions suggest that individuals with smaller CB lesion size but a greater degree of CB atrophy had slower PS, whereas individuals with a larger CB lesion size and less CB atrophy were less affected. The results of the current study suggest that young age at diagnosis and radiation is associated with CB atrophy, which interacts with lesion size to impact both written and oral PS.

  3. The Predictive Value of Resting Heart rate Following Osmotherapy in Brain injury: Back to Basics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Hasanpour Mir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The importance of resting heart rate as a prognostic factor was described in several studies. An elevated heart rate is an independent risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events and total mortality in patients with coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, and the general population. Also heart rate is elevated in the Multi Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS and the mortality due to MODS is highly correlated with inadequate sinus tachycardia.To evaluate the value of resting heart rate in predicting mortality in patients with traumatic brain injury along scoring systems like Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation(APACHE II, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS.Method: By analyzing data which was collected from an open labeled randomized clinical trial that compared the different means of osmotherapy (mannitol vs bolus or infusion hypertonic saline, heart rate, GCS, APACHE II and SOFA score were measured at baseline and daily for 7 days up to 60 days and the relationship between elevatedheart rate and mortality during the first 7 days and 60th day were assessed.Results: After adjustments for confounding factors, although there was no difference in mean heart rate between either groups of alive and expired patients, however, we have found a relative correlation between 60th day mortality rate and resting heart rate (P=0.07.Conclusion: Heart rate can be a prognostic factor for estimating mortality rate in brain injury patients along with APACHE II and SOFA scores in patients with brain injury.Keywords: Heart rate, APACHE II score, SOFA score, GCS score, Head injury

  4. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  5. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  6. Dynamic brain mapping of behavior change: tracking response initiation and inhibition to changes in reinforcement rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Magee, Sandy; Hudgins, Caleb D

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive behavior change is supported by executive control processes distributed throughout a prefrontal-striatal-parietal network. Yet, the temporal dynamics of regions in the network have not been characterized. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we tracked changes brain activation while subjects initiated and inhibited responding in accordance with changes in reinforcement rate. During imaging, subjects completed a free-operant task that involved repeated transitions between fixed-ratio reinforcement and extinction (RF:EXT), where reinforcement rate decreased and responding was inhibited, and between extinction and fixed-ratio reinforcement (EXT:RF), where reinforcement rate increased and responding was initiated. Our whole-brain temporal assessment revealed that transitions which required initiating and inhibiting responding prompted positive phasic responses in a prefrontal-parietal network, the insula and thalamus. However, response initiation prompted by an increase in reinforcement rate during the EXT:RF transition elicited positive phasic responses in reward-sensitive striatal regions. Furthermore, response inhibition prompted by a decrease in reinforcement rate during the RF:EXT transition elicited negative phasic responses in ventral frontal regions sensitive to value and contingency. Our findings highlight the temporal dynamics of a brain network that supports behavioral changes (initiation and inhibition) resulting from changes in local reinforcement rates.

  7. Quantitative Rates of Brain Glucose Metabolism Distinguish Minimally Conscious from Vegetative State Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Kupers, Ron; Rodell, Anders

    2015-01-01

    these results reveal a significant correlation between whole-brain energy metabolism and level of consciousness, suggesting that quantitative values of CMRglc reveal consciousness in severely brain-injured patients.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 8 October 2014; doi:10......The differentiation of the vegetative or unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) from the minimally conscious state (MCS) is an important clinical issue. The cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) declines when consciousness is lost, and may reveal the residual cognitive function...

  8. Mechanical Characterization of Brain Tissue in Compression at Dynamic Strain Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.01.022

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when local mechanical load exceeds certain tolerance levels for brain tissue. Extensive research has been done previously for brain matter experiencing compression at quasistatic loading; however, limited data is available to model TBI under dynamic impact conditions. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform unconfined compression tests and stress relaxation tests at strain rates < 90/s. The brain tissue showed a stiffer response with increasing strain rates, showing that hyperelastic models are not adequate. Specifically, the compressive nominal stress at 30% strain was 8.83 +/- 1.94, 12.8 +/- 3.10 and 16.0 +/- 1.41 kPa (mean +/- SD) at strain rates of 30, 60 and 90/s, respectively. Relaxation tests were also conducted at 10%-50% strain with the average rise time of 10 ms, which can be used to derive time dependent parameters. Numerical simulations were performed using one-term Ogden model with initial shear modulus mu_0 = 6.06 +/- 1.44, 9.44 +/-...

  9. Correlation between hippocampal volumes and medial temporal lobe atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhikav, Vikas; Duraiswamy, Sharmila; Anand, Kuljeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Hippocampus undergoes atrophy in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Calculation of hippocampal volumes can be done by a variety of methods using T1-weighted images of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Medial temporal lobes atrophy (MTL) can be rated visually using T1-weighted MRI brain images. The present study was done to see if any correlation existed between hippocampal volumes and visual rating scores of the MTL using Scheltens Visual Rating Method. We screened 84 subjects presented to the Department of Neurology of a Tertiary Care Hospital and enrolled forty subjects meeting the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke, AD related Disease Association criteria. Selected patients underwent MRI brain and T1-weighted images in a plane perpendicular to long axis of hippocampus were obtained. Hippocampal volumes were calculated manually using a standard protocol. The calculated hippocampal volumes were correlated with Scheltens Visual Rating Method for Rating MTL. A total of 32 cognitively normal age-matched subjects were selected to see the same correlation in the healthy subjects as well. Sensitivity and specificity of both methods was calculated and compared. There was an insignificant correlation between the hippocampal volumes and MTL rating scores in cognitively normal elderly (n = 32; Pearson Correlation coefficient = 0.16, P > 0.05). In the AD Group, there was a moderately strong correlation between measured hippocampal volumes and MTL Rating (Pearson's correlation coefficient = -0.54; P correlation between hippocampal volume and Mini-Mental Status Examination in the AD group. Manual delineation was superior compared to the visual method (P correlation was present between manual hippocampal volume measurements and MTL scores. Sensitivity and specificity of manual measurement of hippocampus was higher compared to visual rating scores for MTL in patients with AD.

  10. One-Dimensional-Ratio Measures of Atrophy Progression in Multiple Sclerosis as Evaluated by Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martola, J.; Wiberg Kristoffersen, M.; Aspelin, P. (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Stawiarz, L.; Fredrikson, S.; Hillert, J. (Div. of Neurology, Dept. of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Bergstroem, J. (Medical Statistics Unit, Dept. of Learning, Informatics, Management, and Ethics (LIME), Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)); Flodmark, O. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2009-10-15

    Background: For decades, normalized one-dimensional (1D) measures have been used in the evaluation of brain atrophy. In multiple sclerosis (MS), the use of normalized linear measures over longitudinal follow-up remains insufficiently documented. Purpose: To evaluate the association between different regional atrophy measures and disability in MS patients over four decades in a longitudinal cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: 37 consecutively selected MS patients were included. At baseline, patients had a range of disease duration (1-33 years) and age (24-65 years). Each patient was followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for a mean of 9.25 years (range 7.3-10 years). Four 1D measures were applied at three time points on axial 5-mm T1-weighted images. Three clinical MS subgroups were represented: relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), secondary progressive MS (SPMS), and primary progressive MS (PPMS). Results: There were significant changes in all 1D ratios during follow-up. The Evans ratio (ER) and the bifrontal ratio (BFR) were associated with the development of disability. Changes of ER and BFR reflected more aggressive disease progression, as expressed by MS severity score (MSSS). Conclusion: All four normalized ratios showed uniform atrophy progression, suggesting a consistent rate of atrophy over long-term disease duration independent of MS course. Disability status correlated with 1D measures, suggesting that serial evaluation of Evans and bifrontal ratios might contribute to the radiological evaluation of MS patients.

  11. Atrophy of the Parietal Lobe in Preclinical Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Verhey, Frans R.; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults…

  12. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-José; Groot, Paul F C; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Majoie, Charles B; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  13. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Raaphorst; M.J. van Tol; P.F.C. Groot; E. Altena; Y.D. van der Werf; C.B. Majoie; A.J. van der Kooi; L.H. van den Berg; B. Schmand; M. de Visser; D.J. Veltman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  14. Atrophy of the Parietal Lobe in Preclinical Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Heidi I. L.; Van Boxtel, Martin P. J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; Gronenschild, Ed H. B. M.; Verhey, Frans R.; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults…

  15. The inheritance of peripapillary atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Healey, Paul R.; Mitchell, Paul; Gilbert, Clare E.; Lee, Anne J.; Ge, Dongliang; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE. To estimate the relative importance of genes and environment in peripapillary atrophy type beta (beta-PPA) in a classic twin study. METHODS. Female twin pairs (n = 506) aged 49 to 79 years were recruited from the St. Thomas' UK Adult Twin Registry. Peripapillary atrophy was identified from

  16. Differences in brain 5-HT transporter dissociation rates among animal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erreboe, I.; Plenge, P.; Mellerup, E.T. [Univ. of Copenhagen, Dept. of Pharmacology, Lab. of Neuropsychiatry, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1995-06-01

    The potential of using receptor-ligand dissociation rates as a model for investigating molecular changes in receptors was tested using the dissociation of [{sup 3}H]citalopram, [{sup 3}H]paroxetine and [{sup 3}H]imipramine from the brain 5-HT transporter of four different species (mouse, rat, pig and man). Since the dissociation rates of each of the three ligands differed in most of the species investigated, receptor-ligand dissociation rate constants would seem to be a sensitive measure of receptor conformation. The model could be useful in the search of structural variation in receptors whether attributable to genetic factors or to posttranslational modification. (au) (12 refs.).

  17. Subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation in the cerebellar subtype of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Esteban; Iranzo, Alex; Rauek, Sebastian; Lomeña, Francisco; Gallego, Judith; Ros, Doménec; Santamaría, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Nigrostriatal involvement is considered an additional feature in the new consensus criteria for the diagnosis of the cerebellar variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C). However, so far, only a few studies, which include a relative small number of patients, give support to this criterion. Our objective was to assess nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with MSA-C without parkinsonism by use of dopamine transporter single photon emission computed tomography (DAT SPECT). Thirteen patients that fulfilled criteria for possible or probable MSA-C and presented no parkinsonian signs, and 12 age-matched healthy controls underwent ((123)I-2-β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane ([(123)I]FP-CIT) SPECT. Patients were also evaluated through the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The mean duration of the cerebellar syndrome was 3.8 ± 1.7 years. DAT SPECT showed a significant decrease of striatal [(123)I]FP-CIT uptake ratios in patients (p MSA-C patients without parkinsonism have subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation which is not related to disease duration, cerebellar dysfunction, or pontine atrophy.

  18. [Psychosocial intellectual development of children with infantile cystinosis and cerebral atrophy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, J H; Wolff, G; Stoeppler, L; Heyer, R; Offner, G; Brodehl, J

    1979-09-01

    The psychosocial and intellectual development of 4 boys with nephropathic cystinosis and brain atrophy documented by cranial computerized tomography was investigated by use of biographical data and psychological tests (HAWIK, Deutscher Rechtschreibtest). Inspite of the brain atrophy the patients showed low-normal intellectual capacities and mainly average school performance. There were no psychosocial abnormalities correlated to the primary metabolic disease. However, renal dwarfism led to mascotism requiring psychotherapy.

  19. 不同认知水平的广泛性脑萎缩患者磁共振波谱分析%The analysis of the neural metabolites in patients with global brain atrophy and different cognitive function in hippocampus and frontal cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊丽; 章军建; 孙冬; 吴光耀

    2009-01-01

    Objective Global brain atrophy was reported as an important structural change in Alzheimer's disease (AD), while it has been detected in the older person with normal cognitive function. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the difference of the neural metabolites in the left hippocampus (HIP) and left frontal cortex (FC) among patients who showed global brain atrophy but with different cognitive function. Methods The 33 patients with global brain atrophy confirmed by MRI scan, underwent a comprehensively clinical and neuropsychological assessment including mini-mental state examination (MMSE), activities of daily living scale (ADL) and clock drawing test(CDT). According to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition(DSM-Ⅳ) and Mayo clinic rochester(MCR), 14 patients were diagnosed as AD, 9 patients as amnestic mild cognitive impairment(aMCI), and 10 patients as normal cognition. Every person was taken a cerebral proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy(1H-MRS) scan to measure the levels of n-acetylaspartate(NAA), choline(Cho), myo-inositol(MI) and Creatine(Cr) in the left HIP and the left FC. Results While compared with the group with normal cognition, the ratio of NAA/Cr in the AD group reduced 10.2% in the left HIP and 5.3% in the left FC, and the ratio of Cho/Cr increased 17.5% in the left HIP and 16.7% in the left FC, and the ratio of MI/Cr increased 39.5% in the left HIP and 19.2% in the left FC. The ratio of NAA/Cr of the left HIP in the AD group was lower than that in the aMCI group at the decrease rate of 6.4%, while the ratio of NAA/Cr of the left FC was not significantly different between the two groups. The AD group had higher ratios of Cho/Cr at the increase rate of 9.3% in the HIP and 12.3% in the FC, and higher MI/Cr ratios at the increase rate of 30% in the HIP and 17% in the FC than in the aMCI group. The aMCI group showed significantly lower ratio of NAA/Cr at the decrease rate of 4.1% and higher ratio of

  20. Abnormalities of fixation, saccade and pursuit in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Timothy J; Kaski, Diego; Yong, Keir X X; Paterson, Ross W; Slattery, Catherine F; Ryan, Natalie S; Schott, Jonathan M; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-01

    The clinico-neuroradiological syndrome posterior cortical atrophy is the cardinal 'visual dementia' and most common atypical Alzheimer's disease phenotype, offering insights into mechanisms underlying clinical heterogeneity, pathological propagation and basic visual phenomena (e.g. visual crowding). Given the extensive attention paid to patients' (higher order) perceptual function, it is surprising that there have been no systematic analyses of basic oculomotor function in this population. Here 20 patients with posterior cortical atrophy, 17 patients with typical Alzheimer's disease and 22 healthy controls completed tests of fixation, saccade (including fixation/target gap and overlap conditions) and smooth pursuit eye movements using an infrared pupil-tracking system. Participants underwent detailed neuropsychological and neurological examinations, with a proportion also undertaking brain imaging and analysis of molecular pathology. In contrast to informal clinical evaluations of oculomotor dysfunction frequency (previous studies: 38%, current clinical examination: 33%), detailed eyetracking investigations revealed eye movement abnormalities in 80% of patients with posterior cortical atrophy (compared to 17% typical Alzheimer's disease, 5% controls). The greatest differences between posterior cortical atrophy and typical Alzheimer's disease were seen in saccadic performance. Patients with posterior cortical atrophy made significantly shorter saccades especially for distant targets. They also exhibited a significant exacerbation of the normal gap/overlap effect, consistent with 'sticky fixation'. Time to reach saccadic targets was significantly associated with parietal and occipital cortical thickness measures. On fixation stability tasks, patients with typical Alzheimer's disease showed more square wave jerks whose frequency was associated with lower cerebellar grey matter volume, while patients with posterior cortical atrophy showed large saccadic intrusions

  1. Utilizing MRI to measure the transcytolemmal water exchange rate for the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, James D.; Bretthorst, G. Larry; Neil, Jeffrey J.

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the exchange of water between the intra- and extracellular compartments of the brain is important both for understanding basic physiology and for the interpretation of numerous MRI results. However, due to experimental difficulties, this basic property has proven difficult to measure in vivo. In our experiments, we will track overall changes in the relaxation rate constant of water in the rat brain following the administration of gadoteridol, a relaxation agent, to the extracellular compartment. From these changes, we will utilize probability theory and Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to infer the compartment specific water exchange and relaxation rate constants. Due to the correlated nature of these parameters and our inability to independently observe them, intelligent model selection is critical. Through analysis of simulated data sets, we refine our choice of model and method of data collection to optimize applicability to the in vivo situation.

  2. The Relationship Between Heart Rate Recovery and Brain Natruretic Peptide in Patients With Chest Discomfort

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Bum Soo; Park, Wan; Huh, Jung Kwon; Kim, Byung Jin; Sung, Ki Chul; Kang, Jin Ho; Lee, Man Ho; Park, Jung Ro

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives The correlation between brain natruretic peptide (BNP) level and cardiac autonomic function has been studied in type 2 diabetic patients. However, there is limited data from patients with normal systolic function. We evaluated the association between heart rate recovery (HRR) representing autonomic dysfunction and three plasma BNP levels: pre-exercise, post-exercise, and change during exercise in patients with normal systolic function. Subjects and Methods Subjects i...

  3. Frequency, Clinical Correlates, and Ratings of Behavioral Changes in Primary Brain Tumor Patients: A Preliminary Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Grahame K.; Eng-Siew eKoh; Diane eWhiting; Wright, Kylie M.; Teresa eSimpson; Rochelle eFirth; Lauren eGillett; Kathryn eYounan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies have addressed the specific behavioral changes associated with primary brain tumor (PBT). This paper will report on the frequency and demographic/clinical correlates of such behaviors, and the reliability of rating such behaviors among people with PBT, family informants, and clinicians. The association of behavioral changes and patient functional status will also be discussed. Methods A total of 57 patients with 37 family informants were recruited from two large...

  4. Midlife obesity and trajectories of brain volume changes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Ira; Beydoun, May A; An, Yang; Davatzikos, Christos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B; Resnick, Susan M

    2012-09-01

    Although obesity has been linked to structural brain changes, little is known about its associations with the rates of brain atrophy. We examined associations between global (BMI) and central (waist circumference) midlife obesity and subsequent trajectories of regional brain atrophy in 152 individuals [M (age) = 69 ± 7.8] prospectively followed through the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging; 21 individuals became impaired during follow-up. We report no associations (P > 0.05) between either global or central midlife obesity and subsequent rates of regional brain volume changes against a background of age-related atrophy in older individuals who remained nondemented. When looking at the entire sample, greater decline was observed in the volume of gray matter, precuneus, cingulate and orbito-frontal gyri for globally obese (P obesity, a different pattern of results emerged. Overall, our results suggest that midlife obesity may be an important modifier of brain atrophy in individuals who are developing cognitive impairment and dementia, while it has little effect on structural brain integrity in nondemented older adults. Moreover, the discrepancies in findings between studies may be in part due to participant sampling and methodological differences. Published 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  6. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  7. Resolving rates of mutation in the brain using single-neuron genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrony, Gilad D; Lee, Eunjung; Park, Peter J; Walsh, Christopher A

    2016-02-22

    Whether somatic mutations contribute functional diversity to brain cells is a long-standing question. Single-neuron genomics enables direct measurement of somatic mutation rates in human brain and promises to answer this question. A recent study (Upton et al., 2015) reported high rates of somatic LINE-1 element (L1) retrotransposition in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex that would have major implications for normal brain function, and suggested that these events preferentially impact genes important for neuronal function. We identify aspects of the single-cell sequencing approach, bioinformatic analysis, and validation methods that led to thousands of artifacts being interpreted as somatic mutation events. Our reanalysis supports a mutation frequency of approximately 0.2 events per cell, which is about fifty-fold lower than reported, confirming that L1 elements mobilize in some human neurons but indicating that L1 mosaicism is not ubiquitous. Through consideration of the challenges identified, we provide a foundation and framework for designing single-cell genomics studies.

  8. MTA index: a simple 2D-method for assessing atrophy of the medial temporal lobe using clinically available neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eMenéndez-González

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Despite a strong correlation between severity of Alzheimer disease (AD pathology and medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA, its measurement has not been widely used in daily clinical practice as a criterion in the diagnosis of prodromal and probable AD. This is mainly because the methods available to date are sophisticated and difficult to implement for routine use in most hospitals. In this pilot study we aim to describe a novel, simple and objective method for measuring the rate of MTA in relation to the global atrophy using clinically available neuroimaging and describe the rationale behind this method.Description: This method consists of calculating a ratio of 3 regions traced manually on one single coronal MRI slide at the level of the interpeduncular fossa: i the medial temporal lobe region (A; ii the parenchyma within the medial temporal region, that includes the hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus -the fimbriae taenia and choroid plexus are excluded- (B; and iii the body of the ipsilateral lateral ventricle (C. Therefore we can compute the ratio Medial Temporal Atrophy index at both sides as follows: MTAi = (A-B x10/C.Conclusions: The MTAi is a simple 2D-method for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. This method can be useful for a more accurate diagnosis of AD in routine clinical practice. Further studies are needed to assess the usefulness of MTAi in the diagnosis of early AD, in tracking the progression of AD and in the differential diagnosis of AD with other dementias.

  9. Incidental extracerebral findings on brain nonenhanced magnetic resonance imaging: frequency, nondetection rate, and clinical importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ming-Liang; Wei, Xiao-Er [School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Lu, Li-Yan [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing (China); Li, Wen-Bin [School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Kashgar Prefecture Second People' s Hospital, Imaging Center, Kashgar (China)

    2017-03-15

    This study aims to elucidate the frequency, nondetection rate, and clinical importance of incidental extracerebral findings (IECFs) on brain nonenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 8284 brain MRIs performed between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2015 were evaluated for the presence of IECFs and the distribution of IECFs was analyzed. IECFs were categorized as E1 (clinically unimportant, e.g., sinus mucosal thickening); E2 (likely unimportant, e.g., pharyngeal mucosal symmetrical thickening); and E3 (potentially important, e.g., pharyngeal mucosal asymmetrical thickening). The nondetection rate was determined by comparing the results of the structured approach with the initial MRI reports. The medical records were examined for patients with E3 IECFs to assess clinical importance and outcome of these lesions. A total of 5992 IECFs were found in 4469 of the 8284 patients (54.0%). E1 findings constituted 82.2% (4924/5992) of all IECFs; E2 constituted 16.6% (995/5992) and E3 constituted 1.2% (73/5992). Overall IECFs and E1 findings were significantly more common in male patients (P < 0.05). Statistically significant difference was also seen between the different age groups (P < 0.001). The nondetection rate was 56.9% (3409/5992) for overall IECFs and 32.9% (24/73) for E3 IECFs. Of the 73 patients with E3 IECFs, 34 (46.6%) received final diagnosis and appropriate treatment during the study period. IECFs are prevalent in clinical patients on brain MR images with a nondetection rate of 32.9% for potentially important (E3) findings. The reporting of IECFs according to clinical importance is helpful for patients' management. (orig.)

  10. Multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies.

  11. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  12. Noise in attractor networks in the brain produced by graded firing rate representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan J Webb

    Full Text Available Representations in the cortex are often distributed with graded firing rates in the neuronal populations. The firing rate probability distribution of each neuron to a set of stimuli is often exponential or gamma. In processes in the brain, such as decision-making, that are influenced by the noise produced by the close to random spike timings of each neuron for a given mean rate, the noise with this graded type of representation may be larger than with the binary firing rate distribution that is usually investigated. In integrate-and-fire simulations of an attractor decision-making network, we show that the noise is indeed greater for a given sparseness of the representation for graded, exponential, than for binary firing rate distributions. The greater noise was measured by faster escaping times from the spontaneous firing rate state when the decision cues are applied, and this corresponds to faster decision or reaction times. The greater noise was also evident as less stability of the spontaneous firing state before the decision cues are applied. The implication is that spiking-related noise will continue to be a factor that influences processes such as decision-making, signal detection, short-term memory, and memory recall even with the quite large networks found in the cerebral cortex. In these networks there are several thousand recurrent collateral synapses onto each neuron. The greater noise with graded firing rate distributions has the advantage that it can increase the speed of operation of cortical circuitry.

  13. Differences in parent and teacher rating of everyday executive function in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wochos, G C; Semerjian, C H; Walsh, K S

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to compare executive function (EF) outcomes in pediatric brain tumor (BT) survivors compared with healthy children (HC) across multiple settings. This retrospective cross-sectional study of BT survivors and age- and gender-matched HC analyzed scale patterns of parent and teacher ratings of EF (Behavior Ratings of Executive Function; BRIEF). We also analyzed relationships between groups and raters (parent/teacher) and clinical elevations across EF domains on the BRIEF. Group differences in aspects of EF emerged from parent ratings in working memory (WM), while significant interactions from teacher ratings emerged on nearly all EF scales. Parents reported impaired cognitive/behavioral flexibility in the BT group four times more than parents of HC. Teachers rated survivors significantly more poorly as a group on the majority of EF domains, and indicated clinical impairment in cognitive/behavioral flexibility, emotional regulation, self-starting/initiation, WM, and planning and organization (P/O) four to ten times more often than the teachers of HC. Overall, teacher ratings of EF impairment in pediatric BT survivors were significantly greater than parent ratings, who reported far fewer EF problems. Possible explanations for inter-rater discrepancies include potential reporting bias/response shift in parents and/or differences in EF demands across settings.

  14. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  15. Microglial imaging with positron emission tomography and atrophy measurements with magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis : a correlative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Debruyne, JC; Van Laere, KJ; De Vos, F; Keppens, J; Strijckmans, K; Achten, E; Slegers, G; Dierckx, RA; Korf, J; De Reuck, JL

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of the present study were to assess brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during different disease stages and to investigate by PET and [C-11]PK11195, a marker of microglial activation, the relationship between inflammation, atrophy and clinically relevant measu

  16. Microglial imaging with positron emission tomography and atrophy measurements with magnetic resonance imaging in multiple sclerosis : a correlative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versijpt, J; Debruyne, JC; Van Laere, KJ; De Vos, F; Keppens, J; Strijckmans, K; Achten, E; Slegers, G; Dierckx, RA; Korf, J; De Reuck, JL

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of the present study were to assess brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients during different disease stages and to investigate by PET and [C-11]PK11195, a marker of microglial activation, the relationship between inflammation, atrophy and clinically relevant measu

  17. Self-awareness of peer-rated social attributes in children with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kelly R; Bigler, Erin D; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Rubin, Kenneth; Taylor, H Gerry; Vannatta, Kathryn; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated self-awareness of peer-rated social attributes and its relations to executive function (EF), theory of mind (TOM), and psychosocial adjustment in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Self- and peer perceptions of classroom social behavior were assessed for 87 children 8-13 years of age: 15 with severe TBI, 40 with complicated mild/moderate TBI, and 32 with orthopedic injury. Participants completed measures of EF and TOM, and parents rated children's psychosocial adjustment. Self-ratings of classroom social behavior did not differ between injury groups. Self- and peer ratings generally agreed, although children with severe TBI rated themselves as less rejected/victimized than did their peers. Higher EF predicted better self- and peer ratings and smaller self-peer discrepancies, which in turn predicted better adjustment. Children with TBI show variable social self-awareness, which relates to EF and adjustment. Future studies should identify additional factors that contribute to limited insight. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Comparison of brain atrophy patterns between first-episode late-onset depression and mild cognitive impairment%首次发作晚发抑郁与轻度认知损害脑萎缩模式的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会英; 张娜; 张美燕; 袁慧书; 苏敏莹; 于欣; 王华丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the brain atrophy patterns measured with optimized voxel-based morphometry(VBM) between patients with first-episode late-onset depression(LOD)and individuals with mild cognitive impairment(MCI) ,and to explore the relationship between brain volume and cognitive functions. Methods Nine LOD patients (LOD group) , fourteen MCI subjects (MCI group), and 16 healthy controls (NC group) were enrolled. General cognitive function was assessed with MMSE and CASI. All subjects were assessed with cross-cultural neuropsychological test battery. High-resolution 3D T1 WI images were analyzed using VBM. Results Compared with NC group,there was significant gray matter(GM) atrophy in bilateral frontal and parietal regions and limbic system in LOD group (P< 0. 01). Compared with MCI group,LOD group showed significant atrophy in frontal lobe and limbic system (P < 0. 01). In LOD group, object memory scores positively correlated with GM volume in multiple brain regions (r = 0.49 -0.76,P < 0. 01). Positive correlation was also observed between verbal fluency score and GM density in right superior temporal gyrus (r = 0. 72,P brain atrophy than MCI. Atrophy in frontal lobe and limbic system is closely associated with cognitive decline in LOD.%目的 用优化的基于体素的形态学研究方法(VBM)比较首次发作晚发抑郁(LOD)与轻度认知功能损害(MCI)患者的脑萎缩模式,探索LOD患者脑结构与认知功能的关系.方法 选择LOD、MCI及正常老人39例,分为LOD组9例,MCI组14例和NC组16例,用简易精神状态检查量表和认知功能筛检工具评估3组总体认知功能,跨文化神经心理成套测验评估不同领域认知功能.用VBM对颅脑高分辨率3D T1WI进行分析.结果 与NC组比较,LOD组双侧额叶、边缘系统和顶叶多个脑区明显萎缩(P<0.01).与MCI组比较,LOD组双侧额叶和边缘系统多个脑区明显萎缩(P<0.01).LOD组

  19. Measurement of cerebral blood flow rate and its relationship with brain function using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Yi; Zhao, Yuqian; Dou, Shidan; Ma, Yushu; Ma, Zhenhe

    2016-03-01

    Activity of brain neurons will lead to changes in local blood flow rate (BFR). Thus, it is important to measure the local BFR of cerebral cortex on research of neuron activity in vivo, such as rehabilitation evaluation after stroke, etc. Currently, laser Doppler flowmetry is commonly used for blood flow measurement, however, relatively low resolution limits its application. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful noninvasive 3D imaging modality with high temporal and spatial resolutions. Furthermore, OCT can provide flow distribution image by calculating Doppler frequency shift which makes it possible for blood flow rate measurement. In this paper, we applied OCT to measure the blood flow rate of the primary motor cortex in rats. The animal was immobilized and anesthetized with isoflurane, an incision was made along the sagittal suture, and bone was exposed. A skull window was opened on the primary motor cortex. Then, blood flow rate changes in the primary motor cortex were monitored by our homemade spectral domain OCT with a stimulation of the passive movement of the front legs. Finally, we established the relationship between blood flow rate and the test design. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of OCT in the evaluation of cerebral cortex function.

  20. MRI phenotypes based on cerebral lesions and atrophy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauhid, Shahamat; Neema, Mohit; Healy, Brian C; Weiner, Howard L; Bakshi, Rohit

    2014-11-15

    While disease categories (i.e. clinical phenotypes) of multiple sclerosis (MS) are established, there remains MRI heterogeneity among patients within those definitions. MRI-defined lesions and atrophy show only moderate inter-correlations, suggesting that they represent partly different processes in MS. We assessed the ability of MRI-based categorization of cerebral lesions and atrophy in individual patients to identify distinct phenotypes. We studied 175 patients with MS [age (mean ± SD) 42.7 ± 9.1 years, 124 (71%) women, Expanded Disability Status (EDSS) score 2.5 ± 2.3, n = 18 (10%) clinically isolated demyelinating syndrome (CIS), n=115 (66%) relapsing-remitting (RR), and n = 42 (24%) secondary progressive (SP)]. Brain MRI measures included T2 hyperintense lesion volume (T2LV) and brain parenchymal fraction (to assess whole brain atrophy). Medians were used to create bins for each parameter, with patients assigned a low or high severity score. Four MRI phenotype categories emerged: Type I = low T2LV/mild atrophy [n = 67 (38%); CIS = 14, RR = 47, SP = 6]; Type II = high T2LV/mild atrophy [n = 21 (12%); RR = 19, SP = 2]; Type III = low T2LV/high atrophy [n = 21 (12%); CIS = 4, RR = 16, SP = 1]; and Type IV = high T2LV/high atrophy [n = 66 (38%); RR = 33, S P = 33]. Type IV was the most disabled and was the only group showing a correlation between T2LV vs. BPF and MRI vs. EDSS score (all p atrophy in individual patients to identify four phenotypes in MS. Most patients have congruent extremes related to the degree of lesions and atrophy. However, many have a dissociation. Longitudinal studies will help define the stability of these patterns and their role in risk stratification. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. The effects of laboratory housing and spatial enrichment on brain size and metabolic rate in the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischa P. Turschwell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It has long been hypothesised that there is a functional correlation between brain size and metabolic rate in vertebrates. The present study tested this hypothesis in wild-caught adult mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki by testing for an intra-specific association between resting metabolic rate (RMR and brain size while controlling for variation in body size, and through the examination of the effects of spatial enrichment and laboratory housing on body mass-independent measures of brain size and RMR. Controlling for body mass, there was no relationship between brain size and RMR in wild-caught fish. Contrary to predictions, spatial enrichment caused a decrease in mass-independent brain size, highlighting phenotypic plasticity in the adult brain. As expected, after controlling for differences in body size, wild-caught fish had relatively larger brains than fish that had been maintained in the laboratory for a minimum of six weeks, but wild-caught fish also had significantly lower mass-independent RMR. This study demonstrates that an organisms' housing environment can cause significant plastic changes to fitness related traits including brain size and RMR. We therefore conclude that current standard laboratory housing conditions may cause captive animals to be non-representative of their wild counterparts, potentially undermining the transferability of previous laboratory-based studies of aquatic ectothermic vertebrates to wild populations.

  2. The effects of laboratory housing and spatial enrichment on brain size and metabolic rate in the eastern mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turschwell, Mischa P; White, Craig R

    2016-01-21

    It has long been hypothesised that there is a functional correlation between brain size and metabolic rate in vertebrates. The present study tested this hypothesis in wild-caught adult mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki by testing for an intra-specific association between resting metabolic rate (RMR) and brain size while controlling for variation in body size, and through the examination of the effects of spatial enrichment and laboratory housing on body mass-independent measures of brain size and RMR. Controlling for body mass, there was no relationship between brain size and RMR in wild-caught fish. Contrary to predictions, spatial enrichment caused a decrease in mass-independent brain size, highlighting phenotypic plasticity in the adult brain. As expected, after controlling for differences in body size, wild-caught fish had relatively larger brains than fish that had been maintained in the laboratory for a minimum of six weeks, but wild-caught fish also had significantly lower mass-independent RMR. This study demonstrates that an organisms' housing environment can cause significant plastic changes to fitness related traits including brain size and RMR. We therefore conclude that current standard laboratory housing conditions may cause captive animals to be non-representative of their wild counterparts, potentially undermining the transferability of previous laboratory-based studies of aquatic ectothermic vertebrates to wild populations.

  3. [Atrophy of the bone marrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziecioł, J; Kemona, A; Sulik, M; Sulkowski, S; Brykalska, A; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Ostapiuk, H

    1990-01-01

    The authors made a quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow with particular consideration of its atrophy in the course of various diseases. The material consisted of 407 non-selected autopsy cases. For a morphometric analysis the bone marrow was sampled from the sternum, ala ossis illi and spine. In the quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue we took into account age groups as quantitative changes appear with age. Atrophy of the bone marrow was in 19.4% of the studied cases. The presence of bone marrow atrophy was found in the course of various diseases, most frequently neoplastic, particularly in patients aged from 50 to 59 years.

  4. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Rojas, Mauricio; Li, Luge; Selzman, Craig H; Tang, Ru-Hang; Stansfield, William E; Rodriguez, Jessica E; Glass, David J; Patterson, Cam

    2009-04-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, induced by various etiologies such as high blood pressure and aortic stenosis, develops in response to increased afterload and represents a common intermediary in the development of heart failure. Understandably then, the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy is associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular event risk and represents an important, yet underdeveloped, target of therapeutic research. Recently, we determined that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific protein, inhibits the development of experimentally induced pathological; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression. This prompted us to investigate the role of MuRF1 in two independent mouse models of cardiac atrophy: 1) cardiac hypertrophy regression after reversal of transaortic constriction (TAC) reversal and 2) dexamethasone-induced atrophy. Using echocardiographic, histological, and gene expression analyses, we found that upon TAC release, cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas in MuRF1(-/-) mice decreased approximately 70% less than in wild type mice in the 4 wk after release. This was in striking contrast to wild-type mice, who returned to baseline cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte size within 4 days of TAC release. Despite these differences in atrophic remodeling, the transcriptional activation of cardiac hypertrophy measured by beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and brain natriuretic peptide was attenuated similarly in both MuRF1(-/-) and wild-type hearts after TAC release. In the second model, MuRF1(-/-) mice also displayed resistance to dexamethasone-induced cardiac atrophy, as determined by echocardiographic analysis. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MuRF1 is essential for cardiac atrophy in vivo, both in the setting of therapeutic

  5. Inducing rat brain CYP2D with nicotine increases the rate of codeine tolerance; predicting the rate of tolerance from acute analgesic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Douglas M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-08-21

    Repeated opioid administration produces analgesic tolerance, which may lead to dose escalation. Brain CYP2D metabolizes codeine to morphine, a bioactivation step required for codeine analgesia. Higher brain, but not liver, CYP2D is found in smokers and nicotine induces rat brain, but not liver, CYP2D expression and activity. Nicotine induction of rat brain CYP2D increases acute codeine conversion to morphine, and analgesia, however the role of brain CYP2D on the effects of repeated codeine exposure and tolerance is unknown. Rats were pretreated with nicotine (brain CYP2D inducer; 1mg/kg subcutaneously) or vehicle (saline; 1ml/kg subcutaneously). Codeine (40-60mg/kg oral-gavage) or morphine (20-30mg/kg oral-gavage) was administered daily and analgesia was assessed daily using the tail-flick reflex assay. Nicotine (versus saline) pretreatment increased acute codeine analgesia (1.32-fold change in AUC0-60min; p0.8), or the rate of morphine tolerance (8.1%/day versus 7.6%; p>0.9). The rate of both codeine and morphine tolerance (loss in peak analgesia from day 1 to day 4) correlated with initial analgesic response on day 1 (R=0.97, p<001). Increasing brain CYP2D altered initial analgesia and subsequent rate of tolerance. Variation in an individual's initial response to analgesic (e.g. high initial dose, smoking) may affect the rate of tolerance, and thereby the risk for dose escalation and/or opioid dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Autoimmune antibody decline in Parkinson's disease and Multiple System Atrophy; a step towards immunotherapeutic strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Folke, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parkinson's' disease (PD) and Multiple System Atrophy (MSA) are progressive brain disorders characterized by intracellular accumulations of α-synuclein and nerve cell loss in specific brain areas. This loss causes problems with movement, balance and/or autonomic functions. Naturally...

  7. Early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA and olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA : a computed tomographic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal P

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomographic (CT studies in olivopontocerebellar atrophies (OPCA and ′early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (EOCA′ are few and vary widely in methodology and criteria for cerebellar and brainstem atrophy. In this prospective study, CT scan observations on 26 patients (EOCA-11, OPCA-15 were compared with 31 controls using qualitative and quantitative assessment of cisterns, ventricles and atrophy of brain. Vermian and/or cerebellar hemispheric (predominantly anterior atrophy was present in 80.8% and both were equally common. Cerebral cortical atrophy (26.9% and leukoariosis (15.4% were less frequently seen. Statistically significant atrophy of pons, brachium pontis, cerebellum and midbrain was noted in patient group. No significant differences were observed between EOCA and OPCA groups. Evidence of atrophy did not correlate with either the duration of illness or the severity of cerebellar ataxia in both the groups. The severity of brainstem atrophy in 14 patients with and 12 patients without abnormal brainstem auditory evoked response did not differ significantly. This study highlights the methodology of CT evaluation for brainstem and cerebellar atrophy, draws attention to cerebral atrophy and emphasizes the lack of significant differences in CT morphology between OPCA and EOCA patients.

  8. Optic atrophy and glaucomatous cupping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Maumenee, A E

    1978-02-01

    We reviewed 170 eyes of 112 patients with optic atrophy from various causes. Special attention was directed towards measured cup:disk ratios as well as presence of glaucomatous-like cupping of the optic nerve head. We observed a small but significant increase in nerve head cupping in eyes with optic atrophy when compared to contralateral eyes, as well as to eyes of 50 diabetic patients. No characteristic glaucomatous disk changes were documented. We evaluated these findings with respect to possible causes of glaucomatous disk and field changes.

  9. Brain activations to emotional pictures are differentially associated with valence and arousal ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje B M Gerdes

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated the neural responses triggered by emotional pictures, but the specificity of the involved structures such as the amygdala or the ventral striatum is still under debate. Furthermore, only few studies examined the association of stimuli’s valence and arousal and the underlying brain responses. Therefore, we investigated brain responses with functional magnetic resonance imaging of 17 healthy subjects to pleasant and unpleasant affective pictures with comparable arousal levels and afterwards assessed ratings of valence and arousal. As expected, unpleasant pictures strongly activated the right and left amygdala, the right hippocampus, and the medial occipital lobe, whereas pleasant pictures elicited significant activations in left occipital regions, and in parts of the medial temporal lobe. The direct comparison of unpleasant and pleasant pictures which were comparable in arousal clearly indicated stronger amygdala activation in response to the unpleasant pictures. Most important, correlational analyses revealed on the one hand that the arousal of unpleasant pictures was significantly associated with activations in the right amygdala and the left caudate body. On the other hand, valence of pleasant pictures was significantly correlated with activations in the right caudate head, extending to the nucleus accumbens (NAcc and the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. These findings support the notion that the amygdala is primarily involved in processing of unpleasant stimuli, and the stronger the more arousing the stimuli are, whereas reward-related structures like the NAcc primarily responds to pleasant stimuli, the stronger the more positive the valence of these stimuli is.

  10. Types of SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes other than the SMN1 gene. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Respiratory Distress (SMARD) SMARD is a very rare ... and 50. It causes muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) throughout the body, which is most noticeable in ...

  11. Functional Connectivity of Ventral and Dorsal Visual Streams in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gallea, Cécile; Kas, Aurélie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Samri, Dalila; Trotta, Laura; Michon, Agnès; Lacomblez, Lucette; Dubois, Bruno; Lehericy, Stéphane; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) induces progressive dysfunction of ventral and dorsal visual networks. Little is known, however, about corresponding changes in functional connectivity (FC). To investigate FC changes in the visual networks, their relationship with cortical atrophy, and the association with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Ten PCA patients and 28 age-matched controls participated in the study. Using resting state fMRI, we measured FC in ventral and dorsal cortical visual networks, defined on the basis of a priori knowledge of long-range white matter connections. To assess the relationships with AD, we determined AD biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid and FC in the default mode network (DMN), which is vulnerable to AD pathology. Voxel-based morphometry analysis assessed the pattern of grey matter (GM) atrophy. PCA patients showed GM atrophy in bilateral occipital and inferior parietal regions. PCA patients had lower FC levels in a ventral network than controls, but higher FC in inferior components of the dorsal network. In particular, the increased connectivity correlated with greater GM atrophy in occipital regions. All PCA patients had positive cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for AD; however, FC in global DMN did not differ from controls. FC in PCA reflects brain structure in a non-univocal way. Hyperconnectivity of dorsal networks may indicate aberrant communication in response to posterior brain atrophy or processes of neural resilience during the initial stage of brain dysfunction. The lack of difference from controls in global DMN FC highlights the atypical nature of PCA with respect to typical AD.

  12. Multichannel NIRS analysis of brain activity during semantic differential rating of drawing stimuli containing different affective polarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miho; Gyoba, Jiro; Sakuta, Yuiko

    2005-02-25

    We used 24-channel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to measure activity in the temporal, parietal, and frontal regions of the brain in eight Japanese women while the participants rated line drawings using semantic differential scales. Participants rated the seven line drawings on 15 bipolar semantic scales, each of which belonged to one of three semantic classes: Evaluation, Activity, or Potency. Suzuki et al. [M. Suzuki, J. Gyoba, Y. Sakuta, Multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy analysis of brain activities during semantic differential rating of drawings, Tohoku Psychologica Folia 62 (2003) 86-98.] had reported previously that the right superior temporal gyrus and the right inferior parietal lobule are associated with Activity rating, while the brain regions around the central fissure were related to Potency rating. Based on these suggestions, we investigated the brain activity in these regions during rating of stimuli containing different affective polarities. When drawings were reported as 'static' or 'calm', oxyhemoglobin concentration was higher around the right superior temporal gyrus as compared to when they were considered 'noisy' or 'excitable'. Oxyhemoglobin concentrations around the central fissure were also higher when drawings were rated as 'soft', 'smooth', or 'blunt' compared to 'hard', 'rough', or 'sharp'. Any characteristic oxyhemoglobin changes were not found during the ratings on the evaluation scales. Our results suggest that activation patterns of the temporal and parietal regions are significantly modified by semantic polarities of Activity and Potency.

  13. Astaxanthin intake attenuates muscle atrophy caused by immobilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Yamaguchi, Yusuke; Miyaji, Nobuyuki; Yoshihara, Toshinori; Naito, Hisashi; Goto, Katsumasa; Ohmori, Daijiro; Yoshioka, Toshitada; Sugiura, Takao

    2016-08-01

    Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment and has been shown to be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage. We tested the hypothesis that astaxanthin intake would attenuate immobilization-induced muscle atrophy in rats. Male Wistar rats (14-week old) were fed for 24 days with either astaxanthin or placebo diet. After 14 days of each experimental diet intake, the hindlimb muscles of one leg were immobilized in plantar flexion position using a plaster cast. Following 10 days of immobilization, both the atrophic and the contralateral plantaris muscles were removed and analyzed to determine the level of muscle atrophy along with measurement of the protein levels of CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and selected proteases. Compared with placebo diet animals, the degree of muscle atrophy in response to immobilization was significantly reduced in astaxanthin diet animals. Further, astaxanthin supplementation significantly prevented the immobilization-induced increase in the expression of CuZn-SOD, cathepsin L, calpain, and ubiquitin in the atrophied muscle. These results support the postulate that dietary astaxanthin intake attenuates the rate of disuse muscle atrophy by inhibiting oxidative stress and proteolysis via three major proteolytic pathways. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  14. A tale of two factors: what determines the rate of progression in Huntington's disease? A longitudinal MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, H Diana; Reuter, Martin; Doros, Gheorghe; Lee, Stephanie Y; Triggs, Tyler; Malarick, Keith; Fischl, Bruce; Salat, David H; Hersch, Steven M

    2011-08-01

    Over the past several years, increased attention has been devoted to understanding regionally selective brain changes that occur in Huntington's disease and their relationships to phenotypic variability. Clinical progression is also heterogeneous, and although CAG repeat length influences age of onset, its role, if any, in progression has been less clear. We evaluated progression in Huntington's disease using a novel longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging analysis. Our hypothesis was that the rate of brain atrophy is influenced by the age of onset of Huntington's disease. We scanned 22 patients with Huntington's disease at approximately 1-year intervals; individuals were divided into 1 of 3 groups, determined by the relative age of onset. We found significant differences in the rates of atrophy of cortex, white matter, and subcortical structures; patients who developed symptoms earlier demonstrated the most rapid rates of atrophy compared with those who developed symptoms during middle age or more advanced age. Rates of cortical atrophy were topologically variable, with the most rapid changes occurring in sensorimotor, posterior frontal, and portions of the parietal cortex. There were no significant differences in the rates of atrophy in basal ganglia structures. Although both CAG repeat length and age influenced the rate of change in some regions, there was no significant correlation in many regions. Rates of regional brain atrophy seem to be influenced by the age of onset of Huntington's disease symptoms and are only partially explained by CAG repeat length. These findings suggest that other genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors play important roles in neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

  15. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal nerve fibre layer thinning following optic neuritis: evidence that axonal loss is a substrate of MRI-detected atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trip, S Anand; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Jones, Stephen J; Li, Wai-Yung; Garway-Heath, David F; Thompson, Alan J; Plant, Gordon T; Miller, David H

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of brain atrophy are often considered to be a marker of axonal loss in multiple sclerosis (MS) but evidence is limited. Optic neuritis is a common manifestation of MS and results in optic nerve atrophy. Retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) imaging is a non-invasive way of detecting axonal loss following optic neuritis. We hypothesise that if the optic nerve atrophy that develops following optic neuritis is contributed to by axonal loss, it will correlate with thinning of the RNFL. Twenty-five patients were studied at least 1 year after a single unilateral attack of optic neuritis without recurrence, with a selection bias towards incomplete recovery. They had MR quantification of optic nerve cross-sectional area and optic nerve lesion length, as well as optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement of mean RNFL thickness and macular volume, quantitative visual testing, and visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Fifteen controls were also studied. Significant optic nerve atrophy (mean decrease 30% versus controls), RNFL thinning (mean decrease 33% versus controls), and macular volume loss occurred in patients' affected eyes when compared with patients' unaffected eyes and healthy controls. The optic nerve atrophy was correlated with the RNFL thinning, macular volume loss, visual acuity, visual field mean deviation, and whole field VEP amplitude but not latency. These findings suggest that axonal loss contributes to optic nerve atrophy following a single attack of optic neuritis. By inference, axonal loss due to other post-inflammatory brain lesions is likely to contribute to the global MRI measure of brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

  16. 血浆同型半胱氨酸水平、脑萎缩与认知障碍的相关性研究%Correlation Study on Plasma Homocysteine, Brain Atrophy and Cognitive Impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱小娥

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨认知障碍程度与血浆同型半胱氨酸(Hcy)水平、脑萎缩系列指标的相关性.方法 将研究对象分为重度AD、中度AD、轻度AD、MCI、正常对照五组,测定其血浆Hcy水平和哈氏值、侧脑室体部指数、沟间距、左右外侧裂宽度、第三脑室宽度几项指标,并研究其统计学相关性.结果 随认知障碍程度的增加,血浆同型半胱氨酸水平也增加,Hcy浓度与重度AD、中度AD、轻度AD、MCI、正常对照五组的MMSE评分Spearman分析分别为r=-0.365、r=-0.389、r=-0.433、r=-0.424、r=-0.412;沟间距、左侧外宽度、右侧外宽度、第三脑室密度和哈氏值均与MMSE评分呈明显的负相关,Spearman分析分别为r=-0.457,r=-0.629,r=-0.636,r=-0.701,r=-0.533,而侧脑室体部指数与MMSE评分呈明显的正相关,Spearman分析r=0.654;Logistic回归模型结果显示Hcy浓度、左侧外宽度、侧脑室体部指数和哈氏值在各组的比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),为认知障碍的影响因素.结论 认知障碍的程度与Hcy浓度、左侧外宽度、侧脑室体部指数和哈氏值存在关联.%Objective To explore the correlation between cognitive impairment and plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy), the indexes of brain atrophy.Methods The surveyed individuals were divided into severe AD group, moderate AD group, mild AD group, MCI group, and normal control group.Plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, Huckmam's values, index of somatic part of lateral ventricle, interuncal distance, width of left end right lateral fissure, and extend of the third ventricle in the five groups were examined.The relationships between Hcy levels and MMSE score in the five groups were analyzed with Spearman correlation enalysis.Results The plasma Hcy levels were increased with the increasing degree of cognitive impairment.Spearman correlation analysis showed that the relationships between Hcy levels end MMSE score in severe AD group, moderate AD group

  17. White matter atrophy and cognitive dysfunctions in neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Blanc

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of central nervous system characterized by optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive acute transverse myelitis. NMO patients have cognitive dysfunctions but other clinical symptoms of brain origin are rare. In the present study, we aimed to investigate cognitive functions and brain volume in NMO. The study population consisted of 28 patients with NMO and 28 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and educational level. We applied a French translation of the Brief Repeatable Battery (BRB-N to the NMO patients. Using SIENAx for global brain volume (Grey Matter, GM; White Matter, WM; and whole brain and VBM for focal brain volume (GM and WM, NMO patients and controls were compared. Voxel-level correlations between diminished brain concentration and cognitive performance for each tests were performed. Focal and global brain volume of NMO patients with and without cognitive impairment were also compared. Fifteen NMO patients (54% had cognitive impairment with memory, executive function, attention and speed of information processing deficits. Global and focal brain atrophy of WM but not Grey Matter (GM was found in the NMO patients group. The focal WM atrophy included the optic chiasm, pons, cerebellum, the corpus callosum and parts of the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes, including superior longitudinal fascicle. Visual memory, verbal memory, speed of information processing, short-term memory and executive functions were correlated to focal WM volumes. The comparison of patients with, to patients without cognitive impairment showed a clear decrease of global and focal WM, including brainstem, corticospinal tracts, corpus callosum but also superior and inferior longitudinal fascicles. Cognitive impairment in NMO patients is correlated to the decreased of global and focal WM volume of the brain. Further studies are needed to better understand the precise origin of cognitive impairment in

  18. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent experiments have provided direct evidence connecting mitochondrial dysfunction to muscle atrophy. Numerous studies have described changes in mitochondria shape, number, and function in skeletal muscles exposed to prolonged periods of inactivity. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that increased mitochondrial ROS production plays a key signaling role in both immobilization-induced limb muscle atrophy and diaphragmatic atrophy occurring during prolonged mechanical ventilation. Moreover, new evidence reveals that, during denervation-induced muscle atrophy, increased mitochondrial fragmentation due to fission is a required signaling event that activates the AMPK-FoxO3 signaling axis, which induces the expression of atrophy genes, protein breakdown, and ultimately muscle atrophy. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of future research to better understand the mitochondrial signaling mechanisms that contribute to disuse muscle atrophy and to develop novel therapeutic interventions for prevention of inactivity-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:22395111

  19. Relationship between Clinical Parameters and Brain Structure in Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients According to Onset Type: A Voxel-Based Morphometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony; Wang, Xiuyuan; Kim, Hyun Young; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Yeon-Ha; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressing, phenotypically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease affecting mainly the motor neuron system. The present voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study investigated whether patterns of brain atrophy differ among sporadic ALS subtypes. Material and methods Sporadic ALS patients (n = 62) with normal cognition and age-matched healthy controls (n = 57) were included in the study. ALS patients were divided into limb- and bulbar-onset groups according to clinical manifestations at symptom onset (n = 48 and 14, respectively). Clinical measures were ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) score, disease duration, and forced vital capacity (FVC). Patterns of brain atrophy between ALS subgroups were compared by VBM. Results In limb-onset ALS patients, atrophy was largely confined to the motor cortex and adjacent pre- and postcentral regions. However, in the bulbar-onset group, affected regions were more widespread and included these same areas but also extended to the bilateral frontotemporal and left superior temporal and supramarginal gyri, and multiple regression analysis revealed that their ALSFRS-R scores were associated with extensive loss of gray matter while FVC was related to atrophy in subcortical regions of the left superior temporal gyrus. In limb-onset ALS patients, disease duration was related to the degree of atrophy in the motor and adjacent areas. Conclusion Sporadic ALS subtypes show different patterns of brain atrophy. Neural networks related to limb and bulbar motor functions in each ALS subtype may underlie their distinct patterns of cerebral atrophy. That is, more extensive cortical and subcortical atrophy is correlated with greater ALSFRS-R severity and shorter disease duration in the bulbar-onset subtype and may explain the poor prognosis of these patients. PMID:28095425

  20. Mapping the Progression of Atrophy in Early- and Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Raffaella; Agosta, Federica; Possin, Katherine L; Canu, Elisa; Filippi, Massimo; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    The term early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) identifies patients who meet criteria for AD, but show onset of symptoms before the age of 65. We map progression of gray matter atrophy in EOAD patients compared to late-onset AD (LOAD). T1-weighted MRI scans were obtained at diagnosis and one-year follow-up from 15 EOAD, 10 LOAD, and 38 age-matched controls. Voxel-based and tensor-based morphometry were used, respectively, to assess the baseline and progression of atrophy. At baseline, EOAD patients already showed a widespread atrophy in temporal, parietal, occipital, and frontal cortices. After one year, EOAD had atrophy progression in medial temporal and medial parietal cortices. At baseline, LOAD patients showed atrophy in the medial temporal regions only, and, after one year, an extensive pattern of atrophy progression in the same neocortical cortices of EOAD. Although atrophy mainly involved different lateral neocortical or medial temporal hubs at baseline, it eventually progressed along the same brain default-network regions in both groups. The cortical region showing a significant progression in both groups was the medial precuneus/posterior cingulate.

  1. Agent-based computational model investigates muscle-specific responses to disuse-induced atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly responsive to use. In particular, muscle atrophy attributable to decreased activity is a common problem among the elderly and injured/immobile. However, each muscle does not respond the same way. We developed an agent-based model that generates a tissue-level skeletal muscle response to disuse/immobilization. The model incorporates tissue-specific muscle fiber architecture parameters and simulates changes in muscle fiber size as a result of disuse-induced atrophy that are consistent with published experiments. We created simulations of 49 forelimb and hindlimb muscles of the rat by incorporating eight fiber-type and size parameters to explore how these parameters, which vary widely across muscles, influence sensitivity to disuse-induced atrophy. Of the 49 muscles modeled, the soleus exhibited the greatest atrophy after 14 days of simulated immobilization (51% decrease in fiber size), whereas the extensor digitorum communis atrophied the least (32%). Analysis of these simulations revealed that both fiber-type distribution and fiber-size distribution influence the sensitivity to disuse atrophy even though no single tissue architecture parameter correlated with atrophy rate. Additionally, software agents representing fibroblasts were incorporated into the model to investigate cellular interactions during atrophy. Sensitivity analyses revealed that fibroblast agents have the potential to affect disuse-induced atrophy, albeit with a lesser effect than fiber type and size. In particular, muscle atrophy elevated slightly with increased initial fibroblast population and increased production of TNF-α. Overall, the agent-based model provides a novel framework for investigating both tissue adaptations and cellular interactions in skeletal muscle during atrophy. PMID:25722379

  2. Neocortical Neuronal Loss in Patients with Multiple System Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Lisette; Winge, Kristian; Brudek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    To determine the extent of neocortical involvement in multiple system atrophy (MSA), we used design-based stereological methods to estimate the total numbers of neurons, oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia in the frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital cortex of brains from 11 patients...... with MSA and 11 age- and gender-matched control subjects. The stereological data were supported by cell marker expression analyses in tissue samples from the prefrontal cortex. We found significantly fewer neurons in the frontal and parietal cortex of MSA brains compared with control brains. Significantly...... more astrocytes and microglia were observed in the frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex of MSA brains, whereas no change in the total number of oligodendrocytes was seen in any of the neocortical regions. There were significantly fewer neurons in the frontal cortex of MSA patients with impaired...

  3. Clinical Relevance of Brain Volume Measures in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Stefano, Nicola; Airas, Laura; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    (e.g. SIENA [Structural Image Evaluation using Normalization of Atrophy]). Although these methods are sensitive and reproducible, caution must be exercised when interpreting brain volume data, as numerous factors (e.g. pseudoatrophy) may have a confounding effect on measurements, especially...... therefore have important clinical implications affecting treatment decisions, with several clinical trials now demonstrating an effect of disease-modifying treatments (DMTs) on reducing brain volume loss. In clinical practice, it may therefore be important to consider the potential impact of a therapy...... on reducing the rate of brain volume loss. This article reviews the measurement of brain volume in clinical trials and practice, the effect of DMTs on brain volume change across trials and the clinical relevance of brain volume loss in MS....

  4. Gastric atrophy, diagnosing and staging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hala MT El-Zimaity

    2006-01-01

    H pylori is now accepted as the cause of gastritis and gastritis-associated diseases, such as duodenal ulcer,gastric ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and gastric MALT lymphoma. The natural history of H pylori gastritis includes inflammation progressing from the antrum into the adjacent corpus resulting in an atrophic front of advancing injury leading to a reduction in acid secretion and eventual loss of parietal cells and development of atrophy. Sub-typing intestinal metaplasia has no clinical value to the patient, the pathologist, or the endoscopist.The pattern, extent, and severity of atrophy, with or without intestinal metaplasia, is a far more important predictor than is intestinal metaplasia subtype. The challenge remains to identify a reliable marker that relates to pre-malignant potential.

  5. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  6. Dissociating memory networks in early Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration - a combined study of hypometabolism and atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Frisch

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We aimed at dissociating the neural correlates of memory disorders in Alzheimer's disease (AD and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. METHODS: We included patients with AD (n = 19, 11 female, mean age 61 years and FTLD (n = 11, 5 female, mean age 61 years in early stages of their diseases. Memory performance was assessed by means of verbal and visual memory subtests from the Wechsler Memory Scale (WMS-R, including forgetting rates. Brain glucose utilization was measured by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET and brain atrophy by voxel-based morphometry (VBM of T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans. Using a whole brain approach, correlations between test performance and imaging data were computed separately in each dementia group, including a group of control subjects (n = 13, 6 female, mean age 54 years in both analyses. The three groups did not differ with respect to education and gender. RESULTS: Patients in both dementia groups generally performed worse than controls, but AD and FTLD patients did not differ from each other in any of the test parameters. However, memory performance was associated with different brain regions in the patient groups, with respect to both hypometabolism and atrophy: Whereas in AD patients test performance was mainly correlated with changes in the parieto-mesial cortex, performance in FTLD patients was correlated with changes in frontal cortical as well as subcortical regions. There were practically no overlapping regions associated with memory disorders in AD and FTLD as revealed by a conjunction analysis. CONCLUSION: Memory test performance may not distinguish between both dementia syndromes. In clinical practice, this may lead to misdiagnosis of FTLD patients with poor memory performance. Nevertheless, memory problems are associated with almost completely different neural correlates in both dementia syndromes. Obviously, memory functions are

  7. From nose to brain: understanding transport capacity and transport rate of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hongbing; Hu, Kaili; Jiang, Xinguo

    2008-10-01

    The unique relationship between nasal cavity and cranial cavity tissues in anatomy and physiology makes intranasal delivery to the brain feasible. An intranasal delivery provides some drugs with short channels to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB), especially for those with fairly low brain concentrations after a routine delivery, thus greatly enhancing the therapeutic effect on brain diseases. In the past two decades, a good number of encouraging outcomes have been reported in the treatment of diseases of the brain or central nervous system (CNS) through nasal administration. In spite of the significant merit of bypassing the BBB, direct nose-to-brain delivery still bears the problems of low efficiency and volume for capacity due to the limited volume of the nasal cavity, the small area ratio of olfactory mucosa to nasal mucosa and the limitations of low dose and short retention time of drug absorption. It is crucial that selective distribution and retention time of drugs or preparations on olfactory mucosa should be enhanced so as to increase the direct delivery efficiency. In this article, we first briefly review the nose-to-brain transport pathways, before detailing the impacts on them, followed by a comprehensive summary of effective methods, including formulation modification, agglutinant-mediated transport and a brain-homing, peptide-mediated delivery based on phage display screening technique, with a view to providing a theoretic reference for elevating the therapeutic effects on brain diseases.

  8. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; DeCarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino II, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%); the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype. PMID:28276464

  9. Robust Identification of Alzheimer's Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L; Han, Cheol E; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2017-03-09

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%); the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  10. Robust Identification of Alzheimer’s Disease subtypes based on cortical atrophy patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Yun; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Hyunwook; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Han, Cheol E.; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Shaw, Leslie M.; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Harvey, Danielle; Bernstein, Matthew; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Decarli, Charles; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Landau, Susan; Cairns, Nigel J.; Householder, Erin; Taylor Reinwald, Lisa; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Shen, Li; Kelley, Faber; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; de Toledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D'Agostino, Daniel, II; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; de Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Terence Z.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, Maryann; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc Adams Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin Cook, Kristen; Devous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; Macavoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging Yuek; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Marsel Mesulam, Marek; Lipowski, Kristine; Kuo Wu, Chuang; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Lynn Johnson, Patricia; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Hudson, Leon; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T. Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B.; Kitzmiller, Tamar J.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Finger, Elizabether; Pasternak, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Smith, Karen Elizabeth; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Raudin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Fargher, Kristin; Raj, Balebail Ashok

    2017-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is heterogenous and can be classified into several subtypes. Here, we propose a robust subtyping method for AD based on cortical atrophy patterns and graph theory. We calculated similarities between subjects in their atrophy patterns throughout the whole brain, and clustered subjects with similar atrophy patterns using the Louvain method for modular organization extraction. We applied our method to AD patients recruited at Samsung Medical Center and externally validated our method by using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Our method categorized very mild AD into three clinically distinct subtypes with high reproducibility (>90%) the parietal-predominant (P), medial temporal-predominant (MT), and diffuse (D) atrophy subtype. The P subtype showed the worst clinical presentation throughout the cognitive domains, while the MT and D subtypes exhibited relatively mild presentation. The MT subtype revealed more impaired language and executive function compared to the D subtype.

  11. Body weight gain rate in patients with Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barichella, Michela; Marczewska, Agnieszka M; Mariani, Claudio; Landi, Andrea; Vairo, Antonella; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2003-11-01

    We evaluated body weight changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in relation to clinical improvement. Thirty PD patients who received STN DBS were included (22 men, 8 women; mean age, 60.0 +/- 7.1 years; mean PD duration, 13.5 +/- 3.7 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 21.6 +/- 3.0 kg/m2). Body weight, physical activity, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores were noted before and 3 and 12 months after the procedure. Significant weight gain occurred in 29 patients; the mean increase was 14.8 +/- 9.8% of initial body weight in 1 year. Of the patients, 46.5% reported weight gain in the first 3 months, 21.4% gradual weight gain in the first 6 months, and 32.1% a slow increase for 1 year. Mean BMI increased up to 24.7 +/- 3.7 kg/m2. After 1 year, mean UPDRS motor score improved significantly in off and in on; and therapy complications improved by 91.0 +/- 17.0%. BMI changes at 3 and 12 months were significantly correlated to dyskinesia score changes, and levodopa dosage was not. In PD, STN DBS produces not only symptom control, but also weight gain. DBS candidates should be given nutritional counseling before the intervention to prevent rapid and/or excessive weight gain.

  12. A study of the brain's resting state based on alpha band power, heart rate and fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, J.C.; Goncalves, S.I.; Faes, T.J.C.; Kuijer, J.P.A.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Heethaar, R.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Considering that there are several theoretical reasons why fMRI data is correlated to variations in heart rate, these correlations are explored using experimental resting state data. In particular, the possibility is discussed that the "default network", being a brain area that deactivates during no

  13. A study of the brain's resting state based on alpha band power, heart rate and fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, J.C.; Goncalves, S.I.; Faes, T.J.C.; Kuijer, J.P.A.; Pouwels, P.J.W.; Heethaar, R.M.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.

    2008-01-01

    Considering that there are several theoretical reasons why fMRI data is correlated to variations in heart rate, these correlations are explored using experimental resting state data. In particular, the possibility is discussed that the "default network", being a brain area that deactivates during

  14. Comments on "Brain Size and Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rate in Nonspecific Mental Retardation and Down Syndrome."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerman, Lee; Schultz, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between mental retardation and brain size is discussed. Research suggests that a common path for many otherwise idiopathic mild retardation cases (genetic or environmental) could be small brain size, indicating reduced information processing capacity. Suggestions are made for further research on neuron number. (SLD)

  15. Positive correlation between occlusion rate and nidus size of proton beam treated brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomquist, Erik; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth; Borota, Ljubisa

    2016-01-01

    those with and without total occlusion regarding mean age, gender distribution or symptoms at diagnosis. Forty-one patients developed a mild radiation-induced brain edema and this was more common in those that had total occlusion of the AVM. Two patients had brain hemorrhages after treatment. One...

  16. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Measures Associated With Increased Risk of Covert Brain Infarction and Worsening Leukoaraiosis in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lester Y; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth; Floyd, James; Psaty, Bruce; Gutierrez, Jose; Longstreth, W T; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2017-08-01

    In people without previous stroke, covert findings on serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of incident brain infarcts and worsening leukoaraiosis are associated with increased risk for ischemic stroke and dementia. We evaluated whether various measures of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate are associated with these MRI findings. In the CHS (Cardiovascular Health Study), a longitudinal cohort study of older adults, we used relative risk regression to assess the associations of mean, variability, and trend in systolic BP, diastolic BP, and heart rate measured at 4 annual clinic visits between 2 brain MRIs with incident covert brain infarction and worsening white matter grade (using a 10-point scale to characterize leukoaraiosis). We included participants who had both brain MRIs, no stroke before the follow-up MRI, and no change in antihypertensive medication status during follow-up. Among 878 eligible participants, incident covert brain infarction occurred in 15% and worsening white matter grade in 27%. Mean systolic BP was associated with increased risk for incident covert brain infarction (relative risk per 10 mm Hg, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.47), and mean diastolic BP was associated with increased risk for worsening white matter grade (relative risk per 10 mm Hg, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.69). These findings persisted in secondary and sensitivity analyses. Elevated mean systolic BP is associated with increased risk for covert brain infarction, and elevated mean diastolic BP is associated with increased risk for worsening leukoaraiosis. These findings reinforce the importance of hypertension in the development of silent cerebrovascular diseases, but the pathophysiologic relationships to BP for each may differ. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Development of an MRI rating scale for multiple brain regions: comparison with volumetrics and with voxel-based morphometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, R.R.; Williams, Guy B. [University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Scahill, Victoria L.; Graham, Kim S. [Cardiff University, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge and Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Graham, Andrew [University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cardiff University, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge and Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hodges, John R. [University of Cambridge, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cardiff University, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge and Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute, Cognitive Neurology, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2009-08-15

    We aimed to devise a rating method for key frontal and temporal brain regions validated against quantitative volumetric methods and applicable to a range of dementia syndromes. Four standardised coronal MR images from 36 subjects encompassing controls and cases with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) were used. After initial pilot studies, 15 regions produced good intra- and inter-rater reliability. We then validated the ratings against manual volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and compared ratings across the subject groups. Validation against both manual volumetry (for both frontal and temporal lobes), and against whole brain VBM, showed good correlation with visual ratings for the majority of the brain regions. Comparison of rating scores across disease groups showed involvement of the anterior fusiform gyrus, anterior hippocampus and temporal pole in semantic dementia, while anterior cingulate and orbitofrontal regions were involved in behavioural variant FTD. This simple visual rating can be used as an alternative to highly technical methods of quantification, and may be superior when dealing with single cases or small groups. (orig.)

  18. Reformatted images improve the detection rate of acute traumatic subdural hematomas on brain CT compared with axial images alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrhein, Timothy J; Mostertz, William; Matheus, Maria Gisele; Maass-Bolles, Genevieve; Sharma, Komal; Collins, Heather R; Kranz, Peter G

    2017-02-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDHs) comprise a significant percentage of missed intracranial hemorrhage on axial brain CT. SDH detection rates could be improved with the addition of reformatted images. Though performed at some centers, the potential additional diagnostic sensitivity of reformatted images has not yet been investigated. The purpose of our study is to determine if the addition of coronal and sagittal reformatted images to an axial brain CT increases the sensitivity and specificity for detection of acute traumatic SDH. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive brain CTs acquired for acute trauma that contained new SDHs. An equivalent number of normal brain CTs served as control. Paired sets of images were created for each case: (1) axial images only ("axial only") and (2) axial, coronal, sagittal images ("reformat added"). Three readers interpreted both the axial only and companion reformat added for each case, separated by 1 month. Reading times and SDH detection rates were compared. One hundred SDH and 100 negative examinations were collected. Sensitivity and specificity for the axial-only scans were 75.7 and 94.3 %, respectively, compared with 88.3 and 98.3 % for reformat added. There was a 24.3 % false negative (missed SDH) rate with axial-only scans versus 11.7 % with reformat added (p = negatives by greater than 50 %. Reformatted images substantially reduce the number of missed SDHs compared with axial images alone.

  19. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Scott K.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent exp...

  20. No increase in brain cancer rates during period of expanding cell phone use

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a new examination of United States cancer incidence data, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) reported that incidence trends have remained roughly constant for glioma, the main type of brain cancer hypothesized to be related to cell ph

  1. Spinal cord atrophy in anterior-posterior direction reflects impairment in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundell, H; Svolgaard, O; Dogonowski, A-M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how atrophy is distributed over the cross section of the upper cervical spinal cord and how this relates to functional impairment in multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: We analysed the structural brain MRI scans of 54 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (n=22), primary...... these atrophy measures and clinical impairments as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and Multiple Sclerosis Impairment Scale (MSIS). RESULTS: In patients with MS, CSA and APW but not LRW were reduced compared to healthy controls (P... and specific MSIS subscores. CONCLUSION: In patients with MS, atrophy of the upper cervical cord is most evident in the antero-posterior direction. As APW of the cervical cord can be readily derived from standard structural MRI of the brain, APW constitutes a clinically useful neuroimaging marker of disease...

  2. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD on donation rates after brain death (DBD and transplantation rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aric Bendorf

    Full Text Available During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01. Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; p<0.0001. We also found that the number of organs transplanted per donor was significantly lower in DCD when compared to DBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; p<0.001. Whilst the results do not infer a causal relationship between increased DCD and decreased DBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  3. An international comparison of the effect of policy shifts to organ donation following cardiocirculatory death (DCD) on donation rates after brain death (DBD) and transplantation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendorf, Aric; Kelly, Patrick J; Kerridge, Ian H; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Myerson, Brian; Stewart, Cameron; Pussell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade an increasing number of countries have adopted policies that emphasize donation after cardiocirculatory death (DCD) in an attempt to address the widening gap between the demand for transplantable organs and the availability of organs from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. In order to examine how these policy shifts have affected overall deceased organ donor (DD) and DBD rates, we analyzed deceased donation rates from 82 countries from 2000-2010. On average, overall DD, DBD and DCD rates have increased over time, with the proportion of DCD increasing 0.3% per year (p = 0.01). Countries with higher DCD rates have, on average, lower DBD rates. For every one-per million population (pmp) increase in the DCD rate, the average DBD rate decreased by 1.02 pmp (95% CI: 0.73, 1.32; pDBD donors with 1.51 less transplants per DCD compared to DBD (95% CI: 1.23, 1.79; pDBD rates, the significant correlation between higher DCD and lower DBD rates coupled with the reduced number of organs transplanted per DCD donor suggests that a national policy focus on DCD may lead to an overall reduction in the number of transplants performed.

  4. Tubular atrophy in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    The longstanding focus in chronic kidney disease (CKD) research has been on the glomerulus, which is sensible because this is where glomerular filtration occurs, and a large proportion of progressive CKD is associated with significant glomerular pathology. However, it has been known for decades that tubular atrophy is also a hallmark of CKD and that it is superior to glomerular pathology as a predictor of glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. Nevertheless, there are vastly fewer studies that investigate the causes of tubular atrophy, and fewer still that identify potential therapeutic targets. The purpose of this review is to discuss plausible mechanisms of tubular atrophy, including tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, cell senescence, peritubular capillary rarefaction and downstream tubule ischemia, oxidative stress, atubular glomeruli, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interstitial inflammation, lipotoxicity and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 inactivation. Once a a better understanding of tubular atrophy (and interstitial fibrosis) pathophysiology has been obtained, it might then be possible to consider tandem glomerular and tubular therapeutic strategies, in a manner similar to cancer chemotherapy regimens, which employ multiple drugs to simultaneously target different mechanistic pathways.

  5. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  6. Connectivity network measures predict volumetric atrophy in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Talia M; Jahanshad, Neda; Toga, Arthur W; Bernstein, Matt A; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cortical atrophy and disrupted anatomic connectivity, and leads to abnormal interactions between neural systems. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and graph theory can be used to evaluate major brain networks and detect signs of a breakdown in network connectivity. In a longitudinal study using both DWI and standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we assessed baseline white-matter connectivity patterns in 30 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, mean age 71.8 ± 7.5 years, 18 males and 12 females) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Using both standard MRI-based cortical parcellations and whole-brain tractography, we computed baseline connectivity maps from which we calculated global "small-world" architecture measures, including mean clustering coefficient and characteristic path length. We evaluated whether these baseline network measures predicted future volumetric brain atrophy in MCI subjects, who are at risk for developing AD, as determined by 3-dimensional Jacobian "expansion factor maps" between baseline and 6-month follow-up anatomic scans. This study suggests that DWI-based network measures may be a novel predictor of AD progression.

  7. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Pravin; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Ahrens, Christine; Hantus, Stephen; Sarwal, Aarti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted. PMID:28182114

  8. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Newey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted.

  9. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  10. CSF biomarker profiles do not differentiate between the cerebellar and parkinsonian phenotypes of multiple system atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, W F; van de Warrenburg, B P C; Kremer, H P H; Bloem, B R; Verbeek, M M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy (MSA) can clinically be divided into the cerebellar (MSA-C) and the parkinsonian (MSA-P) variants. It is unknown whether the variation in clinical expression is also reflected by a different underlying neurochemical profile. METHODS: We analyzed brain specific pro

  11. Self-Awareness and Self-Ratings of On-Road Driving Performance After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, James R; Ponsford, Jennie L; Charlton, Judith L; Ross, Pamela E; Marshall, Shawn; Gagnon, Sylvain; Bédard, Michel; Stolwyk, Renerus J

    To examine self-rated, clinician-rated, and self-awareness of on-road driving performance in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) deemed fit and unfit to resume driving and healthy controls, and to explore their associations with demographic, injury, cognitive, and mood variables. Participants included 37 individuals with moderate to severe TBI, and 49 healthy age, sex, and education-matched controls from Australia and Canada. Participants completed an on-road assessment, the Brain Injury Driving Self-Awareness Measure (BIDSAM), and a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment. Awareness scores on the BIDSAM were significantly different between groups, F(2, 83) = 28.44 (P self-awareness was significantly correlated with reduced psychomotor speed (rs = -0.37; P self-awareness of driving. These findings suggest impaired awareness of driving may need to be addressed as part of driver rehabilitation programs.

  12. Visual neglect in posterior cortical atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Katia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In posterior cortical atrophy (PCA, there is a progressive impairment of high-level visual functions and parietal damage, which might predict the occurrence of visual neglect. However, neglect may pass undetected if not assessed with specific tests, and might therefore be underestimated in PCA. In this prospective study, we aimed at establishing the side, the frequency and the severity of visual neglect, visual extinction, and primary visual field defects in an unselected sample of PCA patients. Methods Twenty-four right-handed PCA patients underwent a standardized battery of neglect tests. Visual fields were examined clinically by the confrontation method. Results Sixteen of the 24 patients (66% had signs of visual neglect on at least one test, and fourteen (58% also had visual extinction or hemianopia. Five patients (21% had neither neglect nor visual field defects. As expected, left-sided neglect was more severe than right-sided neglect. However, right-sided neglect resulted more frequently in this population (29% than in previous studies on focal brain lesions. Conclusion When assessed with specific visuospatial tests, visual neglect is frequent in patients with PCA. Diagnosis of neglect is important because of its negative impact on daily activities. Clinicians should consider the routine use of neglect tests to screen patients with high-level visual deficits. The relatively high frequency of right-sided neglect in neurodegenerative patients supports the hypothesis that bilateral brain damage is necessary for right-sided neglect signs to occur, perhaps because of the presence in the right hemisphere of crucial structures whose damage contributes to neglect.

  13. Grey matter atrophy of basal forebrain and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haobo; Trollor, Julian N; Wen, Wei; Zhu, Wanlin; Crawford, John D; Kochan, Nicole A; Slavin, Melissa J; Brodaty, Henry; Reppermund, Simone; Kang, Kristan; Mather, Karen A; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2011-05-01

    The basal forebrain area (BFA) is closely connected to the hippocampus by virtue of cholinergic neuronal projections. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown reduced volumes of both structures in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal stage mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but generally not in the same investigation. By combining voxel based morphometry and region of interest methods, we measured the grey matter (GM) volumes of the two brain regions with the goal of elucidating their contributions to MCI and its two subtypes (amnestic MCI and non-amnestic MCI) in an elderly epidemiological sample. The results replicated previous findings that the atrophies of both brain regions were associated with an increased likelihood of MCI and its two subtypes. However, in a regression model for the prediction of MCI with GM volumes for both regions used as predictors, only hippocampal atrophy remained significant. Two possible interpretations for this pattern of results were discussed. One is that the observed correlation between BFA atrophy and MCI is spurious and due to the hippocampal atrophy correlated with both. Alternatively, our observation is consistent with the possibility that BFA atrophy has a causal effect on MCI, which is mediated via its influence on hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we found that the left hippocampal atrophy had a stronger effect than the right hippocampus and bilateral BFA in the prediction of amnestic MCI occurrence when the four unilateral areas were entered into one regression model. In addition, a slight but statistically significant difference was found in the left hippocampal volume between APOE ε4 allele carriers and non-carriers, consistent with prior studies.

  14. Focal temporal pole atrophy and network degeneration in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica A; Montal, Victor; Hochberg, Daisy; Quimby, Megan; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Makris, Nikos; Seeley, William W; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-02-01

    A wealth of neuroimaging research has associated semantic variant primary progressive aphasia with distributed cortical atrophy that is most prominent in the left anterior temporal cortex; however, there is little consensus regarding which region within the anterior temporal cortex is most prominently damaged, which may indicate the putative origin of neurodegeneration. In this study, we localized the most prominent and consistent region of atrophy in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia using cortical thickness analysis in two independent patient samples (n = 16 and 28, respectively) relative to age-matched controls (n = 30). Across both samples the point of maximal atrophy was located in the same region of the left temporal pole. This same region was the point of maximal atrophy in 100% of individual patients in both semantic variant primary progressive aphasia samples. Using resting state functional connectivity in healthy young adults (n = 89), we showed that the seed region derived from the semantic variant primary progressive aphasia analysis was strongly connected with a large-scale network that closely resembled the distributed atrophy pattern in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. In both patient samples, the magnitude of atrophy within a brain region was predicted by that region's strength of functional connectivity to the temporopolar seed region in healthy adults. These findings suggest that cortical atrophy in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia may follow connectional pathways within a large-scale network that converges on the temporal pole. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. The Association Between Neurocysticercosis and Hippocampal Atrophy is Related to Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Issa, Naoum P; Salgado, Perla; Del Brutto, Victor J; Zambrano, Mauricio; Lama, Julio; García, Héctor H

    2017-01-11

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) has been associated with hippocampal atrophy, but the prevalence and pathogenic mechanisms implicated in this relationship are unknown. Using a population-based, case-control study design, residents in a rural village (Atahualpa) aged ≥ 40 years with calcified NCC were identified as cases and paired to NCC-free individuals (control subjects) matched by age, sex, and level of education. Cases and control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging for hippocampal rating according to the Scheltens' scale for medial temporal atrophy and were interviewed to identify those with a clinical seizure disorder. The prevalence of hippocampal atrophy was compared between cases and control subjects by the use of the McNemar's test for correlated proportions. Seventy-five individuals with calcified NCC and their matched control subjects were included in the analysis. Hippocampal atrophy was noted in 26 (34.7%) cases and nine (12%) control subjects (odds ratio: 4.4; 95% confidence interval: 1.6-14.9, P atrophy, and the single control subject had normal hippocampi. This study confirms an association between NCC and hippocampal atrophy, and shows that this association is stronger in older age groups. This suggests that NCC-related hippocampal atrophy takes a long time to develop. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  17. Influence of age on brain edema formation, secondary brain damage and inflammatory response after brain trauma in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Timaru-Kast

    Full Text Available After traumatic brain injury (TBI elderly patients suffer from higher mortality rate and worse functional outcome compared to young patients. However, experimental TBI research is primarily performed in young animals. Aim of the present study was to clarify whether age affects functional outcome, neuroinflammation and secondary brain damage after brain trauma in mice. Young (2 months and old (21 months male C57Bl6N mice were anesthetized and subjected to a controlled cortical impact injury (CCI on the right parietal cortex. Animals of both ages were randomly assigned to 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h survival. At the end of the observation periods, contusion volume, brain water content, neurologic function, cerebral and systemic inflammation (CD3+ T cell migration, inflammatory cytokine expression in brain and lung, blood differential cell count were determined. Old animals showed worse neurological function 72 h after CCI and a high mortality rate (19.2% compared to young (0%. This did not correlate with histopathological damage, as contusion volumes were equal in both age groups. Although a more pronounced brain edema formation was detected in old mice 24 hours after TBI, lack of correlation between brain water content and neurological deficit indicated that brain edema formation is not solely responsible for age-dependent differences in neurological outcome. Brains of old naïve mice were about 8% smaller compared to young naïve brains, suggesting age-related brain atrophy with possible decline in plasticity. Onset of cerebral inflammation started earlier and primarily ipsilateral to damage in old mice, whereas in young mice inflammation was delayed and present in both hemispheres with a characteristic T cell migration pattern. Pulmonary interleukin 1β expression was up-regulated after cerebral injury only in young, not aged mice. The results therefore indicate that old animals are prone to functional deficits and strong ipsilateral cerebral

  18. Additional corpus biopsy enhances the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in a background of gastritis with atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The best sites for biopsy-based tests to evaluate H. pylori infection in gastritis with atrophy are not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the site and sensitivity of biopsy-based tests in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Methods One hundred and sixty-four (164) uninvestigated dyspepsia patients were enrolled. Biopsy-based tests (i.e., culture, histology Giemsa stain and rapid urease test) and non-invasive tests (anti-H. pylori IgG) were performed. The gold standard of H. pylori infection was defined according to previous criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive rate and negative predictive rate of biopsy-based tests at the gastric antrum and body were calculated in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Results The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in the 164 patients was 63.4%. Gastritis with atrophy was significantly higher at the antrum than at the body (76% vs. 31%; pgastritis with atrophy increased regardless of biopsy site (for normal, mild, moderate, and severe gastritis with atrophy, the sensitivity of histology Giemsa stain was 100%, 100%, 88%, and 66%, respectively, and 100%, 97%, 91%, and 66%, respectively, for rapid urease test). In moderate to severe antrum or body gastritis with atrophy, additional corpus biopsy resulted in increased sensitivity to 16.67% compare to single antrum biopsy. Conclusions In moderate to severe gastritis with atrophy, biopsy-based test should include the corpus for avoiding false negative results. PMID:23272897

  19. Analysis of voxel-based rCBF in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy of multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Kang, Do Young; Park, Kyung Won; Kim, Sang Ho; Kim, Jae Woo [School of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Olivopontocerebellar Atrophy (OPCA) is one phenotype of multiple system atrophy (MSA) and is characterized neuropathologically by neuronal degeneration in the inferior olives, pons and cerebellar cortex. The diagnosis of OPCA requires clinical evaluation to exclude other diseases. And it's usually supported by atrophy of the cerebellum and brainstem visualized on CT or MRI. But there are some reports that the disease can occur without demonstrable atrophy in these anatomic studies. There are only a few reports about perfusion SPECT imaging in patients with OPCA. The aim of this study was to describe voxel-based rCBF of OPCA in comparison of healthy volunteers. We studied 5 patients with OPCA (1 men, 4 women: age 50.4{+-}9.6y) and age matched 13 healthy volunteers (4 men, 9 women: age 54.9{+-}6.6y). All subjects injected 20mCi of Tc-99m HMPAO and scanning was initiated 20 min after injection. Images were analyzed using SPM (SPM99) with Matlab 5.3. On visual analysis, in 3 patients with OPCA, SPECT image showed significant hypoperfusion in the cerebellum. In another 2 patients, diffuse hypoperfusion was found in the both cerebro-cerebellar hemispheres, untypical perfusion pattern in OPCA. So there is existed limitation to diagnosis by only visual analysis. On SPM analysis, in OPCA patients significantly decreased perfusion was present in culmen, tonsil, tuber in Lt. cerebellum and declive, tonsil, pyramid and inf. Semi-lunar lobule in Rt. cerebellum, Rt. inf. frontal gyrus and Rt. temporal lobe (p<0.001, uncorrected). We also performed individual analysis with SPM. Two of 5 patients have additional hypoperfusion brain lesions. In one patient, decreased perfusion found in Lt. temporal, both occipital lobe, Lt. parahippocampal gyrus. In another patient, decreased perfusion found in both frontal and parietal lobe. This study is one of a few trials analysis with SPM for OPCA. We defined the specific location of decreased perfusion in patients with OPCA.

  20. Prevalence and cognitive impact of medial temporal atrophy in a hospital stroke service: retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebets, Valeria; Gregoire, Simone M; Charidimou, Andreas; Barnes, Josephine; Rantell, Khadija; Brown, Martin M; Jäger, Hans R; Cipolotti, Lisa; Werring, David J

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrovascular disease and neurodegeneration cause cognitive impairment and frequently coexist. Our objectives were to investigate the prevalence and cognitive impact of medial temporal lobe atrophy - a radiological marker often associated with Alzheimer's disease - in a hospital stroke service. Retrospective cohort study of patients from a hospital stroke service. Patients assessed for suspected ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, irrespective of final diagnosis, underwent neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. medial temporal lobe atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, and cerebral microbleeds were rated using established criteria and validated scales. The associations between medial temporal lobe atrophy and cognition were tested using multivariable logistic regression analyses, adjusted for age and imaging markers of cerebrovascular disease. Three hundred and ninety-three patients were included, of whom 169 (43%; 95% confidence interval: 38·1-48·1%) had medial temporal lobe atrophy; in 38 patients (9·7%), medial temporal lobe atrophy was severe (mean score ≥2). In unadjusted logistic regression analyses in the whole cohort, mean medial temporal lobe atrophy score was associated with verbal memory, nominal and perceptual skills, executive function, and speed and attention. After adjustment for age, white matter hyperintensities, number of lacunes, presence of cerebral microbleeds, previous ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, and premorbid intelligence quotient, mean medial temporal lobe atrophy score remained associated with impairment in verbal memory (odds ratio: 1·64; 95% confidence interval 1·04-2·58) and nominal skills (odds ratio: 1·61; 95% confidence interval 1·04-2·48). Medial temporal lobe atrophy is common and has an independent impact on cognitive function in a stroke service population, independent of confounding factors including age and magnetic resonance imaging markers of

  1. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Ewan [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade [University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. (orig.)

  2. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  3. The rate of training response to aerobic exercise affects brain function of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Orsolya; Koltai, Erika; Takeda, Masaki; Mimura, Tatsuya; Pajk, Melitta; Abraham, Dora; Koch, Lauren Gerard; Britton, Steven L; Higuchi, Mitsuru; Boldogh, Istvan; Radak, Zsolt

    2016-10-01

    There is an increasing volume of data connecting capacity to respond to exercise training with quality of life and aging. In this study, we used a rat model in which animals were selectively bred for low and high gain in running distance to test t whether genetic segregation for trainability is associated with brain function and signaling processes in the hippocampus. Rats selected for low response (LRT) and high response training (HRT) were randomly divided into control or exercise group that trained five times a week for 30 min per day for three months at 70% VO2max. All four groups had similar running distance before training. With training, HRT rats showed significantly greater increases in VO2max and running distance than LRT rats (p brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ratio of phospho and total cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), and apoptotic index, also showed significant differences between LRT and HRT groups. These findings suggest that aerobic training responses are not localized to skeletal muscle, but differently involve signaling processes in the brain of LRT and HRT rats.

  4. Identify the Atrophy of Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Normal Aging using Morphometric MRI Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Ma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantitatively assessing the medial temporal lobe structures atrophy is vital for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and accurately tracking of the disease progression. Morphometry characteristics such as gray matter volume (GMV and cortical thickness have been proved to be valuable measurements of brain atrophy. In this study, we proposed a morphometric MRI analysis based method to explore the cross-sectional differences and longitudinal changes of GMV and cortical thickness in patients with AD, (mild cognitive impairment MCI and the normal elderly. High resolution 3D MRI data was obtained from ADNI database. SPM8 plus DARTEL was carried out for data preprocessing. Two kinds of z-score map were calculated to respectively reflect the GMV and cortical thickness decline compared with age-matched normal control database (NCDB. A volume of interest (VOI covering medial temporal lobe structures was defined by group comparison. Within this VOI, GMV and cortical thickness decline indicators were respectively defined as the mean of the negative z-scores and the sum of the normalized negative z-scores of the corresponding z-score map. Kruskal–Wallis test was applied to statistically identify group wise differences of the indicators. Support vector machines (SVM based prediction was performed with a leave-one-out cross-validation design to evaluate the predictive accuracies of the indicators. Linear least squares estimation was utilized to assess the changing rate of the indicators for the three groups. Cross-sectional comparison of the baseline decline indicators revealed that the GMV and cortical thickness decline were more serious from NC, MCI to AD, with statistic significance. Using a multi-region based SVM model with the two indicators, the discrimination accuracy between AD and NC, MCI and NC, AD and MCI was 92.7%, 91.7%, 78.4% respectively. For three-way prediction, the accuracy was 74.6%. Furthermore, the proposed two indicators could

  5. Rates of decline in Alzheimer disease decrease with age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Holland

    Full Text Available Age is the strongest risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD, yet the effects of age on rates of clinical decline and brain atrophy in AD have been largely unexplored. Here, we examined longitudinal rates of change as a function of baseline age for measures of clinical decline and structural MRI-based regional brain atrophy, in cohorts of AD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and cognitively healthy (HC individuals aged 65 to 90 years (total n = 723. The effect of age was modeled using mixed effects linear regression. There was pronounced reduction in rates of clinical decline and atrophy with age for AD and MCI individuals, whereas HCs showed increased rates of clinical decline and atrophy with age. This resulted in convergence in rates of change for HCs and patients with advancing age for several measures. Baseline cerebrospinal fluid densities of AD-relevant proteins, Aβ(1-42, tau, and phospho-tau(181p (ptau, showed a similar pattern of convergence with advanced age across cohorts, particularly for ptau. In contrast, baseline clinical measures did not differ by age, indicating uniformity of clinical severity at baseline. These results imply that the phenotypic expression of AD is relatively mild in individuals older than approximately 85 years, and this may affect the ability to distinguish AD from normal aging in the very old. Our findings show that inclusion of older individuals in clinical trials will substantially reduce the power to detect disease-modifying therapeutic effects, leading to dramatic increases in required clinical trial sample sizes with age of study sample.

  6. 慢性乙醇中毒患者血清IL-6,TNF-α水平与脑萎缩的相关性%Correlation of brain atrophy with the levels of serum interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in chronic alcoholism patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐平; 吴岳洲; 雷显泽; 张骏; 胡泳涛

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcoholism can lead to wide and serious damages in nervoussystem and could reduce the responses of natural killer cells that can induce thechanges in cell-mediated immunity. However, studies on the relationship be-tween the immune injury in alcoholism and cerebral injury are rare.OBJECTIVE: To discuss the relationship between the changes in the serumlevels of interleukin-6(IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF-α) andbrain atrophy caused by alcoholism.DESIGN: A case-control study.SETTINGS and PARTICIPANTS: The study was completed in the FirstAffiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University. Thirty-two chronic alcoholismpatients were selected from outpatient and inpatient department from Febru-ary 1999 to July 2001, and all of them were males aged from 24 to 64 yearswith an onset age from 24 to 50 years and courses of disease from 2 months to6 years. Thirty healthy males were selected in the control group with an agefrom 30 to 60 years old.INTERVENTIONS: Serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were detected by dou-bie-antibody ELISA, which was combined with cranial CT scanning for analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The severity of brain atrophy was deter-mined by the index of ventricle, Huckman value, index of somatic part of lat-eral ventricle and the width of the three ventricles. Corresponding serum IL-6and TNF-α strengths were calculated by standard curve of reagent box.group were(286. 31 ± 104.79) ng/L and(413.34 ±66.87) ng/L respec-tively, which were significantly higher than those of the control group[ (205.43 ± 48.67) ng/L and (261.36 ± 51.48) ng/L respectively] ( P <atrophy patients were(343.75 ±99.59) ng/L and(449.38 ±55.79) ng/Lrespectively, which were significantly higher than those of non - brain atrophypatients[ (228. 88 ± 75.74) ng/L and(337.31 ± 57.96) ng/L respectively]( P < 0. 001 ) . The serum level of TNF-α in chronic alcoholism patientswithout brain atrophy was significantly higher than that of the control groupcorrelated with

  7. Visibility of lipid resonances in HR-MAS spectra of brain biopsies subject to spinning rate variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, C; Diserens, G; Oevermann, A; Vermathen, M; Lang, J; Boesch, C; Vermathen, P

    2015-12-01

    Lipid resonances from mobile lipids can be observed by ¹H NMR spectroscopy in multiple tissues and have also been associated with malignancy. In order to use lipid resonances as a marker for disease, a reference standard from a healthy tissue has to be established taking the influence of variable factors like the spinning rate into account. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of spinning rate variation on the HR-MAS pattern of lipid resonances in non-neoplastic brain biopsies from different regions and visualize polar and non-polar lipids by fluorescence microscopy using Nile Red staining. ¹H HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy demonstrated higher lipid peak intensities in normal sheep brain pure white matter biopsies compared to mixed white and gray matter biopsies and pure gray matter biopsies. High spinning rates increased the visibility particularly of the methyl resonances at 1.3 and the methylene resonance at 0.89 ppm in white matter biopsies stronger compared to thalamus and brainstem biopsies, and gray matter biopsies. The absence of lipid droplets and presence of a large number of myelin sheaths observed in white matter by Nile Red fluorescence microscopy suggest that the observed lipid resonances originate from the macromolecular pool of lipid protons of the myelin sheath's plasma membranes. When using lipid contents as a marker for disease, the variable behavior of lipid resonances in different neuroanatomical regions of the brain and at variable spinning rates should be considered. The findings may open up interesting possibilities for investigating lipids in myelin sheaths.

  8. Effect of speech rate manipulations on articulatory dynamics in severe traumatic brain injury: an EMA and EPG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Bruce E; Kuruvilla, Mili S; Goozée, Justine V

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation of speech rate forms an integral part of the treatment of dysarthria and the effects of changes in speech rate on articulatory dynamics in persons with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is poorly documented. To determine the effects of manipulations of speech rate (habitual vs fast) on lingual kinematics and tongue-to-palate contacts in adult speakers with severe TBI and matched normal controls. Six adults with severe TBI and five matched non-neurologically impaired controls underwent testing of their articulatory function using electromagnetic articulography (EMA) and electropalatography (EPG). The results demonstrated that the TBI and control groups selected different strategies for increasing speech rate, with the TBI group showing an increase in articulatory effort estimated from an increase in maximum velocity and maximum acceleration/deceleration of tongue movement when speaking at the fast rate. The control group demonstrated no effects of a fast speech rate on articulatory kinematics for sentence productions. When speaking at a fast rate, individuals with severe TBI appear to use greater articulatory effort, possibly to preserve the distinctiveness of phonetic segments in order to avoid articulatory undershoot. In contrast, control subjects show a greater economy of effort when speaking at a fast rate, possibly to preserve articulatory precision.

  9. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease.

  10. Brain MRI volumetry in a single patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David E; Castelvecchi, Cody; Ochs, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    This letter to the editor describes the case of a 42 year old man with mild traumatic brain injury and multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms which persisted for a few years after the injury. Initial CT scans and MRI scans of the brain showed no signs of atrophy. Brain volume was measured using NeuroQuant®, an FDA-approved, commercially available software method. Volumetric cross-sectional (one point in time) analysis also showed no atrophy. However, volumetric longitudinal (two points in time) analysis showed progressive atrophy in several brain regions. This case illustrated in a single patient the principle discovered in multiple previous group studies, namely that the longitudinal design is more powerful than the cross-sectional design for finding atrophy in patients with traumatic brain injury.

  11. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Self-initiation of EEG-based brain computer communication using the heart rate response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, R.; Müller-Putz, G. R.; Pfurtscheller, G.

    2007-12-01

    Self-initiation, that is the ability of a brain-computer interface (BCI) user to autonomously switch on and off the system, is a very important issue. In this work we analyze whether the respiratory heart rate response, induced by brisk inspiration, can be used as an additional communication channel. After only 20 min of feedback training, ten healthy subjects were able to self-initiate and operate a 4-class steady-state visual evoked potential-based (SSVEP) BCI by using one bipolar ECG and one bipolar EEG channel only. Threshold detection was used to measure a beat-to-beat heart rate increase. Despite this simple method, during a 30 min evaluation period on average only 2.9 non-intentional switches (heart rate changes) were detected.

  12. Repeated encephalopathy and hemicerebral atrophy in a patient with familial hemiplegic migraine type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Tsuneo; Nagamine, Shun; Mizuno, Yuji; Yoshiki, Adachi; Okamoto, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We herein describe a case of a 38-year-old man with familial hemiplegic migraine with a T666M mutation in the electrical potential-dependent calcium ion channel (CACNA1A) gene. His migraine was accompanied by hemiparesis and impaired consciousness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in the right cortical hemisphere. Single-photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decrease in iomazenil uptake and an increase in (99m)Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer uptake at the ipsilateral site. Positron emission tomography showed a decrease in 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the same area, which later showed atrophic changes. The patient's brain atrophy ceased after treatment with sodium valproate. This case suggests that the progression of brain atrophy can be prevented with adequate prophylaxis.

  13. Deficits in memory and visuospatial learning correlate with regional hippocampal atrophy in MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longoni, Giulia; Rocca, Maria A; Pagani, Elisabetta; Riccitelli, Gianna C; Colombo, Bruno; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus has a critical role in episodic memory and visuospatial learning and consolidation. We assessed the patterns of whole and regional hippocampal atrophy in a large group of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, and their correlations with neuropsychological impairment. From 103 MS patients and 28 healthy controls (HC), brain dual-echo and high-resolution 3D T1-weighted images were acquired using a 3.0-Tesla scanner. All patients underwent a neuropsychological assessment of hippocampal-related cognitive functions, including Paired Associate Word Learning, Short Story, delayed recall of Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure and Paced Auditory Serial Attention tests. The hippocampi were manually segmented and volumes derived. Regional atrophy distribution was assessed using a radial mapping analysis. Correlations between hippocampal atrophy and clinical, neuropsychological and MRI metrics were also evaluated. Hippocampal volume was reduced in MS patients vs HC (p memory and visuospatial abilities.

  14. Transmission of multiple system atrophy prions to transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Middleton, Lefkos; Dexter, David T; Gentleman, Steve M; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-11-26

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations, which become self-propagating. Increasing evidence argues that prions feature in the synucleinopathies that include Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Although TgM83(+/+) mice homozygous for a mutant A53T α-synuclein transgene begin developing CNS dysfunction spontaneously at ∼10 mo of age, uninoculated TgM83(+/-) mice (hemizygous for the transgene) remain healthy. To determine whether MSA brains contain α-synuclein prions, we inoculated the TgM83(+/-) mice with brain homogenates from two pathologically confirmed MSA cases. Inoculated TgM83(+/-) mice developed progressive signs of neurologic disease with an incubation period of ∼100 d, whereas the same mice inoculated with brain homogenates from spontaneously ill TgM83(+/+) mice developed neurologic dysfunction in ∼210 d. Brains of MSA-inoculated mice exhibited prominent astrocytic gliosis and microglial activation as well as widespread deposits of phosphorylated α-synuclein that were proteinase K sensitive, detergent insoluble, and formic acid extractable. Our results provide compelling evidence that α-synuclein aggregates formed in the brains of MSA patients are transmissible and, as such, are prions. The MSA prion represents a unique human pathogen that is lethal upon transmission to Tg mice and as such, is reminiscent of the prion causing kuru, which was transmitted to chimpanzees nearly 5 decades ago.

  15. Quantitative MRI study of progressive cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Yukihiko [Suzuka National Hospital, Suzuka, Mie (Japan); Konagaya, Yoko [JR Tokai General Hospital, Nagoya (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We investigated cerebral atrophy in multiple system atrophy (MSA) by quantitative analysis of MRI. The subjects were 28 patients with MSA (14 striato-nigral degeneration; SND, 14 olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy; OPCA. 106 MRI examinations were performed totally) and 85 normal persons for control. The ratios of the ventral pons to the infratentorial space in the sagittal section, the putamen, cerebrum, frontal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes to the intracranial space in the horizontal section, and the temporal lobe to the intracranial space in the coronal section were measured. In the early stage of the disease, OPCA showed significant atrophy of the ventral pons compared with SND, and conversely, SND demonstrated significantly smaller putamen than that in OPCA. According to the progression of the disease, the atrophy of these neural tissues progressed, which resulted in so significant differences between SND and OPCA. The cerebral atrophy was observed in 17 MSA patients. The atrophy of the frontal lobe was much frequent and prominent to that in the temporal lobe and parietal and occipital lobes. SND showed higher incidence of the cerebral atrophy than OPCA in the early stage of the disease. In long period follow-up cases, one case showed cerebral atrophy in earlier stage, and another case in late stage. We indicated the involvement of the cerebral hemispheres in MSA, especially the frontal lobe. (author)

  16. Infraspinatus muscle atrophy from suprascapular nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Christopher B; Owens, Brett D

    2014-02-01

    Muscle weakness without pain may signal a nerve compression injury. Because these injuries should be identified and treated early to prevent permanent muscle weakness and atrophy, providers should consider suprascapular nerve compression in patients with shoulder muscle weakness.

  17. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powers, Scott K; Wiggs, Michael P; Duarte, Jose A; Zergeroglu, A Murat; Demirel, Haydar A

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals...

  18. Cerebral perfusion changes in traumatic diffuse brain injury. IMP SPECT studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Development, Aging and Cancer; Ishii, Kiyoshi; Onuma, Takehide

    1997-05-01

    Diffuse brain injury (DBI) is characterized by axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which cause diffuse brain atrophy. We have investigated the time course of abnormalities in cerebral perfusion distribution in cases of DBI by using Iodine-123-IMP SPECT, and the relationship to the appearance of diffuse brain atrophy. SPECT scans were performed on eight patients with diffuse brain injury due to closed cranial trauma in acute and chronic stages. All patients showed abnormalities in cerebral perfusion with decreases in perfusion, even in non-depicted regions on MRI, and the affected areas varied throughout the period of observation. Diffuse brain atrophy appeared in all patients. In some patients, diffuse brain atrophy was observed at or just after the time when the maximum number of lesions on SPECT were seen. The abnormalities in cerebral perfusion in cases of DBI might therefore be related to axonal degeneration and neuronal damage which causes diffuse brain atrophy. (author)

  19. Subclinical white matter lesions and medial temporal lobe atrophy are associated with EEG slowing in a memory clinic cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramberger, Milica G; Giske, Katarina; Cavallin, Lena; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Andersson, Thomas; Winblad, Bengt; Jelic, Vesna

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the relationship between electroencephalographic (EEG) findings obtained by standardized visual analysis, subclinical white matter lesions (WML) and brain atrophy in a large memory clinic population. Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=58), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=141), subjective cognitive impairment (SCI, n=194) had clinical, MRI based WML severity and regional atrophy assessments, and routine resting EEG recording. Background activity (BA) and episodic and continuous abnormalities were assessed visually in EEG. WML (p=0.006) and atrophy in medial temporal regions (MTA) (p=atrophy in a memory clinic population. Even the standard visually assessed EEG can complement a memory clinic diagnostic workup. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A method to evaluate the diffusion rate of drugs from a microdialysis probe through brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, B.H.C.; de Vries, J.B

    2001-01-01

    For interpretation of microdialysis experiments in which compounds are applied retrodialysis, it is important to have information about the migration rate of the infused compounds. Here we describe a dual-probe microdialysis method that can be used to evaluate the penetration rate of the infused dru

  1. Text-to-speech technology effects on reading rate and comprehension by adults with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Judy; Hux, Karen; Scott, Nikki; Snell, Jeffry

    2013-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the comprehension, rate and perceptions and reading preferences of adults with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) when reading passages with and without computerized text-to-speech (TTS) support. Nine adults with severe TBI read 24 passages in two conditions: with and without TTS support. The researchers compared reading rate and comprehension accuracy across conditions. Also, participants rated their perceived performance and reading preferences via a follow-up questionnaire. Comparison to normative data revealed that all nine participants read slower than average neurotypical readers. As a group, participants read significantly faster with TTS support than without such support, even though the TTS reading rate was roughly comparable to the oral rather than silent reading rate of neurotypical adults. No significant differences in comprehension resulted between the two conditions. Over half of the participants preferred the TTS condition over the no-TTS condition. In general, participants were inaccurate in judging their relative reading rates and comprehension accuracy across conditions. TTS may improve reading efficiency without compromising reading comprehension accuracy for adults with TBI. Given this finding, some survivors may find use of TTS technology contributes to increased participation in and efficiency when performing reading activities.

  2. Zika virus causes testicular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uraki, Ryuta; Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Householder, Sarah; Yockey, Laura J.; Hastings, Andrew K.; Homer, Robert J.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Fikrig, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that has recently been found to cause fetal infection and neonatal abnormalities, including microcephaly and neurological dysfunction. ZIKV persists in the semen months after the acute viremic phase in humans. To further understand the consequences of ZIKV persistence in males, we infected Ifnar1−/− mice via subcutaneous injection of a pathogenic but nonlethal ZIKV strain. ZIKV replication persists within the testes even after clearance from the blood, with interstitial, testosterone-producing Leydig cells supporting virus replication. We found high levels of viral RNA and antigen within the epididymal lumen, where sperm is stored, and within surrounding epithelial cells. Unexpectedly, at 21 days post-infection, the testes of the ZIKV-infected mice were significantly smaller compared to those of mock-infected mice, indicating progressive testicular atrophy. ZIKV infection caused a reduction in serum testosterone, suggesting that male fertility can be affected. Our findings have important implications for nonvector-borne vertical transmission, as well as long-term potential reproductive deficiencies, in ZIKV-infected males. PMID:28261663

  3. Grey matter atrophy in prodromal stage of dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frederic; Colloby, Sean J; Cretin, Benjamin; de Sousa, Paulo Loureiro; Demuynck, Catherine; O'Brien, John T; Martin-Hunyadi, Catherine; McKeith, Ian; Philippi, Nathalie; Taylor, John-Paul

    2016-07-20

    Little is known about the patterns of brain atrophy in prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (pro-DLB). In this study, we used SPM8 with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra to measure grey matter (GM) volume and investigate patterns of GM atrophy in pro-DLB (n = 28) and prodromal Alzheimer's disease (pro-AD) (n = 27) and compared and contrasted them with those in elderly control subjects (n = 33) (P ≤ 0.05 corrected for family-wise error). Patients with pro-DLB showed diminished GM volumes of bilateral insulae and right anterior cingulate cortex compared with control subjects. Comparison of GM volume between patients with pro-AD and control subjects showed a more extensive pattern, with volume reductions in temporal (hippocampi and superior and middle gyri), parietal and frontal structures in the former. Direct comparison of prodromal groups suggested that more atrophy was evident in the parietal lobes of patients with pro-AD than patients with pro-DLB. In patients with pro-DLB, we found that visual hallucinations were associated with relative atrophy of the left cuneus. Atrophy in pro-DLB involves the insulae and anterior cingulate cortex, regions rich in von Economo neurons, which we speculate may contribute to the early clinical phenotype of pro-DLB.

  4. [Familial posterior cortical atrophy with visual agnosia and Bálint's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, M; Soma, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, K; Tanno, Y; Uesugi, Y; Tsuji, S

    1995-12-01

    We report a patient of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome and dementia in which posterior cortical atrophy with similar characteristics on CT and progressive dementia were found in a sister. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who noted the onset of a progressive visual disorder at the age of 70, and whose family first noticed disoriented behavior at around the same period. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed mild cataract but no evidence of peripheral optic nerve or retinal lesions. Neuropsychological examination showed right homonymous hemianopia, visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome, mild transcortical sensory aphasia, Gerstmann's syndrome, constructional apraxia, mild ideomotor apraxia and memory disorder. MRI showed marked dilatation of both lateral ventricles, especially the posterior horns, and severe atrophy of the occipital lobes, hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus. Assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by IMP-SPECT revealed a generalized decrease in the temporo-parieto-occipital region bilaterally. The patient's sister began to show evidence of progressive dementia at 80 years of age and CT of the brain revealed marked atrophy, predominantly in the occipital lobes, similar to that of the patient. We believe this to be the first report of posterior cortical atrophy with a positive family history, suggesting the possibility of a hereditary syndrome.

  5. Testicular atrophy following paediatric primary orchidopexy: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, J; Johal, N; Burge, D; Wheeler, R; Griffiths, M; Kitteringham, L; Stanton, M; Manoharan, S; Steinbrecher, H; Malone, P; Griffin, S J

    2016-08-01

    With the Nordic consensus statement advocating orchidopexy at an earlier age, the present study sought to investigate the outcomes of primary paediatric orchidopexy at a tertiary UK centre. To prospectively assess testicular atrophy following primary orchidopexy for undescended testes in a paediatric population. Secondary outcomes were complication rates and whether outcomes were dependent on grade of operating surgeon. Prospective data regarding age at operation, classification of the undescended testis, length of follow-up, and subjective comparison of intraoperative and postoperative testicular volumes compared with the contralateral testis were collected. Testicular atrophy was defined as >50% loss of testicular volume or a postoperative testicular volume atrophy occurred in 2.6% of cases. There was no reported testicular re-ascent. All secondary acquired cases underwent a previous ipsilateral hernia repair. There was no significant difference in outcomes comparing the grade of surgeon (consultant n = 8, trainee/staff-grade surgeon n = 7-8). There was a trend towards postoperative catch-up growth in approximately one fifth of cases. Previous studies have reported a testicular atrophy rate of 5%. The present study reported a similar rate of 2.6%. In agreement with a previous publication, it was also found that testicular atrophy was not dependent on the grade of operating surgeon. The mechanism for testicular catch-up growth is not well understood. Animal studies have supported the hypothesis that increased temperature has a detrimental effect on testicular volume. However, follow-up in the present cohort was short (median 6.9 months), making interpretation of this finding difficult. It is acknowledged that clinical palpation alone to determine testicular volume potentially introduces intra-observer and inter-observer error. However, prospective studies using ultrasound to determine testicular volumes following orchidopexy have reported catch-up growth. This

  6. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  7. The gross motor function measure is a valid and sensitive outcome measure for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leslie; Owens, Hollis; Hynan, Linda S; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2006-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic disease of the anterior horn cell with high morbidity rate in childhood. Certain drugs may be of benefit and are in or under consideration for Phase II trials. Outcome measures that are age appropriate and representative of disease activity remain under study. Several have not yet been validated for spinal muscular atrophy. The Gross Motor Function Measure is a measure of motor function. We showed previously that the Gross Motor Function Measure is a reliable outcome measure to assess motor function in children with spinal muscular atrophy. By collating our data from 40 spinal muscular atrophy patients, ages 5 through 17 years, we now show the validity of the Gross Motor Function Measure when compared to Quantitative Muscle Testing and ambulatory status in children with spinal muscular atrophy. The median for Gross Motor Function Measure total scores for walkers was 237 (range: 197-261) and for non-walkers, 64 (range: 4-177; PGross Motor Function Measure is valid and sensitive as an outcome measure for clinical trials in pediatric spinal muscular atrophy.

  8. Calcified neurocysticercosis associates with hippocampal atrophy: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H; Salgado, Perla; Lama, Julio; Del Brutto, Victor J; Campos, Xavier; Zambrano, Mauricio; García, Héctor H

    2015-01-01

    Calcified neurocysticercosis has been associated with hippocampal atrophy in patients with refractory epilepsy, but the relevance of this association in the population at large is unknown. We assessed calcified cysticerci and its association with hippocampal atrophy in elderly persons living in Atahualpa, an Ecuadorian village endemic for neurocysticercosis. All Atahualpa residents ≥ 60 years of age were invited to undergo computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging for neurocysticercosis detection. Twenty-eight (11%) out of 248 enrolled persons had calcified cysticerci (case-patients) and were matched 1:1 by age, sex, and years of education to individuals without neurocysticercosis on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (controls). Four case-patients and none of the controls had epilepsy (P = 0.134). Cognitive performance was similar across both groups. The Scheltens' medial temporal atrophy scale was used for hippocampal rating in case-patients and matched controls without neurocysticercosis. Mean score in the Scheltens' scale was higher in case-patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Atrophic hippocampi were noticed in 19 case-patients and five controls (P = 0.003). Atrophy was bilateral in 11 case-patients and unilateral in eight. All case-patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy had at least one ipsilateral calcification. This study shows an association between calcified cysticerci and hippocampal atrophy and raises the possibility of an inflammation-mediated hippocampal damage as the responsible mechanism for these findings.

  9. Calcified Neurocysticercosis Associates with Hippocampal Atrophy: A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Brutto, Oscar H.; Salgado, Perla; Lama, Julio; Del Brutto, Victor J.; Campos, Xavier; Zambrano, Mauricio; García, Héctor H.

    2015-01-01

    Calcified neurocysticercosis has been associated with hippocampal atrophy in patients with refractory epilepsy, but the relevance of this association in the population at large is unknown. We assessed calcified cysticerci and its association with hippocampal atrophy in elderly persons living in Atahualpa, an Ecuadorian village endemic for neurocysticercosis. All Atahualpa residents ≥ 60 years of age were invited to undergo computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging for neurocysticercosis detection. Twenty-eight (11%) out of 248 enrolled persons had calcified cysticerci (case-patients) and were matched 1:1 by age, sex, and years of education to individuals without neurocysticercosis on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (controls). Four case-patients and none of the controls had epilepsy (P = 0.134). Cognitive performance was similar across both groups. The Scheltens' medial temporal atrophy scale was used for hippocampal rating in case-patients and matched controls without neurocysticercosis. Mean score in the Scheltens' scale was higher in case-patients than in controls (P < 0.001). Atrophic hippocampi were noticed in 19 case-patients and five controls (P = 0.003). Atrophy was bilateral in 11 case-patients and unilateral in eight. All case-patients with unilateral hippocampal atrophy had at least one ipsilateral calcification. This study shows an association between calcified cysticerci and hippocampal atrophy and raises the possibility of an inflammation-mediated hippocampal damage as the responsible mechanism for these findings. PMID:25349375

  10. Relationship between the degree of endoscopic atrophy of the gastric mucosa and carcinogenic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Hironori; Yoshitake, Naoto; Sasai, Takako; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Masuyama, Atsushi; Zuiki, Toru; Kurashina, Kentaro; Mieda, Mitsuyo; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori; Togashi, Kazutomo; Terano, Akira; Hiraishi, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer has been demonstrated, and the risk of gastric cancer occurrence is known to increase with the progression of atrophic changes associated with chronic gastritis. Endoscopic evaluation of the degree and extent of atrophy of the gastric mucosa is a simple and very important means of identifying a group at high risk for gastric cancer. This study aimed to clarify the carcinogenic risk in relation to the degree of atrophy. A total of 27,777 patients (272 with early gastric cancer and 135 with advanced gastric cancer) were included in this study. Endoscopically evaluated atrophy of the gastric mucosa was classified as C-0 to O-3 according to the Kimura and Takemoto classification system. The cancer detection rate in relation to the degree of gastric mucosal atrophy was 0.04% (2/4,183 patients) for C-0, 0% (0/4,506) for C-1, 0.25% (9/3,660) for C-2, 0.71% (21/2,960) for C-3, 1.32% (75/5,684) for O-1, 3.70% (140/3,780) for O-2 and 5.33% (160/3,004) for O-3. As to the proportions of differentiated and undifferentiated cancers, the latter were relatively frequent in the C-0 to C-2 groups, but differentiated cancers became predominant as atrophy progressed. On the other hand, the number of both differentiated and undifferentiated cancers detected increased as gastric mucosal atrophy progressed. In addition, open-type atrophy was found in 29 (96.7%) of 30 patients with synchronous multiple gastric cancers and in all 20 patients with metachronous multiple gastric cancers. Endoscopic evaluation of gastric mucosal atrophy can provide a simple and reliable predictive index for both current and future carcinogenic risk. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effects of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation and levodopa on energy production rate and substrate oxidation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlemoine, Caroline; Macia, Frédéric; Tison, François; Coman, Isabelle; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Baillet, Laurence; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent

    2005-02-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often lose weight, but after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS), they gain weight. We compared daily energy intake (DEI), resting energy expenditure (REE) and substrate oxidation rates (measured by indirect calorimetry) in nineteen STN-DBS-treated patients (Group S), thirteen others on pharmacologic treatment by levodopa (Group L) and eight control subjects. We also determined the acute effects of STN-DBS and levodopa on REE and substrate oxidation rates. STN-DBS treated patients gained 9.7 (SEM 7.1) kg after surgery, whereas patients on pharmacologic treatment lost 3.8 (SEM 10.0) kg since diagnosis. In STN-DBS-treated patients, REE (-16.5 %; Pweight gain on glycaemia.

  12. Baseline CSF p-tau levels independently predict progression of hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, W J.P.; Vrenken, H; Barnes, J; Sluimer, I C.; Verwey, N A.; Blankenstein, M A.; Klein, M; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Barkhof, F; van der Flier, W M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether baseline CSF biomarkers are associated with hippocampal atrophy rate as a measure of disease progression in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls, controlling for baseline neuropsychological and MRI findings. Methods: We assessed data from 31 patients with AD, 25 patients with MCI, and 19 controls (mean age 68 ± 8 years; 39 [52%] female) who visited our memory clinic and had received serial MRI scanning (scan interval 1.7 ± 0.7 years). At baseline, CSF biomarkers (amyloid β 1-42, tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau]) were obtained, as well as neuropsychological data. Baseline MRI scans were assessed using visual rating scales for medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities. Hippocampal atrophy rates were estimated using regional nonlinear “fluid” registration of follow-up scan to baseline scan. Results: Stepwise multiple linear regression, adjusted for age and sex, showed that increased CSF p-tau levels (β [standard error]: −0.79 [0.35]) at baseline was independently associated with higher subsequent hippocampal atrophy rates (p < 0.05), together with poorer memory performance (0.09 [0.04]) and more severe MTA (−0.60 [0.21]). The association of memory function with hippocampal atrophy rate was explained by the link with diagnosis, because it disappeared from the model after we additionally corrected for diagnosis. Conclusions: Baseline CSF levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 are independently associated with subsequent disease progression, as reflected by hippocampal atrophy rate. This effect is independent of baseline neuropsychological and MRI predictors. Our results imply that predicting disease progression can best be achieved by combining information from different modalities. GLOSSARY Aβ1-42 = amyloid β 1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; FOV = field of view; GCA = global cortical

  13. Association between naturally occurring anti-amyloid β autoantibodies and medial temporal lobe atrophy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akio; Takemura, Masao; Saito, Kuniaki; Yoshikura, Nobuaki; Hayashi, Yuichi; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    Naturally occurring autoantibodies against amyloid β (Aβ) peptide exist in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy individuals. Recently, it was reported that administration of intravenous immunoglobulin at the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reduces brain atrophy. To examine the association between naturally occurring anti-Aβ autoantibodies and brain atrophy in patients with cognitive impairment. Serum and CSF levels of anti-Aβ autoantibodies and CSF biomarkers were evaluated in 68 patients with cognitive impairment, comprising 44 patients with AD, 19 patients with amnestic MCI and five patients with non-Alzheimer's dementia. The degree of brain atrophy was assessed using the voxel-based specific regional analysis system for AD, which targets the volume of interest (VOI) in medial temporal structures, including the whole hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala. CSF levels of anti-Aβ autoantibodies were inversely correlated with the extent and severity of VOI atrophy, and the ratio of VOI/grey matter atrophy in patients with AD, but not in MCI or non-AD patients. Serum levels of anti-Aβ autoantibodies were not associated with these parameters in any of the patient groups. These results indicate that CSF levels of naturally occurring anti-Aβ autoantibodies are inversely associated with the degree of the VOI atrophy in patients with AD. Although the mechanism is unclear, CSF levels of naturally occurring anti-Aβ autoantibodies may be implicated in the progression of atrophy of the whole hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and amygdala, in AD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Topological false discovery rates for brain mapping based on signal height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junning; Gahm, Jin Kyu; Shi, Yonggang; Toga, Arthur W

    2016-11-09

    Correcting the effect of multiple testing is important in statistical parametric mapping. If the threshold is too liberal, then spurious claims may flood in; if it is too conservative, then true hints may be overlooked. It is highly desirable to combine random field theory and the false discovery rate (FDR) to achieve more powerful detection under gauged topological errors. However, the current FDR method based on peak height does not fully meet this expectation, and sometimes is more conservative than the traditional family-wise error rate method, for unexplained reasons. In this paper, we introduce a new topological FDR method based on signal height. As analyzed in theory and validated with extensive experiments, it controls error rates much more accurately than the peak FDR method does, and substantially gains detection power. In addition, we discover reasons behind the peak FDR method's under-performance, and formulate equations to predict the two methods' behavior. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Can endoscopic atrophy predict histological atrophy? Historical study in United Kingdom and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Shin; Gotoda, Takuji; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Oda, Ichiro; Kondo, Hitoshi; Gatta, Luigi; Naylor, Greg; Dixon, Michael; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Axon, Anthony

    2015-12-14

    To assess the diagnostic concordance between endoscopic and histological atrophy in the United Kingdom and Japan. Using published data, a total of 252 patients, 126 in the United Kingdom and 126 in Japan, aged 20 to 80 years, were evaluated. The extent of endoscopic atrophy was classified into five subgroups according to a modified Kimura-Takemoto classification system and was compared with histological findings of atrophy at five biopsy sites according to the updated Sydney system. The strength of agreement of the extent of atrophy between histology and visual endoscopic inspection showed good reproducibility, with a weighted kappa value of 0.76 (P atrophy (OR = 0.10, 95%CI: 0.03-0.36). The strength of agreement between endoscopic and histological atrophy, assessed by cancer risk-oriented grading, was reproducible, with a kappa value of 0.81 (95%CI: 0.75-0.87). Only nine patients (3.6%) were endoscopically underdiagnosed with antral predominant rather than extensive atrophy and were considered false negatives. Endoscopic grading can predict histological atrophy with few false negatives, indicating that precancerous conditions can be identified during screening endoscopy, particularly in patients in western countries.

  16. Common multifractality in the heart rate variability and brain activity of healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, D. C.; Sharif, A.

    2010-06-01

    The influence from the central nervous system on the human multifractal heart rate variability (HRV) is examined under the autonomic nervous system perturbation induced by the head-up-tilt body maneuver. We conducted the multifractal factorization analysis to factor out the common multifractal factor in the joint fluctuation of the beat-to-beat heart rate and electroencephalography data. Evidence of a central link in the multifractal HRV was found, where the transition towards increased (decreased) HRV multifractal complexity is associated with a stronger (weaker) multifractal correlation between the central and autonomic nervous systems.

  17. Performance Enhancement of the RatCAP Awake Rate Brain PET System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaska, P.; Vaska, P.; Woody, C.; Schlyer, D.; Radeka, V.; O' Connor, P.; Park, S.-J.; Pratte, J.-F.; Junnarkar, M.; Purschke, S.; Southekal, S.; Stoll, S.; Schiffer, W.; Neill, J.; Wharton, D.; Myers, N.; Wiley, S.; Kandasamy, A.; Fried, J.; Krishnamoorthy, S. Kriplani, A.; Maramraju, S.; Lecomte, R.; Fontaine, R.

    2011-03-01

    The first full prototype of the RatCAP PET system, designed to image the brain of a rat while conscious, has been completed. Initial results demonstrated excellent spatial resolution, 1.8 mm FWHM with filtered backprojection and <1.5 mm FWHM with a Monte Carlo based MLEM method. However, noise equivalent countrate studies indicated the need for better timing to mitigate the effect of randoms. Thus, the front-end ASIC has been redesigned to minimize time walk, an accurate coincidence time alignment method has been implemented, and a variance reduction technique for the randoms is being developed. To maximize the quantitative capabilities required for neuroscience, corrections are being implemented and validated for positron range and photon noncollinearity, scatter (including outside the field of view), attenuation, randoms, and detector efficiency (deadtime is negligible). In addition, a more robust and compact PCI-based optical data acquisition system has been built to replace the original VME-based system while retaining the linux-based data processing and image reconstruction codes. Finally, a number of new animal imaging experiments have been carried out to demonstrate the performance of the RatCAP in real imaging situations, including an F-18 fluoride bone scan, a C-11 raclopride scan, and a dynamic C-11 methamphetamine scan.

  18. Characterizing the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor genetic variation in Alzheimer's disease neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn A Honea

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that neurotrophins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, may impact aging and Alzheimer's Disease. However, traditional genetic association studies have not found a clear relationship between BDNF and AD. Our goal was to test whether BDNF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs impact Alzheimer's Disease-related brain imaging and cognitive markers of disease. We completed an imaging genetics study on 645 Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants (ND=175, MCI=316, AD=154 who had cognitive, brain imaging, and genetics data at baseline and a subset of those with brain imaging data at two years. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip. 13 SNPs in BDNF were identified in the dataset following quality control measures (rs6265(Val66Met, rs12273363, rs11030094, rs925946, rs1050187, rs2203877, rs11030104, rs11030108, rs10835211, rs7934165, rs908867, rs1491850, rs1157459. We analyzed a subgroup of 8 SNPs that were in low linkage disequilibrium with each other. Automated brain morphometric measures were available through ADNI investigators, and we analyzed baseline cognitive scores, hippocampal and whole brain volumes, and rates of hippocampal and whole brain atrophy and rates of change in the ADAS-Cog over one and two years. Three out of eight BDNF SNPs analyzed were significantly associated with measures of cognitive decline (rs1157659, rs11030094, rs11030108. No SNPs were significantly associated with baseline brain volume measures, however six SNPs were significantly associated with hippocampal and/or whole brain atrophy over two years (rs908867, rs11030094, rs6265, rs10501087, rs1157659, rs1491850. We also found an interaction between the BDNF Val66Met SNP and age with whole brain volume. Our imaging-genetics analysis in a large dataset suggests that while BDNF genetic variation is not specifically associated with a diagnosis of AD, it appears to play a role in AD

  19. Conventional and cross-correlation brain-stem auditory evoked responses in the white leghorn chick: rate manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Jones, S.; Jones, T.

    1994-01-01

    Rate-dependent changes in the chick brain-stem auditory evoked response (BAER) using conventional averaging and a cross-correlation technique were investigated. Five 15- to 19-day-old white leghorn chicks were anesthetized with Chloropent. In each chick, the left ear was acoustically stimulated. Electrical pulses of 0.1-ms duration were shaped, attenuated, and passed through a current driver to an Etymotic ER-2 which was sealed in the ear canal. Electrical activity from stainless-steel electrodes was amplified, filtered (300-3000 Hz) and digitized at 20 kHz. Click levels included 70 and 90 dB peSPL. In each animal, conventional BAERs were obtained at rates ranging from 5 to 90 Hz. BAERs were also obtained using a cross-correlation technique involving pseudorandom pulse sequences called maximum length sequences (MLSs). The minimum time between pulses, called the minimum pulse interval (MPI), ranged from 0.5 to 6 ms. Two BAERs were obtained for each condition. Dependent variables included the latency and amplitude of the cochlear microphonic (CM), wave 2 and wave 3. BAERs were observed in all chicks, for all level by rate combinations for both conventional and MLS BAERs. There was no effect of click level or rate on the latency of the CM. The latency of waves 2 and 3 increased with decreasing click level and increasing rate. CM amplitude decreased with decreasing click level, but was not influenced by click rate for the 70 dB peSPL condition. For the 90 dB peSPL click, CM amplitude was uninfluenced by click rate for conventional averaging. For MLS BAERs, CM amplitude was similar to conventional averaging for longer MPIs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. A study of brain MRI findings in children with epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Sachiko; Sumida, Sawako; Muto, Ayako; Osawa, Makiko; Ono, Yuko [Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan); Uchida, Moriyasu; Maruyama, Hiroshi

    2000-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging in the brain was performed in 293 patients with childhood-onset (<15 y.o.) epilepsy who had been classified into 4 groups, idiopathic localization-related epilepsy (ILRE), 78 patients; idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), 116 patients; symptomatic localization-related epilepsy (SLRE), 68 patients and symptomatic generalized epilepsy (SGE), 31 patients, with the Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndrome (1989 International League Against Epilepsy). The examination was performed with a 1.5 T magnet. One hundred twenty-five patients (42.7%) showed abnormal findings, and the incidence in each group was as follows: Idiopathic epilepsy: The rate of abnormal findings in the ILRE and IGE groups was 21.8% and 20.7%, respectively. Most of the abnormal findings were secondary changes, such as diffuse or localized brain atrophy. Of the congenital abnormalities, the main finding was arachnoid cyst. Symptomatic epilepsy: The rate of abnormality in the SLRE patients was 88.2%, and 85% of the findings were secondary changes, i.e., brain atrophy, or degeneration of the white matter. In the SGE group, the rate was 77.4%, with an almost equal percentage of congenital and secondary changes. Of 255 patients who were examined by electroencephalography (EEG) on the same day as MRI, about 50% showed a correlation between the EEG records and the MRI abnormalities. However, only 8 patients showed a correlation in localization between the EEG and MRI abnormalities. (author)

  1. Brain and high metabolic rate organ mass: contributions to resting energy expenditure beyond fat-free mass1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fahad; He, Qing; Davidson, Lance E; Thornton, John C; Albu, Jeanine; Boxt, Lawrence; Krasnow, Norman; Elia, Marinos; Kang, Patrick; Heshka, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Background: The degree to which interindividual variation in the mass of select high metabolic rate organs (HMROs) mediates variability in resting energy expenditure (REE) is unknown. Objective: The objective was to investigate how much REE variability is explained by differences in HMRO mass in adults and whether age, sex, and race independently predict REE after adjustment for HMRO. Design: A cross-sectional evaluation of 55 women [30 African Americans aged 48.7 ± 22.2 y (mean ± SD) and 25 whites aged 46.4 ± 17.7 y] and 32 men (8 African Americans aged 34.3 ± 18.2 y and 24 whites aged 51.3 ± 20.6 y) was conducted. Liver, kidney, spleen, heart, and brain masses were measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and fat and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results: REE estimated from age (P = 0.001), race (P = 0.006), sex (P = 0.31), fat (P = 0.001), and FFM (P brain (P = 0.006) to the model increased the explained variance to 75% and rendered the contributions of age, sex, and race statistically nonsignificant, whereas fat and FFM continued to make significant contributions (both P brain to the model rendered the intercept (69 kcal · kg−1 · d−1) consistent with zero, which indicated zero REE for zero body mass. Conclusions: Relatively small interindividual variation in HMRO mass significantly affects REE and reduces the role of age, race, and sex in explaining REE. Decreases in REE with increasing age may be partly related to age-associated changes in the relative size of FFM components. PMID:20164308

  2. Unraveling the relationship between regional gray matter atrophy and pathology in connected white matter tracts in long-standing multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Daams, Marita; Pouwels, Petra J W; J Balk, Lisanne; Tewarie, Prejaas K; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    Gray matter (GM) atrophy is common in multiple sclerosis (MS), but the relationship with white matter (WM) pathology is largely unknown. Some studies found a co-occurrence in specific systems, but a regional analysis across the brain in different clinical phenotypes is necessary to further understand the disease mechanism underlying GM atrophy in MS. Therefore, we investigated the association between regional GM atrophy and pathology in anatomically connected WM tracts. Conventional and diffusion tensor imaging was performed at 3T in 208 patients with long-standing MS and 60 healthy controls. Deep and cortical GM regions were segmented and quantified, and both lesion volumes and average normal appearing WM fractional anisotropy of their associated tracts were derived using an atlas obtained by probabilistic tractography in the controls. Linear regression was then performed to quantify the amount of regional GM atrophy that can be explained by WM pathology in the connected tract. MS patients showed extensive deep and cortical GM atrophy. Cortical atrophy was particularly present in frontal and temporal regions. Pathology in connected WM tracts statistically explained both regional deep and cortical GM atrophy in relapsing-remitting (RR) patients, but only deep GM atrophy in secondary-progressive (SP) patients. In RRMS patients, both deep and cortical GM atrophy were associated with pathology in connected WM tracts. In SPMS patients, only regional deep GM atrophy could be explained by pathology in connected WM tracts. This suggests that in SPMS patients cortical GM atrophy and WM damage are (at least partly) independent disease processes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH: a better correlation in vaginal atrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiviriyapun, P; Panyakhamlerd, K; Triratanachat, S; Chatsuwan, T; Chaikittisilpa, S; Jaisamrarn, U; Taechakraichana, N

    2015-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation among symptoms, signs, and the number of lactobacilli in postmenopausal vaginal atrophy. The secondary objective was to develop a new parameter to improve the correlation. A cross-sectional descriptive study. Naturally postmenopausal women aged 45-70 years with at least one clinical symptom of vaginal atrophy of moderate to severe intensity were included in this study. All of the objective parameters (vaginal atrophy score, vaginal pH, the number of lactobacilli, vaginal maturation index, and vaginal maturation value) were evaluated and correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. A new parameter of vaginal atrophy, vaginal atrophy symptoms II, was developed and consists of the two most bothersome symptoms (vaginal dryness and dyspareunia). Vaginal atrophy symptoms II was analyzed for correlation with the objective parameters. A total of 132 naturally postmenopausal women were recruited for analysis. Vaginal pH was the only objective parameter found to have a weak correlation with vaginal atrophy symptoms (r = 0.273, p = 0.002). The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II parameter showed moderate correlation with vaginal pH (r = 0.356, p atrophy score (r = 0.230, p atrophy symptoms and the objective parameters. Vaginal pH was significantly correlated with vaginal atrophy symptoms. The newly developed vaginal atrophy symptoms II was associated with a better correlation. The vaginal atrophy symptoms II and vaginal pH may be better tools for clinical evaluation and future study of the vaginal ecosystem.

  4. Large deletions within the spinal muscular atrophy gene region in a patient with spinal muscular atrophy type 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei; Chunyue Chen; Wenting Liu; Zhenfang Du; Xiaoling Chen; Xianning Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and brain stem nuclei, leading to progressive limb and trunk paralysis and muscular atrophy. Depending on the age of onset and maximum muscular function achieved, SMA is recognized as SMA1, SMA2, SMA3 or SMA4, and most patients have a deletion or truncation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In this report, we present a patient with a mild SMA phenotype, SMA3, and define his genetic abnormality. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization were used to determine the genetic variations in this patient. A 500 kb deletion in chromosome 5q13.2, including homozygous deletion of neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, and heterozygous deletion of occludin and B-double prime 1 was identified. This SMA region deletion did not involve SMN, indicating that SMN was likely to function normally. The phenotype was dependent of the large deletion and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, occludin and B-double prime 1 may be candidate genes for SMA3.

  5. Heart rate calculation from ensemble brain wave using wavelet and Teager-Kaiser energy operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Jayaraman; Adithya, V

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signal artifacts are caused by various factors, such as, Electro-oculogram (EOG), Electromyogram (EMG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), movement artifact and line interference. The relatively high electrical energy cardiac activity causes EEG artifacts. In EEG signal processing the general approach is to remove the ECG signal. In this paper, we introduce an automated method to extract the ECG signal from EEG using wavelet and Teager-Kaiser energy operator for R-peak enhancement and detection. From the detected R-peaks the heart rate (HR) is calculated for clinical diagnosis. To check the efficiency of our method, we compare the HR calculated from ECG signal recorded in synchronous with EEG. The proposed method yields a mean error of 1.4% for the heart rate and 1.7% for mean R-R interval. The result illustrates that, proposed method can be used for ECG extraction from single channel EEG and used in clinical diagnosis like estimation for stress analysis, fatigue, and sleep stages classification studies as a multi-model system. In addition, this method eliminates the dependence of additional synchronous ECG in extraction of ECG from EEG signal process.

  6. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, M.; Torres-Silva, H.

    2006-04-01

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) 'inverse skin effect' shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source.

  7. Brain activity in adults who stutter: Similarities across speaking tasks and correlations with stuttering frequency and speaking rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Roger J.; Grafton, Scott T.; Bothe, Anne K.; Ingham, Janis C.

    2012-01-01

    Many differences in brain activity have been reported between persons who stutter (PWS) and typically fluent controls during oral reading tasks. An earlier meta-analysis of imaging studies identified stutter-related regions, but recent studies report less agreement with those regions. A PET study on adult dextral PWS (n = 18) and matched fluent controls (CONT, n = 12) is reported that used both oral reading and monologue tasks. After correcting for speech rate differences between the groups the task-activation differences were surprisingly small. For both analyses only some regions previously considered stutter-related were more activated in the PWS group than in the CONT group, and these were also activated during eyes-closed rest (ECR). In the PWS group, stuttering frequency was correlated with cortico-striatal-thalamic circuit activity in both speaking tasks. The neuroimaging findings for the PWS group, relative to the CONT group, appear consistent with neuroanatomic abnormalities being increasingly reported among PWS. PMID:22564749

  8. Imaging geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Arno P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Brinkmann, Christian K; Holz, Frank G

    2011-01-01

    Advances in retinal imaging technology have largely contributed to the understanding of the natural history, prognostic markers and disease mechanisms of geographic atrophy (GA) due to age-related macular degeneration. There is still no therapy available to halt or slow the disease process. In order to evaluate potential therapeutic effects in interventional trials, there is a need for precise quantification of the GA progression rate. Fundus autofluorescence imaging allows for accurate identification and segmentation of atrophic areas and currently represents the gold standard for evaluating progressive GA enlargement. By means of high-resolution spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, distinct microstructural alterations related to GA can be visualized.

  9. Does gastric atrophy exist in children?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georges Dimitrov; Frédéric Gottrand

    2006-01-01

    Several clinical reports confirmed that gastric atrophy is a pathology not only limited to adult patients. In pediatrics, it is most often described in association with a Hpylori infection but this bacteria does not seem to be the only etiological factor of this preneoplastic state in children. The frequency of gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in children are unknown because they are not systematically sought during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The lack of specific histological classification of children's gastropathies makes their diagnosis difficult for pathologists. Based on our knowledge to date, we think that it is necessary to describe, in detail, the natural course of this lesion during childhood. A close and prolonged clinical and endoscopic follow-up is important for children with gastric atrophy.

  10. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  11. Strain and rate-dependent neuronal injury in a 3D in vitro compression model of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Scimone, Mark T; Estrada, Jonathan B; Franck, Christian

    2016-08-02

    In the United States over 1.7 million cases of traumatic brain injury are reported yearly, but predictive correlation of cellular injury to impact tissue strain is still lacking, particularly for neuronal injury resulting from compression. Given the prevalence of compressive deformations in most blunt head trauma, this information is critically important for the development of future mitigation and diagnosis strategies. Using a 3D in vitro neuronal compression model, we investigated the role of impact strain and strain rate on neuronal lifetime, viability, and pathomorphology. We find that strain magnitude and rate have profound, yet distinctively different effects on the injury pathology. While strain magnitude affects the time of neuronal death, strain rate influences the pathomorphology and extent of population injury. Cellular injury is not initiated through localized deformation of the cytoskeleton but rather driven by excess strain on the entire cell. Furthermore we find that, mechanoporation, one of the key pathological trigger mechanisms in stretch and shear neuronal injuries, was not observed under compression.

  12. Strain and rate-dependent neuronal injury in a 3D in vitro compression model of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Scimone, Mark T.; Estrada, Jonathan B.; Franck, Christian

    2016-08-01

    In the United States over 1.7 million cases of traumatic brain injury are reported yearly, but predictive correlation of cellular injury to impact tissue strain is still lacking, particularly for neuronal injury resulting from compression. Given the prevalence of compressive deformations in most blunt head trauma, this information is critically important for the development of future mitigation and diagnosis strategies. Using a 3D in vitro neuronal compression model, we investigated the role of impact strain and strain rate on neuronal lifetime, viability, and pathomorphology. We find that strain magnitude and rate have profound, yet distinctively different effects on the injury pathology. While strain magnitude affects the time of neuronal death, strain rate influences the pathomorphology and extent of population injury. Cellular injury is not initiated through localized deformation of the cytoskeleton but rather driven by excess strain on the entire cell. Furthermore we find that, mechanoporation, one of the key pathological trigger mechanisms in stretch and shear neuronal injuries, was not observed under compression.

  13. Differential induction of muscle atrophy pathways in two mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Boyer, Justin G.; McFall, Emily R.; Yazdani, Armin; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron loss and neurogenic atrophy are hallmarks of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant deaths. Previous studies have focused on deciphering disease pathogenesis in motor neurons. However, a systematic evaluation of atrophy pathways in muscles is lacking. Here, we show that these pathways are differentially activated depending on severity of disease in two different SMA model mice. Although proteasomal degradation is induced in skeletal muscle of both models, autophagosomal degradation is present only in Smn2B/− mice but not in the more severe Smn−/−; SMN2 mice. Expression of FoxO transcription factors, which regulate both proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation, is elevated in Smn2B/− muscle. Remarkably, administration of trichostatin A reversed all molecular changes associated with atrophy. Cardiac muscle also exhibits differential induction of atrophy between Smn2B/− and Smn−/−; SMN2 mice, albeit in the opposite direction to that of skeletal muscle. Altogether, our work highlights the importance of cautious analysis of different mouse models of SMA as distinct patterns of atrophy induction are at play depending on disease severity. We also revealed that one of the beneficial impacts of trichostatin A on SMA model mice is via attenuation of muscle atrophy through reduction of FoxO expression to normal levels. PMID:27349908

  14. Campylobacter growth rates in four different matrices: broiler caecal material, live birds, Bolton broth, and brain heart infusion broth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Battersby

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to characterise Campylobacter growth in enrichment broths (Bolton broth, brain heart infusion broth, caecal material (in vitro, and in the naturally infected live broilers (in vivo in terms of mean lag periods and generation times as well as maximum growth rates and population (cell concentration achieved. Methods: Bolton and brain heart infusion broths and recovered caecal material were inoculated with 10 poultry strains of Campylobacter (eight Campylobacter jejuni and two Campylobacter coli, incubated under microaerobic conditions, and Campylobacter concentrations determined periodically using the ISO 10272:2006 method. Caeca from 10 flocks, infected at first thinning, were used to characterise Campylobacter growth in the live birds. Mean generation times (G (early lag to exponential phase were calculated using the formula: G=t/3.3 logb/B. Mean lag times and µmax were calculated using the Micro Fit© Software (Version 1.0, Institute of Food Research. Statistical comparison was performed using GENSTAT ver. 14.1 (VSN International Ltd., Hemel, Hempstead, UK. Results: The mean lag periods in Bolton broth, brain heart infusion broth, caecal material, and in the live bird were estimated to be 6.6, 6.7, 12.6, and 31.3 h, respectively. The corresponding mean generation times were 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, and 6.7 h, respectively; maximum growth rates were 0.7, 0.8, 0.4, and 2 generations h−1 and the maximum populations obtained in each matrix were 9.6, 9.9, 7.8, and 7.4 log10 CFU/g, respectively. Conclusion: This study provides data on the growth of Campylobacter in a range of laboratory media, caecal contents, and in broilers which may be used to develop predictive models and/or inform science-based control strategies such as the maximum time between flock testing and slaughter, logistical slaughter, and single-stage depopulation of broiler units.

  15. Parkinson's disease-like presentation of multiple system atrophy with poor response to STN stimulation: a clinicopathological case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano, Elena; Gómez-Esteban, Juan C; Zarranz, Juan J; Alcaraz, Rafael; Atarés, Begoña; Bilbao, Gaizka; Garibi, Jesús; Lambarri, Imanol

    2004-08-01

    We report on a clinicopathological case of multiple system atrophy with good response to levodopa and subsequent development of motor complications. Because the subject complied with all the inclusion criteria (Core Assessment Program for Surgical Interventional Therapies in Parkinson's Disease), bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation electrodes were implanted.

  16. Restless legs syndrome in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorayeb, Imad; Dupouy, Sandrine; Tison, François; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the frequency of restless legs syndrome in 30 patients with multiple system atrophy. Eight patients complained from restless legs syndrome, their severity score was 19.4 ± 4.1. Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly higher in patients with restless legs syndrome than those without (9.3 ± 3.7 vs. 4.8 ± 2.9, p = 0.00165). Periodic limb movements were found in 75% of patients with restless legs syndrome. Restless legs syndrome is more prevalent in multiple system atrophy as compared to the acknowledged prevalence in the general population.

  17. Progressive cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warabi, Yoko; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Isozaki, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica patients with progressive cerebral atrophy. The patients exhibited characteristic clinical features, including elderly onset, secondary progressive tetraparesis and cognitive impairment, abnormally elevated CSF protein and myelin basic protein levels, and extremely highly elevated serum anti-AQP-4 antibody titer. Because neuromyelitis optica pathology cannot switch from an inflammatory phase to the degenerative phase until the terminal phase, neuromyelitis optica rarely appears as a secondary progressive clinical course caused by axonal degeneration. However, severe intrathecal inflammation and massive destruction of neuroglia could cause a secondary progressive clinical course associated with cerebral atrophy in neuromyelitis optica patients.

  18. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajesh; Dixit, Puneet Kumar; Lalla, Rakesh; Singh, Babita

    2015-01-01

    Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand. PMID:26019431

  19. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  20. Posterior cortical atrophy: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Howard S; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2006-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy is a striking clinical syndrome in which a dementing illness begins with visual symptoms. Initially, the problem may seem to be loss of elementary vision, but over time the patient develops features of visual agnosia, topographical difficulty, optic ataxia, simultanagnosia, ocular apraxia (Balint's syndrome), alexia, acalculia, right-left confusion, and agraphia (Gerstmann's syndrome), and later a more generalized dementia. Occasional patients have visual hallucinations and signs of Parkinson's disease or Lewy body dementia. A number of different neuropathologic disorders are associated with posterior cortical atrophy.

  1. Location and progression of cerebral small-vessel disease and atrophy, and depressive symptom profiles: the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART)-Medea study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grool, A M; van der Graaf, Y; Mali, W P Th M; Witkamp, Th D; Vincken, K L; Geerlings, M I

    2012-02-01

    The 'vascular depression' hypothesis states that brain changes located in frontal-subcortical pathways increase vulnerability for specific depressive symptom profiles, but studies examining locations of small-vessel and degenerative changes with individual symptoms are scarce. We examined whether location and progression of white-matter lesions (WMLs), lacunar infarcts and atrophy were associated with motivational and mood symptoms in patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease. In 578 patients [63 (s.d.=8) years] of the Second Manifestations of ARTerial disease (SMART)-Medea study, volumes of WMLs and atrophy and visually rated infarcts were obtained with 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and after 3.9 (s.d.=0.4) years' follow-up. Depressive symptoms were assessed with Patient Health Questionnaire-9 at follow-up and categorized into motivational and mood symptoms. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, education, Mini-Mental State Examination, physical functioning, antidepressant use and vascular risk factors showed that location in mainly deep white-matter tracts and progression of WMLs were associated with symptoms of anhedonia, concentration problems, psychomotor retardation and appetite disturbance. Lacunar infarcts in deep white matter were associated with greater motivational [Incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-2.4] and mood (IRR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6) sumscores, and with symptoms of psychomotor retardation, energy loss and depressed mood; lacunar infarcts in the thalamus were associated with psychomotor retardation only. Cortical atrophy was associated with symptoms of anhedonia and appetite disturbance. Excluding patients with major depression did not materially change the results. Our findings suggest that disruption of frontal-subcortical pathways by small-vessel lesions leads to a symptom profile that is mainly characteristic of motivational problems, also in the absence of major depression.

  2. Brain stem and cerebellum volumetric analysis of Machado Joseph disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S T Camargos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease, or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3(MJD/SCA3, is the most frequent late onset spinocerebellar ataxia and results from a CAG repeat expansion in the ataxin-3 gene. Previous studies have found correlation between atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem with age and CAG repeats, although no such correlation has been found with disease duration and clinical manifestations. In this study we test the hypothesis that atrophy of cerebellum and brainstem in MJD/SCA3 is related to clinical severity, disease duration and CAG repeat length as well as to other variables such as age and ICARS (International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale. Whole brain high resolution MRI and volumetric measurement with cranial volume normalization were obtained from 15 MJD/SCA3 patients and 15 normal, age and sex-matchedcontrols. We applied ICARS and compared the score with volumes and CAG number, disease duration and age. We found significant correlation of both brain stem and cerebellar atrophy with CAG repeat length, age, disease duration and degree of disability. The Spearman rank correlation was stronger with volumetric reduction of the cerebellum than with brain stem. Our data allow us to conclude that volumetric analysis might reveal progressive degeneration after disease onset, which in turn is linked to both age and number of CAG repeat expansions in SCA 3.

  3. Relationship between ghrelin, Helicobacter pylori and gastric mucosal atrophy in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hitomi; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Sakao, Yukitoshi; Sahara, Shu; Ohashi, Naro; Kato, Akihiko; Sugimoto, Ken; Furuta, Takahisa; Andoh, Akira; Sakao, Tadashi; Yasuda, Hideo

    2016-12-21

    To investigate the relationship between plasma ghrelin level, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection status and the severity of atrophy in hemodialysis patients. One hundred eights patients who received hemodialysis and 13 non-hemodialysis H. pylori-negative controls underwent gastroduodenoscopy to evaluate the severity of gastric atrophy. Serum levels of pepsinogen (PG) were measured as serum markers of gastric atrophy. H. pylori infection was evaluated by anti-H. pylori IgG antibody, rapid urease test and culture test. We classified H. pylori infection status as non-infection, present infection and past infection. In addition, plasma acyl-ghrelin and desacyl-ghrelin levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Infection rate of H. pylori was 45.4% (49/108). Acyl-ghrelin level in the non-infection group (39.4 ± 23.0 fmol/mL) was significantly higher than in the past (23.4 ± 19.9 fmol/mL, P = 0.005) and present infection groups (19.5 ± 14.0 fmol/mL, P atrophy (both P atrophy (24.5 ± 23.1 fmol/mL, 20.2 ± 14.9 fmol/mL and 18.3 ± 11.8 fmol/mL) than in those with non-atrophy (39.4 ± 22.2 fmol/mL, P = 0.039, P = 0.002 and P atrophy related to H. pylori infection.

  4. Brain areas controlling heart rate variability in tinnitus and tinnitus-related distress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Vanneste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is defined as an intrinsic sound perception that cannot be attributed to an external sound source. Distress in tinnitus patients is related to increased beta activity in the dorsal part of the anterior cingulate and the amount of distress correlates with network activity consisting of the amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex-insula-parahippocampus. Previous research also revealed that distress is associated to a higher sympathetic (OS tone in tinnitus patients and tinnitus suppression to increased parasympathetic (PS tone. METHODOLOGY: The aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between tinnitus distress and the autonomic nervous system and find out which cortical areas are involved in the autonomic nervous system influences in tinnitus distress by the use of source localized resting state electroencephalogram (EEG recordings and electrocardiogram (ECG. Twenty-one tinnitus patients were included in this study. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that the dorsal and subgenual anterior cingulate, as well as the left and right insula are important in the central control of heart rate variability in tinnitus patients. Whereas the sympathovagal balance is controlled by the subgenual and pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, the right insula controls sympathetic activity and the left insula the parasympathetic activity. The perceived distress in tinnitus patients seems to be sympathetically mediated.

  5. Hippocampal atrophy and memory dysfunction associated with physical inactivity in community-dwelling elderly subjects: The Sefuri study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Araki, Yuko; Takashima, Yuki; Nogami, Kohjiro; Uchino, Akira; Yuzuriha, Takefumi; Yao, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the modifiable risk factors for hippocampal atrophy and Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the relationship between physical activity, hippocampal atrophy, and memory using structural equation modeling (SEM). We examined 213 community-dwelling elderly subjects (99 men and 114 women with a mean age of 68.9 years) without dementia or clinically apparent depression. All participants underwent Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test (RBMT). Physical activities were assessed with a structured questionnaire. We evaluated the degree of hippocampal atrophy (z-score-referred to as ZAdvance hereafter), using a free software program-the voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer's disease (VSRAD) based on statistical parametric mapping 8 plus Diffeomorphic Anatomical Registration Through an Exponentiated Lie algebra. Routine magnetic resonance imaging findings were as follows: silent brain infarction, n = 24 (11.3%); deep white matter lesions, n = 72 (33.8%); periventricular hyperintensities, n = 35 (16.4%); and cerebral microbleeds, n = 14 (6.6%). Path analysis based on SEM indicated that the direct paths from leisure-time activity to hippocampal atrophy (β = -.18, p matter volume to RBMT and MMSE were highly significant, while direct paths from "whole brain" gray matter volume to RBMT and MMSE were not significant. The presented SEM model fit the data reasonably well. Based on the present SEM analysis, we found that hippocampal atrophy was associated with age and leisure-time physical inactivity, and hippocampal atrophy appeared to cause memory dysfunction, although we are unable to infer a causal or temporal association between hippocampal atrophy and memory dysfunction from the present observational study.

  6. Validation of Parkinsonian Disease-Related Metabolic Brain Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teune, Laura K.; Renken, Remco J.; Mudali, Deborah; De Jong, Bauke M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to validate disease-related metabolic brain patterns for Parkinson’s disease, multiple system atrophy, and progressive supranuclear palsy. Methods: The study included 20 patients with Parkinson’s disease, 21 with multiple system atrophy, and 17 with progre