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Sample records for bradycardic drug binding

  1. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug...... is bound per albumin molecule, and binding of the first sulfamethizole molecule is possibly reduced as well. Diazepam binds with equal affinity to the fetal and adult proteins. Among the two main albumin drug-binding functions, for warfarin and diazepam, the former is thus compromised in the newborn...

  2. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  3. Dendrimers bind antioxidant polyphenols and cisplatin drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Abderrezak

    Full Text Available Synthetic polymers of a specific shape and size play major role in drug delivery systems. Dendrimers are unique synthetic macromolecules of nanometer dimensions with a highly branched structure and globular shape with potential applications in gene and drug delivery. We examine the interaction of several dendrimers of different compositions mPEG-PAMAM (G3, mPEG-PAMAM (G4 and PAMAM (G4 with hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs cisplatin, resveratrol, genistein and curcumin at physiological conditions. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyse drug binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of drug complexation on dendrimer stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that cisplatin binds dendrimers in hydrophilic mode via Pt cation and polymer terminal NH(2 groups, while curcumin, genistein and resveratrol are located mainly in the cavities binding through both hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts. The overall binding constants of durg-dendrimers are ranging from 10(2 M(-1 to 10(3 M(-1. The affinity of dendrimer binding was PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G3, while the order of drug-polymer stability was curcumin>cisplatin>genistein>resveratrol. Molecular modeling showed larger stability for genisten-PAMAM-G4 (ΔG = -4.75 kcal/mol than curcumin-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.53 kcal/mol and resveratrol-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.39 kcal/mol. Dendrimers might act as carriers to transport hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs.

  4. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  5. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Joachim Haupt

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand

  6. Allosteric, chiral-selective drug binding to DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Xiaogang; Trent, John O.; Fokt, Izabela; Priebe, Waldemar; Chaires, Jonathan B.

    2000-01-01

    The binding interactions of (−)-daunorubicin (WP900), a newly synthesized enantiomer of the anticancer drug (+)-daunorubicin, with right- and left-handed DNA, have been studied quantitatively by equilibrium dialysis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. (+)-Daunorubicin binds selectively to right-handed DNA, whereas the enantiomeric WP900 ligand binds selectively to left-handed DNA. Further, binding of the enantiomeric pair to DNA is clearly chirally ...

  7. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi SHEN; Lu WANG; Hui ZHOU; Hui-di JIANG; Lu-shan YU; Su ZENG

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body.The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity,which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles.In this review,the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA),α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)and lipoprotein,three most important proteins in human plasma,are detailed.Furthermore,the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed.Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding,enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described.Additionally,the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed.

  8. Drugs That Bind to α-Synuclein: Neuroprotective or Neurotoxic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakish, Joe; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Jeremy S

    2015-12-16

    The misfolding of α-synuclein is a critical event in the death of dopaminergic neurons and the progression of Parkinson's disease. Drugs that bind to α-synuclein and form a loop structure between the N- and C-terminus tend to be neuroprotective, whereas others that cause a more compact structure tend to be neurotoxic. The binding of several natural products and other drugs that are involved in dopamine metabolism were investigated by nanopore analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry. The antinausea drugs, cinnarizine and metoclopramide, do not bind to α-synuclein, whereas amphetamine and the herbicides, paraquat and rotenone, bind tightly and cause α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. The recreational drug, cocaine, binds to α-synuclein, whereas heroin and methadone do not. Metformin, which is prescribed for diabetes and is neuroprotective, binds well without causing α-synuclein to adopt a more compact conformation. Methylphenidate (ritalin) binds to sites in both the N- and C-terminus and causes α-synuclein to adopt a loop conformation. In contrast, amphetamine only binds to the N-terminus. Except for cinnarizine and metoclopramide, there is a good correlation between the mode of binding to α-synuclein and whether a drug is neuroprotective or neurotoxic. PMID:26378986

  9. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  10. A thermodynamic signature for drug-DNA binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaires, Jonathan B

    2006-09-01

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, acting as chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. Two common binding modes for these small molecules are intercalation or groove-binding. Intercalation results from insertion of a planar aromatic substituent between DNA base pairs, with concomitant unwinding and lengthening of the DNA helix. Groove binding, in contrast, does not perturb the duplex structure to any great extent. Groove-binders are typically crescent-shaped, and fit snugly into the minor groove with little distortion of the DNA structure. Recent calorimetric studies have determined the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the DNA binding of representative DNA binding compounds. Analysis of such thermodynamic data culled from the literature reveals distinctive thermodynamic signatures for groove-binding and intercalating compounds. Plots of the binding enthalpy (DeltaH) against binding entropy (-TDeltaS) for 26 drug-DNA interactions reveal that groove-binding interactions are clustered in a region of the graph with favorable entropy contributions to the free energy, while intercalators are clustered in a region with unfavorable entropy but favorable enthalpy contributions. Groove-binding is predominantly entropically driven, while intercalation in enthalpically driven. The molecular basis of the contrasting thermodynamic signatures for the two binding modes is by no means clear, but the pattern should be of use in categorizing new DNA binding agents. PMID:16730635

  11. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS

  12. All-Purpose Containers? Lipid-Binding Protein - Drug Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Beringhelli

    Full Text Available The combined use of in vitro (19F-NMR and in silico (molecular docking procedures demonstrates the affinity of a number of human calycins (lipid-binding proteins from ileum, liver, heart, adipose tissue and epidermis, and retinol-binding protein from intestine for different drugs (mainly steroids and vastatins. Comparative evaluations on the complexes outline some of the features relevant for interaction (non-polar character of the drugs; amino acids and water molecules in the protein calyx most often involved in binding. Dissociation constants (Ki for drugs typically lie in the same range as Ki for natural ligands; in most instances (different proteins and docking conditions, vastatins are the strongest interactors, with atorvastatin ranking top in half of the cases. The affinity of some calycins for some of the vastatins is in the order of magnitude of the drug Cmax after systemic administration in humans. The possible biological implications of this feature are discussed in connection with drug delivery parameters (route of administration, binding to carrier proteins, distribution to, and accumulation in, human tissues.

  13. Sex differences in body fluid homeostasis: Sex chromosome complement influences on bradycardic baroreflex response and sodium depletion induced neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, L; Dadam, F M; Caeiro, X E

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and basic findings indicate that angiotensin II (ANG II) differentially modulates hydroelectrolyte and cardiovascular responses in male and female. But are only the activational and organizational hormonal effects to blame for such differences? Males and females not only differ in their sex (males are born with testes and females with ovaries) but also carry different sex chromosome complements and are thus influenced throughout life by different genomes. In this review, we discuss our recent studies in order to evaluate whether sex chromosome complement is in part responsible for gender differences previously observed in ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response and sodium depletion-induced sodium appetite and neural activity. To test the hypothesis that XX or XY contributes to the dimorphic ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex response, we used the four core genotype mouse model, in which the effects of gonadal sex (testes or ovaries) and sex chromosome complement (XX or XY) are dissociated. The results indicate that ANG II bradycardic-baroreflex sexual dimorphic response may be ascribed to differences in sex chromosomes, indicating an XX-sex chromosome complement facilitatory bradycardic-baroreflex control of heart rate. Furthermore, we evaluated whether genetic differences within the sex chromosome complement may differentially modulate the known sexually dimorphic sodium appetite as well as basal or induced brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the renin-angiotensin system by furosemide and low-sodium treatment. Our studies demonstrate an organizational hormonal effect on sexually dimorphic induced sodium intake in mice, while at the brain level (subfornical organ and area postrema) we showed a sex chromosome complement effect in sodium-depleted mice, suggesting a sex chromosome gene participation in the modulation of neural pathways underlying regulatory response to renin-angiotensin stimulation. PMID:26260434

  14. Characterization of the comparative drug binding to intra- (liver fatty acid binding protein) and extra- (human serum albumin) cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Andrew; Hallifax, David; Nussio, Matthew R; Shapter, Joseph G; Mackenzie, Peter I; Brian Houston, J; Knights, Kathleen M; Miners, John O

    2015-01-01

    1. This study compared the extent, affinity, and kinetics of drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) and liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) using ultrafiltration and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). 2. Binding of basic and neutral drugs to both HSA and LFABP was typically negligible. Binding of acidic drugs ranged from minor (fu > 0.8) to extensive (fu LFABP was observed for the acidic drugs torsemide and sulfinpyrazone, and for β-estradiol (a polar, neutral compound). 3. The extent of binding of acidic drugs to HSA was up to 40% greater than binding to LFABP. SPR experiments demonstrated comparable kinetics and affinity for the binding of representative acidic drugs (naproxen, sulfinpyrazone, and torsemide) to HSA and LFABP. 4. Simulations based on in vitro kinetic constants derived from SPR experiments and a rapid equilibrium model were undertaken to examine the impact of binding characteristics on compartmental drug distribution. Simulations provided mechanistic confirmation that equilibration of intracellular unbound drug with the extracellular unbound drug is attained rapidly in the absence of active transport mechanisms for drugs bound moderately or extensively to HSA and LFABP. PMID:25801059

  15. Do drugs have access to the P-glycoprotein drug-binding pocket through gates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2015-10-13

    The P-glycoprotein efflux mechanism is being studied since its identification as a leading protagonist in multidrug resistance. Recently, it was suggested that drugs enter the drug-binding pocket (DBP) through gates located between the transmembrane domains. For both a substrate and a modulator, the potential of mean force curves along the reaction coordinate obtained with the WHAM approach were similar, with no activation energy required for crossing the gate. Moreover, drug transit from bulk water into the DBP was characterized as an overall free-energy downhill process. PMID:26574244

  16. Melanin and neuromelanin binding of drugs and chemicals: toxicological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Lindquist, Nils Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    Melanin is a polyanionic pigment that colors, e.g., the hair, skin and eyes. The pigment neuromelanin is closely related to melanin and is mainly produced in specific neurons of the substantia nigra. Certain drugs and chemicals bind to melanin/neuromelanin and are retained in pigment cells for long periods. This specific retention is thought to protect the cells but also to serve as a depot that slowly releases accumulated compounds and may cause toxicity in the eye and skin. Moreover, neuromelanin and compounds with high neuromelanin affinity have been suggested to be implicated in the development of adverse drug reactions in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Epidemiologic studies implicate the exposure to pesticides, metals, solvents and other chemicals as risk factors for PD. Neuromelanin interacts with several of these toxicants which may play a significant part in both the initiation and the progression of neurodegeneration. MPTP/MPP(+) that has been casually linked with parkinsonism has high affinity for neuromelanin, and the induced dopaminergic denervation correlates with the neuromelanin content in the cells. Recent studies have also reported that neuromelanin may interact with α-synuclein as well as activate microglia and dendritic cells. This review aims to provide an overview of melanin binding of drugs and other compounds, and possible toxicological implications, with particular focus on the CNS and its potential involvement in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27311820

  17. Cooperative binding of drugs on human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, L. M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; García, M.

    In order to explain the adsorption isotherms of the amphiphilic penicillins nafcillin and cloxacillin onto human serum albumin (HSA), a cooperative multilayer adsorption model is introduced, combining the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm with an amphiphilic ionic adsorbate, whose chemical potential is derived from Guggenheim's theory. The non-cooperative model has been previously proved to qualitatively predict the measured adsorption maxima of these drugs [Varela, L. M., García, M., Pérez-Rodríguez, M., Taboada, P., Ruso, J. M., and Mosquera, V., 2001, J. chem. Phys., 114, 7682]. The surface interactions among adsorbed drug molecules are modelled in a mean-field fashion, so the chemical potential of the adsorbate is assumed to include a term proportional to the surface coverage, the constant of proportionality being the lateral interaction energy between bound molecules. The interaction energies obtained from the empirical binding isotherms are of the order of tenths of the thermal energy, therefore suggesting the principal role of van der Waals forces in the binding process.

  18. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  19. Pharmacological Evidence that Histamine H3 Receptors Mediate Histamine-Induced Inhibition of the Vagal Bradycardic Out-flow in Pithed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Mónica; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2016-02-01

    In vivo stimulation of cardiac vagal neurons induces bradycardia by acetylcholine (ACh) release. As vagal release of ACh may be modulated by autoreceptors (muscarinic M2 ) and heteroreceptors (including serotonin 5-HT1 ), this study has analysed the pharmacological profile of the receptors involved in histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats. For this purpose, 180 male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated and pre-treated (i.v.) with 1 mg/kg atenolol, followed by i.v. administration of physiological saline (1 ml/kg), histamine (10, 50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) or the selective histamine H1 (2-pyridylethylamine), H2 (dimaprit), H3 (methimepip) and H4 (VUF 8430) receptor agonists (1, 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg each). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (3, 6 and 9 Hz; 15 ± 3 V and 1 ms) of the vagus nerve resulted in frequency-dependent bradycardic responses, which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline, 2-pyridylethylamine, dimaprit or VUF 8430; and (ii) dose-dependently inhibited by histamine or methimepip. Moreover, the inhibition of the bradycardia caused by 50 μg/kg of either histamine or methimepip (which failed to inhibit the bradycardic responses to i.v. bolus injections of acetylcholine; 1-10 μg/kg) was abolished by the H3 receptor antagonist JNJ 10181457 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In conclusion, our results suggest that histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats is mainly mediated by pre-junctional activation of histamine H3 receptors, as previously demonstrated for the vasopressor sympathetic out-flow and the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide) out-flow. PMID:26301462

  20. SuperSite: dictionary of metabolite and drug binding sites in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Raphael André; Günther, Stefan; Jansen, Dominic; Heeger, Carolin; Thaben, Paul Florian; Preissner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The increasing structural information about target-bound compounds provide a rich basis to study the binding mechanisms of metabolites and drugs. SuperSite is a database, which combines the structural information with various tools for the analysis of molecular recognition. The main data is made up of 8000 metabolites including 1300 drugs, bound to about 290 000 different receptor binding sites. The analysis tools include features, like the highlighting of evolutionary conserved receptor resi...

  1. The role of water in the thermodynamics of drug binding to cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermodynamic parameters, ΔB G 0, ΔB H 0, ΔB S 0, and ΔB C p, of the drugs flurbiprofen (FLP), nabumetone (NAB), and naproxen (NPX) binding to β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and to γ-cyclodextrin (γCD) in 0.10 M sodium phosphate buffer were determined from isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements over the temperature range from 293.15 K to 313.15 K. The heat capacity changes for the binding reactions ranged from -(362 ± 48) J . mol-1 . K-1 for FLP and -(238 ± 90) J . mol-1 . K-1 for NAB binding in the βCD cavity to 0 for FLP and -(25.1 ± 9.2) J . mol-1 . K-1 for NPX binding in the larger γCD cavity, implying that the structure of water is reorganized in the βCD binding reactions but not reorganized in the γCD binding reactions. Comparison of the fluorescence enhancements of FLP and NAB upon transferring from the aqueous buffer to isopropanol with the maximum fluorescence enhancements observed for their βCD binding reactions indicated that some localized water was retained in the FLP-βCD complex and almost none in the NAB-βCD complex. No fluorescence change occurs with drug binding in the larger γCD cavity, indicating the retention of the bulk water environment in the drug-γCD complex. Since the specific drug binding interactions are essentially the same for CD and γCD, these differences in the retention of bulk water may account for the enthalpically driven nature of the βCD binding reactions and the entropically driven nature of the γCD binding reactions

  2. Lysozyme binding ability toward psychoactive stimulant drugs: Modulatory effect of colloidal metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonu, Vikash K; Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Rohman, Mostofa Ataur; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-10-01

    The interaction and binding behavior of the well-known psychoactive stimulant drugs theophylline (THP) and theobromine (THB) with lysozyme (LYS) was monitored by in-vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. The quenching of protein fluorescence on addition of the drugs is due to the formation of protein-drug complex in the ground state in both the cases. However, the binding interaction is almost three orders of magnitude stronger in THP, which involves mostly hydrogen bonding interaction in comparison with THB where hydrophobic binding plays the predominant role. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching (static type) remains same also in presence of gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs); however, the binding capacity of LYS with the drugs changes drastically in comparison with that in aqueous buffer medium. While the binding affinity of LYS to THB increases ca. 100 times in presence of both the NPs, it is seen to decrease drastically (by almost 1000 fold) for THP. This significant modulation in binding behavior indicates that the drug transportation capacity of LYS can be controlled significantly with the formation protein-NP noncovalent assembly system as an efficient delivery channel. PMID:27419646

  3. Human serum albumin unfolding pathway upon drug binding: A thermodynamic and spectroscopic description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheema, Mohammad Arif [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Taboada, Pablo [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)], E-mail: pablo.taboada@usc.es; Barbosa, Silvia; Juarez, Josue; Gutierrez-Pichel, Manuel [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Siddiq, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mosquera, Victor [Grupo de Fisica de Coloides y Polimeros, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, E-15782, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan)

    2009-04-15

    The interest on phenothiazine drugs has been increased during last years due to their proved utility in the treatment of several diseases and biomolecular processes. In the present work, the binding of the amphiphilic phenothiazines promazine and thioridazine hydrochlorides to the carrier protein human serum albumin (HSA) has been examined by {zeta}-potential, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence and circular dichorism (CD) spectroscopies, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) at physiological pH with the aim of analyzing the role of the different interactions in the drug complexation process with this protein. The {zeta}-potential results were used to check the existence of complexation. This is confirmed by a progressive screening of the protein charge up to a reversal point as a consequence of drug binding. On the other hand, binding causes alterations on the tertiary and secondary structures of the protein, which were observed by fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, involving a two-step, three-state transition. The thermodynamics of the binding process was derived from ITC results. The binding enthalpies were negative, which reveal the existence of electrostatic interactions between protein and drug molecules. In addition, increases in entropy are consistent with the predominance of hydrophobic interactions. Two different classes of binding sites were detected, viz. Binding to the first class of binding sites is dominated by an enthalpic contribution due to electrostatic interactions whereas binding to a second class of binding sites is dominated by hydrophobic bonding. In the light of these results, protein conformational change resembles the acid-induced denaturation of HSA with accumulation of an intermediate state. Binding isotherms were derived from microcalorimetric results by using a theoretical model based on the Langmuir isotherm. On the other hand, the population distribution of the different species in solution and their sizes were

  4. Thermodynamic characterization of drug binding to human serum albumin by isothermal titration microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, H; Yamamoto, M

    1994-12-01

    Binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) for anionic drugs and fatty acids have been thermodynamically characterized by microcalorimetry. The binding and the thermodynamic parameters were directly computed from the calorimetric titration data at 37 degrees C in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using one- and two-class binding models. From compensation analyses plotting the molar enthalpy change (delta Hm,i) versus those of the molar free energy (delta Gm,i) and molar entropy (delta Sm,i) for each class of binding sites, HSA binding sites were classified into groups S1, S2, and S3. Group S1 included high-affinity binding sites for site II-bound drugs, such as ibuprofen, flufenamic acid, and ethacrynic acid, and short- or medium-length alkyl-chain fatty acids; group S2 included low-affinity binding sites of site II-bound drugs and long-length alkyl-chain fatty acids; and group S3 contained the high-affinity binding sites for site I-bound drugs, such as phenylbutazone, oxphenbutazone, and warfarin, and long-length alkyl-chain fatty acids. High- and low-affinity bindings sites for salicylic acid and acetylaslicylic acid agreed with the regions of groups S3 and S2, respectively. Groups S1 and S2 were characterized by large negative values of delta Hm,i and delta Sm,i, reflecting van der Waals interaction and hydrogen-bonding formation in low dielectric media, and the main force to stabilize the binding complex in group S3 was a hydrophobic interaction, characterized by a small negative delta Hm,i and minor or positive values of delta Sm,i (entropy-driven). PMID:7891299

  5. Minor-Groove Binding Drugs: Where Is the Second Hoechst 33258 Molecule?

    KAUST Repository

    Fornander, Louise H.

    2013-05-16

    Hoechst 33258 binds with high affinity into the minor groove of AT-rich sequences of double-helical DNA. Despite extensive studies of this and analogous DNA binding molecules, there still remains uncertainty concerning the interactions when multiple ligand molecules are accommodated within close distance. Albeit not of direct concern for most biomedical applications, which are at low drug concentrations, interaction studies for higher drug binding are important as they can give fundamental insight into binding mechanisms and specificity, including drug self-stacking interactions that can provide base-sequence specificity. Using circular dichroism (CD), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), we examine the binding of Hoechst 33258 to three oligonucleotide duplexes containing AT regions of different lengths: [d(CGCGAATTCGCG)]2 (A2T2), [d(CGCAAATTTGCG)]2 (A3T 3), and [d(CGAAAATTTTCG)]2 (A4T4). We find similar binding geometries in the minor groove for all oligonucleotides when the ligand-to-duplex ratio is less than 1:1. At higher ratios, a second ligand can be accommodated in the minor groove of A4T4 but not A2T2 or A3T3. We conclude that the binding of the second Hoechst to A4T4 is not cooperative and that the molecules are sitting with a small separation apart, one after the other, and not in a sandwich structure as previously proposed. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. Effect of anticonvulsant drugs on (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in vitro and ex vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using several concentrations of eight anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use (carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, primidone, sodium valproate, and D,L-γ-vinyl GABA), we studied their abilities in vitro to displace (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (35S-TBPS) from its binding site in a homogenate of rat brain. Thereafter ethosuximide (150 mg/kg), phenobarbital (30 mg/kg), clonazepam (0.3 mg/kg), or phenytoin (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into rats for 16-20 days; and the effect of drug administration on 35S-TBPS binding was studied in the cortex and hippocampus ex vivo. Phenobarbital (100 μM, P35S-TBPS binding in vitro by 10-16%. After drug administration of phenobarbital (concentration in plasma 168 μM), the number of binding sites decreased and the binding affinity (p35S-TBPS binding in vitro at the concentration analogous to therapeutic plasma levels or ex vivo at the dose used. These results suggest that the use of phenobarbital may modulate the TBPS binding site, but the role of the present findings in the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital needs to be further studied. (author)

  7. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey; (Scripps); (TTU)

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  8. How Beyond Rule of 5 Drugs and Clinical Candidates Bind to Their Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, Bradley C; Zheng, Jie; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-03-24

    To improve discovery of drugs for difficult targets, the opportunities of chemical space beyond the rule of 5 (bRo5) were examined by retrospective analysis of a comprehensive set of structures for complexes between drugs and clinical candidates and their targets. The analysis illustrates the potential of compounds far beyond rule of 5 space to modulate novel and difficult target classes that have large, flat, and groove-shaped binding sites. However, ligand efficiencies are significantly reduced for flat- and groove-shape binding sites, suggesting that adjustments of how to use such metrics are required. Ligands bRo5 appear to benefit from an appropriate balance between rigidity and flexibility to bind with sufficient affinity to their targets, with macrocycles and nonmacrocycles being found to have similar flexibility. However, macrocycles were more disk- and spherelike, which may contribute to their superior binding to flat sites, while rigidification of nonmacrocycles lead to rodlike ligands that bind well to groove-shaped binding sites. These insights should contribute to altering perceptions of what targets are considered "druggable" and provide support for drug design in beyond rule of 5 space. PMID:26457449

  9. Biocompatible medical implant materials with binding sites for a biodegradable drug-delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Dubai H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haifa Al-Dubai1, Gisela Pittner1, Fritz Pittner1, Franz Gabor21Max F Perutz Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Feasibility studies have been carried out for development of a biocompatible coating of medical implant materials allowing the binding of biodegradable drug-delivery systems in a way that their reloading might be possible. These novel coatings, able to bind biodegradable nanoparticles, may serve in the long run as drug carriers to mediate local pharmacological activity. After biodegradation of the nanoparticles, the binding sites could be reloaded with fresh drug-delivering particles. As a suitable receptor system for the nanoparticles, antibodies are anchored. The design of the receptor is of great importance as any bio- or chemorecognitive interaction with other components circulating in the blood has to be avoided. Furthermore, the binding between receptor and the particles has to be strong enough to keep them tightly bound during their lifetime, but on the other hand allow reloading after final degradation of the particles. The nanoparticles suggested as a drug-delivery system for medical implants can be loaded with different pharmaceuticals such as antibiotics, growth factors, or immunosuppressives. This concept may enable the changing of medication, even after implantation of the medical device, if afforded by patients’ needs.Keywords: antibody immobilization, biocompatible coating, chitosan nanoparticles, drug targeting, medical device

  10. Isolation of a basophilic membrane protein binding the anti-allergic drug cromolyn.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurek, N; Bashkin, P.; Pecht, I

    1982-01-01

    The membrane protein component in basophils, responsible for the specific, Ca2+-dependent, binding of the anti-allergic drug cromolyn [disodium cromoglycate, DSCG; the disodium salt of 1,2 bis(2- carboxychromon -5- yloxy )-2-hydroxy propane] was isolated by two procedures based on affinity for the drug. In the first procedure, involving immunoprecipitation, rat basophilic leukemia cells (RBL-2H3), surface labeled by 125I were reacted with a polyvalent conjugate of DSCG and bovine serum albumi...

  11. Development of Drug Loaded Nanoparticles Binding to Hydroxyapatite Based on a Bisphosphonate Modified Nonionic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiabin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at development of drug loaded nanoparticles which could bind to hydroxyapatite (HA to construct drug or growth factor releasing bone graft substitutes. To this end, the terminal hydroxyl group of a nonionic surfactant Brij 78 (polyoxyethylene (20 stearyl ether was first modified with pamidronate (Pa. Using Pa-Brij 78 as both a surfactant and an affinity ligand to HA, three different Pa surface functionalized nanoparticles were prepared, named as solid lipid nanoparticles (Pa-SNPs, nanoemulsions (Pa-NEMs, and PLGA nanoparticles (Pa-PNPs. A model drug curcumin was successfully encapsulated in the three nanoparticles. The sizes of Pa-NEM and Pa-PNP were around 150 nm and the size of Pa-SNP was around 90 nm with polydispersity indexes (PDIs less than 0.20. Drug encapsulation efficiencies of the three nanoparticles were all greater than 85%. Furthermore, the order of binding affinity of the nanoparticles to HA was Pa-PNP>Pa-NEM=Pa-SNP. After lyophilization, the sizes of the three nanoparticles were increased about 0.5–2.0-fold but their binding affinities to HA were almost the same as the fresh prepared nanoparticles. In conclusion, a Pa-modified Brij 78 was synthesized and used for fabrication of a series of drug loaded nanoparticles to construct drug-eluting HA-based bone graft substitutes.

  12. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.P. Ouverney

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  13. H274Y's Effect on Oseltamivir Resistance: What Happens Before the Drug Enters the Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Mohamed, Nornisah; Mohamad, Suriyati; Janezic, Dusanka; Damodaran, K V; Wahab, Habibah A

    2016-01-25

    Increased reports of oseltamivir (OTV)-resistant strains of the influenza virus, such as the H274Y mutation on its neuraminidase (NA), have created some cause for concern. Many studies have been conducted in the attempt to uncover the mechanism of OTV resistance in H274Y NA. However, most of the reported studies on H274Y focused only on the drug-bound system, so the direct effects of the mutation on NA itself prior to drug binding still remain unclear. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations of NA in apo form, followed by principal component analysis and interaction energy calculations, were performed to investigate the structural changes of the NA binding site as a result of the H274Y mutation. It was observed that the disruption of the NA binding site due to the H274Y mutation was initiated by the repulsive effect of Y274 on the 250-loop, which in turn altered the hydrogen-bonding network around residue 274. The rotated W295 side chain caused the upward movement of the 340-loop. Consequently, sliding box docking results suggested that the binding pathway of OTV was compromised because of the disruption of this binding site. This study also highlighted the importance of the functional group at C6 of the sialic acid mimicry. It is hoped that these results will improve the understanding of OTV resistance and shed some light on the design of a novel anti-influenza drug. PMID:26703840

  14. In vivo receptor binding of opioid drugs at the mu site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo receptor binding of a series of opioid drugs was investigated in intact rats after s.c. administration of [3H]etorphine tracer, which selectively binds to mu sites in vivo. Receptor binding was determined by a membrane filtration assay immediately after sacrifice of the animals and brain homogenization. Coadministration of unlabeled opioid drugs together with tracer led to a dose-dependent decrease of in vivo tracer binding. Estimates of the doses required to occupy 50% of the mu sites in vivo established the following potency rank order: diprenorphine, naloxone, buprenorphine, etorphine, levallorphan, cyclazocine, sufentanil, nalorphine, ethylketocyclazocine, ketocyclazocine, pentazocine, morphine. In vivo-in vitro differences among the relative receptor binding potencies were only partially accounted for by differences in their access to the brain and the regulatory effects of Na+ and GTP, which are expected to reduce agonist affinities in vivo. The relationship among mu receptor occupancy in vivo and pharmacological effects of the opioid drugs is described

  15. Characterization of the binding of an anticancer drug, lapatinib to human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Zahirul; Mukarram, Abdul Kadir; Mohamad, Saharuddin B; Alias, Zazali; Tayyab, Saad

    2016-07-01

    Interaction of a promising anticancer drug, lapatinib (LAP) with the major transport protein in human blood circulation, human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy as well as molecular docking analysis. LAP-HSA complex formation was evident from the involvement of static quenching mechanism, as revealed by the fluorescence quenching data analysis. The binding constant, Ka value in the range of 1.49-1.01×10(5)M(-1), obtained at three different temperatures was suggestive of the intermediate binding affinity between LAP and HSA. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data (∆H=-9.75kJmol(-1) and ∆S=+65.21Jmol(-1)K(-1)) suggested involvement of both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding in LAP-HSA interaction, which were in line with the molecular docking results. LAP binding to HSA led to the secondary and the tertiary structural alterations in the protein as evident from the far-UV and the near-UV CD spectral analysis, respectively. Microenvironmental perturbation around Trp and Tyr residues in HSA upon LAP binding was confirmed from the three-dimensional fluorescence spectral results. LAP binding to HSA improved the thermal stability of the protein. LAP was found to bind preferentially to the site III in subdomain IB on HSA, as probed by the competitive drug displacement results and supported by the molecular docking results. The effect of metal ions on the binding constant between LAP and HSA was also investigated and the results showed a decrease in the binding constant in the presence of these metal ions. PMID:27128364

  16. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  17. Simultaneous binding of drugs with different chemical structures to Ca2+-calmodulin: crystallographic and spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertessy, B G; Harmat, V; Böcskei, Z; Náray-Szabó, G; Orosz, F; Ovádi, J

    1998-11-01

    The modulatory action of Ca2+-calmodulin on multiple targets is inhibited by trifluoperazine, which competes with target proteins for calmodulin binding. The structure of calmodulin crystallized with two trifluoperazine molecules is determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.74 A resolution. The X-ray data together with the characteristic and distinct signals obtained by circular dichroism in solution allowed us to identify the binding domains as well as the order of the binding of two trifluoperazine molecules to calmodulin. Accordingly, the binding of trifluperazine to the C-terminal hydrophobic pocket is followed by the interaction of the second drug molecule with an interdomain site. Recently, we demonstrated that the two bisindole derivatives, vinblastine and KAR-2 [3"-(beta-chloroethyl)-2",4"-dioxo-3, 5"-spirooxazolidino-4-deacetoxyvinblastine], interact with calmodulin with comparable affinity; however, they display different functional effects [Orosz et al. (1997) British J. Pharmacol. 121, 955-962]. The structural basis responsible for these effects were investigated by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The data provide evidence that calmodulin can simultaneously accommodate trifluoperazine and KAR-2 as well as vinblastine and KAR-2, but not trifluoperazine and vinblastine. The combination of the binding and structural data suggests that distinct binding sites exist on calmodulin for vinblastine and KAR-2 which correspond, at least partly, to that of trifluoperazine at the C-terminal hydrophobic pocket and at an interdomain site, respectively. This structural arrangement can explain why these drugs display different anticalmodulin activities. Calmodulin complexed with melittin is also able to bind two trifluoperazine molecules, the binding of which appears to be cooperative. Results obtained with intact and proteolytically cleaved calmodulin reveal that the central linker region of the protein is indispensable for simultanous interactions

  18. Differential binding of prohibitin-2 to estrogen receptor α and to drug-resistant ERα mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endocrine resistance is one of the most challenging problems in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is controlled by several coregulators, including prohibitin-2 (PHB2). Because of its ability to repress the transcriptional activity of activated ERα, PHB2 is a promising antiproliferative agent. In this study, were analyzed the interaction of PHB2 with ERα and three mutants (Y537S, D538G, and E380Q) that are frequently associated with a lack of sensitivity to hormonal treatments, to help advance novel drug discovery. PHB2 bound to ERα wild-type (WT), Y537S, and D538G, but did not bind to E380Q. The binding thermodynamics of Y537S and D538G to PHB2 were favorably altered entropically compared with those of WT to PHB2. Our results show that PHB2 binds to the ligand binding domain of ERα with a conformational change in the helix 12 of ERα. - Highlights: • Molten globule-likeness of an ERα repressor Prohibitin-2 (PHB2) is identified. • The thermodynamics is validated for the interaction between ERα and PHB2. • PHB2 binds to Y537S and D538G mutants of ERα commonly found in breast cancer. • ERα WT and mutants showed different thermodynamic parameters in the binding to PHB2. • ERα binds to PHB2 with conformational change involving packing of helix 12

  19. Differential binding of prohibitin-2 to estrogen receptor α and to drug-resistant ERα mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigira, Takeru, E-mail: 8120661875@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Nagatoishi, Satoru, E-mail: nagatoishi@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Tsumoto, Kouhei, E-mail: tsumoto@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2015-08-07

    Endocrine resistance is one of the most challenging problems in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is controlled by several coregulators, including prohibitin-2 (PHB2). Because of its ability to repress the transcriptional activity of activated ERα, PHB2 is a promising antiproliferative agent. In this study, were analyzed the interaction of PHB2 with ERα and three mutants (Y537S, D538G, and E380Q) that are frequently associated with a lack of sensitivity to hormonal treatments, to help advance novel drug discovery. PHB2 bound to ERα wild-type (WT), Y537S, and D538G, but did not bind to E380Q. The binding thermodynamics of Y537S and D538G to PHB2 were favorably altered entropically compared with those of WT to PHB2. Our results show that PHB2 binds to the ligand binding domain of ERα with a conformational change in the helix 12 of ERα. - Highlights: • Molten globule-likeness of an ERα repressor Prohibitin-2 (PHB2) is identified. • The thermodynamics is validated for the interaction between ERα and PHB2. • PHB2 binds to Y537S and D538G mutants of ERα commonly found in breast cancer. • ERα WT and mutants showed different thermodynamic parameters in the binding to PHB2. • ERα binds to PHB2 with conformational change involving packing of helix 12.

  20. Interactions between Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Selective Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Velkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs act as intracellular shuttles for fatty acids as well as lipophilic xenobiotics to the nucleus, where these ligands are released to a group of nuclear receptors called the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. PPAR mediated gene activation is ultimately involved in maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes and transporters that target the activating ligand. Here we show that liver- (L- FABP displays a high binding affinity for PPAR subtype selective drugs. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping and proteolytic protection experiments show that the binding of the PPAR subtype selective drugs produces conformational changes that stabilize the portal region of L-FABP. NMR chemical shift perturbation studies also revealed that L-FABP can form a complex with the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD of PPARα. This protein-protein interaction may represent a mechanism for facilitating the activation of PPAR transcriptional activity via the direct channeling of ligands between the binding pocket of L-FABP and the PPARαLBD. The role of L-FABP in the delivery of ligands directly to PPARα via this channeling mechanism has important implications for regulatory pathways that mediate xenobiotic responses and host protection in tissues such as the small intestine and the liver where L-FABP is highly expressed.

  1. Assessment of Binding Affinity between Drugs and Human Serum Albumin Using Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Mahdieh; Santos, Abel; Law, Cheryl Suwen; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we report an innovative approach aiming to assess the binding affinity between drug molecules and human serum albumin by combining nanoporous anodic alumina rugate filters (NAA-RFs) modified with human serum albumin (HSA) and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). NAA-RFs are photonic crystal structures produced by sinusoidal pulse anodization of aluminum that present two characteristic optical parameters, the characteristic reflection peak (λPeak), and the effective optical thickness of the film (OTeff), which can be readily used as sensing parameters. A design of experiments strategy and an ANOVA analysis are used to establish the effect of the anodization parameters (i.e., anodization period and anodization offset) on the sensitivity of HSA-modified NAA-RFs toward indomethacin, a model drug. To this end, two sensing parameters are used, that is, shifts in the characteristic reflection peak (ΔλPeak) and changes in the effective optical thickness of the film (ΔOTeff). Subsequently, optimized NAA-RFs are used as sensing platforms to determine the binding affinity between a set of drugs (i.e., indomethacin, coumarin, sulfadymethoxine, warfarin, and salicylic acid) and HSA molecules. Our results verify that the combination of HSA-modified NAA-RFs with RIfS can be used as a portable, low-cost, and simple system for establishing the binding affinity between drugs and plasma proteins, which is a critical factor to develop efficient medicines for treating a broad range of diseases and medical conditions. PMID:27128744

  2. Binding of several anti-tumor drugs to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)], E-mail: sy_bi@sina.com; Sun Yantao [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Qiao Chunyu; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Liu Chunming [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The interactions of mitomycin C (MMC), fluorouracil (FU), mercaptopurine (MP) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DXR) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by spectroscopic method. Quenching of fluorescence of serum albumin by these drugs was found to be a static quenching process. The binding constants (K{sub A}) were 9.66x10{sup 3}, 2.08x10{sup 3}, 8.20x10{sup 2} and 7.50x10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} for MMC-, FU-, MP- and DXR-BSA, respectively, at pH 7.4 Britton-Robinson buffer at 28 deg. C. The thermodynamic functions such as enthalpy change ({delta}H), entropy change ({delta}S) and Gibbs free-energy change ({delta}G) for the reactions were also calculated according to the thermodynamic equations. The main forces in the interactions of these drugs with BSA were evaluated. It was found that the interactions of MMC and FU with BSA were exothermic processes and those of MP and DXR with BSA were endothermic. In addition, the binding sites on BSA for the four drugs were probed by the changes of binding properties of these drugs with BSA in the presence of two important site markers such as ibuprofen and indomethacin. Based on the Foester theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distances between the drugs and tryptophane were calculated and they were 3.00, 1.14, 2.85, and 2.79 nm for MMC, FU, MP and DXR, respectively.

  3. Drugs Modulate Interactions between the First Nucleotide-Binding Domain and the Fourth Cytoplasmic Loop of Human P-Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-05-24

    Drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) ATP-binding cassette drug pump by an unknown mechanism. Cross-linking analysis was performed to test if drug substrates stimulate P-gp ATPase activity by altering cross-talk at the first transmission interface linking the drug-binding [intracellular loop 4 (S909C)] and first nucleotide-binding domains [NBD1 (V472C or L443C)]. In the absence of lipid (inactive P-gp), only V472C/S909C showed cross-linking. Drugs blocked V472C/S909C cross-linking. In the presence of lipids (active P-gp), drug substrates promoted only L443C/S909C cross-linking. This suggests that drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity through a conformational change that shifts Ser909 away from Val472 and toward Leu443. PMID:27159830

  4. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The presence of biologically active monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) on the leaf surfaces of medicinally important Catharanthus roseus has led to questions about the secretion processes involved and their prevalence within MIA-producing species of plants. This report shows that a transporter closely related to those involved in cuticle assembly in plants and belonging to the pleiotropic drug resistance family of ATP-binding cassette transporters is specialized for transport of the MIA ca...

  5. Biocompatible medical implant materials with binding sites for a biodegradable drug-delivery system

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dubai H; Pittner G; Pittner F; Gabor F

    2011-01-01

    Haifa Al-Dubai1, Gisela Pittner1, Fritz Pittner1, Franz Gabor21Max F Perutz Laboratories, Department of Biochemistry, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Feasibility studies have been carried out for development of a biocompatible coating of medical implant materials allowing the binding of biodegradable drug-delivery systems in a way that their reloading ...

  6. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  7. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; Watari, Moyu; Barrera, Alejandra Donoso; Zhou, Dejian; Vögtli, Manuel; Batchelor, Matthew; Cooper, Matthew A.; Strunz, Torsten; Horton, Mike A.; Abell, Chris; Rayment, Trevor; Aeppli, Gabriel; McKendry, Rachel A.

    2008-11-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements have quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions activated by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept will underpin the design of devices and coatings to significantly lower the drug detection limit and may also have an impact on our understanding of antibiotic drug action in bacteria.

  8. Moderate to high throughput in vitro binding kinetics for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rumin; Barbieri, Christopher M; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Myers, Robert W; McLaren, David; Kavana, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This review provides a concise summary for state of the art, moderate to high throughput in vitro technologies being employed to study drug-target binding kinetics. These technologies cover a wide kinetic timescale spanning up to nine orders of magnitude from milliseconds to days. Automated stopped flow measures transient and (pre)steady state kinetics from milliseconds to seconds. For seconds to hours timescale kinetics we discuss surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor, global progress curve analysis for high throughput kinetic profiling of enzyme inhibitors and activators, and filtration plate-based radioligand or fluorescent binding assays for receptor binding kinetics. Jump dilution after pre-incubation is the preferred method for very slow kinetics lasting for days. The basic principles, best practices and simulated data for these technologies are described. Finally, the application of a universal label-free technology, liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), is briefly reviewed. Select literature references are highlighted for in-depth understanding. A new reality is dawning wherein binding kinetics is an integral and routine part of mechanism of action elucidation and translational, quantitative pharmacology for drug discovery. PMID:27100706

  9. A magnetic bead-based ligand binding assay to facilitate human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kris; Mole, Damian J; Homer, Natalie Z M; Iredale, John P; Auer, Manfred; Webster, Scott P

    2015-02-01

    Human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is emerging as an important drug target enzyme in a number of inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease states. Recombinant protein production of KMO, and therefore discovery of KMO ligands, is challenging due to a large membrane targeting domain at the C-terminus of the enzyme that causes stability, solubility, and purification difficulties. The purpose of our investigation was to develop a suitable screening method for targeting human KMO and other similarly challenging drug targets. Here, we report the development of a magnetic bead-based binding assay using mass spectrometry detection for human KMO protein. The assay incorporates isolation of FLAG-tagged KMO enzyme on protein A magnetic beads. The protein-bound beads are incubated with potential binding compounds before specific cleavage of the protein-compound complexes from the beads. Mass spectrometry analysis is used to identify the compounds that demonstrate specific binding affinity for the target protein. The technique was validated using known inhibitors of KMO. This assay is a robust alternative to traditional ligand-binding assays for challenging protein targets, and it overcomes specific difficulties associated with isolating human KMO. PMID:25296660

  10. Local anesthetic and antiepileptic drug access and binding to a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Céline; Vorobyov, Igor; French, Robert J; French, Christopher; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Allen, Toby W

    2014-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are important targets in the treatment of a range of pathologies. Bacterial channels, for which crystal structures have been solved, exhibit modulation by local anesthetic and anti-epileptic agents, allowing molecular-level investigations into sodium channel-drug interactions. These structures reveal no basis for the "hinged lid"-based fast inactivation, seen in eukaryotic Nav channels. Thus, they enable examination of potential mechanisms of use- or state-dependent drug action based on activation gating, or slower pore-based inactivation processes. Multimicrosecond simulations of NavAb reveal high-affinity binding of benzocaine to F203 that is a surrogate for FS6, conserved in helix S6 of Domain IV of mammalian sodium channels, as well as low-affinity sites suggested to stabilize different states of the channel. Phenytoin exhibits a different binding distribution owing to preferential interactions at the membrane and water-protein interfaces. Two drug-access pathways into the pore are observed: via lateral fenestrations connecting to the membrane lipid phase, as well as via an aqueous pathway through the intracellular activation gate, despite being closed. These observations provide insight into drug modulation that will guide further developments of Nav inhibitors. PMID:25136136

  11. Spectroscopic study of drug-binding characteristics of unmodified and pNPA-based acetylated human serum albumin: Does esterase activity affect microenvironment of drug binding sites on the protein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Nastaran [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghobadi, Sirous [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahlaei, Mohsen [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most prominent extracellular protein in blood plasma. There are several binding sites on the protein which provide accommodation for structurally-unrelated endogenous and exogenous ligands and a wide variety of drugs. “Esterase-like” activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters) by the protein has been also reported. In the current study, we set out to investigate the interaction of indomethacin and ibuprofen with the unmodified and modified HSA (pNPA-modified HSA) using various spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence data showed that 1:1 binding of drug to HSA is associated with quenching of the protein intrinsic fluorescence. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH), alteration in drug binding affinity and change of the protein stability, after esterase-like activity and permanent acetylation of HSA, were also documented. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that forces involved in drug–HSA interactions change upon the protein modification. - Highlights: • Binding propensity of indomethacin extremely decreased upon the protein acetylation. • There is no ibuprofen binding after protein acetylation. • Protein stability changes upon drug binding as well as protein acetylation. • Drug pharmacokinetics may be influenced under co-administration of HSA-modifier drugs.

  12. Spectroscopic study of drug-binding characteristics of unmodified and pNPA-based acetylated human serum albumin: Does esterase activity affect microenvironment of drug binding sites on the protein?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most prominent extracellular protein in blood plasma. There are several binding sites on the protein which provide accommodation for structurally-unrelated endogenous and exogenous ligands and a wide variety of drugs. “Esterase-like” activity (hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl esters) by the protein has been also reported. In the current study, we set out to investigate the interaction of indomethacin and ibuprofen with the unmodified and modified HSA (pNPA-modified HSA) using various spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescence data showed that 1:1 binding of drug to HSA is associated with quenching of the protein intrinsic fluorescence. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH), alteration in drug binding affinity and change of the protein stability, after esterase-like activity and permanent acetylation of HSA, were also documented. Analysis of the quenching and thermodynamic parameters indicated that forces involved in drug–HSA interactions change upon the protein modification. - Highlights: • Binding propensity of indomethacin extremely decreased upon the protein acetylation. • There is no ibuprofen binding after protein acetylation. • Protein stability changes upon drug binding as well as protein acetylation. • Drug pharmacokinetics may be influenced under co-administration of HSA-modifier drugs

  13. The new generation drug candidate molecules: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding and anticancer activity properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölcü, Ayşegül; Muslu, Harun; Kılıçaslan, Derya; Çeşme, Mustafa; Eren, Özge; Ataş, Fatma; Demirtaş, İbrahim

    2016-09-01

    The new generation drug candidate molecules [Cu(5-Fu)2Cl2H2O] (NGDCM1) and [Zn(5-Fu)2(CH3COO)2] (NGDCM2) were obtained from the reaction of copper(II) and zinc(II) salts with the anticancer drug 5-fluoracil (5-Fu). These compounds have been characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Thermal behavior of the compounds were also investigated. The electrochemical properties of the compounds have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activity of the NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 has been evaluated by examining their ability to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with UV spectroscopy. UV studies of the interaction of the 5-Fu and metal derivatives with FSdsDNA have shown that these compounds can bind to FSdsDNA. The binding constants of the compounds with FSdsDNA have also been calculated. Thermal decomposition of the compounds lead to the formation of CuO and ZnO as final products. The effect of proliferation 5-Fu, NGDCM1 and NGDCM2 were examined on the HeLa cells using real-time cell analyzer with three different concentrations.

  14. Free energy calculations to estimate ligand-binding affinities in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Rami; Reddy, C Ravikumar; Rathore, R S; Erion, Mark D; Aparoy, P; Reddy, R Nageswara; Reddanna, P

    2014-01-01

    Post-genomic era has led to the discovery of several new targets posing challenges for structure-based drug design efforts to identify lead compounds. Multiple computational methodologies exist to predict the high ranking hit/lead compounds. Among them, free energy methods provide the most accurate estimate of predicted binding affinity. Pathway-based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP), Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Slow Growth (SG) as well as less rigorous end-point methods such as Linear interaction energy (LIE), Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann./Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) and λ-dynamics have been applied to a variety of biologically relevant problems. The recent advances in free energy methods and their applications including the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity for some of the important drug targets have been elaborated. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which has the potential to provide a very accurate estimation of binding affinities to date has been discussed. A case study for the optimization of inhibitors for the fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase inhibitors has been described. PMID:23947646

  15. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  16. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  17. Molecular Docking of 3-Methylindole-containing Drugs Binding into CYP3A4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xuan-yu; LI Zhuo; NIU Rui-juan; ZHANG Hong-xing; ZHENG Qing-chuan

    2012-01-01

    Drugs SPD-304(6,7-dimethyl-3- { [methyl-(2-{methyl-[ 1-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)- 1H-indol-3-ylmethyl]-amino}-ethyl)-amino]-methyl}-chromen-4-one) and zafirlukast contain a common structural element of 3-substituted indole moiety which closely relates to a dehydrogenated reaction catalyzed by cytochrome P450s(CYPs).It was reported that the dehydrogenation can produce a reactive electrophilic intermediate which cause toxicities and inactivate CYPs. Drug L-745,870(3-{[4-(4-chlorophenyl)piperazin-l-yl]-methyl}-1H-pyrrolo-2,3-β-pyridine) might have similar effect since it contains the same structural element.We used molecular docking approach combined with molecular dynamics(MD) simulation to model three-dimensional(3D) complex structures of SPD-304,zafirlukast and L-745,870 into CYP3A4,respectively.The results show that these three drugs can stably bind into the active site and the 3-methylene carbons of the drugs keep a reasonable reactive distance from the heme iron.The complex structure of SPD-304-CYP3A4 is in agreement with experimental data.For zafirlukast,the calculation results indicate that 3-methylene carbon might be the dehydrogenation reaction site.Docking model of L-745,870-CYP3A4 shows a potential possibility of L-745,870 dehydrogenated by CYP3A4 at 3-methylene carbon which is in agreement with experiment in vivo.In addition,residues in the phenylalanine cluster as well as S119 and R212 play a critical role in the ligands binding based on our calculations.The docking models could provide some clues to understand the metabolic mechanism of the drugs by CYP3A4.

  18. Probing the binding sites of antibiotic drugs doxorubicin and N-(trifluoroacetyl doxorubicin with human and bovine serum albumins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Agudelo

    Full Text Available We located the binding sites of doxorubicin (DOX and N-(trifluoroacetyl doxorubicin (FDOX with bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum albumins (HSA at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration and various drug contents. FTIR, CD and fluorescence spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyse drug binding sites, the binding constant and the effect of drug complexation on BSA and HSA stability and conformations. Structural analysis showed that doxorubicin and N-(trifluoroacetyl doxorubicin bind strongly to BSA and HSA via hydrophilic and hydrophobic contacts with overall binding constants of K(DOX-BSA = 7.8 (± 0.7 × 10(3 M(-1, K(FDOX-BSA = 4.8 (± 0.5× 10(3 M(-1 and K(DOX-HSA = 1.1 (± 0.3× 10(4 M(-1, K(FDOX-HSA = 8.3 (± 0.6× 10(3 M(-1. The number of bound drug molecules per protein is 1.5 (DOX-BSA, 1.3 (FDOX-BSA 1.5 (DOX-HSA, 0.9 (FDOX-HSA in these drug-protein complexes. Docking studies showed the participation of several amino acids in drug-protein complexation, which stabilized by H-bonding systems. The order of drug-protein binding is DOX-HSA > FDOX-HSA > DOX-BSA > FDOX>BSA. Drug complexation alters protein conformation by a major reduction of α-helix from 63% (free BSA to 47-44% (drug-complex and 57% (free HSA to 51-40% (drug-complex inducing a partial protein destabilization. Doxorubicin and its derivative can be transported by BSA and HSA in vitro.

  19. The Investigation of Different Properties of Clonidine Drug Binding to Carbon Nanotube: A Theoretical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Yousefian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the binding of Clonidine Drug (C9H9Cl2N3) with zigzag single walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) (5, 0) and a length of 5ᵒA by theoretical methods of theory (NMR,NBO, HOMO- LUMO Gap energy,…calculations) using Gaussian ­09 software package. Then, Simulation was done in MM+, AMBER and OPLS force fields by Monte Carlo method in HyperChem. Three important energy parameters – Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy and Total Energy-calculated in five different simulating temp...

  20. The Investigation of Different Properties of Clonidine Drug Binding to Carbon Nanotube: A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Yousefian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the binding of Clonidine Drug (C9H9Cl2N3 with zigzag single walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs (5, 0 and a length of 5ᵒA by theoretical methods of theory (NMR,NBO, HOMO- LUMO Gap energy,…calculations using Gaussian ­09 software package. Then, Simulation was done in MM+, AMBER and OPLS force fields by Monte Carlo method in HyperChem. Three important energy parameters – Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy and Total Energy-calculated in five different simulating temperatures (308, 310, 312, 314 and 316 Kelvin were used for computation and good results were obtained.

  1. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  2. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  3. Development of New Drugs for an Old Target — The Penicillin Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luxen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β-lactamases, sometimes accompanied by a decrease of outer membrane permeability, and the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs. PBPs remain attractive targets for developing new antibiotic agents because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria, and lies outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we summarize the “current state of the art” of non-β-lactam inhibitors of PBPs, which have being developed in an attempt to counter the emergence of β-lactam resistance. These molecules are not susceptible to hydrolysis by β-lactamases and thus present a real alternative to β-lactams. We present transition state analogs such as boronic acids, which can covalently bind to the active serine residue in the catalytic site. Molecules containing ring structures different from the β-lactam-ring like lactivicin are able to acylate the active serine residue. High throughput screening methods, in combination with virtual screening methods and structure based design, have allowed the development of new molecules. Some of these novel inhibitors are active against major pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and thus open avenues new for the discovery of novel antibiotics.

  4. Altering Antibody-Drug Conjugate Binding to the Neonatal Fc Receptor Impacts Efficacy and Tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblett, Kevin J; Le, Tiep; Rock, Brooke M; Rock, Dan A; Siu, Sophia; Huard, Justin N; Conner, Kip P; Milburn, Robert R; O'Neill, Jason W; Tometsko, Mark E; Fanslow, William C

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) rely on the target-binding specificity of an antibody to selectively deliver potent drugs to cancer cells. IgG antibody half-life is regulated by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binding. Histidine 435 of human IgG was mutated to alanine (H435A) to explore the effect of FcRn binding on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and tolerability of two separate maytansine-based ADC pairs with noncleavable linkers, (c-DM1 and c-H435A-DM1) and (7v-Cys-may and 7v-H435A-Cys-may). The in vitro cell-killing potency of each pair of ADCs was similar, demonstrating that H435A showed no measurable impact on ADC bioactivity. The H435A mutant antibodies showed no detectable binding to human or mouse FcRn in vitro, whereas their counterpart wild-type IgG ADCs were found to bind to FcRn at pH = 6.0. In xenograft bearing SCID mice expressing mouse FcRn, the AUC of 7v-Cys-may was 1.6-fold higher than that of 7v-H435A-may, yet the observed efficacy was similar. More severe thrombocytopenia was observed with 7v-H435A-Cys-may as compared to 7v-Cys-may at multiple dose levels. The AUC of c-DM1 was approximately 3-fold higher than that of c-H435A-DM1 in 786-0 xenograft bearing SCID mice, which led to a 3-fold difference in efficacy by dose. Murine FcRn knockout, human FcRn transgenic line 32 SCID animals bearing 786-0 xenografts showed an amplified exposure difference between c-DM1 and c-H435A-DM1 as compared to murine FcRn expressing SCID mice, leading to a 10-fold higher dose required for efficacy despite a 6-fold higher AUC of the c-H435A-DM1. The accelerated clearance observed for the noncleavable maytansine ADCs with the H435A FcRn mutation led to reduced efficacy at equivalent doses and exacerbation of clinical pathology parameters (decreased tolerability) at equivalent doses. The results show that reduced ADC clearance mediated by FcRn modulation can improve therapeutic index. PMID:27248573

  5. Structural Influences: Cholesterol, Drug, and Proton Binding to Full-Length Influenza A M2 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, E Vindana; Fu, Riqiang; Cross, Timothy A

    2016-03-29

    The structure and functions of the M2 protein from Influenza A are sensitive to pH, cholesterol, and the antiinfluenza drug Amantadine. This is a tetrameric membrane protein of 97 amino-acid residues that has multiple functions, among them as a proton-selective channel and facilitator of viral budding, replacing the need for the ESCRT proteins that other viruses utilize. Here, various amino-acid-specific-labeled samples of the full-length protein were prepared and mixed, so that only interresidue (13)C-(13)C cross peaks between two differently labeled proteins representing interhelical interactions are observed. This channel is activated at slightly acidic pH values in the endosome when the His(37) residues in the middle of the transmembrane domain take on a +2 or +3 charged state. Changes observed here in interhelical distances in the N-terminus can be accounted for by modest structural changes, and no significant changes in structure were detected in the C-terminal portion of the channel upon activation of the channel. Amantadine, which blocks proton conductance by binding in the aqueous pore near the N-terminus, however, significantly modifies the tetrameric structure on the opposite side of the membrane. The interactions between the juxtamembrane amphipathic helix of one monomer and its neighboring monomer observed in the absence of drug are disrupted in its presence. However, the addition of cholesterol prevents this structural disruption. In fact, strong interactions are observed between cholesterol and residues in the amphipathic helix, accounting for cholesterol binding adjacent to a native palmitoylation site and near to an interhelix crevice that is typical of cholesterol binding sites. The resultant stabilization of the amphipathic helix deep in the bilayer interface facilitates the bilayer curvature that is essential for viral budding. PMID:27028648

  6. Effect of bioceramic functional groups on drug binding and release kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Christopher

    Bioceramics have been studied extensively as drug delivery systems (DDS). Those studies have aimed to tailor the drug binding and release kinetics to successfully treat infections and other diseases. This research suggests that the drug binding and release kinetics are predominantly driven by the functional groups available on the surface of a bioceramic. The goal of the present study is to explain the role of silicate and phosphate functional groups in drug binding to and release kinetics from bioceramics. alpha-cristobalite (Cris; SiO2) particles (90-150 microm) were prepared and doped with 0 microg (P-0), 39.1 microg (P-39.1), 78.2 microg (P-78.2), 165.5 microg (P-165.5) or 331 microg (P-331) of P 2O5 per gram Cris, using 85% orthophosphoric (H3PO 4) acid and thermal treatment. The material structure was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld Refinement and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with Gaussian fitting. XRD demonstrated an increase from sample P-0 (170.5373 A3) to P-331 (170.6466 A 3) in the unit cell volume as the P2O5 concentration increased in the material confirming phosphate silicate substitution in Cris. Moreover, FTIR showed the characteristic bands of phosphate functional groups of nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending, P-O-P stretching, P-O-P bending, P=O stretching, and P-O-H bending in doped Cris indicating phosphate incorporation in the silicate structure. Furthermore, FTIR showed that the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band around 557.6 cm-1 and P=O stretching band around 1343.9 cm-1 increased in area for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 3.5 to 10.5 and from 10.1 to 22.4, respectively due to phosphate doping. In conjunction with the increase of the nu4 PO4/O-P-O bending band and P=O stretching band, a decrease in area of the O-Si-O bending bands around 488.1 and 629.8 cm-1 was noticed for samples P-39.1 to P-331 from 5 to 2 and from 11.8 to 5.4, respectively. Furthermore, Cris samples (200 mg, n=5 for each sample) were immersed separately in

  7. Effect of anticonvulsant drugs on (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate binding in vitro and ex vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, A.; Riekkinen, P.J.; Saano, V.; Tuomisto, L.

    1987-01-01

    Using several concentrations of eight anticonvulsant drugs in clinical use (carbamazepine, clonazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital, ethosuximide, primidone, sodium valproate, and D,L-..gamma..-vinyl GABA), we studied their abilities in vitro to displace (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) from its binding site in a homogenate of rat brain. Thereafter ethosuximide (150 mg/kg), phenobarbital (30 mg/kg), clonazepam (0.3 mg/kg), or phenytoin (100 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into rats for 16-20 days; and the effect of drug administration on /sup 35/S-TBPS binding was studied in the cortex and hippocampus ex vivo. Phenobarbital (100 ..mu..M, P<0.001), ethosuximide (500 ..mu..M, P<0.001), and phenytoin (40 ..mu..M, P<0.001) decreased the specific /sup 35/S-TBPS binding in vitro by 10-16%. After drug administration of phenobarbital (concentration in plasma 168 ..mu..M), the number of binding sites decreased and the binding affinity (p<0.05) in the cortex increased. Other anticonvulsants did not modulate /sup 35/S-TBPS binding in vitro at the concentration analogous to therapeutic plasma levels or ex vivo at the dose used. These results suggest that the use of phenobarbital may modulate the TBPS binding site, but the role of the present findings in the anticonvulsant action of phenobarbital needs to be further studied.

  8. Peptidyl anthraquinones as potential antineoplastic drugs: synthesis, DNA binding, redox cycling, and biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Sissi, C; Cera, C; Uriarte, E; Palù, G; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1996-08-01

    A series of new compounds containing a 9,10-anthracenedione moiety and one or two peptide chains at position 1 and/or 4 have been synthesized. The amino acid residues introduced are glycine (Gly), lysine (Lys), and tryptophan (Trp), the latter two in both the L- and D-configurations. The peptidyl anthraquinones maintain the ability of intercalating efficiently into DNA, even though the orientation within the base-pair pocket may change somewhat with reference to the parent drugs mitoxantrone (MX) and ametantrone (AM). The interaction constants of the mono-, di-, and triglycyl derivatives are well comparable to those found for AM but 5-10 times lower than the value reported for MX. On the other hand, the glycyl-lysyl compounds bind DNA to the same extent as (L-isomer) or even better than (D-isomer) MX. As for the parent drugs without peptidyl chains, the new compounds prefer alternating CG binding sites, although to different extents. The bis-Gly-Lys derivatives are the least sensitive to base composition, which may be due to extensive aspecific charged interactions with the polynucleotide backbone. As far as redox properties are concerned, all peptidyl anthraquinones show a reduction potential very close to that of AM and 60-80 mV less negative than that of MX; hence, they can produce free-radical-damaging species to an extent similar to the parent drugs. The biological activity has been tested in human tumor and murine leukemia cell lines. Most of the test anthraquinones exhibit cytotoxic properties close to those of AM and considerably lower than those of MX. Stimulation of topoisomerase-mediated DNA cleavage is moderately present in representatives of the glycylanthraquinone family, whereas inhibition of the background cleavage occurs when Lys is present in the peptide chain. For most of the test anthraquinones, the toxicity data are in line with the DNA affinity scale and the topoisomerase II stimulation activity. However, in the lysyl derivatives, for which

  9. Resistance Patterns Associated with HCV NS5A Inhibitors Provide Limited Insight into Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have significantly improved the treatment of infection with the hepatitis C virus. A promising class of novel antiviral agents targets the HCV NS5A protein. The high potency and broad genotypic coverage are favorable properties. NS5A inhibitors are currently assessed in advanced clinical trials in combination with viral polymerase inhibitors and/or viral protease inhibitors. However, the clinical use of NS5A inhibitors is also associated with new challenges. HCV variants with decreased susceptibility to these drugs can emerge and compromise therapy. In this review, we discuss resistance patterns in NS5A with focus prevalence and implications for inhibitor binding.

  10. A novel role for DNA photolyase: binding to DNA damaged by drugs is associated with enhanced cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, M E; Feldman, B. J.; Chu, G.

    1994-01-01

    DNA photolyase binds to and repairs cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV radiation. Here we demonstrate that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, photolyase also binds to DNA damaged by the anticancer drugs cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cis-DDP) and nitrogen mustard (HN2) and by the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Surprisingly, mutations in photolyase were associated with resistance of yeast cells to cis-DDP, MNNG, 4-nitroquinoline oxide (4NQO), and HN2....

  11. Binding of the antitumor drug nogalamycin and its derivatives to DNA: Structural comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three-dimensional molecular structures of the complexes between a novel antitumor drug nogalamycin and its derivative U-58872 with a modified DNA hexamer d[m5CGT(pS)Am5CG] have been determined at 1.7- and 1.8-angstrom resolution, respectively, by X-ray diffraction analyses. Both structures (in space group P61) have been refined with constrained refinement procedure to final R factors of 0.208 (3386 reflections) and 0.196 (2143 reflections). In both complexes, two nogalamycins bind to the DNA hexamer double helix in a 2:1 ratio with the elongated aglycon chromophore intercalated between the CpG steps at both ends of the helix. The aglycon chromophore spans across the GC Watson-Crick base pairs with its nogalose lying in the minor groove and the aminoglucose lying in the major groove of the distorted B-DNA double helix. Most of the sugars remain in the C2'-endo pucker family, except three deoxycytidine residues (terminal C1, C7, and internal C5). All nucleotides are in the anti conformation. Specific hydrogen bonds are found in the complex between the drug and guanine-cytosine bases in both grooves of the helix. One hydroxyl group of the aminoglucose donates a hydrogen bond to the N7 of guanine, while the other receives a hydrogen bond from the N4 amino group of cytosine. The orientation of these two hydrogen bonds suggests that nogalamycin prefers a GC base pair with its aglycon chromophore intercalating at the 5'-side of a guanine (between NpG), or at the 3'-side of a cytosine (between CpN) with the sugars pointing toward the GC base pair. The binding of nogalamycin to DNA requires that the base pairs in DNA open up transiently to allow the bulky sugars to go through, suggesting that nogalamycin prefers GC sequences embedded in a stretch of AT sequences

  12. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation <10 %). Cell-based assays are often considered superior related to the biological significance, however, typically they cannot still be considered as really quantitative, in particular when results are compared over longer periods of time or between laboratories. A very careful choice of assays is therefore recommended. Strategies to further optimize assays are outlined, considering the evaluation and the decrease of the relevant error sources. Analytical performance and data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development. PMID:26070362

  13. Binding Mode and Induced Fit Predictions for Prospective Computational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebner, Christoph; Iegre, Jessica; Ulander, Johan; Edman, Karl; Hogner, Anders; Tyrchan, Christian

    2016-04-25

    Computer-aided drug design plays an important role in medicinal chemistry to obtain insights into molecular mechanisms and to prioritize design strategies. Although significant improvement has been made in structure based design, it still remains a key challenge to accurately model and predict induced fit mechanisms. Most of the current available techniques either do not provide sufficient protein conformational sampling or are too computationally demanding to fit an industrial setting. The current study presents a systematic and exhaustive investigation of predicting binding modes for a range of systems using PELE (Protein Energy Landscape Exploration), an efficient and fast protein-ligand sampling algorithm. The systems analyzed (cytochrome P, kinase, protease, and nuclear hormone receptor) exhibit different complexities of ligand induced fit mechanisms and protein dynamics. The results are compared with results from classical molecular dynamics simulations and (induced fit) docking. This study shows that ligand induced side chain rearrangements and smaller to medium backbone movements are captured well in PELE. Large secondary structure rearrangements, however, remain challenging for all employed techniques. Relevant binding modes (ligand heavy atom RMSD design cycles. PMID:26974351

  14. Binding of the neuroleptic drug, gabapentin, to bovine serum albumin: Insights from experimental and computational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between antiepileptic drug, gabapentin (GP), and bovin serum albumin (BSA) was studied by spectroscopic and computational methods. The native fluorescence of BSA was quenched by GP. Stern–Volmer quenching constant was calculated at different temperatures which suggested a static mechanism. The association constant (Ka) was calculated from fluorescence quenching studies, which increased with temperature rising. GP competed well with warfarine for hydrophobic subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I) on the protein. Enthalpy and entropy changes during the interaction of GP with BSA were obtained using van't Hoff plot, which showed an entropy-driven process and involvement of hydrophobic forces (ΔH>0 and ΔS>0). Synchronous fluorescence measurements of BSA solution in the presence of GP showed a considerable blue shift when Δλ=15 nm, therefore, GP interacts with tyrosine-rich sites on BSA. Optimized docked model of BSA–GP mixture confirmed the experimental results. -- Highlights: • Interaction of gabapentin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated by spectroscopic techniques. • Gabapentin can quench the fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching procedure. • The binding of gabapentin to BSA is driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions. • Subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I) of BSA is found to be the main binding site for gabapentin. • Molecular docking modeling confirmed the experimental results

  15. Towards understanding the unbound state of drug compounds: Implications for the intramolecular reorganization energy upon binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foloppe, Nicolas; Chen, I-Jen

    2016-05-15

    There has been an explosion of structural information for pharmaceutical compounds bound to biological targets, but the conformations and dynamics of compounds free in solution are poorly characterized, if at all. Yet, knowledge of the unbound state is essential to understand the fundamentals of molecular recognition, including the much debated conformational intramolecular reorganization energy of a compound upon binding (ΔEReorg). Also, dependable observation of the unbound compounds is important for ligand-based drug discovery, e.g. with pharmacophore modelling. Here, these questions are addressed with long (⩾0.5μs) state-of-the-art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 26 compounds (including 7 approved drugs) unbound in explicit solvent. These compounds were selected to be chemically diverse, with a range of flexibility, and good quality bioactive X-ray structures. The MD-simulated free compounds are compared to their bioactive structure and conformers generated with ad hoc sampling in vacuo or with implicit generalized Born (GB) aqueous solvation models. The GB conformational models clearly depart from those obtained in explicit solvent, and suffer from conformational collapse almost as severe as in vacuo. Thus, the global energy minima in vacuo or with GB are not suitable representations of the unbound state, which can instead be extensively sampled by MD simulations. Many, but not all, MD-simulated compounds displayed some structural similarity to their bioactive structure, supporting the notion of conformational pre-organization for binding. The ligand-protein complexes were also simulated in explicit solvent, to estimate ΔEReorg as an enthalpic difference ΔHReorg between the intramolecular energies in the bound and unbound states. This fresh approach yielded ΔHReorg values⩽6kcal/mol for 18 out of 26 compounds. For three particularly polar compounds 15⩽ΔHReorg⩽20kcal/mol, supporting the notion that ΔHReorg can be substantial. Those large

  16. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  17. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  18. The bradycardic and hypotensive responses to serotonin are reduced by activation of GABAA receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius of awake rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callera J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of bilateral injections of the GABA receptor agonists muscimol (GABA A and baclofen (GABA B into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS on the bradycardia and hypotension induced by iv serotonin injections (5-HT, 2 µg/rat in awake male Holtzman rats. 5-HT was injected in rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the NTS, before and 5, 15, and 60 min after bilateral injections of muscimol or baclofen into the NTS. The responses to 5-HT were tested before and after the injection of atropine methyl bromide. Muscimol (50 pmol/50 nl, N = 8 into the NTS increased basal mean arterial pressure (MAP from 115 ± 4 to 144 ± 6 mmHg, did not change basal heart rate (HR and reduced the bradycardia (-40 ± 14 and -73 ± 26 bpm at 5 and 15 min, respectively, vs -180 ± 20 bpm for the control and hypotension (-11 ± 4 and -14 ± 4 mmHg, vs -40 ± 9 mmHg for the control elicited by 5-HT. Baclofen (12.5 pmol/50 nl, N = 7 into the NTS also increased basal MAP, but did not change basal HR, bradycardia or hypotension in response to 5-HT injections. Atropine methyl bromide (1 mg/kg body weight injected iv reduced the bradycardic and hypotensive responses to 5-HT injections. The stimulation of GABA A receptors in the NTS of awake rats elicits a significant increase in basal MAP and decreases the cardiac Bezold-Jarisch reflex responses to iv 5-HT injections.

  19. Synthesis, characterization and target protein binding of drug-conjugated quantum dots in vitro and in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Minjung; Cho, Yoojin; Yun, Eunsuk; Song, Rita

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of unknown target proteins of a drug is of great importance in understanding cell biology and drug discovery. There have been extensive studies to discover and identify target proteins in the cell. Visualization of targets using drug-conjugated probes has been an important approach to gathering mechanistic information of drug action at the cellular level. As quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals have attracted much attention as a fluorescent probe in the bioimaging area, we prepared drug-conjugated QD to explore the potential of target discovery. As a model drug, we selected a well-known anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), which has been known to target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) with high affinity binding (Kd = 0.54 nM). MTX molecules were covalently attached to amino-PEG-polymer-coated QDs. Specific interactions of MTX-conjugated QDs with DHFR were identified using agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy. Cellular uptake of the MTX-conjugated QDs in living CHO cells was investigated with regard to their localization and distribution pattern. MTX-QD was found to be internalized into the cells via caveolae-medicated endocytosis without significant sequestration in endosomes. A colocalization experiment of the MTX-QD conjugate with antiDHFR-TAT-QD also confirmed that MTX-QD binds to the target DHFR. This study showed the potential of the drug-QD conjugate to identify or visualize drug-target interactions in the cell, which is currently of great importance in the area of drug discovery and chemical biology.

  20. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B;

    2001-01-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are...... strong inhibitors of peptidyl transferase and interact with domain V of 23S RNA, giving clear chemical footprints at nucleotides A2058-9, U2506 and U2584-5. Most of these nucleotides are highly conserved phylogenetically and functionally important, and all of them are at or near the peptidyl transferase...... centre and have been associated with binding of several antibiotics. Competitive footprinting shows that tiamulin and valnemulin can bind concurrently with the macrolide erythromycin but compete with the macrolide carbomycin, which is a peptidyl transferase inhibitor. We infer from these and previous...

  1. Controlled release of anticancer drug using graphene oxide as a drug-binding effector in konjac glucomannan/sodium alginate hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Liu, Changhua; Shuai, Ying; Cui, Xiaoyan; Nie, Ling

    2014-01-01

    In order to find new composite materials for the controlled release of drugs, a series of novel pH sensitive konjac glucomannan/sodium alginate (KGM/SA) and KGM/SA/graphene oxide (KGM/SA/GO) hydrogels were prepared, using GO as a drug-binding effector for anticancer drug loading and release. The hydrogels were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of component ratio and pH on the swelling properties of hydrogels were studied. The release amount of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) incorporated into KGM/SA/GO-3 hydrogels was about 38.02% at pH 1.2 and 84.19% at pH 6.8 after 6 h and 12 h, respectively. Therefore, the release rate of 5-FU from the functionalized KGM/SA using GO could be effectively controlled, Go has a great potential to be a promising drug-binding effector for hydrogel functionalization in drug delivery. PMID:24096158

  2. Elucidation of binding mechanism and identification of binding site for an anti HIV drug, stavudine on human blood proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, B; Hegde, Ashwini H; Seetharamappa, J

    2013-05-01

    The binding of stavudine (STV) to two human blood proteins [human hemoglobin (HHb) and human serum albumin (HSA)] was studied in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by spectroscopic methods viz., fluorescence, UV absorption, resonance light scattering, synchronous fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and three-dimensional fluorescence. The binding parameters of STV-blood protein were determined from fluorescence quenching studies. Stern-Volmer plots indicated the presence of static quenching mechanism in the interaction of STV with blood proteins. The values of n close to unity indicated that one molecule of STV bound to one molecule of blood protein. The binding process was found to be spontaneous. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters revealed the presence of hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces between protein and STV. Displacement experiments indicated the binding of STV to Sudlow's site I on HSA. Secondary structures of blood proteins have undergone changes upon interaction with STV as evident from the reduction of α-helices (from 46.11% in free HHb to 38.34% in STV-HHb, and from 66.44% in free HSA to 52.26% in STV-HSA). Further, the alterations in secondary structures of proteins in the presence of STV were confirmed by synchronous and 3D-fluorescence spectral data. The distance between the blood protein (donor) and acceptor (STV) was found to be 5.211 and 5.402 nm for STV-HHb and STV-HSA, respectively based on Föster's non-radiative energy transfer theory. Effect of some metal ions was also investigated. The fraction of STV bound to HSA was found to be 87.8%. PMID:23275205

  3. Synthesis, characterization and target protein binding of drug-conjugated quantum dots in vitro and in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidation of unknown target proteins of a drug is of great importance in understanding cell biology and drug discovery. There have been extensive studies to discover and identify target proteins in the cell. Visualization of targets using drug-conjugated probes has been an important approach to gathering mechanistic information of drug action at the cellular level. As quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals have attracted much attention as a fluorescent probe in the bioimaging area, we prepared drug-conjugated QD to explore the potential of target discovery. As a model drug, we selected a well-known anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), which has been known to target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) with high affinity binding (Kd = 0.54 nM). MTX molecules were covalently attached to amino-PEG-polymer-coated QDs. Specific interactions of MTX-conjugated QDs with DHFR were identified using agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy. Cellular uptake of the MTX-conjugated QDs in living CHO cells was investigated with regard to their localization and distribution pattern. MTX–QD was found to be internalized into the cells via caveolae-medicated endocytosis without significant sequestration in endosomes. A colocalization experiment of the MTX–QD conjugate with antiDHFR-TAT-QD also confirmed that MTX–QD binds to the target DHFR. This study showed the potential of the drug-QD conjugate to identify or visualize drug–target interactions in the cell, which is currently of great importance in the area of drug discovery and chemical biology. (paper)

  4. Conformational Selection and Induced Fit Mechanisms in the Binding of an Anticancer Drug to the c-Src Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morando, Maria Agnese; Saladino, Giorgio; D’Amelio, Nicola; Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; Lovera, Silvia; Lelli, Moreno; López-Méndez, Blanca; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the conformational changes associated with the binding of small ligands to their biological targets is a fascinating and meaningful question in chemistry, biology and drug discovery. One of the most studied and important is the so-called “DFG-flip” of tyrosine kinases. The conserved three amino-acid DFG motif undergoes an “in to out” movement resulting in a particular inactive conformation to which “type II” kinase inhibitors, such as the anti-cancer drug Imatinib, bind. Despite many studies, the details of this prototypical conformational change are still debated. Here we combine various NMR experiments and surface plasmon resonance with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to shed light into the conformational dynamics associated with the binding of Imatinib to the proto-oncogene c-Src. We find that both conformational selection and induced fit play a role in the binding mechanism, reconciling opposing views held in the literature. Moreover, an external binding pose and local unfolding (cracking) of the aG helix are observed.

  5. Increment in Drug Loading on an Antibody-Drug Conjugate Increases Its Binding to the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachet, Guillaume; Respaud, Renaud; Arnoult, Christophe; Henriquet, Corinne; Dhommée, Christine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Heuze-Vourc'h, Nathalie; Joubert, Nicolas; Pugnière, Martine; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie

    2016-04-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin (BTXv), are an innovative category of monoclonal antibodies. BTXv is bioconjugated via the chemical reduction of cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds. Species of BTXv containing zero, two, four, six, or eight vedotin molecules per antibody coexist in the stock solution. We investigated the influence of drug loading on the binding of the antibody to FcRn, a major determinant of antibody pharmacokinetics in humans. We developed a hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) method for separating the different species present in the stock solution of BTXv, and we purified and characterized the collected species before use. We assessed the binding of these different species to FcRn in a cellular assay based on flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance. HIC separated the different species of BTXv and allowed their collection at adequate levels of purity. Physicochemical characterization showed that species with higher levels of drug loading tended to form more aggregates. FcRn binding assays showed that the most conjugated species, particularly those with saturated loading, interacted more strongly than unconjugated BTXv with the FcRn. PMID:26900766

  6. Drug binding to higher ordered DNA structures: netropsin complexation with a nucleic acid triple helix.

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Y. W.; Breslauer, K J

    1992-01-01

    We have used a combination of spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques to characterize how netropsin, a ligand that binds in the minor groove of DNA, influences the properties of a DNA triple helix. Specifically, our data allow us to reach the following conclusions: (i) netropsin binds to the triplex without displacing the major-groove-bound third strand; (ii) netropsin binding to the triplex exhibits a lower saturation binding density (7.0 base triplets per netropsin bound) than netropsin b...

  7. Simple and Rapid Hollow Fiber Liquid Phase Microextraction Followed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Method for Determination of Drug-protein Binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Guo-chen; HU Shuang; BAI Xiao-hong

    2011-01-01

    A method was established using hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction(HF-LPME) followed by high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) to determine the concentration of the free(unbound) drug in the solution of the drug and protein.Measurements of drug-protein binding ratios and free drug concentrations were then analyzed with the Klotz equation to determine the equilibrium binding constant and number of binding sites for drug-protein interaction.The optimized method allows one to perform the efficient extraction and separation of free drug from protein-bound drug,protein,and other interfering substances.This approach was used to characterize the binding of the anticholinergic drugs atropine sulfate and scopolamine hydrobromide to proteins in human plasma and bovine serum albumin(BSA).The results demonstrate the utility of HF-LPME method for measuring free drug concentrations in protein-drug mixtures and determining the protein binding parameters of a pharmacologically important class of drugs.

  8. Spectral characterization of the binding and conformational changes of serum albumins upon interaction with an anticancer drug, anastrozole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punith, Reeta; Seetharamappa, J.

    2012-06-01

    The present study employed different optical spectroscopic techniques viz., fluorescence, FTIR, circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy to investigate the mechanism of interaction of an anticancer drug, anastrozole (AZ) with transport proteins viz., bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA). The drug, AZ quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of protein and the analysis of results revealed the presence of dynamic quenching mechanism. The binding characteristics of drug-protein were computed. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were calculated to be +92.99 kJ/mol and +159.18 J/mol/K for AZ-BSA and, +99.43 kJ/mol and +159.19 J/mol/K for AZ-HSA, respectively. These results indicated that the hydrophobic forces stabilized the interaction between the drug and protein. CD, FTIR, absorption, synchronous and 3D fluorescence results indicated that the binding of AZ to protein induced structural perturbation in both serum albumins. The distance, r between the drug and protein was calculated based on the theory of Förster's resonance energy transfer and found to be 5.9 and 6.24 nm, respectively for AZ-BSA and AZ-HSA.

  9. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  10. Structures of Two Coronavirus Main Proteases: Implications for Substrate Binding and Antiviral Drug Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hongwei; Yang, Haitao; Xue, Fei; Wu, Zhixin; Shen, Wei; Li, Jun; Zhou, Zhe; Ding, Yi; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Xuejun C.; Liao, Ming; Bartlam, Mark; Rao, Zihe (SCAU); (Tsinghua); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2008-07-21

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) can infect humans and multiple species of animals, causing a wide spectrum of diseases. The coronavirus main protease (M{sup pro}), which plays a pivotal role in viral gene expression and replication through the proteolytic processing of replicase polyproteins, is an attractive target for anti-CoV drug design. In this study, the crystal structures of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) MP{sup pro} and a severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV) M{sup pro} mutant (H41A), in complex with an N-terminal autocleavage substrate, were individually determined to elucidate the structural flexibility and substrate binding of M{sup pro}. A monomeric form of IBV M{sup pro} was identified for the first time in CoV M{sup pro} structures. A comparison of these two structures to other available M{sup pro} structures provides new insights for the design of substrate-based inhibitors targeting CoV M{sup pro}s. Furthermore, a Michael acceptor inhibitor (named N3) was cocrystallized with IBV M{sup pro} and was found to demonstrate in vitro inactivation of IBV M{sup pro} and potent antiviral activity against IBV in chicken embryos. This provides a feasible animal model for designing wide-spectrum inhibitors against CoV-associated diseases. The structure-based optimization of N3 has yielded two more efficacious lead compounds, N27 and H16, with potent inhibition against SARS-CoV M{sup pro}.

  11. Effect of ethanol on spectral binding, inhibition, and activity of CYP3A4 with an antiretroviral drug nelfinavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Earla, Ravinder; Jin, Mengyao; Mitra, Ashim K; Kumar, Anil

    2010-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant CYP enzyme in the liver and metabolizes approximately 50% of the drugs, including antiretrovirals. Although CYP3A4 induction by ethanol and impact of CYP3A4 on drug metabolism and toxicity is known, CYP3A4-ethanol physical interaction and its impact on drug binding, inhibition, or metabolism is not known. Therefore, we studied the effect of ethanol on binding and inhibition of CYP3A4 with a representative protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, followed by the effect of alcohol on nelfinavir metabolism. Our initial results showed that methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, and isoamyl alcohol bind in the active site of CYP3A4 and exhibit type I spectra. Among these alcohol compounds, ethanol showed the lowest K(D) (5.9±0.34mM), suggesting its strong binding affinity with CYP3A4. Ethanol (20mM) decreased the K(D) of nelfinavir by >5-fold (0.041±0.007 vs. 0.227±0.038μM). Similarly, 20mM ethanol decreased the IC(50) of nelfinavir by >3-fold (2.6±0.5 vs. 8.3±3.1μM). These results suggest that ethanol facilitates binding of nelfinavir with CYP3A4. Furthermore, we performed nelfinavir metabolism using LCMS. Although ethanol did not alter k(cat), it decreased the K(m) of nelfinavir, suggesting a decrease in catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)). This is an important finding because alcoholism is prevalent in HIV-1-infected persons and alcohol is shown to decrease the response to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:20937259

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors: measurement of relative inhibitory potency and serum drug levels by radioinhibitor binding displacement assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioinhibitor binding displacement, a new method for the measurement of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) competitive inhibitors, has been used to assess the relative potency of nine synthetic ACE inhibitors. MK351A, tyrosyl derivative of enalaprilic acid was iodinated with 125I and used as the radioligand. [125I]MK351A bound to human serum ACE in a concentration-dependent manner. It was displaced in a concentration-dependent manner by all ACE inhibitors tested. Fifty percent displacement of bound [125I]MK351A (DD50) for each ACE inhibitor correlated well with inhibitor potency ID50, estimated using an ACE enzymatic activity assay using Hip-His-Leu as substrate (r = 0.96, p less than 0.001; n = 9). The radioinhibitor binding displacement assay was used to measure serum concentration of enalaprilic acid (MK422) in human serum samples. Drug concentration estimated by radioinhibitor binding displacement assay correlated closely (r = 0.96, p less than 0.001; n = 22) with the drug concentration measured by a specific radioimmunoassay. The radioinhibitor binding displacement technique using [125I]MK351A as the ligand for human serum ACE has general application to all competitive ACE inhibitors, allowing comparison of in vitro ACE inhibitor potencies and estimation of serum ACE inhibitor concentrations

  13. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double ...

  14. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  15. Sustained Accumulation of Microtubule-Binding Chemotherapy Drugs in the Peripheral Nervous System: Correlations with Time Course and Neurotoxic Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krystyna M; Vornov, James J; Wu, Ying; Nomoto, Kenichi; Littlefield, Bruce A; DesJardins, Christopher; Yu, Yanke; Lai, George; Reyderman, Larisa; Wong, Nancy; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of many antineoplastic agents, but the mechanisms underlying the toxicities are unclear. At their MTDs, the microtubule-binding drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone induce more severe neuropathy in mice relative to eribulin mesylate, paralleling their toxicity profiles in clinic. We hypothesized that the severity of their neurotoxic effects might be explained by the levels at which they accumulate in the peripheral nervous system. To test this hypothesis, we compared their pharmacokinetics and distribution in peripheral nerve tissue. After administration of a single intravenous dose, each drug was rapidly cleared from plasma but all persisted in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerve (SN) for up to 72 hours. Focusing on paclitaxel and eribulin, we performed a 2-week MTD-dosing regimen, followed by a determination of drug pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and multiple functional measures of peripheral nerve toxicity for 4 weeks. Consistent with the acute dosing study, both drugs persisted in peripheral nervous tissues for weeks, in contrast to their rapid clearance from plasma. Notably, although eribulin exhibited greater DRG and SN penetration than paclitaxel, the neurotoxicity observed functionally was consistently more severe with paclitaxel. Overall, our results argue that sustained exposure of microtubule-binding chemotherapeutic agents in peripheral nerve tissues cannot by itself account for their associated neurotoxicity. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3332-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197173

  16. The unique ligand binding features of subfamily-II iLBPs with respect to bile salts and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Ceccon, Alberto; Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) are a family of evolutionarily related small cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the transcellular transport of lipophilic ligands. Subfamily-II iLBPs include the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and the ileal and the liver and ileal bile acid binding proteins (L-BABP and I-BABP). Atomic-level investigations during the past 15-20 years have delivered relevant information on bile acid binding by this protein group, revealing unique features including binding cooperativity, promiscuity, and site selectivity. Using NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques, our laboratories have contributed to an understanding of the molecular determinants of some of these properties and their generality among proteins from different animal species. We focused especially on formation of heterotypic complexes, considering the mixed compositions of physiological bile acid pools. Experiments performed with synthetic bile acid derivatives showed that iLBPs could act as targets for cell-specific contrast agents and, more generally, as effective carriers of amphiphilic drugs. This review collects the major findings related to bile salt interactions with iLBPs aiming to provide keys for a deeper understanding of protein-mediated intracellular bile salt trafficking. PMID:25468388

  17. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Ndieyira, J W; Barrera, A Donoso; Zhou, D; Vögtli, M; Batchelor, M; Cooper, M A; Strunz, T; Horton, M A; Abell, C; Rayment, T; Aeppli, G; Mckendry, R A; 10.1038/nnano.2008.275

    2008-01-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements quantified binding constants for vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant mucopeptide analogues. Moreover, by systematically modifying the mucopeptide density we gain new insights into the origin of surface stress. We propose that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor describing the mechanical connectivity of regions affected by local binding in terms of a percolation process. Our findings place BioMEMS devices in a new class of percolative systems. The percolation concept w...

  18. Characterization of the binding of metoprolol tartrate and guaifenesin drugs to human serum albumin and human hemoglobin proteins by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Osman; Tunç, Sibel; Kancı Bozoğlan, Bahar

    2013-07-01

    The interactions of metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and guaifenesin (GF) drugs with human serum albumin (HSA) and human hemoglobin (HMG) proteins at pH 7.4 were studied by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Drugs quenched the fluorescence spectra of HSA and HMG proteins through a static quenching mechanism. For each protein-drug system, the values of Stern-Volmer quenching constant, bimolecular quenching constant, binding constant and number of binding site on the protein molecules were determined at 288.15, 298.15, 310.15 and 318.15 K. It was found that the binding constants of HSA-MPT and HSA-GF systems were smaller than those of HMG-MPT and HMG-GF systems. For both drugs, the affinity of HMG was much higher than that of HSA. An increase in temperature caused a negative effect on the binding reactions. The number of binding site on blood proteins for MPT and GF drugs was approximately one. Thermodynamic parameters showed that MPT interacted with HSA through electrostatic attraction forces. However, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were the main interaction forces in the formation of HSA-GF, HMG-MPT and HMG-GF complexes. The binding processes between protein and drug molecules were exothermic and spontaneous owing to negative ∆H and ∆G values, respectively. The values of binding distance between protein and drug molecules were calculated from Förster resonance energy transfer theory. It was found from CD analysis that the bindings of MPT and GF drugs to HSA and HMG proteins altered the secondary structure of HSA and HMG proteins. PMID:23471625

  19. Structural Insights into Binding of the Antifungal Drug Fluconazole to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Lanosterol 14α-Demethylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagatova, Alia A; Keniya, Mikhail V; Wilson, Rajni K; Monk, Brian C; Tyndall, Joel D A

    2015-08-01

    Infections by fungal pathogens such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus and their resistance to triazole drugs are major concerns. Fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase belongs to the CYP51 class in the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes. This monospanning bitopic membrane protein is involved in ergosterol biosynthesis and is the primary target of azole antifungal drugs, including fluconazole. The lack of high-resolution structural information for this drug target from fungal pathogens has been a limiting factor for the design of modified triazole drugs that will overcome resistance. Here we report the X-ray structure of full-length Saccharomyces cerevisiae lanosterol 14α-demethylase in complex with fluconazole at a resolution of 2.05 Å. This structure shows the key interactions involved in fluconazole binding and provides insight into resistance mechanisms by revealing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network between the drug and tyrosine 140, a residue frequently found mutated to histidine or phenylalanine in resistant clinical isolates. PMID:26055382

  20. Binding site prediction within Ebola virus VP40 protein:clue for further drug development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Viroj; Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    To the editor.The emerging African Ebola virus infection in 2014 is the global concernl I].To manage this deadly infection,there arestill no effective drugs and vaccines.Searching for new drug is the urgent requirement for successful control of the disease.Based on the new finding,it is noted that Ebola virus VP40

  1. DNA-binding preferences of bisantrene analogues: relevance to the sequence specificity of drug-mediated topoisomerase II poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissi, C; Bolgan, L; Moro, S; Zagotto, G; Bailly, C; Menta, E; Capranico, G; Palumbo, M

    1998-12-01

    To elucidate structure-activity relationships for drugs that are able to poison or inhibit topoisomerase II, we investigated the thermodynamics and stereochemistry of the DNA binding of a number of anthracene derivatives bearing one or two 4, 5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl-hydrazone side chains (characteristic of bisantrene) at different positions of the planar aromatic system. An aza-bioisostere, which can be considered a bisantrene-amsacrine hybrid, was also tested. The affinity for nucleic acids in different sequence contexts was evaluated by spectroscopic techniques, using various experimental conditions. DNA-melting and DNase I footprinting experiments were also performed. The location and number of the otherwise identical side chains dramatically affected the affinity of the test compounds for the nucleic acid. In addition, the new compounds exhibited different DNA sequence preferences, depending on the locations of the dihydroimidazolyl-hydrazone groups, which indicates a major role for the side-chain position in generating specific contacts with the nucleic acid. Molecular modeling studies of the intercalative binding of the 1- or 9-substituted isomers to DNA fully supported the experimental data, because a substantially more favorable recognition of A-T steps, compared with G-C steps, was found for the 9-substituted derivative, whereas a much closer energy balance was found for the 1-substituted isomer. These results compare well with the alteration of base specificity found for the topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage stimulated by the isomeric drugs. Therefore, DNA-binding specificity appears to represent an important determinant for the recognition of the topoisomerase-DNA cleavable complex by the drug, at least for poisons belonging to the amsacrine-bisantrene family. PMID:9855632

  2. Hydroxychloroquine binding to cytoplasmic domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes: Novel mechanistic insights into drug structure, efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mizuki; Sugawara, Kotomi; Goto, Tatsufumi; Wakui, Hideki; Nunomura, Wataru

    2016-05-13

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a widely used drug in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. It has also been prescribed for the treatment of malaria owing to its lower toxicity compared to its closely related compound chloroquine (CQ). However, the mechanisms of action of HCQ in erythrocytes (which bind preferentially this drug) have not been documented and the reasons underlying the lower side effects of HCQ compared to CQ remain unclear. Here we show that, although the activity of erythrocyte lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not GAPDH, was inhibited by both HCQ and CQ in vitro, LDH activity in erythrocytes incubated with 20 mM HCQ was not significantly reduced within 5 h in contrast to CQ did. Using HCQ coupled Sepharose chromatography (HCQ-Sepharose), we identified Band 3, spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.1R and protein 4.2 as HCQ binding proteins in human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Recombinant cytoplasmic N-terminal 43 kDa domain of Band 3 bound to HCQ-Sepharose and was eluted with 40 mM (but not 20 mM) HCQ. Band 3 transport activity was reduced by only 23% in the presence of 20 mM HCQ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that HCQ binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes but does not inhibit dramatically its transport activity. We hypothesize that the trapping of HCQ on Band 3 contributes to the lower side effects of the drug on energy production in erythrocytes. PMID:27049308

  3. Comparative biochemical analysis of three members of the Schistosoma mansoni TAL family: Differences in ion and drug binding properties

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Charlotte M.; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Dunne, David W.; Timson, David J

    2015-01-01

    The tegumental allergen-like (TAL) proteins from Schistosoma mansoni are part of a family of calcium binding proteins found only in parasitic flatworms. These proteins have attracted interest as potential drug or vaccine targets, yet comparatively little is known about their biochemistry. Here, we compared the biochemical properties of three members of this family: SmTAL1 (Sm22.6), SmTAL2 (Sm21.7) and SmTAL3 (Sm20.8). Molecular modelling suggested that, despite similarities in domain organisa...

  4. Albumin binding of anti-inflammatory drugs. Utility of a site-oriented versus a stoichiometric analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B; Brodersen, R

    1984-01-01

    Binding equilibria of 12 nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory substances, salicylic acid, diflunisal, phenylbutazone, azapropazone, fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid, naproxen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofin, diclofenac, indomethacin, and benoxaprofen, to defatted human serum albumin has been investigated at 37...... degrees, pH 7.4, in a sodium phosphate buffer, 66 mM, by means of equilibrium dialysis and, in case of salicylic acid, by dialysis rate determinations. Cobinding of each of these drugs with monoacetyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone, warfarin, and diazepam has been studied by measuring dialysis rates...

  5. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity but also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double bound TMC114 (2T) to HIV-1-pr. The conformational dynamics of HIV-1-pr and the binding of TMC114 to the WT, V32I and M46L mutants were investigated with all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The 20 ns MD simulation shows many fascinating effects of the inhibitor binding to the WT and mutant proteases. MM-PBSA calculations explain the binding free energies unfavorable for the M46L and V32I mutants as compared to the WT. For the single binding (1T) the less binding affinity can be attributed to the entropic loss for both V32I-1T and M46L-1T. Although the second binding of TMC114 with flap does increase binding energy for the mutants (V32I-2T and M46L-2T), the considerable entropy loss results in the lower binding Gibbs free energies. Thus, binding of TMC114 in the flap region does not help much in the total gain in binding affinity of the system, which was verified from this study and thereby validating experiments. PMID:25562662

  6. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, Ksub(D) = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potenties in displacing [3H]-serontonin and [3H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ksub(i) = 46.7 and 53.4 nM; 22.3 and 36.5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds. (author)

  7. ATP-Binding-Cassette Transporters in Biliary Efflux and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Jenny M.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are known to influence the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) of drugs. At the onset of this thesis work, only a few structure-activity models, in general describing P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) interactions, were developed using small datasets with little structural diversity. In this thesis, drug-transport protein interactions were explored using large, diverse datasets representing the chemical space of orally administered registe...

  8. Drug-induced regulation of 1,4-dihydropyridine Ca sup 2+ channel antagonist binding sites in the brain and heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, V.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of drugs to regulate the voltage-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} channels were assessed by determining the bind of ({sup 3}H)dihydropyridine Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonists in the heart and brain following administration of these drugs to rats and mice. Mice and rats implanted with morphine pellets for 3 days showed an increase in dihydropyridine binding sites in the brain, compared to non-treated or placebo treated controls. No increase in dihydropyridine binding sites was observed in the heart. The significance of the increase in binding to physical dependence on morphine is implied from the findings that pretreatment with Ca{sup 2+} channel antagonist drugs led to an attenuation of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal signs in both dependent rats and mice. Administration of other drugs, known to depress the CNS, was undertaken to determine whether the changes observed with morphine was a nonspecific response of the brain to depressant drugs. Prolonged administration of reserpine to rats resulted in no changes in dihydropyridine binding sites in the brain, even though the {beta}-adrenergic receptors in this tissue are upregulated. However, reserpine decreased the density of ({sup 3}H)nimodipine binding sites in the heart of this is accompanied by concomitant increases in {beta}-adrenergic receptors.

  9. How does fatty acid influence anti-thyroid drugs binding and specificity toward protein human serum albumin? A blind docking simulation study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bijan K Paul; Nikhil Guchhait

    2014-11-01

    This study reports an AutoDock-based blind docking simulation investigation to characterize the binding interaction of a series of anti-thyroid drugs (2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI), 2-thiouracil (TU), 6-methyl-2-thiouracil (MTU), 6--propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) with a model plasma protein Human SerumAlbumin (HSA) in the presence and absence of fatty acid (FA). The drug-protein binding efficiency is characterized in terms of binding free energy and the association constant (Ka, which is estimated as the reciprocal of the inhibition constant, Ki) of the drugs to the transport protein. The study also unveils the substantial impact of the presence of fatty acid (FA) on the binding interaction process. It is shown that in the presence of FA the drug-protein binding efficiency is markedly enhanced (except for MTU) and the binding location is changed. Hydrogen bonding interaction appears to play a governing role in the process of FA-induced modifications of binding efficiency and location.

  10. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-08-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b-FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 A resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45' (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  11. Recognition of binding sites and targeting of drugs on nucleic acids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíp, Miroslav

    České Budějovice : Kopp Publishing, 2002 - (Berger, J.), s. 84-85 [Conference on Cell Biology /4./. České Budějovice (CZ), 09.09.2002-11.09.2002] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5051902 Keywords : nucleic acid * binding sites Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  12. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets. PMID:26691755

  13. Modeling the effects of drug binding on the dynamic instability of microtubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady-state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin in the possible presence of a microtubule-associated drug. As an example of the latter, we both experimentally and theoretically study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. Our model predicts that among the drugs that act locally at the microtubule tip, primary inhibition of the loss of GDP tubulin results in stronger damping of microtubule dynamics than inhibition of GTP tubulin addition. On the other hand, drugs whose action occurs in the interior of the microtubule need to be present in much higher concentrations to have visible effects

  14. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 and [3H]haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D2 sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10-8 M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from μ, kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for [3H]spiperone (dopamine D2) sites. [3H]-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable [3H]haloperidol binding was to [3H]spiperone (D2) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  15. Interaction Between Drugs and Biomedical Materials i: Binding Position of Bezafibrate to Human Serum Alubmin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masami; Minagawa, Keiji; Berber, Mohamed R.; Hafez, Inas H.; Mori, Takeshi

    The interaction between bezafibrate (BZF) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated by equilibrium dialysis. Since the binding constant of BZF to HSA was independent of ionic strength and decreased with the addition of fatty acid, the interaction between BZF and HSA was considered to be due to hydrophobic mechanism. Chemical shifts in 1H-NMR spectra of BZF were independent of the concentration of BZF and addition of HSA. Spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of respective protons of BZF were independent of the concentration, but depended on the concentration of HSA added. The binding position of BZF to HSA was considered to involve the hydrophobic aromatic moiety of BZF from the ratio of spin-spin relaxation rates (1/T2) of BZF bound to HSA and free BZF.

  16. Low dose tubulin-binding drugs rescue peroxisome trafficking deficit in patient-derived stem cells in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Fan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP is a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, diagnosed by progressive gait disturbances with muscle weakness and spasticity, for which there are no treatments targeted at the underlying pathophysiology. Mutations in spastin are a common cause of HSP. Spastin is a microtubule-severing protein whose mutation in mouse causes defective axonal transport. In human patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS cells, spastin mutations lead to lower levels of acetylated α-tubulin, a marker of stabilised microtubules, and to slower speed of peroxisome trafficking. Here we screened multiple concentrations of four tubulin-binding drugs for their ability to rescue levels of acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. Drug doses that restored acetylated α-tubulin to levels in control-derived ONS cells were then selected for their ability to rescue peroxisome trafficking deficits. Automated microscopic screening identified very low doses of the four drugs (0.5 nM taxol, 0.5 nM vinblastine, 2 nM epothilone D, 10 µM noscapine that rescued acetylated α-tubulin in patient-derived ONS cells. These same doses rescued peroxisome trafficking deficits, restoring peroxisome speeds to untreated control cell levels. These results demonstrate a novel approach for drug screening based on high throughput automated microscopy for acetylated α-tubulin followed by functional validation of microtubule-based peroxisome transport. From a clinical perspective, all the drugs tested are used clinically, but at much higher doses. Importantly, epothilone D and noscapine can enter the central nervous system, making them potential candidates for future clinical trials.

  17. Nanomechanical detection of antibiotic-mucopeptide binding in a model for superbug drug resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ndieyira, J. W.; Watari, M.; Barrera, A. Donoso; Zhou, D; Vögtli, M; Batchelor, M.; Cooper, M. A.; Strunz, T; Horton, M. A.; Abell, C; Rayment, T.; Aeppli, G.; McKendry, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The alarming growth of the antibiotic-resistant superbugs methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) is driving the development of new technologies to investigate antibiotics and their modes of action. We report the label-free detection of vancomycin binding to bacterial cell wall precursor analogues (mucopeptides) on cantilever arrays, with 10 nM sensitivity and at clinically relevant concentrations in blood serum. Differential measurements...

  18. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    OpenAIRE

    Tiraidis, C.; Alexacou, K. M.; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, T.; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where th...

  19. Interactions between Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Selective Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Velkov

    2013-01-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular shuttles for fatty acids as well as lipophilic xenobiotics to the nucleus, where these ligands are released to a group of nuclear receptors called the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR mediated gene activation is ultimately involved in maintenance of cellular homeostasis through the transcriptional regulation of metabolic enzymes and transporters that target the activating ligand. Here we show that liver- (L-) FA...

  20. The FNIP co-chaperones decelerate the Hsp90 chaperone cycle and enhance drug binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Mark R.; Dunn, Diana M.; Blanden, Adam R.; Capriotti, Dante; Loiselle, David; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Panaretou, Barry; Hughes, Philip F.; Smith, Aaron; Ackerman, Wendi; Haystead, Timothy A.; Loh, Stewart N.; Bourboulia, Dimitra; Schmidt, Laura S.; Marston Linehan, W.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Mollapour, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone in eukaryotes involved in maintaining the stability and activity of numerous signalling proteins, also known as clients. Hsp90 ATPase activity is essential for its chaperone function and it is regulated by co-chaperones. Here we show that the tumour suppressor FLCN is an Hsp90 client protein and its binding partners FNIP1/FNIP2 function as co-chaperones. FNIPs decelerate the chaperone cycle, facilitating FLCN interaction with Hsp90, consequently ensuring FLCN stability. FNIPs compete with the activating co-chaperone Aha1 for binding to Hsp90, thereby providing a reciprocal regulatory mechanism for chaperoning of client proteins. Lastly, downregulation of FNIPs desensitizes cancer cells to Hsp90 inhibitors, whereas FNIPs overexpression in renal tumours compared with adjacent normal tissues correlates with enhanced binding of Hsp90 to its inhibitors. Our findings suggest that FNIPs expression can potentially serve as a predictive indicator of tumour response to Hsp90 inhibitors. PMID:27353360

  1. Binding of the Multimodal Antidepressant Drug Vortioxetine to the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Wang, Danyang;

    2015-01-01

    Selective inhibitors of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) have been first-line treatment against depression for several decades. Recently, vortioxetine was approved as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of depression. Vortioxetine represents a new class of antidepressant drugs...

  2. Drug-binding ability of human serum albumin at children with chronic virus hepatitis radiochemical definition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    chronic virus hepatitis B and C at children the hypoproteinaemia and disproteinemia are observed. Thus the contents of common protein and albumin fraction at chronic hepatitis B is reduced in comparison with control group 1,3 times on the average (P<0,05). It was marked disproteinemia due to increasing of gamma-globulin fraction of blood serum. At a chronic virus hepatitis B at children the ability of serum albumin to bind the tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride was reduced in comparison with control groip on the average in 1,3 times. At a chronic hepatitis C hypoproteinemia was expressed less than at a chronic virus hepatitis B, however paid to itself attention more expressed disproteinemia due to increasing of gamma-globulin fraction. Thus ability of serum albumin to bind the tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride dropped in comparison with control group on the average in 1,5 times (P<0,05). Thus, received results testify that at a chronic virus hepatitis B and C at children infringement of complexing properties of albumin of a blood is marked that testifies to downstroke of drug-binding function. The radiochemical method of definition of ability of serum albumin to bind the tritium labeled drotaverine hydrochloride is efficient and high informative. (author)

  3. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo 3H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo 3H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the 3H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific 3H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal 3H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the 3H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal 3H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure. (Author)

  4. Regional blockade by neuroleptic drugs of in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in the rat brain. Relation to blockade of apomorphine induced hyperactivity and stereotypies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C.; Haglund, L.; Oegren, S.O.; Aengeby, T. (Astra Lackemedel AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden). Dept. of Pharmacology)

    1981-01-01

    The regional prevention by neuroleptic drugs of specific in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding was studied in the rat brain. L-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine were found to reduce the /sup 3/H-spiperone bindings selectively in the olfactory tubercle, septum, substantia nigra and frontal cortex but not the striatum at dose levels which preferentially block apomorphine (APO) induced hyperactivity. The maximal prevention of specific /sup 3/H-spiperone binding by l-sulpiride and clozapine reached 60-80% in the former structures while the displacement of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding did not exceed 40%. In contrast to l-sulpiride, thioridazine and clozapine both chlorpromazine and haloperidol reduced the /sup 3/H-spiperone binding to the same extent in all regions studied. Chlorpromazine and haloperidol were potent in prevention of striatal /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in vivo which reached 60-80% in this structure.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Drug Binding on the Dynamic Instability of Microtubules

    CERN Document Server

    Hinow, Peter; Lopus, Manu; Jordan, Mary Ann; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2010-01-01

    We propose a stochastic model that accounts for the growth, catastrophe and rescue processes of steady state microtubules assembled from MAP-free tubulin. Both experimentally and theoretically we study the perturbation of microtubule dynamic instability by S-methyl-D-DM1, a synthetic derivative of the microtubule-targeted agent maytansine and a potential anticancer agent. We find that to be an effective suppressor of microtubule dynamics a drug must primarily suppress the loss of GDP tubulin from the microtubule tip.

  6. Selective binding of tumor suppressor p53 protein to topologically constrained DNA: Modulation by intercalative drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Šebest, Peter; Pečinka, P.; Tichá, Olga; Němcová, Kateřina; Brázdová, Marie; Brázdová Jagelská, Eva; Brázda, Václav; Fojta, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 393, č. 4 (2010), s. 894-899. ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500040701; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/07/P476; GA ČR(CZ) GP301/07/P160; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035; GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1560 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : p53 -DNA binding * supercoiled DNA * DNA topology Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.595, year: 2010

  7. Investigating the binding interactions of the anti-Alzheimer's drug donepezil with CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Rao, Praveen P N

    2015-01-15

    The anti-Alzheimer's agent donepezil is known to bind to the hepatic enzyme CYP3A4, but its relationship with the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is not as well elucidated. We conducted in vitro inhibition studies of donepezil using human recombinant CYP3A4 and P-gp. These studies show that donepezil is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4 (IC50=54.68±1.00μM) whereas the reference agent ketoconazole exhibited potent inhibition (CYP3A4 IC50=0.20±0.01μM). P-gp inhibition studies indicate that donepezil exhibits better inhibition relative to CYP3A4 (P-gp EC50=34.85±4.63μM) although it was less potent compared to ketoconazole (P-gp EC50=9.74±1.23μM). At higher concentrations, donepezil exhibited significant inhibition of CYP3A4 (69%, 84% and 87% inhibition at 100, 250 and 500μM, respectively). This indicates its potential to cause drug-drug interactions with other CYP3A4 substrates upon co-administration; however, this scenario is unlikely in vivo due to the low therapeutic concentrations of donepezil. Similarly, donepezil co-administration with P-gp substrates or inhibitors is unlikely to result in beneficial or adverse drug interactions. The molecular docking studies show that the 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one moiety of donepezil was oriented closer to the heme center in CYP3A4 whereas in the P-gp binding site, the protonated benzylpiperidine pharmacophore of donepezil played a major role in its binding ability. Energy parameters indicate that donepezil complex with both CYP3A4 and P-gp was less stable (CDOCKER energies=-15.05 and -4.91kcal/mol, respectively) compared to the ketoconazole-CYP3A4 and P-gp complex (CDOCKER energies=-41.89 and -20.03kcal/mol, respectively). PMID:25499431

  8. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  9. Effects of centrally acting antihypertensive drugs on the microcirculation of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estato V.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the acute effects of centrally acting antihypertensive drugs on the microcirculation of pentobarbital-anesthetized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The effects of the sympatho-inhibitory agents clonidine and rilmenidine, known to activate both alpha2-adrenoceptors and nonadrenergic I1-imidazoline binding sites (I1BS in the central nervous system, were compared to those of dicyclopropylmethyl-(4,5-dimethyl-4,5-dihydro-3H -pyrrol-2-yl-amine hydrochloride (LNP 509, which selectively binds to the I1BS. Terminal mesenteric arterioles were observed by intravital microscopy. Activation of the central sympathetic system with L-glutamate (125 µg, ic induced marked vasoconstriction of the mesenteric microcirculation (27 ± 3%; N = 6, P < 0.05. In contrast, the marked hypotensive and bradycardic effects elicited by intracisternal injection of clonidine (1 µg, rilmenidine (7 µg and LNP 509 (60 µg were accompanied by significant increases in arteriolar diameter (12 ± 1, 25 ± 10 and 21 ± 4%, respectively; N = 6, P < 0.05. The vasodilating effects of rilmenidine and LNP 509 were two-fold higher than those of clonidine, although they induced an identical hypotensive effect. Central sympathetic inhibition elicited by baclofen (1 µg, ic, a GABA B receptor agonist, also resulted in vasodilation of the SHR microvessels. The acute administration of clonidine, rilmenidine and LNP 509 also induced a significant decrease of cardiac output, whereas a decrease in systemic vascular resistance was observed only after rilmenidine and LNP 509. We conclude that the normalization of blood pressure in SHR induced by centrally acting antihypertensive agents is paralleled by important vasodilation of the mesenteric microcirculation. This effect is more pronounced with substances acting preferentially (rilmenidine or exclusively (LNP 509 upon I1BS than with those presenting important alpha2-adrenergic activity (clonidine.

  10. HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND THE ANALYSIS OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH MODIFIED PROTEINS: BINDING OF GLICLAZIDE WITH GLYCATED HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Ryan; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Joseph, K S; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study used high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) to examine the binding of gliclazide (i.e., a sulfonylurea drug used to treat diabetes) with the protein human serum albumin (HSA) at various stages of modification due to glycation. Frontal analysis conducted with small HPAC columns was first used to estimate the number of binding sites and association equilibrium constants (Ka) for gliclazide with normal HSA and glycated HSA. Both normal and glycated HSA interacted with gliclaz...

  11. Effects of several cerebroprotective drugs on NMDA channel function: evaluation using Xenopus oocytes and [3H]MK-801 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, S; Sugimura, M; Inoue, T; Satoh, M

    1991-06-19

    The effects of several cerebroprotective and nootropic drugs on the function of excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptor subtypes expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of rodent brain poly(A)+ mRNA were investigated. The oocyte response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the presence of glycine (Gly) was inhibited dose-dependently by bifemelane, indeloxazine, vinpocetine and vincamine while no effect was observed by idebenone, Ca hopantenate, aniracetam or piracetam. Bifemelane, indeloxazine and vinpocetine suppressed the maximum response of NMDA and Gly without affecting their EC50 values. Unlike Mg2+, they did not affect the current-voltage relationship of the NMDA response below 0 mV. On the non-NMDA-type responses of the injected oocytes to kainate (KA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and quisqualate (QA), no significant effects were observed by these drugs at 100 microM. On the binding of [3H](+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imi ne (MK-801) to brain membranes, the estimated IC50 values were 88 microM for bifemelane, 102 microM for indeloxazine, and 115 microM for vinpocetine. The dissociation rate of [3H]MK-801 was significantly slowed by Zn2+ and vinpocetine, but not affected by bifemelane or indeloxazine. The Kd value for [3H]MK-801 binding was increased by bifemelane and indeloxazine while Bmax was unchanged. These results suggest that the inhibition of NMDA channels by vinpocetine shows a similarity to the action of Zn2+ which closes the gate of the NMDA channel. In contrast, bifemelane and indeloxazine may affect the phencyclidine (PCP)-site in the open channels and inhibit NMDA function. PMID:1652446

  12. ATP-binding cassette transporter controls leaf surface secretion of anticancer drug components in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-09-24

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is highly specialized for the biosynthesis of many different monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), many of which have powerful biological activities. Such MIAs include the commercially important chemotherapy drugs vinblastine, vincristine, and other synthetic derivatives that are derived from the coupling of catharanthine and vindoline. However, previous studies have shown that biosynthesis of these MIAs involves extensive movement of metabolites between specialized internal leaf cells and the leaf epidermis that require the involvement of unknown secretory processes for mobilizing catharanthine to the leaf surface and vindoline to internal leaf cells. Spatial separation of vindoline and catharanthine provides a clear explanation for the low levels of dimers that accumulate in intact plants. The present work describes the molecular cloning and functional identification of a unique catharanthine transporter (CrTPT2) that is expressed predominantly in the epidermis of young leaves. CrTPT2 gene expression is activated by treatment with catharanthine, and its in planta silencing redistributes catharanthine to increase the levels of catharanthine-vindoline drug dimers in the leaves. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CrTPT2 is closely related to a key transporter involved in cuticle assembly in plants and that may be unique to MIA-producing plant species, where it mediates secretion of alkaloids to the plant surface. PMID:24019465

  13. A novel cyclophilin from parasitic and free-living nematodes with a unique substrate- and drug-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dong; Nelson, Laura S; LeCoz, Krystel; Poole, Catherine; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2002-04-26

    A highly diversified member of the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases has been isolated from the human parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvCYP-16). This 25-kDa cyclophilin shares 43-46% similarity to other filarial cyclophilins but does not belong to any of the groups previously defined in invertebrates or vertebrates. A homolog was also isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans (CeCYP-16). Both recombinant O. volvulus and C. elegans cyclophilins were found to possess an enzyme activity with similar substrate preference and insensitivity to cyclosporin A. They represent novel cyclophilins with important differences in the composition of the drug-binding site in particular, namely, a Glu(124) (C. elegans) or Asp(123) (O. volvulus) residue present in a critical position. Site-directed mutagenesis studies and kinetic characterization demonstrated that the single residue dictates the degree of binding to substrate and cyclosporin A. CeCYP-16::GFP-expressing lines were generated with expression in the anterior and posterior distal portions of the intestine, in all larval stages and adults. An exception was found in the dauer stage, where fluorescence was observed in both the cell bodies and processes of the ventral chord motor neurons but was absent from the intestine. These studies highlight the extensive diversification of cyclophilins in an important human parasite and a closely related model organism. PMID:11847225

  14. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Zanni, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  15. X-Aptamers: A bead-based selection method for random incorporation of drug-like moieties onto next-generation aptamers for enhanced binding

    OpenAIRE

    He, WeiGuo; Elizondo-Riojas, Miguel-Angel; LI, XIN; Lokesh, Ganesh Lakshmana Rao; Somasunderam, Anoma; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Volk, David E.; Durland, Ross H.; Englehardt, Johnnie; Cavasotto, Claudio N.; Gorenstein, David G.

    2012-01-01

    By combining pseudo-random bead-based aptamer libraries with conjugation chemistry, we have created next-generation aptamers, X-aptamers (XAs). Several X ligands can be added in a directed or random fashion to the aptamers to further enhance their binding affinities to the target proteins. Here we describe the addition of a drug (N-acetyl-2,3-dehydro-2-deoxyneuraminic acid) demonstrated to bind to CD44-HABD, to a complete monothioate backbone substituted aptamer to increase its binding affini...

  16. Heparin-binding peptide amphiphile supramolecular architectures as platforms for angiogenesis and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lesleyann W.

    A fascinating phenomenon in nature is the self-assembly of molecules into a functional, hierarchical structure. In the past decade, the Stupp Laboratory has developed several classes of self-assembling biomaterials, one of which is the synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA). Self-assembling PAs are attractive and versatile biomolecules that can be customized for specific applications in regenerative medicine. In particular, a heparin-binding peptide amphiphile (HBPA) containing a specific heparin-binding peptide sequence was used here to induce angiogenesis and serve as a delivery vehicle for growth factors and small hydrophobic molecules. Throughout this dissertation, the HBPA/heparin system is used in different architectures for a variety of regenerative medicine applications. In one aspect of this work, hybrid scaffolds made from HBPA/heparin gelled on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber mesh were used to promote angiogenesis to facilitate pancreatic islet transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Delivery of growth factors with HBPA/PLLA scafflolds increased vessel density in vivo and correlated with improved transplant outcomes in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic mouse model. Soluble HBPA nanofiber architectures were also useful for islet transplantation applications. These nanofibers were used at concentrations below gelation to deliver growth factors into the dense islet cell aggregate, promoting cell survival and angiogenesis in vitro. The nanostructures infiltrated the islets and promoted the retention of heparin and growth factors within the islet. Another interesting growth factor release system discussed here is the HBPA membrane structure. HBPA was found to self-assemble with hyaluronic acid, a large biopolymer found in the body, into macroscopic, hierarchically-ordered membranes. Heparin was incorporated into these membranes and affected the membrane's mechanical properties and growth factor release. Human mesenchymal stem cells were also shown

  17. Pharmacological effects of dopaminergic drugs on in vivo binding of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 to the central dopamine transporters in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of drugs competing for the dopamine transporter (DAT) or changing intra- and/or extracellular dopamine levels on the binding of a novel technetium-99m labeled tropane derivative, technetium, [2-[[2-[[[3-(4-chloro-phenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3, 2, 1]oct-2-yl]methyl] (2-mercaptoethyl)amino]ethyl]amino]ethanethiolato(3)]-oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)]-, [99mTc]TRODAT-1, to DAT. This paper describes the further characterization of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 binding sites in rats under conditions which may exist in patients receiving various drug treatments. All experiments were carried out using an i.v. injection of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 into male Sprague-Dawley rats. The biodistribution studies were performed in the presence of drugs which compete for the binding site. Additionally, the influence of dopamine receptor agonists, such as apomorphine and (+)bromocriptine, on biodistribution was tested. It is likely that a low dose of l-DOPA (normally needed in the treatment of Parkinson's disease) will not affect the results on [99mTc]TRODAT-1 single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the results clearly demonstrate the specificity of [99mTc]TRODAT-1 binding to DAT in vivo. Competition for [99mTc]TRODAT-1 binding was observed only with drug treatment that significantly increases dopamine levels or actively competes for binding at DAT. The results suggest that prior knowledge of whether patients are receiving various drug treatments may assist in the interpretation of DAT status as assessed by SPET imaging studies using [99mTc]TRODAT-1. (orig.)

  18. Pharmacological effects of dopaminergic drugs on in vivo binding of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 to the central dopamine transporters in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, S.H.J.; Kung, M.P.; Ploessl, K.; Meegalla, S.K. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States); Kung, H.F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)]|[Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of drugs competing for the dopamine transporter (DAT) or changing intra- and/or extracellular dopamine levels on the binding of a novel technetium-99m labeled tropane derivative, technetium, [2-[[2-[[[3-(4-chloro- phenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3, 2, 1]oct-2-yl]methyl] (2-mercaptoethyl)amino]ethyl]amino]ethanethiolato(3)]-oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)]-, [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1, to DAT. This paper describes the further characterization of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 binding sites in rats under conditions which may exist in patients receiving various drug treatments. All experiments were carried out using an i.v. injection of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 into male Sprague-Dawley rats. The biodistribution studies were performed in the presence of drugs which compete for the binding site. Additionally, the influence of dopamine receptor agonists, such as apomorphine and (+)bromocriptine, on biodistribution was tested. It is likely that a low dose of l-DOPA (normally needed in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease) will not affect the results on [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the results clearly demonstrate the specificity of [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 binding to DAT in vivo. Competition for [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1 binding was observed only with drug treatment that significantly increases dopamine levels or actively competes for binding at DAT. The results suggest that prior knowledge of whether patients are receiving various drug treatments may assist in the interpretation of DAT status as assessed by SPET imaging studies using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 73 refs.

  19. Investigation of β-lactam antibacterial drugs, β-lactamases, and penicillin-binding proteins with fluorescence polarization and anisotropy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B.

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the uses of fluorescence polarization and anisotropy for the investigation of bacterial penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), which are the targets of β-lactam antibacterial drugs (penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams), and of the β-lactamase enzymes that destroy these drugs and help to render bacterial pathogens resistant to them. Fluorescence polarization and anisotropy-based methods for quantitation of β-lactam drugs are also reviewed. A particular emphasis is on methods for quantitative measurement of the interactions of β-lactams and other inhibitors with PBPs and β-lactamases.

  20. The microtubule binding drug EM011 inhibits the growth of paediatric low grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeawung, Norbert F; Joshi, Harish C; Kamnasaran, Deepak

    2013-07-10

    Low grade gliomas are a heterogeneous group of tumours representing the most common form of neoplasms in the central nervous system among children. Although gross total resection remains the principal treatment, it is often impractical especially for the resection of tumours within eloquent regions of the brain. Instead Radiotherapy is utilised in such cases, but because of its associated toxicities, it is refrained from use among younger children. These limitations coupled with hypersensitivity and toxicities associated with some commonly used chemotherapeutic agents, have ignited the need to search for safer and more effective treatments for paediatric low grade gliomas. In this study, we investigated the EM011 drug on the growth of two pilocytic and one diffuse paediatric astrocytoma cell lines, using an assortment of cancer assays. We discovered that treatments of low grade gliomas with EM011 abrogated cell viability by inducing a decrease in cell proliferation and an arrest in the S and G2M cell cycle phases, followed by a converse increase in apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. The cell migratory and invasion indices, as well as anchorage independent growth in soft agarose, were significantly attenuated. These findings were mechanistically associated with a transient release of AIF, a disruption of microtubule architecture, and a decline in the expression of key genes which drive cancer progression including EGFR, mTORC1, JUN and multiple MMPs. In fact, the activity of MMP2 was also perturbed by EM011. These findings, in conjunction with the insignificant adverse side effects established from other studies, make EM011 an appealing chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of paediatric low grade gliomas. PMID:23402815

  1. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019. PMID:27196130

  2. X-ray Structure Analysis of Indazolium trans-[Tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) Bound to Human Serum Albumin Reveals Two Ruthenium Binding Sites and Provides Insights into the Drug Binding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic, Aleksandar; Theiner, Sarah; Keppler, Bernhard K; Rompel, Annette

    2016-06-23

    Ruthenium(III) complexes are promising candidates for anticancer drugs, especially the clinically studied indazolium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (KP1019) and its analogue sodium trans-[tetrachlorobis(1H-indazole)ruthenate(III)] (NKP-1339). Several studies have emphasized the likely role of human serum proteins in the transportation and accumulation of ruthenium(III) complexes in tumors. Therefore, the interaction between KP1019 and human serum albumin was investigated by means of X-ray crystallography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural data unambiguously reveal the binding of two ruthenium atoms to histidine residues 146 and 242, which are both located within well-known hydrophobic binding pockets of albumin. The ruthenium centers are octahedrally coordinated by solvent molecules revealing the dissociation of both indazole ligands from the ruthenium-based drug. However, a binding mechanism is proposed indicating the importance of the indazole ligands for binding site recognition and thus their indispensable role for the binding of KP1019. PMID:27196130

  3. Using mutagenesis to explore conserved residues in the RNA-binding groove of influenza A virus nucleoprotein for antiviral drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Hung, Hui-Chen; Lo, Shou-Chen; Chiang, Ching-Hui; Chen, I-Jung; Hsu, John T-A; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant type of RNA-binding viral protein in influenza A virus-infected cells and is necessary for viral RNA transcription and replication. Recent studies demonstrated that influenza NP is a valid target for antiviral drug development. The surface of the groove, covered with numerous conserved residues between the head and body domains of influenza A NP, plays a crucial role in RNA binding. To explore the mechanism by which NP binds RNA, we performed a series of site-directed mutagenesis in the RNA-binding groove, followed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to characterize the interactions between RNA and NP. Furthermore, a role of Y148 in NP stability and NP-RNA binding was evaluated. The aromatic residue of Y148 was found to stack with a nucleotide base. By interrupting the stacking interaction between Y148 and an RNA base, we identified an influenza virus NP inhibitor, (E, E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl) -1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione; this inhibitor reduced the NP's RNA-binding affinity and hindered viral replication. Our findings will be useful for the development of new drugs that disrupt the interaction between RNA and viral NP in the influenza virus. PMID:26916998

  4. Analysis of drug-protein binding using on-line immunoextraction and high-performance affinity microcolumns: Studies with normal and glycated human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ryan; Jobe, Donald; Beyersdorf, Jared; Hage, David S

    2015-10-16

    A method combining on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was developed and tested for use in examining drug-protein interactions with normal or modified proteins. Normal human serum albumin (HSA) and glycated HSA were used as model proteins for this work. High-performance immunoextraction microcolumns with sizes of 1.0-2.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. and containing anti-HSA polyclonal antibodies were developed and tested for their ability to bind normal HSA or glycated HSA. These microcolumns were able to extract up to 82-93% for either type of protein at 0.05-0.10 mL/min and had a binding capacity of 0.34-0.42 nmol HSA for a 1.0 cm × 2.1mm i.d. microcolumn. The immunoextraction microcolumns and their adsorbed proteins were tested for use in various approaches for drug binding studies. Frontal analysis was used with the adsorbed HSA/glycated HSA to measure the overall affinities of these proteins for the drugs warfarin and gliclazide, giving comparable values to those obtained previously using similar protein preparations that had been covalently immobilized within HPAC columns. Zonal elution competition studies with gliclazide were next performed to examine the specific interactions of this drug at Sudlow sites I and II of the adsorbed proteins. These results were also comparable to those noted in prior work with covalently immobilized samples of normal HSA or glycated HSA. These experiments indicated that drug-protein binding studies can be carried out by using on-line immunoextraction microcolumns with HPAC. The same method could be used in the future with clinical samples and other drugs or proteins of interest in pharmaceutical studies or biomedical research. PMID:26381571

  5. Recommendations for Use and Fit-for-Purpose Validation of Biomarker Multiplex Ligand Binding Assays in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Darshana; Allinson, John; Berisha, Flora; Cowan, Kyra J; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Gleason, Carol; Jeromin, Andreas; Keller, Steve; Khan, Masood U; Nowatzke, Bill; Rhyne, Paul; Stephen, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Multiplex ligand binding assays (LBAs) are increasingly being used to support many stages of drug development. The complexity of multiplex assays creates many unique challenges in comparison to single-plexed assays leading to various adjustments for validation and potentially during sample analysis to accommodate all of the analytes being measured. This often requires a compromise in decision making with respect to choosing final assay conditions and acceptance criteria of some key assay parameters, depending on the intended use of the assay. The critical parameters that are impacted due to the added challenges associated with multiplexing include the minimum required dilution (MRD), quality control samples that span the range of all analytes being measured, quantitative ranges which can be compromised for certain targets, achieving parallelism for all analytes of interest, cross-talk across assays, freeze-thaw stability across analytes, among many others. Thus, these challenges also increase the complexity of validating the performance of the assay for its intended use. This paper describes the challenges encountered with multiplex LBAs, discusses the underlying causes, and provides solutions to help overcome these challenges. Finally, we provide recommendations on how to perform a fit-for-purpose-based validation, emphasizing issues that are unique to multiplex kit assays. PMID:26377333

  6. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar_mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-10-01

    We have developed {sup 18}F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 {mu}M) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine.

  7. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, 18F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed 18F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of 18F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of 18F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 μM) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of 18F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with 18F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of 18F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of 18F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with 18F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of 18F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine

  8. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  9. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guodong; Ma, Aijing; Dou, Xianghua; Zhao, Liling; Wang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A) and inhibitor (GRL-0519) complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT) complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors. PMID:27240358

  10. The structure of the complex of calmodulin with KAR-2: a novel mode of binding explains the unique pharmacology of the drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, István; Harmat, Veronika; Perczel, András; Pálfi, Villo; Nyitray, László; Nagy, Attila; Hlavanda, Emma; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Ovádi, Judit

    2005-03-01

    3'-(beta-Chloroethyl)-2',4'-dioxo-3,5'-spiro-oxazolidino-4-deacetoxyvinblastine (KAR-2) is a potent anti-microtubular agent that arrests mitosis in cancer cells without significant toxic side effects. In this study we demonstrate that in addition to targeting microtubules, KAR-2 also binds calmodulin, thereby countering the antagonistic effects of trifluoperazine. To determine the basis of both properties of KAR-2, the three-dimensional structure of its complex with Ca(2+)-calmodulin has been characterized both in solution using NMR and when crystallized using x-ray diffraction. Heterocorrelation ((1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence) spectra of (15)N-labeled calmodulin indicate a global conformation change (closure) of the protein upon its binding to KAR-2. The crystal structure at 2.12-A resolution reveals a more complete picture; KAR-2 binds to a novel structure created by amino acid residues of both the N- and C-terminal domains of calmodulin. Although first detected by x-ray diffraction of the crystallized ternary complex, this conformational change is consistent with its solution structure as characterized by NMR spectroscopy. It is noteworthy that a similar tertiary complex forms when calmodulin binds KAR-2 as when it binds trifluoperazine, even though the two ligands contact (for the most part) different amino acid residues. These observations explain the specificity of KAR-2 as an anti-microtubular agent; the drug interacts with a novel drug binding domain on calmodulin. Consequently, KAR-2 does not prevent calmodulin from binding most of its physiological targets. PMID:15596444

  11. NMR investigation of the binding of the anticancer drug actinomycin D to oligodeoxyribonucleotides with isolated 5'd(GC)3' binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imino proton and 31P NMR studies were conducted on the binding of actinomycin D (ActD) to self-complementary oligodeoxyribonucleotides with one GC binding site [d(ATATGCATAT) (1), d(ATACGCGTAT) (2), and d(ATATACGCGTATAT) (3)] and with two GC sites [d(ATGCATGCAT) (4)]. At R = 1 (molar ratio of ActD to oligomer duplex) ActD caused a doubling of the number of imino proton signals at, and adjacent to, the GC binding site of 1. One of the G-C base pair signals shifted upfield while the other shifted downfield. Both of the signals for the A-T base pairs adjacent to the binding site shifted downfield. All imino proton signals of 2 and the longer sequence, 3 shifted upfield on binding of ActD to the GC site, indicating a sequence-dependent change in base stacking on complex formation. For both 1 and 2 addition of ActD resulted in a similar pattern of three downfield 31P NMR signals. The two most downfield signals have chemical shift and temperature dependence which are characteristic of phosphate groups at isolated intercalation sites. At R = 1 the ActD complex with 4 has very complex spectra with both upfield and downfield A-T and G-C imino signals. All these data were consistent with two 1:1 complexes with the unsymmetrical phenoxazone ring adopting both of the two possible orientations. The variety of ActD adducts observed for these relatively simple sequences indicates that ActD binding to natural DNA must be much more complex than previously anticipated

  12. Lectin binding and effects in culture on human cancer and non-cancer cell lines: examination of issues of interest in drug design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrossian, Karineh; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2007-01-01

    By using a non-cancer and a cancer cell line originally from the same tissue (colon), coupled with testing lectins for cell binding and for their effects on these cell lines in culture, this study describes a simple multi-parameter approach that has revealed some interesting results that could be useful in drug development strategies. Two human cell lines, CCL-220/Colo320DM (human colon cancer cells, tumorigenic in nude mice) and CRL-1459/CCD-18Co (non-malignant human colon cells) were tested for their ability to bind to agarose microbeads derivatized with two lectins, peanut agglutinin (Arachis hypogaea agglutinin, PNA) and Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), and the effects of these lectins were assessed in culture using the MTT assay. Both cell lines bound to DBA-derivatized microbeads, and binding was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, but not by L-fucose. Neither cell line bound to PNA-derivatized microbeads. Despite the lack of lectin binding using the rapid microbead method, PNA was mitogenic in culture at some time points and its mitogenic effect displayed a reverse-dose response. This was also seen with effects of DBA on cells in culture. While this is a simple study, the results were statistically highly significant and suggest that: (1) agents may not need to bind strongly to cells to exert biological effects, (2) cell line pairs derived from diseased and non-diseased tissue can provide useful comparative data on potential drug effects and (3) very low concentrations of potential drugs might be initially tested experimentally because reverse-dose responses should be considered. PMID:17706752

  13. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Oscar B.; Antoline, Joshua F. G.; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C.; Alving, Carl R.; Matyas, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antib...

  14. Spectroscopic and nano-molecular modeling investigation on the binary and ternary bindings of colchicine and lomefloxacin to Human serum albumin with the viewpoint of multi-drug therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamani, J., E-mail: Chamani@ibb.ut.ac.i [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Homayoni-Tabrizi, M. [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amiri Tehranizadeh, Z.; Baratian, A.; Saberi, M.R. [Medical Chemistry Department, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gharanfoli, M. [Department of Development Biology, Culture and Science University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Combination of several drugs is often necessary especially during long-term therapy. The competitive binding drugs can cause a decrease in the amount of drug bound to protein and increase the biological active fraction of the drug. The aim of this study is to analyze the interactions of Lomefloxacin (LMF) and Colchicine (COL) with human serum albumin (HSA) and to evaluate the mechanism of simultaneous binding of LMF and COL to protein. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of drugs on the protein fluorescence and to define the binding and quenching properties of drugs-HSA complexes. The binding sites for LMF and COL were identified in tertiary structure of HSA with the use of spectrofluorescence analysis. The analysis of fluorescence quenching of HSA in the binary and ternary systems show that LMF does not affect the complex formed between COL and HSA. On the contrary, COL decreases the interaction between LMF and HSA. The results of synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering and circular dichroism spectra of binary and ternary systems show that binding of LMF and COL to HSA can induce micro-environmental and conformational changes in HSA. The simultaneous presence of LMF and COL in binding to HSA should be taken into account in the multi-drug therapy, and necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of the uncontrolled toxic effects. Molecular modeling of the possible binding sites of LMF and COL in binary and ternary systems to HSA confirms the spectroscopic results.

  15. Spectroscopic and nano-molecular modeling investigation on the binary and ternary bindings of colchicine and lomefloxacin to Human serum albumin with the viewpoint of multi-drug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combination of several drugs is often necessary especially during long-term therapy. The competitive binding drugs can cause a decrease in the amount of drug bound to protein and increase the biological active fraction of the drug. The aim of this study is to analyze the interactions of Lomefloxacin (LMF) and Colchicine (COL) with human serum albumin (HSA) and to evaluate the mechanism of simultaneous binding of LMF and COL to protein. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of drugs on the protein fluorescence and to define the binding and quenching properties of drugs-HSA complexes. The binding sites for LMF and COL were identified in tertiary structure of HSA with the use of spectrofluorescence analysis. The analysis of fluorescence quenching of HSA in the binary and ternary systems show that LMF does not affect the complex formed between COL and HSA. On the contrary, COL decreases the interaction between LMF and HSA. The results of synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering and circular dichroism spectra of binary and ternary systems show that binding of LMF and COL to HSA can induce micro-environmental and conformational changes in HSA. The simultaneous presence of LMF and COL in binding to HSA should be taken into account in the multi-drug therapy, and necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of the uncontrolled toxic effects. Molecular modeling of the possible binding sites of LMF and COL in binary and ternary systems to HSA confirms the spectroscopic results.

  16. Structural and binding studies of C-terminal half (C-lobe) of lactoferrin protein with COX-2-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Rafia; Singh, Nagendra; Vikram, Gopalakrishnapillai; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2010-08-15

    Three COX-2-specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), etoricoxib, parecoxib, and nimesulide are widely prescribed against inflammatory conditions. However, their long term administration leads to severe conditions of cardiovascular complications and gastric ulceration. In order to minimize these side effects, C-terminal half (C-lobe) of colostrum protein lactoferrin has been indicated to be useful if co-administered with NSAIDs. Lactoferrin is an 80kDa glycoprotein with two similar halves designated as N- and C-lobes. Since NSAID-binding site is located in the C-terminal half of lactoferrin, C-lobe was prepared from lactoferrin by limited proteolysis using proteinase K. The incubation of lactoferrin with serine proteases for extended periods showed that N-lobe was completely digested but C-lobe was resistant for more than 72h indicating its long half life in the animal gut. The solution studies have shown that COX-2-specific NSAIDs bind to C-lobe with binding constants ranging from 10(-4) to 10(-5)M showing significant affinities for sequestering these compounds. In order to understand the mode of binding and sequestering properties, the complexes of C-lobe with all these three compounds, etoricoxib, parecoxib, and nimesulide were prepared and the structures of their complexes with C-lobe were determined at 2.2, 2.9, and 2.7A resolutions, respectively. The analysis of the structures of complexes of C-lobe with NSAIDs clearly show that all the three compounds bind firmly at the same ligand-binding site in the C-lobe revealing the details of the interactions between C-lobe and NSAIDs. The mode of binding of COX-2-specific NSAIDs to C-lobe is similar to that of the binding of COX-2 non-specific NSAIDs to C-lobe. PMID:20515646

  17. Isolation of cDNAs encoding a human protein that binds selectively to DNA modified by the anticancer drug cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA modified by the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP or cisplatin) was used to identify a factor in mammalian cells that binds to cis-DDP-damaged DNA and hence may play a role in repair. This factor selectivity recognizes double-stranded DNA fragments modified by cis-DDP or [Pt(en)Cl2] (en, ethylenediamine). Little or no binding occurs to unmodified double-stranded DNA or to DNA modified with the clinically ineffective compounds trans-DDP and [Pt(dien)Cl]Cl (dien, diethylenetriamine). Low levels of binding to single-stranded DNA modified by cis-DDP are observed. The apparent molecular mass of the factor in a variety of mammalian cells is ∼ 100 kDa, as determined by modified Western blotting. Two recombinant phage have been isolated from a human B-cell λgt11 library by using a cis-DDP-modified DNA restriction fragments as a probe. The two clones have insert sizes of 1.88 and 1.44 kilobases and are aligned at their 5' ends. The polypeptides encoded by the recombinant phage exhibit DNA binding properties similar to those of the cellular factor identified in crude extracts prepared from mammalian cells. Northern analysis with one of the clones revealed an mRNA of 2.8 kilobases that is conserved in humans and rodents. The methods used here should be applicable in studies of other damage-specific DNA binding proteins

  18. Determining Favorable Binding Configurations of the Anti-Cancer Drug Ellipticine to the KV11.1 Potassium Channel V-VI Transmembrane Domain Through Autodock Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Gentile, Saverio; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs that exert their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) > Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal/mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal/mol) > Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). Autodock simulations demonstrate that binding affinity is high at opposing ends of the channel and low within the channel interior. These favorable binding configurations suggest that Ellipticine derivatives may bridge among end subunits of the channel and potentially inhibit the flow of ions.

  19. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies. PMID:26420919

  20. Ampicillin/penicillin-binding protein interactions as a model drug-target system to optimize affinity pull-down and mass spectrometric strategies for target and pathway identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rechenberg, Moritz; Blake, Brian Kelly; Ho, Yew-Seng J; Zhen, Yuejun; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Richardson, Bonnie E; Xu, Nafei; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    The identification and validation of the targets of active compounds identified in cell-based assays is an important step in preclinical drug development. New analytical approaches that combine drug affinity pull-down assays with mass spectrometry (MS) could lead to the identification of new targets and druggable pathways. In this work, we investigate a drug-target system consisting of ampicillin- and penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) to evaluate and compare different amino-reactive resins for the immobilization of the affinity compound and mass spectrometric methods to identify proteins from drug affinity pull-down assays. First, ampicillin was immobilized onto various amino-reactive resins, which were compared in the ampicillin-PBP model with respect to their nonspecific binding of proteins from an Escherichia coli membrane extract. Dynal M-270 magnetic beads were chosen to further study the system as a model for capturing and identifying the targets of ampicillin, PBPs that were specifically and covalently bound to the immobilized ampicillin. The PBPs were identified, after in situ digestion of proteins bound to ampicillin directly on the beads, by using either one-dimensional (1-D) or two-dimensional (2-D) liquid chromatography (LC) separation techniques followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis. Alternatively, an elution with N-lauroylsarcosine (sarcosyl) from the ampicillin beads followed by in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis identified proteins potentially interacting noncovalently with the PBPs or the ampicillin. The in situ approach required only little time, resources, and sample for the analysis. The combination of drug affinity pull-down assays with in situ digestion and 2-D LC-MS/MS analysis is a useful tool in obtaining complex information about a primary drug target as well as its protein interactors. PMID:15761956

  1. Selective binding of antiinfluenza drugs and their analogues to 'open' and 'closed' conformations of H5N1 neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Zhang, John Z H

    2010-10-14

    It was suggested that the open conformation of the 150-loop of H5N1 avian influenza neuraminidase is intrinsically lower in energy than the closed conformation and that oseltamivir (tamiflu) favors binding to the closed conformation through a relatively slow conformational change [Russell, R. J. Nature 2006, 443, 45-49]. In the present work, a systematic computational study is performed to investigate the binding mechanism of five ligands to H5N1 neuraminidase (H5N1 NA) with the 150-loop in both open and closed conformations through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and MM/PBSA free energy calculation. Our result shows that the electrostatic interactions between polar groups on the 150-loop and the charged groups of the ligands play a key role on the binding selectivity. In particular, ligands having a small positively charged group favor binding to the closed conformation of H5N1 NA, while those having a large positively charged group generally prefer binding to the open conformation. Our analysis suggests that it may be possible to design new inhibitors with large basic groups that are selective for the open conformation and thereby have stronger binding affinity to H5N1 neuraminidase. PMID:20860351

  2. Binding of the immunomodulatory drug Bz-423 to mitochondrial FoF1-ATP synthase in living cells by FRET acceptor photobleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Ilka; Johnson, Kathryn M.; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter; Opipari, Anthony W.; Glick, Gary D.; Börsch, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Bz-423 is a promising new drug for treatment of autoimmune diseases. This small molecule binds to subunit OSCP of the mitochondrial enzyme FoF1-ATP synthase and modulates its catalytic activities. We investigate the binding of Bz-423 to mitochondria in living cells and how subunit rotation in FoF1-ATP synthase, i.e. the mechanochemical mechanism of this enzyme, is affected by Bz-423. Therefore, the enzyme was marked selectively by genetic fusion with the fluorescent protein EGFP to the C terminus of subunit γ. Imaging the threedimensional arrangement of mitochondria in living yeast cells was possible at superresolution using structured illumination microscopy, SIM. We measured uptake and binding of a Cy5-labeled Bz-423 derivative to mitochondrial FoF1-ATP synthase in living yeast cells using FRET acceptor photobleaching microscopy. Our data confirmed the binding of Cy5-labeled Bz-423 to the top of the F1 domain of the enzyme in mitochondria of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  3. [Differential diagnosis and therapy of bradycardic arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, P; Jungmair, W; Kaliman, J F

    1994-01-01

    The most important symptoms in bradycardia are vertigo, dizziness and syncopy due to diminished cerebral blood sypply. Cardial symptoms are cardiac insufficiency and angina pectoris. By means of ECG, especially Holter-ECG, carotid sinus massage, atropin test and invasive methods (atrial stimulation, His-bundle ECG) sinu-nodal dysfunction, carotid sinus syndrome, bradyarrhythmia absoluta and AV-block can be diagnosed. Pharmacological treatment is only useful in acute situations. For symptomatic bradyarrhythmias the implantation of a Pacemaker is the therapy of choice. Individual treatment of the various types of bradyarrhythmia and the patients special needs is possible through the evolution of pacemaker technology. PMID:7825327

  4. DNA interstrand cross-links of antitumor platinum drugs and their recognition by DNA-binding proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabec, Viktor; Natile, G.

    Senigallia : Societá Chimica Italiana, 1995, s. SL16. [Greek, Italian, Potuguese, Spanish Meeting in Inorganic Chemistry /3./. Senigallia (IT), 09.06.1995-14.06.1995] Keywords : platinum drugs * interstrand crosslinks * DNA

  5. Differential risk of tuberculosis reactivation among anti-TNF therapies is due to drug binding kinetics and permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased rates of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation have been reported in humans treated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-neutralizing drugs, and higher rates are observed with anti-TNF antibodies (e.g. infliximab) as compared with TNF receptor fusion protein (etanercept). Mechanisms driving differential reactivation rates and differences in drug action are not known. We use a computational model of a TB granuloma formation that includes TNF/TNF receptor dynamics to elucidate these mechanisms...

  6. Affinity Chromatography Method for Determination of Binding of Drugs to Melanin and Evaluation of Side Effect Potential of Antipsychotic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Marszałł, Michał Piotr; Proszowska, Anna; Buciński, Adam; Kaliszan, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The extrapyramidal side effect parameters of typical and atypical antypsychotics were correlated with affinity chromatographic data determined on the melanin-based column. The chromatographic study was performed according to the hypothesis that extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) as side effects of the use of antipsychotic drugs at clinically effective doses are correlated to the affinity of these drugs to neuromelanin. For that aim the polymerization product of L-DOPA (melanin) was immobilized ont...

  7. Fab-mediated binding of drug-dependent antibodies to platelets in quinidine- and quinine-induced thrombocytopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, D J; Mullen, P C; Aster, R H

    1985-01-01

    Platelets coated with quinine- or quinidine-induced antibodies form rosettes around protein A-Sepharose beads and normal platelets form rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with these antibodies. These reactions occurred only in the presence of sensitizing drug. Platelets also formed rosettes about protein A-Sepharose beads coated with an anti-PIA1 antibody, but drug was not required. Formation of rosettes between antibody-coated platelets and protein A-Sepharose was inhibited by F...

  8. Evaluation of the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and dimethyl fumarate, an anti-inflammatory drug by multispectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jattinagoudar, Laxmi; Meti, Manjunath; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa; Chimatadar, Shivamurti

    2016-03-01

    The information of the quenching reaction of bovine serum albumin with dimethyl fumarate is obtained by multi-spectroscopic methods. The number of binding sites, n and binding constants, KA were determined at different temperatures. The effect of increasing temperature on Stern-Volmer quenching constants (KD) indicates that a dynamic quenching mechanism is involved in the interaction. The analysis of thermodynamic quantities namely, ∆H° and ∆S° suggested hydrophobic forces playing a major role in the interaction between dimethyl fumarate and bovine serum albumin. The binding site of dimethyl fumarate on bovine serum albumin was determined by displacement studies, using the site probes viz., warfarin, ibuprofen and digitoxin. The determination of magnitude of the distance of approach for molecular interactions between dimethyl fumarate and bovine serum albumin is calculated according to the theory of Förster energy transfer. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra, synchronous fluorescence measurements and FT-IR spectral results were indicative of the change in secondary structure of the protein. The influence of some of the metal ions on the binding interaction was also studied.

  9. Definition of the G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane bundle binding pocket and calculation of receptor similarities for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David Erik Immanuel; Foord, Steven M; Blaney, Frank E;

    2009-01-01

    currently available crystal structures. This was used to characterize pharmacological relationships of Family A/Rhodopsin family GPCRs, minimizing evolutionary influence from parts of the receptor that do not generally affect ligand binding. The resultant dendogram tended to group receptors according to...

  10. Evaluation of the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and dimethyl fumarate, an anti-inflammatory drug by multispectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jattinagoudar, Laxmi; Meti, Manjunath; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa; Chimatadar, Shivamurti

    2016-03-01

    The information of the quenching reaction of bovine serum albumin with dimethyl fumarate is obtained by multi-spectroscopic methods. The number of binding sites, n and binding constants, KA were determined at different temperatures. The effect of increasing temperature on Stern-Volmer quenching constants (KD) indicates that a dynamic quenching mechanism is involved in the interaction. The analysis of thermodynamic quantities namely, ∆H° and ∆S° suggested hydrophobic forces playing a major role in the interaction between dimethyl fumarate and bovine serum albumin. The binding site of dimethyl fumarate on bovine serum albumin was determined by displacement studies, using the site probes viz., warfarin, ibuprofen and digitoxin. The determination of magnitude of the distance of approach for molecular interactions between dimethyl fumarate and bovine serum albumin is calculated according to the theory of Förster energy transfer. The CD, 3D fluorescence spectra, synchronous fluorescence measurements and FT-IR spectral results were indicative of the change in secondary structure of the protein. The influence of some of the metal ions on the binding interaction was also studied. PMID:26688208

  11. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  12. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  13. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahpour, Nooshin [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, Ahmad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saberi, Mohammad Reza [Department of Medical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chamani, JamshidKhan, E-mail: chamani@ibb.ut.ac.ir [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  14. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  15. Computational fragment-based drug design to explore the hydrophobic sub-pocket of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 allosteric binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguievetskaia, Ksenia; Martin-Chanas, Laetitia; Vorotyntsev, Artem; Doppelt-Azeroual, Olivia; Brotel, Xavier; Adcock, Stewart A; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Delfaud, Francois; Moriaud, Fabrice

    2009-08-01

    Eg5, a mitotic kinesin exclusively involved in the formation and function of the mitotic spindle has attracted interest as an anticancer drug target. Eg5 is co-crystallized with several inhibitors bound to its allosteric binding pocket. Each of these occupies a pocket formed by loop 5/helix alpha2 (L5/alpha2). Recently designed inhibitors additionally occupy a hydrophobic pocket of this site. The goal of the present study was to explore this hydrophobic pocket with our MED-SuMo fragment-based protocol, and thus discover novel chemical structures that might bind as inhibitors. The MED-SuMo software is able to compare and superimpose similar interaction surfaces upon the whole protein data bank (PDB). In a fragment-based protocol, MED-SuMo retrieves MED-Portions that encode protein-fragment binding sites and are derived from cross-mining protein-ligand structures with libraries of small molecules. Furthermore we have excluded intra-family MED-Portions derived from Eg5 ligands that occupy the hydrophobic pocket and predicted new potential ligands by hybridization that would fill simultaneously both pockets. Some of the latter having original scaffolds and substituents in the hydrophobic pocket are identified in libraries of synthetically accessible molecules by the MED-Search software. PMID:19533373

  16. Targeting the Small- and Intermediate-Conductance Ca2+-Activated Potassium Channels: The Drug-Binding Pocket at the Channel/Calmodulin Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Cui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (SK/IK channels play important roles in the regulation of excitable cells in both the central nervous and cardiovascular systems. Evidence from animal models has implicated SK/IK channels in neurological conditions such as ataxia and alcohol use disorders. Further, genome-wide association studies have suggested that cardiovascular abnormalities such as arrhythmias and hypertension are associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms that occur within the genes encoding the SK/IK channels. The Ca2+ sensitivity of the SK/IK channels stems from a constitutively bound Ca2+-binding protein: calmodulin. Small-molecule positive modulators of SK/IK channels have been developed over the past decade, and recent structural studies have revealed that the binding pocket of these positive modulators is located at the interface between the channel and calmodulin. SK/IK channel positive modulators can potentiate channel activity by enhancing the coupling between Ca2+ sensing via calmodulin and mechanical opening of the channel. Here, we review binding pocket studies that have provided structural insight into the mechanism of action for SK/IK channel positive modulators. These studies lay the foundation for structure-based drug discovery efforts that can identify novel SK/IK channel positive modulators. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Dual binding mode of antithyroid drug methimazole to mammalian heme peroxidases - structural determination of the lactoperoxidase-methimazole complex at 1.97 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Singh, Avinash; Sirohi, Harsh Vardhan; Singh, Amit Kumar; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2016-07-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO, EC 1.11.1.7) is a member of the mammalian heme peroxidase family which also includes thyroid peroxidase (TPO). These two enzymes have a sequence homology of 76%. The structure of LPO is known but not that of TPO. In order to determine the mode of binding of antithyroid drugs to thyroid peroxidase, we have determined the crystal structure of LPO complexed with an antithyroid drug, methimazole (MMZ) at 1.97 Å resolution. LPO was isolated from caprine colostrum, purified to homogeneity and crystallized with 20% poly(ethylene glycol)-3350. Crystals of LPO were soaked in a reservoir solution containing MMZ. The structure determination showed the presence of two crystallographically independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. Both molecules contained one molecule of MMZ, but with different orientations. MMZ was held tightly between the heme moiety on one side and the hydrophobic parts of the side chains of Arg255, Glu258, and Leu262 on the opposite side. The back of the cleft contained the side chains of Gln105 and His109 which also interacted with MMZ. In both orientations, MMZ had identical buried areas and formed a similar number of interactions. It appears that the molecules of MMZ can enter the substrate-binding channel of LPO in two opposite orientations. But once they reach the distal heme pocket, their orientations are frozen due to equally tight packing of MMZ in both orientations. This is a novel example of an inhibitor binding to an enzyme with two orientations at the same site with nearly equal occupancies. PMID:27398304

  18. Expanding the druggable space of the LSD1/CoREST epigenetic target: new potential binding regions for drug-like molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C Robertson

    Full Text Available Lysine specific demethylase-1 (LSD1/KDM1A in complex with its corepressor protein CoREST is a promising target for epigenetic drugs. No therapeutic that targets LSD1/CoREST, however, has been reported to date. Recently, extended molecular dynamics (MD simulations indicated that LSD1/CoREST nanoscale clamp dynamics is regulated by substrate binding and highlighted key hinge points of this large-scale motion as well as the relevance of local residue dynamics. Prompted by the urgent need for new molecular probes and inhibitors to understand LSD1/CoREST interactions with small-molecules, peptides, protein partners, and chromatin, we undertake here a configurational ensemble approach to expand LSD1/CoREST druggability. The independent algorithms FTMap and SiteMap and our newly developed Druggable Site Visualizer (DSV software tool were used to predict and inspect favorable binding sites. We find that the hinge points revealed by MD simulations at the SANT2/Tower interface, at the SWIRM/AOD interface, and at the AOD/Tower interface are new targets for the discovery of molecular probes to block association of LSD1/CoREST with chromatin or protein partners. A fourth region was also predicted from simulated configurational ensembles and was experimentally validated to have strong binding propensity. The observation that this prediction would be prevented when using only the X-ray structures available (including the X-ray structure bound to the same peptide underscores the relevance of protein dynamics in protein interactions. A fifth region was highlighted corresponding to a small pocket on the AOD domain. This study sets the basis for future virtual screening campaigns targeting the five novel regions reported herein and for the design of LSD1/CoREST mutants to probe LSD1/CoREST binding with chromatin and various protein partners.

  19. Hernandezine, a Bisbenzylisoquinoline Alkaloid with Selective Inhibitory Activity against Multidrug-Resistance-Linked ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporter ABCB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Sung-Han; Lu, Yu-Jen; Yang, Chun-Chiao; Tuo, Wei-Cherng; Li, Yan-Qing; Huang, Yang-Hui; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Hung, Tai-Ho; Wu, Chung-Pu

    2016-08-26

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug transporter ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, MDR1) is the most studied mechanism of multidrug resistance (MDR), which remains a major obstacle in clinical cancer chemotherapy. Consequently, resensitizing MDR cancer cells by inhibiting the efflux function of ABCB1 has been considered as a potential strategy to overcome ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer patients. However, the task of developing a suitable modulator of ABCB1 has been hindered mostly by the lack of selectivity and high intrinsic toxicity of candidate compounds. Considering the wide range of diversity and relatively nontoxic nature of natural products, developing a potential modulator of ABCB1 from natural sources is particularly valuable. Through screening of a large collection of purified bioactive natural products, hernandezine was identified as a potent and selective reversing agent for ABCB1-mediated MDR in cancer cells. Experimental data demonstrated that the bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid hernandezine is selective for ABCB1, effectively inhibits the transport function of ABCB1, and enhances drug-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. More importantly, hernandezine significantly resensitizes ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to multiple chemotherapeutic drugs at nontoxic, nanomolar concentrations. Collectively, these findings reveal that hernandezine has great potential to be further developed into a novel reversal agent for combination therapy in MDR cancer patients. PMID:27504669

  20. The Trypanocidal Drug Suramin and Other Trypan Blue Mimetics Are Inhibitors of Pyruvate Kinases and Bind to the Adenosine Site*

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Hugh P.; McNae, Iain W.; Nowicki, Matthew W.; Zhong, Wenhe; Michels, Paul A M; Auld, Douglas S.; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A.; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2011-01-01

    Ehrlich's pioneering chemotherapeutic experiments published in 1904 (Ehrlich, P., and Shiga, K. (1904) Berlin Klin. Wochenschrift 20, 329–362) described the efficacy of a series of dye molecules including trypan blue and trypan red to eliminate trypanosome infections in mice. The molecular structures of the dyes provided a starting point for the synthesis of suramin, which was developed and used as a trypanocidal drug in 1916 and is still in clinical use. Despite the biological importance of ...

  1. A Study on Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs by Cyclodextrins and Micelles: Complexation and Binding Characteristics of Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Göktürk

    2012-01-01

    > α-CD. With taking into consideration of solubilization capacity of SDS micelles, it has been found that the solubility enhancement of TMP is much higher than that of SMX in the presence of SDS micelles. The binding constants of SMX and TMP obtained from the Benesi-Hildebrand equation are also confirmed by the estimated surface properties of SDS, employing the surface tension measurements. In order to elucidate the solubilization characteristics the surface tension measurements were also performed for nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. Polarity of the microenvironment and probable location of SMX and TMP were also discussed in the presence of various organic solvents.

  2. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense. PMID:22234525

  3. A simple nonradioactive method for the determination of the binding affinities of antibodies induced by hapten bioconjugates for drugs of abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Oscar B; Antoline, Joshua F G; Li, Fuying; Jalah, Rashmi; Jacobson, Arthur E; Rice, Kenner C; Alving, Carl R; Matyas, Gary R

    2016-02-01

    The accurate analytical measurement of binding affinities of polyclonal antibody in sera to heroin, 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), and morphine has been a challenging task. A simple nonradioactive method that uses deuterium-labeled drug tracers and equilibrium dialysis (ED) combined with ultra performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) to measure the apparent dissociation constant (K d) of antibodies to 6-AM and morphine is described. The method can readily detect antibodies with K d in the low nanomolar range. Since heroin is rapidly degraded in sera, esterase inhibitors were included in the assay, greatly reducing heroin hydrolysis. MS/MS detection directly measured the heroin in the assay after overnight ED, thereby allowing the quantitation of % bound heroin in lieu of K d as an alternative measurement to assess heroin binding to polyclonal antibody sera. This is the first report that utilizes a solution-based assay to quantify heroin-antibody binding without being confounded by the presence of 6-AM and morphine and to measure K d of polyclonal antibody to 6-AM. Hapten surrogates 6-AcMorHap, 6-PrOxyHap, MorHap, DiAmHap, and DiPrOxyHap coupled to tetanus toxoid (TT) were used to generate high affinity antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In comparison to competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS which gave K d values in the nanomolar range, the commonly used competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) measured the 50% inhibition concentration (IC50) values in the micromolar range. Despite the differences in K d and IC50 values, similar trends in affinities of hapten antibodies to heroin, 6-AM, and morphine were observed by both methods. Competition ED-UPLC/MS/MS revealed that among the five TT-hapten bioconjugates, TT-6-AcMorHap and TT-6-PrOxyHap induced antibodies that bound heroin, 6-AM, and morphine. In contrast, TT-MorHap induced antibodies that poorly bound heroin, while TT-DiAmHap and TT-DiPrOxyHap induced antibodies either did not

  4. Metabolic Disposition of Osimertinib in Rats, Dogs, and Humans: Insights into a Drug Designed to Bind Covalently to a Cysteine Residue of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Paul A; Cantarini, Mireille V; Collier, Jo; Frewer, Paul; Martin, Scott; Pickup, Kathryn; Ballard, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies were conducted to determine the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of osimertinib and key metabolites AZ5104 and AZ7550. Osimertinib was designed to covalently bind to epidermal growth factor receptors, allowing it to achieve nanomolar cellular potency (Finlay et al., 2014). Covalent binding was observed in incubations of radiolabeled osimertinib with human and rat hepatocytes, human and rat plasma, and human serum albumin. Osimertinib, AZ5104, and AZ7550 were predominantly metabolized by CYP3A. Seven metabolites were detected in human hepatocytes, also observed in rat or dog hepatocytes at similar or higher levels. After oral administration of radiolabeled osimertinib to rats, drug-related material was widely distributed, with the highest radioactivity concentrations measured at 6 hours postdose in most tissues; radioactivity was detectable in 42% of tissues 60 days postdose. Concentrations of [(14)C]-radioactivity in blood were lower than in most tissues. After the administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg of radiolabeled osimertinib to healthy male volunteers, ∼19% of the dose was recovered by 3 days postdose. At 84 days postdose, mean total radioactivity recovery was 14.2% and 67.8% of the dose in urine and feces. The most abundant metabolite identified in feces was AZ5104 (∼6% of dose). Osimertinib accounted for ∼1% of total radioactivity in the plasma of non-small cell lung cancer patients after 22 days of 80-mg osimertinib once-daily treatment; the most abundant circulatory metabolites were AZ7550 and AZ5104 (<10% of total osimertinib-related material). Osimertinib is extensively distributed and metabolized in humans and is eliminated primarily via the fecal route. PMID:27226351

  5. Novel Hybrid Compound of a Plinabulin Prodrug with an IgG Binding Peptide for Generating a Tumor Selective Noncovalent-Type Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Kyohei; Yakushiji, Fumika; Kawamata, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Daichi; Arima, Risako; Shirasaka, Takuya; Kikkawa, Yamato; Taguchi, Akihiro; Takayama, Kentaro; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Watabe, Tetsuro; Ito, Yuji; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2016-07-20

    Although several approaches for making antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have been developed, it has yet to be reported that an antibody binding peptide such as Z33 from protein A is utilized as the pivotal unit to generate the noncovalent-type ADC (NC-ADC). Herein we aim to establish a novel probe for NC-ADC by synthesizing the Z33-conjugated antitumor agent, plinabulin. Due to the different solubility of two components, including hydrophobic plinabulin and hydrophilic Z33, an innovative method with a solid-supported disulfide coupling reagent is required for the synthesis of the target compounds with prominent efficiency (29% isolated yield). We demonstrate that the synthesized hybrid exhibits a binding affinity against the anti-HER2 antibody (Herceptin) and the anti-CD71 antibody (6E1) (Kd = 46.6 ± 0.5 nM and 4.5 ± 0.56 μM, respectively) in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. In the cell-based assays, the hybrid provides a significant cytotoxicity in the presence of Herceptin against HER2 overexpressing SKBR-3 cells, but not against HER2 low-expressing MCF-7 cells. Further, it is noteworthy that the hybrid in combination with Herceptin induces cytotoxicity against Herceptin-resistant SKBR-3 (SKBR-3HR) cells. Similar results are obtained with the 6E1 antibody, suggesting that the synthesized hybrid can be widely applicable for NC-ADC using the antibody of interest. In summary, a series of evidence presented here strongly indicate that NC-ADCs have high potential for the next generation of antitumor agents. PMID:27304609

  6. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R; Borbat, Peter P; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21-49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21-49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21-49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21-49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5-8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21-49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21-49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation found in certain

  7. Conformational Response of Influenza A M2 Transmembrane Domain to Amantadine Drug Binding at Low pH (pH 5.5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Elka R.; Borbat, Peter P.; Grushin, Kirill; Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Kulkarni, Nichita J.; Liang, Zhichun; Freed, Jack H.

    2016-01-01

    The M2 protein from influenza A plays important roles in its viral cycle. It contains a single transmembrane helix, which oligomerizes into a homotetrameric proton channel that conducts in the low-pH environment of the host-cell endosome and Golgi apparatus, leading to virion uncoating at an early stage of infection. We studied conformational rearrangements that occur in the M2 core transmembrane domain residing on the lipid bilayer, flanked by juxtamembrane residues (M2TMD21−49 fragment), upon its interaction with amantadine drug at pH 5.5 when M2 is conductive. We also tested the role of specific mutation and lipid chain length. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy were applied to M2TMD21−49, labeled at the residue L46C with either nitroxide spin-label or Nanogold® reagent, respectively. Electron microscopy confirmed that M2TMD21−49 reconstituted into DOPC/POPS at 1:10,000 peptide-to-lipid molar ratio (P/L) either with or without amantadine, is an admixture of monomers, dimers, and tetramers, confirming our model based on a dimer intermediate in the assembly of M2TMD21−49. As reported by double electron-electron resonance (DEER), in DOPC/POPS membranes amantadine shifts oligomer equilibrium to favor tetramers, as evidenced by an increase in DEER modulation depth for P/L's ranging from 1:18,000 to 1:160. Furthermore, amantadine binding shortens the inter-spin distances (for nitroxide labels) by 5–8 Å, indicating drug induced channel closure on the C-terminal side. No such effect was observed for the thinner membrane of DLPC/DLPS, emphasizing the role of bilayer thickness. The analysis of continuous wave (cw) ESR spectra of spin-labeled L46C residue provides additional support to a more compact helix bundle in amantadine-bound M2TMD 21−49 through increased motional ordering. In contrast to wild-type M2TMD21−49, the amantadine-bound form does not exhibit noticeable conformational changes in the case of G34A mutation

  8. [(3) H]-L685,458 binding sites are abundant in multiple peripheral organs in rats: implications for safety assessment of putative γ-secretase targeting drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Ling; Mou, Lin; Cai, Yan; Huang, He; Luo, Xue-Gang; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2014-12-01

    γ-Secretase is a multimeric enzyme complex that carries out proteolytic processing to a variety of cellular proteins. It is currently explored as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Mechanism-based toxicity needs to be thoroughly evaluated for γ-secretase inhibitory and/or modulatory drugs. This study comparatively assessed putative γ-secretase catalytic sites in rat peripheral tissues relative to brain and explored an effort of its pharmacological inhibition on hair regeneration. Using [(3) H]-labelled L685,458, a potent γ-secretase inhibitor, as probe, we found more abundant presence of γ-secretase binding sites in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, hair follicle, pituitary gland, ovary and testis, as compared to the brain. Local application of L658,458 delayed vibrissal regrowth following whisker removal. These results suggest that γ-secretase may execute important biological functions in many peripheral systems, as in the brain. The development of γ-secretase inhibitors/modulators for AD and cancer therapy should include close monitoring of toxicological panels for hepatic, gastrointestinal, endocrinal and reproductive functions. PMID:24861611

  9. Pharmacophore Modeling of Nilotinib as an Inhibitor of ATP-Binding Cassette Drug Transporters and BCR-ABL Kinase Using a Three-Dimensional Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla, Suneet; Kouanda, Abdul; Silverton, Latoya; Talele, Tanaji T.; Suresh V Ambudkar

    2014-01-01

    Nilotinib (Tasigna) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved by the FDA to treat chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients. It is also a transport substrate of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporters ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) and ABCG2 (BCRP), which may have an effect on the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of this drug. The goal of this study was to identify pharmacophoric features of nilotinib in order to potentially develop specific inhibitors of BCR-ABL kinase with mi...

  10. Fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α- and γ-mediated gene expression via liver fatty acid binding protein: A signaling path to the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfrum, Christian; Borrmann, Carola M.; Börchers, Torsten; Spener, Friedrich

    2001-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes and target for fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs. How these signaling molecules reach the nuclear receptor is not known; however, similarities in ligand specificity suggest the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) as a possible candidate. In localization studies using laser-scanning microscopy, we show that L-FABP and PPARα colocalize in the nucleus of...

  11. Phenylacetic acids and the structurally related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac bind to specific gamma-hydroxybutyric acid sites in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Høg, Signe; Skonberg, Christian; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a proposed neurotransmitter or neuromodulator with a yet unresolved mechanism of action. GHB binds to both specific high-affinity GHB binding sites and to gamma-aminobutyric acid subtype B (GABA(B)) receptors in the brain. To separate specific GHB effects from G...

  12. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B. Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with ...

  13. Drug development and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2015-10-13

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry has been used for detecting binding events and measuring binding selectivities between chemicals and receptors. XRF may also be used for estimating the therapeutic index of a chemical, for estimating the binding selectivity of a chemical versus chemical analogs, for measuring post-translational modifications of proteins, and for drug manufacturing.

  14. The increased binding affinity of curcumin with human serum albumin in the presence of rutin and baicalin: A potential for drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun; Hao, Ai-Jun; Xu, Liang; Wang, Dan; Ji, Hui; Sun, Shi-Jie; Chen, Bo-Qi; Liu, Bin

    2016-02-01

    The impacts of rutin and baicalin on the interaction of curcumin (CU) with human serum albumin (HSA) were investigated by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies under imitated physiological conditions. The results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA by CU was a simultaneous static and dynamic quenching process, irrespective of the presence or absence of flavonoids. The binding constants between CU and HSA in the absence and presence of rutin and baicalin were 2.268 × 105 M- 1, 3.062 × 105 M- 1, and 3.271 × 105 M- 1, indicating that the binding affinity was increased in the case of two flavonoids. Furthermore, the binding distance determined according to Förster's theory was decreased in the presence of flavonoids. Combined with the fact that flavonoids and CU have the same binding site (site I), it can be concluded that they may simultaneously bind in different regions in site I, and formed a ternary complex of flavonoid-HSA-CU. Meanwhile, the results of fluorescence quenching, CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra revealed that flavonoids further strengthened the microenvironmental and conformational changes of HSA induced by CU binding. Therefore, it is possible to develop a novel complex involving CU, flavonoid and HSA for CU delivery. The work may provide some valuable information in terms of improving the poor bioavailabiliy of CU.

  15. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  16. Deconvolution procedure of the UV-vis spectra. A powerful tool for the estimation of the binding of a model drug to specific solubilisation loci of bio-compatible aqueous surfactant-forming micelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ilaria; Merli, Marcello; Turco Liveri, Maria Liria

    2015-05-01

    UV-vis-spectra evolution of Nile Red loaded into Tween 20 micelles with pH and [Tween 20] have been analysed in a non-conventional manner by exploiting the deconvolution method. The number of buried sub-bands has been found to depend on both pH and bio-surfactant concentration, whose positions have been associated to Nile Red confined in aqueous solution and in the three micellar solubilisation sites. For the first time, by using an extended classical two-pseudo-phases-model, the robust treatment of the spectrophotometric data allows the estimation of Nile Red binding constant to the available loci. Hosting capability towards Nile Red is exalted by the pH enhancement. Comparison between binding constant values classically evaluated and those estimated by the deconvolution protocol unveiled that overall binding values perfectly match with the mean values of the local binding sites. This result suggests that deconvolution procedure provides more precise and reliable values, which are more representative of drug confinement. PMID:25703359

  17. In Vitro Resistance Selections for Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors Give Mutants with Multiple Point Mutations in the Drug-binding Site and Altered Growth*

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Leila S.; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M. P.; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characte...

  18. NUCLEIC-ACID BINDING-DRUGS .10. A THEORETICAL-STUDY OF PROFLAVINE INTERCALATION INTO RNA AND DNA FRAGMENTS - COMPARISON WITH CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, S., Aguilar, J. A., Powner, M. W., Nilsson, M., Morris, G. A. and Sutherland, J. D; Neidle, S

    1984-01-01

    The minimum-energy structure for the interactions of the intercalation drug proflavine with the dinucleoside phosphates cytidylyl-3',5'-guanosine and deoxycytidylyl- 3',5'-deoxyguanosine have been found by means of a combination of computer graphics and empirical energy calculations. The minimum-energy positions for the drug, given the crystallographically observed nucleotide backbone conformations as starting points, are very close to the positions in the crystal structures of the complexes,...

  19. Determination of apparent binding constants of drugs by capillary electrophoresis using beta-cyclodextrin as ligand and three different linear plotting methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellini, M. S.; Deyl, Zdeněk; Manetto, G.; Kohlíčková, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 924, 1-2 (2001), s. 483-491. ISSN 0021-9673 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : binding constants * pharmaceutical analysis * cyclodextrins Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2001

  20. Potent inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase display a two-step, slow-binding inhibition mechanism which is absent in a drug-resistant T66I/M154I mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Edward P; Schwartz, Benjamin; Gartland, Margaret J; Lang, Scott; Halsey, Wendy; Sathe, Ganesh; Carter, H Luke; Weaver, Kurt L

    2009-02-24

    Two-metal binding HIV-1 integrase inhibitors (INIs) are potent inhibitors of HIV-1 in vitro and in patients. We report here for the first time the kinetics of inhibition of integrase-catalyzed strand transfer. First, the IC(50) values for each of six structurally distinct INIs decreased when a preincubation was included: S-1360 (1.3 microM vs 0.12 microM), L-731,988 (130 nM vs 9 nM), L-870,810 (130 nM vs 4 nM), raltegravir (300 nM vs 9 nM), elvitegravir (90 nM vs 6 nM), and GSK364735 (90 nM vs 6 nM). When reactions with these INIs were initiated with integrase, progress curve analyses indicated time-dependent inhibition, which could be fitted to a two-step mechanism of binding. Overall fitted K(i) values matched the IC(50) values measured with a preincubation: S-1360 (0.17 microM), L-731,988 (34 nM), L-870,810 (2.4 nM), raltegravir (10 nM), elvitegravir (4.0 nM), and GSK364735 (2.5 nM). To begin to understand the mechanism for this slow onset of inhibition and its possible impact on drug resistance, studies of resistance mutations were initiated. T66I/M154I exhibited little if any time-dependent inhibition by any of the six INIs, as measured by differences in potency upon preincubation or by progress curve analysis. These data demonstrate that slow binding is a signature of two-metal binding INIs, and that the second slow step is required for full potency. We discuss a possible structural explanation of the second slow step of inhibition and also the relationship between loss of time-dependent inhibition and drug resistance of this important new class of HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs. PMID:19178153

  1. Large-scale integration of small molecule-induced genome-wide transcriptional responses, Kinome-wide binding affinities and cell-growth inhibition profiles reveal global trends characterizing systems-level drug action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eVidovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily accessible. LINCS data include genome-wide transcriptional signatures, biochemical protein binding profiles, cellular phenotypic response profiles and various other datasets for a wide range of cell model systems and molecular and genetic perturbations. Here we present a partial survey of this data facilitated by data standards and in particular a robust compound standardization workflow; we integrated several types of LINCS signatures and analyzed the results with a focus on mechanism of action and chemical compounds. We illustrate how kinase targets can be related to disease models and relevant drugs. We identified some fundamental trends that appear to link Kinome binding profiles and transcriptional signatures to chemical information and biochemical binding profiles to transcriptional responses independent of chemical similarity. To fill gaps in the datasets we developed and applied predictive models. The results can be interpreted at the systems level as demonstrated based on a large number of signaling pathways. We can identify clear global relationships, suggesting robustness of cellular responses to chemical perturbation. Overall, the results suggest that chemical similarity is a useful measure at the systems level, which would support phenotypic drug optimization efforts. With this study we demonstrate the potential of such integrated analysis approaches and suggest prioritizing further experiments to fill the gaps in the current data.

  2. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu JX

    2015-02-01

    2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π–π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood–brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a synergistic effect on platelet aggregation in humans. Moreover, ginger components showed a rapid half-life and no to low toxicity in humans. Taken together, this study shows that ginger components may regulate the activity and expression of various human CYPs, probably resulting in alterations in drug clearance and response. More studies are warranted to identify and confirm potential ginger–drug interactions and explore possible interactions of ginger with human CYPs and other functionally important proteins, to reduce and avoid side effects induced by unfavorable ginger–drug interactions.Keywords: CYP, drug metabolism, ginger, drug interaction, docking

  3. Inhibitory Potential of Antifungal Drugs on ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters P-Glycoprotein, MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempers, Vincent J C; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; Russel, Frans G M; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Burger, David M; Brüggemann, Roger J; Koenderink, Jan B

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of ABC transporters is a common mechanism underlying drug-drug interactions (DDIs). We determined the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs currently used for invasive fungal infections on ABC transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp), MRP1 to MRP5, BCRP, and BSEP in vitro Membrane vesicles isolated from transporter-overexpressing HEK 293 cells were used to investigate the inhibitory potential of antifungal drugs (250 μM) on transport of model substrates. Concentration-inhibition curves were determined if transport inhibition was >60%. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for P-gp and BCRP were both 2 μM for itraconazole, 5 and 12 μM for hydroxyitraconazole, 3 and 6 μM for posaconazole, and 3 and 11 μM for isavuconazole, respectively. BSEP was strongly inhibited by itraconazole and hydroxyitraconazole (3 and 17 μM, respectively). Fluconazole and voriconazole did not inhibit any transport for >60%. Micafungin uniquely inhibited all transporters, with strong inhibition of MRP4 (4 μM). Anidulafungin and caspofungin showed strong inhibition of BCRP (7 and 6 μM, respectively). Amphotericin B only weakly inhibited BCRP-mediated transport (127 μM). Despite their wide range of DDIs, azole antifungals exhibit selective inhibition on efflux transporters. Although echinocandins display low potential for clinically relevant DDIs, they demonstrate potent in vitro inhibitory activity. This suggests that inhibition of ABC transporters plays a crucial role in the inexplicable (non-cytochrome P450-mediated) DDIs with antifungal drugs. PMID:27001813

  4. Evaluating the Immunogenicity of Protein Drugs by Applying In Vitro MHC Binding Data and the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Sinu Paul; Kolla, Ravi V.; John Sidney; Daniela Weiskopf; Ward Fleri; Yohan Kim; Bjoern Peters; Alessandro Sette

    2013-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to become highly specialized in recognizing and responding to pathogens and foreign molecules. Specifically, the function of HLA class II is to ensure that a sufficient sample of peptides derived from foreign molecules is presented to T cells. This leads to an important concern in human drug development as the possible immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals, especially those intended for chronic administration, can lead to reduced efficacy and an undesired safety p...

  5. Genetic Association Analysis of ATP Binding Cassette Protein Family Reveals a Novel Association of ABCB1 Genetic Variants with Epilepsy Risk, but Not with Drug-Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to vari...

  6. Reduced tumorigenicity and drug resistance through the downregulation of octamer-binding protein 4 and Nanog transcriptional factor expression in human breast stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    HUANG, ZHENG-JIE; You, Jun; Luo, Wei-yuan; CHEN, BAI-SHENG; FENG, QING-ZHAO; WU, BING-LIN; Jiang, Long; Luo, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignancy among females. Previous studies examining breast cancer tissue have demonstrated the presence of stem cells, and have detected octamer-binding protein 4 (Oct4) and Nanog transcription factor expression. In the present study, breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) were isolated and enriched from MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, and were defined as MDA-MB-231 stem cells using flow cytometry. The expression of Oct4 and Nanog in breast CSCs were de...

  7. The equilibrium and kinetic drug binding properties of the mouse P-gp1a and P-gp1b P-glycoproteins are similar

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, J. C.; Ferry, D. R.; Higgins, C F; Callaghan, R

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding the multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is duplicated in rodent species and the functional basis for this remains unresolved. Despite a high sequence similarity, the mouse P-gp1a and P-gp1b isoforms show distinct patterns of tissue distribution which suggest a specific role of the P-gp1b isoform in steroid transport. In the present study possible biochemical differences between the isoforms were directly investigated at the level of drug interaction. There was no dete...

  8. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wang, Yuchan; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1(S102) were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1(S102) nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. PMID:27397581

  9. Structure and stability of a DNA triple helix in solution: NMR studies on d(T) sub 6 ter dot d(T) sub 6 and its complex with a minor groove binding drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemoto, Kimiko; Sarma, Mukti H.; Gupta, Goutam; Luo, Jia; Sarma, Ramaswamy H. (State Univ. of New York, Albany (USA))

    1990-05-23

    The possibility of both Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A{center dot}T pairs can result in a triple helical structure for d(T){sub 6}{center dot}d(A){sub 6}{center dot}d(T){sub 6} in solution. In the triple helix the Watson-Crick paired T strand can run antiparallel, while the Hoogsteen paired T strand can run parallel to the A strand. On the basis of 1D/2D NMR studies, we have characterized the structural properties of the triple helix in terms of (a) nature of H-bonding, (b) chain conformations and relative chain orientations, (c) location of triplets T{center dot}A{center dot}T with respect to the helix axis, and (d) effects of NaCl and MgCl{sub 2}. In addition, we experimentally demonstrate that a minor groove specific drug Dst2 (a distamycin analogue) can bind to the triple helix. We show that the nature of thermal transition is altered by Dst2 binding; i.e., the host triple helix shows triple {yields} coil (monophasic) transition in the absence of Dst2, while in its presence the helix shows a triplex {yields} duplex {yields} coil (biphasic) transition.

  10. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabeesh Balan

    Full Text Available Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy; juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy; and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004. This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004 and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05 cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency

  11. Genetic association analysis of ATP binding cassette protein family reveals a novel association of ABCB1 genetic variants with epilepsy risk, but not with drug-resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with greater tendency for MTLE

  12. Genetic Association Analysis of ATP Binding Cassette Protein Family Reveals a Novel Association of ABCB1 Genetic Variants with Epilepsy Risk, but Not with Drug-Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Shabeesh; Bharathan, Sumitha Prameela; Vellichiramal, Neetha Nanoth; Sathyan, Sanish; Joseph, Vijai; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Banerjee, Moinak

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy constitutes a heterogeneous group of disorders that is characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to widely different etiologies. Multidrug resistance remains a major issue in clinical epileptology, where one third of patients with epilepsy continue to have seizures. Role of efflux transporters in multidrug resistant epilepsy has been attributed to drug-resistant epilepsy although, with discrepant observation in genetic studies. These discrepancies could be attributed to variety of factors such as variable definition of the anti-epileptic drug (AED)-resistance, variable epilepsy phenotypes and ethnicities among the studies. In the present study we inquired the role of multidrug transporters ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants in determining AED-resistance and susceptibility to epilepsy in three well-characterized cohorts comprising of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) (prototype for AED-resistant epilepsy); juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) (prototype for AED-responsive epilepsy); and healthy non-epileptic controls, in 738 subjects of Malayalam speaking south Indian ancestry. ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants were not found to be associated with drug resistance when AED-resistant and AED-responsive cohorts were compared. However, a significant association was observed between ABCB1 (C3435T) rs1045642 and risk of having epilepsy (MTLE-HS and JME pooled cohort; genotypic p-value = 0.0002; allelic p-value = 0.004). This association was seen persistent with MTLE-HS (genotypic p-value = 0.0008; allelic p-value = 0.004) and also with JME (genotypic p-value = 0.01; allelic p-value = 0.05) cohort individually. In-silico functional prediction indicated that ABCB1 rs1045642 has a deleterious impact on protein coding function and in splicing regulation. We conclude that the ABCB1 and ABCG2 variants do not confer to AED-resistance in the study population. However, ABCB1 rs1045642 increases vulnerability to epilepsy with

  13. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  14. Analysis of the effect of the bovine adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter G2 single nucleotide polymorphism Y581S on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs using new cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, R; González-Lobato, L; Baro, M F; Valbuena, S; de la Fuente, A; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I; Marques, M M; Merino, G

    2011-12-01

    In commercial dairy production, the risk of drug residues and environmental pollutants in milk from ruminants has become an outstanding problem. One of the main determinants of active drug secretion into milk is the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2/breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2/BCRP). It is located in several organs associated with drug absorption, metabolism, and excretion, and its expression is highly induced during lactation in the mammary gland of ruminants, mice, and humans. As a consequence, potential contamination of milk could expose suckling infants to xenotoxins. In cows, a SNP for this protein affecting quality and quantity of milk production has been described previously (Y581S). In this study, our main purpose was to determine whether this polymorphism has an effect on transcellular transport of veterinary drugs because this could alter substrate pharmacokinetics and milk residues. We stably expressed the wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant in Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells (MDCKII) and MEF3.8 cell lines generating cell models in which the functionality of the bovine transporter could be addressed. Functional studies confirmed the greater functional activity in mitoxantrone accumulation assays for the Y581S variant with a greater relative V(MAX) value (P = 0.040) and showed for the first time that the Y581S variant presents greater transcellular transport of the model ABCG2 substrate nitrofurantoin (P = 0.024) and of 3 veterinary antibiotics, the fluoroquinolone agents enrofloxacin (P = 0.035), danofloxacin (P = 0.001), and difloxacin (P = 0.008), identified as new substrates of the bovine ABCG2. In addition, the inhibitory effect of the macrocyclic lactone ivermectin on the activity of wild-type bovine ABCG2 and the Y581S variant was also confirmed, showing a greater inhibitory potency on the wild-type protein at all the concentrations tested (5 μM, P = 0.017; 10 μM, P = 0.001; 25 μM, P = 0.008; and 50 μM, P = 0

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Abuse Hurts Other People Drug Abuse Hurts Families Drug Abuse Hurts Kids Drug Abuse Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts Your Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental ...

  16. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Drug Abuse Hurts Kids Drug Abuse Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts Your Health Drug Abuse Hurts ... and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  17. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... People Drug Abuse Hurts Families Drug Abuse Hurts Kids Drug Abuse Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts ... Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What To Say if You Were ...

  18. Clinical value of a new TSH binding inihibitory activity assay using human TSH receptors in the follow-up of antithyroid drug treated Graves' disease. Comparison with thyroid stimulating antibody bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugendre, D; Massart, C

    2001-01-01

    First, to evaluate the performance level of a new TSH binding inhibitory antibody assay using human recombinant TSH receptors (h-TBII) in comparison with a thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) bioassay performed before, at the end of treatment (18 months) and after antithyroid drug withdrawal in Graves' disease patients; second, to assess the accuracy with which h-TBII levels could predict relapse and remission. Retrospective study on serum samples of Graves' disease patients treated by antithyroid drugs for 18 months. Serum samples from 140 patients (27 men and 113 women; median age 42 years) with recent onset hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease were retrospectively tested for h-TBII at diagnosis, at 18 months and for 76 of them 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after drug withdrawal or at relapse. TSAb were also evaluated at each time. Thyroid blocking antibodies (TBAb) were measured in sera positive for h-TBII and negative for TSAb. h-TBII levels were measured with a radioreceptor assay using the human recombinant TSH receptor (DYNOtest TRAK human from B.R.A.H.M.S. Diagnostica, Berlin, Germany). TSAb and TBAb levels were assayed in thyrocyte cultures. At diagnosis, high levels of h-TBII were found in 138 of 140 patients with Graves' disease (98.6%). High TSAb values were also detected in the same 138 patients. The h-TBII and TSAb values were significantly correlated (r = 0.582, p tested patients who relapsed were negative for h-TBII at 18 months, were then positive for h-TBII at the time of relapse, whereas 15 of them were still negative, 6-12 months before the relapse. Among the 80 patients who remained in remission at 3 years, only 10 (13%) displayed TSAb and 12 (15%) h-TBII at 18 months. In 10 of these 12 patients who were further evaluated for h-TBII positivity, h-TBII fell to control levels during the 3 years following the end of treatment. The new h-TBII assay is a simple and rapid method with a performance level similar to that of TSAb determination. Its

  19. Aptamers as Both Drugs and Drug-Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ashrafuzzaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short nucleic acid oligos. They may serve as both drugs and drug-carriers. Their use as diagnostic tools is also evident. They can be generated using various experimental, theoretical, and computational techniques. The systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment which uses iterative screening of nucleic acid libraries is a popular experimental technique. Theory inspired methodology entropy-based seed-and-grow strategy that designs aptamer templates to bind specifically to targets is another one. Aptamers are predicted to be highly useful in producing general drugs and theranostic drugs occasionally for certain diseases like cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and so on. They bind to various targets like lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, small organic compounds, and even entire organisms. Aptamers may also serve as drug-carriers or nanoparticles helping drugs to get released in specific target regions. Due to better target specific physical binding properties aptamers cause less off-target toxicity effects. Therefore, search for aptamer based drugs, drug-carriers, and even diagnostic tools is expanding fast. The biophysical properties in relation to the target specific binding phenomena of aptamers, energetics behind the aptamer transport of drugs, and the consequent biological implications will be discussed. This review will open up avenues leading to novel drug discovery and drug delivery.

  20. Metallomics in drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Trinh Thi Nhu Tam; Ostergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan;

    2013-01-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation...... to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before...... and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics....

  1. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [3]tetrahydrotrazodone ([3] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [3]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [3] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [3]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abuse Hurts Unborn Children Drug Abuse Hurts Your Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  3. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Addiction? Addiction Risk Factors Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Abuse Hurts Other People Drug Abuse Hurts Families Drug Abuse Hurts Kids Drug Abuse Hurts Unborn ...

  4. Drug: D05393 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e conditions (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease) [binds and therapy inhi...hsa05323(7124) Rheumatoid arthritis Target-based classification of drugs [BR:br08310] Cytokines TNF family T

  5. Drug: D07657 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D07657 Drug Ceftiofur (INN); Naxcel [veterinary] (TN) C19H17N5O7S3 523.029 523.5626... D07657.gif Antibiotic [veterinary] Cephalosporins penicillin binding proteins inhibitor ko00550 Peptidoglyc

  6. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Abuse and HIV/AIDS Recovery & Treatment Drug Treatment Facts Does Drug Treatment Work? Types of Drug Treatment What Is a Relapse? ...

  7. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... vomiting to life-threatening anaphylaxis . A true drug allergy is caused by a series of chemical steps ...

  8. Anti-Microtubule Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Stefan; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule drugs that target microtubules (MTs), many of them natural products, have long been important tools in the MT field. Indeed, tubulin (Tb) was discovered, in part, as the protein binding partner of colchicine. Several anti-MT drug classes also have important medical uses, notably colchicine, which is used to treat gout, familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and pericarditis, and the vinca alkaloids and taxanes, which are used to treat cancer. Anti-MT drugs have in common that they bind specifically to Tb in the dimer, MT or some other form. However, their effects on polymerization dynamics and on the human body differ markedly. Here we briefly review the most-studied molecules, and comment on their uses in basic research and medicine. Our focus is on practical applications of different anti-MT drugs in the laboratory, and key points that users should be aware of when designing experiments. We also touch on interesting unsolved problems, particularly in the area of medical applications. In our opinion, the mechanism by which any MT drug cures or treats any disease is still unsolved, despite decades of research. Solving this problem for particular drug-disease combinations might open new uses for old drugs, or provide insights into novel routes for treatment. PMID:27193863

  9. Drug Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... text to you. This web site talks about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ... of the drug. "Max" was addicted to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different ...

  10. Generic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... name drug. A brand- name drug has a patent. When the patent runs out— usually after 10 to 14 years— ... if you do not have drug coverage. Condition Diabetes Heart failure High cholesterol Migraine Brand-name drug ...

  11. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Drug Abuse Hurts Other People Drug Abuse Hurts Families Drug Abuse Hurts Kids Drug Abuse Hurts Unborn Children ... a Relapse? Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Friends and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free ...

  12. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials

  13. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  14. Ligand Binding Analysis and Screening by Chemical Denaturation Shift

    OpenAIRE

    Sch n, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M.; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Towards this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Since ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization ef...

  15. Drug transporters in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kümler, Iben; Stenvang, Jan; Moreira, José;

    2015-01-01

    basis. Although effective, their usefulness is limited by the inevitable development of resistance, a lack of response to drug-induced cancer cell death. A large body of research has resulted in the characterization of a plethora of mechanisms involved in resistance; ATP-binding cassette transporter...... proteins, through their function in xenobiotic clearance, play an important role in resistance. We review here the current evidence for drug transporters as biomarkers and the benefit of adding drug transporter modulators to conventional chemotherapy....

  16. PoSSuM: a database of similar protein–ligand binding and putative pockets

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Tabei, Yasuo; Shimizu, Kana; Tsuda, Koji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    Numerous potential ligand-binding sites are available today, along with hundreds of thousands of known binding sites observed in the PDB. Exhaustive similarity search for such vastly numerous binding site pairs is useful to predict protein functions and to enable rapid screening of target proteins for drug design. Existing databases of ligand-binding sites offer databases of limited scale. For example, SitesBase covers only ∼33 000 known binding sites. Inferring protein function and drug disc...

  17. Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Search Search close Teens Teachers Parents Drugs & Health Blog NDAFW Enter Search Term(s): Teens / Drug Facts / Prescription Drugs Prescription Drugs Print What Is Prescription Drug Abuse? Also known as: Opioids: Hillbilly heroin, oxy, OC, oxycotton, percs, happy pills, vikes Depressants: ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Work? Types of Drug Treatment What Is a Relapse? Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Friends and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What To Say if You Were Once Addicted Drug Abuse Prevention Phone ... English ...

  19. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can cause serious health problems and sometimes death. ...

  20. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Drug Abuse Hurts Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental Health Problems Often Happen ... of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency of the United States Government. NIH is ...

  1. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice Drugged Driving Drug Testing Drugs and the ... Learn more Statistics and Trends Swipe left or right to scroll. Monitoring the Future Study: Trends in ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  4. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as gingko and blood thinners ...

  5. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  6. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Nikolaus; Beate Strehlitz

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminog...

  7. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  8. Dendrimers in drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2004-01-01

    and in vivo cytotoxicity, as well as biopermeability, biostability and immunogenicity. The review deals with numerous applications of dendrimers as tools for efficient multivalent presentation of biological ligands in biospecific recognition, inhibition and targeting. Dendrimers may be used as drugs...... for antibacterial and antiviral treatment and have found use as antitumor agents. The review highlights the use of dendrimers as drug or gene delivery devices in e.g. anticancer therapy, and the design of different host-guest binding motifs directed towards medical applications is described. Other specific examples...

  9. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Kejian Wang; Jiazhi Sun; Shufeng Zhou; Chunling Wan; Shengying Qin; Can Li; Lin He; Lun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore develop...

  10. UNIQUE ORAL DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raphael M. Ottenbrite; ZHAO Ruifeng; Sam Milstein

    1995-01-01

    An oral drug delivery system using proteinoid microspheres is discussed with respect to its unique dependence on pH. It has been found that certain drugs such as insulin and heparin can be encapsulated in proteinoid spheres at stomach pH's (1-3). These spheres also dissemble at intestinal pH's (6-7) releasing the drug for absorption. Using this technique low molecular weight heparin and human growth hormone have been orally delivered successfully to several animal species. Future work has been proposed to study the interaction and binding of the specific drugs with synthesized oligopeptides.

  11. Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... text to you. This web site talks about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ... of the drug. "Max" was addicted to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different ...

  13. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, Michael J.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Laggner, Christian; Abbas, Atheir; Hufeisen, Sandra J.; Jensen, Niels H.; Kuijer, Michael B.; Matos, Roberto C.; Tran, Thuy B.; Whaley, Ryan; Glennon, Richard A.; Hert, Jérôme; THOMAS, KELAN L. H.; Edwards, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiologic targets, explaining both side effects and efficacy. As many drug-target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible interactions computationally. Here, we compared 3,665 FDA-approved and investigational drugs against hundreds of targets, defining each target by its ligands. Chemical similarities between drugs and ligand sets predicted thousands of unanticipated associations. Thirty were tested...

  14. Paracetamol and cytarabine binding competition in high affinity binding sites of transporting protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2006-07-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen, AA) the most popular analgesic drug is commonly used in the treatment of pain in patients suffering from cancer. In our studies, we evaluated the competition in binding with serum albumin between paracetamol (AA) and cytarabine, antyleukemic drug (araC). The presence of one drug can alter the binding affinity of albumin towards the second one. Such interaction can result in changing of the free fraction of the one of these drugs in blood. Two spectroscopic methods were used to determine high affinity binding sites and the competition of the drugs. Basing on the change of the serum albumin fluorescence in the presence of either of the drugs the quenching ( KQ) constants for the araC-BSA and AA-BSA systems were calculated. Analysis of UV difference spectra allowed us to describe the changes in drug-protein complexes (araC-albumin and AA-albumin) induced by the presence of the second drug (AA and araC, respectively). The mechanism of competition between araC and AA has been proposed.

  15. Pharmacosomes: A Potential Vesicular Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nagasamy Venkatesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lipid based drug delivery systems have been examined in various studies and exhibited their potential in controlled and targeted drug delivery. Pharmacosomes, a novel vesicular drug delivery system, offering a unique advantage over liposomes and niosomes, and serve as potential alternative to these conventional vesicles. They constitute an amphiphilic phospholipid complex with drug bearing an active hydrogen atom covalently that bind to phospholipids. They provide an efficient delivery of drug required at the site of action, which ultimately reduces the drug toxicity with reduced adverse effects and also reduces the cost of therapy by imparting better biopharmaceutical properties to the drug, resulting in increases bioavailability, especially in case of poorly soluble drugs. As the system is formed by binding the drug (pharmakon to carrier (soma, they are termed as pharmacosomes. Depending upon the chemical structure of the drug lipid complex they may exist as ultrafine vesicular, micellar and hexagonal aggregate. Drug having active hydrogen group such as carboxyl, hydroxyl group can be esterified to lipids, resulting in amphiphilic compound. Pharmacosomes are widely used as carriers for various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proteins, cardiovascular and antineoplastic drugs. The release of drug from pharmacosomes is generally governed by the process of enzymatic reaction and acid hydrolysis. Here, in the present review paper we have discussed the potential of pharmacosomes as a controlled and targeted drug delivery system and highlighted the method of preparation and characterization.

  16. Analgesic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Kerec Kos, Mojca

    2015-01-01

    In the management of pain analgesic drugs are chosen regarding the intensity and type of pain. The selection of analgesic drug depends on pharmacokinetic properties of the drug and available pharmaceutical dosage forms. Beside non-opioid analgesics (non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, acetaminophen), opioid analgesic drugs have an important role in the treatment of pain. Pri zdravljenju bolečine izberemo analgetik glede na jakost in vrsto bolečine. Na izbiro ustreznega analgetika vplivaj...

  17. Cancer Drug-Resistance and a Look at Specific Proteins: Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor 2, Y-Box Binding Protein 1, and HSP70/90 Organizing Protein in Proteomics Clinical Application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Skalníková, Helena; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Halada, Petr; Dziechciarková, M.; Hajdúch, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Hammar, A.; Enetoft, D.; Ekefjard, A.; Forsstrom-Olsson, O.; Kovářová, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2011), s. 404-415. ISSN 1535-3893 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Grant ostatní: Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : cancer * anti-cancer drugs * drug resistance Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.113, year: 2011

  18. Protein-ligand binding affinities from large-scale quantum mechanical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate prediction of protein-drug binding affinities is a major aim of computational drug optimisation and development. A quantitative measure of binding affinity is provided by the free energy of binding, and such calculations typically require extensive configurational sampling of entities such as proteins with thousands of atoms. Current binding free energy methods use force fields to perform the configurational sampling and to compute interaction energies. Due to the empirical natur...

  19. Effects of Cu(II) and cisplatin on the stability of Specific protein 1 (Sp1)-DNA binding: Insights into the regulation of copper homeostasis and platinum drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Aiba, Isamu; Chen, Helen H W; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-08-01

    The human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) transports both Cu(I) and cisplatin (cDDP). Because Cu deficiency is lethal yet Cu overload is poisonous, hCtr1 expression is transcriptionally upregulated in response to Cu deficiency but is downregulated under Cu replete conditions in controlling Cu homeostasis. The up- and down-regulation of hCtr1 is regulated by Specific protein 1 (Sp1), which itself is also correspondingly regulated under these Cu conditions. hCtr1 expression is also upregulated by cDDP via upregulation of Sp1. The underlying mechanisms of these regulations are unknown. Using gel-electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated here that Sp1-DNA binding affinity is reduced under Cu replete conditions but increased under reduced Cu conditions. Similarly, Sp1-DNA binding affinity is increased by cDDP treatment. This in vitro system demonstrated, for the first time, that regulation of Sp1/hCtr1 expression by these agents is modulated by the stability of Sp1-DNA binding, the first step in the Sp1-mediated transcriptional regulation process. PMID:27172866

  20. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) ... addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other ...

  2. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, ... and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bodies Drug Abuse Hurts Brains Drug Abuse and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between ... This Website Tools and Resources | Contact Us | Site Map | Accessibility | Privacy | FOIA (NIH) The National Institute on ...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) ... and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs ...

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco ... 662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter ...

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? Do You or a Loved ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts Meth ( ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Abuse Alcohol Facts Cigarette and Tobacco Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that ... about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain ...

  12. Evaluation of drug interactions with nanofibrillar cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolakovic, Ruzica; Peltonen, Leena; Laukkanen, Antti; Hellman, Maarit; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-11-01

    Nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) (also referred to as cellulose nanofibers, nanocellulose, microfibrillated, or nanofibrillated cellulose) has recently gotten wide attention in various research areas and it has also been studied as excipient in formulation of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. Here, we have evaluated the interactions between NFC and the model drugs of different structural characteristics (size, charge, etc.). The series of permeation studies were utilized to evaluate the ability of the drugs in solution to diffuse through the thin, porous, dry NFC films. An incubation method was used to determine capacity of binding of chosen model drugs to NFC as well as isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to study thermodynamics of the binding process. A genetically engineered fusion protein carrying double cellulose binding domain was used as a positive control since its affinity and capacity of binding for NFC have already been reported. The permeation studies revealed the size dependent diffusion rate of the model drugs through the NFC films. The results of both binding and ITC studies showed that the studied drugs bind to the NFC material and indicated the pH dependence of the binding and electrostatic forces as the main mechanism. PMID:23774185

  13. Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Justinova, Zuzana; Panlilio, Leigh V; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Many drugs of abuse, including cannabinoids, opioids, alcohol and nicotine, can alter the levels of endocannabinoids in the brain. Recent studies show that release of endocannabinoids in the ventral tegmental area can modulate the reward-related effects of dopamine and might therefore be an important neurobiological mechanism underlying drug addiction. There is strong evidence that the endocannabinoid system is involved in drug-seeking behavior (especially behavior that is reinforced by drug-...

  14. Medicaid Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Poisal, John A.

    2004-01-01

    The following commentary unites a collection of articles primarily concerned with prescription drug issues in Medicaid. It also features highlights from a piece outlining Australia's pharmaceutical delivery system. Specifically, in this issue, you will find comprehensive analyses of drug expenditure trends, issues regarding access to pharmaceuticals in Medicaid, and an evaluation of ongoing generic drug cost-containment programs.

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you. This web site talks about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin ... HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. ... addiction. Counseling is very helpful to her. All I ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near ... different people around me. To stop using marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. ...

  17. Drug allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  18. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  19. Drug: D10029 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10029 Drug Verubulin (USAN/INN) C17H17N3O 279.1372 279.3364 D10029.gif Treatment of cancer tubu ... lin polymerization ... inhibitor Verubulin binds to the same sites on bet ... n as Colchicine [DR:D00570]. beta-tubulin, tubulin polymerization ... inhibitor [HSA:10381 10382 10383 203068 347688 347 ...

  20. Drug: D10149 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D10149 Drug Patiromer calcium (USAN) [(C3H2FO2)182. (C10H10)8. (C8H14)10. Ca91]n Treatment of hy ... perkalemia potassium binding polymer ... CAS: 1208912-84-8 PubChem: 135626867 ...

  1. Drug: D03429 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03429 Drug Cefquinome sulfate (USAN) C23H25N6O5S2. H2SO4 627.1002 627.6903 D03429.gif Antibacte ... rial [veterinary ] Cephalosporins penicillin binding proteins inhibi ... ins inhibitor Cephems - Cephalosporins Cefquinome; Veterinary ... D03429 Cefquinome sulfate (USAN) CAS: 118443-89-3 ...

  2. Drug: D01682 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01682 Drug Ceftiofur sodium (JAN/USAN); Ceftiofur sodium (TN) C19H16N5O7S3. Na 545.011 545.5444 ... D01682.gif Antibacterial [veterinary ] Same as: C13143 Cephalosporins penicillin binding ... eins inhibitor Cephems - Cephalosporins Ceftiofur; Veterinary ... D01682 Ceftiofur sodium (JAN/USAN) CAS: 104010-37- ...

  3. Drug: D03430 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03430 Drug Ceftiofur hydrochloride (USAN) C19H17N5O7S3. HCl 559.0057 560.0235 D03430.gif Antiba ... cterial [veterinary ] Cephalosporins penicillin binding proteins inhibi ... eins inhibitor Cephems - Cephalosporins Ceftiofur; Veterinary ... D03430 Ceftiofur hydrochloride (USAN) CAS: 103980- ...

  4. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  5. COPD - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  6. Role of Molecular Dynamics and Related Methods in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vivo, Marco; Masetti, Matteo; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Cavalli, Andrea

    2016-05-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and related methods are close to becoming routine computational tools for drug discovery. Their main advantage is in explicitly treating structural flexibility and entropic effects. This allows a more accurate estimate of the thermodynamics and kinetics associated with drug-target recognition and binding, as better algorithms and hardware architectures increase their use. Here, we review the theoretical background of MD and enhanced sampling methods, focusing on free-energy perturbation, metadynamics, steered MD, and other methods most consistently used to study drug-target binding. We discuss unbiased MD simulations that nowadays allow the observation of unsupervised ligand-target binding, assessing how these approaches help optimizing target affinity and drug residence time toward improved drug efficacy. Further issues discussed include allosteric modulation and the role of water molecules in ligand binding and optimization. We conclude by calling for more prospective studies to attest to these methods' utility in discovering novel drug candidates. PMID:26807648

  7. Orphan drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goločorbin-Kon Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. The beginning of orphan drugs development. This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the ”Orphan Drug Act” was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. Conclusion. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 41012

  8. Study Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... messages back and forth by releasing chemicals called neurotransmitters. Prescription stimulants have chemical structures that are similar to some neurotransmitters. When someone takes them, the drugs boost the ...

  9. Probing the binding of coumarins and cyclothialidines to DNA gyrase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Gormley, N A; Tranter, R;

    1999-01-01

    DNA gyrase is the target of a number of antibacterial agents, including the coumarins and the cyclothialidines. To extend our understanding of the mechanism of action of these compounds, we have examined the previously published crystal structures of the complexes between the 24 kDa fragment of Gyr......, suggesting a drug-induced conformational change. The ability of the mutants to bind the drugs was studied by testing their ability to induce the coumarin-associated proteolytic signature and to bind to a novobiocin-affinity column. To analyze further the interaction of the drugs with gyrase, we studied the...

  10. Characterizing Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Binding to Human Serum Albumin by Spin-Labeling and EPR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenschild, Till; Reichenwallner, Jörg; Enkelmann, Volker; Hinderberger, Dariush

    2016-08-26

    Drug binding to human serum albumin (HSA) has been characterized by a spin-labeling and continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectroscopic approach. Specifically, the contribution of functional groups (FGs) in a compound on its albumin-binding capabilities is quantitatively described. Molecules from different drug classes are labeled with EPR-active nitroxide radicals (spin-labeled pharmaceuticals (SLPs)) and in a screening approach CW-EPR spectroscopy is used to investigate HSA binding under physiological conditions and at varying ratios of SLP to protein. Spectral simulations of the CW-EPR spectra allow extraction of association constants (KA ) and the maximum number (n) of binding sites per protein. By comparison of data from 23 SLPs, the mechanisms of drug-protein association and the impact of chemical modifications at individual positions on drug uptake can be rationalized. Furthermore, new drug modifications with predictable protein binding tendency may be envisaged. PMID:27460503

  11. Drug Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... WITH HIV MEDICATIONS? Protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are processed by the liver and cause many ... taken with any protease inhibitor or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor. You can also check for drug-drug and ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Cocaine Heroin Marijuana Meth Pain Medicines Tobacco ... of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft ...

  13. DRUG METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Singla

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The termmetabolism, derived from the Greek language, simply means change or transformation. It relates to various processes within the body that convert food and other substances into energy and other metabolic byproducts used by the body. Drug metabolism is the body’s way of transforming drugs, so they can be excreted from the body. Many drugs arenot active until they have been metabolized in the body by enzymes that transform them. Most drugs are lipophilic, meaning they pass through membranes to reach their target site. Most drugs are treated by the body like foreign substances, also known as xenobiotics. Humans have evolved a complex system for xenobiotic metabolism. 

  14. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    OpenAIRE

    Jarecka, Dorota; Arabas, Sylwester; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python ...

  15. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  16. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    CERN Document Server

    Jarecka, Dorota; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python bindings to access libcloudph++ from Fortran is presented.

  17. On the accessibility of surface-bound drugs on magnetic nanoparticles. Encapsulation of drugs loaded on modified dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide by β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, Natesan; Yousuf, Sameena; Israel, Enoch V M V; Paulraj, Mosae Selvakumar; Dhanaraj, Premnath

    2016-05-01

    We report the loading of drugs on aminoethylaminodextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, their superparamagnetic behavior, loading of drugs on them, and the β-cyclodextrin-complex formation of the drugs on the surface of the nanoparticles. The magnetic behavior is studied using vibrating sample magnetometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to analyze the elemental composition of drug-loaded nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy shows ordered structures of drug-loaded nanoparticles. UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy are used to study the binding of the surface-loaded drugs to β-cyclodextrin. All of the drugs form 1:1 host-guest complexes. The iodide ion quenching of fluorescence of free- and iron oxide-attached drugs are compared. The binding strengths of the iron oxide surface-loaded drugs-β-cyclodextrin binding are smaller than those of the free drugs. PMID:26895504

  18. Drug-resin drug interactions in patients with delayed gastric emptying: What is optimal time window for drug administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, M

    2016-08-01

    Most drug-drug interactions involve overlap or competition in drug metabolic pathways. However, there are medications, typically resins, whose function is to bind injurious substances such as bile acids or potassium within the digestive tract. The objective of this article is to review the functions of the stomach and the kinetics of emptying of different food forms or formulations to make recommendations on timing of medication administration in order to avoid intragastric drug interactions. Based on the profiles and kinetics of emptying of liquid nutrients and homogenized solids, a window of 3 h between administration of a resin drug and another 'target' medication would be expected to allow a median of 80% of medications with particle size interaction such as binding of the 'target' medication within the stomach. PMID:26987693

  19. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  20. Albumin-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Maja Thim; Kuhlmann, Matthias; Hvam, Michael Lykke;

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of a drug is dependent on accumulation at the site of action at therapeutic levels, however, challenges such as rapid renal clearance, degradation or non-specific accumulation requires drug delivery enabling technologies. Albumin is a natural transport protein with multiple ligand...... binding sites, cellular receptor engagement, and a long circulatory half-life due to interaction with the recycling neonatal Fc receptor. Exploitation of these properties promotes albumin as an attractive candidate for half-life extension and targeted intracellular delivery of drugs attached by covalent...... conjugation, genetic fusions, association or ligand-mediated association. This review will give an overview of albumin-based products with focus on the natural biological properties and molecular interactions that can be harnessed for the design of a next-generation drug delivery platform....

  1. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  2. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  3. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ... marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who ...

  5. Antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Erik

    2010-10-01

    In October 2010, it will be exactly 25 years ago that the first antiretroviral drug, AZT (zidovudine, 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine), was described. It was the first of 25 antiretroviral drugs that in the past 25 years have been formally licensed for clinical use. These antiretroviral drugs fall into seven categories [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), protease inhibitors (PIs), fusion inhibitors (FIs), co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). The INIs (i.e. raltegravir) represent the most recent advance in the search for effective and selective anti-HIV agents. Combination of several anti-HIV drugs [often referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)] has drastically altered AIDS from an almost uniformly fatal disease to a chronic manageable one. PMID:20471318

  6. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that says "Listen" ... the computer will read the text to you. This web site talks about drug abuse, addiction and ...

  7. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... following information: Facts and Figures – Includes the latest information and statistics. Legislation – A sample of links to online Federal and ... recognized agencies and organizations that provide services or information. CLUB DRUGS Summary Facts & ... & Technical Assistance Grants & Funding Related ...

  8. Drug abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of cocaine may need larger amounts of the drug to feel these effects. Regular users of cocaine may develop: Loss of interest in school, work, family, and friends Memory loss Mood swings Sleep problems ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that says "Listen" on any page and the computer will read the text to you. This web ... The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , the ...

  10. Drug dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problem or risky use. The user loses any motivation; does not care about school and work; has ... withdrawal. Most employers offer referral services for their employees with substance use problems. Prevention Drug education programs ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... computer will read the text to you. This web site talks about drug abuse, addiction and treatment. ... of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft ...

  12. DNA binding studies of Vinca alkaloids: experimental and computational evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Prateek; Gupta, Surendra P; Pandav, Kumud; Barthwal, Ritu; Jayaram, B; Kumar, Surat

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence studies on the indole alkaloids vinblastine sulfate, vincristine sulfate, vincamine and catharanthine have demonstrated the DNA binding ability of these molecules. The binding mode of these molecules in the minor groove of DNA is non-specific. A new parameter of the purine-pyrimidine base sequence specificty was observed in order to define the non-specific DNA binding of ligands. Catharanthine had shown 'same' pattern of 'Pu-Py' specificity while evaluating its DNA binding profile. The proton resonances of a DNA decamer duplex were assigned. The models of the drug:DNA complexes were analyzed for DNA binding features. The effect of temperature on the DNA binding was also evaluated. PMID:22545401

  13. Ligand binding studies in the mouse olfactory bulb: identification and characterisation of a L-[3H]carnosine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding sites for the dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-t-histidine) have been detected in membranes prepared from mouse olfactory bulbs. The binding of L-[3H]- carnosine was saturable, reversible and stereospecific and had a Ksub(d) of about 770 nM. The stereospecific binding of L-carnosine represented about 30% of the totoal binding at pH 6.8, and decreased markedly with increasing pH. Binding was stimulated by calcium, unaffected by zinc, magnesium or manganese and inhibted by sodium and potassium. Carnosine binding was sensitive to trypsin and phospholipases A and C, but not to neuraminidase. Nystatin and filipin, which interact with membrane lipids, also interfered with binding. Some peptide analogues of carnosine were potent inhibitors of binding, but a variety of drugs serving as potent inhibitors in other binding systems had no effect on carnosine binding. Carnosine binding to mouse olfactory bulb membranes was 15-fold higher than that seen in membranes prepared from cerebral hemispheres, 5-fold higher than in cerebellum membranes and 3-fold higher than in membranes from spinal medulla and the olfactory tubercle-lateral olfactory tract area. (Auth.)

  14. Drug allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Warrington Richard; Silviu-Dan Fanny

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR) not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis a...

  15. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs include Amphetamines Anabolic steroids Club drugs Cocaine Heroin Inhalants Marijuana Prescription drugs There are different ...

  16. Drug: D03674 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03674 Drug Enoxaparin sodium (JAN/USAN/INN); Lovenox (TN) Antithrombotic intended ...olism 33 Blood and body fluid agents 333 Anticoagulants 3334 Heparins D03674 Enoxaparin sodium (JAN/USAN/INN...ITHROMBOTIC AGENTS B01A ANTITHROMBOTIC AGENTS B01AB Heparin group B01AB05 Enoxaparin D0367...lume Expanders Anticoagulants Enoxaparin D03674 Enoxaparin sodium (JAN/USAN/INN) Target-based classification... of drugs [BR:br08310] Others Heparin binding proteins antithrombin III [HSA:462] [KO:K03911] Enoxaparin [ATC:B01AB05] D0367

  17. Differential binding of 3H-imipramine and 3H-mianserin in rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug competition profiles, effect of raphe lesion, and sodium dependency of the binding of two antidepressant drugs 3H-imipramine and 3H-mianserin to rat cerebral cortex homogenate were compared to examine whether the drugs bound to a common ''antidepressant receptor.'' Of the neurotransmitters tested, only serotonin displaced binding of both 3H-imipramine and 3H-mianserin. 3H-Mianserin binding was potently displaced by serotonin S2 antagonists and exhibited a profile similar to that of 3H-spiperone binding. In the presence of the serotonin S2 antagonist spiperone, antihistamines (H1) potently displaced 3H-mianserin binding. 3H-Imipramine binding was displaced potently by serotonin uptake inhibitors. The order of potency of serotonergic drugs in displacing 3H-imipramine binding was not similar to their order in displacing 3H-spiperone or -3H-serotonin binding. Prior midbrain raphe lesions greatly decreased the binding of 3H-imipramine but did not alter binding of 3H-mianserin. Binding of 3H-imipramine but not 3H-mianserin was sodium dependent. These results show that 3H-imipramine and 3H-mianserin bind to different receptors. 3H-Imipramine binds to a presynaptic serotonin receptor which is probably related to a serotonin uptake recognition site, the binding of which is sodium dependent. 3H-Mianserin binds to postsynaptic receptors, possibly both serotonin S2 and histamine H1 receptors, the binding of which is sodium independent

  18. Trusted Allies with New Benefits: Repositioning Existing Drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-01-25

    The classical assumption that one drug cures a single disease by binding to a single drug-target has been shown to be inaccurate. Recent studies estimate that each drug on average binds to at least six known and several unknown targets. Identifying the “off-targets” can help understand the side effects and toxicity of the drug. Moreover, off-targets for a given drug may inspire “drug repositioning”, where a drug already approved for one condition is redirected to treat another condition, thereby overcoming delays and costs associated with clinical trials and drug approval. In this talk, I will introduce our work along this direction. We have developed a structural alignment method that can precisely identify structural similarities between arbitrary types of interaction interfaces, such as the drug-target interaction. We have further developed a novel computational framework, iDTP that constructs the structural signatures of approved and experimental drugs, based on which we predict new targets for these drugs. Our method combines information from several sources including sequence independent structural alignment, sequence similarity, drug-target tissue expression data, and text mining. In a cross-validation study, we used iDTP to predict the known targets of 11 drugs, with 63% sensitivity and 81% specificity. We then predicted novel targets for these drugs—two that are of high pharmacological interest, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and the oncogene B-cell lymphoma 2, were successfully validated through in vitro binding experiments.

  19. 21 CFR 862.1415 - Iron-binding capacity test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-binding capacity test system. 862.1415 Section 862.1415 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  20. Liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry detection of covalent binding of acetaminophen to human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damsten, M.C.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Fidder, A.; Hulst, A.G.; Touw, D.; Noort, D.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    2007-01-01

    Covalent binding of reactive electrophilic intermediates to proteins is considered to play an important role in the processes leading to adverse drug reactions and idiosyncratic drug reactions. Consequently, both for the discovery and the development of new drugs, there is a great interest in sensit

  1. Drug misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, T

    1992-12-01

    1. Assessment by history and examination should include: a history of all drugs taken during each day for the previous 7 days (including alcohol), length of drug use and route (including the sharing of needles or syringes), the possibility of pregnancy if female, previous psychiatric history and treatment of drug misuse, social factors (including employment, family, friends, involvement in prostitution, legal problems), medical problems, including evidence of hepatitis, injection abscesses and other infections, suicide attempts, and weight loss. 2. Notification to the Chief Medical Officer of the Drug Branch of the Home Office is a legal obligation. 3. Investigations include: liver function tests (LFTs), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), hepatitis C antibody, full blood count (FBC), and urine for drug screening. Consider HIV testing if at risk but it is usually better arranged at a later stage. 4. Prescribing may be considered for a variety of drugs but objectives will differ according to drug type and individual. 5. In the case of opioid users, prescribing may be useful to stabilize their lives and to promote attendance for professional help. It may reduce high risk behaviour for contracting and spreading HIV. 6. If medication is given to opioid users, methadone mixture 1 mg/ml given once a day is the prescription of choice. Dispensing should be on a daily basis and the blue prescription form FP10 (MDA) allows the chemist to dispense daily for up to 14 days. A maximum ceiling of 100 mg methadone/day should not be exceeded. The initial dose will depend on the amount of opioid consumed in the previous week.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1345155

  2. Herbal drugs and drug interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Dülger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drugs are defined as any form of a plant or plant product that contains a single herb or combinations of herbs that are believed to have complementary effects. Although they are considered to be safe, because they are natural, they may have various adverse effects, and may interact with other herbal products or conventional drugs. These interactions are especially important for drugs with narrow therapeutic indices.In the present study, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of some most commanly used herbals (St John's wort, ginkgo biloba, ginseng, ginger, garlic, echinacea, ephedra and valerian with the conventional drugs were reviewed. Pharmacokinetic interactions involve mainly induction or inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoproteins by the herbal medicine, thus changing the absorption and/or elimination rate and consequently the efficacy of the concommitantly used drugs. St John's wort, a well known enzyme inducer, decreases the efficacy of most of the other drugs that are known to be the substrates of these enzymes.Pharmacodynamic interactions may be due to additive or synergistic effects which results in enhanced effect or toxicity, or herbal medicines with antagonistic properties reduce drug efficacy and result in therapeutic failure. For exampla, St John's wort may have synergistic effects with other antidepressant drugs used by the patient, resulting in increased CNS effects.Herbals like ginseng, ginkgo, garlic, ginger were reported to increase bleeding time, thus potentiating the effect of anticoagulant and antithrombotic agents. In conclusion, patients should be warned against the interaction between the herbal products and conventional medicines.

  3. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos fami...

  4. Legal Drugs Are Good Drugs And Illegal Drugs Are Bad Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Dina Indrati; Herry Prasetyo

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT : Labelling drugs are important issue nowadays in a modern society. Although it is generally believed that legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs, it is evident that some people do not aware about the side effects of drugs used. Therefore, a key contention of this philosophical essay is that explores harms minimisation policy, discuss whether legal drugs are good drugs and illegal drugs are bad drugs and explores relation of drugs misuse in a psychiatric nursing s...

  5. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  6. Drug Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Abdul; Hill, Tiffany; Dhawan, Nidhi

    2016-09-01

    An adverse drug reaction relates to an undesired response to administration of a drug. Type A reactions are common and are predictable to administration, dose response, or interaction with other medications. Type B reactions are uncommon with occurrences that are not predictable. Appropriate diagnosis, classification, and entry into the chart are important to avoid future problems. The diagnosis is made with careful history, physical examination, and possibly allergy testing. It is recommended that help from allergy immunology specialists should be sought where necessary and that routine prescription of Epi pen should be given to patients with multiple allergy syndromes. PMID:27545730

  7. Snapshot of the equilibrium dynamics of a drug bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Daniel G.; Bauman, Joseph D.; Challa, J. Reddy; Patel, Disha; Troxler, Thomas; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Hochstrasser, Robin M.

    2013-01-01

    The anti-AIDS drug rilpivirine undergoes conformational changes to bind HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and retain potency against drug-resistance mutations. Our discovery that water molecules play an essential role in the drug binding is reported. Femtosecond experiments and theory expose molecular level dynamics of rilpivirine bound to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. The two nitrile substituents (-CN), one on each arm of the drug, have vibrational spectra consistent with their protein environments...

  8. Effects of Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Drug Treatment Facts Does Drug Treatment Work? Types of Drug Treatment What Is a Relapse? Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Friends and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking ...

  9. Other Drugs of Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Drug Treatment Facts Does Drug Treatment Work? Types of Drug Treatment What Is a Relapse? Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Friends and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking ...

  10. The undesirable effects of neuromuscular blocking drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claudius, C; Garvey, L H; Viby-Mogensen, J

    question. Moreover, all neuromuscular blocking drugs may cause hypersensitivity reactions. Often the symptoms are mild and self-limiting but massive histamine release can cause systematic reactions with circulatory and respiratory symptoms and signs. At the end of anaesthesia, no residual effect of a......Neuromuscular blocking drugs are designed to bind to the nicotinic receptor at the neuromuscular junction. However, they also interact with other acetylcholine receptors in the body. Binding to these receptors causes adverse effects that vary with the specificity for the cholinergic receptor in...... neuromuscular blocking drug should be present. However, the huge variability in response to neuromuscular blocking drugs makes it impossible to predict which patient will suffer postoperative residual curarization. This article discusses the undesirable effects of the currently available neuromuscular blocking...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button ... sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the ... información sobre el abuso de drogas, y adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse ( ...

  13. Antineoplastic Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Sara; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antineoplastic drugs is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  14. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All NIDA's Publication Series Brain Power DrugFacts Mind Over Matter Research Reports NIDA Home Site Map FAQs Accessibility Privacy FOIA(NIH) Working at NIDA Contact Subscribe Archives PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft Word documents require the free Microsoft Word ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What Is a Relapse? Find Treatment/Rehab Resources Friends and Family Can Help Prevent Drug Abuse Help ... her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't use marijuana. Haga clic aquí ...

  16. Tamoxifen and curcumin binding to serum albumin. Spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Maliszewska, M.; Pożycka, J.; Równicka-Zubik, J.; Góra, A.; Sułkowska, A.

    2013-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TMX) is widely used for the breast cancer treatment and is known as chemopreventive agent. Curcumin (CUR) is natural phenolic compound with broad spectrum of biological activity e.g. anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal and chemopreventive. Combination of tamoxifen and curcumin could be more effective with lower toxicity than each agent alone in use for the treatment or chemoprevention of breast cancer. Binding of drugs to serum albumin is an important factor, which determines toxicity and therapeutic dosage of the drugs. When two drugs are administered together the competition between them for the binding site on albumin can result in a decrease in bound fraction and an increase in the concentration of free biologically active fraction of drug.

  17. Optical Properties of Drug Metabolites in Latent Fingermarks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Drug metabolites usually have structures of split-ring resonators (SRRs), which might lead to negative permittivity and permeability in electromagnetic field. As a result, in the UV-vis region, the latent fingermarks images of drug addicts and non drug users are inverse. The optical properties of latent fingermarks are quite different between drug addicts and non-drug users. This is a technic superiority for crime scene investigation to distinguish them. In this paper, we calculate the permittivity and permeability of drug metabolites using tight-binding model. The latent fingermarks of smokers and non-smokers are given as an example.

  18. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude;

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  19. Overcoming drug resistance by regulating nuclear receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Taosheng

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance involves multiple mechanisms. Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the leading cause of treatment failure in cancer therapy. Elevated levels of MDR proteins [members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family] increase cellular efflux and decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents. As a salvage approach to overcome drug resistance, inhibitors of MDR proteins have been developed, but have had limited success mainly due to undesired toxicities. Nuclear receptors (N...

  20. Drug Discovery Targeted to Transthyretin Related Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi Pérez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    [eng] Several drug discovery approaches has been performed to find new compounds able to interact with high affinity with the hormone binding site of the homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR), and stabilize this tetramer, becoming drug candidates to treat several rare amyloid diseases associated with TTR. With this aim, several computational workflows and chemico-biological databases have been developed, and in collaboration with two experimental research laboratories of our TTR Con...

  1. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    OpenAIRE

    Huaping Liang; Liangren Zhang; Wuzhuang Gong; Yanhui Zhang; Zhanli Wang; Lidan Sun; Hui Yu; Hongwei Jin

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K

  2. Flavonoid-DNA binding studies and thermodynamic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Shaheen, Amber; Yaqub, Azra; Perveen, Fouzia; Sabahat, Sana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Jacob, Claus; Ba, Lalla Aicha; Mohammed, Hamdoon A.

    2011-09-01

    Interactional studies of new flavonoid derivatives (Fl) with chicken blood ds.DNA were investigated spectrophotometrically in DMSO-H 2O (9:1 v/v) at various temperatures. Spectral parameters suggest considerable binding between the flavonoid derivatives studied and ds.DNA. The binding constant values lie in the enhanced-binding range. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from UV studies also point to strong spontaneous binding of Fl with ds.DNA. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a small linear increase in relative viscosity of the DNA solution was observed with added optimal flavonoid concentration. An overall mixed mode of interaction (intercalative plus groove binding) is proposed between DNA and flavonoids. Conclusively, investigated flavonoid derivatives are found to be strong DNA binders and seem to be promising drug candidates like their natural analogues.

  3. Effects of antidepressant drugs on different receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioligand receptor binding techniques were used to characterize the effects of different structural types of antidepressant drugs on neurotransmitter receptors. The tricyclic antidepressants more or less potently inhibited the binding to rat brain preparations of several different radiolabelled ligands ([3H]WB4101, [3H]QNB, [3H]d-LSD, [3H]mepyramine). The potency of the nontricyclic antidepressants varied greatly. Mianserin, potently displaced [3H]mepyramine, [3H]d-LSD and [3H]WB4101 while it was very weak on [3H]QNB-binding. Nomifensine and the specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimelidine and alaproclate had very low affinity for these receptors. All the antidepressants tested were practically devoid of activity on [3H]DHA binding, [3H]spiroperidol binding, [3H]flunitrazepam binding, [3H]muscimol binding and [3H]naloxone binding. The implications of these findings for biogenic amine theories of affective disorders are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. [Cost reducing of or by drugs. More rationality and efficiency in drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeske, G

    2010-08-01

    The expenditure incurred in the German statutory health insurance (SHI) in relation to drugs, are characterized not only by the amount of drug prices, but also by their degree of efficient usage. The prevention of superfluous and inappropriate pharmaceutical supply leads to direct savings in expenditure, a drug-based guideline-oriented therapy, and prevention of diseases and deficiency symptoms leads to savings by avoiding hospitalizations, operations, and maintaining the ability to work. Prescriptions of new and expensive me-too drugs with no additional benefit bind financial resources of the SHI, which should be available for pharmaceutical therapeutic innovations. PMID:20552155

  5. Knowledge-based fragment binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace W; Altman, Russ B

    2014-04-01

    Target-based drug discovery must assess many drug-like compounds for potential activity. Focusing on low-molecular-weight compounds (fragments) can dramatically reduce the chemical search space. However, approaches for determining protein-fragment interactions have limitations. Experimental assays are time-consuming, expensive, and not always applicable. At the same time, computational approaches using physics-based methods have limited accuracy. With increasing high-resolution structural data for protein-ligand complexes, there is now an opportunity for data-driven approaches to fragment binding prediction. We present FragFEATURE, a machine learning approach to predict small molecule fragments preferred by a target protein structure. We first create a knowledge base of protein structural environments annotated with the small molecule substructures they bind. These substructures have low-molecular weight and serve as a proxy for fragments. FragFEATURE then compares the structural environments within a target protein to those in the knowledge base to retrieve statistically preferred fragments. It merges information across diverse ligands with shared substructures to generate predictions. Our results demonstrate FragFEATURE's ability to rediscover fragments corresponding to the ligand bound with 74% precision and 82% recall on average. For many protein targets, it identifies high scoring fragments that are substructures of known inhibitors. FragFEATURE thus predicts fragments that can serve as inputs to fragment-based drug design or serve as refinement criteria for creating target-specific compound libraries for experimental or computational screening. PMID:24762971

  6. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    2001-10-09

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  7. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  8. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Caroline (Albany, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  9. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, J.O.; Spevak, W.R.; Dasgupta, F.; Bertozzi, C.

    1999-11-16

    This invention provides compositions for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10{sup 6} fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, these composition scan be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  10. Inhibition of selectin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Jon O. (Rodeo, CA); Spevak, Wayne R. (Albany, CA); Dasgupta, Falguni (New Delhi, IN); Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA)

    1999-10-05

    This invention provides a system for inhibiting the binding between two cells, one expressing P- or L-selectin on the surface and the other expressing the corresponding ligand. A covalently crosslinked lipid composition is prepared having saccharides and acidic group on separate lipids. The composition is then interposed between the cells so as to inhibit binding. Inhibition can be achieved at an effective oligosaccharide concentration as low as 10.sup.6 fold below that of the free saccharide. Since selectins are involved in recruiting cells to sites of injury, this system can be used to palliate certain inflammatory and immunological conditions.

  11. Drug Rash (Unclassified Drug Eruption) in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Drug Eruption, Unclassified (Pediatric) A parent's guide to condition ... lesions coming together into larger lesions typical of drug rashes (eruptions). Overview A drug eruption, also known ...

  12. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[3H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[3H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  13. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  14. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×104 M−1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol−1 and −25.52±11.52 J mol−1 K−1, respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val216, Leu327, Ala350 and polar residues such as Glu354 play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu327, Ala350 as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×104 M−1 at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I

  15. [Emergent drugs (I): smart drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo-Putze, G; Díaz, B Climent; Pazos, J L Echarte; Mas, P Munné; Miró, O; Puiguriguer, J; Dargan, P

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a series of new drugs, known as smart drugs or legal highs, have gaining in popularity. They are easily obtainable through online shops. This is happening amongst younger segments of the population and is associated with recreational consumption, at weekends. In general, they are synthetic derivatives of natural products. There has been hardly any clinical research into them and they are not detectable in hospital laboratories. Three of these products, BZP (1- benzylpiperazine), mefedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and Spice are probably the most widely used in Europe. The first two are consumed as an alternative to ecstasy and cocaine and are characterized by their producing a clinical profile of a sympathetic mimetic type; on occasion, they have serious consequences, with convulsions and even death. Spice (a mixture of herbs with synthetic cannabinoids such as JWH-018, JWH-073 and CP 47497-C8) is giving rise to profiles of dependence and schizophrenia. Although the emergent drugs have an aura of safety, there is an increasing amount of experience on their secondary effects. PMID:21904408

  16. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by albumin.

  17. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frei Eva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by...

  18. Unravelling the complex drug–drug interactions of the cardiovascular drugs, verapamil and digoxin, with P-glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledwitch, Kaitlyn V.; Barnes, Robert W.; Roberts, Arthur G.

    2016-01-01

    Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) and associated toxicity from cardiovascular drugs represents a major problem for effective co-administration of cardiovascular therapeutics. A significant amount of drug toxicity from DDIs occurs because of drug interactions and multiple cardiovascular drug binding to the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp), which is particularly problematic for cardiovascular drugs because of their relatively low therapeutic indexes. The calcium channel antagonist, verapamil and the cardiac glycoside, digoxin, exhibit DDIs with Pgp through non-competitive inhibition of digoxin transport, which leads to elevated digoxin plasma concentrations and digoxin toxicity. In the present study, verapamil-induced ATPase activation kinetics were biphasic implying at least two verapamil-binding sites on Pgp, whereas monophasic digoxin activation of Pgp-coupled ATPase kinetics suggested a single digoxin-binding site. Using intrinsic protein fluorescence and the saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR techniques to probe drug–Pgp interactions, verapamil was found to have little effect on digoxin–Pgp interactions at low concentrations of verapamil, which is consistent with simultaneous binding of the drugs and non-competitive inhibition. Higher concentrations of verapamil caused significant disruption of digoxin–Pgp interactions that suggested overlapping and competing drug-binding sites. These interactions correlated to drug-induced conformational changes deduced from acrylamide quenching of Pgp tryptophan fluorescence. Also, Pgp-coupled ATPase activity kinetics measured with a range of verapamil and digoxin concentrations fit well to a DDI model encompassing non-competitive and competitive inhibition of digoxin by verapamil. The results and previous transport studies were combined into a comprehensive model of verapamil–digoxin DDIs encompassing drug binding, ATP hydrolysis, transport and conformational changes. PMID:26823559

  19. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Robert; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) has pharmacologic applications in the field of antiglaucoma, anticonvulsant, antiobesity, and anticancer agents but is also emerging for designing anti-infectives (antifungal and antibacterial agents) with a novel mechanism of action. As a consequence, the drug design of CA inhibitors (CAIs) is a very dynamic field. Sulfonamides and their isosteres (sulfamates/sulfamides) constitute the main class of CAIs which bind to the metal ion in the enzyme active site. Recently the dithiocarbamates, possessing a similar mechanism of action, were reported as a new class of inhibitors. Other families of CAIs possess a distinct mechanism of action: phenols, polyamines, some carboxylates, and sulfocoumarins anchor to the zinc-coordinated water molecule. Coumarins and five/six-membered lactones are prodrug inhibitors, binding in hydrolyzed form at the entrance of the active site cavity. Novel drug design strategies have been reported principally based on the tail approach for obtaining all these types of CAIs, which exploit more external binding regions within the enzyme active site (in addition to coordination to the metal ion), leading thus to isoform-selective compounds. Sugar-based tails as well as click chemistry were the most fruitful developments of the tail approach. Promising compounds that inhibit CAs from bacterial and fungal pathogens, of the dithiocarbamate, phenol and carboxylate types have also been reported. PMID:24146385

  1. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chandra Prakash; Baltazar Zuniga; Chung Seog Song; Shoulei Jiang; Jodie Cropper; Sulgi Park; Bandana Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs), and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0) and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III). Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs), i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor) and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor), and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D recep...

  2. Tetracycline diffusion through phospholipid bilayers and binding to phospholipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Argast, M; Beck, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of tetracycline to pass through phospholipid bilayers by diffusion was investigated. Liposomes did not retain enclosed tetracycline. Accumulation of tetracycline was observed with liposomes containing entrapped Tet repressor protein. These results indicate that the drug can pass through lipid bilayers. The antibiotic was also shown to bind to liposomes and isolated phospholipids.

  3. Characterization of pulmonary sigma receptors by radioligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, John R; Litton, Tyler P; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A

    2015-09-01

    This study establishes the expression of appreciable populations of sites on mouse lung membranes that exhibit radioligand binding properties and pharmacology consistent with assignment as sigma1 and sigma2 receptors. Specific binding of the sigma1 receptor radioligand [(3)H](+)-pentazocine reached steady state within 6h at 37°C. Saturation studies revealed high affinity binding to a single class of sites (Kd 1.36±0.04nM; Bmax 967±11fmol/mg protein). Inhibition studies showed appropriate sigma1 receptor pharmacology, including higher affinity for (+)-N-allylnormetazocine with respect to the (-)-enantiomer, and positive allosteric modulation of dextromethorphan binding by phenytoin. Using [(3)H]1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine in the presence of (+)-pentazocine to assess sigma2 receptor binding, steady state was achieved within 2min at 25°C. Cold saturation studies revealed one high affinity, low capacity binding site (Kd 31.8±8.3nM; Bmax 921±228fmol/mg protein) that displayed sigma2 receptor pharmacology. A very low affinity, high capacity interaction also was observed that represents saturable, but not sigma receptor specific, binding. A panel of ligands showed rank order inhibition of radioligand binding appropriate for the sigma2 receptor, with ifenprodil displaying the highest apparent affinity. In vivo, dextromethorphan inhibited the specific binding of a radioiodinated sigma1 receptor ligand in lung with an ED50 of 1.2μmol/kg, a value near the recommended dosage for the drug as a cough suppressant. Overall, the present work provides a foundation for studies of drug interactions with pulmonary sigma1 and sigma2 receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26004528

  4. Computational analysis of protein-ligand binding : from single continuous trajectories to multiple parallel simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsteinsdottir, Holmfridur B.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with other proteins or small molecules is essential for biological functions. Understanding the molecular basis of protein-ligand binding is of a vast interest for drug discovery, and computational methods to estimate proteinligand binding are starting to play an increasingly important role. In order to apply atomistic computational methods to the drug discovery process it is necessary to have accurate three-dimensional structures of the target prote...

  5. In vitro selection and characterization of streptomycin-binding RNAs: recognition discrimination between antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, S T; Schroeder, R

    1998-01-01

    As pathogens continue to evade therapeutical drugs, a better understanding of the mode of action of antibiotics continues to have high importance. A growing body of evidence points to RNA as a crucial target for antibacterial and antiviral drugs. For example, the aminocyclitol antibiotic streptomycin interacts with the 16S ribosomal RNA and, in addition, inhibits group I intron splicing. To understand the mode of binding of streptomycin to RNA, we isolated small, streptomycin-binding RNA apta...

  6. Drug abuse first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other over-the-counter medications. Many drugs are addictive. Sometimes the addiction is gradual. However, some drugs ( ... Using such drugs may cause paranoia , hallucinations, aggressive behavior, or extreme social withdrawal. Cannabis-containing drugs such ...

  7. National Drug Code Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Drug Listing Act of 1972 requires registered drug establishments to provide the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) with a current list of all drugs...

  8. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  9. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Urine drug screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug screen -- urine ... detect the presence of illegal and some prescription drugs in your urine. Their presence indicates that you recently used these drugs. Some drugs may remain in your system for ...

  11. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Widgets Order Publications Skip Nav AIDS info Drug Database Home > Drugs Español small medium large Text Size ... health care providers and patients. Search the Drug Database Help × Search by drug name Performs a search ...

  12. On the mechanism of action of quinolone drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, M; Gatto, B; Zagotto, G; Palù, G

    1993-09-01

    Antibacterial quinolones are thought to inhibit DNA gyrase by trapping the enzyme as a complex with the DNA substrate. The precise molecular details of drug-DNA and drug-enzyme interactions remain controversial. Here, a model is proposed that accounts for the influence of magnesium ions on quinolone-DNA binding. PMID:8137121

  13. Sphingolipids in neuroblastoma : Their role in drug resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sietsma, H; Dijkhuis, AJ; Kamps, W; Kok, JW

    2002-01-01

    Disseminated neuroblastoma usually calls for chemotherapy as the primary approach for treatment. Treatment failure is often attributable to drug resistance. This involves a variety of cellular mechanisms, including increased drug efflux through expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (e.g.,

  14. Transcriptional Mechanisms of Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is considered a plausible mechanism of drug addiction given the stability of behavioral abnormalities that define an addicted state. Numerous transcription factors, proteins that bind to regulatory regions of specific genes and thereby control levels of their expression, have been implicated in the addiction process over the past decade or two. Here we review the growing evidence for the role played by several prominent transcription factors, including a Fos family protein (ΔFosB), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), among several others, in drug addiction. As will be seen, each factor displays very different regulation by drugs of abuse within the brain's reward circuitry, and in turn mediates distinct aspects of the addiction phenotype. Current efforts are geared toward understanding the range of target genes through which these transcription factors produce their functional effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. This work promises to reveal fundamentally new insight into the molecular basis of addiction, which will contribute to improved diagnostic tests and therapeutics for addictive disorders. PMID:23430970

  15. CONCEPT OF DRUG INTERACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Nidhi

    2012-01-01

    Drug interaction is an increasingly important cause of adverse reactions (ADR), and is the modification of the effect of one drug (object) by the prior or concomitant administration of another drug (precipitant drug). Drug interaction may either enhance or diminish the intended effect of one or both drugs. For example severe haemorrhage may occur if warfarin and salicylates (asprin) are combined. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or act...

  16. Differential binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine and /sup 3/H-mianserin in rat cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumbrille-Ross, A.; Tang, S.W.; Coscina, D.V.

    1981-11-16

    Drug competition profiles, effect of raphe lesion, and sodium dependency of the binding of two antidepressant drugs /sup 3/H-imipramine and /sup 3/H-mianserin to rat cerebral cortex homogenate were compared to examine whether the drugs bound to a common ''antidepressant receptor.'' Of the neurotransmitters tested, only serotonin displaced binding of both /sup 3/H-imipramine and /sup 3/H-mianserin. /sup 3/H-Mianserin binding was potently displaced by serotonin S/sub 2/ antagonists and exhibited a profile similar to that of /sup 3/H-spiperone binding. In the presence of the serotonin S/sub 2/ antagonist spiperone, antihistamines (H/sub 1/) potently displaced /sup 3/H-mianserin binding. /sup 3/H-Imipramine binding was displaced potently by serotonin uptake inhibitors. The order of potency of serotonergic drugs in displacing /sup 3/H-imipramine binding was not similar to their order in displacing /sup 3/H-spiperone or -3H-serotonin binding. Prior midbrain raphe lesions greatly decreased the binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine but did not alter binding of /sup 3/H-mianserin. Binding of /sup 3/H-imipramine but not /sup 3/H-mianserin was sodium dependent. These results show that /sup 3/H-imipramine and /sup 3/H-mianserin bind to different receptors. /sup 3/H-Imipramine binds to a presynaptic serotonin receptor which is probably related to a serotonin uptake recognition site, the binding of which is sodium dependent. /sup 3/H-Mianserin binds to postsynaptic receptors, possibly both serotonin S/sub 2/ and histamine H/sub 1/ receptors, the binding of which is sodium independent.

  17. Sex_hormone-binding_globulin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia [Gene Wiki

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PBBgeneid=6462 Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) or sex steroid-binding globulin (SSBG) is a g ... reduce SHBG, whereas insulin does not. As an example an ti-psoriatic drugs that inhibit TNF-alpha cause an ... enarche due to lower levels of SHBG. Anorexia or a lean ... physique in women leads to higher SHBG levels, whi ...

  18. Isothermal Chemical Denaturation to Determine Binding Affinity of Small Molecules to G-Protein Coupled Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Patrick; Weihofen, Wilhelm; Siu, Fai; Xie, Amy; Katakia, Hetal; Wright, S. Kirk; Hunt, Ian; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The determination of accurate binding affinities is critical in drug discovery and development. Several techniques are available for characterizing the binding of small molecules to soluble proteins. The situation is different for integral membrane proteins. Isothermal chemical denaturation (ICD) has been shown to be a valuable biophysical method to determine in a direct and label-free fashion the binding of ligands to soluble proteins. In this communication, the application of isothermal che...

  19. Effect of Protein Binding on the Pharmacological Activity of Highly Bound Antibiotics▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Stephan; Röck, Katharina; Sahre, Martina; Burkhardt, Olaf; Brunner, Martin; Lobmeyer, Maximilian T.; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    During antibiotic drug development, media are frequently spiked with either serum/plasma or protein supplements to evaluate the effect of protein binding. Usually, previously reported serum or plasma protein binding values are applied in the analysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate this approach by experimentally measuring free, unbound concentrations for antibiotics with reportedly high protein binding and their corresponding antimicrobial activities in media containing commonly used ...

  20. Drug abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that this study used SPECT to examine patients who have abused drugs to determine whether SPECT could identify abnormalities and whether these findings have clinical importance. Fifteen patients with a history of substance abuse (eight with cocaine, six with amphetamine, and one with organic solvent) underwent SPECT performed with a triple-headed camera and Tc-99m HMPAO both early for blood flow and later for functional information. These images were then processed into a 3D videotaped display used in group therapy. All 15 patients had multiple areas of decreased tracer uptake peppered throughout the cortex but mainly affecting the parietal lobes, expect for the organic solvent abuser who had a large parietal defect. The videotapes were subjectively described by a therapist as an exceptional tool that countered patient denial of physical damage from substance abuse. Statistical studies of recidivism between groups is under way

  1. Drug-drug interactions in the hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Vonbach, Priska

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Drug interaction screening programs are an important tool to check prescriptions of multiple drugs for potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs). Several programs are available on the market. They differ in layout, update frequency, search functions, content and price. The aim of the current study was to critically appraise several interaction screening programs in the Department of Medicine of a Swiss public teaching hospital. Methods A drug interaction screening program had to f...

  2. Drug: D00263 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D00263 Drug Cefalexin (JP16); Cephalexin; CEX; Keflex (TN) C16H17N3O4S 347.094 347....acteria 6132 Cephem antibioitics D00263 Cefalexin (JP16) Anatomical Therapeutic C...USE J01D OTHER BETA-LACTAM ANTIBACTERIALS J01DB First-generation cephalosporins J01DB01 Cefalexin D00263 Cefalexin...phalosporins Cephalexin D00263 Cefalexin (JP16) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antibacterials Cell wall biosynt...hesis inhibitor Penicillin binding proteins inhibitor Cephems - Cephalosporins Cefalexin [ATC:J01DB01] D00263 Cefalexin

  3. Drug: D01819 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01819 Drug Cefotiam hydrochloride (JP16/USP); CTM; Ceradon (TN); Pansporin (TN) C1...ics 613 Acting mainly on gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria 6132 Cephem antibioitics D01819 Cefotiam h...real diagnostic agents 729 Miscellaneous 7290 Miscellaneous D01819 Cefotiam hydrochloride (JP16/USP) Anatomi...n cephalosporins J01DC07 Cefotiam D01819 Cefotiam hydrochloride (JP16/USP) Antiinfectives [BR:br08307] Antib...acterials Cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor Penicillin binding proteins inhibitor Cephems - Cephalosporins Cefoti

  4. Personality, Drug Preference, Drug Use, and Drug Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Marc; Boyer, Bret; Kumar, V. K.; Prout, Maurice

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between drug preference, drug use, drug availability, and personality among individuals (n = 100) in treatment for substance abuse in an effort to replicate the results of an earlier study (Feldman, Kumar, Angelini, Pekala, & Porter, 2007) designed to test prediction derived from Eysenck's (1957, 1967)…

  5. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J. J.; van de Velden, M.; Sauerwein, R. W.; Russel, F. G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involved in drug deposition, as they are located at membranes of many uptake and excretory organs and at protective barriers, where they export endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including pharmaceutica...

  6. Multidrug transport by ATP binding cassette transporters : a proposed two-cylinder engine mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, HW; Higgins, CF; Konings, WN

    2001-01-01

    The elevated expression of ATP binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporters in multidrug-resistant cells interferes with the drug-based control of cancers and infectious pathogenic microorganisms. Multidrug transporters interact directly with the drug substrates. This review summarizes current insi

  7. DNA-binding residues and binding mode prediction with binding-mechanism concerned models

    OpenAIRE

    Oyang Yen-Jen; Liu Yu-Cheng; Huang Chun-Chin; Huang Yu-Feng; Huang Chien-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-DNA interactions are essential for fundamental biological activities including DNA transcription, replication, packaging, repair and rearrangement. Proteins interacting with DNA can be classified into two categories of binding mechanisms - sequence-specific and non-specific binding. Protein-DNA specific binding provides a mechanism to recognize correct nucleotide base pairs for sequence-specific identification. Protein-DNA non-specific binding shows sequence indepe...

  8. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described

  9. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  10. Drug discovery in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Dana M; Mathur, Nidhee; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2010-11-01

    Drug discovery in the ovarian cancer arena has led to the activation of several important clinical trials. Many biologic agents have come down the pipeline and are being studied in phase II trials for recurrent disease. These agents include antivascular compounds that disrupt angiogenesis through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., prevention of ligand-binding to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), high-affinity VEGF blockade, oral inhibitors of tyrosine kinases stimulated by VEGF, inhibition of alpha5beta1 integrin, neutralization of angioproteins, etc.). Other novel drugs include oral platinum compounds as well as those that antagonize the tumor proliferation genes in the Hedgehog pathway, and that target folic acid receptors which are expressed by ovarian cancer cells. In addition, studies are underway with oral agents that inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity associated with two oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2/neu). Finally, emerging technologies in clinical trials include nanotechnology to enhance delivery of chemotherapy to ovarian tumors, drug resistance/sensitivity assays to guide therapy, and agents that mobilize and induce proliferation of hematopoetic progenitor cells to aid in red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet recovery following chemotherapy. The relevant patents in drug discovery of ovarian cancer are discussed. PMID:20524931

  11. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP–BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: ► Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. ► Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. ► Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP–BSA complex. ► Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions

  13. Food-Drug Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Yar Khan; Nousheen Aslam; Rabia Bushra

    2011-01-01

    The effect of drug on a person may be different than expected because that drug interacts with another drug the person is taking (drug-drug interaction), food, beverages, dietary supplements the person is consuming (drug-nutrient/food interaction) or another disease the person has (drug-disease interaction). A drug interaction is a situation in which a substance affects the activity of a drug, i.e. the effects are increased or decreased, or they produce a new effect that neither produces on i...

  14. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  15. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar

  16. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase may confer resistance to fusidic acid by sequestering the drug.

    OpenAIRE

    Proctor, G N; McKell, J.; Rownd, R H

    1983-01-01

    Enterobacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase bound fusidic acid with high affinity, but did not acetylate the drug at an experimentally detectable rate. The enzyme may therefore confer resistance to fusidic acid by sequestering the drug and thereby preventing the drug from binding to translational elongation factor G.

  17. Drugs and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different kinds of drugs who can be transferred through the mother's milk to the lactant and its effects are showed in this work. A list of them as below: cardiotonics, diuretics, anti-hypertensives, beta-blockings, anti-arrythmics, drugs with gastrintestinal tract action, hormones, antibiotics and chemotherapeutics, citostatic drugs, central nervous system action drugs and anticoagulants drugs. (L.M.J.)

  18. A Two-Layer Mathematical Modelling of Drug Delivery to Biological Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarty, Koyel

    2016-01-01

    Local drug delivery has received much recognition in recent years, yet it is still unpredictable how drug efficacy depends on physicochemical properties and delivery kinetics. The purpose of the current study is to provide a useful mathematical model for drug release from a drug delivery device and consecutive drug transport in biological tissue, thereby aiding the development of new therapeutic drug by a systemic approach. In order to study the complete process, a two-layer spatio-temporal model depicting drug transport between the coupled media is presented. Drug release is described by considering solubilisation dynamics of drug particle, diffusion of the solubilised drug through porous matrix and also some other processes like reversible dissociation / recrystallization, drug particle-receptor binding and internalization phenomena. The model has led to a system of partial differential equations describing the important properties of drug kinetics. This model contributes towards the perception of the roles...

  19. Identifying Interactions that Determine Fragment Binding at Protein Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radoux, Chris J; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Pitt, Will R; Groom, Colin R; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-05-12

    Locating a ligand-binding site is an important first step in structure-guided drug discovery, but current methods do little to suggest which interactions within a pocket are the most important for binding. Here we illustrate a method that samples atomic hotspots with simple molecular probes to produce fragment hotspot maps. These maps specifically highlight fragment-binding sites and their corresponding pharmacophores. For ligand-bound structures, they provide an intuitive visual guide within the binding site, directing medicinal chemists where to grow the molecule and alerting them to suboptimal interactions within the original hit. The fragment hotspot map calculation is validated using experimental binding positions of 21 fragments and subsequent lead molecules. The ligands are found in high scoring areas of the fragment hotspot maps, with fragment atoms having a median percentage rank of 97%. Protein kinase B and pantothenate synthetase are examined in detail. In each case, the fragment hotspot maps are able to rationalize a Free-Wilson analysis of SAR data from a fragment-based drug design project. PMID:27043011

  20. Computational characteristics of valproic acid binding to histone deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the anticpileptic drug valproic acid (VPA) has also demonstrated efficacy in the management of cancer and bipolar disorders. These actions are largely mediated by inhibition of the HDAC enzyme/induction of certain genes. Relative to other HDAC inhibitors such as trichostatin-A (TSA), VPA offers higher selectivity on cancer cells with virtually no detrimental effects on normal cells. The molecular underpinnings of these biological profiles for VPA remain undefined. We currently propose for an attempt to identify differences in the binding of VPA and TSA to HDAC. In this paper, conformational changes and energy calculations have derived. VPA had to accomplish conformational changes in its structure for best accommodation at the HDAC binding site. Energy computations showed that VPA has a lower binding affinitythan TSA (-53.80 vs. -66.30 Kcal/mol). These findings demonstrate that VPA binding to HDAC confers catalytic, conformational and computational characteristics that are distinct from those of TSA. These findings of VPA are consistent with a moderate inhibition of HDAC, a low toxicity on normal cells, and a higher selectivity on cancer cells than TSA. Accordingly, these newly identified binding properties of VPA can state a framework strategy for the rational design of VPA-related anticancer drugs with superior cytodifferentiating-and/or safety-profiles. (author)

  1. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  2. Melanin binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined the biodistribution an uptake by the Greene melanoma in the Syrian golden hamster with 21 radiopharmaceuticals. Maximum % uptake and the time at which this occurred are listed. It is essential to know maximum tumor to background ration and the time after injection that this occurs to determine suitability for tumor scanning. The importance of species variation deserves mention. Detection of eye melanoma in humans was quite variable whereas in hamsters it was quite easy to obtain a positive scan with a single pinhole. We then looked at brain uptake in man and found it (the brain scan) to be significant. In addition, we found a high uptake by the lung, something not found in hamsters but not entirely unsuspected of a amine, such as 123I-4,3DMQ. Finally, our clinical experience has shown us some of the vagaries of melanoma-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. This reflects the complexity of melanin and melanin-binding and points out the necessity for a more detailed analysis of the mechanisms involved in melanin binding radionuclides

  3. [Drug-drug interactions in antirheumatic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, K

    2012-04-01

    Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions contribute considerably to potentially dangerous drug side-effects and are frequently the reason for hospitalization. Nevertheless they are often overlooked in daily practice. For most antirheumatic drugs a vast number of interactions have been described but only a minority with clinical relevance. Several potentially important drug interactions exist for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), methotrexate, azathioprine, mycophenolate-mofetil and especially for cyclosporin A. Most importantly co-medication with methotrexate and sulfmethoxazole trimethoprim as well as azathioprine and allopurinol carries the risk of severe, sometimes life-threatening consequences. Nevertheless, besides these well-known high-risk combinations in each case of polypharmacy with antirheumatic drugs it is necessary to bear in mind the possibility of drug interactions. As polypharmacy is a common therapeutic practice in older patients with rheumatic diseases, they are at special risk. PMID:22527215

  4. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  5. Drugs and drug policy in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Leuw, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The Dutch parliament enacted the revised Opium Act in 1976. This penal law is part of the Dutch drug policy framework that includes tolerance for nonconforming lifestyles, risk reduction in regard to the harmful health and social consequences of drug taking, and penal measures directed against illegal trafficking in hard drugs. This multifaceted approach established the basic principles and operating practices of contemporary social and criminal drug policy in the Netherlands.

  6. Pumping of drugs by P-glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Skovsgaard, Torben; Stein, Wilfred D

    2003-01-01

    The apparent inhibition constant, Kapp, for the blockade of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) by four drugs, verapamil, cyclosporin A, XR9576 (tariquidar), and vinblastine, was measured by studying their ability to inhibit daunorubicin and calcein-AM efflux from four strains of Ehrlich cells with different...... levels of drug resistance and P-gp content. For daunorubicin as a transport substrate, Kapp was independent of [P-gp] for verapamil but increased strictly linearly with [P-gp] for vinblastine, cyclosporin A, and XR9576. A theoretical analysis of the kinetics of drug pumping and its reversal shows that...... rather, in serial, i.e., a drug that is pumped from the cytoplasmic phase has to pass the preemptive route upon leaving the cell. Our results are consistent with the Sauna-Ambudkar two-step model for pumping by P-gp. We suggest that the vinblastine/cyclosporin A/XR9576-binding site accepts daunorubicin...

  7. Drug targeting to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-09-01

    The goal of brain drug targeting technology is the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), including the human BBB. This is accomplished by re-engineering pharmaceuticals to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium. Certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin or transferrin, undergo receptor-mediated transport (RMT) across the BBB in vivo. In addition, peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) may also cross the BBB via RMT on the endogenous transporters. The MAb may be used as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry across the BBB large molecule pharmaceuticals, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, RNA interference drugs, or non-viral gene medicines. Fusion proteins of the molecular Trojan horse and either neurotrophins or single chain Fv antibodies have been genetically engineered. The fusion proteins retain bi-functional properties, and both bind the BBB receptor, to trigger transport into brain, and bind the cognate receptor inside brain to induce the pharmacologic effect. Trojan horse liposome technology enables the brain targeting of non-viral plasmid DNA. Molecular Trojan horses may be formulated with fusion protein technology, avidin-biotin technology, or Trojan horse liposomes to target to brain virtually any large molecule pharmaceutical. PMID:17554607

  8. Drug: D06912 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Drugs for blood Drugs for removing blood stasis D06912 *Quercus cortex; Bokusoku Drug...s for external use Drugs for external use D06912 *Quercu

  9. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods. PMID:27046190

  10. Reversible binding of some isoxazolyl penicillins with serum albumin using fluorescence spectroscopic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seedher Neelam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanism of interaction of three isoxazolyl penicillins, cloxacillin sodium, dicloxacillin sodium, and flucloxacillin sodium - with bovine serum albumin has been studied using fluorescence spectroscopic technique. The stoichiometry of the interaction was found to be 1:1, and association constants were of the order of 10 4sub in each case. The nature of drug-protein interaction could be predicted from the thermodynamic parameters for the binding. High positive entropy changes and positive enthalpy changes indicated that hydrophobic interactions are predominantly involved in the binding of these drugs to serum albumin. Binding studies carried out in the presence of hydrophobic probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS showed that the drugs and ANS do not share a common site on the albumin molecule. Stern-Volmer analysis of the fluorescence data showed that both the tryptophan residues of albumin are involved; but they are not fully accessible to the drugs, and static quenching mechanism is operative.

  11. Drug Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Device Approvals The Drug Development Process The Drug Development Process Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Pin it Email Print Step 1 Discovery and Development Discovery and Development Research for a new drug ...

  12. Medication/Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Allergy: Allergens > Medication/Drug Allergy Medication/Drug Allergy Allergies to medications/drugs are complicated because they ... Calendar Read the News View Daily Pollen Count Allergy Treatment Programs, Adult At National Jewish Health, some ...

  13. Drug Retention Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  14. Drug Retention Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user

  15. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Leukemia This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Arranon (Nelarabine) Asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi ...

  16. National Drug IQ Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge Get Started! Correct/Total Questions: Score: Other ... accessible version of the 2016 National Drug & Alcohol IQ Challenge , [PDF, 637KB]. Download an accessible version of ...

  17. Drug-induced hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  18. Drug Interaction API

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Interaction API is a web service for accessing drug-drug interactions. No license is needed to use the Interaction API. Currently, the API uses DrugBank for its...

  19. Prescription Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not lead to physical dependence and withdrawal, the feelings these drugs give people can cause them to use the drugs more and more ...

  20. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  1. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    OpenAIRE

    Mashiur Rahman; Farzana Prianka; Mohammad Shohel; Md. Abdul Mazid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED) at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 a...

  2. Resistance to Linezolid Caused by Modifications at Its Binding Site on the Ribosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S.; Vester, Birte

    2012-01-01

    linezolid binding site, so this review will therefore focus on the various changes that can adversely affect drug binding and confer resistance. High-resolution structures of linezolid bound to the 50S ribosomal subunit show that it binds in a deep cleft that is surrounded by 23S rRNA nucleotides. Mutation...... evidence has been presented to confirm this. Furthermore, recent findings on the Cfr methyltransferase underscore the modification of 23S rRNA as a highly effective and transferable form of linezolid resistance. On a positive note, detailed knowledge of the linezolid binding site has facilitated the design...

  3. Nuclear Receptors in Drug Metabolism, Drug Response and Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Orally delivered small-molecule therapeutics are metabolized in the liver and intestine by phase I and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs, and transport proteins coordinate drug influx (phase 0 and drug/drug-metabolite efflux (phase III. Genes involved in drug metabolism and disposition are induced by xenobiotic-activated nuclear receptors (NRs, i.e. PXR (pregnane X receptor and CAR (constitutive androstane receptor, and by the 1α, 25-dihydroxy vitamin D3-activated vitamin D receptor (VDR, due to transactivation of xenobiotic-response elements (XREs present in phase 0-III genes. Additional NRs, like HNF4-α, FXR, LXR-α play important roles in drug metabolism in certain settings, such as in relation to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism. The phase I enzymes CYP3A4/A5, CYP2D6, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP1A2, CYP2C8, CYP2A6, CYP2J2, and CYP2E1 metabolize >90% of all prescription drugs, and phase II conjugation of hydrophilic functional groups (with/without phase I modification facilitates drug clearance. The conjugation step is mediated by broad-specificity transferases like UGTs, SULTs, GSTs. This review delves into our current understanding of PXR/CAR/VDR-mediated regulation of DME and transporter expression, as well as effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and epigenome (specified by promoter methylation, histone modification, microRNAs, long non coding RNAs on the expression of PXR/CAR/VDR and phase 0-III mediators, and their impacts on variable drug response. Therapeutic agents that target epigenetic regulation and the molecular basis and consequences (overdosing, underdosing, or beneficial outcome of drug-drug/drug-food/drug-herb interactions are also discussed. Precision medicine requires understanding of a drug's impact on DME and transporter activity and their NR-regulated expression in order to achieve optimal drug efficacy without adverse drug reactions. In future drug screening, new tools such as humanized mouse

  4. Drug: D06722 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ranthes bidentata root Major component: Ecdysterone [CPD:C02633] Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 5 Crude drugs... and Chinese medicine formulations 51 Crude drugs 510 Crude drugs 5100 Crude drugs D06...ude Drugs Drugs for blood Drugs for removing blood stasis D06722 Achyranthes root; Achyranthese root Crude drugs

  5. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  6. Quarkonium Binding and Entropic Force

    CERN Document Server

    Satz, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A Q-Qbar bound state represents a balance between repulsive kinetic and attractive potential energy. In a hot quark-gluon plasma, the interaction potential experiences medium effects. Color screening modifies the attractive binding force between the quarks, while the increase of entropy with Q-Qbar separation gives rise to a growing repulsion. We study the role of these phenomena for in-medium Q-Qbar binding and dissociation. It is found that the relevant potential for Q-Qbar binding is the free energy F; with increasing Q-Qbar separation, further binding through the internal energy U is compensated by repulsive entropic effects.

  7. Young drug addicts and the drug scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchini, R

    1985-01-01

    The drug scene generally comprises the following four distinct categories of young people: neophytes, addicts who enjoy a high status vis-à-vis other addicts, multiple drug addicts, and non-addicted drug dealers. It has its own evolution, hierarchy, structure and criteria of success and failure. The members are required to conform to the established criteria. The integration of the young addict into the drug scene is not voluntary in the real sense of the word, for he is caught between the culture that he rejects and the pseudo-culture of the drug scene. To be accepted into the drug scene, the neophyte must furnish proof of his reliability, which often includes certain forms of criminal activities. The addict who has achieved a position of importance in the drug world serves as a role model for behaviour to the neophyte. In a more advanced phase of addiction, the personality of the addict and the social functions of the drug scene are overwhelmed by the psychoactive effects of the drug, and this process results in the social withdrawal of the addict. The life-style of addicts and the subculture they develop are largely influenced by the type of drug consumed. For example, it is possible to speak of a heroin subculture and a cocaine subculture. In time, every drug scene deteriorates so that it becomes fragmented into small groups, which is often caused by legal interventions or a massive influx of new addicts. The fragmentation of the drug scene is followed by an increase in multiple drug abuse, which often aggravates the medical and social problems of drug addicts. PMID:4075000

  8. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH(3) group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH(3) at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design. PMID:23247390

  9. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  10. CONCEPT OF DRUG INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Nidhi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug interaction is an increasingly important cause of adverse reactions (ADR, and is the modification of the effect of one drug (object by the prior or concomitant administration of another drug (precipitant drug. Drug interaction may either enhance or diminish the intended effect of one or both drugs. For example severe haemorrhage may occur if warfarin and salicylates (asprin are combined. Precipitant drugs modify the object drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion or actual clinical effect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics and, in particular, rifampin are common precipitant drugs prescribed in primary care practice. Drugs with a narrow therapeutic range or low therapeutic index are more likely to be the objects for serious drug interactions. Object drugs in common use include warfarin, fluoroquinolones, antiepileptic drugs, oral contraceptives, cisapride and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. Many other drugs, act as precipitants or objects, and a number of drugs act as both. The aim of present review is to throw light on the concept of drug interaction.

  11. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  12. Fluorescence analysis of competition of phenylbutazone and methotrexate in binding to serum albumin in combination treatment in rheumatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, M.; Sułkowska, A.; Bojko, B.; Równicka, J.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Combination of several drugs is often necessary especially during long-them therapy. The competition between drugs can cause a decrease of the amount of a drug bound to albumin. This results in an increase of the free, biological active fraction of the drug. The aim of the presented study was to describe the competition between phenylbutazone (Phe) and methotrexate (MTX), two drugs recommended for the treatment of rheumatology in binding to bovine (BSA) and human (HSA) serum albumin in the high affinity binding site. Fluorescence analysis was used to estimate the effect of drugs on the protein fluorescence and to define the binding and quenching properties of drugs-serum albumin complexes. The effect of the displacement of one drug from the complex of the other with serum albumin has been described on the basis of the comparison of the quenching curves and binding constants for the binary and ternary systems. The conclusion that both Phe and MTX form a binding site in the same subdomain (IIA) points to the necessity of using a monitoring therapy owning to the possible increase of the uncontrolled toxic effects.

  13. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  14. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  15. Improving drug discovery using hybrid softcomputing methods

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Sánchez, Horacio; Cano, Gaspar; García Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) methods can considerably aid clinical research, predicting how ligands interact with drug targets. Most VS methods suppose a unique binding site for the target, but it has been demonstrated that diverse ligands interact with unrelated parts of the target and many VS methods do not take into account this relevant fact. This problem is circumvented by a novel VS methodology named BINDSURF that scans the whole protein surface in order to find new hotspots, where ligands mi...

  16. Drug: D06758 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available component: Zizyphus saponin Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 5 Crude drugs and Chinese m...edicine formulations 51 Crude drugs 510 Crude drugs 5100 Crude drugs D06758 Jujub...e (JP16) Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Stomachic and antidiarrheal drugs St...omachic and antidiarrheal drugs D06758 *Jujube; Jujube Drugs for Qi Drugs for replenishing Qi D06758 *Jujube; Jujube Crude drugs

  17. Drug: D07154 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aki mature fruit calyx; Standards for non-pharmacopoeial crude drugs Therapeutic category of drugs in Japan [BR:br08301] 5 Crude drug...s and Chinese medicine formulations 51 Crude drugs 510 Crude drugs 5100 Crude drugs...4] Crude Drugs Drugs for Qi Drugs for regulating Qi D07154 Kaki calyx Crude drugs [BR:br08305] Dicot plants: asterids Ebenaceae (ebony family) D07154 Kaki calyx PubChem: 51091493 ...

  18. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Kumari; Dependra K Timshina; Devinder Mohan Thappa

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalit...

  19. Club Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Club Drug Use Overview What are "club drugs"? Club drugs are popular in nightclubs, at parties and at raves (all- ... MDMA are stimulants that can increase your heart rate and blood pressure. ... if they use GHB, ketamine and flunitrazepam repeatedly. These drugs can ...

  20. Drugs and Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug abuse is a serious public health problem. It affects almost every community and family in some way. Drug abuse in children and teenagers may pose a ... of young people may be more susceptible to drug abuse and addiction than adult brains. Abused drugs ...

  1. POVME: An Algorithm for Measuring Binding-Pocket Volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Durrant, Jacob D; de Oliveira, César Augusto F; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Researchers engaged in computer-aided drug design often wish to measure the volume of a ligand-binding pocket in order to predict pharmacology. We have recently developed a simple algorithm, called POVME (POcket Volume MEasurer), for this purpose. POVME is Python implemented, fast, and freely available. To demonstrate its utility, we use the new algorithm to study three members of the matrix-metalloproteinase family of proteins. Despite the structural similarity of these proteins, differences...

  2. A drug-specific nanocarrier design for efficient anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Xiao, Kai; Wang, Xu; Wang, Lili; Luo, Juntao

    2015-07-01

    The drug-loading properties of nanocarriers depend on the chemical structures and properties of their building blocks. Here we customize telodendrimers (linear dendritic copolymer) to design a nanocarrier with improved in vivo drug delivery characteristics. We do a virtual screen of a library of small molecules to identify the optimal building blocks for precise telodendrimer synthesis using peptide chemistry. With rationally designed telodendrimer architectures, we then optimize the drug-binding affinity of a nanocarrier by introducing an optimal drug-binding molecule (DBM) without sacrificing the stability of the nanocarrier. To validate the computational predictions, we synthesize a series of nanocarriers and evaluate systematically for doxorubicin delivery. Rhein-containing nanocarriers have sustained drug release, prolonged circulation, increased tolerated dose, reduced toxicity, effective tumour targeting and superior anticancer effects owing to favourable doxorubicin-binding affinity and improved nanoparticle stability. This study demonstrates the feasibility and versatility of the de novo design of telodendrimer nanocarriers for specific drug molecules, which is a promising approach to transform nanocarrier development for drug delivery.

  3. Introduction to drug pharmacokinetics in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian S; Yogaratnam, Dinesh; Levasseur-Franklin, Kimberly E; Forni, Allison; Fong, Jeffrey

    2012-05-01

    Despite regular use of drugs for critically ill patients, overall data are limited regarding the impact of critical illness on pharmacokinetics (PK). Designing safe and effective drug regimens for patients with critical illness requires an understanding of PK. This article reviews general principles of PK, including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination, and how critical illness can influence these parameters. In the area of drug absorption, we discuss the impact of vasopressor use, delayed gastric emptying and feeding tubes, and nutrient interactions. On the topic of drug distribution, we review fluid resuscitation, alterations in plasma protein binding, and tissue perfusion. With drug metabolism, we discuss hepatic enzyme activity, protein binding, and hepatic blood flow. Finally, we review drug elimination in the critically ill patient and discuss the impact of augmented renal clearance and acute kidney injury on drug therapies. In each section, we highlight select literature reviewing the PK impact of these conditions on a drug PK profile and, where appropriate, provide general suggestions for clinicians on how to modify drug regimens to manage PK challenges. PMID:22553267

  4. Food and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đaković-Švajcer Kornelija

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Food can exert a significant influence on the effects of certain drugs. The interactions between food and drugs can be pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. Pharmacokinetic interactions most often take place on absorption and drug metabolism levels. Absorption can be either accelerated or delayed, increased or decreased, while drug metabolism can be either stimulated or inhibited. The factors which influence food-drug interactions are as follows: composition and physic-chemical properties of drugs, the interval between a meal and drug intake and food composition. Food consistency is of lesser influence on drug bioavailability than food composition (proteins, fats, carbohydrates, cereals. Important interactions can occur during application of drugs with low therapeutic index, whereby the plasma level significantly varies due to changes in resorption or metabolism (e.g. digoxin, theophyllin, cyclosporin and drugs such as antibiotics, whose proper therapeutic effect requires precise plasma concentrations.

  5. Synthesis of imidazole derivatives and the spectral characterization of the binding properties towards human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuanyuan; Dong, Qiao; Zhang, Yajie; Li, Xiaoge; Yan, Xuyang; Sun, Yahui; Liu, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Small molecular drugs that can combine with target proteins specifically, and then block relative signal pathway, finally obtain the purpose of treatment. For this reason, the synthesis of novel imidazole derivatives was described and this study explored the details of imidazole derivatives binding to human serum albumin (HSA). The data of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence showed that the conjugation of imidazole derivatives with HSA yielded quenching by a static mechanism. Meanwhile, the number of binding sites, the binding constants, and the thermodynamic parameters were also measured; the raw data indicated that imidazole derivatives could spontaneously bind with HSA through hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds which agreed well with the results from the molecular modeling study. Competitive binding experiments confirmed the location of binding. Furthermore, alteration of the secondary structure of HSA in the presence of the imidazole derivatives was tested.

  6. Endogenous dopamine (DA) modulates [3H]spiperone binding in vivo in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]spiperone (SPI) binding in vivo, biochemical parameters and behavior were measured after modulating DA levels by various drug treatments. DA releasers and uptake inhibitors increased SPI binding in rat striatum. In other brain areas, the effects were variable, but only the pituitary remained unaffected. Surprisingly, nomifensine decreased SPI binding in frontal cortex. The effects of these drugs were monitored by measuring DA, serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the same rats. The increased SPI binding in striatum was parallel to the locomotor stimulation with the following rank order: amfonelic acid greater than nomifensine greater than D-amphetamine greater than or equal to methylphenidate greater than amineptine greater than bupropion. Decreasing DA levels with reserpine or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine reduced SPI binding by 45% in striatum only when both drugs were combined. In contrast, reserpine enhanced SPI binding in pituitary. Thus, the amount of releasable DA seems to modulate SPI binding characteristics. It is suggested that in vivo, DA receptors are submitted to dynamic regulation in response to changes in intrasynaptic concentrations of DA

  7. Endogenous dopamine (DA) modulates (3H)spiperone binding in vivo in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, S.; Krauss, J.; Grunenwald, C.; Gunst, F.; Heinrich, M.; Schaub, M.; Stoecklin, K.V.; Vassout, A.; Waldmeier, P.; Maitre, L. (Research Department, CIBA-GEIGY Ltd., Basel (Switzerland))

    1991-01-01

    (3H)spiperone (SPI) binding in vivo, biochemical parameters and behavior were measured after modulating DA levels by various drug treatments. DA releasers and uptake inhibitors increased SPI binding in rat striatum. In other brain areas, the effects were variable, but only the pituitary remained unaffected. Surprisingly, nomifensine decreased SPI binding in frontal cortex. The effects of these drugs were monitored by measuring DA, serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the same rats. The increased SPI binding in striatum was parallel to the locomotor stimulation with the following rank order: amfonelic acid greater than nomifensine greater than D-amphetamine greater than or equal to methylphenidate greater than amineptine greater than bupropion. Decreasing DA levels with reserpine or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine reduced SPI binding by 45% in striatum only when both drugs were combined. In contrast, reserpine enhanced SPI binding in pituitary. Thus, the amount of releasable DA seems to modulate SPI binding characteristics. It is suggested that in vivo, DA receptors are submitted to dynamic regulation in response to changes in intrasynaptic concentrations of DA.

  8. Determinants of benzodiazepine brain uptake: lipophilicity versus binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, R M; Greenblatt, D J; Liebisch, D C; Luu, M D; Paul, S M

    1987-01-01

    Factors influencing brain uptake of benzodiazepine derivatives were evaluated in adult Sprague Dawley rats (n = 8-10 per drug). Animals received single intraperitoneal doses of alprazolam, triazolam, lorazepam, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, desmethyldiazepam, or clobazam. Concentrations of each drug (and metabolites) in whole brain and serum 1 h after dosage were determined by gas chromatography. Serum free fraction was measured by equilibrium dialysis. In vitro binding affinity (apparent Ki) of each compound was estimated based on displacement of tritiated flunitrazepam in washed membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex. Lipid solubility of each benzodiazepine was estimated using the reverse-phase liquid chromatographic (HPLC) retention index at physiologic pH. There was no significant relation between brain:total serum concentration ratio and either HPLC retention (r = 0.18) or binding Ki (r = -0.34). Correction of uptake ratios for free as opposed to total serum concentration yielded a highly significant correlation with HPLC retention (r = 0.78, P less than 0.005). However, even the corrected ratio was not correlated with binding Ki (r = -0.22). Thus a benzodiazepine's capacity to diffuse from systemic blood into brain tissue is much more closely associated with the physicochemical property of lipid solubility than with specific affinity. Unbound rather than total serum or plasma concentration most accurately reflects the quantity of drug available for diffusion. PMID:2888155

  9. Ciprofloxacin encapsulation into giant unilamellar vesicles: membrane binding and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszás, Nóra; Bozó, Tamás; Budai, Marianna; Gróf, Pál

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed at investigating some respects of binding and interaction between water-soluble drugs and liposomal carrier systems depending on their size and lamellarity. As model substance, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CPFX) was incorporated into giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to study their CPFX encapsulation/binding capacity. To characterize molecular interactions of various CPFX microspecies with lipid bilayer, zeta potential and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements were performed. The increase of the zeta potential at pH 5.4 but no change at pH 7.2 was interpreted in terms of the CPFX microspecies' distribution at the two pH values. EPR observations showed an increased fluidity because of CPFX binding to GUVs. We worked out and applied a three-compartment dialysis model to separately determine the rate of drug diffusion through the liposomal membrane. Equilibrium dialysis showed (a) different permeation of CPFX through the membranes of GUVs and multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), with characteristic half-lives of 54.4 and 18.1 h, respectively; and (b) increased retention of CPFX in case of GUVs with released amounts of 70% compared with about 97% in case of MLVs. Our results may provide further details for efficient design of liposomal formulations incorporating water-soluble drugs. PMID:23233199

  10. Practice Gaps: Drug Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    The term "drug reactions" is relevant to dermatology in three categories of reactions: cutaneous drug reactions without systemic features, cutaneous drug reactions with systemic features, and systemic drugs prescribed by the dermatologist with systematic adverse effects. This article uses examples from each of these categories to illustrate several important principles central to drug reaction diagnosis and management. The information presented will help clinicians attain the highest possible level of certainty before making clinical decisions. PMID:27363888

  11. Food and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Đaković-Švajcer Kornelija

    2002-01-01

    Food can exert a significant influence on the effects of certain drugs. The interactions between food and drugs can be pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. Pharmacokinetic interactions most often take place on absorption and drug metabolism levels. Absorption can be either accelerated or delayed, increased or decreased, while drug metabolism can be either stimulated or inhibited. The factors which influence food-drug interactions are as follows: composition and physic-chemical properties of d...

  12. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  13. Protein-binding properties of a designed steroidal lactam compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Xin; Liu, Y

    2014-02-01

    Introducing amide bonds into a steroid nucleus or its side chain may reduce the acute toxicity and enhance the pharmaceutical activity. In this work, a designed steroidal amide compound, named 3β-hydroxy-17-aza-d-homo-5-androsten-17-one (HAAO), was synthesized and identified. The interactions between HAAO and human serum albumin (HSA) were studied by multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling procedures. It was found that HAAO locates in Sudlow's site I in subdomain IIA of HSA molecules, relying on hydrogen bonds and van der Waals power to form HAAO-HSA complexes at ground state. The number of binding sites, binding constants, enthalpy change (ΔH(θ)), Gibbs free energy change (ΔG(θ)) and entropy change (ΔS(θ)) were calculated at different temperatures based on fluorescence quenching theory and classical thermodynamic equation. The percentages content of the HSA's secondary structures in presence of HAAO were detected by circular dichroism (CD) spectra and compared with those in no presence of HAAO. In addition, the experimental results of both binding site and conformational change were further confirmed by molecular modeling investigation, in which more details of the binding were visually unfolded. The information provided by the study may be useful for designing novel chemotherapeutic drugs and be helpful both in the early stages of drug discovery and in clinical practice. PMID:24316162

  14. Ondansetron and Granisetron Binding Orientation in the 5-HT3 Receptor Determined by Unnatural Amino Acid Mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Noah H.; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R) is a ligand-gated ion channel that mediates fast synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The 5-HT3R is a therapeutic target, and the clinically available drugs ondansetron and granisetron inhibit receptor activity. Their inhibitory action is through competitive binding to the native ligand binding site, although the binding orientation of the drugs at the receptor has been a matter of debate. Here we heterologously express mouse 5-HT3A receptors in Xenopus oocytes and use unnatural amino acid mutagenesis to establish a cation-π interaction for both ondansetron and granisetron to tryptophan 183 in the ligand binding pocket. This cation-π interaction establishes a binding orientation for both ondansetron and granisetron within the binding pocket. PMID:22873819

  15. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Vihang S. Chawan; Abhishek M. Phatak; Kalpesh V. Gawand; Sagar V. Badwane; Sagar S. Panchal

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and...

  16. Binding of nucleotides to nucleoside diphosphate kinase: a calorimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervoni, L; Lascu, I; Xu, Y; Gonin, P; Morr, M; Merouani, M; Janin, J; Giartosio, A

    2001-04-17

    The source of affinity for substrates of human nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinases is particularly important in that its knowledge could be used to design more effective antiviral nucleoside drugs (e.g., AZT). We carried out a microcalorimetric study of the binding of enzymes from two organisms to various nucleotides. Isothermal titration calorimetry has been used to characterize the binding in terms of Delta G degrees, Delta H degrees and Delta S degrees. Thermodynamic parameters of the interaction of ADP with the hexameric NDP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum and with the tetrameric enzyme from Myxococcus xanthus, at 20 degrees C, were similar and, in both cases, binding was enthalpy-driven. The interactions of ADP, 2'deoxyADP, GDP, and IDP with the eukaryotic enzyme differed in enthalpic and entropic terms, whereas the Delta G degrees values obtained were similar due to enthalpy--entropy compensation. The binding of the enzyme to nonphysiological nucleotides, such as AMP--PNP, 3'deoxyADP, and 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP, appears to differ in several respects. Crystallography of the protein bound to 3'-deoxy-3'-amino-ADP showed that the drug was in a distorted position, and was unable to interact correctly with active site side chains. The interaction of pyrimidine nucleoside diphosphates with the hexameric enzyme is characterized by a lower affinity than that with purine nucleotides. Titration showed the stoichiometry of the interaction to be abnormal, with 9--12 binding sites/hexamer. The presence of supplementary binding sites might have physiological implications. PMID:11294625

  17. Drug: D06742 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Crude drugs D06742 Houttuynia herb (JP16) Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Drugs for clearing heat Drug...s for clearing heat D06742 *Houttuynia herb; Houttuynia harb Drugs... for pus discharge Drugs for pus discharge D06742 *Houttuynia herb; Houttuynia harb Crude drugs [B

  18. Monitoring of drug-drug and drug-food interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabedian-Ruffalo, S M; Syrja-Farber, M; Lanius, P M; Plucinski, A

    1988-07-01

    A program for detecting and preventing potentially serious drug-drug and drug-food interactions is described. Two clinical pharmacists developed drug interaction alert (DIA) cards for each potential interaction to be monitored. The cards contain information about the proposed mechanism and potential result of the interaction, as well as information about how to monitor or circumvent the interaction. Staff pharmacists check for the occurrence of potential interactions daily as they verify the filling of the patient-medication cassettes; a poster of all the interactions that are included in the program is posted in each satellite pharmacy to serve as a quick reference for the pharmacists. When a pharmacist detects a potential interaction, he or she completes a DIA card and places it in the medication cassette drawer (if the notice is directed to the nurse) or on the front of the patient's chart (if the notice is directed to the physician). The program was introduced to hospital personnel through inservice education programs and departmental newsletters. The results of a quality assurance review indicated that 95 of 279 (34%) cards dispensed to nurses and 40 of 49 (82%) cards dispensed to physicians resulted in some form of action. The program to detect and prevent potentially serious drug-drug and drug-food interactions has been successful. PMID:3414718

  19. Role of solution conformation and flexibility of short peptide ligands that bind to the p56(lck) SH2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; de Mol, Nico J; Bultinck, Patrick; Kemmink, Johan; Hilbers, Hans W; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2003-01-01

    A general approach in drug design is making ligands more rigid in order to avoid loss in conformational entropy (deltaS(conf)) upon receptor binding. We hypothesized that in the high affinity binding of pYEEI peptide ligands to the p56(lck) SH2 domain this loss in deltaS(conf) might be diminished du

  20. Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Drug Addiction DrugFacts: Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction Email Facebook Twitter Revised July 2016 NOTE: This ... treatment options in your state. What is drug addiction? Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by ...

  1. Drug: D01033 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D01033 Crude, Drug Tragacanth (JP16/NF); Powdered tragacanth (JP16); Tragacanth (TN...rude drugs and Chinese medicine formulations 51 Crude drugs 510 Crude drugs 5100 Crude drugs D01033 Tragacanth (JP16/NF); Powdered

  2. Drug: D06813 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nent: Scopoletin [CPD:C01752] Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Stomachic and a...ntidiarrheal drugs Stomachic and antidiarrheal drugs D06813 *Dolichos seed Drugs for dampness Drugs

  3. Drug: D09185 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Stomachic and antidiarrheal drugs Stomachic ...and antidiarrheal drugs D09185 *Myrica Drugs for external use Drugs for external use D09185 *Myrica Crude dr

  4. Drug: D06894 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available daisy family) Artemisia leaf (dried) Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Drugs for blood Drugs... for replenishing blood D06894 *Artemisiae folium; Gaiyo Drugs for external use Drugs

  5. Drug: D03404 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drugs D03404 Cardamon (JP16); Cardamom seed (NF) Traditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Drugs... for dampness Drugs for resolving dampness D03404 Cardamon; Cardamom seed; Cardamon Crude drugs [B

  6. Drug: D09151 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available raditional Chinese Medicine in Japan [BR:br08304] Crude Drugs Drugs for Qi Drugs for regulating Qi D09151 Sw...eetflag rhizome Other drugs Drugs for resuscitation D09151 Acorus gramineus rhizo

  7. Psychostimulant Drugs and Neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Fernandez-Espejo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse induce plastic changes in the brain that seem to underlie addictive phenomena. These plastic changes can be structural (morphological or synaptic (biochemical, and most of them take place in the mesolimbic and mesostriatal circuits. Several addiction-related changes in brain circuits (hypofrontality, sensitization, tolerance as well as the outcome of treatment have been visualized in addicts to psychostimulants using neuroimaging techniques. Repeated exposure to psychostimulants induces morphological changes such as increase in the number of dendritic spines, changes in the morphology of dendritic spines, and altered cellular coupling through new gap junctions. Repeated exposure to psychostimulants also induces various synaptic adaptations, many of them related to sensitization and neuroplastic processes, that include up- or down-regulation of D1, D2 and D3 dopamine receptors, changes in subunits of G proteins, increased adenylyl cyclase activity, cyclic AMP and protein kinase A in the nucleus accumbens, increased tyrosine hydroxylase enzyme activity, increased calmodulin and activated CaMKII in the ventral tegmental area, and increased deltaFosB, c-Fos and AP-1 binding proteins. Most of these changes are transient, suggesting that more lasting plastic brain adaptations should take place. In this context, protein synthesis inhibitors block the development of sensitization to cocaine, indicating that rearrangement of neural networks must develop for the long-lasting plasticity required for addiction to occur. Self-administration studies indicate the importance of glutamate neurotransmission in neuroplastic changes underlying transition from use to abuse. Finally, plastic changes in the addicted brain are enhanced and aggravated by neuroinflammation and neurotrophic disbalance after repeated psychostimulants.

  8. Identification of Inhibitor Binding Site in Human Sirtuin 2 Using Molecular Docking and Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Sugunadevi Sakkiah; Mahreen Arooj; Manian Rajesh Kumar; Soo Hyun Eom; Keun Woo Lee

    2013-01-01

    The ability to identify the site of a protein that can bind with high affinity to small, drug-like compounds has been an important goal in drug design. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), histone deacetylase protein family, plays a central role in the regulation of various pathways. Hence, identification of drug for SIRT2 has attracted great interest in the drug discovery community. To elucidate the molecular basis of the small molecules interactions to inhibit the SIRT2 function we employed the molecular doc...

  9. The role of glucuronidation in drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerska, Zofia; Mróz, Anna; Pawłowska, Monika; Augustin, Ewa

    2016-03-01

    The final therapeutic effect of a drug candidate, which is directed to a specific molecular target strongly depends on its absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). The disruption of at least one element of ADME may result in serious drug resistance. In this work we described the role of one element of this resistance: phase II metabolism with UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). UGT function is the transformation of their substrates into more polar metabolites, which are better substrates for the ABC transporters, MDR1, MRP and BCRP, than the native drug. UGT-mediated drug resistance can be associated with (i) inherent overexpression of the enzyme, named intrinsic drug resistance or (ii) induced expression of the enzyme, named acquired drug resistance observed when enzyme expression is induced by the drug or other factors, as food-derived compounds. Very often this induction occurs via ligand binding receptors including AhR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) PXR (pregnane X receptor), or other transcription factors. The effect of UGT dependent resistance is strengthened by coordinate action and also a coordinate regulation of the expression of UGTs and ABC transporters. This coupling of UGT and multidrug resistance proteins has been intensively studied, particularly in the case of antitumor treatment, when this resistance is "improved" by differences in UGT expression between tumor and healthy tissue. Multidrug resistance coordinated with glucuronidation has also been described here for drugs used in the management of epilepsy, psychiatric diseases, HIV infections, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. Proposals to reverse UGT-mediated drug resistance should consider the endogenous functions of UGT. PMID:26808161

  10. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na+, Cl- and K+ to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na+. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na+ and Cl-, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na+ binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl-. Cl- enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na+. At concentrations in the range of its KM for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na+-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [3H]imipramine binding and [3H]serotonin transport

  11. Spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies of binding mechanism of metformin with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepti; Ojha, Himanshu; Pathak, Mallika; Singh, Bhawna; Sharma, Navneet; Singh, Anju; Kakkar, Rita; Sharma, Rakesh K.

    2016-08-01

    Metformin is a biguanide class of drug used for the treatment of diabetes mellitus. It is well known that serum protein-ligand binding interaction significantly influence the biodistribution of a drug. Current study was performed to characterize the binding mechanism of metformin with serum albumin. The binding interaction of the metformin with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was examined using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence, circular dichroism, density functional theory and molecular docking studies. Absorption spectra and fluorescence emission spectra pointed out the weak binding of metformin with BSA as was apparent from the slight change in absorbance and fluorescence intensity of BSA in presence of metformin. Circular dichroism study implied the significant change in the conformation of BSA upon binding with metformin. Density functional theory calculations showed that metformin has non-planar geometry and has two energy states. The docking studies evidently signified that metformin could bind significantly to the three binding sites in BSA via hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions. The data suggested the existence of non-covalent specific binding interaction in the complexation of metformin with BSA. The present study will certainly contribute to the development of metformin as a therapeutic molecule.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms affect efficacy and adverse drug reactions of DMARDs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling Ling; Yang, Sen; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xue Jun

    2014-11-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and biological agents are critical in preventing the severe complications of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the outcome of treatment with these drugs in RA patients is quite variable and unpredictable. Drug-metabolizing enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase, cytochrome P450 enzymes, N-acetyltransferases, etc.), drug transporters (ATP-binding cassette transporters), and drug targets (tumor necrosis factor-α receptors) are coded for by variant alleles. These gene polymorphisms may influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and side effects of medicines. The cause for differences in efficacy and adverse drug reactions may be genetic variation in drug metabolism among individuals. Polymorphisms in drug transporter genes may change the distribution and excretion of medicines, and the sensitivity of the targets to drugs is strongly influenced by genetic variations. In this article, we review the genetic polymorphisms that affect the efficacy of DMARDs or the occurrence of adverse drug reactions associated with DMARDs in RA. PMID:25144752

  13. Drugs and drug policy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuw, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The Dutch parliament enacted the revised Opium Act in 1976. This penal law is part of the Dutch drug policy framework that includes tolerance for nonconforming lifestyles, risk reduction in regard to the harmful health and social consequences of drug taking, and penal measures directed against illeg

  14. Assessment of Free Drug Concentration in Cyclodextrin Formulations Is Essential to Determine Drug Potency in Functional In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Andersson, Sara; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna K; Halldin, Magnus M; Stålberg, Olle

    2016-09-01

    Cyclodextrins (CD) have the ability to form inclusion complexes with drugs and can be used as excipients to enhance solubility of poorly soluble drugs. To make accurate estimations of the potency of the drug, knowledge of the free drug concentration is important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability of calculated free drug concentrations toward response measurements in a transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 cell-based in vitro assay. This included accounting for potential competitive CD binding of 2 transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 active entities: 1 antagonist, and 1 agonist (capsaicin). Solubility of the CD-drug complexes was measured, and the ligand to substrate affinity in CD formulations was determined according to the phase-solubility technique. The total concentration of antagonist, agonist, CD, and the binding constants between ligands and CD were used to calculate the free concentration of CD ligands. For capsaicin and 2 of the 3 investigated model drugs, the calculated free drug concentration was consistent with the experimental in vitro data while it was overestimated for one of the compounds. In conclusion, the suggested approach can be used to calculate free drug concentration and competitive binding in CD formulations for the application of cell-based drug functionality assays. PMID:27431012

  15. NEW DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Biresh K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating an existing medicine into a new drug delivery system can significantly improve its performance in terms of efficacy, safety, and improved patient compliance. The need for delivering drugs to patients efficiently and with fewer side effects has prompted pharmaceutical companies to engage in the development of new drug delivery systems. Today, drug delivery companies are engaged in the development of multiple platform technologies for controlled release, delivery of large molecules, liposome, taste-masking, oral fast- dispersing dosage forms, technology for in- soluble drugs, and delivery of drugs through intranasal, pulmonary, transdermal, vaginal, colon, and transmucosal routes.

  16. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  17. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein-ligand binding from host-guest affinity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the "stalemates" in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein-ligand binding, organic host-guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host-guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein-ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein-ligand systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256816

  18. Ligand Binding Pathways of Clozapine and Haloperidol in the Dopamine D2 and D3 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Trayder; Fang, Yu; Yuriev, Elizabeth; Chalmers, David K

    2016-02-22

    The binding of a small molecule ligand to its protein target is most often characterized by binding affinity and is typically viewed as an on/off switch. The more complex reality is that binding involves the ligand passing through a series of intermediate states between the solution phase and the fully bound pose. We have performed a set of 29 unbiased molecular dynamics simulations to model the binding pathways of the dopamine receptor antagonists clozapine and haloperidol binding to the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. Through these simulations we have captured the binding pathways of clozapine and haloperidol from the extracellular vestibule to the orthosteric binding site and thereby, we also predict the bound pose of each ligand. These are the first long time scale simulations of haloperidol or clozapine binding to dopamine receptors. From these simulations, we have identified several important stages in the binding pathway, including the involvement of Tyr7.35 in a "handover" mechanism that transfers the ligand between the extracellular vestibule and Asp3.32. We have also performed interaction and cluster analyses to determine differences in binding pathways between the D2 and D3 receptors and identified metastable states that may be of use in drug design. PMID:26690887

  19. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  20. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity. (paper)

  1. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  2. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenshahlaei@yahoo.com [Nano drug delivery research Center, Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Behnoosh [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Student research committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrjavadi, Komail [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol{sup −1} and −25.52±11.52 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val{sub 216}, Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} and polar residues such as Glu{sub 354} play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I.

  3. Binding of Natural and Synthetic Polyphenols to Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Neptuno Rodríguez-López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for antifolate drugs. Fluorescence quenching experiments show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and (--epicatechin gallate (ECG are potent inhibitors of DHFR with dissociation constants (KD of 0.9 and 1.8 μM, respectively, while polyphenols lacking the ester bound gallate moiety [e.g., (--epigallocatechin (EGC and (--epicatechin (EC] did not bind to this enzyme. To avoid stability and bioavailability problems associated with tea catechins we synthesized a methylated derivative of ECG (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--epicatechin; TMECG, which effectively binds to DHFR (KD = 2.1 μM. In alkaline solution, TMECG generates a stable quinone methide product that strongly binds to the enzyme with a KD of 8.2 nM. Quercetin glucuronides also bind to DHFR but its effective binding was highly dependent of the sugar residue, with quercetin-3-xyloside being the stronger inhibitor of the enzyme with a KD of 0.6 μM. The finding that natural polyphenols are good inhibitors of human DHFR could explain the epidemiological data on their prophylactic effects for certain forms of cancer and open a possibility for the use of natural and synthetic polyphenols in cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on Titanium ion binding to the apo lactoferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium is a relatively abundant element that has found growing applications in medical science and recently some of Titanium compounds are introduced as anticancer drugs. In spite of very limited data which exist on the Titanium metabolism, some proteins might be involved in the mechanism of action of Titanium up to our knowledge, there is not any report in the literature concerning binding of Titanium to apo lactoferrin. Binding of apo lactoferrin with Ti(IV)-citrate was studied by spectroflourimeterey and spectrophotometery techniques under physiological conditions. The spectroflourimeteric studies revealed a significant fluorescence quenching, that indicated binding of apo lactoferrin with Ti(IV). The same reaction was monitored through spectrophotometry technique; this represents a characteristic UV difference band at 267 nm, which is different from lac-Fe (III). Titration studies how that lactoferrin specifically binds two moles Ti(IV) as complex with citrate per mol protein. Spectroflourimeterey and spectrophotometery techniques indicated that Ti(IV) ions cause a reduction (13%-14%) in binding of Fe(III) to lactoferrin. In overall, we may come to this conclusion that this element might be involved in the iron metabolism

  5. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  6. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs. PMID:27053240

  7. A dual drug regimen synergistically blocks human parainfluenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Benjamin; Dirr, Larissa; El-Deeb, Ibrahim M.; Altmeyer, Ralf; Guillon, Patrice; von Itzstein, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Human parainfluenza type-3 virus (hPIV-3) is one of the principal aetiological agents of acute respiratory illness in infants worldwide and also shows high disease severity in the elderly and immunocompromised, but neither therapies nor vaccines are available to treat or prevent infection, respectively. Using a multidisciplinary approach we report herein that the approved drug suramin acts as a non-competitive in vitro inhibitor of the hPIV-3 haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN). Furthermore, the drug inhibits viral replication in mammalian epithelial cells with an IC50 of 30 μM, when applied post-adsorption. Significantly, we show in cell-based drug-combination studies using virus infection blockade assays, that suramin acts synergistically with the anti-influenza virus drug zanamivir. Our data suggests that lower concentrations of both drugs can be used to yield high levels of inhibition. Finally, using NMR spectroscopy and in silico docking simulations we confirmed that suramin binds HN simultaneously with zanamivir. This binding event occurs most likely in the vicinity of the protein primary binding site, resulting in an enhancement of the inhibitory potential of the N-acetylneuraminic acid-based inhibitor. This study offers a potentially exciting avenue for the treatment of parainfluenza infection by a combinatorial repurposing approach of well-established approved drugs.

  8. Rational Use of Drugs: Pharmaceutical Aspects of the Drug Selection

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya B. Rostova, PhD, ScD; Tatiana F. Odegova, PhD, ScD

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the problems encountered in the rational use of drugs are discussed, one of the areas of optimization of drug supply being the rational choice of drugs, particularly, a regulatory activity regarding the approach to the selection of standardized drug lists (drug formulary) for public drug supply, according to government guarantees and programs. The clinical aspects of the drug selection are expounded in detail. The characteristics of the drugs (original or generic drug (generi...

  9. Stimulus responsive drug release from polymer gel. Controlled release of ionic drug from polyampholyte gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate or Methacryloyloxyethyltrimethylammonium chloride as a cationic monomer was copolymerized by UV with anionic monomer such as acrylic acid (AAc), into a polyampholyte. The pH responsive swelling behaviour and the pH and electro-responsive drug release functions of polyampholyte were investigated. The result showed that a copolymer of cation rich composition swelled at acidic condition, and shrank at alkaline condition. On the other hand, an anion rich copolymer showed a reverse phenomenon. Polyampholyte proved to interact with an ionic drug both by ionic binding and physical adsorption

  10. Prediction of SAMPL3 Host-Guest Affinities with the Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Ronald M Levy

    2012-01-01

    BEDAM calculations are described to predict the free energies of binding of a series of anaesthetic drugs to a recently characterized acyclic cucurbituril host. The modeling predictions, conducted as part of the SAMPL3 host-guest affinity blind challenge, are generally in good quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements. The correlation coefficient between computed and measured binding free energies is 70% with high statistical significance. Multiple conformational stereoisomers...

  11. Calculation of Host-Guest Binding Affinities Using a Quantum-Mechanical Energy Model

    OpenAIRE

    Muddana, Hari S.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    The prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities is of central interest in computer-aided drug discovery, but it is still difficult to achieve a high degree of accuracy. Recent studies suggesting that available force fields may be a key source of error motivate the present study, which reports the first mining minima (M2) binding affinity calculations based on a quantum mechanical energy model, rather than an empirical force field. We apply a semi-empirical quantum-mechanical energy functi...

  12. Stereoselective binding of mexiletine and ketoprofen enantiomers with human serum albumin domains

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Da; Jin, Yin-xiu; Tang, Yi-hong; Hu, Hai-Hong; Xu, Si-yun; Yu, Lu-Shan; Jiang, Hui-di; Zeng, Su

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the stereoselective binding of mexiletine or ketoprofen enantiomers with different recombinant domains of human serum albumin (HSA). Methods: Three domains (HSA DOM I, II and III) were expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115 cells. Blue Sepharose 6 Fast Flow was employed to purify the recombinant HSA domains. The binding properties of the standard ligands, digitoxin, phenylbutazone and diazepam, and the chiral drugs to HSA domains were investigated using ultrafiltration. The co...

  13. A comparative analysis on the binding characteristics of various mammalian albumins towards a multitherapeutic agent, pinostrobin

    OpenAIRE

    Feroz, Shevin R.; SUMI, Rumana A.; Sri N A Malek; Tayyab, Saad

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of pinostrobin (PS), a multitherapeutic agent with serum albumins of various mammalian species namely, goat, bovine, human, porcine, rabbit, sheep and dog was investigated using fluorescence quench titration and competitive drug displacement experiments. Analysis of the intrinsic fluorescence quenching data revealed values of the association constant, Ka in the range of 1.49 – 6.12 × 104 M−1, with 1:1 binding stoichiometry. Based on the PS–albumin binding characteristics, thes...

  14. Binding of Tetracycline and Chlortetracycline to the Enzyme Trypsin: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Zhenxing; Liu, Rutao; Yang, Hongxu; Shen, Hengmei; Wang, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Tetracycline (TC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) are common members of the widely used veterinary drug tetracyclines, the residue of which in the environment can enter human body, being potentially harmful. In this study, we establish a new strategy to probe the binding modes of TC and CTC with trypsin based on spectroscopic and computational modeling methods. Both TC and CTC can interact with trypsin with one binding site to form trypsin-TC (CTC) complex, mainly through van der Waals' interacti...

  15. The Fundamental Role of Flexibility on the Strength of Molecular Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Forrey, Christopher; Douglas, Jack F.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent molecular association underlies a diverse set of biologically and technologically relevant phenomena, including the action of drugs on their biomolecular targets and self- and supra-molecular assembly processes. Computer models employed to model binding frequently use interaction potentials with atomistic detail while neglecting the thermal molecular motions of the binding species. However, errors introduced by this simplification and, more broadly, the thermodynamic consequences...

  16. Mechanism of ABC transporters: A molecular dynamics simulation of a well characterized nucleotide-binding subunit

    OpenAIRE

    Peter M Jones; Anthony M George

    2002-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are membrane-bound molecular pumps that form one of the largest of all protein families. Several of them are central to phenomena of biomedical interest, including cystic fibrosis and resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs. ABC transporters share a common architecture comprising two hydrophilic nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) and two hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) that form the substrate pathway across the membrane. The conformational changes ...

  17. Triclosan-loaded Tooth-binding Micelles for Prevention and Treatment of Dental Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fu; Rice, Kelly C.; Liu, Xin-Ming; Reinhardt, Richard A.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Wang, Dong

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop tooth-binding micelle formulations and evaluate their ability to both inhibit initial biofilm formation as well as decrease the viability of preformed biofilm using an in vitro dental biofilm model. Alendronate (ALN, a bisphosphonate) was covalently attached to the ends of different Pluronic copolymers to confer tooth-binding ability to the micelles, and triclosan was used as a model drug. Based on different micelle preparation methods, Pluronic...

  18. Fluoxetine (Prozac) Binding to Serotonin Transporter Is Modulated by Chloride and Conformational Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) is the main target for widely used antidepressant agents. Several of these drugs, including imipramine, citalopram, sertraline, and fluoxetine (Prozac), bound more avidly to SERT in the presence of Cl–. In contrast, Cl– did not enhance cocaine or paroxetine binding. A Cl– binding site recently identified in SERT, and shown to be important for Cl– dependent transport, was also critical for the Cl– dependence of antidepressant affinity. Mutation of the residues cont...

  19. Windows Presentation Foundation & Data Binding

    OpenAIRE

    JANDA, Vilém

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is a course in the form of e-learning study materials for the interpretation of technology Data Binding in Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF). In the first, mostly theoretical part will be done a description and interpretation of the elements of technology, focusing on WPF Data Binding. In the second part, is available methodology and training course with their own interpretive audio-visual files for self-study. The lectures are supplemented by solved examples, and exa...

  20. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595