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Sample records for brachytherapy dose calculation

  1. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  2. Calculation of the Transit Dose in HDR Brachytherapy Based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Monte Carlo method, which is the gold standard for accurate dose calculations in radiotherapy, was used to obtain the transit doses around a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant with thirteen dwell points. The midpoints of each of the inter-dwell separations, of step size 0.25 cm, were representative of the ...

  3. A modified dose calculation formalism for electronic brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWerd, Larry A; Culberson, Wesley S; Micka, John A; Simiele, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    To propose a modification of the current dose calculation formalism introduced in the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. Electronic brachytherapy sources are miniature x-ray tubes emitting low energies with high-dose-rates. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has introduced a new primary air-kerma rate standard for one of these sources, in contrast to air-kerma strength. A modification of the TG-43 protocol for calculation of dose-rate distributions around electronic brachytherapy sources including sources in an applicator is presented. It cannot be assumed that the perturbations from sources in an applicator are negligible, and thus, the applicator is incorporated in the formalism. The modified protocol mimics the fundamental methodology of the original TG-43 formalism, but now incorporates the new NIST-traceable source strength metric of air-kerma rate at 50 cm and introduces a new subscript, i, to denote the presence of an applicator used in treatment delivery. Applications of electronic brachytherapy sources for surface brachytherapy are not addressed in this Technical Note since they are well documented in other publications. A modification of the AAPM TG-43 protocol has been developed to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. The modified TG-43 formalism allows dose calculations to be performed using a new NIST-traceable source strength metric and introduces the concept of applicator-specific formalism parameters denoted with subscript, i. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  5. Monte Carlo dose calculations for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using GPU-accelerated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, M; Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Jiang, S B; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are typically based on the Association of American Physicists in Medicine Task Group report 43 (TG-43) guidelines, which approximate patient geometry as an infinitely large water phantom. This ignores patient and applicator geometries and heterogeneities, causing dosimetric errors. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is commonly recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This article presents our recent developments of a fast MC dose calculation package for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, gBMC, built on a graphics processing unit (GPU) platform. gBMC-simulated photon transport in voxelized geometry with physics in (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy energy range considered. A phase-space file was used as a source model. GPU-based parallel computation was used to simultaneously transport multiple photons, one on a GPU thread. We validated gBMC by comparing the dose calculation results in water with that computed TG-43. We also studied heterogeneous phantom cases and a patient case and compared gBMC results with Acuros BV results. Radial dose function in water calculated by gBMC showed GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gBMC, for HDR brachytherapy make it attractive for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  7. Using matrix summation method for three dimensional dose calculation in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibandeh-Gorji, Mahmoud; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Mohammadi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to calculate radiation dose around a brachytherapy source in a water phantom for different seed locations or rotation the sources by the matrix summation method. Monte Carlo based codes like MCNP are widely used for performing radiation transport calculations and dose evaluation in brachytherapy. But for complicated situations, like using more than one source, moving or rotating the source, the routine Monte Carlo method for dose calculation needs a long time running. The MCNPX code has been used to calculate radiation dose around a (192)Ir brachytherapy source and saved in a 3D matrix. Then, we used this matrix to evaluate the absorbed dose in any point due to some sources or a source which shifted or rotated in some places by the matrix summation method. Three dimensional (3D) dose results and isodose curves were presented for (192)Ir source in a water cube phantom shifted for 10 steps and rotated for 45 and 90° based on the matrix summation method. Also, we applied this method for some arrays of sources. The matrix summation method can be used for 3D dose calculations for any brachytherapy source which has moved or rotated. This simple method is very fast compared to routine Monte Carlo based methods. In addition, it can be applied for dose optimization study.

  8. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  9. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J

    2014-02-01

    In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR(60)Co and (192)Ir sources and a hypothetical (169)Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. For a 5 cm × 5 cm(192)Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about -3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than -1% for (60)Co and (192)Ir, yet -3% for (169)Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were -7% for (60)Co, -0.6% for (192)Ir, and -2.5% for (169)Yb. This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either (60)Co and (192)Ir. For lower energy radionuclides like (169)Yb, bolus may be needed; and (iii) for the interstitial case, at

  10. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  11. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Thilagam; Subbaiah, K V; Thayalan, K; Kannan, S E

    2010-04-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR). TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC) results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i) Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) low dose rate (LDR) applicator and (ii) Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii) Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron). The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5.5% for

  12. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  13. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, de l' Universite Laval, CHUQ, Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  14. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M.; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  15. Manual method for dose calculation in gynecologic brachytherapy; Metodo manual para o calculo de doses em braquiterapia ginecologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, Elizabeth A.; Almeida, Carlos E. de [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Biaggio, Maria F. de [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a manual method for dose calculation in brachytherapy of gynecological tumors, which allows the calculation of the doses at any plane or point of clinical interest. This method uses basic principles of vectorial algebra and the simulating orthogonal films taken from the patient with the applicators and dummy sources in place. The results obtained with method were compared with the values calculated with the values calculated with the treatment planning system model Theraplan and the agreement was better than 5% in most cases. The critical points associated with the final accuracy of the proposed method is related to the quality of the image and the appropriate selection of the magnification factors. This method is strongly recommended to the radiation oncology centers where are no treatment planning systems available and the dose calculations are manually done. (author) 10 refs., 5 figs.

  16. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The goal of this work is to compare D(m,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D(w,m) (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether ap plying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D(w,m) over D(m,m) are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using 103Pd) and prostate (using 125I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D90 values are compared for D(w,m) and D(m,m). (1) Differences (D(w,m)/D(m,m)-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D(w,m)/D(m,m) is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D90(w,m) over D90(m,m) for clinical implants matches D(w,m)/D(m,m) at 1 cm from the single point sources, Given

  17. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  18. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for (103)Pd breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksys, N; Cygler, J E; Caudrelier, J M; Thomson, R M

    2016-04-07

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for (103)Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV [Formula: see text] and skin [Formula: see text] each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV [Formula: see text] and skin [Formula: see text] are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV [Formula: see text] of up to 11% and skin [Formula: see text] of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ([Formula: see text] on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ([Formula: see text] on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images

  19. The difference of scoring dose to water or tissues in Monte Carlo dose calculations for low energy brachytherapy photon sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, CHUQ Pavillon L' Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The goal of this work is to compare D{sub m,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in medium) and D{sub w,m} (radiation transported in medium; dose scored in water) obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for a subset of human tissues of interest in low energy photon brachytherapy. Using low dose rate seeds and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the authors quantify the large cavity theory conversion factors required. The authors also assess whether applying large cavity theory utilizing the sources' initial photon spectra and average photon energy induces errors related to spatial spectral variations. First, ideal spherical geometries were investigated, followed by clinical brachytherapy LDR seed implants for breast and prostate cancer patients. Methods: Two types of dose calculations are performed with the GEANT4 MC code. (1) For several human tissues, dose profiles are obtained in spherical geometries centered on four types of low energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds, as well as an EBS operating at 50 kV. Ratios of D{sub w,m} over D{sub m,m} are evaluated in the 0-6 cm range. In addition to mean tissue composition, compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean are also studied. (2) Four clinical breast (using {sup 103}Pd) and prostate (using {sup 125}I) brachytherapy seed implants are considered. MC dose calculations are performed based on postimplant CT scans using prostate and breast tissue compositions. PTV D{sub 90} values are compared for D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m}. Results: (1) Differences (D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m}-1) of -3% to 70% are observed for the investigated tissues. For a given tissue, D{sub w,m}/D{sub m,m} is similar for all sources within 4% and does not vary more than 2% with distance due to very moderate spectral shifts. Variations of tissue composition about the assumed mean composition influence the conversion factors up to 38%. (2) The ratio of D

  20. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  1. On the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms for 192Ir HDR brachytherapy treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Eleftherios P.; Zoros, Emmanouil; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Peppa, Vasiliki; Zourari, Kyveli; Karaiskos, Pantelis; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2017-05-01

    There is an acknowledged need for the design and implementation of physical phantoms appropriate for the experimental validation of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) introduced recently in 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS), and this work investigates whether it can be met. A PMMA phantom was prepared to accommodate material inhomogeneities (air and Teflon), four plastic brachytherapy catheters, as well as 84 LiF TLD dosimeters (MTS-100M 1  ×  1  ×  1 mm3 microcubes), two radiochromic films (Gafchromic EBT3) and a plastic 3D dosimeter (PRESAGE). An irradiation plan consisting of 53 source dwell positions was prepared on phantom CT images using a commercially available TPS and taking into account the calibration dose range of each detector. Irradiation was performed using an 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) source. Dose to medium in medium, Dmm , was calculated using the MBDCA option of the same TPS as well as Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with the MCNP code and a benchmarked methodology. Measured and calculated dose distributions were spatially registered and compared. The total standard (k  =  1) spatial uncertainties for TLD, film and PRESAGE were: 0.71, 1.58 and 2.55 mm. Corresponding percentage total dosimetric uncertainties were: 5.4-6.4, 2.5-6.4 and 4.85, owing mainly to the absorbed dose sensitivity correction and the relative energy dependence correction (position dependent) for TLD, the film sensitivity calibration (dose dependent) and the dependencies of PRESAGE sensitivity. Results imply a LiF over-response due to a relative intrinsic energy dependence between 192Ir and megavoltage calibration energies, and a dose rate dependence of PRESAGE sensitivity at low dose rates (required for the full characterization of dosimeter response for 192Ir and the reduction of experimental uncertainties.

  2. Impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation using a grid-based Boltzmann solver on breast and cervix cancer brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Hofbauer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To analyze the impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation on dosimetric quality parameters in gyne¬cological and breast brachytherapy using Acuros, a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS, and to evaluate the shielding effects of different cervix brachytherapy applicators. Material and methods: Calculations with TG-43 and Acuros were based on computed tomography (CT retrospectively, for 10 cases of accelerated partial breast irradiation and 9 cervix cancer cases treated with tandem-ring applicators. Phantom CT-scans of different applicators (plastic and titanium were acquired. For breast cases the Vdose volume histogram (DVH analysis. Absorbed dose and equivalent dose to 2 Gy fractionation (EQD2 were used for comparison. Results : Calculations with TG-43 overestimated the dose for all dosimetric indices investigated. For breast, a decrease of ~8% was found for D 10cm³ to the skin and 5% for D 2cm³ to rib, resulting in a difference ~ –1.5 Gy EQD2 for overall treatment. Smaller effects were found for cervix cases with the plastic applicator, with up to –2% (–0.2 Gy EQD2 per fraction for organs at risk and –0.5% (–0.3 Gy EQD2 per fraction for CTV HR . The shielding effect of the titanium applicator resulted in a decrease of 2% for D 2cm³ to the organ at risk versus 0.7% for plastic. Conclusions : Lower doses were reported when calculating with Acuros compared to TG-43. Differences in dose parameters were larger in breast cases. A lower impact on clinical dose parameters was found for the cervix cases. Applicator material causes

  3. Impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation using a grid-based Boltzmann solver on breast and cervix cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Julia; Kirisits, Christian; Resch, Alexandra; Xu, Yingjie; Sturdza, Alina; Pötter, Richard; Nesvacil, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the impact of heterogeneity-corrected dose calculation on dosimetric quality parameters in gynecological and breast brachytherapy using Acuros, a grid-based Boltzmann equation solver (GBBS), and to evaluate the shielding effects of different cervix brachytherapy applicators. Calculations with TG-43 and Acuros were based on computed tomography (CT) retrospectively, for 10 cases of accelerated partial breast irradiation and 9 cervix cancer cases treated with tandem-ring applicators. Phantom CT-scans of different applicators (plastic and titanium) were acquired. For breast cases the V20Gyαβ3 to lung, the D0.1cm(3) , D1cm(3) , D2cm(3) to rib, the D0.1cm(3) , D1cm(3) , D10cm(3) to skin, and Dmax for all structures were reported. For cervix cases, the D0.1cm(3) , D2cm(3) to bladder, rectum and sigmoid, and the D50, D90, D98, V100 for the CTVHR were reported. For the phantom study, surrogates for target and organ at risk were created for a similar dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Absorbed dose and equivalent dose to 2 Gy fractionation (EQD2) were used for comparison. Calculations with TG-43 overestimated the dose for all dosimetric indices investigated. For breast, a decrease of ~8% was found for D10cm(3) to the skin and 5% for D2cm(3) to rib, resulting in a difference ~ -1.5 Gy EQD2 for overall treatment. Smaller effects were found for cervix cases with the plastic applicator, with up to -2% (-0.2 Gy EQD2) per fraction for organs at risk and -0.5% (-0.3 Gy EQD2) per fraction for CTVHR. The shielding effect of the titanium applicator resulted in a decrease of 2% for D2cm(3) to the organ at risk versus 0.7% for plastic. Lower doses were reported when calculating with Acuros compared to TG-43. Differences in dose parameters were larger in breast cases. A lower impact on clinical dose parameters was found for the cervix cases. Applicator material causes systematic shielding effects that can be taken into account.

  4. Dosimetry comparison between TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations using the Freiburg flap for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Ouhib, Zoubir; Granero, Domingo; Pujades-Claumarchirant, M Carmen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether the delivered dose to the skin surface and at the prescription depth when using a Freiburg flap applicator is in agreement with the one predicted by the treatment planning system (TPS) using the TG-43 dose-calculation formalism. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and radiochromic film measurements have been performed to obtain dose distributions with the source located at the center of one of the spheres and between two spheres. Primary and scatter dose contributions were evaluated to understand the role played by the scatter component. A standard treatment plan was generated using MC- and TG-43-based TPS applying the superposition principle. The MC model has been validated by performing additional simulations in the same conditions but transforming air and Freiburg flap materials into water to match TG-43 parameters. Both dose distributions differ less than 1%. Scatter defect compared with TG-43 data is up to 15% when the source is located at the center of the sphere and up to 25% when the source is between two spheres. Maximum deviations between TPS- and MC-based distributions are of 5%. The deviations in the TG-43-based dose distributions for a standard treatment plan with respect to the MC dose distribution calculated taking into account the composition and shape of the applicator and the surrounding air are lower than 5%. Therefore, this study supports the validity of the TPS used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monte Carlo-based dose calculation for 32 P patch source for superficial brachytherapy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar Sahoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer treatment involving 32 P source is an easy, less expensive method of treatment limited to small and superficial lesions of approximately 1 mm deep. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC has indigenously developed 32 P nafion-based patch source (1 cm Χ 1 cm for treating skin cancer. For this source, the values of dose per unit activity at different depths including dose profiles in water are calculated using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code system. For an initial activity of 1 Bq distributed in 1 cm 2 surface area of the source, the calculated central axis depth dose values are 3.62 Χ 10 -10 GyBq -1 and 8.41 Χ 10 -11 GyBq -1 at 0.0125 and 1 mm depths in water, respectively. Hence, the treatment time calculated for delivering therapeutic dose of 30 Gy at 1 mm depth along the central axis of the source involving 37 MBq activity is about 2.7 hrs.

  6. Dose comparison between TG-43-based calculations and radiochromic film measurements of the Freiburg flap applicator used for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments of skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldelaijan, Saad; Bekerat, Hamed; Buzurovic, Ivan; Devlin, Phillip; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    Current high-dose-rate brachytherapy skin treatments with the Freiburg flap (FF) applicator are planned with treatment planning systems based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-43 data sets, which assume full backscatter conditions in dose calculations. The aim of this work is to describe an experimental method based on radiochromic film dosimetry to evaluate dose calculation accuracy during surface treatments with the FF applicator at different depths and bolus thicknesses. Absolute doses were measured using a reference EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry system within a Solid Water phantom at different depths (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cm) with respect to the phantom surface. The impact of bolus (up to 3-cm thickness) placed on top of the applicator was investigated for two clinical loadings created using Oncentra MasterPlan: 5 cm × 5 cm and 11 cm × 11 cm. For smaller loading and depths beyond 2 cm and for larger loading and depths beyond 1 cm, the dose difference was less than 3% (±4%). At shallower depths, differences of up to 6% (±4%) at the surface were observed if no bolus was added. The addition of 2-cm bolus for the smaller loading and 1 cm for larger loading minimized the difference to less than 3% (±4%). For typical FF applicator loading sizes, the actual measured dose was 6% (±4%) lower at the skin level when compared with TG-43. Additional bolus above the FF was shown to decrease the dose difference. The consideration of change in clinical practice should be carefully investigated in light of clinical reference data. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-F-19A-01: APBI Brachytherapy Treatment Planning: The Impact of Heterogeneous Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loupot, S; Han, T; Salehpour, M; Gifford, K [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the difference in dose to PTV-EVAL and OARs (skin and rib) as calculated by (TG43) and heterogeneous calculations (CCC). Methods: 25 patient plans (5 Contura and 20 SAVI) were selected for analysis. Clinical dose distributions were computed with a commercially available treatment planning algorithm (TG43-D-(w,w)) and then recomputed with a pre-clinical collapsed cone convolution algorithm (CCCD-( m,m)). PTV-EVAL coverage (V90%, V95%), and rib and skin maximum dose were compared via percent difference. Differences in dose to normal tissue (V150cc, V200cc of PTV-EVAL) were also compared. Changes in coverage and maximum dose to organs at risk are reported in percent change, (100*(TG43 − CCC) / TG43)), and changes in maximum dose to normal tissue are absolute change in cc (TG43 − CCC). Results: Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the SAVI cases were −0.2%, −0.4%, −0.03cc, and −0.14cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −0.78%, −1.7%, 1.28cc, and 1.01cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −1.4% and −0.22%, respectively, with maximum differences of −4.5% and 16%, respectively. Mean differences in V90, V95, V150, and V200 for the Contura cases were −1.2%, −2.1%, −1.8cc, and −0.59cc, respectively, with maximum differences of −2.0%, −3.16%, −2.9cc, and −0.76cc, respectively. Mean differences in the 0.1cc dose to the rib and skin were −2.6% and −3.9%, respectively, with maximum differences of −3.2% and −5.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The effects of translating clinical knowledge based on D-(w,w) to plans reported in D-(m,m) are minimal (2% or less) on average, but vary based on the type and placement of the device, source, and heterogeneity information.

  8. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate 192 Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-11-01

    A joint working group was created by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the Australasian Brachytherapy Group (ABG) with the charge, among others, to develop a set of well-defined test case plans and perform calculations and comparisons with model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs). Its main goal is to facilitate a smooth transition from the AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dose calculation formalism, widely being used in clinical practice for brachytherapy, to the one proposed by Task Group No. 186 (TG-186) for MBDCAs. To do so, in this work a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir shielded applicator has been designed and benchmarked. A generic HDR 192 Ir shielded applicator was designed based on three commercially available gynecological applicators as well as a virtual cubic water phantom that can be imported into any DICOM-RT compatible treatment planning system (TPS). The absorbed dose distribution around the applicator with the TG-186 192 Ir source located at one dwell position at its center was computed using two commercial TPSs incorporating MBDCAs (Oncentra® Brachy with Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine, ACE™, and BrachyVision ACUROS™) and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) codes, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, egs_brachy, Geant4, MCNP6, and Penelope2008. TPS-based volumetric dose distributions for the previously reported "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test cases, and the new "source centered in applicator" test case, were analyzed here using the MCNP6 dose distribution as a reference. Volumetric dose comparisons of TPS results against results for the other MC codes were also performed. Distributions of local and global dose difference ratios are reported. The local dose differences among MC codes are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of the reference datasets for the "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test

  9. SU-F-T-46: The Effect of Inter-Seed Attenuation and Tissue Composition in Prostate 125I Brachytherapy Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, K; Araki, F; Ohno, T [Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the difference of dose distributions with/without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and tissue compositions in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations, using Monte Carlo simulations of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS). Methods: The dose distributions in {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy were calculated using PHITS for non-simultaneous and simultaneous alignments of STM1251 sources in water or prostate phantom for six patients. The PHITS input file was created from DICOM-RT file which includes source coordinates and structures for clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of urethra and rectum, using in-house Matlab software. Photon and electron cutoff energies were set to 1 keV and 100 MeV, respectively. The dose distributions were calculated with the kerma approximation and the voxel size of 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3}. The number of incident photon was set to be the statistical uncertainty (1σ) of less than 1%. The effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions was evaluated from dose volume histograms (DVHs) for each structure, by comparing to results of the AAPM TG-43 dose calculation (without the effect of inter-seed attenuation and prostate tissue compositions). Results: The dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation by source capsules was approximately 2% for CTV and OARs compared to those of TG-43. In additions, by considering prostate tissue composition, the D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} of CTV reduced by 6% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: It needs to consider the dose reduction due to the inter-seed attenuation and tissue composition in prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy dose calculations.

  10. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, C.-Y.; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, 825 NE 10th Street, OUPB 1430, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)], E-mail: iali@ouhsc.edu

    2009-09-21

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm{sup 3} on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  11. A comparative study of seed localization and dose calculation on pre- and post-implantation ultrasound and CT images for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imad; Algan, Ozer; Thompson, Spencer; Sindhwani, Puneet; Herman, Terence; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2009-09-01

    This work investigates variation in the volume of the prostate measured at different stages through the prostate brachytherapy procedure for 30 patients treated with I-125 radioactive seeds. The implanted seeds were localized on post-implantation ultrasound (US) images and the effect of prostate enlargement due to edema on dose coverage for 15 patients was studied. The volume of the prostate was measured at four stages as follows: (a) 2-3 weeks prior to implantation using US imaging, (b) then at the start of the intra-operative prostate brachytherapy procedure on the day of the implant, (c) immediately post-implantation using US imaging in the operating room and (d) finally by CT imaging at nearly 4 weeks post-implantation. Comparative prostate volume studies were performed using US imaging stepper and twister modes. For the purpose of this study, the implanted seeds were localized successfully on post-implant ultrasound twister images, retrospectively. The plans using post-implant US imaging were compared with intra-operative plans on US and plans created on CT images. The prostate volume increases about 10 cm3 on average due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed loading during implantation. The visibility of the implanted seeds on US twister images acquired post-implantation is as good as those on CT images and can be localized and used for dose calculation. The dose coverage represented by parameters such as D90 (dose covering 90% of the volume) and V100 (volume covered by 100% dose) is poorer on plans performed on post-implantation twister US studies than on the intra-operative live plan or the CT scan performed 4 weeks post-operatively. For example, the mean D90 difference on post-implantation US is lower by more than 15% than that on pre-implantation US. The volume enlargement of the prostate due to edema induced by needle insertion and seed placement has a significant effect on the quality of dosimetric coverage in brachytherapy prostate seed

  12. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  13. A generic high-dose rate (192)Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank-André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan L; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Vijande, Javier; Ma, Yunzhi; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-06-01

    In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. A hypothetical, generic HDR (192)Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic (192)Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra(®) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS™ ]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR (192)Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then

  14. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using (60)Co or (192)Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of (60)Co or (192)Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by (60)Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from (192)Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by (60)Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a (60)Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a (192)Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials such as air, bone, or lungs, produced variations between both

  15. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, Cristian [Radioprotection Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  16. Improved tissue assignment using dual-energy computed tomography in low-dose rate prostate brachytherapy for Monte Carlo dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Côté, Nicolas [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Bedwani, Stéphane [Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Carrier, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.carrier.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boulevard Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal, Québec H3T 1J4, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: An improvement in tissue assignment for low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDRB) patients using more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation was accomplished with a metallic artifact reduction (MAR) method specific to dual-energy computed tomography (DECT). Methods: The proposed MAR algorithm followed a four-step procedure. The first step involved applying a weighted blend of both DECT scans (I {sub H/L}) to generate a new image (I {sub Mix}). This action minimized Hounsfield unit (HU) variations surrounding the brachytherapy seeds. In the second step, the mean HU of the prostate in I {sub Mix} was calculated and shifted toward the mean HU of the two original DECT images (I {sub H/L}). The third step involved smoothing the newly shifted I {sub Mix} and the two original I {sub H/L}, followed by a subtraction of both, generating an image that represented the metallic artifact (I {sub A,(H/L)}) of reduced noise levels. The final step consisted of subtracting the original I {sub H/L} from the newly generated I {sub A,(H/L)} and obtaining a final image corrected for metallic artifacts. Following the completion of the algorithm, a DECT stoichiometric method was used to extract the relative electronic density (ρ{sub e}) and effective atomic number (Z {sub eff}) at each voxel of the corrected scans. Tissue assignment could then be determined with these two newly acquired physical parameters. Each voxel was assigned the tissue bearing the closest resemblance in terms of ρ{sub e} and Z {sub eff}, comparing with values from the ICRU 42 database. A MC study was then performed to compare the dosimetric impacts of alternative MAR algorithms. Results: An improvement in tissue assignment was observed with the DECT MAR algorithm, compared to the single-energy computed tomography (SECT) approach. In a phantom study, tissue misassignment was found to reach 0.05% of voxels using the DECT approach, compared with 0.40% using the SECT method. Comparison of the DECT and SECT D

  17. Verification of the calculation program for brachytherapy planning system of high dose rate (PLATO); Programa de verificacion del calculo para un sistema de planificacion de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis (PLATO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, J.; Alaman, C.; Perez-Alija, J.; Herrero, C.; Real, R. del; Ososrio, J. L.

    2011-07-01

    In our treatments are performed brachytherapy high dose rate since 2007. The procedures performed include gynecological intracavitary treatment and interstitial. The treatments are performed with a source of Ir-192 activity between 5 and 10 Ci such that small variations in treatment times can cause damage to the patient. In addition the Royal Decree 1566/1998 on Quality Criteria in radiotherapy establishes the need to verify the monitor units or treatment time in radiotherapy and brachytherapy. All this justifies the existence of a redundant system for brachytherapy dose calculation that can reveal any abnormality is present.

  18. SU-F-J-217: Accurate Dose Volume Parameters Calculation for Revealing Rectum Dose-Toxicity Effect Using Deformable Registration in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: A Pilot Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen, X; Chen, H; Liao, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of employing deformable registration methods for accurate rectum dose volume parameters calculation and their potentials in revealing rectum dose-toxicity between complication and non-complication cervical cancer patients with brachytherapy treatment. Method and Materials: Data from 60 patients treated with BT including planning images, treatment plans, and follow-up clinical exam were retrospectively collected. Among them, 12 patients complained about hematochezia were further examined with colonoscopy and scored as Grade 1–3 complication (CP). Meanwhile, another 12 non-complication (NCP) patients were selected as a reference group. To seek for potential gains in rectum toxicity prediction when fractional anatomical deformations are account for, the rectum dose volume parameters D0.1/1/2cc of the selected patients were retrospectively computed by three different approaches: the simple “worstcase scenario” (WS) addition method, an intensity-based deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm-Demons, and a more accurate, recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). Statistical significance of the differences between rectum doses of the CP group and the NCP group were tested by a two-tailed t-test and results were considered to be statistically significant if p < 0.05. Results: For the D0.1cc, no statistical differences are found between the CP and NCP group in all three methods. For the D1cc, dose difference is not detected by the WS method, however, statistical differences between the two groups are observed by both Demons and TOP, and more evident in TOP. For the D2cc, the CP and NCP cases are statistically significance of the difference for all three methods but more pronounced with TOP. Conclusion: In this study, we calculated the rectum D0.1/1/2cc by simple WS addition and two DIR methods and seek for gains in rectum toxicity prediction. The results favor the claim that accurate dose

  19. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: Report of the AAPM and ESTRO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J.; Sloboda, Ron S.; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe Polytechnic and University Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Accredited Dosimetry and Calibration Laboratory, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States); Radiation Oncology, Lynn Regional Cancer Center, 16313 South Military Trail, Delray Beach, Florida 33484 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific {sup 192}Ir, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 60}Co source models. Methods: This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Results: Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Conclusions: Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  20. Dose calculation for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources with average energy higher than 50 keV: report of the AAPM and ESTRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Das, Rupak K; Dewerd, Larry A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Meigooni, Ali S; Ouhib, Zoubir; Rivard, Mark J; Sloboda, Ron S; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2012-05-01

    Recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) on dose calculations for high-energy (average energy higher than 50 keV) photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are presented, including the physical characteristics of specific (192)Ir, (137)Cs, and (60)Co source models. This report has been prepared by the High Energy Brachytherapy Source Dosimetry (HEBD) Working Group. This report includes considerations in the application of the TG-43U1 formalism to high-energy photon-emitting sources with particular attention to phantom size effects, interpolation accuracy dependence on dose calculation grid size, and dosimetry parameter dependence on source active length. Consensus datasets for commercially available high-energy photon sources are provided, along with recommended methods for evaluating these datasets. Recommendations on dosimetry characterization methods, mainly using experimental procedures and Monte Carlo, are established and discussed. Also included are methodological recommendations on detector choice, detector energy response characterization and phantom materials, and measurement specification methodology. Uncertainty analyses are discussed and recommendations for high-energy sources without consensus datasets are given. Recommended consensus datasets for high-energy sources have been derived for sources that were commercially available as of January 2010. Data are presented according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism, with modified interpolation and extrapolation techniques of the AAPM TG-43U1S1 report for the 2D anisotropy function and radial dose function.

  1. Dose determination in high dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, P V; Schwade, J G; Wu, X; Pisciotta, V; Fiedler, J A; Serago, C F; Markoe, A M; Abitbol, A A; Lewin, A A; Braunschweiger, P G

    1992-01-01

    Although high dose-rate brachytherapy with a single, rapidly moving radiation source is becoming a common treatment modality, a suitable formalism for determination of the dose delivered by a moving radiation source has not yet been developed. At present, brachytherapy software simulates high dose-rate treatments using only a series of stationary sources, and consequently fails to account for the dose component delivered while the source is in motion. We now describe a practical model for determination of the true, total dose administered. The algorithm calculates both the dose delivered while the source is in motion within and outside of the implanted volume (dynamic component), and the dose delivered while the source is stationary at a series of fixed dwell points. It is shown that the dynamic dose element cannot be ignored because it always increases the dose at the prescription points and, in addition, distorts the dose distribution within and outside of the irradiated volume. Failure to account for the dynamic dose component results in dosimetric errors that range from significant (> 10%) to negligible (source activity, and source speed as defined by the implant geometry.

  2. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  3. SU-E-T-58: Calculation of Dose Distribution of Accuboost Brachytherapy in Deformable Polyvinil Alcohol Breast Phantom Using Biomechanical Modeling and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadyari, P [Nuclear Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, Shiraz Un, Ilam (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faghihi, R [Nuclear Engineering Department, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirazi, M Mosleh [Radiotherapy and Oncology Department, Namazi Hospital, Shiraz University of M, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lotfi, M [Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Medical Imaging Research Center, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A [Comprehensive cancer center of Nevada - University of Nevada Las Vegas UNL, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: the accuboost is the most modern method of breast brachytherapy that is a boost method in compressed tissue by a mammography unit. the dose distribution in uncompressed tissue, as compressed tissue is important that should be characterized. Methods: In this study, the mechanical behavior of breast in mammography loading, the displacement of breast tissue and the dose distribution in compressed and uncompressed tissue, are investigated. Dosimetry was performed by two dosimeter methods of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP5 code and thermoluminescence dosimeters. For Monte Carlo simulations, the dose values in cubical lattice were calculated using tally F6. The displacement of the breast elements was simulated by Finite element model and calculated using ABAQUS software, from which the 3D dose distribution in uncompressed tissue was determined. The geometry of the model is constructed from MR images of 6 volunteers. Experimental dosimetery was performed by placing the thermoluminescence dosimeters into the polyvinyl alcohol breast equivalent phantom and on the proximal edge of compression plates to the chest. Results: The results indicate that using the cone applicators would deliver more than 95% of dose to the depth of 5 to 17mm, while round applicator will increase the skin dose. Nodal displacement, in presence of gravity and 60N forces, i.e. in mammography compression, was determined with 43% contraction in the loading direction and 37% expansion in orthogonal orientation. Finally, in comparison of the acquired from thermoluminescence dosimeters with MCNP5, they are consistent with each other in breast phantom and in chest's skin with average different percentage of 13.7±5.7 and 7.7±2.3, respectively. Conclusion: The major advantage of this kind of dosimetry is the ability of 3D dose calculation by FE Modeling. Finally, polyvinyl alcohol is a reliable material as a breast tissue equivalent dosimetric phantom that provides the ability of TLD

  4. Report of the Task Group 186 on model-based dose calculation methods in brachytherapy beyond the TG-43 formalism: current status and recommendations for clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Luc; Carlsson Tedgren, Asa; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Davis, Stephen D; Mourtada, Firas; Rivard, Mark J; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Wareing, Todd A; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2012-10-01

    The charge of Task Group 186 (TG-186) is to provide guidance for early adopters of model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for brachytherapy (BT) dose calculations to ensure practice uniformity. Contrary to external beam radiotherapy, heterogeneity correction algorithms have only recently been made available to the BT community. Yet, BT dose calculation accuracy is highly dependent on scatter conditions and photoelectric effect cross-sections relative to water. In specific situations, differences between the current water-based BT dose calculation formalism (TG-43) and MBDCAs can lead to differences in calculated doses exceeding a factor of 10. MBDCAs raise three major issues that are not addressed by current guidance documents: (1) MBDCA calculated doses are sensitive to the dose specification medium, resulting in energy-dependent differences between dose calculated to water in a homogeneous water geometry (TG-43), dose calculated to the local medium in the heterogeneous medium, and the intermediate scenario of dose calculated to a small volume of water in the heterogeneous medium. (2) MBDCA doses are sensitive to voxel-by-voxel interaction cross sections. Neither conventional single-energy CT nor ICRU∕ICRP tissue composition compilations provide useful guidance for the task of assigning interaction cross sections to each voxel. (3) Since each patient-source-applicator combination is unique, having reference data for each possible combination to benchmark MBDCAs is an impractical strategy. Hence, a new commissioning process is required. TG-186 addresses in detail the above issues through the literature review and provides explicit recommendations based on the current state of knowledge. TG-43-based dose prescription and dose calculation remain in effect, with MBDCA dose reporting performed in parallel when available. In using MBDCAs, it is recommended that the radiation transport should be performed in the heterogeneous medium and, at minimum, the dose

  5. Improved dose calculation accuracy for low energy brachytherapy by optimizing dual energy CT imaging protocols for noise reduction using sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Munich Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Physics; Gaudreault, Mathieu [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Laval Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie; Laval Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique; Elmpt, Wouter van [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology; Verhaegen, Frank [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO); McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Oncology

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the noise reduction achievable from dual energy computed tomography (CT) imaging (DECT) using filtered backprojection (FBP) and iterative image reconstruction algorithms combined with increased imaging exposure. We evaluated the data in the context of imaging for brachytherapy dose calculation, where accurate quantification of electron density ρ{sub e} and effective atomic number Z{sub eff} is beneficial. A dual source CT scanner was used to scan a phantom containing tissue mimicking inserts. DECT scans were acquired at 80 kVp/140Sn kVp (where Sn stands for tin filtration) and 100 kVp/140Sn kVp, using the same values of the CT dose index CTDI{sub vol} for both settings as a measure for the radiation imaging exposure. Four CTDI{sub vol} levels were investigated. Images were reconstructed using FBP and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with strength 1,3 and 5. From DECT scans two material quantities were derived, Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e}. DECT images were used to assign material types and the amount of improperly assigned voxels was quantified for each protocol. The dosimetric impact of improperly assigned voxels was evaluated with Geant4 Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for an {sup 125}I source in numerical phantoms. Standard deviations for Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e} were reduced up to a factor ∝2 when using SAFIRE with strength 5 compared to FBP. Standard deviations on Z{sub eff} and ρ{sub e} as low as 0.15 and 0.006 were achieved for the muscle insert representing typical soft tissue using a CTDI{sub vol} of 40 mGy and 3 mm slice thickness. Dose calculation accuracy was generally improved when using SAFIRE. Mean (maximum absolute) dose errors of up to 1.3% (21%) with FBP were reduced to less than 1% (6%) with SAFIRE at a CTDI{sub vol} of 10 mGy. Using a CTDI{sub vol} of 40mGy and SAFIRE yielded mean dose calculation errors of the order of 0.6% which was the MC dose calculation precision in this study and

  6. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-10-01

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - A convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX. The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33.3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1.7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D90 , HR-CTV D100 , rectum D2cc , sigmoid D2cc , and bladder D2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. For all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 s for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 s for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D90 , organ at risk (OAR) D2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  8. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study aims to report the incidence of treatment-induced acute toxicities, local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy concomitant with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy. Methods: Forty patients with FIGO Stages IB2 ...

  9. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  10. Skin dose in breast brachytherapy: Defining a robust metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilts, Michelle; Halperin, Heather; Morton, Dan; Batchelar, Deidre; Bachand, Francois; Chowdhury, Rezwan; Crook, Juanita

    2015-01-01

    To define a simple, robust, and relevant metric for measuring skin dose in breast brachytherapy. Postoperative treatment plans (Day 0) for 15 permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) and 10 multicatheter high-dose-rate (MC-HDR) brachytherapy patients were included. Retrospectively, three skin structures were contoured: 2 mm external from the body; and subsurface layers 2 mm and 4 mm thick. Maximum point dose (Dmax), doses to small volumes (e.g., D0.2cc), and the volumes receiving a percentage of the prescription dose (V%, e.g., V66) were calculated. D0.2cc was investigated as a surrogate to the dose given to 1 cm(2) of skin (D1cm(2)). Pearson product-moment correlation (R(2)) was computed between metrics. Observed trends were consistent across brachytherapy technique. V% did not correlate well with any other metrics: median (range) R(2), 0.63 (0.43, 0.77) and 0.69 (0.3, 0.89) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. Dmax was inconsistently correlated across contours and not well correlated with doses to small volumes: median (range) R(2), 0.85 (0.76, 0.93) and 0.88 (0.83, 0.93) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. In contrast, doses to small volumes were consistently well correlated, even across skin layers: D0.1cc vs. D0.2cc median (range) R(2), 0.98 (0.97, 0.99) and 0.97 (0.94, 0.99) for PBSI and MC-HDR, respectively. Doses to small volumes are robust measures of breast skin dose and given skin's strong area effect, D0.2cc for a 2 mm thick skin layer, a simple surrogate of D1cm(2), is recommended for recording skin dose in any breast brachytherapy. Dmax is not robust and should be avoided. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (p<0.001). HI, COIN, and OI were significantly improved from 0.50+/-0.05 to 0.60+/-0.05, from 0.65+/-0.04 to 0.71+/-0.04, and from 0.19+/-0.03 to 0.15+/-0.03, respectively (p<0.001 for all). Moreover, minimum target dose increased significantly from 71%+/-5% to 80%+/-5% (p<0.001). The improvement in OI and HI obtained by optimisation depended on the regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  12. A dose verification method for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Vijaykumar, C; Deshpande, Sudesh; Sharma, P K; Vandana, S; Philomena, A; Chilkulwar, Ravi H

    2008-01-01

    To evolve a fast dose verification method for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans and to demonstrate its applicability in different clinical cases. We developed a software tool in VC++ for the Varisource HDR unit for HDR dosimetry plan verification using TG-43 parameters. HDR treatment dosimetry of a number clinical cases using Varisource was verified by comparison with the treatment planning system (TPS). A number of different types of clinical cases treated by Varisource were evaluated. TPS calculated dose values and verification code calculated dose values were found to agree to within 3% for most of the dose calculation points. We have validated with clinical cases a fast and independent dose verification method of the dosimetry at selected points for HDR brachytherapy treatments plan using TG-43 parameters. This can be used for the verification of the TPS calculated dose at various points. The code is written to work with Varisource, but it can conceivably be modified for other sources also by using the fitted constant of the respective source.

  13. Calculation Monte Carlo equivalent dose to organs in a treatment of prostate with Brachytherapy of high rate; Calculo Monte Carlo de dosis equivalente a organos en un tratamiento de prostata con braquiterapia de alta tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C.; Vijande, J.; Granero, D.; Ballester, F.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Rivard, M. J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs when applies brachytherapy high dose (HDR) with sources of 60 Co or 192 Go to a localized carcinoma of the prostate. The results are compared with those reported in the literature on treatment with protons and intensity modulated (IMRT) radiation therapy. (Author)

  14. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

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    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  15. Radiochromic film-based quality assurance for CT-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharizadeh, Saeid; Bekerat, Hamed; Syme, Alasdair; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, François; Vuong, Té; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    In the past, film dosimetry was developed into a powerful tool for external beam radiotherapy treatment verification and quality assurance. The objective of this work was the development and clinical testing of the EBT3 model GafChromic film based brachytherapy quality assurance (QA) system. Retrospective dosimetry study was performed to test a patient-specific QA system for preoperative endorectal brachytherapy that uses a radiochromic film dosimetry system. A dedicated phantom for brachytherapy applicator used for rectal cancer treatment was fabricated enabling us to compare calculated-to-measured dose distributions. Starting from the same criteria used for external beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy QA (3%, 3 mm), passing criteria for high- and low-dose gradient regions were subsequently determined. Finally, we investigated the QA system's sensitivity to controlled source positional errors on selected patient plans. In low-dose gradient regions, measured dose distributions with criteria of 3%, 3 mm barely passed the test, as they showed 95% passing pixels. However, in the high-dose gradient region, a more stringent condition could be established. Both criteria of 2%, 3 mm and 3%, 2 mm with gamma function calculated using normalization to the same absolute dose value in both measured and calculated dose distributions, and matrix sizes rescaled to match each other showed more than 95% of pixels passing, on average, for 15 patient plans analyzed. Although the necessity of the patient-specific brachytherapy QA needs yet to be justified, we described a radiochromic film dosimetry-based QA system that can be a part of the brachytherapy commissioning process, as well as yearly QA program. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Calculation of Changes in RadiationExposure due to Prostate Displacement inPermanent Prostate Brachytherapy

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    Zahra Siavashpour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Limited studies are available on the calculation of radiation exposure and its associated risks for people in contact with patients who have been treated with permanent prostate brachytherapy. In this study the changes in the radiation exposure were calculated in different stages of the bladder fullness in prostate seed brachytherapy.Methods:Magnetic resonance images of three patients with full and empty bladders and different prostate sizes (32-71 mL; mean 54.6 mL were used for Monte-Carlo dose calculations. Dose rate to skin for each patient was calculated using MCNP4c, MCNPX.Results:There were no significant differences between dose distribution in the skin relative to the changes in the prostate position due to bladder filling (P=0.05.Conclusion:Our results showed a negligible change in radiation exposure around the patient due to prostate displacement after bladder filling.

  17. A dose verification tool for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning in accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqa, Mohamad Feras; Caudrelier, Jean-Michel; Betrouni, Nacim

    2012-01-01

    To develop a dose verification tool for high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning in accelerated partial breast irradiation. We have developed a software tool for interstitial brachytherapy treatment planning assessment. The software contains a database of seven (192)Ir source models and is able to estimate the dose distribution using the Task Group 43 and the Sievert integral algorithms. Dose-volume histogram analysis and dose quality assurance (QA) criteria including conformity (COnformal INdex [COIN] and conformation number [CN]), homogeneity (homogeneity index [HI]) parameters were implemented in the software to evaluate and to compare between the doses estimated by the two algorithms and a dose extracted from an external treatment planning system (TPS). The tool was evaluated and validated on four clinical cases treated by high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy. The doses provided by the Task Group 43 and the Sievert integral algorithms were evaluated by establishing the dose-volume histogram analysis and then by calculating the QA criteria. The algorithms were validated by comparing the dose at different anatomic points with their corresponding dose points provided from TPS. The differences were considered in good agreement (within 5%). Pretreatment dose verification is an important step in the QA of brachytherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation. A simple, fast, and accurate method of dose verification is therefore needed. The software proposed in this study could fulfill these requirements. In addition, it is freely available for using by anyone wishing to do a QA on any TPS. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In vivo dose verification method in catheter based high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaselskė, Evelina; Adlienė, Diana; Rudžianskas, Viktoras; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Inčiūra, Arturas

    2017-12-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a powerful tool for dose verification in radiotherapy. Its application in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is usually limited to the estimation of gross errors, due to inability of the dosimetry system/ method to record non-uniform dose distribution in steep dose gradient fields close to the radioactive source. In vivo dose verification in interstitial catheter based HDR brachytherapy is crucial since the treatment is performed inserting radioactive source at the certain positions within the catheters that are pre-implanted into the tumour. We propose in vivo dose verification method for this type of brachytherapy treatment which is based on the comparison between experimentally measured and theoretical dose values calculated at well-defined locations corresponding dosemeter positions in the catheter. Dose measurements were performed using TLD 100-H rods (6 mm long, 1 mm diameter) inserted in a certain sequences into additionally pre-implanted dosimetry catheter. The adjustment of dosemeter positioning in the catheter was performed using reconstructed CT scans of patient with pre-implanted catheters. Doses to three Head&Neck and one Breast cancer patient have been measured during several randomly selected treatment fractions. It was found that the average experimental dose error varied from 4.02% to 12.93% during independent in vivo dosimetry control measurements for selected Head&Neck cancer patients and from 7.17% to 8.63% - for Breast cancer patient. Average experimental dose error was below the AAPM recommended margin of 20% and did not exceed the measurement uncertainty of 17.87% estimated for this type of dosemeters. Tendency of slightly increasing average dose error was observed in every following treatment fraction of the same patient. It was linked to the changes of theoretically estimated dosemeter positions due to the possible patient's organ movement between different treatment fractions, since catheter reconstruction was

  19. Dose evaluation of organs at risk (OAR) cervical cancer using dose volume histogram (DVH) on brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Wibowo, R.; Haris, Bambang; Inganatul Islamiyah, dan

    2017-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one way to cure cervical cancer. It works by placing a radioactive source near the tumor. However, there are some healthy tissues or organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum which received radiation also. This study aims to evaluate the radiation dose of the bladder and rectum. There were 12 total radiation dose data of the bladder and rectum obtained from patients’ brachytherapy. The dose of cervix for all patients was 6 Gy. Two-dimensional calculation of the radiation dose was based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) points or called DICRU while the 3-dimensional calculation derived from Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) on a volume of 2 cc (D2cc). The radiation dose of bladder and rectum from both methods were analysed using independent t test. The mean DICRU of bladder was 4.33730 Gy and its D2cc was4.78090 Gy. DICRU and D2cc bladder did not differ significantly (p = 0.144). The mean DICRU of rectum was 3.57980 Gy and 4.58670 Gy for D2cc. The mean DICRU of rectum differed significantly from D2cc of rectum (p = 0.000). The three-dimensional method radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was higher than the two-dimensional method with ratios 1.10227 for bladder and 1.28127 for rectum. The radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was still below the tolerance dose. Two-dimensional calculation of the bladder and rectum dose was lower than three-dimension which was more accurate due to its calculation at the whole volume of the organs.

  20. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  1. Comparison between calculation methods of dose rates in gynecologic brachytherapy; Comparacion entre metodos de calculo de tasa de dosis en braquiterapia ginecologica8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianello, E.A.; Biaggio, M.F.; Dr, M.F.; Almeida, C.E. de [Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas- (L.C.R.)-D.B.B.- UERJ- R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524- Pav. HLC- sala 136- CEP 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    In treatments with radiations for gynecologic tumors is necessary to evaluate the quality of the results obtained by different calculation methods for the dose rates on the points of clinical interest (A, rectal, vesicle). The present work compares the results obtained by two methods. The Manual Calibration Method (MCM) tri dimensional (Vianello E., et.al. 1998), using orthogonal radiographs for each patient in treatment, and the Theraplan/T P-11 planning system (Thratonics International Limited 1990) this last one verified experimentally (Vianello et.al. 1996). The results show that MCM can be used in the physical-clinical practice with a percentile difference comparable at the computerized programs. (Author)

  2. A Comparison of Skin Dose Delivered with MammoSite and Multicatheter Breast Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshaghi M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers however skin, chest wall and Lung doses are correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy. Objective: To investigate the percentage of the dose received by critical organ (skin, thermoluminescence detector was used in MammoSite brachytherpy and the ability to control skin dose between MammoSite and MultiCatheter brachytherapy was compared with each other. Method: Dosimetry is carried out using a female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom and Ir-192 source for brachytherapy application. Results: Our initial results has shown good agreement with surface doses between those calculated from the treatment planning results and those measured by the thermoluminescence detector. The mean skin dose for the experimental dosimetry in MammoSite was 2.3 Gy (56.76% of prescription dose. Conclusion: The results show that the MultiCatheter method is associated with signifcantly lower mean skin and chest wall dose than is the MammoSite. The MultiCatheter technique is quite flexible and can be applied to any size of breast or lumpectomy cavity, But in MammoSite technique, verifcation of balloon symmetry, balloon/ cavity conformance and overlying skin thickness is essential to assure target coverage and toxicity avoidance.

  3. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian Z; Mayr, Nina A; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-01

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters (alpha=0.15 Gy(-1) and alpha/beta=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD2) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for 125I and 103Pd implants. The EUD2 analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D90 (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for 125I and 103Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for 125I and 1.3-1.6 for 103Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the literature. These results may explain why in earlier modeling studies

  4. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose. PMID:26290399

  5. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ⁎ 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ⁎ 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  6. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) * 0.930 (R(2) = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) * 0.955 (R(2) = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric verification of a high dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning system in homogeneous and heterogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uniyal, S C; Sharma, S D; Naithani, U C

    2013-03-01

    To verify the dosimetric accuracy of treatment plans in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy by using Gafchromic EBT2 film and to demonstrate the adequacy of dose calculations of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in a heterogeneous medium. Absorbed doses at chosen points in anatomically different tissue equivalent phantoms were measured using Gafchromic EBT2 film. In one case, tandem ovoid brachytherapy was performed in a homogeneous cervix phantom, whereas in the other, organ heterogeneities were introduced in a phantom to replicate the upper thorax for esophageal brachytherapy treatment. A commercially available TPS was used to perform treatment planning in each case and the EBT2 films were irradiated with the HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy source. Film measurements in the cervix phantom were found to agree with the TPS calculated values within 3% in the clinically relevant volume. In the thorax phantom, the presence of surrounding heterogeneities was not seen to affect the dose distribution in the volume being treated, whereas, a little dose perturbation was observed at the lung surface. Doses to the spinal cord and to the sternum bone were overestimated and underestimated by 14.6% and 16.5% respectively by the TPS relative to the film measurements. At the trachea wall facing the esophagus, a dose reduction of 10% was noticed in the measurements. The dose calculation accuracy of the TPS was confirmed in homogeneous medium, whereas, it was proved inadequate to produce correct dosimetric results in conditions of tissue heterogeneity. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  9. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Neeharika [Department of Sciences, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cifter, Gizem [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sajo, Erno [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Electronic Materials Research Institute and Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ngwa, Wilfred, E-mail: wngwa@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application

  10. Dose volume analysis in brachytherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Tozer-Loft, S M

    2000-01-01

    compared with a range of figures of merit which express different aspects of the quality of each dose distributions. The results are analysed in an attempt to answer the question: What are the important features of the dose distribution (conformality, uniformity, etc) which show a definite relationship with the outcome of the treatment? Initial results show positively that, when Gamma Knife radiosurgery is used to treat acoustic neuroma, some measures of conformality seem to have a surprising, but significant association with outcome. A brief introduction to three branches of radiotherapy is given: interstitial brachytherapy, external beam megavoltage radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. The current interest in issues around conformity, uniformity and optimisation is explained in the light of technical developments in these fields. A novel method of displaying dose-volume information, which mathematically suppresses the inverse-square law, as first suggested by L.L. Anderson for use in brachytherapy i...

  11. Multichannel vaginal cylinder brachytherapy-Impact of tumor thickness and location on dose to organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Scott M; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Multichannel vaginal cylinder brachytherapy (MCVCB) has the potential to sculpt dose distribution, although this is typically reserved for lesions brachytherapy treatment plans for each of the six patients' three target volumes were generated. Total 2 Gy per fraction equivalent dosages (EQD2) were calculated using an external beam radiation therapy dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions in conjunction with a high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose of 25 Gy in five fractions. Maximum EQD2 vaginal surface doses in gray for 5-, 7-, and 10-mm targets were as follows (location-cylinder size): lateral-3.0 cm: 122/153/210, lateral-2.5 cm: 145/195/301, anterior-3.0 cm: 115/135/197, anterior-2.5 cm: 132/173/283, apex-3.0 cm: 173/241/367, and apex-2.5 cm: 349/461/706. Total rectal EQD2 D 2 cc ranged from 53.9 to 67.2 Gy. Total bladder EQD2 D 2 cc ranged from 51.5 to 71.2 Gy. The vaginal surface dose seems to be the dose-limiting structure for anterior, lateral, and apical vaginal lesions. Caution should be taken when treating lesions >5 mm in depth, with particular attention to vaginal surface dose, especially for apical lesions and with smaller cylinders. In such cases, interstitial brachytherapy should be given strong consideration. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: A pooled analysis of clinical outcomes for high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Viswanathan, Akila; Liu, Yu; Li, Chin-Shang; Albuquerque, Kevin; Damato, Antonio L; Beriwal, Sushil; Erickson, Beth

    Advanced imaging used in combination with brachytherapy (BT) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. We present a comprehensive review of the literature for definitive radiation with high-dose-rate (HDR) BT. In addition, we investigate potential outcome improvement with image-based brachytherapy (IBBT) compared to studies using traditional Point A dosing. This review extensively investigates acute and late toxicities. This study reviews the literature from 2000 to 2015 with an emphasis on modern approaches including concurrent chemotherapy (chemoRT), radiation, and HDR BT and IBBT. Descriptive statistics and pelvic control (PC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes were calculated using weighted means to report pooled analysis of outcomes. Literature search yielded 16 prospective, 51 retrospective studies that reported survival outcomes, and 13 retrospective studies that focused on acute and late toxicity outcomes regardless of applicator type. There are 57 studies that report Point A dose specification with 33 having chemoRT, and 10 studies that use IBBT, 8 with chemoRT. Patients receiving radiation and chemoRT with HDR BT in the prospective studies, with >24 months followup, rates of PC were: for RT: 73%, SD: 11; CRT: 82%, SD: 8; DFS-RT: 55%, SD: 10; CRT: 65%, SD: 7; OS-RT: 66%, SD: 7; CRT: 70%, SD: 11. In the retrospective studies, the PC rates (weighted means) for the radiation and chemoradiation outcomes are 75% vs. 80%, and for DFS, the values were 55% vs. 63%, respectively. Comparing patients receiving chemoRT and IBBT to traditional Point A dose specification, there is a significant improvement in PC (p Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Dose When Prescribed to Point A and Point H for Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Ji Hyeong; Gim, Il Hwan; Hwang, Seon Boong; Kim, Woong; Im, Hyeong Seo; Gang, Jin Mook; Gim, Gi Hwan; Lee, Ah Ram [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seou (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare plans prescribed to point A with these prescribed to point H recommended by ABS (American Brachytherapy Society) in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. This study selected 103 patients who received HDR (High Dose Rate) brachytherapy using tandem and ovoids from March 2010 to January 2012. Point A, bladder point, and rectal point conform with Manchester System. Point H conforms with ABS recommendation. Also Sigmoid colon point, and vagina point were established arbitrarily. We examined distance between point A and point H. The percent dose at point A was calculated when 100% dose was prescribed to point H. Additionally, the percent dose at each reference points when dose is prescribed to point H and point A were calculated. The relative dose at point A was lower when point H was located inferior to point A. The relative doses at bladder, rectal, sigmoid colon, and vagina points were higher when point H was located superior to point A, and lower when point H was located inferior to point A. This study found out that as point H got located much superior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became higher, and as point H got located much inferior to point A, the absorbed dose of surrounding normal organs became lower. This differences dose not seem to affect the treatment. However, we suggest this new point is worth being considered for the treatment of HDR if dose distribution and absorbed dose at normal organs have large differences between prescribed to point A and H.

  14. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mason, Josh, E-mail: joshua.mason@nhs.net [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann [Leeds Cancer Centre, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Louise [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Northwick Park Hospital, London North West NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U. [Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Langley, Stephen [St Luke' s Cancer Centre, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  15. Verification of SuperMC for simulation of a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Hamza; Wasaye, Muhammad Abdul; Chen, Chaobin; Zheng, Huaqing; Hao, Lijuan

    2017-06-01

    In this study, SuperMC (Super Monte Carlo simulation program for nuclear and radiation simulation) was tested and verified for simulation of a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The Monte Carlo simulation includes calculations of the air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function as recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) in Task Group reports 43 and 43U1 (TG-43, TG-43U1). The air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function were compared with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results and experimental data. The calculated parameters were found to be in good agreement with published Monte Carlo and measured data. The value obtained from the SuperMC simulation for the air kerma strength was 9.779 × 10-8 U·Bq-1 and the dose rate constant was 1.1092 ± 0.02% cGy·h-1·U-1. The time to transport 5 × 107 photons showed SuperMC to be relatively faster than MCNP. The results show that SuperMC can be used for fast and accurate simulations and dosimetric calculations of HDR brachytherapy sources.

  16. Development of a program for calculation of second dose and securities in brachytherapy high dose rate; Elaboracion de un programa para el segundo calculo de la dosis y seguridades en braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve Sanchez, S.; Martinez Albaladejo, M.; Garcia Fuentes, J. D.; Bejar Navarro, M. J.; Capuz Suarez, B.; Moris de Pablos, R.; Colmenares Fernandez, R.

    2015-07-01

    We assessed the reliability of the program with 80 patients in the usual points of prescription of each pathology. The average error of the calculation points is less than 0.3% in 95% of cases, finding the major differences in the axes of the applicators (maximum error -0.798%). The program has proved effective previously testing him with erroneous dosimetry. Thanks to the implementation of this program is achieved by the calculation of the dose and part of the process of quality assurance program in a few minutes, highlighting the case of HDR prostate due to having a limited time. Having separate data sheet allows each institution to its protocols modify parameters. (Author)

  17. Dose calculation in eye brachytherapy with Ir-192 threads using the Sievert integral and corrected by attenuation and scattering with the Meisberg polynomials; Calculo de dosis en braquiterapia ocular con hilos de Ir-192 utilizando la integral de Sievert y cooregida por atenuacion y dispersion con los polinomios de Meisberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, M.G. Bernui de; Cardenas R, A. [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Angamos No. 2520, Surquillo, Lima (Peru)]. e-mail: gisellebdv@hotmail.com

    2006-07-01

    The ocular brachytherapy many times unique alternative to conserve the visual organ in patients of ocular cancer, one comes carrying out in the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses (INEN) using threads of Iridium 192; those which, they are placed in radial form on the interior surface of a spherical cap of gold of 18 K; the cap remains in the eye until reaching the prescribed dose by the doctor. The main objective of this work is to be able to calculate in a correct and practical way the one time that the treatment of ocular brachytherapy should last to reach the dose prescribed by the doctor. To reach this objective I use the Sievert integral corrected by attenuation effects and scattering (Meisberg polynomials); calculating it by the Simpson method. In the calculations by means of the Sievert integral doesn't take into account the scattering produced by the gold cap neither the variation of the constant of frequency of exposure with the distance. The calculations by means of Sievert integral are compared with those obtained using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code, where it is observed that they agree at distances of the surface of the cap greater or equal to 2mm. (Author)

  18. American brachytherapy society recommends no change for prostate permanent implant dose prescriptions using iodine-125 or palladium-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J. [Tufts-New England Medical Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Boston, MA (United States); Butler, W.M.; Merrick, G.S. [Wheeling Jesuit Univ., Schiffler Cancer Center, WV (United States); Devlin, P.M. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Hayes, J.K. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Hearn, R.A. [Gamma West Brachytherapy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Lief, E.P. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Meigooni, A.S. [Kentucky Univ., Dept. of Radiation Medicine, Lexington, KY (United States); Williamson, J.F. [Medical College of Virginia, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose - In 2004, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) issued a report outlining recommended {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd datasets for consistency in calculating brachytherapy dose distributions. In 2005, to aid evaluating the clinical impact of implementing these datasets, the AAPM assessed the historical dependence of how prescribed doses differed from administered doses for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd for permanent implantation of the prostate. Consequently, the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) considered the nature of these changes towards issuing recommended dose prescriptions for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd interstitial brachytherapy implants for mono-therapy and standard boosts. Methods and materials - An investigation was performed of the 2005 AAPM analysis to determine changes in administered dose while affixing prescribed dose using 2004 AAPM {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy dosimetry datasets for prostate implants. For {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, administered dose would change by +1.4% and +4.2%, respectively. The biological and societal impact of changing prescribed dose was considered. Results - Based on the need for clinical constancy and in recognition of overall uncertainties, the ABS recommends immediate implementation of the 2004 AAPM consensus brachytherapy dosimetry datasets and no changes to {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd dose prescriptions at this time. Conclusions - Radiation oncologists should continue to prescribe mono-therapy doses of 145 Gy and 125 Gy for {sup 125}I and {sup 105}Pd, respectively, and standard boost doses of 100-110 Gy and 90-100 Gy for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd, respectively. (authors)

  19. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette H

    2006-01-01

    on the       regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was       larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target       volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose       plans between patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dwell time optimisation significantly...

  20. In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical implementation of OSLDs for high dose-rate (HDR) in vivo dosimetry for gynecological and breast patients. To discuss how the OSLDs were characterized for an Ir-192 source, taking into account low gamma energy and high dose gradients. To describe differences caused by the dose calculation formalism of treatment planning systems.Methods: OSLD irradiations were made using the GammaMedplus iX Ir-192 HDR, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA. BrachyVision versions 8.9 and 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA, were used for calculations. Version 8.9 used the TG-43 algorithm and version 10.0 used the Acuros algorithm. The OSLDs (InLight Nanodots) were characterized for Ir-192. Various phantoms were created to assess calculated and measured doses and the angular dependence and self-absorption of the Nanodots. Following successful phantom measurements, patient measurements for gynecological patients and breast cancer patients were made and compared to calculated doses.Results: The OSLD sensitivity to Ir-192 compared to 6 MV is between 1.10 and 1.25, is unique to each detector, and changes with accumulated dose. The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment planning system and found to be in agreement for the gynecological patients to within measurement uncertainty. The range of differences between the measured and Acuros calculated doses was -10%-14%. For the breast patients, there was a discrepancy of -4.4% to +6.5% between the measured and calculated doses at the skin surface when the Acuros algorithm was used. These differences were within experimental uncertainty due to (random) error in the location of the detector with respect to the treatment catheter.Conclusions: OSLDs can be successfully used for HDR in vivo dosimetry. However, for the measurements to be meaningful one must account for the angular dependence, volume-averaging, and the greater sensitivity to Ir-192 gamma rays than to 6 MV x

  1. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam Singh; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D) USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT). The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites. PMID:28533803

  2. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susovan Banerjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT. The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites.

  3. Postoperative single-dose interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in therapy-resistant keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hafkamp, C. J. H.; Lapid, O.; Dávila Fajardo, R.; van de Kar, A. L.; Koedooder, C.; Stalpers, L. J.; Pieters, B. R.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with keloids complain of the cosmetic aspect, pain, and pruritus. Many different therapies are being used for keloids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recurrence rate and outcome after resection followed by a single-dose brachytherapy. Patients treated by resection of the keloid

  4. Dose estimation for different skin models in interstitial breast brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Skin is a major organ at risk in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations require monitoring of maximum dose received, however, there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring provided. The purpose of this study was to compare the doses received by the skin in different models. Material and methods Standard treatment plans of 20 patients who underwent interstitial breast brachytherapy were analyzed. Every patient had a new treatment plan prepared according to Paris system and had skin contoured in three different ways. The first model, Skin 2 mm, corresponds to the dermatological breast skin thickness and is reaching 2 mm into an external patient contour. It was rejected in a further analysis, because of distinct discontinuities in contouring. The second model, Skin 4 mm, replaced Skin 2 mm, and is reaching 2 mm inside and 2 mm outside of the External contour. The third model, Skin EXT, is created on the External contour and it expands 4 mm outside. Doses received by the most exposed 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and the maximum doses for Skin 4 mm and Skin EXT were compared. Results Mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation of percentage dose difference between Skin EXT and Skin 4 mm for the most exposed 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of skin were 18.01%, 17.20%, 27.84%, and 4.01%, respectively. All differences were statistically significant (p skin is necessary to avoid complications and obtain a satisfactory cosmetic effect. It is difficult to assess the compatibility of treatment plans with recommendations, while there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring. Especially, if a mean difference of doses between two models of skin contouring is 18% for the most exposed 0.1 cc and can reach almost 28% in some cases. Differences of this magnitude can result in skin complications during BCT. PMID:25097562

  5. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Susovan Banerjee; Tejinder Kataria; Deepak Gupta; Shikha Goyal; Shyam Singh Bisht; Trinanjan Basu; Ashu Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of br...

  6. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P., E-mail: ppapagi@phys.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens (Greece); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel 24105 (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  7. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I, E-mail: mmakrigiorgos@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-11-07

    Tumor vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) represent a promising approach to the treatment of cancer, in view of the tumor vasculature's pivotal role in tumor survival, growth and metastasis. VDAs targeting the tumor's dysmorphic endothelial cells can cause selective and rapid occlusion of the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell death from ischemia and extensive hemorrhagic necrosis. In this study, the potential for applying gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as VDAs, during brachytherapy, is examined. Analytic calculations based on the electron energy loss formula of Cole were carried out to estimate the endothelial dose enhancement caused by radiation-induced photo/Auger electrons originating from AuNPs targeting the tumor endothelium. The endothelial dose enhancement factor (EDEF), representing the ratio of the dose to the endothelium with and without gold nanoparticles was calculated for different AuNP local concentrations, and endothelial cell thicknesses. Four brachytherapy sources were investigated, I-125, Pd-103, Yb-169, as well as 50 kVp x-rays. The results reveal that, even at relatively low intra-vascular AuNP concentrations, ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells due to photo/Auger electrons from the AuNPs can be achieved. Pd-103 registered the highest EDEF values of 7.4-271.5 for local AuNP concentrations ranging from 7 to 350 mg g{sup -1}, respectively. Over the same concentration range, I-125, 50 kVp and Yb-169 yielded values of 6.4-219.9, 6.3-214.5 and 4.0-99.7, respectively. Calculations of the EDEF as a function of endothelial cell thickness showed that lower energy sources like Pd-103 reach the maximum EDEF at smaller thicknesses. The results also reveal that the highest contribution to the EDEF comes from Auger electrons, apparently due to their shorter range. Overall, the data suggest that ablative dose enhancement to tumor endothelial cells can be achieved by applying tumor vasculature-targeted AuNPs as adjuvants to

  8. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of radionuclide-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Chadha, Manjeet; Mourtada, Firas; Demanes, D Jeffrey

    Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy method in which radionuclide sources are used to deliver a radiation dose at a distance of up to a few centimeters by surface, intracavitary, intraluminal, or interstitial application. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclides for brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses radionuclides such as iridium-192 at dose rates of 20 cGy per minute (12 Gy per hour) or more to a designated target point or volume. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is indicated for treating malignant or benign tumors where the treatment volume or targeted points are defined and accessible. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  10. High brachytherapy doses can counteract hypoxia in cervical cancer—a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, Emely; Dasu, Alexandru; Beskow, Catharina; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia is a well-known adverse factor for the outcome of radiotherapy. For cervical tumours in particular, several studies indicate large variability in tumour oxygenation. However, clinical evidence shows that the management of cervical cancer including brachytherapy leads to high rate of success. It was the purpose of this study to investigate whether the success of brachytherapy for cervical cancer, seemingly regardless of oxygenation status, could be explained by the characteristics of the brachytherapy dose distributions. To this end, a previously used in silico model of tumour oxygenation and radiation response was further developed to simulate the treatment of cervical cancer employing a combination of external beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. Using a clinically-derived brachytherapy dose distribution and assuming a homogeneous dose delivered by external radiotherapy, cell survival was assessed on voxel level by taking into account the variation of sensitivity with oxygenation as well as the effects of repair, repopulation and reoxygenation during treatment. Various scenarios were considered for the conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the hypoxic region in the target. By using the clinically-prescribed brachytherapy dose distribution and varying the total dose delivered with external beam radiotherapy in 25 fractions, the resulting values of the dose for 50% tumour control, D 50, were in agreement with clinically-observed values for high cure rates if fast reoxygenation was assumed. The D 50 was furthermore similar for the different degrees of conformity of the brachytherapy dose distribution to the tumour, regardless of whether the hypoxic fraction was 10%, 25%, or 40%. To achieve 50% control with external RT only, a total dose of more than 70 Gy in 25 fractions would be required for all cases considered. It can thus be concluded that the high doses delivered in brachytherapy can counteract the increased

  11. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  12. Postoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Ronald E.; Kal, Henk B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy.

  13. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in eyelid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareco, Virgínia; Bujor, Laurentiu; Abrunhosa-Branquinho, André N; Ferreira, Miguel Reis; Ribeiro, Tiago; Vasconcelos, Ana Luisa; Ferreira, Cidalina Reis; Jorge, Marília

    2015-01-01

    To report the experience and the outcomes of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) of eyelid skin cancer at the Department of Radiotherapy of Hospital de Santa Maria in Lisbon. Seventeen patients (pts; mean age, 73.75 years) who underwent eyelid interstitial HDR BT with an (192)Ir source between January 2011 and February 2013 were analyzed. Lesions were basal (94%) and squamous (6%) cell carcinomas, on lower (88%) or upper (6%) eyelids, and on inner canthus (6%). T-stage was Tis (6%), T1 (46%), T2 (36%), and T3a (12%). The purpose of BT was radical (12%), adjuvant to surgery (71%), or salvage after surgery (18%). The BT implant and treatment planning were based on the Stepping Source Dosimetry System. The median total dose was 42.75 Gy (range, 32-50 Gy), with a median of 10 fractions (range, 9-11 fractions), twice daily, 6 h apart. The median V100 was 2.38 cm(3) (range, 0.83-5.59 cm(3)), and the median V150 was 1.05 cm(3) (range, 0.24-3.12 cm(3)). At a median followup of 40 months (range, 7-43 months), the local control was 94.1%. There was one local recurrence and one non-related death. The BT was well tolerated. Madarosis was the most common late effect (65% of pts) and was related with higher values of V100 (p = 0.027). Cosmetic outcomes were good and excellent in 70% of pts. Interstitial HDR BT is a feasible and safe technique for eyelid skin cancers, with good local control. Recurrent lesions and higher volumes receiving the prescribed dose were associated with worse outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Geometric stability of intracavitary pulsed dose rate brachytherapy monitored by in vivo rectal dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Christensen, Jens Juul; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate geometric stability of applicator and rectum during pulsed dose rate (PDR) intracavitary brachytherapy. A total of 14 patients with cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA) were analysed retrospectively. A dose of 10 Gy to point A was prescribed per brachytherapy session, and PDR was given with 1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h, using a ring applicator (Varian). A rectal dosimeter consisting of five diodes spaced by 1.5 cm was routinely placed in the rectum. The diodes detected the progression of each pulse of radiation, as the stepping source was advanced through the applicator. A mathematical model has been developed for spatial analysis of the pattern of the dose readings. The model transforms dose measurement into a quantification of the geometric relationship between rectum diodes and applicator. The model could be used for all treatment sessions, and the relative positions of diodes and applicator were calculated for each pulse of radiation. The SD of displacements during the treatment was below 2.8mm in all directions for all patients. The mean SD in lateral, longitudinal and anterior-posterior directions were 1.2 +/- 0.7, 1.2 +/- 0.7 and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively. The mean measurement uncertainty was below 0.8 +/- 0.5 mm in all directions. A new mathematical method has been developed, enabling us to quantitate and monitor relative positions of applicator and rectal diodes during a PDR treatment. The spatial relation between rectal dosimeter and applicator was very stable during extended PDR treatments suggesting that the geometric stability of PDR treatment is at the same level as the stability reported for HDR brachytherapy.

  15. Collision-kerma conversion between dose-to-tissue and dose-to-water by photon energy-fluence corrections in low-energy brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Alventosa, Vicent; Antunes, Paula C. G.; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Andreo, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    The AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry formalism, introduced in 1995, has become a standard for brachytherapy dosimetry worldwide; it implicitly assumes that charged-particle equilibrium (CPE) exists for the determination of absorbed dose to water at different locations, except in the vicinity of the source capsule. Subsequent dosimetry developments, based on Monte Carlo calculations or analytical solutions of transport equations, do not rely on the CPE assumption and determine directly the dose to different tissues. At the time of relating dose to tissue and dose to water, or vice versa, it is usually assumed that the photon fluence in water and in tissues are practically identical, so that the absorbed dose in the two media can be related by their ratio of mass energy-absorption coefficients. In this work, an efficient way to correlate absorbed dose to water and absorbed dose to tissue in brachytherapy calculations at clinically relevant distances for low-energy photon emitting seeds is proposed. A correction is introduced that is based on the ratio of the water-to-tissue photon energy-fluences. State-of-the art Monte Carlo calculations are used to score photon fluence differential in energy in water and in various human tissues (muscle, adipose and bone), which in all cases include a realistic modelling of low-energy brachytherapy sources in order to benchmark the formalism proposed. The energy-fluence based corrections given in this work are able to correlate absorbed dose to tissue and absorbed dose to water with an accuracy better than 0.5% in the most critical cases (e.g. bone tissue).

  16. Biological effective doses in the intracavitary high dose rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sobita Devi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the decrease of biological equivalent dose and its correlation withlocal/loco-regional control of tumour in the treatment of cervical cancer when the strength of the Ir-192 high dose rate(HDR brachytherapy (BT source is reduced to single, double and triple half life in relation to original strength of10 Ci (~ 4.081 cGy x m2 x h–1. Material and methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 52 cervical cancer patients with stage II and IIItreated with fractionated HDR-BT following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. International Commission onRadiation Units and Measurement (ICRU points were defined according to ICRU Report 38, using two orthogonal radiographimages taken by Simulator (Simulix HQ. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated at point A for diffe -rent Ir-192 source strength and its possible correlation with local/loco-regional tumour control was discussed. Result: The increase of treatment time per fraction of dose due to the fall of dose rate especially in HDR-BT of cervicalcancer results in reduction in BED of 2.59%, 7.02% and 13.68% with single, double and triple half life reduction ofsource strength, respectively. The probabilities of disease recurrence (local/loco-regional within 26 months are expectedas 0.12, 0.12, 0.16, 0.39 and 0.80 for source strength of 4.081, 2.041, 1.020, 0.510 and 0.347 cGy x m2 x h–1, respectively.The percentages of dose increase required to maintain the same BED with respect to initial BED were estimated as1.71, 5.00, 11.00 and 15.86 for the dose rate of 24.7, 12.4, 6.2 and 4.2 Gy/hr at point A, respectively. Conclusions: This retrospective study of cervical cancer patients treated with HDR-BT at different Ir-192 sourcestrength shows reduction in disease free survival according to the increase in treatment time duration per fraction.The probable result could be associated with the decrease of biological equivalent dose to point A. Clinical

  17. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer with salvage interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Lotter, Michael; Kreppner, Stephan; Fietkau, Rainer [University Hospital Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    To assess the long-term results of protocol-based interstitial pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy as reirradiation combined with simultaneous chemotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia in selected patients with recurrent head and neck tumors. A total of 104 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent head and neck cancer were treated with interstitial PDR brachytherapy. Salvage surgery had also been undergone by 53/104 (51 %) patients (R1 or R2 resection in > 80 % of patients). Salvage brachytherapy alone was administered in 81 patients (78 %), with a median total dose of 56.7 Gy. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was performed in 23/104 patients (32 %), using a median total dose of D{sub REF} = 24 Gy. Simultaneously to PDR brachytherapy, concomitant chemotherapy was administered in 58/104 (55.8 %) patients. A single session of interstitial hyperthermia was also used to treat 33/104 (31.7 %) patients. The analysis was performed after a median follow-up of 60 months. Calculated according to Kaplan-Meier, local tumor control rates after 2, 5, and 10 years were 92.5, 82.4, and 58.9 %, respectively. Comparing results of salvage PDR brachytherapy with or without simultaneous chemotherapy, the 10-year local control rates were 76 vs. 39 % (p= 0014), respectively. No other patient- or treatment-related parameters had a significant influence on treatment results. Soft tissue necrosis or bone necrosis developed in 18/104 (17.3 %) and 11/104 (9.6 %) patients, respectively, but only 3 % of patients required surgical treatment. PDR interstitial brachytherapy with simultaneous chemotherapy is a very effective and, in experienced hands, also a safe treatment modality in selected patients with head and neck cancer in previously irradiated areas. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte die Analyse der Langzeitergebnisse einer protokollbasierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (Re-Bestrahlung) mit simultaner Chemotherapie und interstitieller Hyperthermie

  18. Anthropomorphic phantom to investigate the bladder dose in gynecological high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R M V; Belinato, W; Macedo, L E; Souza, D N

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a prototype of a phantom appropriate for experimental bladder dosimetry. This work presents details of the phantom construction and dosimetric results obtained using radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs). The phantom was constructed of polymethyl methacrylate. Two artificial bladders were three-dimensional printed using previous computed tomography images. Radiochromic films and OSLDs were positioned on the artificial bladder walls, and the applicators were placed according to the original computed tomography image. The prototype phantom simulated the behavior of the dose on the bladder surface, enabling bladder movement in all directions. The dosimetric study that was performed using radiochromic film and OSLDs exhibited concordance, in most cases, with the results obtained from the planning system. The methodology presented offers conditions for researchers to investigate more accurately the behavior of the dose on the bladder surface during intracavitary brachytherapy procedures. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A method for verification of treatment times for high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asghar Gadhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was aimed to increase the quality of high dose rate (HDR intraluminal brachytherapy treatment. For this purpose, an easy, fast and accurate patient-specific quality assurance (QA tool has been developed. This tool has been implemented at Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan.Methods: ABACUS 3.1 Treatment planning system (TPS has been used for treatment planning and calculation of total dwell time and then results were compared with the time calculated using the proposed method. This method has been used to verify the total dwell time for different rectum applicators for relevant treatment lengths (2-7 cm and depths (1.5-2.5 cm, different oesophagus applicators of relevant treatment lengths (6-10 cm and depths (0.9 & 1.0 cm, and a bronchus applicator for relevant treatment lengths (4-7.5 cm and depth (0.5 cm.Results: The average percentage differences between treatment time TM with manual calculation and as calculated by the TPS is 0.32% (standard deviation 1.32% for rectum, 0.24% (standard deviation 2.36% for oesophagus and 1.96% (standard deviation 0.55% for bronchus, respectively. These results advocate that the proposed method is valuable for independent verification of patient-specific treatment planning QA.Conclusion: The technique illustrated in the current study is an easy, simple, quick and useful for independent verification of the total dwell time for HDR intraluminal brachytherapy. Our method is able to identify human error-related planning mistakes and to evaluate the quality of treatment planning. It enhances the quality of brachytherapy treatment and reliability of the system.

  20. Model of distribution of dose for intravascular brachytherapy; Modelo de distribucion de dosis para braquiterapia intravascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirchio, Rosana; Signoretta, Catalina [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dosimetria de Radioaciones Ionizantes; Martin, Gabriela; Rivera, Elena; Bergoc, Rosa [Univeridad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica. Lab. de Radioisotopos; Guzman, Luis [Instituto Cardiovascular de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    In this work we present the radiation dose distributions for a theoretical model with Monte Carlo simulation, which was based on an experimental model developed for the study of the prevention of restenosis post-angioplasty employing intravascular brachytherapy. In the experimental model, the atherosclerotic plaques were induced in femoral arteries of male New Zealand rabbits through surgical intervention and later administration of cholesterol enriched diet. For the intravascular irradiation we employed a {sup 32} P source contained within the balloon used for the angioplasty. The radiation dose distributions were calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B according to a segment of a simulated artery. We studied the radiation dose distribution in the axial and radial directions for different thickness of the atherosclerotic plaques. The results will be correlated with the biologic effects observed by means of histological analysis of the irradiated arteries. (author)

  1. Automated construction of an intraoperative high-dose-rate treatment plan library for the Varian brachytherapy treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M; Dahl, Robert A; Haddock, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create treatment plans for intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy is limited by lack of imaging and time constraints. An automated method for creation of a library of high-dose-rate brachytherapy plans that can be used with standard planar applicators in the intraoperative setting is highly desirable. Nonnegative least squares algebraic methods were used to identify dwell time values for flat, rectangular planar applicators. The planar applicators ranged in length and width from 2 cm to 25 cm. Plans were optimized to deliver an absorbed dose of 10 Gy to three different depths from the patient surface: 0 cm, 0.5 cm, and 1.0 cm. Software was written to calculate the optimized dwell times and insert dwell times and positions into a .XML plan template that can be imported into the Varian brachytherapy treatment planning system. The user may import the .XML template into the treatment planning system in the intraoperative setting to match the patient applicator size and prescribed treatment depth. A total of 1587 library plans were created for IOHDR brachytherapy. Median plan generation time was approximately 1 minute per plan. Plan dose was typically 100% ± 1% (mean, standard deviation) of the prescribed dose over the entire length and width of the applicator. Plan uniformity was best for prescription depths of 0 cm and 0.5 cm from the patient surface. An IOHDR plan library may be created using automated methods. Thousands of plan templates may be optimized and prepared in a few hours to accommodate different applicator sizes and treatment depths and reduce treatment planning time. The automated method also enforces dwell time symmetry for symmetrical applicator geometries, which simplifies quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A study on the dose distributions in various materials from an Ir-192 HDR brachytherapy source.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ming Hsu

    Full Text Available Dose distributions of (192Ir HDR brachytherapy in phantoms simulating water, bone, lung tissue, water-lung and bone-lung interfaces using the Monte Carlo codes EGS4, FLUKA and MCNP4C are reported. Experiments were designed to gather point dose measurements to verify the Monte Carlo results using Gafchromic film, radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter, solid water, bone, and lung phantom. The results for radial dose functions and anisotropy functions in solid water phantom were consistent with previously reported data (Williamson and Li. The radial dose functions in bone were affected more by depth than those in water. Dose differences between homogeneous solid water phantoms and solid water-lung interfaces ranged from 0.6% to 14.4%. The range between homogeneous bone phantoms and bone-lung interfaces was 4.1% to 15.7%. These results support the understanding in dose distribution differences in water, bone, lung, and their interfaces. Our conclusion is that clinical parameters did not provide dose calculation accuracy for different materials, thus suggesting that dose calculation of HDR treatment planning systems should take into account material density to improve overall treatment quality.

  3. Postoperative single-dose interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in therapy-resistant keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafkamp, C J H; Lapid, O; Dávila Fajardo, R; van de Kar, A L; Koedooder, C; Stalpers, L J; Pieters, B R

    Patients with keloids complain of the cosmetic aspect, pain, and pruritus. Many different therapies are being used for keloids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recurrence rate and outcome after resection followed by a single-dose brachytherapy. Patients treated by resection of the keloid plus a single dose of 13 Gy high-dose-rate brachytherapy were evaluated at least 1 year after treatment. Clinical response and cosmesis were assessed by a plastic surgeon and by the patients using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Only 24 of the 61 invited patients responded to participate with the study; 29 keloids were evaluated. The recurrence rate was 24.1% after a median followup of 53 months (19-95 months). Patients scored on average 24.3 for their total Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale score (range 6-52), whereas the observer scored on average 14.6 (range 6-42). This treatment has a higher recurrence rate than that reported in most other studies. This may be explained by differences in recurrence definition, differences in followup time among studies, and selection bias because of not contributing to the study. The cosmetic outcome for evaluated patients is relatively good. This treatment policy has the advantage that patients are treated in a single day. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sungjae; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Sumida, Iori; Tamari, Keisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. From 1997 to 2012, salvage HDR brachytherapy was performed in 43 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 41-88 years). HDR brachytherapy was performed by interstitial brachytherapy in 34 patients (79%) and by intracavity brachytherapy in nine patients (21%). Seventeen (40%) of the 43 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy. The median followup period was 58 months (range, 6-179 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates (LC) were 84%, 52%, and 78%, respectively. Patients who received brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy experienced no nodal recurrence (0 of 17 patients), whereas 23% of the patients (6 of 26 patients) who received brachytherapy alone experienced nodal recurrence (p = 0.047). The pathologic grade at the time of initial surgery (G1-2 vs. G3) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. The respective 5-year OS was 96% vs. 40% (p brachytherapy vs. intracavity brachytherapy) were significant prognostic factors for LC. The respective 5-year LC was 74% vs. 100% (p = 0.020) and 85% vs. 56% (p = 0.035). HDR brachytherapy is effective and feasible in patients with isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Pathologic grade, age, and modality were significant prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of the gold nanoparticles effects on the prostate dose distribution in brachytherapy: gel dosimetry and Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Khosravi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this work, gold nanoparticles (GNPs were embedded in the MAGIC-f polymer gel irradiated with the 192 Ir brachytherapy sources. Material and methods: At the first plexiglas phantom was made as the human pelvis. The GNPs were synthesized with 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM (0.0197 mg/ml in concentration by using a chemical reduction method. Then, the MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured into the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated with 192 Ir brachytherapy sources for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels was read by using Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Following the brachytherapy practices, the absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves were extracted and compared by experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. Results : The mean absorbed doses in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 14% higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs in the brachytherapy. The gamma index analysis (between gel and MC using 7%/7 mm was also applied to the data and a high pass rate achieved (91.7% and 86.4% for analysis with/without GNPs, respectively. Conclusions : The real three-dimensional analysis shows the comparison of the dose-volume histograms measured for planning volumes and the expected one from the MC calculation. The results indicate that the polymer gel dosimetry method, which developed and used in this study, could be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the dose enhancement factor of GNPs in brachytherapy.

  6. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Ping; Baumann, René; Dunst, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. METHODS AND MATERIALS: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated...... with immediate perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy; 3 patients had been previously treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy and presented with recurrences in the pretreated areas. Two or more different treatment modalities had been tried in all patients and had failed to achieve remission....... After (re-)excision of the keloids, a single brachytherapy tube was placed subcutaneously before closing the wound. The target volume covered the scar in total length. Brachytherapy was given in 3 fractions with a single dose of 6 Gy in 5 mm tissue depth. The first fraction was given within 6 hours...

  7. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Hee Kam, Stéphanie; Rivera, Sofia; Hennequin, Christophe; Lourenço, Nelson; Chirica, Mircea; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Quéro, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes after exclusive salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) intraluminal esophageal brachytherapy given to previously irradiated patients with recurrent esophageal cancer. We reviewed medical records of 30 patients who were treated by salvage HDR brachytherapy for local esophageal cancer. Brachytherapy delivered four to six fractions of 5-7 Gy at 5 mm from the applicator surface and 20 mm above and below the macroscopic tumor volume. Eighty percentage of patients received treatment as initially planned. Complete response rate, evaluated 1 month after brachytherapy by endoscopy and biopsy, was 53%. Squamous histology and complete endoscopic tumor response at 1 month were significantly associated with better local tumor control. Median local progression-free survival was 9.8 months. Overall survival was 31.5% and 17.5% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, preserved performance status and limited weight loss (brachytherapy were associated with better overall survival. Severe toxicity (Grade ≥3) occurred in 7 patients (23%). Although esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients is associated with poor outcomes, HDR brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment for inoperable patients with locally limited esophageal cancer, particularly in the subset of patients with preserved performance status and limited weight loss (≤10%) before salvage brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose optimization of intra-operative high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy implants for soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamema Swamidas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : A three dimensional (3D image-based dosimetric study to quantitatively compare geometric vs. dose-point optimization in combination with graphical optimization for interstitial brachytherapy of soft tissue sarcoma (STS. Materials and Methods : Fifteen consecutive STS patients, treated with intra-operative, interstitial Brachytherapy, were enrolled in this dosimetric study. Treatment plans were generated using dose points situated at the "central plane between the catheters", "between the catheters throughout the implanted volume", at "distances perpendicular to the implant axis" and "on the surface of the target volume" Geometrically optimized plans had dose points defined between the catheters, while dose-point optimized plans had dose points defined at a plane perpendicular to the implant axis and on the target surface. Each plan was graphically optimized and compared using dose volume indices. Results : Target coverage was suboptimal with coverage index (CI = 0.67 when dose points were defined at the central plane while it was superior when the dose points were defined at the target surface (CI=0.93. The coverage of graphically optimized plans (GrO was similar to non-GrO with dose points defined on surface or perpendicular to the implant axis. A similar pattern was noticed with conformity index (0.61 vs. 0.82. GrO were more conformal and less homogeneous compared to non-GrO. Sum index was superior for dose points defined on the surface of the target and relatively inferior for plans with dose points at other locations (1.35 vs. 1.27. Conclusions : Optimization with dose points defined away from the implant plane and on target results in superior target coverage with optimal values of other indices. GrO offer better target coverage for implants with non-uniform geometry and target volume.

  9. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Larissa J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  10. Predictors of toxicity after image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Larissa J; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2012-12-01

    To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure adequate tumor coverage while minimizing the D2cc to the

  11. LOW-DOSE RATE BRACHYTHERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: DIFFERENT INDICATIONS – DIFFERENT RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Biryukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In Russia, there is presently a growing interest in low-dose intratissue radiotherapy (brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer (PC. Since its inception, current brachytherapy has undergone a number of significant changes in terms of improved visualization and better treatment planning and monitoring, which is sure to have affected the higher quality of their performance and better long-term results. The main purpose of the given paper is to generalize the data of foreign investigators who have the greatest experience with brachytherapy for its further use in the treatment of patients with locally advanced PC under the conditions of Russian clinics.

  12. Metallic artifact mitigation and organ-constrained tissue assignment for Monte Carlo calculations of permanent implant lung brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Miksys, N.; Thomson, R. M., E-mail: rthomson@physics.carleton.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Furutani, K. M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate methods of generating accurate patient-specific computational phantoms for the Monte Carlo calculation of lung brachytherapy patient dose distributions. Methods: Four metallic artifact mitigation methods are applied to six lung brachytherapy patient computed tomography (CT) images: simple threshold replacement (STR) identifies high CT values in the vicinity of the seeds and replaces them with estimated true values; fan beam virtual sinogram replaces artifact-affected values in a virtual sinogram and performs a filtered back-projection to generate a corrected image; 3D median filter replaces voxel values that differ from the median value in a region of interest surrounding the voxel and then applies a second filter to reduce noise; and a combination of fan beam virtual sinogram and STR. Computational phantoms are generated from artifact-corrected and uncorrected images using several tissue assignment schemes: both lung-contour constrained and unconstrained global schemes are considered. Voxel mass densities are assigned based on voxel CT number or using the nominal tissue mass densities. Dose distributions are calculated using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose for{sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, and {sup 131}Cs seeds and are compared directly as well as through dose volume histograms and dose metrics for target volumes surrounding surgical sutures. Results: Metallic artifact mitigation techniques vary in ability to reduce artifacts while preserving tissue detail. Notably, images corrected with the fan beam virtual sinogram have reduced artifacts but residual artifacts near sources remain requiring additional use of STR; the 3D median filter removes artifacts but simultaneously removes detail in lung and bone. Doses vary considerably between computational phantoms with the largest differences arising from artifact-affected voxels assigned to bone in the vicinity of the seeds. Consequently, when metallic artifact reduction and constrained tissue

  13. Monte Carlo Dosimetry of the 60Co BEBIG High Dose Rate for Brachytherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Tourinho Campos

    Full Text Available The use of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is currently a widespread practice worldwide. The most common isotope source is 192Ir, but 60Co is also becoming available for HDR. One of main advantages of 60Co compared to 192Ir is the economic and practical benefit because of its longer half-live, which is 5.27 years. Recently, Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG, Germany, introduced a new afterloading brachytherapy machine (MultiSource®; it has the option to use either the 60Co or 192Ir HDR source. The source for the Monte Carlo calculations is the new 60Co source (model Co0.A86, which is referred to as the new BEBIG 60Co HDR source and is a modified version of the 60Co source (model GK60M21, which is also from BEBIG.The purpose of this work is to obtain the dosimetry parameters in accordance with the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism with Monte Carlo calculations regarding the BEBIG 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy to investigate the required treatment-planning parameters. The geometric design and material details of the source was provided by the manufacturer and was used to define the Monte Carlo geometry. To validate the source geometry, a few dosimetry parameters had to be calculated according to the AAPM TG-43U1 formalism. The dosimetry studies included the calculation of the air kerma strength Sk, collision kerma in water along the transverse axis with an unbounded phantom, dose rate constant and radial dose function. The Monte Carlo code system that was used was EGSnrc with a new cavity code, which is a part of EGS++ that allows calculating the radial dose function around the source. The spectrum to simulate 60Co was composed of two photon energies, 1.17 and 1.33 MeV. Only the gamma part of the spectrum was used; the contribution of the electrons to the dose is negligible because of the full absorption by the stainless-steel wall around the metallic 60Co. The XCOM photon cross-section library was used in subsequent simulations, and the photoelectric effect, pair

  14. A study on the variation of bladder and rectal doses with respiration in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Karuna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In cervical intracavitary brachytherapy, it is mandatory to evaluate if the doses to bladder and rectum are within tolerance limits. In this study, an effort has been made to evaluate the effect of respiration on the doses to bladder and rectum in patients undergoing brachytherapy.Material and methods: Fifteen patients with cervix cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation followed by intracavitary brachytherapy were included in this study. At the time of brachytherapy, all patients underwent 4D computed tomography (CT imaging. Five out of fifteen patients were scanned with empty bladder while the rest had full bladder during sectional imaging. Four sets of pelvic CT image datasets with applicators in place were acquired at equal interval in a complete respiratory cycle. Treatment plans were generated for all the CT datasets on a PlatoTM Sunrise planning system. A dose of 7 Gy was prescribed to Point A. Doses to ICRU (Report No.38 bladder (IBRP and rectal (IRRP reference points were calculated in all the CT datasets.Results: The mean of maximum dose to IBRP at four different respiratory phases for full and empty bladder were 53.38 ± 19.20%, 55.75 ± 16.71%, 56.13 ± 17.70%, 57.50 ± 17.48% and 60.93 ± 15.18%, 60.29 ± 16.28%, 60.86 ± 15.90%, 60.82 ± 15.42% of the prescribed dose respectively. Similarly, maximum dose to IRRP for full and empty bladder were 55.50 ± 18.66%, 57.38 ± 14.81%, 58.00 ± 14.97%, 58.38 ± 17.28% and 71.96 ± 6.90%, 71.58 ± 7.52%, 68.92 ± 6.21%, 71.45 ± 7.16% respectively.Conclusions: Our study shows that respiration affects the dose distribution to the bladder and rectum in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervix cancer. It is advisable to reduce the critical organ dose to account for the dose variation introduced by respiratory motion.

  15. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Small, William; Eifel, Patricia J

    Brachytherapy is the use of radionuclides to treat malignancies or benign conditions by means of a radiation source placed close to or into the tumor or treatment site. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclide brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has traditionally been used for treating prostate, head and neck, breast, cervical, and endometrial cancers as well as obstructive bile duct, esophageal, or bronchial lesions. It has been practiced for over a century with a variety of sources including radium-226, cesium-137, and, more recently, iridium- 192, iodine-125, and palladium-103. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy can be given as interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and/or plesiotherapy to a wide variety of treatment sites. This practice parameter addresses sealed sources as they are used for LDR brachytherapy. It is recognized that unsealed sources (e.g., yttrium-90) are also a form of LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical application of a OneDose MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  17. WE-A-17A-04: Development of An Ultra-Fast Monte Carlo Dose Engine for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z; Hrycushko, B; Stojadinovic, S; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are based on AAPM TG43 guidelines, which approximate the patient geometry as a large water phantom. This ignores heterogeneities and tends to overestimate skin dose. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations have been recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This work aims to develop a GPU-based ultra-fast MC dose engine (gBMC) for HDR brachytherapy to provide clinical users with accurate sub-minute dose calculations. Methods: Standard photon transport with discrete events including: Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering and Photoelectric effect, was implemented. Secondary electrons were transported under the continuous slowing down approximation. To reduce the GPU thread divergence, photons and electrons were separately transported. Transport of photons was grouped according to energy. The source model in gBMC can be either a phase-space file generated using Geant4 or a parameterized source model. This dose engine was validated against TG43 in a water phantom and against Geant4 calculations in heterogeneous patient geometries. Results: A phase space file was generated for the Varian VS2000 Ir-192 source. In a water phantom, the calculated radial dose function was within 0.6% of the TG43 calculations for radial distances from 1 cm to 20 cm. The anisotropy functions were within 1% for radial distances from 1 cm to 20 cm except for polar angles larger than 173°. Local point-dose differences were within 2%. In a Mammosite breast cancer case with 22 dwell locations, gBMC and Geant4 isodose lines compared well. The computation time was about 28 seconds using the phase-space file source and 20 seconds using the parameterized source to simulate 1 billion particles, yielding less than 1% statistical uncertainty. Conclusion: The gBMC dose engine makes it possible to use fast and accurate MC dose calculations for

  18. Ureteral stent insertion for gynecologic interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanes, D Jeffrey; Banerjee, Robyn; Cahan, Benjamin L; Lee, Steve P; Park, Sang-June; Fallon, Julia M; Reyes, Paula; Van, Thanh Q; Steinberg, Michael L; Kamrava, Mitchell R

    2015-01-01

    To determine the utility of ureteral stents in interstitial gynecological brachytherapy. We reviewed 289 patients with cervix cancer treated with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy who did not have pretreatment hydronephrosis to determine the relative incidence of benign ureteral strictures after treatment. We also did comparative dosimetry analysis in five cases of high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Bilateral ureteral stents were placed during the procedure. Three dosimetry plans were created to determine the impact of modifying clinical target volume (CTV) and applying ureteral dose constraints. In Plan 1, the ureters were contoured and excluded from the CTV and 120% dose constraints were applied. In Plan 2, the ureters were contoured and excluded, but no dose constraints were applied to the ureter. In Plan 3, the CTV was created as if the location of the ureters was unknown and then ureteral dose was determined. There were 11 ureteral strictures observed in 255 nonstented cases and 0 ureteral strictures in 34 stented cases. Plan 1 reduced the ureter dose (D(0.1cc)) by a median 22% (7.0-53.8%) compared with Plan 2 and by a median of 30.9% (12.3-65%). compared with Plan 3. Placement of stents and ureteral dose constraints facilitates dosimetry and reduces the dose to ureters. Temporary ureteral stents prevent obstruction during interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy and allows the ureters to be addressed as an organ at risk. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. SU-E-T-165: Characterization of Dose Distributions in High-Dose-Rate Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Hansen, J; Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Damato, A; Friesen, S; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    %(80.7CAX,39.9E,35.7L)],HC[90%(11.1CAX,10.9E,10.6L),5 0%(34.4CAX,38.8E,47.2L),25%(70.4CAX,80.7E,96.6L);DS[90%(12.1CA X,8.5E,6.8L),50%(60.6CAX,17.7E,15.8L),25%(109.6CAX,40.3E,34.3L)]. Conclusion: These results can be used for the approximate calculation and quick assessment of the radiation dose to the organs-at-risk at depth (heart,brain,thyroid, optical nerve) or at the surface distance from the CT (breast,eyes, gonads), and only the geometry of the CT needs to be measured. Understanding of the dose distributions in HDR surface brachytherapy may improve clinical decision making process.

  20. Film based verification of calculation algorithms used for brachytherapy planning-getting ready for upcoming challenges of MBDCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Zwierzchowski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Well-known defect of TG-43 based algorithms used in brachytherapy is a lack of information about interaction cross-sections, which are determined not only by electron density but also by atomic number. TG-186 recommendations with using of MBDCA (model-based dose calculation algorithm, accurate tissues segmentation, and the structure’s elemental composition continue to create difficulties in brachytherapy dosimetry. For the clinical use of new algorithms, it is necessary to introduce reliable and repeatable methods of treatment planning systems (TPS verification. The aim of this study is the verification of calculation algorithm used in TPS for shielded vaginal applicators as well as developing verification procedures for current and further use, based on the film dosimetry method. Material and methods : Calibration data was collected by separately irradiating 14 sheets of Gafchromic® EBT films with the doses from 0.25 Gy to 8.0 Gy using HDR 192Ir source. Standard vaginal cylinders of three diameters were used in the water phantom. Measurements were performed without any shields and with three shields combination. Gamma analyses were performed using the VeriSoft® package. Results : Calibration curve was determined as third-degree polynomial type. For all used diameters of unshielded cylinder and for all shields combinations, Gamma analysis were performed and showed that over 90% of analyzed points meets Gamma criteria (3%, 3 mm. Conclusions : Gamma analysis showed good agreement between dose distributions calculated using TPS and measured by Gafchromic films, thus showing the viability of using film dosimetry in brachytherapy.

  1. Time-resolved in vivo luminescence dosimetry for online error detection in pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus E; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate a dose-verification protocol for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy based on in vivo time-resolved (1 s time resolution) fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry. Five cervix cancer patients undergoing PDR brachytherapy (Varian GammaMed Plus with 192Ir) were monitored. The treatments comprised from 10 to 50 pulses (1 pulse/h) delivered by intracavitary/interstitial applicators (tandem-ring systems and/or needles). For each patient, one or two dosimetry probes were placed directly in or close to the tumor region using stainless steel or titanium needles. Each dosimeter probe consisted of a small aluminum oxide crystal attached to an optical fiber cable (1 mm outer diameter) that could guide radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from the crystal to special readout instrumentation. Positioning uncertainty and hypothetical dose-delivery errors (interchanged guide tubes or applicator movements from +/-5 to +/-15 mm) were simulated in software in order to assess the ability of the system to detect errors. For three of the patients, the authors found no significant differences (P>0.01) for comparisons between in vivo measurements and calculated reference values at the level of dose per dwell position, dose per applicator, or total dose per pulse. The standard deviations of the dose per pulse were less than 3%, indicating a stable dose delivery and a highly stable geometry of applicators and dosimeter probes during the treatments. For the two other patients, the authors noted significant deviations for three individual pulses and for one dosimeter probe. These deviations could have been due to applicator movement during the treatment and one incorrectly positioned dosimeter probe, respectively. Computer simulations showed that the likelihood of detecting a pair of interchanged guide tubes increased by a factor of 10 or more for the considered patients when going from integrating to time

  2. Time-resolved in vivo luminescence dosimetry for online error detection in pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Claus E.; Nielsen, Soeren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari [Radiation Research Division, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate a dose-verification protocol for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy based on in vivo time-resolved (1 s time resolution) fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry. Methods: Five cervix cancer patients undergoing PDR brachytherapy (Varian GammaMed Plus with {sup 192}Ir) were monitored. The treatments comprised from 10 to 50 pulses (1 pulse/h) delivered by intracavitary/interstitial applicators (tandem-ring systems and/or needles). For each patient, one or two dosimetry probes were placed directly in or close to the tumor region using stainless steel or titanium needles. Each dosimeter probe consisted of a small aluminum oxide crystal attached to an optical fiber cable (1 mm outer diameter) that could guide radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from the crystal to special readout instrumentation. Positioning uncertainty and hypothetical dose-delivery errors (interchanged guide tubes or applicator movements from {+-}5 to {+-}15 mm) were simulated in software in order to assess the ability of the system to detect errors. Results: For three of the patients, the authors found no significant differences (P>0.01) for comparisons between in vivo measurements and calculated reference values at the level of dose per dwell position, dose per applicator, or total dose per pulse. The standard deviations of the dose per pulse were less than 3%, indicating a stable dose delivery and a highly stable geometry of applicators and dosimeter probes during the treatments. For the two other patients, the authors noted significant deviations for three individual pulses and for one dosimeter probe. These deviations could have been due to applicator movement during the treatment and one incorrectly positioned dosimeter probe, respectively. Computer simulations showed that the likelihood of detecting a pair of interchanged guide tubes increased by a factor of 10 or more for the considered patients when

  3. MO-AB-BRA-02: Modeling Nanoparticle-Eluting Spacer Degradation During Brachytherapy Application with in Situ Dose-Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boateng, F [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy application with in situ dose-painting using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers has been proposed as an innovative approach to increase therapeutic efficacy during brachytherapy. This work investigates the dosimetric impact of slow versus burst release of GNP from next generation biodegradable spacers. Methods: Mathematical models were developed based on experimental data to study the release of GNP from a spacer designed with FDA approved poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer. The diffusion controlled released process and PLGA polymer degradation kinetics was incorporated in the calculations for the first time. An in vivo determined diffusion coefficient was used for determining the concentration profiles and corresponding dose enhancement based on initial GNP-loading concentrations of 7 mg/g. Results: The results showed that there is significant delay before the concentration profile of GNP diffusion in the tumor is similar to that when burst release is assumed as in previous studies. For example, in the case of burst release after spacer administration, it took up to 25 days for all the GNP to be released from the spacer using diffusion controlled release process only. However, it took up to 45 days when a combined model for both diffusion and polymer degradation processes was used. Based on the tumor concentration profiles, a significant dose enhancement factor (DEF >20%), could be attained at a tumor distances of 5 mm from a spacer loaded with 10 nm GNP sizes. Conclusion: The results highlight the need to take the slow release of GNP from spacers and factors such as biodegradation of polymers into account in research development of GNP-eluting spacers for brachytherapy applications with in-situ dose-painting using gold nanoparticles. The findings suggest that I-125 may be the more appropriate for such applications given the relatively longer half-live compared to other radioisotopes like Pd-103

  4. Learning curve of MRI-based planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Simon; Rylander, Susanne; Hokland, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate introduction of MRI-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT), including procedure times, dose-volume parameters, and perioperative morbidity. Methods and Materials Study included 42 high-risk prostate cancer patients enrolled in a clinical protocol, offering external beam...

  5. A comparison of skin and chest wall dose delivered with multicatheter, Contura multilumen balloon, and MammoSite breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W

    2011-01-01

    Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. High-dose-rate brachytherapy of rhabdomyosarcoma limited to the external auditory canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Martin T; Voros, Laszlo; Cohen, Gil'ad N; Lanning, Ryan M; Ganly, Ian; O'Suoji, Chibuzo C; Wolden, Suzanne L

    To report on the single-catheter high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of a 21-month-old girl child with an embryonal, botryoid-type, rhabdomyosarcoma limited to the external auditory canal (EAC). A 2.4-mm diameter catheter was inserted into the right EAC and placed against the tympanic membrane. A computed tomography simulation scan was acquired. A brachytherapy treatment plan, in which 21 Gy in seven fractions was prescribed to a 1-mm depth along the distal 2 cm of the catheter, was generated. Treatments were delivered under anesthesia without complication. A dosimetric comparison between this plan and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan was then conducted. A clinical target volume (CTV), which encompassed a 1-mm margin along the distal 2 cm of the catheter, was delineated for both plans. Given positioning uncertainty under image guidance, a planning target volume (PTV = CTV + 3-mm margin) was defined for the IMRT plan. The IMRT plan was optimized for maximal CTV coverage but subsequently normalized to the same CTV volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (V100) of the brachytherapy plan. The IMRT plan was normalized to the brachytherapy CTV V100 of 82.0%. The PTV V100 of this plan was 34.1%. The PTV exhibited dosimetric undercoverage within the middle ear and toward the external ear. Mean cochlea doses for the IMRT and brachytherapy plans were 26.7% and 10.5% of prescription, respectively. For rhabdomyosarcomas limited to the EAC, a standard brachytherapy catheter can deliver a highly conformal radiation plan that can spare the nearby cochlea from excess radiation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  8. High-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervical cancer: the results of different fractionation regimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yang, Dae Sik; Choi, Myung Sun; Kim, Chul Yong [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Although high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens have been practiced with a variety of modalities and various degrees of success, few studies on the subject have been conducted. The purpose of this study was to compare the results of local control and late complication rate according to different HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens in uterine cervical cancer patients. From November 1992 to March 1998, 224 patients with uterine cervical cancer were treated with external beam irradiation and HDR brachytherapy. In external pelvic radiation therapy, the radiation dose was 45 {approx} 54 Gy (median dose 54 Gy) with daily fraction size 1.8 Gy, five times per week. In HDR brachytherapy, 122 patients (Group A) were treated with three times weekly with 3 Gy to line-A (isodose line of 2 cm radius from source) and 102 patients (Group B) underwent the HDR brachytherapy twice weekly with 4 or 4.5 Gy to line-A after external beam irradiation. Iridium-192 was used as the source of HDR brachytherapy. Late complication was assessed from grade 1 to 5 using the RTOG morbidity grading system. The local control rate (LCR) at 5 years was 80% in group A and 84% in group B ({rho} = 0.4523). In the patients treated with radiation therapy alone, LCR at 5 years was 60.9% in group A and 76.9% in group B ({rho} = 0.2557). In post-operative radiation therapy patients, LCR at 5 years was 92.6% in group A and 91.6% in group B ({rho} 0.8867). The incidence of late complication was 18% (22 patients) and 29.4% (30 patients), of bladder complication was 9.8% (12 patients) and 14.7% (15 patients), and of rectal complication was 9.8% (12 patients) and 21.6% (22 patients), in group A and B, respectively. Lower fraction sized HDR brachytherapy was associated with decrease in late complication ({rho} =0.0405) (rectal complication, {rho} = 0.0147; bladder complication, {rho} =0.115). The same result was observed in postoperative radiation therapy patients ({rho} = 0.0860) and radiation only

  9. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of penile carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petera, J.; Odrazka, K.; Zouhar, M.; Bedrosova, J.; Dolezel, M. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2004-02-01

    Background: interstitial low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy allows conservative treatment of T1-T2 penile carcinoma. High-dose-rate (HDR) is often considered to be dangerous for interstitial implants because of a higher risk of complications, but numerous reports suggest that results may be comparable to LDR. Nevertheless, there are no data in the literature available regarding HDR interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the penis. Case report: a 64-year-old man with T1 NO MO epidermoid carcinoma of the glans is reported. Interstitial HDR brachytherapy was performed using the stainless hollow needle technique and a breast template for fixation and good geometry. The dose delivered was 18 x 3 Gy twice daily. Results: after 232 days from brachytherapy, the patient was without any evidence of the tumor, experienced no serious radiation-induced complications, and had a fully functional organ. Conclusion: HDR interstitial brachytherapy is feasible in selected case of penis carcinoma, when careful planning and small single fractions are used. (orig.)

  10. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for local prostate cancer recurrence after radical radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Solodkiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies salvage interstitial radiation therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, launched at the end of the XX century. In recent years, more and more attention is paid to high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT as a method of treating local recurrence.The purpose of research – preliminary clinical results of salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy applied in cases of suspected local recurrence or of residual tumour after radiotherapy.Preliminary findings indicate the possibility of using HDR-BT, achieving local tumor control with low genitourinary toxicity.

  11. Parallelized patient-specific quality assurance for high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography-on-rails brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Showalter, Timothy N; Watkins, W Tyler; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    To describe a parallelized patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program designed to ensure safety and quality in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails brachytherapy suite. A patient-specific QA program has been modified for the image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) program in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite. In the modification of the QA procedures of Task Group-59, the additional patient-specific QA procedures are included to improve rapid IGBT workflow with applicator placement, imaging, planning, treatment, and applicator removal taking place in one room. The IGBT workflow is partitioned into two groups of tasks that can be performed in parallel by two or more staff members. One of the unique components of our implemented workflow is that groups work together to perform QA steps in parallel and in series during treatment planning and contouring. Coordinating efforts in this systematic way enable rapid and safe brachytherapy treatment while incorporating 3-dimensional anatomic variations between treatment days. Implementation of these patient-specific QA procedures in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite ensures confidence that a rapid workflow IGBT program can be implemented without sacrificing patient safety or quality and deliver highly-conformal dose to target volumes. These patient-specific QA components may be adapted to other IGBT environments that seek to provide rapid workflow while ensuring quality. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-06-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general, the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 and 3 min on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  13. Modeling study for optimization of skin dose for partial breast irradiation using Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Hiatt, Jessica R; Cardarelli, Gene A; Wazer, David E

    2010-01-01

    the perpendicular orientation with a calculated dose of 99%. The parallel orientation had the highest surface dose of 164%. The oblique orientation showed intermediate results with a surface dose of 117%. Measured surface doses were reproducible and correlated well with calculated values. Optimized Xoft Axxent balloon catheter orientation using source anisotropy and multiple dwell positions can be used to minimize excessive skin dose and yet maintain optimal tumor cavity coverage when the cavity to skin distance is small. This has the potential to decrease skin late effects and improve cosmetic outcome. Further clinical study is warranted. Copyright (c) 2010 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preparation of a program for the independent verification of the brachytherapy planning systems calculations; Confeccion de un programa para la verificacion independiente de los calculos de los sistemas de planificacion en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Carmona, V.; Perez-Calatayud, J.; Lliso, F.; Richart Sancho, J.; Ballester, F.; Pujades-Claumarchirant, M.C.; Munoz, M.

    2010-07-01

    In this work a program is presented that independently checks for each patient the treatment planning system calculations in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate brachytherapy. The treatment planning system output text files are automatically loaded in this program in order to get the source coordinates, the desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell times when it is the case. The source strength and the reference dates are introduced by the user. The program allows implementing the recommendations about independent verification of the clinical brachytherapy dosimetry in a simple and accurate way, in few minutes. (Author).

  15. High-dose-rate brachytherapy monotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shyamal; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ragab, Omar; Zhang, Mingle; Veruttipong, Darlene; Nguyen, Kristine; Park, Sang-June; Marks, Leonard; Pantuck, Allan; Steinberg, Michael; Kamrava, Mitchell

    Outcomes using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy monotherapy (without androgen deprivation therapy or external beam radiation therapy) for National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined intermediate-risk (IR) patients are limited. We report our long-term data using HDR monotherapy for this patient population. One-hundred ninety IR prostate cancer patients were treated 1996-2013 with HDR monotherapy. Biochemical prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure was per the Phoenix definition. Acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were graded according to Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Events, version 4. Kaplan-Meier (KM) biochemical progression-free survival (BPFS), cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were calculated. Univariate analyses were performed to determine relationships with BPFS. The median patient age was 66 years (43-90), and the median initial PSA was 7.4 ng/mL. The Gleason score was ≤6 in 26%, 3 + 4 in 62%, and 4 + 3 in 12%. The median treatment BED1.5 was 254 Gy; 83% of patients were treated with a dose of 7.25 Gy × six fractions delivered in two separate implants. With a median follow-up of 6.2 years, KM BPFS at 5/8 years was 97%/90%, cause-specific survival at 8 years was 100%, and overall survival at 5/8 years was 93%/88%. Late genitourinary toxicities were 36.3% Grade 1, 18.9% Grade 2, and 3.7% Grade 3. Late gastrointestinal toxicities were 6.3% Grade 1, 1.1% Grade 2, and no Grade ≥3. Of the patients with no sexual dysfunction before treatment, 68% maintained potency. Age, initial PSA, T stage, Gleason score, prostate volume, and percent positive cores did not correlate with BPFS. Stratifying by favorable vs. unfavorable IR groups did not affect BPFS. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy represents a safe and highly effective treatment for IR prostate cancer patients with long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the management of uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Chul; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    2002-12-01

    It is well known that intracavitary radiotherapy (ICR), either alone or in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is an essential component of the radiation treatment of uterine cervical cancer. Although low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been successfully applied to the management of such patients, several radiation oncologists have experience of using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with promising clinical results over the past 4 decades. However, there has been a considerable reluctance by radiation oncologists and gynecologists in North America to employ the HDR remote afterloading technique instead of the more firmly established LDR treatment modality. In contrast, the HDR-ICR system is rapidly gaining acceptance in Korea since the introduction of the Ralstron, remotely controlled afterloading system using HDR Co-60 sources, at the Yonsei Cancer Center in 1979. According to brachytherapy statistics reported by the Korean Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, in 1997, brachytherapy was performed upon 1,758 Korean patients with uterine cervical cancer, of whom approximately 83% received HDR brachytherapy. In this review, we present our experiences of HDR-ICR for the treatment of uterine cervical cancer. In addition, we discuss the controversial points, which are raised by those considering the use of HDR-ICR for uterine cervical cancer; these issues include physical and radiobiological considerations, and the prospect of future technical improvements.

  17. Introduction of novel 3D-printed superficial applicators for high-dose-rate skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma-Louise; Tonino Baldion, Anna; Thomas, Christopher; Burrows, Tom; Byrne, Nick; Newton, Victoria; Aldridge, Sarah

    Custom-made surface mold applicators often allow more flexibility when carrying out skin brachytherapy, particularly for small treatment areas with high surface obliquity. They can, however, be difficult to manufacture, particularly if there is a lack of experience in superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy techniques or with limited resources. We present a novel method of manufacturing superficial brachytherapy applicators utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-printing techniques. We describe the treatment planning process and the process of applicator manufacture. The treatment planning process, with the introduction of a pre-plan, allows for an "ideal" catheter arrangement within an applicator to be determined, exploiting varying catheter orientations, heights, and curvatures if required. The pre-plan arrangement is then 3D printed to the exact specifications of the pre-plan applicator design. This results in improved target volume coverage and improved sparing of organs at risk. Using a pre-plan technique for ideal catheter placement followed by automated 3D-printed applicator manufacture has greatly improved the entire process of superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment. We are able to design and manufacture flexible, well-fitting, superior quality applicators resulting in a more efficient and improved patient pathway and patient experience. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage treatment of local prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Krystyna; Ciezki, Jay; Klein, Eric A

    2011-06-01

    To present our initial experience with brachytherapy used as a salvage procedure for local recurrence of prostate cancer in the prostatic fossa after radical prostatectomy. The patients included 5 consecutive men who underwent brachytherapy as a salvage procedure after radical prostatectomy from December 2006 to March 2008. We used a technique of implanting the local recurrences similar to the American Brachytherapy Society Guidelines for implanting an intact prostate as definitive therapy. Two modifications were made related to the recurrence location: a rare need to manage urethral doses because the recurrence was typically perirectal, and more aggressive management of the dose to the rectum because of this proximity. All patients tolerated the brachytherapy procedure well and showed a decline in the prostate-specific antigen level, with a median nadir of 0.72 ng/mL at a median follow-up of 13 months. The postprocedural symptoms were minor and included limited new-onset urgency. At the last follow-up visit, all patients had prostate-specific antigen doubling times, which have been associated with long median survival times. Salvage brachytherapy for biopsy-proven local recurrence of prostate cancer is a technically feasible alternative to external beam radiotherapy for local control of recurrences in the prostatic fossa in selected patients after radical prostatectomy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gestaut, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.Gestaut@BSWHealth.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Cai, Wendi [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Vyas, Shilpa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, Washington (United States); Patel, Belur J. [Department of Urology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); Hasan, Salman A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States); MunozMaldonado, Yolanda [Department of Biostatistics, Baylor Scott and White Health, Temple, Texas (United States); Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A& M University School of Medicine, Temple, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Methods and Materials: Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. Results: A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression–free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (P<.0001). The 5-year bPFS rate was 70.0% (LRC), 51.4% (IRC), 89.4% (LRB), and 89.7% (IRB). The bPFS rate was significantly different between brachytherapy and cryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (P<.05). The mean nadir temperature reached for cryotherapy patients was −35°C (range, −96°C to −6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with

  20. 3D-printed applicators for high dose rate brachytherapy: Dosimetric assessment at different infill percentage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Vavassori, Andrea; Bazani, Alessia; Ciardo, Delia; Pansini, Floriana; Spoto, Ruggero; Sammarco, Vittorio; Cattani, Federica; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-12-01

    Dosimetric assessment of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicators, printed in 3D with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) at different infill percentage. A low-cost, desktop, 3D printer (Hamlet 3DX100, Hamlet, Dublin, IE) was used for manufacturing simple HDR applicators, reproducing typical geometries in brachytherapy: cylindrical (common in vaginal treatment) and flat configurations (generally used to treat superficial lesions). Printer accuracy was investigated through physical measurements. The dosimetric consequences of varying the applicator's density by tuning the printing infill percentage were analysed experimentally by measuring depth dose profiles and superficial dose distribution with Gafchromic EBT3 films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ). Dose distributions were compared to those obtained with a commercial superficial applicator. Measured printing accuracy was within 0.5mm. Dose attenuation was not sensitive to the density of the material. Surface dose distribution comparison of the 3D printed flat applicators with respect to the commercial superficial applicator showed an overall passing rate greater than 94% for gamma analysis with 3% dose difference criteria, 3mm distance-to-agreement criteria and 10% dose threshold. Low-cost 3D printers are a promising solution for the customization of the HDR brachytherapy applicators. However, further assessment of 3D printing techniques and regulatory materials approval are required for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiobiological equivalent of low/high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluation of tumor and normal responses to the dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological equivalent of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in terms of the more recent linear quadratic (LQ) model, which leads to theoretical estimation of biological equivalence. One of the key features of the LQ model is that it allows a more systematic radiobiological comparison between different types of treatment because the main parameters alpha/beta and micro are tissue-specific. Such comparisons also allow assessment of the likely change in the therapeutic ratio when switching between LDR and HDR treatments. The main application of LQ methodology, which focuses on by increasing the availability of remote afterloading units, has been to design fractionated HDR treatments that can replace existing LDR techniques. In this study, with LDR treatments (39 Gy in 48 h) equivalent to 11 fractions of HDR irradiation at the experimental level, there are increasing reports of reproducible animal models that may be used to investigate the biological basis of brachytherapy and to help confirm theoretical predictions. This is a timely development owing to the nonavailability of sufficient retrospective patient data analysis. It appears that HDR brachytherapy is likely to be a viable alternative to LDR only if it is delivered without a prohibitively large number of fractions (e.g., fewer than 11). With increased scientific understanding and technological capability, the prospect of a dose equivalent to HDR brachytherapy will allow greater utilization of the concepts discussed in this article.

  2. Dose volume uniformity index: a simple tool for treatment plan evaluation in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Prabhakar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In radiotherapy treatment planning, dose homogeneity inside the target volume plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome. Especially in brachytherapy where there is a steep dose gradient in the dose distribution inside the target volume, comparing the plans based on the dose homogeneity helps in assessing the high dose volume inside the final treatment plan. In brachytherapy, the dose inhomogeneity inside the target volume depends on many factors such as the type of sources, placement of these radioactive sources, distance between the applicators/implanttubes, dwell time of the source, etc. In this study, a simple index, the dose volume uniformity index (DVUI, has been proposed to study the dose homogeneity inside the target volume. This index gives the total dose volume inhomogeneity inside a given prescription isoline.Material and methods: To demonstrate the proposed DVUI in this study, a single plane implant (breast: 6 catheters, a double plane implant (breast: 9 catheters and a tongue implant (5 catheters were selected. The catheters were reconstructed from the CT image datasets in the Plato treatment planning system. The doses for the single, double and tongue implants were prescribed to the reference dose rate as per the Paris technique. DVUI was computed from the cumulative dose volume histogram.Results: For a volume receiving a uniform dose inside the prescription isoline, the DVUI is 1. Any value of DVUI > 1 shows the presence of a relatively high dose volume inside the prescription isoline. In addition to the concept of DVUI, a simple conformality index, the dose volume conformality index (DVCI, has also been proposed in this study based on the DVUI.Conclusion: The DVUI and the proposed DVCI in this study provide an easy way of comparing the rival plans in brachytherapy.

  3. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J., E-mail: dscanderbeg@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Rebecca and John Moores Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Alksne, John F. [Division of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Lawson, Joshua D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Rebecca and John Moores Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Murphy, Kevin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  4. Tolerance of the vaginal vault to high-dose rate brachytherapy and concomitant chemo-pelvic irradiation: Long-term perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Amit, Amnon; Nevelsky, Alexander; Berniger, Alison; Bar-Deroma, Raquel; Ben-Yosef, Rahamim; Kuten, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the tolerance level and complication rates of the vaginal vault to combined high-dose-rate intra-cavitary brachytherapy with concomitant chemo-radiotherapy. A retrospective review of medical records of all the patients who received definitive chemo-radiotherapy for cervical cancer between 1998 and 2002 was undertaken. The records were reviewed for doses and for radiation-associated early and late sequelae of the vagina, rectum and bladder. Cumulative biological effective dose was calculated for two reference vaginal surface points. Fifty patients were included. Average age at diagnosis was 54 years. Median follow-up was 59 months. There were no recorded instances of acute grade IV toxicity. Maximal high-dose-rate vaginal surface dose (upper central point) was 103 Gy, and maximal brachytherapy lateral surface dose was 70 Gy. Maximal cumulative biological effective dose for the lateral surface reference point was 465.5 Gy3, and the maximal cumulative biological effective dose for the superior reference point was 878.6 Gy3. There were no cases of vaginal necrosis or fistulas, and no cases of grade IV late vaginal, rectal or bladder toxicity. No correlation was found between the maximal vaginal surface dose and vaginal, rectal or bladder toxicity. The maximal surface HDR brachytherapy dose of 103 Gy and the maximal cBED of 878.6 Gy3 were not associated with fistula or necrosis or other grade 3-4 vaginal complications. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, including pelvic radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy, is relatively safe for cervical cancer patients.

  5. Low-Dose-Rate Definitive Brachytherapy for High-Grade Vaginal Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Laurie; Dumas, Isabelle; Morice, Philippe; Pautier, Patricia; Duvillard, Pierre; Azoury, Fares; Mazeron, Renaud; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background. Treatment of high-grade vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) is controversial and could include surgical excision, topical medication, brachytherapy, or other treatments. We report the results of low-dose-rate (LDR) vaginal brachytherapy for grade 3 VAIN (VAIN-3) over a 25-year period at Gustave Roussy Institute. Patients and Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the files of all patients treated at Gustave Roussy Institute for VAIN-3 since 1985. The treatment consisted of LDR brachytherapy using a personalized vaginal mold and delivered 60 Gy to 5 mm below the vaginal mucosa. All patients had at least an annual gynecological examination, including a vaginal smear. Results. Twenty-eight patients were eligible. The median follow-up was 41 months. Seven patients had a follow-up brachytherapy was 63 years (range, 38–80 years). Twenty-six patients had a history of VAIN recurring after cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 24 had a previous hysterectomy. The median brachytherapy duration was 4.5 days. Median doses to the International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements rectum and bladder points were 68 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median prescription volume (60 Gy) was 74 cm3. Only one “in field” recurrence occurred, corresponding to a 5- and 10-year local control rate of 93% (95% confidence interval, 70%–99%). The treatment was well tolerated, with no grade 3 or 4 late toxicity and only one grade 2 digestive toxicity. No second cancers were reported. Conclusion. LDR brachytherapy is an effective and safe treatment for vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia. PMID:21262875

  6. Bladder wall recurrence of prostate cancer after high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Hsu, I-Chow; Braunstein, Steve; Chang, Albert J; Simko, Jeffry P; Roach, Mack

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer seeding after needle biopsy has been reported in the perineum, rectal wall, and periprostatic soft tissue. In this article, we report the results of a localized prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder following protrusion of a single high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter through the bladder wall at the ultimate site of failure. A 62-year-old man with high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma was treated with long-term androgen deprivation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation, and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost. He developed biochemical recurrence 4 years after treatment, and a CT scan of the pelvis revealed a nodule in the posterior, inferior bladder wall. Surgical pathology following transurethral resection of tumor within the bladder was consistent with high-grade prostate adenocarcinoma. The patient's prostate-specific antigen level fell to the range of normal postoperatively, and whole body imaging, including a multi-parametric MRI of the prostate with diffusion and spectroscopy, failed to reveal any other sites of disease. Review of the CT scan obtained for dosimetry at the time of brachytherapy demonstrated a lone catheter protruding through the bladder wall at the site of eventual recurrence. The tumor recurred in the bladder 12 months later, once more without evidence of disease within the prostate itself or distantly, and the patient was started on salvage androgen deprivation therapy. This case is the first report of prostate cancer recurrence in the bladder wall after brachytherapy and raises questions about prostate cancer biology, brachytherapy technique, and the timing of brachytherapy boost relative to whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. SU-C-16A-05: OAR Dose Tolerance Recommendations for Prostate and Cervical HDR Brachytherapy: Dose Versus Volume Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geneser, S; Cunha, J; Pouliot, J; Hsu, I [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: HDR brachytherapy consensus dose tolerance recommendations for organs at risk (OARs) remain widely debated. Prospective trials reporting metrics must be sufficiently data-dense to assess adverse affects and identify optimally predictive tolerances. We explore the tradeoffs between reporting dose-metrics versus volume-metrics and the potential impact on trial outcome analysis and tolerance recommendations. Methods: We analyzed 26 prostate patients receiving 15 Gy HDR single-fraction brachytherapy boost to 45 Gy external beam radiation therapy and 28 cervical patients receiving 28 Gy HDR brachytherapy monotherapy in 4 fractions using 2 implants. For each OAR structure, a robust linear regression fit was performed for the dose-metrics as a function of the volume-metrics. The plan quality information provided by recommended dose-metric and volume-metric values were compared. Results: For prostate rectal dose, D2cc and V75 lie close to the regression line, indicating they are similarly informative. Two outliers for prostate urethral dose are substantially different from the remaining cohort in terms of D0.1cc and V75, but not D1cc, suggesting the choice of reporting dose metric is essential. For prostate bladder and cervical bladder, rectum, and bowel, dose outliers are more apparent via V75 than recommended dose-metrics. This suggests that for prostate bladder dose and all cervical OAR doses, the recommended volume-metrics may be better predictors of clinical outcome than dose-metrics. Conclusion: For plan acceptance criteria, dose and volume-metrics are reciprocally equivalent. However, reporting dosemetrics or volume-metrics alone provides substantially different information. Our results suggest that volume-metrics may be more sensitive to differences in planned dose, and if one metric must be chosen, volumemetrics are preferable. However, reporting discrete DVH points severely limits the ability to identify planning tolerances most predictive of adverse

  8. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  9. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio Assis, E-mail: acapellizzon@hcancer.org.br [A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia

    2016-05-15

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. (author)

  10. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of benign obstructive endobronchial granulation tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Chika N; Machuzak, Michael S; Sterman, Daniel H; Musani, Ali; Ahya, Vivek; McDonough, James; Metz, James M

    2006-12-01

    Severe airway obstruction can occur in the setting of benign granulation tissue forming at bronchial anastomotic sites after lung transplantation in up to 20% of patients. Many of these benign lesions respond to stent placement, laser ablation, or balloon bronchoplasty. However, in certain cases, proliferation of granulation tissue may persist despite all therapeutic attempts. This study describes a series of refractory patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for benign proliferation of granulation tissue, causing airway compromise. Between April 2002 and June 2005, 5 patients with significant airway compromise from recurrent granulation tissue were treated with HDR brachytherapy. All patients had previously failed to maintain a patent airway despite multiple bronchoscopic interventions. Treatment was delivered using an HDR brachytherapy afterloader with (192)Ir. Dose prescription was to a depth of 1 cm. All patients were treated weekly, with total doses ranging from 10 Gy to 21 Gy in two to three fractions. The median follow-up was 12 months. All patients experienced a reduction in therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures after HDR brachytherapy compared with the pretreatment period. With the exception of possible radiation-induced bronchitis in 1 patient, there were no other treatment related complications. At the time of this report, 2 patients have died and the other 3 are alive with marked symptomatic improvement and reduced bronchoscopic procedures. High-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for benign proliferation of granulation tissue causing airway obstruction. The early response to therapy is encouraging and further follow-up is necessary to determine long-term durability and late effects.

  11. Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Versus Cryotherapy in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestaut, Matthew M; Cai, Wendi; Vyas, Shilpa; Patel, Belur J; Hasan, Salman A; MunozMaldonado, Yolanda; Deb, Niloyjyoti; Swanson, Gregory

    2017-05-01

    Cryotherapy and brachytherapy are definitive local treatment options for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. There are both prospective and retrospective data for brachytherapy, but the use of cryotherapy has been limited primarily to single-institution retrospective studies. Currently, no published evidence has compared low-dose-rate brachytherapy versus cryotherapy. Institutional review board approval was obtained to conduct a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients treated at our institution from 1990 to 2012. For inclusion, patients must have received a prostate cancer diagnosis and have been considered to have low- to intermediate-risk disease according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria. All patients received brachytherapy or cryotherapy treatment. Disease specifics and failure details were collected for all patients. Failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen nadir +2 ng/mL. A total of 359 patients were analyzed. The groups comprised 50 low-risk cryotherapy (LRC), 92 intermediate-risk cryotherapy (IRC), 133 low-risk brachytherapy (LRB), and 84 intermediate-risk brachytherapy (IRB) patients. The median prostate-specific antigen follow-up periods were 85.6 months (LRC), 59.2 months (IRC), 74.9 months (LRB), and 59.8 months (IRB). The 5-year biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) rate was 57.9% in the cryotherapy group versus 89.6% in the brachytherapy group (Pcryotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk groups (Pcryotherapy patients was -35°C (range, -96°C to -6°C). Cryotherapy used a median of 2 freeze-thaw cycles (range, 2-4 freeze-thaw cycles). Results from this study suggest that cryotherapy is inferior to brachytherapy for patients with low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Patient selection criteria for consideration of cryotherapy and brachytherapy are similar in terms of anesthesia candidacy. Therefore, cryotherapy would not be recommended as a first-line local therapy for this particular

  12. Low-dose rate brachytherapy of the prostate in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumento, C; Fiorentino, A; Caivano, R; Clemente, S; Fusco, V

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the biochemical diseasefree survival (bDFS) rate, overall survival rate (OS) and toxicity after low-dose rate I(125) permanent-implant prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BRT) in elderly patients affected by prostate cancer. Patients aged ≥65 years with a diagnosis of prostate cancer and treated at our institution were retrospectively evaluated. All patients received LDR-BRT as monotherapy; the prescribed dose was 145 Gy to the prostate. Patients were stratified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) recurrence risk groups. Biochemical failure was defined according to the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) criteria. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale was used for toxicity. The bDFS was calculated from implant date to biochemical recurrence. Between June 2003 and December 2008, 80 elderly patients with a median age of 75 (range, 65-86) years were treated with LDR-BRT: 51 low risk (64%), and 29 intermediate risk (36%). Over a median follow-up period of 53 (range, 28-94) months, the global actuarial 5-year bDFS rate was 91.3% and the 5-year OS was 95%. Toxicity was mild: late grade-3 genitourinary toxicity was observed in only four patients (5%). Our data suggest that LDR-BRT is effective and safe as monotherapy in elderly patients.

  13. SU-F-BRA-06: Dose Distributions for the CivaSheet Pd-103 Directional Brachytherapy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A flexible polymer membrane (CivaSheet) has been developed by CivaTech Oncology, Inc. (Research Triangle Park, NC) for permanent brachytherapy. Distributed throughout the array are small plastic disks containing Pd-103 and gold foil shielding on one side to provide a directional dose distribution and facilitate imaging. This study evaluated dosimetry for the CivaSheet. Methods: Manufacturer-provided dimensional and compositional information for the device were compared to physical samples for validation of design information, then entered into the MCNP6 radiation transport code for dosimetry simulations. Three device sizes (6×6, 6×12, or 6×18 disk-arrays) were simulated as the membrane can be custom-sized preceding surgical placement. Dose to water was estimated with 0.01 cm resolution from the surface to 10 cm on both sides of the device. Because this is a novel device with calibration methods under development, results were normalized using DVHs to provide 90% prescription coverage to a plane positioned 0.5 cm from the front surfaces. This same normalization was used for creating isodose distributions. Results: Planar dose distributions of flat CivaSheets were relatively homogeneous with acceptable dose uniformity variations. Differences in the results between the differently sized CivaSheets were not significant. At 0.5 mm, 87% of the target volume was within the therapeutic dose range. Dose hotspots on the CivaSheet forward surfaces were directly above the disks. However, dose hotspots on the rear-facing surfaces were positioned between the disks. Doses in contact with the front surface were similar to those observed for currently available brachytherapy sources. Maximum doses that occurred on the rear surface were approximately 55 times lower than the dose on the front surface. Conclusion: Monte Carlo calculations validated the directional capabilities and advantageous dosimetry of the new Pd-103 brachytherapy device. It appears feasible to re

  14. Dose calculation of anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Bo; Klumpen, Heinz-Josef; Gurney, Howard

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anticancer drugs are characterized by a narrow therapeutic window and significant inter-patient variability in therapeutic and toxic effects. Current body surface area (BSA)-based dosing fails to standardize systemic anticancer drug exposure and other alternative dosing strategies also

  15. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela-Juan, C; Niatsetski, Y; van der Laarse, R; Granero, D; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Vijande, J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a (192)Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. The penelope2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a (192)Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth-dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable tool in clinical practice, making treatment of

  16. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and National Dosimetry Centre (CND), Valencia 46009 (Spain); Niatsetski, Y. [Elekta Brachytherapy, Veenendaal 3905 TH (Netherlands); Laarse, R. van der [Quality Radiation Therapy BV, Zeist 3707 HB (Netherlands); Granero, D. [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J. [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Radiotherapy, Clínica Benidorm, Benidorm 03501 (Spain); Vijande, J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), Burjassot 46100 (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a {sup 192}Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. Methods: The PENELOPE2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth–dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. Results: The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. Conclusions: The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable

  17. Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy for High-Dose-Rate Treatment of Cervical Cancer. I: Theoretical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dae Yup [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Webster, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Choi, Dongju; Song, Bongyong [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Devic, Slobodan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Ravi, Ananth [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, William Y., E-mail: wyjsong@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate that utilization of the direction-modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) concept can significantly improve treatment plan quality in the setting of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The new, MRI-compatible, tandem design has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter, grooved along a nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod (ρ = 18.0 g/cm{sup 3}), enclosed in Delrin tubing (polyoxymethylene, ρ = 1.41 g/cm{sup 3}), with a total thickness of 6.4 mm. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code was used to calculate the anisotropic {sup 192}Ir dose distributions. An in-house-developed inverse planning platform, geared with simulated annealing and constrained-gradient optimization algorithms, was used to replan 15 patient cases (total 75 plans) treated with a conventional tandem and ovoids (T and O) applicator. Prescription dose was 6 Gy. For replanning, we replaced the conventional tandem with that of the new DMBT tandem for optimization but left the ovoids in place and kept the dwell positions as originally planned. All DMBT plans were normalized to match the high-risk clinical target volume V100 coverage of the T and O plans. Results: In general there were marked improvements in plan quality for the DMBT plans. On average, D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were reduced by 0.59 ± 0.87 Gy (8.5% ± 28.7%), 0.48 ± 0.55 Gy (21.1% ± 27.2%), and 0.10 ± 0.38 Gy (40.6% ± 214.9%) among the 75 plans, with best single-plan reductions of 3.20 Gy (40.8%), 2.38 Gy (40.07%), and 1.26 Gy (27.5%), respectively. The high-risk clinical target volume D90 was similar, with 6.55 ± 0.96 Gy and 6.59 ± 1.06 Gy for T and O and DMBT, respectively. Conclusions: Application of the DMBT concept to cervical cancer allowed for improved organ at risk sparing while achieving similar target coverage on a sizeable patient population, as intended, by maximally utilizing the anatomic information contained in 3-dimensional

  18. Current situation of high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Rogerio Matias Vidal da; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento, E-mail: rmv.fisica@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Pinezi, Juliana Castro Dourado [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Goias (PUC-Goias), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Macedo, Luiz Eduardo Andrade [Hospital Chama, Arapiraca, AL (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    To assess the current situation of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cancer of the cervix in Brazil, regarding apparatuses, planning methods, prescription, fractionation schedule and evaluation of dose in organs at risk. Materials and methods: in the period between March/2012 and May/2013, a multiple choice questionnaire was developed and sent to 89 Brazilian hospitals which perform HDR brachytherapy. Results: sixty-one services answered the questionnaire. All regions of the country experienced a sharp increase in the number of HDR brachytherapy services in the period from 2001 to 2013. As regards planning, although a three-dimensional planning software was available in 91% of the centers, conventional radiography was mentioned by 92% of the respondents as their routine imaging method for such a purpose. Approximately 35% of respondents said that brachytherapy sessions are performed after teletherapy. The scheme of four 7 Gy intracavitary insertions was mentioned as the most frequently practiced. Conclusion: the authors observed that professionals have difficulty accessing adjuvant three-dimensional planning tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (author)

  19. Triple-tandem high-dose-rate brachytherapy for early-stage medically inoperable endometrial cancer: Initial report on acute toxicity and dosimetric comparison to stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffmann, Greg; Wu, Tianming; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) may be appealing in medically inoperable endometrial cancer to avoid procedural risks. We performed a dosimetric comparison to triple-tandem, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Six consecutive clinical stage I, grade 1-2, medically inoperable endometrial cancer patients were treated with triple-tandem HDR brachytherapy. We report patient factors and acute toxicity. Also, we performed dosimetric comparison to SBRT using both 3D conformal arc (3DArc) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy. D2cc values for normal tissues were calculated and compared to the HDR plans. Median age was 57 years. Patient comorbidities included morbid obesity, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and pulmonary emboli. In three patients who received prior external beam radiation (EBRT), median EBRT and HDR doses were 46 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The median dose with HDR brachytherapy monotherapy was 35 Gy. Acute toxicities during EBRT included gastrointestinal (3/3 with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (3/3 with grade 1-2). Acute toxicities during HDR brachytherapy were gastrointestinal (2/6 total with grade 1-2) and genitourinary (2/6 total with grade 1). The mean D2cc/Gy of prescription dose for rectum, sigmoid, and bladder were 0.58, 0.40, and 0.47 respectively. Overall, doses to normal tissues were higher for SBRT plans as compared to HDR. Also, the R50 (ratio of the 50% prescription isodose volume to the PTV) was lowest with HDR brachytherapy. In medically inoperable, clinical stage I endometrial cancer patients with multiple comorbidities, definitive triple-tandem, HDR brachytherapy results in mild acute toxicity. In addition, HDR brachytherapy achieves relatively lower doses to surrounding normal tissues as compared to SBRT. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adjuvant high dose rate brachytherapy for soft tissue sarcomas: initial experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Whitfield

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adjuvant high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT offers advantages over low dose rate brachytherapy (LDRBT, although there are little data on local tumor control and treatment related toxicity. We report outcome in patients with primary, recurrent, and metastatic extremity and superficial trunk soft tissue sarcoma. Material and methods: Eleven patients (12 sites with intermediate or high grade sarcoma were treated with adjuvant HDRBT following surgical resection. Patients were treated at 3.4 Gy fractions delivered twice daily to a total dose of 34 Gy (1 patient received 9 fractions. Results: With median follow-up of 20.8 months, 1 patient developed a local recurrence. 2-year local control and overall survival are 89% and 71%, respectively. Wound complications occurred in 3 sites. Two of the wound complications developed in the area of previous external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Conclusion: Surgical resection followed by HDRBT is associated with excellent early local tumor control and acceptable wound complication.

  1. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  2. Vaginal dose de-escalation in image guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Sandy; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; de Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Vaginal stenosis is a major problem following radiotherapy in cervical cancer. We investigated a new dose planning strategy for vaginal dose de-escalation (VDD). Fifty consecutive locally advanced cervical cancer patients without lower or middle vaginal involvement at diagnosis from 3 institutions were analysed. External beam radiotherapy was combined with MRI-guided brachytherapy. VDD was obtained by decreasing dwell times in ovoid/ring and increasing dwell times in tandem/needles. The aim was to maintain the target dose (D90 of HR-CTV⩾85Gy EQD2) while reducing the dose to the surface of the vagina to <140% of the physical fractional brachytherapy dose corresponding to a total EQD2 of 85Gy. The mean vaginal loading (ovoid/ring) was reduced from 51% to 33% of the total loading with VDD, which significantly reduced the dose to the vaginal dose points (p<0.001) without compromising the target dose. The dose to the ICRU recto-vaginal point was reduced by a mean of 4±4Gy EQD2 (p<0.001), while doses to bladder and rectum (D 2cm 3 ) were reduced by 2±2Gy and 3±2Gy, respectively (p<0.001). VDD significantly reduces dose to the upper vagina which is expected to result in reduction of vaginal stenosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of RADPOS in Vivo Dosimetry for QA of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherpak, A.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The RADPOS in vivo dosimetry system combines an electromagnetic positioning sensor with MOSFET dosimetry, allowing for simultaneous online measurements of dose and spatial position. In this work, we assess the potential use of RADPOS for measurements of motion and dose during prostate HDR......Gy. Conclusions: In vivo dosimetry can potentially signal errors in catheter placement or numbering before entire dose is delivered. The demonstrated accuracy of RADPOS dose measurements and its ability to simultaneously measure displacement makes it a powerful tool for HDR brachytherapy treatments for prostate...

  4. The Effect of Scattering from Leg Region on Organ Doses in Prostate Brachytherapy for 103Pd, 125I and 131Cs Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Milad Vahabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dose calculation of tumor and surrounding tissues is essential during prostate brachytherapy. Three radioisotopes, namely, 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs, are extensively used in this method. In this study, we aimed to calculate the received doses by the prostate and critical organs using the aforementioned radioactive seeds and to investigate the effect of scattering contribution for the legs on dose calculations. Materials and Methods The doses to organs of interest were calculated using MCNPX code and ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory phantom. Results Doses to the prostate as a source of radiation for 125I, 103Pd, and 131Cs were approximately 108.9, 97.7, and 81.5 Gy, respectively. Bladder, sigmoid colon, and testes received higher doses than other organs due to proximity to the prostate. Differences between the doses when tallying with the legs intact and with the legs voided were significant for testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall because of their proximity to the prostate. There was also a good consistency between our results and the data published by Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine for the prostate. Conclusion Scattering from leg region had a significant effect on doses to testes, sigmoid colon contents, and sigmoid colon wall in the pelvic region, and prostate and the other organs were unaffected. Brachytherapy treatment plans using 131Cs seeds allow for better sparing of critical tissues, with a comparable number of, or fewer, seeds required, compared to 125I seeds.

  5. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost for patients with early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Deo, S V S; Rath, Goura Kisor; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Thulkar, Sanjay; Madan, Renu; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost treatment preceding whole breast external beam radiation therapy in patients with early breast cancer. From 2005-2010, 100 patients with early breast cancer who met the eligibility criteria were enrolled in the study. Brachytherapy implant was performed during the breast-conserving surgery procedure. The boost treatment was started on the 3rd postoperative day to deliver a dose of 15 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 days. Three weeks later, external beam radiation therapy to the whole breast was started for a prescription dose of 50 Gy. The study end points were local recurrence, acute toxicity and cosmetic outcome. Median age of the patients was 46 years, and median follow-up was 52 months. No patient developed a local recurrence but 5 patients developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 86% and 77%, respectively. Eleven patients had acute toxicity; 4 wound complications and 7 grade III skin toxicity. Nine of the 11 patients had breast size of more than 1500 cc. Except for the breast volume (>1500 cc), there was no statistically significant correlation between any of the patient or dosimetry-related factors and acute toxicity. Good-excellent cosmesis was observed in 87% of patients. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy boost followed by whole breast external beam radiation therapy provides excellent local control, acceptable acute toxicity and good-excellent breast cosmesis in patients with early breast cancer.

  6. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M.; Van Hecke, H.; Boterberg, T.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  7. Pediatric peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent Wilms’ tumor using a reconstructed Freiburg flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Flower

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with a 3D customized Freiburg flap applicator to treat locally recurrent Wilms’ tumor, followed by immediate hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for a 16-year-old with a second recurrence of nephroblastoma (Wilms’ tumor. Material and methods: The tumor was excised and surgical bed was treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy using a Freiburg flap applicator. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed immediately after the removal of brachytherapy applicator. Results: The Freiburg flap was successfully reconstructed to enable delivery of conformable peri-operative HDR brachytherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV D90 was 26 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusions : Peri-operative fractionated HDR brachytherapy with a customized Freiburg flap applicator was delivered successfully across a large multi-disciplinary team.

  8. Radiation protection procedures and dose to the staff in brachytherapy with permanent implant of the sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosi, G.; Cattani, F.

    2002-07-01

    The treatment of intra capsular prostate cancers with the permanent implantation of low energy sealed radioactive sources (''103 Pd-''125I) offers the same probability of curing the tumours as surgery and external-beam radiotherapy with a minimum incidence of unwanted side-effects. The first attempts of using sealed sources for treating prostate cancers go back to 1917, when Barringer reported the results obtained with the implant of ''236Ra needles. Beginning from that period the interest for prostate brachytherapy has shown a fluctuating trend, due especially to the technological possibilities and to the status of the alternative treatment modalities (surgery, external radiotherapy). The main reason of the substantial failure of brachytherapy as compared to the two other treatment modalities had two main causes: the energy, too high ( E{approx_equal} 840 keV), of {gamma}-radiation emitted by ''226 Ra in equilibrium with its decay products and the lack of imaging techniques able to visualize with sufficient accuracy both the prostate and the arrangement, inside it, of the radioactive sources. The employ of low energy {gamma}-emitting radionuclides began in 1974, when Whitmore et al. working at the Sloan Kettering Memorial Cancer Hospital of New York suggested the use of ''125 I sealed sources for the realisation of interstitial permanent implants. Also this attempt, though reducing the side effects typical of the surgical intervention (incontinence, impotence), did non give the expected results in terms of local control of the disease and, as a consequence, of the survival's length. This partial failure was attributed to the fact that, in most cases the dose distribution inside the target volume was not homogeneous, due to the inadequacy of the available imaging techniques used for checking the real position of the sources, during their manual insertion in the tissues. In the last ten years,however, great

  9. Comparison of dose and catheter optimization algorithms in prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Eric; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Aubin, Sylviane; Beaulieu, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the hybrid inverse treatment planning optimization (HIPO), inverse dose-volume histogram-based optimization (DVHO), and fast simulated annealing stochastic algorithm (IPSA). The catheter optimization algorithm HIPO was also compared with the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) algorithm. In this study, eight high-dose-rate prostate cases were randomly selected from an anonymized bank of patients. Oncentra Prostate v4.1 was used to run DVHO and the HIPO catheter optimization (HIPO_cat), whereas Oncentra Brachy v4.3 was used for the remaining. For fixed catheter configurations, DVHO plans were compared with IPSA and HIPO. For catheter positions optimization, CVT and HIPO_cat algorithms were compared with standard clinical template plans. CVT catheters were further restrained to the template grid (CVT_grid) and compared with HIPO_cat. For dose optimization, IPSA and HIPO were not different from each other. The urethra D10 and the computation time were found significantly better with IPSA and HIPO compared with DVHO (p 0.05). For catheter placement, CVT plans were better, whereas HIPO_cat plans were significantly worse (p HIPO_cat plans do not for all catheter numbers. The CVT algorithm run time was significantly faster than HIPO_cat (p HIPO give similar dosimetric results. The CVT approach was found to be better than HIPO_cat and was able to reduce the number of catheters significantly. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

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    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  11. Prognostic factors in squamous cell lip carcinoma treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Jose-Luis; Arribas, Leoncio; Vendrell, Juan B; Santos, Miguel; Tortajada, Maria I; Mut, Alejandro; Cruz, Julia; Mengual, Jose L; Chust, Maria L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was for us to present our analysis of the results and prognostic factors in squamous lip carcinoma treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. From 1999 to 2010, 102 patients were treated with HDR-brachytherapy, 54 with T1, 33 with T2, and 15 with T4. Eight cases were N+. Twenty-one patients were treated with surgery plus brachytherapy because of close/positive margins. Nine fractions of 5 Gy were given over 5 days in 67% of the patients. Elective neck treatment was performed in 23 cases. The 10-year actuarial local control was 94.6%, nodal regional control was 88.6%, disease-free survival was 84.6%, and cause-specific survival was 93.2%. In the univariate analysis, T4 tumors had higher risk of local failure and T2 of regional relapse. In the multivariate analysis, skin involvement was the only significant factor for tumor progression. HDR-brachytherapy yields excellent local control rates. Skin involvement increases the risk of local and cervical recurrence. Elective neck treatment should be done in T2 to T4 tumors or with skin or commissure involvement. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue using a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Imai, Michiko; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nozue, Masashi; Kaneko, Masao; Mukodaka, Hiroyuki; Asai, Yoshihiro [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We have applied an interstitial brachytherapy employing a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader to five patients with cancer of the base of tongue since December 1994. Insertion of applicators was carried out with tracheotomy under general anesthesia. Brachytherapy was delivered twice a day with a 6-hour interval. Irradiation dose was estimated at the point of 5 mm from outer applicators. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated for 4-5 days in all patients and acute radiation reaction was minimal. Local control were observed in two cases. In conclusion, our preliminary experience suggests that HDR brachytherapy may be an option in the radiotherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue. Optimal dose-fractionation protocol should be established. (author)

  13. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra J; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Cormack, Robert A; Hansen, Jorgen L; Khan, Atif J; Mutyala, Subhakar; Devlin, Phillip M

    2008-11-19

    To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT). Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10) and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20), were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925-1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337-551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets.

  14. Dose volume histogram analysis of normal structures associated with accelerated partial breast irradiation delivered by high dose rate brachytherapy and comparison with whole breast external beam radiotherapy fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutyala Subhakar

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To assess the radiation dose delivered to the heart and ipsilateral lung during accelerated partial breast brachytherapy using a MammoSite™ applicator and compare to those produced by whole breast external beam radiotherapy (WBRT. Materials and methods Dosimetric analysis was conducted on patients receiving MammoSite breast brachytherapy following conservative surgery for invasive ductal carcinoma. Cardiac dose was evaluated for patients with left breast tumors with a CT scan encompassing the entire heart. Lung dose was evaluated for patients in whom the entire lung was scanned. The prescription dose of 3400 cGy was 1 cm from the balloon surface. MammoSite dosimetry was compared to simulated WBRT fields with and without radiobiological correction for the effects of dose and fractionation. Dose parameters such as the volume of the structure receiving 10 Gy or more (V10 and the dose received by 20 cc of the structure (D20, were calculated as well as the maximum and mean doses received. Results Fifteen patients were studied, five had complete lung data and six had left-sided tumors with complete cardiac data. Ipsilateral lung volumes ranged from 925–1380 cc. Cardiac volumes ranged from 337–551 cc. MammoSite resulted in a significantly lower percentage lung V30 and lung and cardiac V20 than the WBRT fields, with and without radiobiological correction. Conclusion This study gives low values for incidental radiation received by the heart and ipsilateral lung using the MammoSite applicator. The volume of heart and lung irradiated to clinically significant levels was significantly lower with the MammoSite applicator than using simulated WBRT fields of the same CT data sets. Trial registration Dana Farber Trial Registry number 03-179

  15. NOTE: Clinical application of a OneDose™ MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Sharma, Pramod K.; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Mahantshetty, Umesh M.; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2006-07-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose™ in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  16. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  17. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delishaj, Durim; Rembielak, Agata; Manfredi, Bruno; Ursino, Stefano; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Laliscia, Concetta; Orlandi, Francesca; Morganti, Riccardo; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Paiar, Fabiola

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been increasing over the past 30 years. There are different treatment options and surgical excision is the most frequent treatment due to its low rates of recurrence. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative of surgery, and brachytherapy (BT) might be a better therapeutic option due to high radiation dose concentration to the tumor with rapid dose fall-off resulting in normal tissues sparing. The aim of this review was to evaluate the local control, toxicity, and cosmetic outcomes in NMSC treated with high-dose-rate BT (HDR-BT). In May 2016, a systematic search of bibliographic database of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library with a combination of key words of "skin cancer", "high dose rate brachytherapy", "squamous cell carcinoma", "basal cell carcinoma", and "non melanoma skin cancer" was performed. In this systematic review, we included randomized trials, non-randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies in patients affected by NMSC treated with HDR-BT. Our searches generated a total of 85 results, and through a process of screening, 10 publications were selected for the review. Brachytherapy was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and high local control rates (median: 97%). Cosmetic outcome was reported in seven study and consisted in an excellent and good cosmetic results in 94.8% of cases. Based on the review data, we can conclude that the treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results, even in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective with very good local disease control. More data with large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of brachytherapy.

  18. Association between maximal skin dose and breast brachytherapy outcome: a proposal for more rigorous dosimetric constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttino, Laurie W; Heffernan, Jill; Vera, Robyn; Rosu, Mihaela; Ramakrishnan, V Ramesh; Arthur, Douglas W

    2011-11-01

    Multiple investigations have used the skin distance as a surrogate for the skin dose and have shown that distances brachytherapy. No publications have yet described the relationship between the actual maximal skin dose and the outcome. The present study analyzed the maximal skin dose delivered and the occurrence of late toxicity in a large cohort of patients with prolonged follow-up. A total of 96 patients treated with breast brachytherapy between 2000 and 2007 for whom complete planning and follow-up data were available were included in the present analysis. The median follow-up was 48 months (range, 24-111). Of the 96 patients, 40 were treated with multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy and 56 with MammoSite. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed to determine the relationship between several dosimetric parameters and patient outcome. The treatment was well tolerated, with 98% of patients experiencing good to excellent cosmesis. Significant late toxicity was uncommon. The maximal dose delivered to the skin was significantly associated with the incidence of any degree of telangiectasia (p = .009) and moderate to severe fibrosis (p = .010). The incidence of late toxicity was significantly increased when the dose to the skin was >4.05 Gy/fraction. The initial skin dose recommendations have been based on safe use and the avoidance of significant toxicity. The results from the present study have suggested that patients might further benefit if more rigorous constraints were applied and if the skin dose were limited to 120% of the prescription dose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Preliminary Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satmoko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary prototype of a brachytherapy equipment has been constructed. The work started by developing conceptual design, followed by basic design and detailed design. In the conceptual design, design requirements are stated. In the basic design, technical specifications for main components are determined. In detailed design, general drawings are discussed. The prototype consists of three main systems: a mechanical system, an instrumentation system, and a safety system. The mechanical system assures the movement mechanism of the isotope source position beginning from the standby position until the applicators. It consists of three main modules: a position handling module, a container module, and a channel distribution module. The position handling module serves to move the isotope source position. As shielding, the second module is to store the source when the equipment is in standby position. The prototype provides 12 output channels. The channel selection is performed by the third module. The instrumentation system controls the movement of source position by handling motor operations. It consists of several modules. A microcontroller module serves as a control center whose task includes both controlling motors and communicating with computer. A motor module serves to handle motors. 10 sensors, including their signal conditionings, are introduced to read the environment conditions of the equipment. LEDs are used to display these conditions. In order to facilitate the operators’ duty, communication via RS232 is provided. The brachytherapy equipment can therefore be operated by using computer. Interface software is developed using C# language. To complete both mechanical and instrumentation systems performance, a safety system is developed to make sure that the safety for operator and patients from receiving excessive radiation. An interlock system is introduced to guard against abnormal conditions. In the worst case, a manual intervention

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of PLATO and Oncentra treatment planning systems for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy gynecological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Hardev; De La Fuente Herman, Tania; Showalter, Barry; Thompson, Spencer J.; Syzek, Elizabeth J.; Herman, Terence; Ahmad, Salahuddin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK 73104 (United States)

    2012-10-23

    This study compares the dosimetric differences in HDR brachytherapy treatment plans calculated with Nucletron's PLATO and Oncentra MasterPlan treatment planning systems (TPS). Ten patients (1 T1b, 1 T2a, 6 T2b, 2 T4) having cervical carcinoma, median age of 43.5 years (range, 34-79 years) treated with tandem and ring applicator in our institution were selected retrospectively for this study. For both Plato and Oncentra TPS, the same orthogonal films anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral were used to manually draw the prescription and anatomical points using definitions from the Manchester system and recommendations from the ICRU report 38. Data input for PLATO was done using a digitizer and Epson Expression 10000XL scanner was used for Oncentra where the points were selected on the images in the screen. The prescription doses for these patients were 30 Gy to points right A (RA) and left A (LA) delivered in 5 fractions with Ir-192 HDR source. Two arrangements: one dwell position and two dwell positions on the tandem were used for dose calculation. The doses to the patient points right B (RB) and left B (LB), and to the organs at risk (OAR), bladder and rectum for each patient were calculated. The mean dose and the mean percentage difference in dose calculated by the two treatment planning systems were compared. Paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in mean RB, LB, bladder and rectum doses were found with p-values > 0.14. The mean percent difference of doses in RB, LB, bladder and rectum are found to be less than 2.2%, 1.8%, 1.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Dose calculations based on the two different treatment planning systems were found to be consistent and the treatment plans can be made with either system in our department without any concern.

  1. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, Yuko, E-mail: kaneyasu@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kita, Midori [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Tama Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Okawa, Tomohiko [Evaluation and Promotion Center, Utsunomiya Memorial Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Maebayashi, Katsuya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Kohno, Mari [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  2. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in (192)Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in (192)Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Time-driven activity-based costing of low-dose-rate and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for low-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, Annette M; Laviana, Aaron A; Kamrava, Mitchell; Veruttipong, Darlene; Steinberg, Michael; Park, Sang-June; Burke, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Douglas; Kupelian, Patrick A; Saigal, Christopher

    Cost estimates through traditional hospital accounting systems are often arbitrary and ambiguous. We used time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) to determine the true cost of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for prostate cancer and demonstrate opportunities for cost containment at an academic referral center. We implemented TDABC for patients treated with I-125, preplanned LDR and computed tomography based HDR brachytherapy with two implants from initial consultation through 12-month followup. We constructed detailed process maps for provision of both HDR and LDR. Personnel, space, equipment, and material costs of each step were identified and used to derive capacity cost rates, defined as price per minute. Each capacity cost rate was then multiplied by the relevant process time and products were summed to determine total cost of care. The calculated cost to deliver HDR was greater than LDR by $2,668.86 ($9,538 vs. $6,869). The first and second HDR treatment day cost $3,999.67 and $3,955.67, whereas LDR was delivered on one treatment day and cost $3,887.55. The greatest overall cost driver for both LDR and HDR was personnel at 65.6% ($4,506.82) and 67.0% ($6,387.27) of the total cost. After personnel costs, disposable materials contributed the second most for LDR ($1,920.66, 28.0%) and for HDR ($2,295.94, 24.0%). With TDABC, the true costs to deliver LDR and HDR from the health system perspective were derived. Analysis by physicians and hospital administrators regarding the cost of care afforded redesign opportunities including delivering HDR as one implant. Our work underscores the need to assess clinical outcomes to understand the true difference in value between these modalities. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High dose rate prostate brachytherapy: an overview of the rationale, experience and emerging applications in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challapalli, A; Jones, E; Harvey, C; Hellawell, G O; Mangar, S A

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy places this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in radiotherapy. This review article will explore the rationale for HDR brachytherapy as a highly conformal method of dose delivery and safe dose escalation to the prostate, in addition to the particular radiobiological advantages it has over low dose rate and external beam radiotherapy. The encouraging outcome data and favourable toxicity profile will be discussed before looking at emerging applications for the future and how this procedure will feature alongside stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:23118099

  5. Clinical outcome of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in patients with oral cavity cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Moon, Sung Ho; Choi, Sung Weon; Park, Joo Yong; Yun, Tak; Lee, Sang Hyun; Lim, Young Kyung; Jeong, Chi Young [National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) in patients with oral cavity cancer. Sixteen patients with oral cavity cancer treated with HDR remote-control afterloading brachytherapy using 192Ir between 2001 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Brachytherapy was administered in 11 patients as the primary treatment and in five patients as salvage treatment for recurrence after the initial surgery. In 12 patients, external beam radiotherapy (50-55 Gy/25 fractions) was combined with IBT of 21 Gy/7 fractions. In addition, IBT was administered as the sole treatment in three patients with a total dose of 50 Gy/10 fractions and as postoperative adjuvant treatment in one patient with a total of 35 Gy/7 fractions. The 5-year overall survival of the entire group was 70%. The actuarial local control rate after 3 years was 84%. All five recurrent cases after initial surgery were successfully salvaged using IBT +/- external beam radiotherapy. Two patients developed local recurrence at 3 and 5 months, respectively, after IBT. The acute complications were acceptable (< or =grade 2). Three patients developed major late complications, such as radio-osteonecrosis, in which one patient was treated by conservative therapy and two required surgical intervention. HDR IBT for oral cavity cancer was effective and acceptable in diverse clinical settings, such as in the cases of primary or salvage treatment.

  6. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  7. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy for thick uveal melanoma: reappraisal of apex and base dose radiation and dose rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Naseripour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of ruthenium-106 ( 106 Ru brachytherapy in terms of radiation parameters in patients with thick uveal melanomas. Material and methods: Medical records of 51 patients with thick (thickness ≥ 7 mm and < 11 mm uveal melanoma treated with 106 Ru brachytherapy during a ten-year period were reviewed. Radiation parameters, tumor regression, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA, and treatment-related complications were assessed. Results: Fifty one eyes of 51 consecutive patients including 25 men and 26 women with a mean age of 50.5 ± 15.2 years were enrolled. Patients were followed for 36.1 ± 26.5 months (mean ± SD. Mean radiation dose to tumor apex and to sclera were 71 (± 19.2 Gy and 1269 (± 168.2 Gy. Radiation dose rates to tumor apex and to sclera were 0.37 (± 0.14 Gy/h and 6.44 (± 1.50 Gy/h. Globe preservation was achieved in 82.4%. Preoperative mean tumor thickness of 8.1 (± 0.9 mm decreased to 4.5 (± 1.6 mm, 3.4 (± 1.4 mm, and 3.0 (± 1.46 mm at 12, 24, and 48 months after brachytherapy (p = 0.03. Four eyes that did not show regression after 6 months of brachytherapy were enucleated. Secondary enucleation was performed in 5 eyes because of tumor recurrence or neovascular glaucoma. Tumor recurrence was evident in 6 (11.8% patients. Mean Log MAR (magnification requirement visual acuity declined from 0.75 (± 0.63 to 0.94 (± 0.5 (p = 0.04. Best corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or worse was recorded in 37% of the patients at the time of diagnosis and 61.7% of the patients at last exam (p = 0.04. Non-proliferative and proliferative radiation-induced retinopathy was observed in 20 and 7 eyes. Conclusions : Thick uveal melanomas are amenable to 106 Ru brachytherapy with less than recommended apex radiation dose and dose rates.

  8. A dosimetric study of polyethylene glycol hydrogel in 200 prostate cancer patients treated with high-dose rate brachytherapy±intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Tobin J; Wilder, Richard B; Fernandez, Daniel C; Mellon, Eric A; Saini, Amarjit S; Hunt, Dylan C; Pow-Sang, Julio M; Spiess, Phillipe E; Sexton, Wade J; Poch, Michael A; Biagioli, Matthew C

    2014-04-01

    We sought to analyze the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel on rectal doses in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Between July 2009 and April 2013, we treated 200 clinically localized prostate cancer patients with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy±intensity modulated radiation therapy. Half of the patients received a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided transperineal injection of 10mL PEG hydrogel (DuraSeal™ Spinal Sealant System; Covidien, Mansfield, MA) in their anterior perirectal fat immediately prior to the first HDR brachytherapy treatment and 5mL PEG hydrogel prior to the second HDR brachytherapy treatment. Prostate, rectal, and bladder doses and prostate-rectal distances were calculated based upon treatment planning CT scans. There was a success rate of 100% (100/100) with PEG hydrogel implantation. PEG hydrogel significantly increased the prostate-rectal separation (mean±SD, 12±4mm with gel vs. 4±2mm without gel, phydrogel temporarily displaced the rectum away from the prostate by an average of 12mm and led to a significant reduction in rectal radiation doses, regardless of BMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy; Otimizacao de dose em implantes intersticiais permanentes simulados de braquiterapia de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-07-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  10. Patient-Specific Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Kernel Approach for Inverse Planning in Afterloading Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amours, Michel [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dagnault, Anne [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastro Clinic, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. Methods and Materials: The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. Results: A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. Conclusion: A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report

  11. Patient-specific Monte Carlo-based dose-kernel approach for inverse planning in afterloading brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amours, Michel; Pouliot, Jean; Dagnault, Anne; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-12-01

    Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report 43 approach for the Axxent source. Copyright © 2011

  12. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our stud...

  13. Evaluation of a real-time BeO ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alexandre M Caraça; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Afshar V, Shahraam

    2015-11-01

    The authors evaluate the capability of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimeter, named radioluminescence/optically stimulated luminescence (RL/OSL) BeO FOD, for dosimetric verification of high dose rate (HDR) treatments. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is capable of RL and OSL measurements. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is able to be inserted in 6F proguide needles, used in interstitial HDR treatments. Using a custom built Perspex phantom, 6F proguide needles could be submerged in a water tank at 1 cm separations from each other. A second background fiber was required to correct for the stem effect. The stem effect, dose linearity, reproducibility, depth-dose curves, and angular and temperature dependency of the RL/OSL BeO FOD were characterised using an Ir-192 source. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was also applied to the commissioning of a 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator. Both the RL and OSL were found to be reproducible and their percentage depth-dose curves to be in good agreement with those predicted via TG-43. A combined uncertainty of 7.9% and 10.1% (k=1) was estimated for the RL and OSL, respectively. For the 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator, measured percentage depth doses were within 5% agreement of the published reference calculations. The output at the 3 mm prescription depth for a 1 Gy delivery was verified to be 0.99±0.08 Gy and 1.01±0.10 Gy by the RL and OSL, respectively. The use of the second background fiber under the current setup means that the two fibers cannot fit into a single 6F needle. Hence, use of the RL is currently not adequate for the purpose of in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry. While not real-time, the OSL is shown to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  14. Long-term outcome of magnetic resonance spectroscopic image–directed dose escalation for prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Martin T.; Nasser, Nicola J.; Mathur, Nitin; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yuen, Jasper; Vargas, Hebert A.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Zakian, Kristen L.; Zaider, Marco; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To report the long-term control and toxicity outcomes of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer, who underwent low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy with magnetic resonance spectroscopic image (MRSI)–directed dose escalation to intraprostatic regions. METHODS AND MATERIALS Forty-seven consecutive patients between May 2000 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. Each patient underwent a preprocedural MRSI, and MRS-positive voxels suspicious for malignancy were identified. Intraoperative planning was used to determine the optimal seed distribution to deliver a standard prescription dose to the entire prostate, while escalating the dose to MRS-positive voxels to 150% of prescription. Each patient underwent transperineal implantation of radioactive seeds followed by same-day CT for postimplant dosimetry. RESULTS The median prostate D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the prostate) was 125.7% (interquartile range [IQR], 110.3–136.5%) of prescription. The median value for the MRS-positive mean dose was 229.9% (IQR, 200.0–251.9%). Median urethra D30 and rectal D30 values were 142.2% (137.5–168.2%) and 56.1% (40.1–63.4%), respectively. Median followup was 86.4 months (IQR, 49.8–117.6). The 10-year actuarial prostate-specific antigen relapse–free survival was 98% (95% confidence interval, 93–100%). Five patients (11%) experienced late Grade 3 urinary toxicity (e.g., urethral stricture), which improved after operative intervention. Four of these patients had dose-escalated voxels less than 1.0 cm from the urethra. CONCLUSIONS Low-dose-rate brachytherapy with MRSI-directed dose escalation to suspicious intraprostatic regions exhibits excellent long-term biochemical control. Patients with dose-escalated voxels close to the urethra were at higher risk of late urinary stricture. PMID:27009848

  15. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  16. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durim Delishaj

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC has been increasing over the past 30 years. There are different treatment options and surgical excision is the most frequent treatment due to its low rates of recurrence. Radiotherapy is an effective alternative of surgery, and brachytherapy (BT might be a better therapeutic option due to high radiation dose concentration to the tumor with rapid dose fall-off resulting in normal tissues sparing. The aim of this review was to evaluate the local control, toxicity, and cosmetic outcomes in NMSC treated with high-dose-rate BT (HDR-BT. Material and methods: In May 2016, a systematic search of bibliographic database of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Cochrane Library with a combination of key words of “skin cancer”, “high dose rate brachytherapy”, “squamous cell carcinoma”, “basal cell carcinoma”, and “non melanoma skin cancer“ was performed. In this systematic review, we included randomized trials, non-randomized trials, prospective and retrospective studies in patients affected by NMSC treated with HDR-BT. Results: Our searches generated a total of 85 results, and through a process of screening, 10 publications were selected for the review. Brachytherapy was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and high local control rates (median: 97%. Cosmetic outcome was reported in seven study and consisted in an excellent and good cosmetic results in 94.8% of cases. Conclusions : Based on the review data, we can conclude that the treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results, even in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective with very good local disease control. More data with large-scale randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the efficacy and safety of brachytherapy.

  17. Comparison of manual and inverse optimisation techniques in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy of cervical cancer: A dosimetric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ram Abhinav; Gururajachar, Janaki Manur; Ponni, Arul; Koushik, Kirthi; Kumar, Mohan; Alva, Ram Charith; Harjani, Ritika; Murthy, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    To compare dosimetrically the manual optimisation with IPSA using dose volume histograms (DVH) among patients treated for carcinoma of cervix with intracavitary brachytherapy. With the advent of advanced imaging modalities, there has been a shift from conventional X-ray based planning to three-dimensional planning. Manual optimisation is widely used across various institutions but it is time consuming and operator dependant. Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) is now available in various brachytherapy planning systems. But there is a paucity of studies comparing manual optimisation and IPSA in treatment of carcinoma cervix with intracavitary brachytherapy and hence this study. Fifteen consecutive patients treated between December 2013 and March 2014 with intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of cervix were selected for this study. All patients were initially treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy. The DVH was evaluated and compared between manually optimised plans and IPSA in the same set of patients. There was a significant improvement in the HRCTV coverage, mean V100 of 87.75% and 82.37% (p = 0.001) and conformity index 0.67 and 0.6 (p = 0.007) for plans generated using IPSA and manual optimisation, respectively. Homogeneity index and dose to the OARs remained similar between the two groups. The use of inverse planning in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervix has shown a significant improvement in the target volume coverage when compared with manual planning.

  18. Global convergence analysis of fast multiobjective gradient-based dose optimization algorithms for high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahanas, M; Baltas, D; Giannouli, S

    2003-03-07

    We consider the problem of the global convergence of gradient-based optimization algorithms for interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose optimization using variance-based objectives. Possible local minima could lead to only sub-optimal solutions. We perform a configuration space analysis using a representative set of the entire non-dominated solution space. A set of three prostate implants is used in this study. We compare the results obtained by conjugate gradient algorithms, two variable metric algorithms and fast-simulated annealing. For the variable metric algorithm BFGS from numerical recipes, large fluctuations are observed. The limited memory L-BFGS algorithm and the conjugate gradient algorithm FRPR are globally convergent. Local minima or degenerate states are not observed. We study the possibility of obtaining a representative set of non-dominated solutions using optimal solution rearrangement and a warm start mechanism. For the surface and volume dose variance and their derivatives, a method is proposed which significantly reduces the number of required operations. The optimization time, ignoring a preprocessing step, is independent of the number of sampling points in the planning target volume. Multiobjective dose optimization in HDR brachytherapy using L-BFGS and a new modified computation method for the objectives and derivatives has been accelerated, depending on the number of sampling points, by a factor in the range 10-100.

  19. Impact of dose rate on clinical course in uveal melanoma after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mossboeck, G.; Rauscher, T.; Langmann, G. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Opthalmology; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology

    2007-10-15

    Background and Purpose: It has been suggested that the actual dose rate of an irradiating source may be a distinct influencing factor for the biological effect after brachytherapy with ruthenium-106 for uveal melanoma. The purpose of this study was to investigate a hypothesized impact of the dose rate on the clinical and echographic course after brachytherapy. Patients and Methods: In total, 45 patients were included in this retrospective study. According to the actual dose rate, two groups were defined: group 1 with a dose rate < 4 Gy/h and group 2 with a dose rate {>=} 4 Gy/h. Regarding age, tumor height, basal diameter, scleral and apical dose, differences between the groups were not significant. Clinical parameters, including early and late side effects, and echographic courses were compared. Results: A significantly lower metastatic rate was found in group 2. Using univariate Cox proportional hazards regression, only dose rate predicted metastatic spread significantly (p < 0.05), while in a multivariate analysis, using age at the time of treatment, greatest tumor height and greatest basal diameter as covariates, the variable dose rate was of borderline significance (p = 0.077). Patients in group 2 had more early side effects and more pronounced visual decline, but these differences were of borderline significance with p-values of 0.072 and 0.064, respectively. Conclusion: These data suggest that a higher dose rate may confer a lower risk for metastatic spread, but may be associated with more side effects and more pronounced visual decline. (orig.)

  20. Efficacy and Feasibility of Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, J; Hashimoto, Yas; Hashimoto, Yai; Kondo, T; Takagi, T; Nozaki, T; Shimizu, T; Akimoto, T; Ishida, H; Karasawa, K; Tanabe, K

    2016-04-01

    In young patients with localized prostate cancer, radical prostatectomy is the treatment of choice in the general population. Radiotherapy, such as low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy, is a viable alternative as well. However, in transplant patients, irradiation is not proposed as often as it is in healthy adults because of the risk of post-radiation ureteral stenosis and gastrointestinal toxicity as the result of fragile tissue. The objective of the study was to assess the efficacy and feasibility of LDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Between May 2007 and December 2014, all patients who had undergone LDR brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer at our institution were retrospectively identified (n = 203). Of these patients, 2 had a history of renal transplantation. We reviewed all available clinical data retrospectively. One patient had a functioning graft and the other had re-started hemodialysis 7 years after the transplantation. The mean time from renal transplantation to prostate cancer diagnosis was 16 years. The mean follow-up after seed implantation was 45 months. There were no peri-operative complications after seed implantation. The 2 patients remained free of prostate-specific antigen progression during the follow-up period. The renal function of the patient with a functioning graft, as measured by serum creatinine, was stable during and after the operation. LDR brachytherapy is technically feasible and acceptable as a minimally invasive treatment in carefully selected RTRs with localized prostate cancer. This treatment should be considered a suitable option for RTRs with localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TU-AB-201-08: Rotating Shield High Dose Rate Brachytherapy with 153Gd and 75Se Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, M; Seuntjens, J; Enger, S [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Flynn, R [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) for different cancer sites with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se isotopes. RSBT is a form of intensity modulated brachytherapy, using shielded rotating catheters to provide a better dose distribution in the tumour while protecting healthy tissue. Methods: BrachySource, a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dose planning system was developed for investigation of RSBT with {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se for different cancer sites. Dose distributions from {sup 153}Gd, {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir isotopes were calculated in a 40 cm radius water phantom by using the microSelectron-v2 source model. The source was placed inside a cylindrical platinum shield with 1.3 mm diameter. An emission window coinciding with the active core of the source was created by removing half (180°) of the wall of the shield. Relative dose rate distributions of the three isotopes were simulated. As a proof of concept, a breast cancer patient originally treated with Mammosite was re-simulated with unshielded {sup 192}Ir and shielded {sup 153}Gd. Results: The source with the lowest energy, {sup 153}Gd, decreased the dose on the shielded side by 91%, followed by {sup 75}Se and {sup 192}Ir with 36% and 16% reduction at 1 cm from the source. The breast cancer patient simulation showed the ability of shielded {sup 153}Gd to spare the chest wall by a 90% dose reduction when only one emission window angle is considered. In this case, fully covering the PTV would require more delivery angles and the chest wall dose reduction would be less, however, the simulation demonstrates the potential of shielded {sup 153}Gd to selectively isolate organs at risk. Conclusion: Introducing {sup 153}Gd and {sup 75}Se sources combined with RSBT will allow escalation of dose in the target volume while maintaining low doses in radiation sensitive healthy tissue. Tailoring treatments to each individual patient by treating all parts of the tumour without over-irradiation of normal

  2. Experiences of high dose rate interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko; Yamazaki, Hideya (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1994-03-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy was conducted for mobile tongue carcinoma using a high dose rate remote afterloading machine with small [sup 192]I source. Detailed method, named as 'linked double-botton technique', is to approach from submandibular skin by an open-ended stainless steel needles to the tongue lesion, and to replace each needle into flexible nylon tube from the oral cavity. Delivered dose was 60 Gy/10 Fr./5-6 days at the distance 5 mm from the source plane. Ten patients with mobile tongue carcinoma Tl-2N0 were treated with this method from October 1991 through August 1992. Local was uncontrolled in one patient, in whom the lesion was combined with leukoplakia at both lateral borders of the tongue. This was in accordance with the result in low dose rate treatment. This can be a substitute to low dose rate system for treatment of mobile tongue carcinoma. (author).

  3. Dose-volume analysis of target volume and critical structures in computed tomography image-based multicatheter high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Akiyama

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate dose-volume relationships of target volume and critical structures in computed tomography (CT image-based brachytherapy for head and neck cancer. Material and methods : Thirty-seven patients with mobile tongue, floor of mouth, and base of tongue cancer treated with brachytherapy (post-operative alone and as a boost after external beam radiotherapy [EBRT], or definitive alone or as a boost after EBRT were selected. Treatment plans were made using post-implant CT images. The fractionation schedule was 7-15 × 3-5 Gy for post-operative (with or without EBRT, 14-15 × 3 Gy for definitive alone, and 5-10 × 3 Gy for boost treatments. For the target volume, V 100 , D 90 , and dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR were calculated. For the mandible, spinal cord and salivary glands doses to specified volumes were reported. Results : The median values of V 100 and D 90 were 89.9% and 99.9%, respectively; the median values of DNR was 0.46. The median D 2cm 3 of the mandible and spinal cord were 48.3% and 5.8%, respectively. The ipsilateral median D 2cm 3 of parotid and submandibular glands were 6.4% and 12.5%, whereas on the contralateral side, the corresponding values were 5.3% and 7.0%, respectively. Conclusions : Using conformal treatment planning, it was desirable to keep the dose to the mandible, spinal cord, and salivary glands at an acceptable level. The quantitative plan evaluation may help us find correlations between dosimetric parameters and clinical outcome, which may lead to improve the quality of the treatment, but it requires longer follow-up and results from other studies.

  4. A brief look at model-based dose calculation principles, practicalities, and promise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron S. Sloboda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs have recently emerged as potential successors to the highly practical, but sometimes inaccurate TG-43 formalism for brachytherapy treatment planning. So named for their capacity to more accurately calculate dose deposition in a patient using information from medical images, these approaches to solve the linear Boltzmann radiation transport equation include point kernel superposition, the discrete ordinates method, and Monte Carlo simulation. In this overview, we describe three MBDCAs that are commercially available at the present time, and identify guidance from professional societies and the broader peer-reviewed literature intended to facilitate their safe and appropriate use. We also highlight several important considerations to keep in mind when introducing an MBDCA into clinical practice, and look briefly at early applications reported in the literature and selected from our own ongoing work. The enhanced dose calculation accuracy offered by a MBDCA comes at the additional cost of modelling the geometry and material composition of the patient in treatment position (as determined from imaging, and the treatment applicator (as characterized by the vendor. The adequacy of these inputs and of the radiation source model, which needs to be assessed for each treatment site, treatment technique, and radiation source type, determines the accuracy of the resultant dose calculations. Although new challenges associated with their familiarization, commissioning, clinical implementation, and quality assurance exist, MBDCAs clearly afford an opportunity to improve brachytherapy practice, particularly for low-energy sources.

  5. Calculated neutron air kerma strength conversion factors for a generically encapsulated Cf-252 brachytherapy source

    CERN Document Server

    Rivard, M J; D'Errico, F; Tsai, J S; Ulin, K; Engler, M J

    2002-01-01

    The sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron air kerma strength conversion factor (S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f) is a parameter needed to convert the radionuclide mass (mu g) provided by Oak Ridge National Laboratory into neutron air kerma strength required by modern clinical brachytherapy dosimetry formalisms indicated by Task Group No. 43 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The impact of currently used or proposed encapsulating materials for sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf brachytherapy sources (Pt/Ir-10%, 316L stainless steel, nitinol, and Zircaloy-2) on S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f was calculated and results were fit to linear equations. Only for substantial encapsulation thicknesses, did S sub K sub N /m sub C sub f decrease, while the impact of source encapsulation composition is increasingly negligible as Z increases. These findings are explained on the basis of the non-relativistic kinematics governing the majority of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron interactions. Neutron kerma and energy spectra resul...

  6. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  7. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  8. Dose verification in HDR brachytherapy and IMRT with Fricke gel-layer dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Bartesaghi, G.; Pirola, L. [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy (Italy); Carrara, M.; Gambini, I.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.; Zonca, G. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy (Italy); Stokucova, J. [Faculty Hospital Na Bulovce, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2009-10-15

    At the Department of Physics of the Universita degli Studi di Milano in collaboration with the Medical Physics Unit and the Radiotherapy Unit of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano the research of a dosimetric technique based on Fricke gel layers and optical analysis in under study. In fact, Fricke gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) have various advantages such as the tissue-equivalence for photons in the clinical energy interval, the possibility to obtain the spatial information about continuous dose distribution and not only a point dose distribution as it is for example in the case of ionization chambers, TLD or diodes and the possibility to obtain the information about 3D dose distributions. In this work, specific applications of FGLD to absolute dosimetry in radiotherapy have been studied, i.e. in-phantom measurements of complex intensity modulated radiation therapy fields (IMRT) and complex brachytherapy fields. (Author)

  9. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  10. Pulsed-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapy : Comparison of sparing effects in cells of a radiosensitive and a radioresistant cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, J; Woudstra, EC; Kampinga, HH

    Pulsed-dose-rate regimens are an attractive alternative to continuous low-dose-rate brachytherapy. However, apart from data obtained from modeling, only a few irt vitro results are available for comparing the biological effectiveness of both modalities. Cells of two human cell lines with survival

  11. A novel conformal superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy device for the treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer and keloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Clara; Johnson, Daniel; Rasmussen, Karl; Leinweber, Clinton; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Jung, Jae Won

    To develop a novel conformal superficial brachytherapy (CSBT) device as a treatment option for the patient-specific radiation therapy of conditions including superficial lesions, postsurgical positive margins, Dupuytren's contractures, keloid scars, and complex anatomic sites (eyelids, nose, ears, etc.). A preliminary CSBT device prototype was designed, built, and tested using readily available radioactive seeds. Iodine-125 ((125)I) seeds were independently guided to the treatment surface to conform to the target. Treatment planning was performed via BrachyVision Planning System (BPS) and dose distributions measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Percent depth dose curves and profiles for Praseodymium-142 ((142)Pr), and Strontium-90/Yttrium-90 ((90)Sr-(90)Y) were also investigated as potential sources. Results achieved with (90)Sr-(90)Y and electron external beam radiation therapy were compared and Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended 2.6 simulations of (142)Pr seeds were validated. BPS was able to predict clinical dose distributions for a multiple seeds matrix. Calculated and measured doses for the (125)I seed matrix were 500 cGy and 473.5 cGy at 5 mm depth, and 171.0 cGy and 201.0 cGy at 10 mm depth, respectively. Results of (90)Sr-(90)Y tests demonstrate a more conformal dose than electron EBRT (1.6 mm compared to 4.3 mm penumbra). Measured (142)Pr doses were 500 cGy at surface and 17.4 cGy at 5 mm depth. The CSBT device provides a highly conformal dose to small surface areas. Commercially available BPS can be used for treatment planning, and Monte Carlo simulation can be used for plans using beta-emitting sources and complex anatomies. Various radionuclides may be used in this device to suit prescription depths and treatment areas. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-F-T-60: A Quick Dose Calculation Check for Accuboost Breast Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A [Cancer Treatment Center of America, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuboost treatment planning uses dwell times from a nomogram designed with Monte Carlo calculations for round and D-shaped applicators. A quick dose calculation method has been developed for verification of the HDR Brachytherapy dose as a second check. Methods: Accuboost breast treatment uses several round and D-shaped applicators to be used non-invasively with an Ir-192 source from a HDR Brachytherapy afterloader after the breast is compressed in a mammographic unit for localization. The breast thickness, source activity, the prescription dose and the applicator size are entered into a nomogram spreadsheet which gives the dwell times to be manually entered into the delivery computer. Approximating the HDR Ir-192 as a point source, and knowing the geometry of the round and D-applicators, the distances from the source positions to the midpoint of the central plane are calculated. Using the exposure constant of Ir-192 and medium as human tissue, the dose at a point is calculated as: D(cGy) = 1.254 × A × t/R2, where A is the activity in Ci, t is the dwell time in sec and R is the distance in cm. The dose from each dwell position is added to get the total dose. Results: Each fraction is delivered in two compressions: cranio-caudally and medial-laterally. A typical APBI treatment in 10 fractions requires 20 compressions. For a patient treated with D45 applicators and an average of 5.22 cm thickness, this calculation was 1.63 % higher than the prescription. For another patient using D53 applicators in the CC direction and 7 cm SDO applicators in the ML direction, this calculation was 1.31 % lower than the prescription. Conclusion: This is a simple and quick method to double check the dose on the central plane for Accuboost treatment.

  13. Determination of surface dose rate of indigenous (32)P patch brachytherapy source by experimental and Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Saxena, Sanjay Kumar; Bakshi, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Babu, D A R; Sharma, D N

    2015-09-01

    Isotope production and Application Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Center developed (32)P patch sources for treatment of superficial tumors. Surface dose rate of a newly developed (32)P patch source of nominal diameter 25 mm was measured experimentally using standard extrapolation ionization chamber and Gafchromic EBT film. Monte Carlo model of the (32)P patch source along with the extrapolation chamber was also developed to estimate the surface dose rates from these sources. The surface dose rates to tissue (cGy/min) measured using extrapolation chamber and radiochromic films are 82.03±4.18 (k=2) and 79.13±2.53 (k=2) respectively. The two values of the surface dose rates measured using the two independent experimental methods are in good agreement to each other within a variation of 3.5%. The surface dose rate to tissue (cGy/min) estimated using the MCNP Monte Carlo code works out to be 77.78±1.16 (k=2). The maximum deviation between the surface dose rates to tissue obtained by Monte Carlo and the extrapolation chamber method is 5.2% whereas the difference between the surface dose rates obtained by radiochromic film measurement and the Monte Carlo simulation is 1.7%. The three values of the surface dose rates of the (32)P patch source obtained by three independent methods are in good agreement to one another within the uncertainties associated with their measurements and calculation. This work has demonstrated that MCNP based electron transport simulations are accurate enough for determining the dosimetry parameters of the indigenously developed (32)P patch sources for contact brachytherapy applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy: a curative treatment; La curietherapie endobronchique de haut debit de dose: un traitement curatif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiffert, D.; Spaeth, D.; Winnefeld, J. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Menard, O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nancy-Brabois, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-06-01

    New endobronchial techniques of treatment allow a good unblocking. Nevertheless, only high dose rate brachytherapy delivers a curative treatment for invasive carcinomas. This study analyses the results of the first 33 consecutive patients treated with curative intent by this technique from 1994 to 1997, and followed-up more than one year. Thirty-seven lesions were treated, with usual schedule delivering 30 Gy at 1 cm depth in six fractions and three to five weeks. All the patients were meticulously selected on the local involvement of the tumour and absolute contraindications to a surgical treatment. All of them have a pulmonary disease history or a general contraindication. With a 14-month follow-up, the local control at two months after the treatment was 95 % (endoscopic and histologic), and 90 % of the patients presented a prolonged local control. Four patients died of the treated cancer, another of a controlateral cancer. Ten patients died of another disease, five of them from a respiratory insufficiency. The overall survival rate at two years was 53 % and the specific survival rate 80 %. The acute tolerance was good, without incident. Asymptomatic bronchial stenoses, described by endoscopic follow-up, were described for seven patients. We conclude that, on the basis of a good selection of the patients, and a respect of the indications, high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy is an effective curative treatment. It offers a new curative option and must be proposed for the small invasive carcinomas in non-operable patients. (author)

  15. Development of a phantom to validate high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment planning systems with heterogeneous algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Eduardo S., E-mail: emoura@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil); Micka, John A.; Hammer, Cliff G.; Culberson, Wesley S.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Rostelato, Maria Elisa C. M.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares—IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: This work presents the development of a phantom to verify the treatment planning system (TPS) algorithms used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. It is designed to measure the relative dose in a heterogeneous media. The experimental details used, simulation methods, and comparisons with a commercial TPS are also provided. Methods: To simulate heterogeneous conditions, four materials were used: Virtual Water™ (VM), BR50/50™, cork, and aluminum. The materials were arranged in 11 heterogeneity configurations. Three dosimeters were used to measure the relative response from a HDR {sup 192}Ir source: TLD-100™, Gafchromic{sup ®} EBT3 film, and an Exradin™ A1SL ionization chamber. To compare the results from the experimental measurements, the various configurations were modeled in the PENELOPE/penEasy Monte Carlo code. Images of each setup geometry were acquired from a CT scanner and imported into BrachyVision™ TPS software, which includes a grid-based Boltzmann solver Acuros™. The results of the measurements performed in the heterogeneous setups were normalized to the dose values measured in the homogeneous Virtual Water™ setup and the respective differences due to the heterogeneities were considered. Additionally, dose values calculated based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine-Task Group 43 formalism were compared to dose values calculated with the Acuros™ algorithm in the phantom. Calculated doses were compared at the same points, where measurements have been performed. Results: Differences in the relative response as high as 11.5% were found from the homogeneous setup when the heterogeneous materials were inserted into the experimental phantom. The aluminum and cork materials produced larger differences than the plastic materials, with the BR50/50™ material producing results similar to the Virtual Water™ results. Our experimental methods agree with the PENELOPE/penEasy simulations for most setups and dosimeters. The

  16. Extrascleral extension of choroidal melanoma: post-enucleation high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Paul T; Tena, Lawrence B; Semenova, Ekaterina; Aridgides, Paul; Choi, Walter H

    2014-01-01

    To investigate if orbital extension of uveal melanoma can be treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. This study is a retrospective analysis of the results of a clinical case series was performed on 10 patients. Each underwent primary enucleation for uveal melanoma, was discovered to have orbital extension, and consented for HDR brachytherapy. By American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) initial tumor grading, there was one each (T1c, T2c, T2d, and T3d, three T4c, and two T4d-staged uveal melanomas. One was AJCC-staged R2 due to orbital recurrence presenting 16 months after enucleation. (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy involved transcutaneous circumferential orbital incisions allowing for evenly spaced brachytherapy catheters into the orbit. A target dose of 32.85 Gy (range, 32.85-34 Gy) was delivered in 9-10 twice-daily fractions (range, 3.4-3.65 Gy per fraction) over 5 consecutive days. Data analysis included but was not limited to radiation therapy methods, local tumor control, side effects, and metastatic rate. In the 9 patients who tolerated treatment, there has been no orbital recurrence at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 1-62 months). Four patients died of metastatic disease (one presented with a treated solitary liver metastasis before brachytherapy). There was no significant eyelash or eyebrow loss. There was no radiation-induced eyelid erythema, orbital infection, or contracted sockets. All orbits accepted and maintained ocular prostheses. Brachytherapy was used as an alternative to external beam radiation treatment for postenucleation orbital melanoma. This series reports complete local control, few side effects, and excellent cosmetic results. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dose Modification Factor Analysis of Multi-Lumen Brachytherapy Applicator with Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eric Alan

    Multi-lumen applicators like the Contura (SenoRx, Inc.) are used in partial breast irradiation (PBI) brachytherapy in instances where asymmetric dose distributions are desired, for example, when the applicator surface-to-skin thickness is small (<7mm). In these instances, the air outside the patient and the lung act as a poor scattering medium, scattering less dose back into the breast tissue which affects the dose distribution. Many commercial treatment planning systems do not correct for tissue heterogeneity, which results in inaccuracies in the planned dose distribution. This deviation has been quantified as the dose modification factor (DMF), equal to the ratio of the dose rate at 1cm beyond the applicator surface, with homogenous medium, to the dose rate at 1cm with heterogeneous medium. This investigation intends to model the Contura applicator with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP, Los Alamos National Labs), determine a DMF through simulation, and correlate to previous measurements. Taking all geometrical considerations into account, an accurate model of the Contura balloon applicator was created in MCNP. This model was used to run simulations of symmetric and asymmetric plans. The dose modification factor was found to be dependent on the simulated water phantom geometry, with cuboid geometry yielding a max DMF of 1.0664. The same measurements taken using a spherical geometry water phantom gave a DMF of 1.1221. It was also seen that the difference in DMF between symmetric and asymmetric plans using the Contura applicator is minimal.

  18. Three-dimensional dose accumulation in pseudo-split-field IMRT and brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yang, Deshan; Esthappan, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Dose accumulation of split-field external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) is challenging because of significant EBRT and BT dose gradients in the central pelvic region. We developed a method to determine biologically effective dose parameters for combined split-field inte......PURPOSE: Dose accumulation of split-field external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) is challenging because of significant EBRT and BT dose gradients in the central pelvic region. We developed a method to determine biologically effective dose parameters for combined split......-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided BT in locally advanced cervical cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Thirty-three patients treated with split-field-IMRT to 45.0-51.2 Gy in 1.6-1.8 Gy per fraction to the elective pelvic lymph nodes and to 20 Gy to the central pelvis region were...

  19. SU-E-J-181: Effect of Prostate Motion On Combined Brachytherapy and External Beam Dose Based On Daily Motion of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, V; McLaughlin, P [Providence Cancer Center, Southfield, MI (United States); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ealbaj, J [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, the adequacy of target expansions on the combined external beam and implant dose was examined based on the measured daily motion of the prostate. Methods: Thirty patients received an I–125 prostate implant prescribed to dose of 90Gy. This was followed by external beam to deliver a dose of 90Gyeq (external beam equivalent) to the prostate over 25 to 30 fractions. An ideal IMRT plan was developed by optimizing the external beam dose based on the delivered implant dose. The implant dose was converted to an equivalent external beam dose using the linear quadratic model. Patients were set up on the treatment table by daily orthogonal imaging and aligning the marker seeds in the prostate. Orthogonal images were obtained at the end of treatment to assess prostate intrafraction motion. Based on the observed motion of the markers between the initial and final images, 5 individual plans showing the actual dose delivered to the patient were calculated. A final true dose distribution was established based on summing the implant dose and the 5 external beam plans. Dose to the prostate, seminal vesicles, lymphnodes and normal tissues, rectal wall, urethra and lower sphincter were calculated and compared to ideal. On 18 patients who were sexually active, dose to the corpus cavernosum and internal pudendal artery was also calculated. Results: The average prostate motion in 3 orthogonal directions was less than 1 mm with a standard deviation of less than +2 mm. Dose and volume parameters showed that there was no decrease in dose to the targets and a marginal decrease in dose to in normal tissues. Conclusion: Dose delivered by seed implant moves with the prostate, decreasing the impact of intrafractions dose movement on actual dose delivered. Combined brachytherapy and external beam dose delivered to the prostate was not sensitive to prostate motion.

  20. MRI-based treatment planning and dose delivery verification for intraocular melanoma brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoberi, Jacqueline Esthappan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Hedrick, Samantha; Rodriguez, Vivian; Bertelsman, Carol G; Mackey, Stacie; Hu, Yanle; Gach, H Michael; Rao, P Kumar; Grigsby, Perry W

    2017-08-14

    Episcleral plaque brachytherapy (EPB) planning is conventionally based on approximations of the implant geometry with no volumetric imaging following plaque implantation. We have developed an MRI-based technique for EPB treatment planning and dose delivery verification based on the actual patient-specific geometry. MR images of 6 patients, prescribed 85 Gy over 96 hours from Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study-based EPB, were acquired before and after implantation. Preimplant and postimplant scans were used to generate "preplans" and "postplans", respectively. In the preplans, a digital plaque model was positioned relative to the tumor, sclera, and nerve. In the postplans, the same plaque model was positioned based on the imaged plaque. Plaque position, point doses, percentage of tumor volume receiving 85 Gy (V100), and dose to 100% of tumor volume (Dmin) were compared between preplans and postplans. All isodose plans were computed using TG-43 formalism with no heterogeneity corrections. Shifts and tilts of the plaque ranged from 1.4 to 8.6 mm and 1.0 to 3.8 mm, respectively. V100 was ≥97% for 4 patients. Dmin for preplans and postplans ranged from 83 to 118 Gy and 45 to 110 Gy, respectively. Point doses for tumor apex and base were all found to decrease from the preimplant to the postimplant plan, with mean differences of 16.7 ± 8.6% and 30.5 ± 11.3%, respectively. By implementing MRI for EPB, we eliminate reliance on approximations of the eye and tumor shape and the assumption of idealized plaque placement. With MRI, one can perform preimplant as well as postimplant imaging, facilitating EPB treatment planning based on the actual patient-specific geometry and dose-delivery verification based on the imaged plaque position. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement in high-dose rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, William; Cunha, J Adam M; Hsu, I-Chow; Weinberg, Vivan; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Pouliot, Jean

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of interfraction catheter movement on dosimetry in prostate high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Fifteen patients were treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy. Implants were performed on day 1 under transrectal ultrasound guidance. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed. Inverse planning simulated annealing was used for treatment planning. The first fraction was delivered on day 1. A cone beam CT (CBCT) was performed on day 2 before the second fraction was given. A fusion of the CBCT and CT was performed using intraprostatic gold markers as landmarks. Initial prostate and urethra contours were transferred to the CBCT images. Bladder and rectum contours were drawn, and catheters were digitized on the CBCT. The planned treatment was applied to the CBCT dataset, and dosimetry was analyzed and compared to the initial dose distribution. This process was repeated after a reoptimization was performed, using the same constraints used on day 1. Mean interfraction catheter displacement was 5.1 mm. When we used the initial plan on day 2, the mean prostate V100 (volume receiving 100 Gy or more) decreased from 93.8% to 76.2% (p < 0.01). Rectal V75 went from 0.75 cm(3) to 1.49 cm(3) (p < 0.01). A reoptimization resulted in a mean prostate V100 of 88.1%, closer to the initial plan (p = 0.05). Mean rectal V75 was also improved with a value of 0.59 cm(3). There was no significant change in bladder and urethra dose on day 2. A mean interfraction catheter displacement of 5.1 mm results in a significant decrease in prostate V100 and an increase in rectum dose. A reoptimization before the second treatment improves dose distribution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Recurrent Keloids: Feasibility and Early Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping, E-mail: ping.jiang@uksh.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Baumann, René [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Geenen, Matthias [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, Lubinus Clinic Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Siebert, Frank-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Niehoff, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Clinic Köln, Köln (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Witten/Herdecke, Witten (Germany); Bertolini, Julia; Druecke, Daniel [Department of Reconstructive Surgery, University Clinic Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate high-dose-rate brachytherapy in the treatment of therapy-resistant keloids and report first results, with emphasis on feasibility and early treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: From 2009 to 2014, 24 patients with 32 recurrent keloids were treated with immediate perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy; 3 patients had been previously treated with adjuvant external beam radiation therapy and presented with recurrences in the pretreated areas. Two or more different treatment modalities had been tried in all patients and had failed to achieve remission. After (re-)excision of the keloids, a single brachytherapy tube was placed subcutaneously before closing the wound. The target volume covered the scar in total length. Brachytherapy was given in 3 fractions with a single dose of 6 Gy in 5 mm tissue depth. The first fraction was given within 6 hours after surgery, the other 2 fractions on the first postoperative day. Thus, a total dose of 18 Gy in 3 fractions was administered within 36 hours after the resection. Results: The treatment was feasible in all patients. No procedure-related complications (eg, secondary infections) occurred. Nineteen patients had keloid-related symptoms before treatment like pain and pruritus; disappearance of symptoms was noticed in all patients after treatment. After a median follow-up of 29.4 months (range, 7.9-72.4 months), 2 keloid recurrences and 2 mildly hypertrophied scars were observed. The local control rate was 94%. Pigmentary abnormalities were detected in 3 patients, and an additional 6 patients had a mild delay in the wound-healing process. Conclusions: The early results of this study prove the feasibility and the efficacy of brachytherapy for the prevention of keloids. The results also suggest that brachytherapy may be advantageous in the management of high-risk keloids or as salvage treatment for failure after external beam therapy.

  3. An open-source genetic algorithm for determining optimal seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, P; Madamesila, J; Beauchamp, A; Khan, R

    2015-01-01

    An open source optimizer that generates seed distributions for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy was designed, tested, and validated. The optimizer was a simple genetic algorithm (SGA) that, given a set of prostate and urethra contours, determines the optimal seed distribution in terms of coverage of the prostate with the prescribed dose while avoiding hotspots within the urethra. The algorithm was validated in a retrospective study on 45 previously contoured low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy patients. Dosimetric indices were evaluated to ensure solutions adhered to clinical standards. The SGA performance was further benchmarked by comparing solutions obtained from a commercial optimizer (inverse planning simulated annealing [IPSA]) with the same cohort of 45 patients. Clinically acceptable target coverage by the prescribed dose (V100) was obtained for both SGA and IPSA, with a mean ± standard deviation of 98 ± 2% and 99.5 ± 0.5%, respectively. For the prostate D90, SGA and IPSA yielded 177 ± 8 Gy and 186 ± 7 Gy, respectively, which were both clinically acceptable. Both algorithms yielded reasonable dose to the rectum, with V100 open source SGA was validated that provides a research tool for the brachytherapy community. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  5. Radioactive waste evacuation of the sources of a low dose rate brachytherapy unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrada, A.; Huerga, C.; Santa Olalla, I.; Vicedo, A.; Corredoira, E.; Plaza, R.; Vidal, J.; Tellez, M. [La Paz Hospital, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    Introduction The second class Radioactive Installation start -up authorization makes responsible for its security to the installation exploiter and supervisor. The specifications established in the authorization, which are mandatory, point out several actions, some of these actions are the hermeticity tests of radioactive sources an radiologic controls of environment dosimetry. It is necessary to optimize the time spent in each activity, managing them as reasonably as possible. An important matter to take into account is to keep and control only those radioactive or radiological equipment which, even if are in work, have an appropriate performance for the patient treatment Material And Method a Paz hospital has an intracavity brachytherapy (L.D.R.), Curietron model. The Radioprotection Department proposed to remove from service the unit due to its age, this was carried out by the Commission of Guarantee and Quality Control. There were different solutions taken into account to decommission the unit, finally the option chosen as the most convenient for the installation was to manage directly the withdrawal of the radioactive material which consisted of seven Cs-137 probes model CsM1 and total nominal certificated activity of 7770 MBq ( 210 mCi ) dated in May 2005. It also has to be considered as a radioactive waste the inner storage elements of the Curietron and the transport and storage curie stock, built with depleted uranium. To accomplish this aim an evacuation container was designed consisting of an alloy of low-melting point (M.C.P.96), which fulfills the transport conditions imposed by E.N.R.E.S.A. ( Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radiactivos, S.A). A theoretical calculation was performed to estimate the thickness of the shield which adequate to the rate of dose in contact demanded. Accuracy of these calculations has been verified using T.L. dosimetry. Results The radiation levels during the extraction intervention of the radioactive probes and its transfer to

  6. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  7. Bladder–Rectum Spacer Balloon in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Cervix Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Bhavana [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Patel, Firuza D., E-mail: firuzapatel@gmail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Chakraborty, Santam; Sharma, Suresh C.; Kapoor, Rakesh [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Regional Cancer Centre, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Aprem, Abi Santhosh [Corporate R and D Division, HLL Lifecare Limited, Karamana, Trivandrum (India)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To compare bladder and rectum doses with the use of a bladder–rectum spacer balloon (BRSB) versus standard gauze packing in the same patient receiving 2 high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy fractions. Methods and Materials: This was a randomized study to compare the reduction in bladder and rectum doses with the use of a BRSB compared with standard gauze packing in patients with carcinoma of the cervix being treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. The patients were randomized between 2 arms. In arm A, vaginal packing was done with standard gauze packing in the first application, and BRSB was used in the second application. Arm B was the reverse of arm A. The International Commission for Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) point doses and doses to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, 2-cm{sup 3}, 5-cm{sup 3}, and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes of bladder and rectum were compared. The patients were also subjectively assessed for the ease of application and the time taken for application. Statistical analysis was done using the paired t test. Results: A total of 43 patients were enrolled; however, 3 patients had to be excluded because the BRSB could not be inserted owing to unfavorable local anatomy. Thus 40 patients (80 plans) were evaluated. The application was difficult in 3 patients with BRSB, and in 2 patients with BRSB the application time was prolonged. There was no significant difference in bladder doses to 0.1 cm{sup 3}, 1 cm{sup 3}, 2 cm{sup 3}, 5 cm{sup 3}, and 10 cm{sup 3} and ICRU bladder point. Statistically significant dose reductions to 0.1-cm{sup 3}, 1-cm{sup 3}, and 2-cm{sup 3} volumes for rectum were observed with the BRSB. No significant differences in 5-cm{sup 3} and 10-cm{sup 3} volumes and ICRU rectum point were observed. Conclusion: A statistically significant dose reduction was observed for small high-dose volumes in rectum with the BRSB. The doses to bladder were comparable for BRSB and gauze packing. Transparent balloons of

  8. Comparative dosimetry of GammaMed Plus high-dose rate Ir brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N P; Majumdar, B; Vijayan, V

    2010-07-01

    The comparative dosimetry of GammaMed (GM) Plus high-dose rate brachytherapy source was performed by an experiment using 0.1-cc thimble ionization chamber and simulation-based study using EGSnrc code. In-water dose measurements were performed with 0.1-cc chamber to derive the radial dose function (r = 0.8 to 20.0 cm) and anisotropy function (r = 5.0 cm with polar angle from 10° to 170°). The nonuniformity correction factor for 0.1-cc chamber was applied for in-water measurements at shorter distances from the source. The EGSnrc code was used to derive the dose rate constant (Λ), radial dose function g(L)(r) and anisotropy function F(r, θ) of GM Plus source. The dosimetric data derived using EGSnrc code in our study were in very good agreement relative to published data for GM Plus source. The radial dose function up to 12 cm derived from measured dose using 0.1-cc chamber was in agreement within ±3% of data derived by the simulation study.

  9. Comparison of 3D dose distributions for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources with normoxic polymer gel dosimetry and treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkesen, Oznur; Tezcanli, Evrim; Buyuksarac, Bora; Ozbay, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Radiation fluence changes caused by the dosimeter itself and poor spatial resolution may lead to lack of 3-dimensional (3D) information depending on the features of the dosimeter and quality assurance of dose distributions for high-dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 ((192)Ir) brachytherapy sources is challenging and experimental dosimetry methods used for brachytherapy sources are limited. In this study, we investigated 3D dose distributions of (192)Ir brachytherapy sources for irradiation with single and multiple dwell positions using a normoxic gel dosimeter and compared them with treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. For dose calibration purposes, 100-mL gel-containing vials were irradiated at predefined doses and then scanned in an magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. Gel phantoms prepared in 2 spherical glasses were irradiated with (192)Ir for the calculated dwell positions, and MR scans of the phantoms were obtained. The images were analyzed with MATLAB software. Dose distributions and profiles derived with 1-mm resolution were compared with TPS calculations. Linearity was observed between the delivered dose and the reciprocal of the T2 relaxation time constant of the gel. The x-, y-, and z-axes were defined as the sagittal, coronal, and axial planes, respectively, the sagittal and axial planes were defined parallel to the long axis of the source while the coronal plane was defined horizontally to the long axis of the source. The differences between measured and calculated profile widths of 3-cm source length and point source for 70%, 50%, and 30% isodose lines were evaluated at 3 dose levels using 18 profiles of comparison. The calculations for 3-cm source length revealed a difference of > 3mm in 1 coordinate at 50% profile width on the sagittal plane and 3 coordinates at 70% profile width and 2 coordinates at 50% and 30% profile widths on the axial plane. Calculations on the coronal plane for 3-cm source length showed > 3-mm difference in 1 coordinate at

  10. In vivo dosimetry with a linear MOSFET array to evaluate the urethra dose during permanent implant brachytherapy using iodine-125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther J; Haanstra, Björk K C; Murrer, Lars H P; van Gils, Francis C J M; Dekker, Andre L A J; Mijnheer, Ben J; Lambin, Philippe

    2009-11-15

    To develop a technique to monitor the dose rate in the urethra during permanent implant brachytherapy using a linear MOSFET array, with sufficient accuracy and without significantly extending the implantation time. Phantom measurements were performed to determine the optimal conditions for clinical measurements. In vivo measurements were performed in 5 patients during the (125)I brachytherapy implant procedure. To evaluate if the urethra dose obtained in the operating room with the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and the patient in treatment position is a reference for the total accumulated dose; additional measurements were performed after the implantation procedure, in the recovery room. In vivo measurements during and after the implantation procedure agree very well, illustrating that the ultrasound transducer in the rectum and patient positioning do not influence the measured dose in the urethra. In vivo dose values obtained during the implantation are therefore representative for the total accumulated dose in the urethra. In 5 patients, the dose rates during and after the implantation were below the maximum dose rate of the urethra, using the planned seed distribution. In vivo dosimetry during the implantation, using a MOSFET array, is a feasible technique to evaluate the dose in the urethra during the implantation of (125)I seeds for prostate brachytherapy.

  11. Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc [Département de Physique, de Génie Physique et d’Optique et Centre de recherche sur le cancer de l’Université Laval, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Axe oncologie du Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Létourneau, Mélanie [Département de Radio-Oncologie, CHU de Québec, 11 Côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (United Kingdom); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the

  12. Phase I/II prospective trial of cancer-specific imaging using ultrasound spectrum analysis tissue-type imaging to guide dose-painting prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Ronald D; Quinn, S Aidan; Trichter, Frieda; Ryemon, Shannon; Jain, Anudh; Saigal, Kunal; Chandrashekhar, Sarayu; Romas, Nicholas A; Feleppa, Ernest J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the technical feasibility, toxicity, dosimetry, and preliminary efficacy of dose-painting brachytherapy guided by ultrasound spectrum analysis tissue-type imaging (TTI) in low-risk, localized prostate cancer. Fourteen men with prostate cancer who were candidates for brachytherapy as sole treatment were prospectively enrolled. Treatment planning goal was to escalate the tumor dose to 200% with a modest de-escalation of dose to remaining prostate compared with our standard. Primary end points included technical feasibility of TTI-guided brachytherapy and equivalent or better toxicity compared with standard brachytherapy. Secondary end points included dose escalation to tumor regions and de-escalated dose to nontumor regions on the preimplant plan, negative prostate biopsy at 2 years, and freedom from biochemical failure. Thirteen of fourteen men successfully completed the TTI-guided brachytherapy procedure for a feasibility rate of 93%. A software malfunction resulted in switching one patient from TTI-guided to standard brachytherapy. An average of 2.7 foci per patient was demonstrated and treated with an escalated dose. Dosimetric goals on preplan were achieved. One patient expired from unrelated causes 65 days after brachytherapy. Toxicity was at least as low as standard brachytherapy. Two-year prostate biopsies were obtained from six men; five (83%) were definitively negative, one showed evidence of disease with treatment effect, and none were positive. No patients experienced biochemical recurrence after a median followup of 31.5 (24-52) months. We have demonstrated that TTI-guided dose-painting prostate brachytherapy is technically feasible and results in clinical outcomes that are encouraging in terms of low toxicity and successful biochemical disease control. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transperineal low-dose rate iridium-192 interstitial brachytherapy in cervical carcinoma stage IIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budrukkar, A.N.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Jalali, R.; Agarwal, J.P.; Dinshaw, K.A. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deshpande, D.D.; Nehru, R.M. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Parel, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    2001-10-01

    Purpose: To assess local control, survival and complications in patients with cervical carcinoma Stage IIB treated radically with transperineal Iridium-192 low-dose rate interstitial brachytherapy following external beam radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: 65 women (age 25-70 years, mean 47 years) with cervical carcinoma Stage IIB were initially treated with external beam radiotherapy on a telecobalt or 6 MW linear accelerator to a dose of 50 Gy delivered in 5-6 weeks. After 2-3 weeks of completing external radiation, patients received interstitial brachytherapy with Iridium-192 (activity 0.5-1 mCi/cm) using a Syed-Neblett perineal template. The median dose delivered to the implant volume was 24 Gy (range 20-32 Gy) delivered at an average dose rate of 0.70 Gy/h (range 0.40-1.20 Gy/h). A point defined at 1.5 cm lateral to the central uterine tandem at the level of os was taken as a representative for assessing the dose to the cervix. Mean doses delivered by interstitial brachytherapy to point A, cervix, point B and rectum were 38 Gy, 34 Gy, 16 Gy and 16 Gy, respectively. Results: At a median follow-up of 53 months, the actuarial disease free survival and overall survival for 65 patients at both 5 and 10 years was 64% and 44%, respectively. Response to radiotherapy was a strong predictor of local control with 82% of patients continuing to have pelvic control after initial complete response. Overall, nine (14%) patients had persistent disease, ten (15%) developed a central recurrence after initial control and three patients developed distant metastasis on follow-up. No patient had any immediate treatment-related complication. Late toxicity included grade I-II rectal reactions in five patients and grade IV bladder complication (vesico-vaginal fistula) in two patients. 5 years after treatment, one patient developed intestinal obstruction, which was relieved after conservative management. Two patients developed vaginal stenosis. The 5- and 10-year disease free survival

  14. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in early stage oral tongue cancer – 15 year experience from a tertiary care institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuma Bansal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine outcomes of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT in patients with early stage oral tongue cancer. Material and methods : Ninety-two patients with stage I and II oral tongue cancer were treated with HDR-BT between 1999 and 2014: brachytherapy alone = 62 (67.4%, and combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy = 30 (32.6%. Median follow-up was 53.5 months. Patterns of failure, overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, local control rates (LCR, and nodal control rates (NCR were determined. Results : 5-year OS, DFS, LCR, and NCR were 73.2%, 58.2%, 64.2%, and 83.8%, respectively. In total, 43 patients (46.7% failed treatment: isolated local failures = 28 (30.4%, isolated nodal failures = 8 (8.7%, both local and regional failures = 7 (7.6%. While in T1 stage, 5 year LCR were significantly higher in brachytherapy alone group compared to combined EBRT and brachytherapy group (81.7% vs. 62.5%, p = 0.04, the isolated nodal failure rates were not significantly different among the two groups. For T2 stage, NCR were higher in combined EBRT and brachytherapy group compared to brachytherapy alone (92.9% vs. 74.3%. Acute mucositis (grade ≥ 2 was seen more in brachytherapy alone group compared to the combined modality group (87% vs. 66%, and this correlated significantly with the higher biological equivalent dose (BED in the brachytherapy alone group. Conclusions : Our study recommends treating patients with brachytherapy alone in T1 stage, and demonstrates the need for addressing nodal region either by neck dissection or nodal irradiation in T2 stage patients. Also, the study highlights the need for dose escalation (from the doses used in the study in both T1 and T2 stage tumors when using interstitial brachytherapy either as sole modality or as a boost.

  15. Absorbed dose simulations in near-surface regions using high dose rate Iridium-192 sources applied for brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, E. S.; Zeituni, C. A.; Sakuraba, R. K.; Gonçalves, V. D.; Cruz, J. C.; Júnior, D. K.; Souza, C. D.; Rostelato, M. E. C. M.

    2014-02-01

    Brachytherapy treatment with Iridium-192 high dose rate (HDR) sources is widely used for various tumours and it could be developed in many anatomic regions. Iridium-192 sources are inserted inside or close to the region that will be treated. Usually, the treatment is performed in prostate, gynaecological, lung, breast and oral cavity regions for a better clinical dose coverage compared with other techniques, such as, high energy photons and Cobalt-60 machines. This work will evaluate absorbed dose distributions in near-surface regions around Ir-192 HDR sources. Near-surface dose measurements are a complex task, due to the contribution of beta particles in the near-surface regions. These dose distributions should be useful for non-tumour treatments, such as keloids, and other non-intracavitary technique. For the absorbed dose distribution simulations the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE with the general code penEasy was used. Ir-192 source geometry and a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) tube, for beta particles shield were modelled to yield the percentage depth dose (PDD) on a cubic water phantom. Absorbed dose simulations were realized at the central axis to yield the Ir-192 dose fall-off along central axis. The results showed that more than 99.2% of the absorbed doses (relative to the surface) are deposited in 5 cm depth but with slower rate at higher distances. Near-surface treatments with Ir-192 HDR sources yields achievable measurements and with proper clinical technique and accessories should apply as an alternative for treatment of lesions where only beta sources were used.

  16. SU-GG-T-49: Real Time Dose Verification for Novel Shielded Balloon Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, Nandakarthik; Nazaryan, Vahagn; Gueye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The validation of a novel approach for reducing skindoses to an acceptable level during Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) when the balloon-to-skin distance is inadequate (less than 7 mm) is reported. The study uses a real time dose verification method for a metallic shielded balloon applicator using scintillation fiber technology. Method and Materials: Partial shielding of the radiationdose to the skin using iron or other ferrous powder could enable the extension of APBI to some patients. With small external and pre-determined magnetic fields (dose curve for various radiation lengths after cross-calibration with dedicated data acquired at Jefferson Lab. Some powder was then injected into various inflated MammoSite and rectal balloons within realistic breast and torso phantoms of differing sizes. The dose on the external surface of the skin was measured from a 6.1 Ci {sup 192}Ir of a GammaMed 12i afterloader unit, with a MOSFET,ion chamber and scintillating fiber array detectors. Results: Realistic Monte Carlo simulation studies for the amount and distribution of the required shielding material were compared to dedicated phantom data. A decrease of the skindose was measured to an acceptable level (~350-450 cGy) during standard breast Brachytherapy treatments with relatively weak magnetic fields. Additional measurements provided negligible corrections (< few %) on the saline water density from the suspended ironpowder.Conclusion: This project opens the possibility to increasing the survival expectancy and minimizing negative side effects during brachytherapy treatments, as well as improving cosmetic outcome for all APBI patients. The proposed method may also be used in other procedures for brain, heart, rectal, or vaginal cancers.

  17. High dose rate brachytherapy with customized applicators for malignant facial skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumeau, R; Renard-Oldrini, S; Courrech, F; Buchheit, I; Oldrini, G; Vogin, G; Peiffert, D

    2016-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a well-known treatment in the management of skin tumors. For facial or scalp lesions, applicators have been developed to deliver non-invasive treatment. We present cases treated with customized applicators with high dose rate system. Patients with poor performance status treated for malignant skin lesions of the scalp or the facial skin between 2011 and 2014 were studied. Afterloading devices were chosen between Freiburg(®) Flap, silicone-mold or wax applicators. The clinical target volume (CTV) was created by adding margins to lesions (10mm to 20mm). The dose schedules were 25Gy in five fractions for postoperative lesions, 30Gy in six fractions for exclusive treatments and a single session of 8Gy could be considered for palliative treatments. In 30 months, 11 patients received a treatment for a total of 12 lesions. The median age was 80 years. The median follow-up was 17 months and the 2-year local control rate was 91%. The mean CTV surface was 41.1cm(2) with a mean thickness of 6.1mm. We conceived three wax applicators, used our silicone-mold eight times and the Freiburg(®) Flap one time. We observed only low-grade radiodermitis (grade I: 50%, grade II: 33%), and no high-grade skin toxicity. High dose rate brachytherapy with customized applicators for facial skin and scalp lesions is efficient and safe. It is a good modality to treat complex lesions in patients unfit for invasive treatment. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimization for high-dose-rate brachytherapy of cervical cancer with adaptive simulated annealing and gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Templeton, Alistair K; Liao, Yixiang; Turian, Julius V; Kiel, Krystyna D; Chu, James C H

    2014-01-01

    To validate an in-house optimization program that uses adaptive simulated annealing (ASA) and gradient descent (GD) algorithms and investigate features of physical dose and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)-based objective functions in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Eight Syed/Neblett template-based cervical cancer HDR interstitial brachytherapy cases were used for this study. Brachytherapy treatment plans were first generated using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA). Using the same dwell positions designated in IPSA, plans were then optimized with both physical dose and gEUD-based objective functions, using both ASA and GD algorithms. Comparisons were made between plans both qualitatively and based on dose-volume parameters, evaluating each optimization method and objective function. A hybrid objective function was also designed and implemented in the in-house program. The ASA plans are higher on bladder V75% and D2cc (p=0.034) and lower on rectum V75% and D2cc (p=0.034) than the IPSA plans. The ASA and GD plans are not significantly different. The gEUD-based plans have higher homogeneity index (p=0.034), lower overdose index (p=0.005), and lower rectum gEUD and normal tissue complication probability (p=0.005) than the physical dose-based plans. The hybrid function can produce a plan with dosimetric parameters between the physical dose-based and gEUD-based plans. The optimized plans with the same objective value and dose-volume histogram could have different dose distributions. Our optimization program based on ASA and GD algorithms is flexible on objective functions, optimization parameters, and can generate optimized plans comparable with IPSA. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  20. Electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction in ultrasound-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Shyam; Kung, Cynthia; Dehghan, Ehsan; Ravi, Ananth; Venugopal, Niranjan; Bonillas, Antonio; Stanton, Doug; Kruecker, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The accurate delivery of high-dose-rate brachytherapy is dependent on the correct identification of the position and shape of the treatment catheters. In many brachytherapy clinics, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is used to identify the catheters. However, manual catheter identification on TRUS images can be time consuming, subjective, and operator dependent because of calcifications and distal shadowing artifacts. We report the use of electromagnetic (EM) tracking technology to map the position and shape of catheters inserted in a tissue-mimicking phantom. The accuracy of the EM system was comprehensively quantified using a three-axis robotic system. In addition, EM tracks acquired from catheters in a phantom were compared with catheter positions determined from TRUS and CT images to compare EM system performance to standard clinical imaging modalities. The tracking experiments were performed in a controlled laboratory environment and also in a typical brachytherapy operating room to test for potential EM distortions. The robotic validation of the EM system yielded a mean accuracy of brachytherapy operating room. The achievable accuracy depends to a large extent on the calibration of the TRUS probe, geometry of the tracked devices relative to the EM field generator, and locations of surrounding clinical equipment. To address the issue of variable accuracy, a robust calibration algorithm has been developed and integrated into the workflow. The proposed mapping technique was also found to improve the workflow efficiency of catheter identification. The high baseline accuracy of the EM system, the consistent agreement between EM-tracked, TRUS- and CT-identified catheters, and the improved workflow efficiency illustrate the potential value of using EM tracking for catheter mapping in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Estimates of relative doses of {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh of spherical applicators used in ophthalmic brachytherapy; Estimativas de doses relativas de aplicadores esfericos de {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh usados em braquiterapia oftalmologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Eduardo de, E-mail: edup2112@gmail.com, E-mail: epaiva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Fisica Medica

    2016-11-01

    Spherical ophthalmic applicators containing the beta emitter {sup 106}Ru / {sup 106}Rh are much used in brachytherapy for the treatment of various eye diseases. However, there is great difficulty in dosimetry these sources because of its geometric shape, the short range of the beta particles and the large dose gradient, and because of that calculation methods of dose distributions around these sources take on a great importance. In this work an analytical / numerical method is used to estimate the dose rates for a function of depth for spherical sources containing {sup 106}Ru / {sup 106}Rh. The results of the doses on along the central axis for applicators models CXS, CCX, CCY, CCZ, CCD and CGD and CCC are compared with published values calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and measurement results.

  2. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Francisco; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the lumpectomy site (p brachytherapy to the lumpectomy site, TLD skin dose was significantly related to acute skin reaction and to pigmentation and telangiectasia at 60 months. An acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with the development of telangiectasia at 60 months. TLD skin dose measurement may allow modification of the brachytherapy implant geometry (dwell times and position) to minimize late skin toxicity.

  3. Performance assessment of the BEBIG MultiSource® high dose rate brachytherapy treatment unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Antony; Mzenda, Bongile

    2009-12-01

    A comprehensive system characterisation was performed of the Eckert & Ziegler BEBIG GmbH MultiSource® High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment unit with an 192Ir source. The unit is relatively new to the UK market, with the first installation in the country having been made in the summer of 2009. A detailed commissioning programme was devised and is reported including checks of the fundamental parameters of source positioning, dwell timing, transit doses and absolute dosimetry of the source. Well chamber measurements, autoradiography and video camera analysis techniques were all employed. The absolute dosimetry was verified by the National Physical Laboratory, UK, and compared to a measurement based on a calibration from PTB, Germany, and the supplied source certificate, as well as an independent assessment by a visiting UK centre. The use of the 'Krieger' dosimetry phantom has also been evaluated. Users of the BEBIG HDR system should take care to avoid any significant bend in the transfer tube, as this will lead to positioning errors of the source, of up to 1.0 mm for slight bends, 2.0 mm for moderate bends and 5.0 mm for extreme curvature (depending on applicators and transfer tube used) for the situations reported in this study. The reason for these errors and the potential clinical impact are discussed. Users should also note the methodology employed by the system for correction of transit doses, and that no correction is made for the initial and final transit doses. The results of this investigation found that the uncorrected transit doses lead to small errors in the delivered dose at the first dwell position, of up to 2.5 cGy at 2 cm (5.6 cGy at 1 cm) from a 10 Ci source, but the transit dose correction for other dwells was accurate within 0.2 cGy. The unit has been mechanically reliable, and source positioning accuracy and dwell timing have been reproducible, with overall performance similar to other existing HDR equipment. The unit is capable of high

  4. Evaluation of a real-time BeO ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Alexandre M. Caraça, E-mail: alexandre.santos@adelaide.edu.au [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide 5000, Australia and Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia); Mohammadi, Mohammad [Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide 5000, Australia and Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan 65167-3-8736 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahraam, Afshar V. [Laser Physics and Photonic Devices Laboratories, School of Engineering, The University of South Australia, Adelaide 5095 (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, School of Physical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5005 (Australia)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the capability of a beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic fiber-coupled luminescence dosimeter, named radioluminescence/optically stimulated luminescence (RL/OSL) BeO FOD, for dosimetric verification of high dose rate (HDR) treatments. The RL/OSL BeO FOD is capable of RL and OSL measurements. Methods: The RL/OSL BeO FOD is able to be inserted in 6F proguide needles, used in interstitial HDR treatments. Using a custom built Perspex phantom, 6F proguide needles could be submerged in a water tank at 1 cm separations from each other. A second background fiber was required to correct for the stem effect. The stem effect, dose linearity, reproducibility, depth-dose curves, and angular and temperature dependency of the RL/OSL BeO FOD were characterised using an Ir-192 source. The RL/OSL BeO FOD was also applied to the commissioning of a 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator. Results: Both the RL and OSL were found to be reproducible and their percentage depth-dose curves to be in good agreement with those predicted via TG-43. A combined uncertainty of 7.9% and 10.1% (k = 1) was estimated for the RL and OSL, respectively. For the 10 mm horizontal Leipzig applicator, measured percentage depth doses were within 5% agreement of the published reference calculations. The output at the 3 mm prescription depth for a 1 Gy delivery was verified to be 0.99 ± 0.08 Gy and 1.01 ± 0.10 Gy by the RL and OSL, respectively. Conclusions: The use of the second background fiber under the current setup means that the two fibers cannot fit into a single 6F needle. Hence, use of the RL is currently not adequate for the purpose of in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry. While not real-time, the OSL is shown to be adequate for in vivo brachytherapy dosimetry.

  5. Approaches to calculating AAPM TG-43 brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, Christopher S; Rivard, Mark J

    2006-06-01

    Underlying characteristics in brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for medical radionuclides 137Cs, 125I, 192Ir, 103Pd, and 169Yb were examined using Monte Carlo methods. Sources were modeled as unencapsulated point or line sources in liquid water to negate variations due to materials and construction. Importance of phantom size, mode of radiation transport physics--i.e., photon transport only or coupled photon:electron transport, phantom material, volume averaging, and Monte Carlo tally type were studied. For noninfinite media, g(r) was found to degrade as r approached R, the phantom radius. MCNP5 results were in agreement with those published using GEANT4. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated using coupled photon:electron radiation transport simulations did not differ significantly from those using photon transport only. Dose distributions from low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides 125I and 103Pd were sensitive to phantom material by upto a factor of 1.4 and 2.0, respectively, between tissue-equivalent materials and water at r =9 cm. In comparison, high-energy photons from 137Cs, 192Ir, and 169Yb demonstrated +/- 5% differences in dose distributions between water and tissue substitutes at r=20 cm. Similarly, volume-averaging effects were found to be more significant for low-energy radionuclides. When modeling line sources with L F4 track-length estimators were employed to determine brachytherapy dosimetry parameters. F6 was found to be necessary for g(r), while both tallies provided equivalent results for F(r, theta).

  6. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  7. High-dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent pelvic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukiyama, Iwao; Katano, Susumu; Kotake, Kenjiro; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Kamata, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Isao [Tochigi Cancer Center, (Japan); Furuta, Masaya; Ohno, Tatsuya

    1999-06-01

    Recurrent pelvic tumors are difficult to control with external irradiation alone. We have conducted phase I and II clinical trials against recurrent pelvic tumors. From January 1995 through March 1997, 13 recurrent pelvic tumors in 10 patients were treated with high-dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy. Complete responses were achieved for 2 tumors, partial responses for 5 tumors, and no response for 6 tumors; therefore, the response rate was 61% (8 of 13 tumors). Treatment-related morbidity was noted in 5 patients and included one case each of skin ulcer, rectovaginal fistula, sacral abscess, rectal bleeding, and vesicovaginal fistula. In January 1999, four patients were alive and had survived for 17, 18, 28, and 46 months. Six patients had died but had survived 4, 13, 15, 16, and 27 months. (author)

  8. A phantom for verification of dwell position and time of a high dose rate brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madebo, M; Pillainayagam, J; Kron, T; Franich, R

    2012-09-01

    Accuracy of dwell position and reproducibility of dwell time are critical in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. A phantom was designed to verify dwell position and dwell time reproducibility for an Ir-192 HDR stepping source using Computed Radiography (CR). The central part of the phantom, incorporating thin alternating strips of lead and acrylic, was used to measure dwell positions. The outer part of the phantom features recesses containing different absorber materials (lead, aluminium, acrylic and polystyrene foam), and was used for determining reproducibility of dwell times. Dwell position errors of dwell time as low as 0.1 s, the minimum dwell time of the treatment unit, could be detected by choosing dwell times over the four materials that produce identical exposure at the CR detector.

  9. An absorbed dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources based on water calorimetry: numerical and experimental proof-of-principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Stewart, Kristin; Seuntjens, Jan

    2007-12-01

    Water calorimetry is an established technique for absorbed dose to water measurements in external beams. In this paper, the feasibility of direct absorbed dose measurements for high dose rate (HDR) iridium-192 (192Ir) sources using water calorimetry is established. Feasibility is determined primarily by a balance between the need to obtain sufficient signal to perform a reproducible measurement, the effect of heat loss on the measured signal, and the positioning uncertainty affecting the source-detector distance. The heat conduction pattern generated in water by the Nucletron microSelectron-HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source was simulated using COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS software. Source heating due to radiation self-absorption was calculated using EGSnrcMP. A heat-loss correction k(c) was calculated as the ratio of the temperature rise under ideal conditions to temperature rise under realistic conditions. The calorimeter setup used a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel of 79 mm diameter and 1.12 mm thick front and rear glass windows located 24 mm apart. Absorbed dose was measured with two sources with nominal air kerma strengths of 38 000 and 21 000 U, at source-detector separations ranging from 24.7 to 27.6 mm and irradiation times of 36.0 to 80.0 s. The preliminary measured dose rate per unit air kerma strength of (0.502 +/- 0.007) microGy/(s U) compares well with the TG-43 derived 0.505 microGy/(s U). This work shows that combined dose uncertainties of significantly less than 5% can be achieved with only modest modifications of current water calorimetry techniques and instruments. This work forms the basis of a potential future absolute dose to water standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy.

  10. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain) and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Avenida Tres Cruces, 2, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, La Fe University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source {beta}{sup -}, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Results: Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., >0.5%) within 3.3 mm of {sup 60}Co and 1.7 mm of {sup 192}Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 169}Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Conclusions: Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  11. Verification of High Dose Rate 192Ir Source Position During Brachytherapy Treatment Using Silicon Pixel Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, Matej; Burger, Janez; Cindro, Vladimir; Kramberger, Gregor; Mandic, Igor; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2011-10-01

    A system for in-vivo tracking of 192Ir source during high dose rate or pulsed dose rate brachytherapy treatment was built using 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors as image sensors and knife-edge lead pinholes as collimators. With source self-images obtained from a dual-pinhole system, location of the source could be reconstructed in three dimensions in real time. The system was tested with 192Ir clinical source (kerma rate in air at 1 m 2.38 Gy/h) in air and plexi-glass phantom. The locations of the source were tracked from a distance of 40 cm in a field of view of 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. Reconstruction precision, defined as the average distance between true and reconstructed source positions, with data collected in less than 1 s with 22 GBq 192Ir source was about 5 mm. The reconstruction precision was in our case mainly limited by imperfect alignment of detectors and pinholes. With perfect alignment the statistical error would allow precision of about 1 mm which could further be improved with larger detector placed at larger distance from the pinhole. However already the modest precision of few millimeters is sufficient for in-vivo detection of larger deviations from planned treatment caused by various misadministrations or malfunctioning of the brachytherapy treatment apparatus. Usage of silicon detectors offers a possibility for building a compact device which could be used as an independent online quality assurance system. In this paper details about sensors, readout system and reconstruction algorithm are described. Results from measurements with clinical source are presented.

  12. Unified registration framework for cumulative dose assessment in cervical cancer across external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharmili; Totman, John J.; Choo, Bok A.

    2016-03-01

    Dose accumulation across External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Brachytherapy (BT) treatment fractions in cervical cancer is extremely challenging due to structural dissimilarities and large inter-fractional anatomic deformations between the EBRT and BT images. The brachytherapy applicator and the bladder balloon, present only in the BT images, introduce missing structural correspondences for the underlying registration problem. Complex anatomical deformations caused by the applicator and the balloon, different rectum and bladder filling and tumor shrinkage compound the registration difficulties. Conventional free-form registration methods struggle to handle such topological differences. In this paper, we propose a registration pipeline that first transforms the original images to their distance maps based on segmentations of critical organs and then performs non-linear registration of the distance maps. The resulting dense deformation field is then used to transform the original anatomical image. The registration accuracy is evaluated on 27 image pairs from stage 2B-4A cervical cancer patients. The algorithm reaches a Hausdorff distance of close to 0:5 mm for the uterus, 2:2 mm for the bladder and 1:7 mm for the rectum when applied to (EBRT,BT) pairs, taken at time points more than three months apart. This generalized model-free framework can be used to register any combination of EBRT and BT images as opposed to methods in the literature that are tuned for either only (BT,BT) pair, or only (EBRT,EBRT) pair or only (BT,EBRT) pair. A unified framework for 3D dose accumulation across multiple EBRT and BT fractions is proposed to facilitate adaptive personalized radiation therapy.

  13. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  14. The impact of body mass index on dosimetric quality in low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Echevarria

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy has been established as an effective and safe treatment option for men with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer. In this retrospective analysis, we sought to study the effect of body mass index (BMI on post-implant dosimetric quality. Material and methods : After institutional approval, records of patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer treated in Puerto Rico with LDR brachytherapy during 2008-2013 were reviewed. All patients were implanted with 125I seeds to a prescription dose of 145 Gy. Computed tomography (CT based dosimetry was performed 1 month after implant. Patients with at least 1 year of prostate-specific antigen (PSA follow-up were included. Factors predictive of adequate D90 coverage (≥ 140 Gy were compared via the Pearson χ2 or Wilcoxon rank-sum test as appropriate. Results : One-hundred and four patients were included in this study, with 53 (51% patients having a D90 ≥ 140 Gy. The only factor associated with a dosimetric coverage detriment (D90 < 140 Gy was BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (p = 0.03. Prostate volume (p = 0.26, initial PSA (p = 0.236, age (p = 0.49, hormone use (p = 0.93, percent of cores positive (p = 0.95, risk group (p = 0.24, tumor stage (p = 0.66, and Gleason score (p = 0.61 did not predict D90. Conclusions : In this study we show that BMI is a significant pre-implant predictor of D90 (< 140 Gy vs. ≥ 140 Gy. Although other studies have reported that prostate volume also affects D90, our study did not find this correlation to be statistically significant, likely because all of our patients had a prostate volume 140 Gy.

  15. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for female peri-urethral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daya Nand Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Peri-urethral cancer (PUC in females is a rare malignancy. Surgery is not usually contemplated due to associated morbidity. Radiation therapy (RT can be employed in the form of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT alone for early lesions, and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT with or without IBT for advanced lesions. We report our first experience in the literature to evaluate the role of high-dose-rate (HDR IBT in female PUC. Material and methods : Between 2008 and 2013, 10 female patients with PUC (5 primary and 5 recurrent were treated with HDR-IBT with or without EBRT at our center. Size of the lesion ranged from 1.5 cm to 5.0 cm. A 2-3 plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42 Gy in 14 fractions for brachytherapy alone (5 patients, and 18-21 Gy for the boost along with EBRT (5 patients. Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of disease control and toxicity. Results: At a median follow up of 25 months, six patients were disease free at their last follow up. Four patients developed recurrence: 2 at inguinal nodes, 1 at local site, and 1 at both local as well as inguinal nodes. Moist desquamation was the commonest acute toxicity observed in all 5 patients treated with IBT alone, which healed within 4 weeks’ time. Overall, grade II delayed complication rate was 30%. Conclusions : Though small sample size, the results of our study have shown that HDR-IBT provides good loco-regional control with acceptable toxicity for female PUC.

  16. Preoperative high dose rate brachytherapy for clinical stage II endometrial carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Olawaiye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We sought to evaluate pathological response, tolerance, and outcome after preoperative (neoadjuvant high dose rate brachytherapy in a small series of patients with clinical stage II endometrial carcinoma, and to evaluate a dose and fractionation protocol for this treatment. Material and methods: Twelve women diagnosed with clinical stage II endometrial carcinoma from 1999-2010 were treated with preoperative radiation therapy. Their medical charts were retrospectively analyzed for HDR treatment regimen, pathological response, and longitudinal outcomes. Radiation doses were normalized to a biologically equi­valent dose of 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2. Results: Two patients had complete pathological response to neoadjuvant therapy; five more had only microscopic residual disease at the time of surgery. At a median follow up of 37 months (1-91 months, one patient has developed recurrence at the vaginal apex six months after completing initial therapy, while another developed a lung recurrence at 28 months. Two-year disease-free and cause-specific survivals were 88% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Our small study shows that the HDR fractionation schedule, as done in our series for preoperative radiation therapy for clinical stage II endometrial cancer, is well tolerated and would be an option for patients treated with neoadjuvant radiation therapy.

  17. Radioablation of adrenal gland malignomas with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Efficacy and outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnike, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany); DTZ am Frankfurter Tor, Berlin (Germany); Neumann, K.; Seidensticker, M.; Seidensticker, R.; Pech, M.; Streitparth, T.; Ricke, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Magdeburg (Germany); Hass, P.; Gademann, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Magdeburg (Germany); Klose, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Nieren- und Hochdruckkrankheiten, Diabetologie und Endokrinologie, Magdeburg (Germany); Garlipp, B.; Benckert, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Gefaesschirurgie, Magdeburg (Germany); Wendler, J.J.; Liehr, U.B.; Schostak, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Urologie und Kinderurologie, Magdeburg (Germany); Goeppner, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Dermatologie, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    To assess the efficacy, safety, and outcome of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with adrenal gland metastases (AGM). From January 2007 to April 2014, 37 patients (7 female, 30 male; mean age 66.8 years, range 41.5-82.5 years) with AGM from different primary tumors were treated with CT-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy (iBT). Primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC). Secondary endpoints were time to untreatable progression (TTUP), time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), and safety. In a secondary analysis, risk factors with an influence on survival were identified. The median biological equivalent dose (BED) was 37.4 Gy. Mean LTC after 12 months was 88%; after 24 months this was 74%. According to CTCAE criteria, one grade 3 adverse event occurred. Median OS after first diagnosis of AGM was 18.3 months. Median OS, TTUP, and TTP after iBT treatment were 11.4, 6.6, and 3.5 months, respectively. Uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses revealed significant influences of synchronous disease, tumor diameter, and the total number of lesions on OS or TTUP or both. Image-guided HDR-iBT is safe and effective. Treatment- and primary tumor-independent features influenced survival of patients with AGM after HDR-iBR treatment. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung der Effektivitaet, Sicherheit und Ergebnisse nach bildgefuehrter High-dose-rate-(HDR-)Brachytherapie bei Patienten mit Nebennierenmetastasen. Von Januar 2007 bis April 2014 wurden 37 Patienten (7 weiblich, 30 maennlich; mittleres Alter 66,8 Jahre, Spanne 41,5-82,5 Jahre) mit Nebennierenmetastasen verschiedener Primarien mit CT-gesteuerter interstitieller HDR-Brachytherapie (iBT) behandelt. Der primaere Endpunkt war die lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC). Sekundaere Endpunkte umfassten die Zeit bis zum nicht mehr behandelbaren Progress (TTUP), die Zeit bis zum Progress (TTP), das Gesamtueberleben (OS) und die Sicherheit der Methode. In einer sekundaeren Analyse wurden Risikofaktoren

  18. The use of adjuvant high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy in patients with collagen vascular disease: a collaborative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Anthony E; Harper, Jennifer L; Olyejar, S Eric; Zunzunegui, Raul G; Wazer, David E

    2011-01-01

    To analyze toxicity and cosmesis in patients with collagen vascular disease (CVD) treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) via high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. This is a pooled analysis of patients with early stage and in situ breast cancer with CVD treated with adjuvant multicatheter or balloon brachytherapy. Physicians at multiple institutions were asked to review their experience and report data regarding toxicity and cosmesis in patients with CVD. All patients fit American Society of Breast Surgeons recommendations for APBI and were treated with HDR brachytherapy with ≥ 3 months followup. Nine cases from five institutions are the subject of this analysis. The median patient age was 54 years and median followup was 31 months. All patients had documented history and active signs/symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, psoriatic arthritis, or scleroderma. All patients had received medical therapy for CVD in the past, and 78% were under active treatment at the time of brachytherapy. All the patients were treated with multicatheter or balloon (MammoSite [Hologic, Inc., Marlboro, MA], MammoSite ML [Hologic, Inc., Marlboro, MA], or Contura [Senorx, Irvine, CA]) brachytherapy with a median volume of 45.5 cc and a median skin distance of 7.5mm. Acute toxicity included Grade 1 skin erythema (5) and catheter-site wound dehiscence (1). Late toxicity included seroma (5), induration (5), pain (2), telangectasia (2), and superficial infection (1). Cosmesis was excellent or good for all the patients. Women with CVD have a toxicity and cosmesis profile consistent with other APBI series. Although confirmatory data is needed, it may not be necessary to exclude these patients from clinical trials of APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning curve of MRI-based planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Rylander, Susanne; Hokland, Steffen; Søndergaard, Christian Skou; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate introduction of MRI-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT), including procedure times, dose-volume parameters, and perioperative morbidity. Study included 42 high-risk prostate cancer patients enrolled in a clinical protocol, offering external beam radiotherapy + two HDRBT 8.5 Gy boosts. Time was recorded for initiation of anesthesia (A), fixation of needle implant (B), end of MR imaging (C), plan approval (D), and end of HDRBT delivery (E). We defined time A-E as total procedure time, A-B as operating room time, B-C as MRI procedure time, C-D as treatment planning time, and D to E as treatment delivery time. Dose-volume parameters were retrieved from the dose planning system. Results from the first 21 patients were compared with the last 21 patients. Total procedure time, operating room time, MRI procedure time, and treatment planning time decreased significantly from average 7.6 to 5.3 hours (p < 0.01), 3.6 to 2.4 hours (p < 0.01), 1.6 to 0.8 hours (p < 0.01), and 2.0 to 1.3 hours (p < 0.01), respectively. HDRBT delivery time remained unchanged at 0.5 hours. Clinical target volume prostate+3mmD90 fulfilled planning aim in 92% of procedures and increased significantly from average 8.3 to 9.0 Gy (p < 0.01). Urethral D0.1 cm(3) and rectal D2 cm(3) fulfilled planning aim in 78% and 95% of procedures, respectively, and did not change significantly. Hematuria occurred in (95%), hematoma (80%), moderate to strong pain (35%), and urinary retention (5%) of procedures. After introduction of MRI-based HDRBT, procedure times were significantly reduced. D90 Clinical target volumeprostate+3mm fulfilled constraints in most patients and improved over time, but not at expense of an increased urethral or rectal dose. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Monte Carlo studies on water and LiF cavity properties for dose-reporting quantities when using x-ray and brachytherapy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Lopes Branco, Isabela; Guimarães Antunes, Paula Cristina; Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Yoriyaz, Hélio

    2016-12-01

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) are the current tools to estimate dose in brachytherapy, which takes into account heterogeneous medium, therefore, departing from water-based formalism (TG-43). One aspect associated to MBCDA is the choice of dose specification medium since it offers two possibilities to report dose: (a) dose to medium in medium, D m,m; and (b) dose to water in medium, D w,m. The discussion about the preferable quantity to be reported is underway. The dose conversion factors, DCF, between dose to water in medium, D w,m, and dose to medium in medium, D m,m, is based on cavity theory and can be obtained using different approaches. When experimental dose verification is desired using, for example, thermoluminescent LiF dosimeters, as in in vivo dose measurements, a third quantity is obtained, which is the dose to LiF in medium, D LiF,m. In this case, DCF to convert from D LiF,m to D w,m or D m,m is necessary. The objective of this study is to estimate DCFs using different approaches, present in the literature, quantifying the differences between them. Also, dose in water and LiF cavities in different tissue media and respective conversion factors to be able to convert LiF-based dose measured values into dose in water or tissue were obtained. Simple cylindrical phantoms composed by different tissue equivalent materials (bone, lung, water and adipose) are modelled. The phantoms contain a radiation source and a cavity with 0.002 69 cm3 in size, which is a typical volume of a disc type LiF dosimeter. Three x-rays qualities with average energies ranging from 47 to 250 keV, and three brachytherapy sources, 60Co, 192Ir and 137Cs, are considered. Different cavity theory approaches for DCF calculations and different cavity/medium combinations have been considered in this study. DCF values for water/bone and LiF/bone cases have strong dependence with energy increasing as the photon energy increases. DCF values also increase with energy for

  1. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  2. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chen, Lee-May [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Littell, Ramey [Gynecologic Oncology, The Permanente Medical Group, San Francisco, California (United States); Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Chan, John K. [Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California (United States); Hsu, I-Chow, E-mail: ichow.hsu@ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  3. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cohen, Gil' ad N. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  4. Clinical implementation of a novel applicator in high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In this study, we present the clinical implementation of a novel transoral balloon centering esophageal applicator (BCEA and the initial clinical experience in high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer, using this applicator. Material and methods: Acceptance testing and commissioning of the BCEA were performed prior to clinical use. Full performance testing was conducted including measurements of the dimensions and the catheter diameter, evaluation of the inflatable balloon consistency, visibility of the radio-opaque markers, congruence of the markers, absolute and relative accuracy of the HDR source in the applicator using the radiochromic film and source position simulator, visibility and digitization of the applicator on the computed tomography (CT images under the clinical conditions, and reproducibility of the offset. Clinical placement of the applicator, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient’s response to the treatment were elaborated as well. Results : The experiments showed sub-millimeter accuracy in the source positioning with distal position at 1270 mm. The digitization (catheter reconstruction was uncomplicated due to the good visibility of markers. The treatment planning resulted in a favorable dose distribution. This finding was pronounced for the treatment of the curvy anatomy of the lesion due to the improved repeatability and consistency of the delivered fractional dose to the patient, since the radioactive source was placed centrally within the lumen with respect to the clinical target due to the five inflatable balloons. Conclusions : The consistency of the BCEA positioning resulted in the possibility to deliver optimized non-uniform dose along the catheter, which resulted in an increase of the dose to the cancerous tissue and lower doses to healthy tissue. A larger number of patients and long-term follow-up will be required to investigate if the delivered optimized treatment can

  5. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Online pretreatment verification of high-dose rate brachytherapy using an imaging panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Podesta, Mark; Bellezzo, Murillo; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Lutgens, Ludy; Vanneste, Ben G. L.; Voncken, Robert; Van Limbergen, Evert J.; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is employed to treat a wide variety of cancers. However, an accurate treatment verification method is currently not available. This study describes a pre-treatment verification system that uses an imaging panel (IP) to verify important aspects of the treatment plan. A detailed modelling of the IP was only possible with an extensive calibration performed using a robotic arm. Irradiations were performed with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source within a water phantom. An empirical fit was applied to measure the distance between the source and the detector so 3D Cartesian coordinates of the dwell positions can be obtained using a single panel. The IP acquires 7.14 fps to verify the dwell times, dwell positions and air kerma strength (Sk). A gynecological applicator was used to create a treatment plan that was registered with a CT image of the water phantom used during the experiments for verification purposes. Errors (shifts, exchanged connections and wrong dwell times) were simulated to verify the proposed verification system. Cartesian source positions (panel measurement plane) have a standard deviation of about 0.02 cm. The measured distance between the source and the panel (z-coordinate) have a standard deviation up to 0.16 cm and maximum absolute error of  ≈0.6 cm if the signal is close to sensitive limit of the panel. The average response of the panel is very linear with Sk. Therefore, Sk measurements can be performed with relatively small errors. The measured dwell times show a maximum error of 0.2 s which is consistent with the acquisition rate of the panel. All simulated errors were clearly identified by the proposed system. The use of IPs is not common in brachytherapy, however, it provides considerable advantages. It was demonstrated that the IP can accurately measure Sk, dwell times and dwell positions.

  7. SU-F-T-51: Investigating the Effect of Eye Size and Eccentricity On Normal Tissue Doses From Eye Plaque Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsdofer, E; Crilly, R [Oregon Health & Science University Portland, OR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study investigates the effect of eye size and eccentricity on doses to critical tissues by simulating doses in the Plaque Simulator (v. 6.3.1) software. Present OHSU plaque brachytherapy treatment focuses on delivering radiation to the tumor measured with ocular ultrasound plus a small margin and assumes the orbit has the dimensions of a “standard eye.” Accurately modeling the dimensions of the orbit requires a high resolution ocular CT. This study quantifies how standard differences in equatorial diameters and eccentricity affect calculated doses to critical structures in order to query the justification of the additional CT scan to the treatment planning process. Methods: Tumors of 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm were modeled at the 12:00:00 hour with a latitude of 45 degrees. Right eyes were modeled at a number of equatorial diameters from 17.5 to 28 mm for each of the standard non-notched COMS plaques with silastic inserts. The COMS plaques were fully loaded with uniform activity, centered on the tumor, and prescribed to a common tumor dose (85 Gy/100 hours). Variations in the calculated doses to normal structures were examined to see if the changes were significant. Results: The calculated dose to normal structures show a marked dependence on eye geometry. This is exemplified by fovea dose which more than doubled in the smaller eyes and nearly halved in the larger model. Additional significant dependence was found in plaque size on the calculated dose in spite of all plaques giving the same dose to the prescription point. Conclusion: The variation in dose with eye dimension fully justifies the addition of a high resolution ocular CT to the planning technique. Additional attention must be made to plaque size beyond simply covering the tumor when considering normal tissue dose.

  8. Optimal bladder filling during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a dosimetric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Mahantshetty

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare 3D dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of bladder and other organs at risk with different bladder filling protocol during high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT in cervical cancer, and to find optimized bladder volume. Material and methods : This dosimetric study was completed with 21 patients who underwent HDR-ICBT with computed tomography/magnetic resonance compatible applicator as a routine treatment. Computed tomography planning was done for each patient with bladder emptied (series 1, after 50 ml (series 2, and 100 ml (series 3 bladder filling with a saline infusion through the bladder catheter. Contouring was done on the Eclipse Planning System. 7 Gy to point A was prescribed with the standard loading patterns. Various 3D DVH parameters including 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc doses and mean doses to the OAR’s were noted. Paired t-test was performed. Results : The mean (± SD bladder volume was 64.5 (± 25 cc, 116.2 (± 28 cc, and 172.9 (± 29 cc, for series 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The 0.1 cm 3 ,1 cm 3 , 2 cm 3 mean bladder doses for series 1, series 2, and series 3 were 9.28 ± 2.27 Gy, 7.38 ± 1.72 Gy, 6.58 ± 1.58 Gy; 9.39 ± 2.28 Gy, 7.85 ± 1.85 Gy, 7.05 ± 1.59 Gy, and 10.09 ± 2.46 Gy, 8.33 ± 1.75 Gy, 7.6 ± 1.55 Gy, respectively. However, there was a trend towards higher bladder doses in series 3. Similarly, for small bowel dose 0.1 cm 3 , 1 cm 3 , and 2 cm 3 in series 1, 2, and 3 were 5.44 ± 2.2 Gy, 4.41 ± 1.84 Gy, 4 ± 1.69 Gy; 4.57 ± 2.89 Gy, 3.78 ± 2.21 Gy, 3.35 ± 2.02 Gy, and 4.09 ± 2.38 Gy, 3.26 ± 1.8 Gy, 3.05 ± 1.58 Gy. Significant increase in small bowel dose in empty bladder (series 1 compared to full bladder (series 3 (p = 0.03 was noted. However, the rectal and sigmoid doses were not significantly affected with either series. Conclusions : Bladder filling protocol with 50 ml and 100 ml was well tolerated and achieved a reasonably reproducible bladder volume

  9. Interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of squamous cell anal carcinoma: A retrospective single institution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhelif, W; Ferri-Molina, M; Mazeron, R; Maroun, P; Duhamel-Oberlander, A S; Dumas, I; Martinetti, F; Guemnie-Tafo, A; Chargari, C; Haie-Meder, C

    2015-01-01

    To examine the outcome of patients receiving interstitial pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) after pelvic radiation therapy for treatment of an anal squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-one patients were identified: 13, six, and two with stages I, II, and III tumors, respectively. After receiving received pelvic irradiation +/- concurrent chemotherapy, patients were delivered a PDR-BT boost to the residual tumor, with intention to deliver a minimal total dose of 60 Gy. The greatest dimension of residual tumor at the time of brachytherapy procedure was 12.5 mm (range: 0-20 mm). Brachytherapy implantation was performed according to the Paris system, only one plane implant being used. Median dose delivered through BT was 20 Gy (range: 10-30 Gy). Median number of pulses was 48 (range: 20-80 pulses). Median treated volume was 9 cm(3) (range: 5-16 cm(3)). Median dose per pulse was 40 cGy (range: 37.5-50 cGy). No Grade 3 or more acute toxicity was reported. No Grade 3 or more delayed toxicity was seen among 18 patients with more than 6 months follow-up. Median followup was 47 months (range: 6-73 months). Twenty patients (95%) were alive at last follow-up. Tumor relapses were experienced in four patients (19%), including local relapse in three patients (14%). With almost 4 years median followup, this study confirms previous data suggesting that PDR-BT is effective and safe in this indication. Local control rate and toxicity were in the range of what was seen with continuous low-dose-rate BT. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as a monotherapy for prostate cancer--Single-institution results of the extreme fractionation regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukiełka, Andrzej Marek; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Walasek, Tomasz; Olchawa, Agnieszka; Kudzia, Roksana; Dybek, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    We report a single-institution retrospective analysis of the outcomes, disease control, and toxicity of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment modality (monotherapy) for localized prostate cancer. Between 2006 and 2012, 77 patients with diagnosed prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy. The prescribed dose was 45 Gy in three separate implants 21 days apart, with single fraction per implant. Of the 77 patients, 67 (87%) received hormonal therapy. Prostate-specific antigen failure was defined according to Phoenix consensus, as nadir + 2 ng/mL. Toxicity was scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.03. The median followup time was 57 months (4.75 years). The 5-year actuarial overall survival was 98.7%, biochemical control 96.7%, local control 96.9%, and metastasis-free survival 98.4%. Younger age at the beginning of brachytherapy predicted the onset of bounce phenomenon. There were no Grade 3 or higher acute toxicities detected, and Grade 2 genitourinary acute toxicity developed in 19 patients (24.6%). There were no Grade 2 gastrointestinal complications. No Grade 4 or 5 late toxicity was detected. There were also no Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicities detected. One patient (1.3%) underwent transurethral resection of the prostate because of Grade 3 urethral stenosis and urinary retention. A total of 26 patients (33.8%) developed Grade 2 late toxicity. HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer was feasible, effective, and had acceptable toxicity profile. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dose distribution in water for monoenergetic photon point sources in the energy range of interest in brachytherapy: Monte Carlo simulations with PENELOPE and GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansa, Julio F. [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Universitario ' Puerta del Mar' , E-11009 Cadiz (Spain)]. E-mail: juliof.almansa.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es; Guerrero, Rafael [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario ' San Cecilio' , Avda. Dr. Oloriz, 16, E-18012 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: rafael.guerrero.alcalde.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es; Al-Dweri, Feras M.O. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: faldweri@ugr.es; Anguiano, Marta [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: mangui@ugr.es; Lallena, Antonio M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: lallena@ugr.es

    2007-05-15

    Monte Carlo calculations using the codes PENELOPE and GEANT4 have been performed to characterize the dosimetric properties of monoenergetic photon point sources in water. The dose rate in water has been calculated for energies of interest in brachytherapy, ranging between 10keV and 2MeV. A comparison of the results obtained using the two codes with the available data calculated with other Monte Carlo codes is carried out. A {chi}{sup 2}-like statistical test is proposed for these comparisons. PENELOPE and GEANT4 show a reasonable agreement for all energies analyzed and distances to the source larger than 1cm. Significant differences are found at distances from the source up to 1cm. A similar situation occurs between PENELOPE and EGS4.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of multilumen intracavitary balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G

    2014-01-06

    The objective of this work is to evaluate dosimetric impact of multilumen balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer. Highly asymmetrical dose distribution was generated for patients A and B, depending upon applicator proximity to skin and rib. Both skin and rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for A; only rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for B. Thirty-five rotation scenarios were simulated for each patient by rotating outer lumens every 10° over ± 180° range with respect to central lumen using mathematically calculated rotational matrix. Thirty-five rotated plans were compared with three plans: 1) original multidwell multilumen (MDML) plan, 2) multidwell single-lumen (MDSL) plan, and 3) single-dwell single-lumen (SDSL) plan. For plan comparison, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) coverage (dose to 95% and 90% volume of PTV_EVAL) (D95 and D90), skin and rib maximal dose (Dmax), and normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) of prescribed dose (PD) were evaluated. Dose variation due to device rotation ranged from -5.6% to 0.8% (A) and -6.5% to 0.2% (B) for PTV_EVAL D95; -5.2% to 0.4% (A) and -4.1% to 0.7% (B) for PTV_EVAL D90; -2.0 to 18.4% (A) and -7.8 to 17.5% (B) for skin Dmax; -11.1 to 22.8% (A) and -4.7 to 55.1% (B) of PD for rib Dmax, respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 and V200 variation was < 1.0 cc, except for -0.1 to 2.5cc (B) of V200. Furthermore, 30° device rotation increased rib Dmax over 145% of PD: 152.9% (A) by clockwise 30° rotation and 152.5% (B) by counterclockwise 30° rotation. For a highly asymmetric dose distribution, device rotation can outweigh the potential benefit of improved dose shaping capability afforded by multilumen and make dosimetric data worse than single-lumen plans unless it is properly corrected.

  13. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the performance of high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hayes, John K; Hsu, I-Chow J; Morris, David E; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Tward, Jonathan D; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Recommendations of the Spanish brachytherapy group (GEB) of Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) and the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM) for high-dose rate (HDR) non melanoma skin cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S; Arenas, M; Gutierrez, C; Richart, J; Perez-Calatayud, J; Celada, F; Santos, M; Rovirosa, A

    2017-08-14

    Clinical indications of brachytherapy in non-melanoma skin cancers, description of applicators and dosimetry recommendations are described based on the literature review, clinical practice and experience of Spanish Group of Brachytherapy and Spanish Society of Medical Physics reported in the XIV Annual Consensus Meeting on Non Melanoma Skin Cancer Brachytherapy held in Benidorm, Alicante (Spain) on October 21st, 2016. All the recommendations for which consensus was achieved are highlighted in blue. Regular and small surfaces may be treated with Leipzig, Valencia, flap applicators or electronic brachytherapy (EBT). For irregular surfaces, customized molds or interstitial implants should be employed. The dose is prescribed at a maximum depth of 3-4 mm of the clinical target volume/planning target volume (CTV/PTV) in all cases except in flaps or molds in which 5 mm is appropriate. Interstitial brachytherapy should be used for CTV/PTV >5 mm. Different total doses and fraction sizes are used with very similar clinical and toxicity results. Hypofractionation is very useful twice or 3 times a week, being comfortable for patients and practical for Radiotherapy Departments. In interstitial brachytherapy 2 fractions twice a day are applied.

  15. High-Dose-Rate Monotherapy: Safe and Effective Brachytherapy for Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demanes, D. Jeffrey, E-mail: jdemanes@mednet.ucla.edu [California Endocurietherapy at UCLA, Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine of University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A.; Ghilezan, Michel [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hill, Dennis R.; Schour, Lionel; Brandt, David [California Endocurietherapy, Oakland, CA (United States); Gustafson, Gary [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy used as the only treatment (monotherapy) for early prostate cancer is consistent with current concepts in prostate radiobiology, and the dose is reliably delivered in a prospectively defined anatomic distribution that meets all the requirements for safe and effective therapy. We report the disease control and toxicity of HDR monotherapy from California Endocurietherapy (CET) and William Beaumont Hospital (WBH) in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: There were 298 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Two biologically equivalent hypofractionation protocols were used. At CET the dose was 42 Gy in six fractions (two implantations 1 week apart) delivered to a computed tomography-defined planning treatment volume. At WBH the dose was 38 Gy in four fractions (one implantation) based on intraoperative transrectal ultrasound real-time treatment planning. The bladder, urethral, and rectal dose constraints were similar. Toxicity was scored with the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. Results: The median follow-up time was 5.2 years. The median age of the patients was 63 years, and the median value of the pretreatment prostate-specific antigen was 6.0 ng/mL. The 8-year results were 99% local control, 97% biochemical control (nadir +2), 99% distant metastasis-free survival, 99% cause-specific survival, and 95% overall survival. Toxicity was scored per event, meaning that an individual patient with more than one symptom was represented repeatedly in the morbidity data table. Genitourinary toxicity consisted of 10% transient Grade 2 urinary frequency or urgency and 3% Grade 3 episode of urinary retention. Gastrointestinal toxicity was <1%. Conclusions: High disease control rates and low morbidity demonstrate that HDR monotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized prostate cancer.

  16. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer: long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana Garcia; Paya, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain); Vazquez, Andres; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica [Department of Radiation Physics, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Cantabria (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Objectives: We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the 'Phoenix consensus'. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results: The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions: The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. (author)

  17. SU-E-T-16: A Comparison of Expected Dwell Times and Dose Variations for NAMD Patients Treated with An Episcleral Brachytherapy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, R [Univ Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Patel, P; Balaggan, K; Restori, M; Ilginis, T [Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Drew, M; McGovern, M; Vitali, J; Marsteller, L [Salutaris Medical Devices, Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the variations in dwell times and doses expected when using an episcleral brachytherapy device for treatment of neovascular agerelated macular degeneration (n-AMD) based on accurate imaging modalities Methods: Data from 40 eyes from 40 subjects with known n- AMD acquired through the Distance of Choroid Study (DOCS) conducted at Moorfields Eye Hospital was used to determine the target depth; the distance from the outer scleral surface of the eye, through the choroid, to the apex of the choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Each subject underwent, in triplicate, enhanced-depth Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT), Swept Source Optical Coherence Tomography, (SS-OCT) and Ocular Ultrasound (O-US). These data are the most comprehensive and accurate measurements of the dimensions of the CNV and adjacent layers of the eye for this cohort of patients. During treatment of n-AMD, patients receive a dose of 24Gy to the apex at the target depth. Using the percentage depth dose for a Sr-90 episcleral brachytherapy device, dwell times and doses to the apex were computed to determine the expected variations. Results: The mean target depth and the 95% confidence interval (CI) determined by combining O-US with SD-OCT were 1326 (956,1696)µm and with SS-OCT were 1332 (970,1693)µm. The calculated corresponding mean dwell times and 95% (CI) were 334 (223,445)s and 335 (226,445)s for SD-OCT and SS-OCT determined depths, respectively. The corresponding mean apex dose and 95% (CI) were 24 (35.9,18.0)Gy (SD-OCT) and 24 (35.6,18.1)Gy (SS-OCT). Conclusion: For episcleral brachytherapy treatment of n-AMD, using a patient population average target depth for treatment planning is inadequate, resulting in dose variations of a factor of approximately two over the 95% CI and larger variations for a nontrivial segment of the population. Each patient should have individualized imaging studies to determine the target depth for use in the dwell time calculation

  18. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieszko, Dariusz; Brzozowska, Anna; Kordzin’ska-Cisek, Izabela; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT)-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy). Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90) was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED) and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2) median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months), 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher). Conclusions Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy. PMID:28115962

  19. The Real-Time Dose Measurement Scintillating Fiber Array for Brachytherapy Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynes, Lawrence

    2007-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment modality that uses tiny radioactive sources (few mm in length) by delivering enough doses to kill cancer tumors or plaque build-up. The type of sources used in hospitals include both gamma and beta emitters. Presently, the technique suffers from not having a single detector with the capability of providing accurate dose distribution information within sub-mm accuracy. The current standard is based primarily on well chambers and film dosimetry. The Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation (CAMI) at Hampton University is developing a Scintillating Fiber Based Beta Detector prototype in collaboration with the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) to address this problem. The device is composed of an array of 1x1 mm^2 scintillating fibers optically coupled to photo-multiplier tubes for photon-to-current conversion. A CAMAC LabView based data acquisition system is used for real time data collection and histogramming, data analysis. A set of data were collected at the nearby Bon Secours DePaul Medical Center using a GammaMed 12i HDR after-loader housing a 6.62 mCi Ir-192 source. Preliminary comparison between our device and film dosimetry will be discussed.

  20. A method for restricting intracatheter dwell time variance in high-dose-rate brachytherapy plan optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Adam; Siauw, Timmy; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2016-01-01

    To present the algorithm of a modification to the inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimization engine that allows for restriction of the intracatheter dwell time variance. IPSA was modified to allow user control of dwell time variance within each catheter through a single parameter, the dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC). The minimum DTDC value (DTDC = 0) does not impose any restriction on dwell time variance, and the maximum value (DTDC = 1) restricts all dwell times within each catheter to take on the same value. The final optimization penalty function value was evaluated as a function of DTDC. The algorithm proposed fully preserves the inverse planning nature of the IPSA algorithm along with the penalty-based dose optimization workflow. Increasing DTDC creates less variance in dwell time between dwell positions in each catheter and may be used to induce a more smooth change in dwell time with dwell position in each catheter. Nonzero DTDC values always increased the optimization penalty function value. The DTDC was developed as an extension to IPSA to allow restriction of the difference in dwell time between adjacent dwell positions. This results in less variation between neighboring dwell positions which can be clinically desirable. However, the impact of this restriction needs to be considered for its clinical relevance on a case-by-case basis because considerable degradation in dose-volume histogram metrics can result for large DTDC values. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  2. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  3. The impact of body mass index on rectal dose in locally advanced cervical cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jihoon; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Valicenti, Richard; Mathai, Matthew; Stern, Robin L; Mayadev, Jyoti

    2013-01-01

    The impact of body mass index (BMI) on rectal dose in brachytherapy for cervical cancer is unknown. We assessed the association of BMI on rectal dose and lower gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Between 2007 and 2010, 51 patients with 97 brachytherapy planning images were reviewed. Volumetric measurements of the maximum percentage, mean percentage, dose to 2cc (D2cc), and dose to 1cc (D1cc) of the rectum, and the Internal Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) rectal point were recorded. Linear mixed effect models, analysis of variance, and regression analyses were used to determine the correlation between multiple observations or to detect a difference in the mean. The GI acute and late toxicity were prospectively recorded and retrospectively analyzed. The average BMI (kg/m(2)) was 27.7 with a range of 17.4-46.6. Among the patients, 8% were morbidly obese, 25% obese, 25% overweight, 40% normal weight, and 2% underweight. The mean D1cc, D2cc, mean rectal dose (%), maximum rectal dose (%), and ICRU rectum was 3.03 Gy, 2.78 Gy, 20%, 60%, and 2.99 Gy, respectively. On multivariate analysis, there was a significant decrease in the D1cc and D2cc rectal dose (p=0.016), ICRU rectal point dose (p=0.022), and mean rectal dose percentage (p=0.021) with an increase in BMI. There was, however, no statistically significant relationship between BMI and GI toxicity. Obesity decreases the rectal dose given in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer because of an increase in fatty tissue in the recto-uterine space. There is no significant correlation between BMI and acute or late GI toxicity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Comparison of absorbed dose in the cervix carcinoma therapy by brachytherapy of high dose rate using the conventional planning and Monte Carlo simulation; Comparacao da dose absorvida no tratamento do cancer ginecologico por braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose utilizando o planejamento convencional do tratamento e simulacao de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Aneli Oliveira da

    2010-07-01

    This study aims to compare the doses received for patients submitted to brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method of treatment of the cervix carcinoma, performed in the planning system PLATO BPS with the doses obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using the radiation transport code MCNP 5 and one female anthropomorphic phantom based on voxel, the FAX. The implementation of HDR brachytherapy treatment for the cervix carcinoma consists of the insertion of an intrauterine probe and an intravaginal probe (ring or ovoid) and then two radiographs are obtained, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral (LAT) to confirm the position of the applicators in the patient and to allow the treatment planning and the determination of the absorbed dose at points of interest: rectum, bladder, sigmoid and point A, which corresponds anatomically to the crossings of the uterine arteries with ureters The absorbed doses obtained with the code MCNP 5, with the exception of the absorbed dose in the rectum and sigmoid for the simulation considering a point source of {sup 192}Ir, are lower than the absorbed doses from PLATO BPS calculations because the MCNP 5 considers the chemical compositions and densities of FAX body, not considering the medium as water. When considering the Monte Carlo simulation for a source with dimensions equal to that used in the brachytherapy irradiator used in this study, the values of calculated absorbed dose to the bladder, to the rectum, to the right point A and to the left point A were respectively lower than those determined by the treatment planning system in 33.29, 5.01, 22.93 and 19.04%. These values are almost all larger than the maximum acceptable deviation between patient planned and administered doses (5 %). With regard to the rectum and bladder, which are organs that must be protected, the present results are in favor of the radiological protection of patients. The point A, that is on the isodose of 100%, used to tumor treatment, the results

  5. Fast Electron Beam Simulation and Dose Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Trindade, A; Peralta, L; Lopes, M C; Alves, C; Chaves, A

    2003-01-01

    A flexible multiple source model capable of fast reconstruction of clinical electron beams is presented in this paper. A source model considers multiple virtual sources emulating the effect of accelerator head components. A reference configuration (10 MeV and 10x10 cm2 field size) for a Siemens KD2 linear accelerator was simulated in full detail using GEANT3 Monte Carlo code. Our model allows the reconstruction of other beam energies and field sizes as well as other beam configurations for similar accelerators using only the reference beam data. Electron dose calculations were performed with the reconstructed beams in a water phantom and compared with experimental data. An agreement of 1-2% / 1-2 mm was obtained, equivalent to the accuracy of full Monte Carlo accelerator simulation. The source model reduces accelerator simulation CPU time by a factor of 7500 relative to full Monte Carlo approaches. The developed model was then interfaced with DPM, a fast radiation transport Monte Carlo code for dose calculati...

  6. Quality control of high-dose-rate brachytherapy: treatment delivery analysis using statistical process control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Able, Charles M; Bright, Megan; Frizzell, Bart

    2013-03-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a quality control method used to ensure that a process is well controlled and operates with little variation. This study determined whether SPC was a viable technique for evaluating the proper operation of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery system. A surrogate prostate patient was developed using Vyse ordnance gelatin. A total of 10 metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were placed from prostate base to apex. Computed tomography guidance was used to accurately position the first detector in each train at the base. The plan consisted of 12 needles with 129 dwell positions delivering a prescribed peripheral dose of 200 cGy. Sixteen accurate treatment trials were delivered as planned. Subsequently, a number of treatments were delivered with errors introduced, including wrong patient, wrong source calibration, wrong connection sequence, single needle displaced inferiorly 5 mm, and entire implant displaced 2 mm and 4 mm inferiorly. Two process behavior charts (PBC), an individual and a moving range chart, were developed for each dosimeter location. There were 4 false positives resulting from 160 measurements from 16 accurately delivered treatments. For the inaccurately delivered treatments, the PBC indicated that measurements made at the periphery and apex (regions of high-dose gradient) were much more sensitive to treatment delivery errors. All errors introduced were correctly identified by either the individual or the moving range PBC in the apex region. Measurements at the urethra and base were less sensitive to errors. SPC is a viable method for assessing the quality of HDR treatment delivery. Further development is necessary to determine the most effective dose sampling, to ensure reproducible evaluation of treatment delivery accuracy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An automated optimization tool for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy with divergent needle pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; Maenhout, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; van Vulpen, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Focal high-dose-rate (HDR) for prostate cancer has gained increasing interest as an alternative to whole gland therapy as it may contribute to the reduction of treatment related toxicity. For focal treatment, optimal needle guidance and placement is warranted. This can be achieved under MR guidance. However, MR-guided needle placement is currently not possible due to space restrictions in the closed MR bore. To overcome this problem, a MR-compatible, single-divergent needle-implant robotic device is under development at the University Medical Centre, Utrecht: placed between the legs of the patient inside the MR bore, this robot will tap the needle in a divergent pattern from a single rotation point into the tissue. This rotation point is just beneath the perineal skin to have access to the focal prostate tumor lesion. Currently, there is no treatment planning system commercially available which allows optimization of the dose distribution with such needle arrangement. The aim of this work is to develop an automatic inverse dose planning optimization tool for focal HDR prostate brachytherapy with needle insertions in a divergent configuration. A complete optimizer workflow is proposed which includes the determination of (1) the position of the center of rotation, (2) the needle angulations and (3) the dwell times. Unlike most currently used optimizers, no prior selection or adjustment of input parameters such as minimum or maximum dose or weight coefficients for treatment region and organs at risk is required. To test this optimizer, a planning study was performed on ten patients (treatment volumes ranged from 8.5 cm3to 23.3 cm3) by using 2-14 needle insertions. The total computation time of the optimizer workflow was below 20 min and a clinically acceptable plan was reached on average using only four needle insertions.

  8. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  9. The incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship in parotid gland cancer patients treated with 125I seed brachytherapy. Incidence of radioepidermitis and the dose-response relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Ming-Hui; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shu-ming; Huang, Ming-wei; Shi, Yan [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Zhang, Jian-Guo [Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Beijing (China); Fujian Provincial Hospital, Fujian (China)

    2014-09-09

    We studied the incidence and dose-response relationship of radioepidermitis in parotid gland carcinoma patients treated with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy in the hopes of designing an optimized pre-implant treatment plan that would reduce the incidence and severity of radioepidermitis in patients receiving this therapy. Between January 2007 and May 2010, 100 parotid gland cancer patients were treated postoperatively with [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy. The matched peripheral dose (MPD) was 80-140 Gy, and [{sup 125}I] seed activity was 0.7-0.8 mCi. The mean dose delivered to the skin was calculated in the post-implant CT on day 0 following implantation. Grades of acute and late dermatitis were evaluated at 2, 6, 12, and 18 months post-implantation. Most patients experienced grade 0-2 acute and late skin side effects (86 and 97 %, respectively), though a small subset developed severe complications. Most grade 1-3 effects resolved within 6 months of implantation, though some grade 1-3 effects and all grade 4 effects remained unchanged throughout the 18-month follow-up period. Grade 3 and 4 effects were most prominent (75 and 25 %, respectively) with doses of 110-140 Gy; doses higher than 140 Gy produced only grade 4 effects. [{sup 125}I] seed brachytherapy produced acceptable levels of acute and late radioepidermitis with a good clinical outcome. A mean dose under 100 Gy delivered to the skin was safe, though doses of 110-140 Gy should be given with caution and extra monitoring; doses greater than 140 Gy are dangerous and likely to produce grade 4-5 effects. (orig.) [German] Wir untersuchten die Inzidenz und die Dosis-Wirkung-Beziehung bei Patienten mit Ohrspeicheldruesenkrebs, die mit [{sup 125}I]-Seed-Brachytherapie behandelt wurden, in der Hoffnung, eine optimierte praeimplantologische Behandlung zu entwickeln, welche die Inzidenz und Schwere der Radioepidermitis bei Patienten, die diese Therapie erhalten haben, reduziert. Zwischen Januar 2007 und Mai 2010

  10. SU-E-J-93: Parametrisation of Dose to the Mucosa of the Anterior Rectal Wall in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkenhead, A; Hamlett, L; Wood, D; Choudhury, A [The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, Greater Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of the prostate, radiation is delivered from a number of radioactive sources which are inserted via catheter into the target volume. The rectal mucosa also receives dose during the treatment, which may lead to late toxicity effects. To allow possible links between rectal dose and toxicity to be investigated, suitable methods of parametrising the rectal dose are needed. Methods: During treatment of a series of 95 patients, anatomy and catheter locations were monitored by transrectal ultrasound, and target volume positions were contoured on the ultrasound scan by the therapist. The anterior rectal mucosal wall was identified by contouring the transrectal ultrasound balloon within the ultrasound scan. Source positions and dwell times, along with the dose delivered to the patient were computed using the Oncentra Prostate treatment planning system (TPS). Data for the series of patients were exported from the TPS in Dicom format, and a series of parametrisation methods were developed in a Matlab environment to assess the rectal dose. Results: Contours of the anterior rectal mucosa were voxelised within Matlab to allow the dose to the rectal mucosa to be analysed directly from the 3D dose grid. Dose parametrisations based on dose-surface (DSH) and dose-line (DLH) histograms were obtained. Both lateral and longitudinal extents of the mucosal dose were parametrised using dose-line histograms in the relevant directions. Conclusion: We have developed a series of dose parametrisations for quantifying the dose to the rectal mucosa during HDR prostate brachytherapy which are suitable for future studies investigating potential associations between mucosal dose and late toxicity effects. The geometry of the transrectal probe standardises the rectal anatomy, making this treatment technique particularly suited to studies of this nature.

  11. Influence of length of interval between pulses in PDR brachytherapy (PDRBT on value of Biologically Equivalent Dose (BED in healthy tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Piotrowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Different PDR treatment schemas are used in clinical practice, however optimal length of interval between pulses still remains unclear. The aim of this work was to compare value of BED doses measured in surrounded healthy tissues according to different intervals between pulses in PDRBT. Influence of doses optimization on BED values was analyzed.Material and methods: Fifty-one patients treated in Greater Poland Cancer Centre were qualified for calculations.Calculations of doses were made in 51 patients with head and neck cancer, brain tumor, breast cancer, sarcoma, penis cancer and rectal cancer. Doses were calculated with the use of PLATO planning system in chosen critical points in surrounded healthy tissues. For all treatment plans the doses were compared using Biologically Equivalent Dose formula.Three interval lengths (1, 2 and 4 hours between pulses were chosen for calculations. For statistical analysis Friedman ANOVA test and Kendall ratio were used.Results: The median value of BED in chosen critical points in healthy tissues was statistically related to the length of interval between PDR pulses and decreased exponentially with 1 hour interval to 4 hours (Kendall = from 0.48 to 1.0; p = from 0.002 to 0.00001.Conclusions: Prolongation of intervals between pulses in PDR brachytherapy was connected with lower values of BED doses in healthy tissues. It seems that longer intervals between pulses reduced the risk of late complications, but also decreased the tumour control. Furthermore, optimization influenced the increase of doses in healthy tissues.

  12. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for accelerated partial breast irradiation – trial results of Azerbaijan National Center of Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil A. Aliyev

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To describe early results of two cohorts of patients with low and intermediate risk of early breast cancer treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using different schedules of multicatheter brachytherapy. Material and methods: Patients with early stage breast cancer after breast conserving surgery were enrolled for a prospective analysis. The APBI, using multicatheter brachytherapy, was delivered either eight times 4 Gy in five days with a planned total dose of 32 Gy, or seven times 5 Gy in four days with a planned total dose of 35 Gy. Primary endpoints were side effects. Results : Forty-eight patients were enrolled between 2012 and 2014. Patients characteristics were as follow: median age of patients was 55 years, early breast cancer was defined according GEC-ESTRO recommendations. With a median follow-up period of 37 months, no significant differences regarding late side effects and cosmesis between two cohorts of patients were documented. In total, cosmesis was excellent in 13/48 (27.1% patients, good in 34/48 (70.8% patients, and moderate in 1/48 patient (2.1%. Conclusions : Accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy with 32 Gy/8 fractions and 35 Gy/7 fractions for early breast cancer seems to be similar in terms of late side effects. According to our findings, APBI was also feasible for intermediate-risk of early breast cancer patients.

  13. Dedicated high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy radiation fields for in vitro cell exposures at variable source-target cell distances: killing of mammalian cells depends on temporal dose rate fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veigel, Cornelia; Hartmann, Günther H.; Fritz, Peter; Debus, Jürgen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2017-02-01

    Afterloading brachytherapy is conducted by the stepwise movement of a radioactive source through surgically implanted applicator tubes where at predefined dwell positions calculated dwell times optimize spatial dose delivery with respect to a planned dose level. The temporal exposure pattern exhibits drastic fluctuations in dose rate at a given coordinate and within a single treatment session because of the discontinuous and repeated source movement into the target volume. This could potentially affect biological response. Therefore, mammalian cells were exposed as monolayers to a high dose rate 192Ir source by utilizing a dedicated irradiation device where the distance between a planar array of radioactive source positions and the plane of the cell monolayer could be varied from 2.5 mm to 40 mm, thus varying dose rate pattern for any chosen total dose. The Gammamed IIi afterloading system equipped with a nominal 370 GBq (10 Ci) 192-Ir source was used to irradiate V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts from both confluent and from exponential growth phase with dose up to 12 Gy (at room temperature, total exposure not exceeding 1 h). For comparison, V79 cells were also exposed to 6 MV x-rays from a clinical linear accelerator (dose rate of 2.5 Gy min-1). As biological endpoint, cell survival was determined by standard colony forming assay. Dose measurements were conducted with a diamond detector (sensitive area 7.3 mm2), calibrated by means of 60Co radiation. Additionally, dose delivery was simulated by Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc code system. The calculated secondary electron fluence spectra at the cell location did not indicate a significant change of radiation quality (i.e. higher linear energy transfer) at the lower distances. Clonogenic cell survival curves obtained after brachytherapy exhibited an altered biological response compared to x-rays which was characterized by a significant reduction of the survival curve shoulder when dose rate

  14. On the use of particle filters for electromagnetic tracking in high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Th I.; Lahmer, G.; Brandt, T.; Kallis, K.; Strnad, V.; Bert, Ch; Hensel, B.; Tomé, A. M.; Lang, E. W.

    2017-10-01

    Modern radiotherapy of female breast cancers often employs high dose rate brachytherapy, where a radioactive source is moved inside catheters, implanted in the female breast, according to a prescribed treatment plan. Source localization relative to the patient’s anatomy is determined with solenoid sensors whose spatial positions are measured with an electromagnetic tracking system. Precise sensor dwell position determination is of utmost importance to assure irradiation of the cancerous tissue according to the treatment plan. We present a hybrid data analysis system which combines multi-dimensional scaling with particle filters to precisely determine sensor dwell positions in the catheters during subsequent radiation treatment sessions. Both techniques are complemented with empirical mode decomposition for the removal of superimposed breathing artifacts. We show that the hybrid model robustly and reliably determines the spatial positions of all catheters used during the treatment and precisely determines any deviations of actual sensor dwell positions from the treatment plan. The hybrid system only relies on sensor positions measured with an EMT system and relates them to the spatial positions of the implanted catheters as initially determined with a computed x-ray tomography.

  15. Two-piece customized mold technique for high-dose-rate brachytherapy on cancers of the buccal mucosa and lip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Hidenobu; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Hara, Marina; Unetsubo, Teruhisa; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Katsui, Kuniaki; Katayama, Norihisa; Yoshio, Kotaro; Takenobu, Toshihiko; Kuroda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Asaumi, Jun-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using a customized mold is a minimally invasive treatment for oral cancer; however, it is difficult to use this technique for buccal and lip cancers involving the commissura labiorum, owing to its anatomic form. The purpose of this study was to introduce an improved customized mold consisting of 2 pieces to allow the fixation of molds to these sites. Five patients with buccal carcinoma and 1 patient with lip carcinoma were treated with this technique after external beam radiotherapy. One patient with neck metastasis underwent both neck dissection and partial tumor resection before HDR brachytherapy. At the end of the follow-up period, 5 patients had no tumor recurrence, and 1 patient had suffered local recurrence. Our technique is a viable therapeutic option for patients with buccal and lip carcinomas for whom the therapeutic modalities are limited by age, performance status, and other factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementation of the global risk analysis in pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy: methods and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, R; Aguini, N; Rivin Del Campo, E; Dumas, I; Gensse, M-C; Brusadin, G; Lefkopoulos, D; Deutsch, E; Haie-Meder, C

    2015-04-01

    To report the application of the global risk analysis (GRA) in the pulsed-dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy workflow. Analyses were led by a multidisciplinary working group established within the unit with the guidance of a quality engineer. First, a mapping of hazardous situations was developed as a result of interactions between the patient workflow for a treatment using PDR brachytherapy split into 51 sub-phases with a comprehensive list of the hazards that he/she faces (44). Interactions, when relevant, were sorted by level of priority: to be treated immediately, secondarily (the group is not entitled to treat the situation), or later (safe situation). Secondly, for each high priority dangerous situation, scenarios were developed to anticipate their potential consequences. Criticality was assessed, using likelihood and severity scales and a matrix, which allocated risks into categories: acceptable (C1), tolerable under control (C2) and unacceptable (C3). Then, corrective actions were proposed and planned when relevant, after assessment of their feasibility with a scale of effort. Finally, the criticality of the scenarios was reevaluated, taking into account the implementation of these actions, leading to a residual risk mapping, which could trigger additional proposals of actions. Two thousand one hundred and eighty-four potential interactions between the list of hazards and the workflow were analyzed. Mapping of dangerous situations identified 213 relevant interactions, from which 61 were considered with high priority. One hundred and twenty-six scenarios were generated: 68 with a low criticality (74.3%), 58 with an intermediate score (25.7%). No scenario with the highest criticality was individualized. Twenty-one corrective actions were planned. Mapping of residual risk resulted in the disappearance of most C2 risks, leaving 5 C2 scenarios (4%), for which four monitoring indicators were implemented in addition to the corrected actions decided on. The

  17. Simple DVH parameter addition as compared to deformable registration for bladder dose accumulation in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Else Stougård; Noe, Karsten Østergaaard; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Variations in organ position, shape, and volume cause uncertainties in dose assessment for brachytherapy (BT) in cervix cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate uncertainties associated with bladder dose accumulation based on DVH parameter addition (previously...... called "the worst case assumption") in fractionated BT. Materials and methods: Forty-seven patients treated for locally advanced cervical cancer were included. All patients received EBRT combined with two individually planned 3D image-guided adaptive BT fractions. D2 and D0.1 were estimated by DVH...

  18. Bladder accumulated dose in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer and its relation to urinary toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariaee, Roja; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Brown, Colin J.; Gaudet, Marc; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Spadinger, Ingrid

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate locally accumulated dose to the bladder in multi-fraction high-dose-date (HDR) image-guided intracavitary brachytherapy (IG-ICBT) for cervical cancer, and study the locally-accumulated dose parameters as predictors of late urinary toxicity. A retrospective study of 60 cervical cancer patients who received five HDR IG-ICBT sessions was performed. The bladder outer and inner surfaces were segmented for all sessions and a bladder-wall contour point-set was created in MATLAB. The bladder-wall point-sets for each patient were registered using a deformable point-set registration toolbox called coherent point drift (CPD), and the fraction doses were accumulated. Various dosimetric and volumetric parameters were calculated using the registered doses, including r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum dose to the most exposed n-cm3 volume of bladder wall), r V n Gy (wall volume receiving at least m Gy), and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} (minimum equivalent biologically weighted dose to the most exposed n-cm3 of bladder wall), where n  =  1/2/5/10 and m  =  3/5/10. Minimum dose to contiguous 1 and 2 cm3 hot-spot volumes was also calculated. The unregistered dose volume histogram (DVH)-summed equivalent of r{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} and r\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} parameters (i.e. s{{\\text{D}}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}\\text{3}}}} and s\\text{EQD}{{2}n \\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} ) were determined for comparison. Late urinary toxicity was assessed using the LENT-SOMA scale, with toxicity Grade 0-1 categorized as Controls and Grade 2-4 as Cases. A two-sample t-test was used to identify the differences between the means of Control and Case groups for all parameters. A binomial logistic regression was also performed between the registered dose parameters and toxicity grouping. Seventeen patients were in the Case and 43 patients in the Control group. Contiguous

  19. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, high-dose rate brachytherapy, and low-dose rate permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruijie; Zhao, Nan; Liao, Anyan; Wang, Hao; Qu, Ang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric and radiobiological differences among volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, and low-dose rate (LDR) permanent seeds implant for localized prostate cancer. A total of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer were selected for this study. VMAT, HDR brachytherapy, and LDR permanent seeds implant plans were created for each patient. For VMAT, planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the clinical target volume plus a margin of 5mm. Rectum, bladder, urethra, and femoral heads were considered as organs at risk. A 78Gy in 39 fractions were prescribed for PTV. For HDR and LDR plans, the dose prescription was D90 of 34Gy in 8.5Gy per fraction, and 145Gy to clinical target volume, respectively. The dose and dose volume parameters were evaluated for target, organs at risk, and normal tissue. Physical dose was converted to dose based on 2-Gy fractions (equivalent dose in 2Gy per fraction, EQD2) for comparison of 3 techniques. HDR and LDR significantly reduced the dose to rectum and bladder compared with VMAT. The Dmean (EQD2) of rectum decreased 22.36Gy in HDR and 17.01Gy in LDR from 30.24Gy in VMAT, respectively. The Dmean (EQD2) of bladder decreased 6.91Gy in HDR and 2.53Gy in LDR from 13.46Gy in VMAT. For the femoral heads and normal tissue, the mean doses were also significantly reduced in both HDR and LDR compared with VMAT. For the urethra, the mean dose (EQD2) was 80.26, 70.23, and 104.91Gy in VMAT, HDR, and LDR brachytherapy, respectively. For localized prostate cancer, both HDR and LDR brachytherapy were clearly superior in the sparing of rectum, bladder, femoral heads, and normal tissue compared with VMAT. HDR provided the advantage in sparing of urethra compared with VMAT and LDR. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of organ doses for patients undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or electronic sources using Monte Carlo simulations in a heterogeneous human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mille, Matthew M.; Xu, X. George; Rivard, Mark J. [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers. The radiation can be delivered using a conventional high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir gamma-emitting source or a novel electronic brachytherapy (eBx) source which uses lower energy x rays that do not penetrate as far within the patient. A previous study [A. Dickler, M. C. Kirk, N. Seif, K. Griem, K. Dowlatshahi, D. Francescatti, and R. A. Abrams, ''A dosimetric comparison of MammoSite high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy,'' Brachytherapy 6, 164-168 (2007)] showed that the target dose is similar for HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx. This study compares these sources based on the dose received by healthy organs and tissues away from the treatment site. Methods: A virtual patient with left breast cancer was represented by a whole-body, tissue-heterogeneous female voxel phantom. Monte Carlo methods were used to calculate the dose to healthy organs in a virtual patient undergoing balloon brachytherapy of the left breast with HDR {sup 192}Ir or eBx sources. The dose-volume histograms for a few organs which received large doses were also calculated. Additional simulations were performed with all tissues in the phantom defined as water to study the effect of tissue inhomogeneities. Results: For both HDR {sup 192}Ir and eBx, the largest mean organ doses were received by the ribs, thymus gland, left lung, heart, and sternum which were close to the brachytherapy source in the left breast. eBx yielded mean healthy organ doses that were more than a factor of {approx}1.4 smaller than for HDR {sup 192}Ir for all organs considered, except for the three closest ribs. Excluding these ribs, the average and median dose-reduction factors were {approx}28 and {approx}11, respectively. The volume distribution of doses in nearby soft tissue organs that were outside the PTV were also

  1. Development and evaluation of an automatic interstitial catheter digitization tool for adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dise, Joseph; Liang, Xing; Scheuermann, Joshua; Anamalayil, Shibu; Mesina, Carmen; Lin, Lilie L; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To develop and evaluate an automatic interstitial catheter digitization algorithm for use in adaptive high-dose-rate brachytherapy for gynecologic cancers using the Syed-Neblett template. We developed an automatic catheter digitization tool, which uses a region growing algorithm in conjunction with a spline model of the catheters. Seed locations were selected in each catheter for the region growing algorithm. The region growing was constrained by a spline model of the catheters, which prevents intercatheter crossover or incorrect digitization due to air pockets. Plan reoptimization was performed on successive day computed tomography scans using dwell positions for the Day 1 computed tomography. This method was applied to 10 patients who had received high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy using the Syed-Neblett template. The prescribed dose was 18.75 or 20 Gy delivered in five fractions, twice daily, and more than 3 consecutive days. Dosimetric comparisons were made between automatically and manually digitized plans. The region growing algorithm was able to successfully digitize all catheters. The mean difference between automatic and manually digitized positions was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. No significant difference was found in dosimetric parameters between the automatic and manually digitized plans. The mean D90% of the clinical target volume over all 3 days of treatment of the manual vs. reoptimized automatic plans was 94.3 ± 6.58% and 92.32 ± 8.34%, respectively (p = 0.50). The algorithm discussed in this article is the first developed for adaptive interstitial brachytherapy for a large number of catheters (14 on average). The algorithm has future potential in digitization quality assurance. A region growing algorithm was developed to automatically digitize interstitial catheters in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. This automatic digitization tool was shown to be accurate compared with manual digitization. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society

  2. Outcomes Associated With 3 Treatment Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Maha Saada; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Ye, Hong; Wallace, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro [Michigan HealthCare Professionals/21" s" t Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: DKrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We report the outcomes associated with 3 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens used as monotherapy for favorable-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Four hundred ninety-four patients with stage ≤T2b prostate cancer, Gleason score ≤7, and prostate-specific antigen levels ≤15 ng/mL underwent HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy. Of those, 319 received 38 Gy in 4 fractions, 79 received 24 Gy in 2 fractions, and 96 received 27 Gy in 2 fractions. Acute and chronic genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were defined as side effects occurring ≤6 and >6 months, respectively, after radiation therapy (RT) and were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The time to toxicity was calculated from the date of RT completion. Variables were analyzed with χ{sup 2} test. P values <.05 were considered significant. Results: The median overall follow-up time was 4 years (range, 5.5, 3.5, and 2.5 years for 38 Gy, 24 Gy, and 27 Gy, respectively, P<.001). Acute and chronic grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity profiles were similar among groups. Acceptable rates of grade 2 GU toxicities were seen with overall acute/chronic frequency/urgency, dysuria, retention, incontinence, and hematuria rates of 14%/20%, 6%/7%, 7%/4%, 1.5%/2%, and 1.5%/7%, respectively. Minimal grade 3 and no grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. Grade 1, 2, and 3 chronic urethral stricture rates were 0.3%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. All GI toxicities were similar between groups, with overall rates of acute/chronic grade 2 diarrhea, rectal pain/tenesmus, rectal bleeding, and proctitis of 1%/1%, <1%/0.5%, 0%/2%, and <1%/1%, respectively. No grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicities were seen. All comparisons were similar for hormone-naïve patients. The median time to maximal GU/GI toxicity was similar between groups, ranging from 1 to 1.6 to 0.9 to 1.2 years, respectively. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the 3 groups at 5

  3. SU-G-TeP4-05: An Evaluation of a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure Using a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheong, S-K; Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is the application of a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to access the risks for patients undergoing a Low Dose Rate (LDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Treatment. Methods: FMEA was applied to identify all the sub processes involved in the stages of identifying patient, source handling, treatment preparation, treatment delivery, and post treatment. These processes characterize the radiation treatment associated with LDR Prostate Brachytherapy. The potential failure modes together with their causes and effects were identified and ranked in order of their importance. Three indexes were assigned for each failure mode: the occurrence rating (O), the severity rating (S), and the detection rating (D). A ten-point scale was used to score each category, ten being the number indicating most severe, most frequent, and least detectable failure mode, respectively. The risk probability number (RPN) was calculated as a product of the three attributes: RPN = O X S x D. The analysis was carried out by a working group (WG) at UPMC. Results: The total of 56 failure modes were identified including 32 modes before the treatment, 13 modes during the treatment, and 11 modes after the treatment. In addition to the protocols already adopted in the clinical practice, the prioritized risk management will be implanted to the high risk procedures on the basis of RPN score. Conclusion: The effectiveness of the FMEA method was established. The FMEA methodology provides a structured and detailed assessment method for the risk analysis of the LDR Prostate Brachytherapy Procedure and can be applied to other radiation treatment modes.

  4. High dose-rate brachytherapy as a treatment option in primary tracheal tumors Braquiterapia de alta taxa de dose como opção terapêutica nos tumores primários da traquéia

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    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To present experience with high dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of primary tracheal tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four patients with nonresected primary tracheal tumors are presented: 2 cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the trachea, 1 of recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma, and 1 with recurrent plasmacytoma. All received brachytherapy, alone or as a boost for primary irradiation, in 3 or 4 fractions of 7.5 Gy, calculated at a depth of 1 cm. Follow-up was considered to start from the end of brachytherapy. RESULTS: Local control was achieved in all cases at the time of first bronchoscopic evaluation. Two patients with squamous cell carcinoma died at 6th and 33rd months after brachytherapy, respectively. The first had no evidence of disease, and the latter had local recurrence. The other 2 patients were alive after 64 and 110 months of follow-up, respectively, both with no evidence of disease. Tracheal stenosis developed in these 2 cases, 22 and 69 months after brachytherapy. Tracheal stent placement was needed only for the patient with an adenoid cystic carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: Endobronchial high dose-rate brachytherapy may be used for tracheal tumors, even as a boost for external beam irradiation, or in recurrences. Local control in 3 out of 4 patients indicates that individual cases may benefit from the treatment. Long-term survival may also be expected, mainly for tumors with adenoid cystic histology.OBJETIVO: Apresentar a experiência do tratamento de 4 pacientes com tumores primários de traquéia, não operados, submetidos à braquiterapia endobrônquica de alta taxa de dose. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Dois casos de carcinoma espinocelular, uma recidiva de carcinoma adenóide cístico e uma recidiva de plasmocitoma primário da traquéia. Todos receberam braquiterapia endobrônquica, exclusiva ou como reforço de dose da radioterapia externa. Foram administradas 3 ou 4 frações de 7,5 Gy cada, calculados a 1 cm de

  5. SU-F-T-09: In Phantom Full-Implant Validation of Plastic Scintillation Detectors for in Vivo Dosimetry During Low Dose Rate Brachytherapy

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    Therriault-Proulx, F; Bruno, T; Beddar, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Beaulieu, L [CHU de Quebec, Quebec, QC, CA (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate in a water phantom the use of plastic scintillation detectors to measure dose to the urethra and the rectal wall during a clinically realistic low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy implant. Methods: A template was designed to replicate a clinically realistic LDR brachytherapy prostate implant inside a water phantom. Twenty-two catheters were inserted, including one mimicking the urethra and another the rectal wall. The needles inserted in the remaining 20 catheters were composed of thin-walled nylon tubes in which I-125 radioactive seeds (Air Kerma Strengths of (0.328±0.020)U) were abutted together with plastic spacers to replicate a typical loading. A plastic scintillation detector (PSD) with a 5-mm long × 1-mm diameter sensitive element was first placed inside the urethra and 1-second measurements were performed for 60s after each needle implant. Measurements were also performed at multiple positions along the urethra once all the needles were inserted. The procedure was then repeated with the PSD placed at the rectal wall. Results: Individual dose-rates ranging from 0.07µGy/s to 1.5µGy/s were measured after each needle implant. The average absolute relative differences were (6.2±3.6)% and (6.9±6.5)% to the values calculated with the TG-43 formalism, for the urethra and rectal wall respectively. These results are within expectations from the error uncertainty budget once accounting for uncertainties in seeds’ strength and positioning. Interestingly, the PSD allowed for unplanned error detection as the study was performed. Finally, the measured dose after the full implant at different positions along the mimicked organs at risk were in agreement with TG-43 values for all of the positions tested. Conclusion: Plastic scintillation detectors could be used as in vivo detectors for LDR brachytherapy as they would provide accurate dose information after each needle implant as well as along the organs at risk at the end of the implant.

  6. External beam radiation and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma

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    Wei Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 96 elderly patients with gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma (GEJAC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT with or without chemotherapy. Material and methods: From January 2002 to November 2012, 96 patients with GEJAC underwent treatment. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in 2 to 5 fractions, with 1 fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 40-54 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 4 to 5.5 weeks with normal fraction. Results: The median survival time for the 96 patients was 15.3 months, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates of overall survival (OS were 62.5%, 33.7%, 20.1%, and 7.9%, respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year rates for local-regional control (LRC were 78.7%, 57.9%, 41.8%, and 26.4%, respectively. The patients’ age was an independent factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.006 and LRC (p = 0.0005, according to univariate analysis. The 3-year OS (LRC was 31.9% (62.9% for patients aged 70-74 years and 16.1% (19.5% for patients aged ≥ 75 years. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (5.2% patients experienced fistula and 7 (7.3% experienced massive bleeding. Conclusions: The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with GEJAC, and that the side effects were tolerable. The patient’s age could be used to select the appropriate treatment in an elderly patient.

  7. Preliminary report of pulsed dose rate brachytherapy in head-and-neck cancer

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    Ziemlewski, A.; Zienkiewicz, J. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Serkies, K.; Badzio, A. [Medical Univ. of Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and acute/delayed toxicity of pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR BT) in head-and-neck tumors. Patients and Methods: 45 head and neck cancer patients underwent interstitial or contact PDR BT at a dose of 10.2-70 Gy (median, 70 Gy) and 0.6 or 1.0 Gy/pulse/h. 42 patients were administered BT as part of their curative treatment; 32 of them had sole BT. Three reirradiated patients with recurrent tumor had palliative BT. Results: PDR BT was well tolerated. Intense bleeding was the only complication associated with catheter removal from the tongue and bucca. 44 patients who completed BT experienced acute mucositis. Grade 3 toxicity of skin and oral mucosa occurred in three (6.8%) and six patients (13.6%), respectively. At a median follow-up of 22 months (range, 2-67 months), late serious toxicity (grade 4, for soft tissue and bone) was seen in seven patients (15.9%). Among the parameters analyzed, only dental care performed before BT had a significant impact on mucosal side effects. Acute severe mucositis was observed in 23% of patients without dental care compared to 0% of those with dental care (p = 0.044). Late severe mucositis occurred in 17.7% and 26.9% of the respective patients (p = 0.035), overall in 23%. The larger the volume encompassed by the reference isodose, the more late (p = 0.004) mucosal reactions were observed. Conclusion: PDR BT continued over a few days is a feasible and safe approach in head-and-neck tumors; however, it is accompanied by some toxicity. Dental care should precede isotope application. (orig.)

  8. Second salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for radiorecurrent prostate cancer

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    Metha Maenhout

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Salvage treatments for localized radiorecurrent prostate cancer can be performed safely when a focal and image guided approach is used. Due to the low toxicity, the opportunity exists to investigate a second salvage treatment when a second locally recurrent prostate cancer occurs. Here, we describe a second salvage treatment procedure of 4 patients. Material and methods : Four patients with a pathologically proven second local recurrence were treated in an outpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided setting with a single fraction of 19 Gy focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT. Delineation was performed using choline-PET-CT or a 68Ga-PSMA PET in combination with multiparametric 3 Tesla MRI in all four patients. Toxicity was measured using common toxicity criteria for adverse events (CTCAE version 4.0. Results : With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-15, there were 2 patients with biochemical recurrence as defined by the Phoenix-definition. There were no patients with grade 3 or more toxicity. In all second salvage HDR-BT treatments, the constraints for rectum, bladder, and urethra were met. Median treatment volume (GTV was 4.8 cc (range, 1.9-6.6 cc. A median of 8 catheters (range, 6-9 were used, and the median dose to the treatment volume (GTV was a D95: 19.3 Gy (SD 15.5-19.4 Gy. Conclusions : Second focal salvage MRI-guided HDR-BT for a select group of patients with a second locally recurrent prostate cancer is feasible. There was no grade 3 or more acute toxicity for these four patients.

  9. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  10. Absorbed dose calculations using mesh-based human phantoms and Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Richard [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Full text. Health risks attributable to ionizing radiation are considered to be a function of the absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. However, as human tissue cannot express itself in terms of absorbed dose, exposure models have to be used to determine the distribution of absorbed dose throughout the human body. An exposure model, be it physical or virtual, consists of a representation of the human body, called phantom, plus a method for transporting ionizing radiation through the phantom and measuring or calculating the absorbed dose to organ and tissues of interest. Female Adult meSH (FASH) and the Male Adult meSH (MASH) virtual phantoms have been developed at the University of Pernambuco in Recife/Brazil based on polygon mesh surfaces using open source software tools. Representing standing adults, FASH and MASH have organ and tissue masses, body height and mass adjusted to the anatomical data published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the reference male and female adult. For the purposes of absorbed dose calculations the phantoms have been coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code, which transports photons, electrons and positrons through arbitrary media. This presentation reports on the development of the FASH and the MASH phantoms and will show dosimetric applications for X-ray diagnosis and for prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  11. SU-F-T-38: How Much Dose Is Given in MR Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy with the Ring and Tandem Applicators?

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    Zhang, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric metrics of HDR Ring and Tandem applicator Brachytherapy for primary cervical cancers. Methods: The dosimetric metrics of high-risk clinical target volumes (HDR-CTV) of 12 patients (in total 60 fractions/plans) treated with the HDR ring and tandem applicators were retrospectively analyzed. Ring diameter is from 2.6 to 3.4 cm, tandem length is from 4 to 6 cm, and the angle is either 45 or 60 degrees. The first fraction plan was MR guided, the MR images were then used as a reference for contouring the HR-CTV in CT images of following 4 fractions. The nominal prescription dose was between 5.2 and 5.8 Gy at the point A. The plans were adjusted to cover at least 90% of the HR-CTV by 90% of the prescription dose and to reduce the doses to the bladder, rectum and bowel-bag. Minimum target dose of D100 and D90 were converted into the biologically equivalent EBRT dose D90-iso and D100-iso (using α/β=10 Gy, 2 Gy/fx). Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) based on the average cancer killing across the target volume were calculated by the modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) from the differential dose volume histogram (DVH) tables. Results: The average D90iso of all plans is 8.1 Gy (ranging from 6.2 to 15 Gy, median 7.8 Gy); the average D100iso is just 4.1 Gy (ranging from 1.8 to 7.8 Gy; median 3.9 Gy). The average EUD is 7.0 Gy (ranging from 6.1 to 9.6 Gy, median 6.9 Gy), which is 87% of the D90iso, and 170% of the D100iso. Conclusion: The EUDs is smaller than D90iso but greater than D100iso. Because the EUD takes into account the intensive cancer cell killing in the high dose zone of HR-CTV, MLQ calculated EUD apparently is more relevant than D90 and D100 to describe the HDR brachytherapy treatment quality.

  12. Neither high-dose nor low-dose brachytherapy increases flap morbidity in salvage treatment of recurrent head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Henderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While brachytherapy is often used concurrently with flap reconstruction following surgical ablation for head and neck cancer, it remains unclear whether it increases morbidity in the particularly high risk subset of patients undergoing salvage treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer (RH&NC. Material and methods : A retrospective chart review was undertaken that evaluated patients with RH&NC who underwent flap coverage after surgical re-resection and concomitant brachytherapy. The primary endpoint was flap viability, and the secondary endpoints were flap and recipient site complications. Results : In the 23 subjects included in series, flap viability and skin graft take was 100%. Overall recipient site complication rate was 34.8%, high-dose radiation (HDR group 50%, and low-dose radiation (LDR group 29.4%. There was no statistically significant difference between these groups. Conclusions : In patients who undergo flap reconstruction and immediate postoperative radiotherapy following salvage procedures for RH&NC, flap coverage of defects in combination with brachytherapy remains a safe and effective means of providing stable soft tissue coverage.

  13. Perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy for soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Deo, S V Suryanarayana; Rath, Goura Kisor; Shukla, Nootan Kumar; Bakhshi, Sameer; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of perioperative high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (PHDRIBT) in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in patients with localized soft tissue sarcoma (STS). From year 2004 to 2010, 52 patients with localized STS were treated with wide local excision plus PHDRIBT followed by EBRT. Median size of the tumor was 8 cm (range, 4-19 cm). A single-plane interstitial brachytherapy implant with an average of nine catheters was performed during the surgical resection. The PHDRIBT was started on third postoperative day to deliver a high-dose-rate dose of 16 Gy in four fractions over 2 days using twice-a-day fractionation schedule. After 4 weeks, EBRT was started for a prescription dose of 50 Gy by conventional fractionation. Subsequently, chemotherapy was administered, if indicated as per our institutional policy. Patients were followed up regularly to study local control, survival, and toxicity. At a median followup of 46 months, no patient developed local recurrence, but 12 patients developed distant metastases. The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival were 67% and 63%, respectively. Main acute toxicity was delayed wound healing observed in 3 patients (5.7%). Commonest late toxicity was chronic skin/subcutaneous fibrosis noticed in 5 patients (9.6%). The PHDRIBT combined with EBRT provides excellent local control and survival rates with acceptable acute and late toxicity in patients with localized STS. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

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    Paweł Cisek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods : The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR bra­chytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy. Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results: Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90 was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2 median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months, 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher. Conclusions : Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy.

  15. Validation of GPU based TomoTherapy dose calculation engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Lu, Weiguo; Chen, Yu; Chen, Mingli; Henderson, Douglas; Sterpin, Edmond

    2012-04-01

    The graphic processing unit (GPU) based TomoTherapy convolution/superposition(C/S) dose engine (GPU dose engine) achieves a dramatic performance improvement over the traditional CPU-cluster based TomoTherapy dose engine (CPU dose engine). Besides the architecture difference between the GPU and CPU, there are several algorithm changes from the CPU dose engine to the GPU dose engine. These changes made the GPU dose slightly different from the CPU-cluster dose. In order for the commercial release of the GPU dose engine, its accuracy has to be validated. Thirty eight TomoTherapy phantom plans and 19 patient plans were calculated with both dose engines to evaluate the equivalency between the two dose engines. Gamma indices (Γ) were used for the equivalency evaluation. The GPU dose was further verified with the absolute point dose measurement with ion chamber and film measurements for phantom plans. Monte Carlo calculation was used as a reference for both dose engines in the accuracy evaluation in heterogeneous phantom and actual patients. The GPU dose engine showed excellent agreement with the current CPU dose engine. The majority of cases had over 99.99% of voxels with Γ(1%, 1 mm) GPU dose engine also showed similar degree of accuracy in heterogeneous media as the current TomoTherapy dose engine. It is verified and validated that the ultrafast TomoTherapy GPU dose engine can safely replace the existing TomoTherapy cluster based dose engine without degradation in dose accuracy.

  16. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as salvage modality for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Georgios; Zamboglou, Nikolaos; Roedel, Claus; Tselis, Nikolaos [J.W. Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Zoga, Eleni [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Strouthos, Iosif [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Butt, Saeed Ahmed [Sana Klinikum Offenbach, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Offenbach am Main (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    To review the current status of interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a salvage modality (sHDR BRT) for locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive radiotherapy (RT). A literature search was performed in PubMed using ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' as search terms. In all, 51 search results published between 2000 and 2016 were identified. Data tables were generated and summary descriptions created. The main outcome parameters used were biochemical control (BC) and toxicity scores. Eleven publications reported clinical outcome and toxicity with follow-up ranging from 4-191 months. A variety of dose and fractionation schedules were described, including 19.0 Gy in 2 fractions up to 42.0 Gy in 6 fractions. The 5-year BC ranged from 18-77%. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was 0-32% and 0-5.1%, respectively. sHDR BRT appears as safe and effective salvage modality for the reirradiation of locally recurrent prostate cancer after definitive RT. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassende Darstellung relevanter Literatur zur interstitiellen High-Dose-Rate-Brachytherapie als Salvage-Modalitaet (sHDR-BRT) bei der Behandlung des lokal rezidivierten Prostatakarzinoms nach vorausgegangener definitiver Radiotherapie (RT). In der PubMed-Datenbank wurde eine Literaturrecherche mit den Suchbegriffen ''high-dose-rate, brachytherapy, prostate cancer, salvage'' durchgefuehrt. Zwischen den Jahren 2000 und 2016 wurden 51 Publikationen identifiziert. Die biochemische Kontrolle (BC) sowie das assoziierte Toxizitaetsprofil waren onkologische Hauptpunkte in der Analyse der beruecksichtigten Literatur. Von onkologischen Ergebnissen und Toxizitaeten berichteten 11 Publikationen bei einer medianen Nachbeobachtungszeit von 4-191 Monaten. Eine Variabilitaet von Dosis- und Fraktionierungsregimen wurde beschrieben mit totalen physikalischen Dosen von 19,0 Gy in 2 Fraktionen bis zu 42,0 Gy in 6 Fraktionen

  17. Radioablation of liver malignancies with interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Complications and risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohnike, Konrad; Wolf, Steffen; Damm, Robert; Seidensticker, Max; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Fischbach, Frank; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany); Peters, Nils; Hass, Peter; Gademann, Guenther [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg A.oe.R., Magdeburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate complications and identify risk factors for adverse events in patients undergoing high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (iBT). Data from 192 patients treated in 343 CT- or MRI-guided interventions from 2006-2009 at our institution were analyzed. In 41 %, the largest tumor treated was ≥ 5 cm, 6 % of the patients had tumors ≥ 10 cm. Prior to iBT, 60 % of the patients had chemotherapy, 22 % liver resection, 19 % thermoablation or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Safety was the primary endpoint; survival data were obtained as the secondary endpoints. During follow-up, MRI or CT imaging was performed and clinical and laboratory parameters were obtained. The rate of major complications was below 5 %. Five major bleedings (1.5 %) occurred. The frequency of severe bleeding was significantly higher in patients with advanced liver cirrhosis. One patient developed signs of a nonclassic radiation-induced liver disease. In 3 patients, symptomatic gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers were detected. A dose exposure to the GI wall above 14 Gy/ml was a reliable threshold to predict ulcer formation. A combination of C-reactive protein ≥ 165 mg/l and/or leukocyte count ≥ 12.7 Gpt/l on the second day after the intervention predicted infection (sensitivity 90.0 %; specificity 92.8 %.) Two patients (0.6 %) died within 30 days. Median overall survival after the first liver treatment was 20.1 months for all patients and the local recurrence-free surviving proportion was 89 % after 12 months. Image-guided iBT yields a low rate of major complications and is effective. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Komplikationsrate und Identifizierung von Risikofaktoren fuer Komplikationen und Nebenwirkungen bei Patienten mit Lebermalignomen, die mit der hochdosierten interstitiellen Brachytherapie (iBT) behandelt wurden. Von 2006 bis 2009 wurden 192 Patienten in 343 CT- oder MRT-gefuehrten Interventionen behandelt und deren Daten ausgewertet. Der groesste behandelte Tumor war in

  18. Tandem-ring dwell time ratio in Nigeria: dose comparisons of two loading patterns in standard high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibhade, Obed Rachel; Oyeyemi, Oyekunle Emmanuel; Idayat, Akinlade Bidemi; Atara I, Ntekim

    2015-04-01

    In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT), the source dwell times and dwell positions are essential treatment planning parameters. An optimal choice of these factors is fundamental to obtain the desired target coverage with the lowest achievable dose to the organs at risk (OARs). This study evaluates relevant dose parameters in cervix brachytherapy in order to assess existing tandem-ring dwell time ratio used at the first HDR BT center in Nigeria, and compare it with an alternative source loading pattern. At the Radiotherapy Department, University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria, a total of 370 standard treatment plans in two alternative sets were generated with HDR basic 2.6 software for one hundred and eighty five cervical cancer patients. The initial 185 individual plans were created for clinical treatment using the tandem-ring dwell time ratio of 1 : 1. Modifying the initial applicator loading ratio, the second set of plans with related dose data were also obtained for study purposes only. Total reference air kerma (TRAK), total time index (TTI), ICRU volume, treatment time, point B dose, ICRU bladder dose, and rectal points dose were evaluated for both sets of plans. The means of all evaluated dose parameters decreased when the existing tandem-ring dwell time ratio (1 : 1) was modified to other dwell weightings (1 : 1 - 3 : 1). These reductions were 13.43% (ICRU volume), 9.83% (rectal dose), 6.68% (point B dose), 6.08% (treatment time), 5.90% (TRAK), 5.88% (TTI), and 1.08% (bladder dose). Correspondingly, coefficients of variation changed by -7.98%, -5.02%, -5.23%, -4.20%, -3.93%, 8.65%, and 3.96% from the existing pattern to the alternative one. Tandem-ring dwell time ratio has significant influence on dosimetric parameters. This study has indicated the need to modify the existing planning approach at UCH.

  19. 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound system for high-dose-rate interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy needle guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jessica R.; Surry, Kathleen; D'Souza, David; Leung, Eric; Fenster, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for gynaecological cancers often includes brachytherapy; in particular, in high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy, hollow needles are inserted into the tumour and surrounding area through a template in order to deliver the radiation dose. Currently, there is no standard modality for visualizing needles intra-operatively, despite the need for precise needle placement in order to deliver the optimal dose and avoid nearby organs, including the bladder and rectum. While three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging has been proposed for 3D intra-operative needle guidance, anterior needles tend to be obscured by shadowing created by the template's vaginal cylinder. We have developed a 360-degree 3D transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) system that uses a conventional two-dimensional side-fire TRUS probe rotated inside a hollow vaginal cylinder made from a sonolucent plastic (TPX). The system was validated using grid and sphere phantoms in order to test the geometric accuracy of the distance and volumetric measurements in the reconstructed image. To test the potential for visualizing needles, an agar phantom mimicking the geometry of the female pelvis was used. Needles were inserted into the phantom and then imaged using the 3D TVUS system. The needle trajectories and tip positions in the 3D TVUS scan were compared to their expected values and the needle tracks visualized in magnetic resonance images. Based on this initial study, 360-degree 3D TVUS imaging through a sonolucent vaginal cylinder is a feasible technique for intra-operatively visualizing needles during HDR interstitial gynaecological brachytherapy.

  20. The usefulness of fleet rectal enemas on high-dose-rate intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Andres

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during radical high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary cervical brachytherapy (BT. Material and methods : Twenty patients suffering from cervical cancer and treated with external beam radiotherapy and HDR-BT were included in a prospective trial. The first brachytherapy fraction was considered the basal status, and patients were instructed to self-administer two rectal cleansing enemas before the second fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Brachytherapy was carried out with a Fletcher or Utrecht applicator. Results : No significant rectal volume differences were observed between fractions with or without rectal enemas (without, 52.64 ± 15.92 cc; with, 53.16 ± 19.28 cc. There was a significant correlation between both rectal volumes (r = 0.722, p = 0.001. No significant differences were observed in analyzed DVH parameters (median values: ΔD 0.1cc , 4.17 vs. 3.61 Gy; ΔD 1cc , 3.23 vs. 2.87 Gy; Δ D2cc , 2.9 vs. 2.54 Gy; ΔD 5cc , 2.35 vs. 2.05 Gy, for no enema and enema fraction, respectively. No significant rectal volume differences nor DVH parameter differences were observed according the applicator type. Conclusions : Our rectal enemas protocol prior to HDR-BT was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters. No differences were observed according to the type of applicator used.

  1. SU-G-201-11: Exploring the Upper Limits of Dose Sculpting Capacity of the Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Safigholi, H; Soliman, A [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore and quantify the upper limits in dose sculpting capacity of the novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator compared with conventional tandem design for {sup 192}Ir-based HDR planning. Methods: The proposed DMBT tandem applicator is designed for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT), especially MRI, of cervical cancer. It has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm width, grooved along a 5.4-mm diameter nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cc, capable of generating directional dose profiles – leading to enhanced dose sculpting capacity through inverse planning. The external dimensions are identical to that of conventional tandem design to ensure clinical compatibility. To explore the expansive dose sculpting capacity, we constructed a hypothetical circular target with 20-mm radius and positioned the DMBT and conventional tandems at the center. We then incrementally shifted the positions laterally away from the center of up to 15 mm, at 1-mm steps. The in-house coded gradient projection-based inverse planning system was then used to generate inverse optimized plans ensuring identical V100=100% coverage. Conformity index (CI) was calculated for all plans. Results: Overall, the DMBT tandem generates more conformal dose distributions than conventional tandem for all lateral positional shifts of 0-15 mm (CI=0.91–0.52 and 0.99–0.34, respectively), with an exception at the central position due to the ideal circular dose distribution, generated by the {sup 192}Ir, fitting tightly around the circular target (CI = 0.91 and 0.99, respectively). The DMBT tandem is able to generate dose conformity of CI>0.8 at up to 6-mm positional shift while the conventional tandem violates this past 2-mm shift. Also, the CI ratio (=DMBT/conv.) increases rapidly until about 8 mm and then stabilizes beyond. Conclusion: A substantial enhancement in the dose sculpting capacity has been demonstrated for the novel DMBT tandem applicator. While

  2. Class solution in inverse planned HDR prostate brachytherapy for dose escalation of DIL defined by combined MRI/MRSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Lessard, Etienne; Kurhanewicz, John; Noworolski, Susan Moyher; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To establish an inverse planning set of parameters (class solution) to boost dominant intra-prostatic lesion (DIL) defined by MRI/MRSI. Methods For 15 patients, DIL were contoured on CT or MR images and a class solution was developed to boost the DIL under the dosimetric requirements of the RTOG-0321 protocol. To determine the maximum attainable level of boost for each patient, 5 different levels were considered, at least 110%, 120%, 130%, 140% and 150% of the prescribed dose. The maximum attainable level was compared to the plan without boost using cumulative dose volume histogram (DVH). Results DIL dose escalation was feasible for 11/15 patients under the requirements. The planning target volume (PTV) dose was slightly increased, while the DIL dose was significantly increased without any violation of requirements. With slight adjustments of the dose constraint parameters, the dose escalation was feasible for 13/15 patients under requirements. Conclusion Using a class solution, a dose escalation of the MRI/MRSI defined DIL up to 150% while complying with RTOG dosimetric requirements is feasible. This HDR brachytherapy approach to dose escalation allows a significant dose increase to the tumor while maintaining an acceptable risk of complications. PMID:18083260

  3. Needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer evaluated by repeated MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buus, Simon; Lizondo, Maria; Hokland, Steffen; Rylander, Susanne; Pedersen, Erik M; Tanderup, Kari; Bentzen, Lise

    To quantify needle migration and dosimetric impact in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer and propose a threshold for needle migration. Twenty-four high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with an HDR boost of 2 × 8.5 Gy were included. Patients received an MRI for planning (MRI1), before (MRI2), and after treatment (MRI3). Time from needle insertion to MRI3 was ∼3 hours. Needle migration was evaluated from coregistered images: MRI1-MRI2 and MRI1-MRI3. Dose volume histogram parameters from the treatment plan based on MRI1 were related to parameters based on needle positions in MRI2 or MRI3. Regression was used to model the average needle migration per implant and change in D90 clinical target volume, CTV prostate+3mm . The model fit was used for estimating the dosimetric impact in equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy. Needle migration was on average 2.2 ± 1.8 mm SD from MRI1-MRI2 and 5.0 ± 3.0 mm SD from MRI1-MRI3. D90 CTV prostate+3mm was robust toward average needle migration ≤3 mm, whereas for migration >3 mm D90 decreased by 4.5% per mm. A 3 mm of needle migration resulted in a decrease of 0.9, 1.7, 2.3, 4.8, and 7.6 equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions for dose levels of 6, 8.5, 10, 15, and 19 Gy, respectively. Substantial needle migration in high-dose-rate brachytherapy occurs frequently in 1-3 hours following needle insertion. A 3-mm threshold of needle migration is proposed, but 2 mm may be considered for dose levels ≥15 Gy. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel adaptive needle insertion sequencing for robotic, single needle MR-guided high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borot de Battisti, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Maenhout, M.; Moerland, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has gained increasing interest as a treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer because of the superior value of MRI for tumor and surrounding tissues localization. To enable needle insertion into the prostate with the patient in the MR bore, a single needle MR-compatible robotic system involving needle-by-needle dose delivery has been developed at our institution. Throughout the intervention, dose delivery may be impaired by: (1) sub-optimal needle positioning caused by e.g. needle bending, (2) intra-operative internal organ motion such as prostate rotations or swelling, or intra-procedural rectum or bladder filling. This may result in failure to reach clinical constraints. To assess the first aforementioned challenge, a recent study from our research group demonstrated that the deposited dose may be greatly improved by real-time adaptive planning with feedback on the actual needle positioning. However, the needle insertion sequence is left to the doctor and therefore, this may result in sub-optimal dose delivery. In this manuscript, a new method is proposed to determine and update automatically the needle insertion sequence. This strategy is based on the determination of the most sensitive needle track. The sensitivity of a needle track is defined as its impact on the dose distribution in case of sub-optimal positioning. A stochastic criterion is thus presented to determine each needle track sensitivity based on needle insertion simulations. To assess the proposed sequencing strategy, HDR prostate brachytherapy was simulated on 11 patients with varying number of needle insertions. Sub-optimal needle positioning was simulated at each insertion (modeled by typical random angulation errors). In 91% of the scenarios, the dose distribution improved when the needle was inserted into the most compared to the least sensitive needle track. The computation time for sequencing was less than 6 s per needle track. The

  5. CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, Federico; Schreiber, Nadja; Schnapauff, Dirk; Denecke, Timm; Hamm, Bernd; Gebauer, Bernhard [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter [ChariteUniversitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Schott, Eckart [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Over a 6-year period, 98 patients with 212 unresectable HCC underwent CT-HDRBT applying a {sup 192}Ir source at our institution. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed 6 weeks after the intervention and then every 3 months. The primary endpoint was local tumor control (LTC); secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were available for MRI evaluation for a mean follow-up of 23.1 months (range 4-64 months; median 20 months). Mean tumor diameter was 5 cm (range 1.8-12 cm). Eighteen of 212 (8.5 %) tumors showed local progression after a mean LTC of 21.1 months. In all, 67 patients (68.4 %) experienced distant tumor progression. The mean PFS was 15.2 months. Forty-six patients died during the follow-up period. Median OS was 29.2 months. Actuarial 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 80, 62, and 46 %, respectively. CT-HDRBT is an effective therapy to attain local tumor control in patients with unresectable HCC. Prospective randomized studies comparing CT-HDRBT with the standard treatments like Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and chemoembolization (TACE) are mandatory. (orig.) [German] Zweck der vorliegenden Arbeit war die Analyse der klinischen Effektivitaet der CT-gesteuerten Hochdosis-Brachytherapie (CT-HDRBT) bei Patienten mit inoperablem hepatozellulaeren Karzinom (HCC). Ueber einen Zeitraum von 6 Jahren, wurden an unserer Klinik 98 Patienten mit 212 inoperablen HCC mittels CT-HDRBT mit {sup 192}Ir behandelt. MRT-Verlaufskontrollen erfolgten 6 Wochen nach der Intervention und dann alle 3 Monate. Primaerer Endpunkt der Studie war die lokale Tumorkontrolle (LTC); sekundaere Endpunkte waren das progressionsfreie Ueberleben (PFS) und Gesamtueberleben (OS). Die mittlere Nachbeobachtungszeit betrug 23,1 Monate (Spanne 4

  6. Nationwide, Multicenter, Retrospective Study on High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yoshioka@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Kotsuma, Tadayuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Komiya, Akira [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Department of Urology, Chiba University Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Kariya, Shinji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Konishi, Koji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nonomura, Norio [Department of Urology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, Eiichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Nishimura, Kensaku [Department of Urology, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Fujiuchi, Yasuyoshi; Kitamura, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Yamagami, Takuji [Department of Radiology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Yamasaki, Ichiro [Department of Urology, Kochi Medical School, Kochi (Japan); Nishimura, Kazuo [Department of Urology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Itami, Jun [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To present, analyze, and discuss results of a nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study on high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) as monotherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From 1995 through 2013, 524 patients, 73 (14%) with low-risk, 207 (40%) with intermediate-risk, and 244 (47%) with high-risk prostate cancer, were treated with HDR-BT as monotherapy at 5 institutions in Japan. Dose fractionations were 27 Gy/2 fractions for 69 patients (13%), 45.5 Gy/7 fractions for 168 (32%), 49 Gy/7 fractions for 149 (28%), 54 Gy/9 fractions for 130 (25%), and others for 8 (2%). Of these patients, 156 (30%) did not receive androgen deprivation therapy, and 202 patients (39%) did receive androgen deprivation therapy <1 year, 112 (21%) for 1-3 years, and 54 (10%) for >3 years. Median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range, 0.4-18.1 years), with a minimum of 2 years for surviving patients. Results: After 5 years, respective actuarial rates of no biochemical evidence of disease, overall survival, cause-specific survival, and metastasis-free survival for all patients were 92%, 97%, 99%, and 94%. For low/intermediate/high-risk patients, the 5-year no biochemical evidence of disease rates were 95%/94%/89%, the 5-year overall survival rates were 98%/98%/94%, the 5-year cause-specific survival rates were 98%/100%/98%, and the 5-year metastasis-free survival rates were 98%/95%/90%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of late grade 2 to 3 genitourinary toxicity at 5 years was 19%, and that of late grade 3 was 1%. The corresponding incidences of gastrointestinal toxicity were 3% and 0% (0.2%). No grade 4 or 5 of either type of toxicity was detected. Conclusions: The findings of this nationwide, multicenter, retrospective study demonstrate that HDR-BT as monotherapy was safe and effective for all patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk prostate cancer.

  7. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bailleux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods: From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Median age was 56.4 years (27-79. Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%, T3a = 1 pt (3%, T3b = 6 pts (18.2%, and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%. Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27. Median CTVCT (16 pts and HR-CTV MRI (17 pts were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3, 31.9 cc (17.1-58, respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5, 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4, respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9, 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4, and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1, respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51. Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pt, G3 infection = 2 pts, and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts, respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion; no bleeding was

  8. The influence of the dose calculation resolution of VMAT plans on the calculated dose for eye lens and optic apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Min; Park, So Yeon; Kim, Jung In; Kim, Jin Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong Gyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Since those organs are small in volume, dose calculation for those organs seems to be more susceptible to the calculation grid size in the treatment planning system (TPS). Moreover, since they are highly radio-sensitive organs, especially eye lens, they should be considered carefully for radiotherapy. On the other hand, in the treatment of head and neck (H and N) cancer or brain tumor that generally involves radiation exposure to eye lens and optic apparatus, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques are frequently used because of the proximity of various radio-sensitive normal organs to the target volumes. Since IMRT and VMAT can deliver prescription dose to target volumes while minimizing dose to nearby organs at risk (OARs) by generating steep dose gradients near the target volumes, high dose gradient sometimes occurs near or at the eye lenses and optic apparatus. In this case, the effect of dose calculation resolution on the accuracy of calculated dose to eye lens and optic apparatus might be significant. Therefore, the effect of dose calculation grid size on the accuracy of calculated doses for each eye lens and optic apparatus was investigated in this study. If an inappropriate calculation resolution was applied for dose calculation of eye lens and optic apparatus, considerable errors can be occurred due to the volume averaging effect in high dose gradient region.

  9. Advancements in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherapy makes it attractive for boosting limited size target volumes to very high doses while sparing normal tissues. Significant developments over the last decades have increased the use of 3D image guided procedures with the utilization of CT, MRI, US and PET. This has taken brachytherapy to a new level in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The influence of a rectal ultrasound probe on the separation between prostate and rectum in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Susanne; Buus, Simon; Bentzen, Lise; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Tanderup, Kari

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the distance between prostate and rectum as well as rectal dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy (BT) with and without a transrectal ultrasound (US) probe in place during delivery. The study included 20 patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated consecutively with combined external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and MRI-based HDR-BT. The MRI-based HDR-BT dose plan and prostate gland contour were transferred to the US images after rigid MRI/US coregistration, followed by delineation of the rectum on US images acquired with a transrectal US probe. The prostate-rectum separation was estimated at the apex, reference, and base plane on the US (with rectal probe) and MR images (without rectal probe). Rectal DVH parameters for EBRT + HDR-BT given in equivalent 2 Gy fractionation doses were estimated and compared for US-based and MRI-based HDR-BT dose planning. The median (and range) prostate-rectum separation increased on MR images (without rectal probe) as compared with on US images (with rectal probe) by 10 mm (-5, 18) at the base, 1 mm (-2, 3) at the reference and decreased at the apex by 2 mm (-5, 11). The rectal D5.0cm3, D2.0cm3, and D0.1cm3 decreased by a median of 4 Gy (-1, 10), 4 Gy (-2, 13), and 7 Gy (-4, 26), respectively. MRI-based HDR-BT without a rectal US probe in place as compared with US-based BT with the probe in place demonstrated a significant increase in the prostate-rectum separation, with a potential of reducing rectal dose. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of linear array MOSFET detectors for in vivo dosimetry to measure rectal dose in HDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, Aisling; Coalter, George; Mugabe, Koki

    2011-09-01

    The study aimed to assess the suitability of linear array metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor detectors (MOSFETs) as in vivo dosimeters to measure rectal dose in high dose rate brachytherapy treatments. The MOSFET arrays were calibrated with an Ir192 source and phantom measurements were performed to check agreement with the treatment planning system. The angular dependence, linearity and constancy of the detectors were evaluated. For in vivo measurements two sites were investigated, transperineal needle implants for prostate cancer and Fletcher suites for cervical cancer. The MOSFETs were inserted into the patients' rectum in theatre inside a modified flatus tube. The patients were then CT scanned for treatment planning. Measured rectal doses during treatment were compared with point dose measurements predicted by the TPS. The MOSFETs were found to require individual calibration factors. The calibration was found to drift by approximately 1% ±0.8 per 500 mV accumulated and varies with distance from source due to energy dependence. In vivo results for prostate patients found only 33% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%. For cervix cases 42% of measured doses agreed with the TPS within ±10%, however of those not agreeing variations of up to 70% were observed. One of the most limiting factors in this study was found to be the inability to prevent the MOSFET moving internally between the time of CT and treatment. Due to the many uncertainties associated with MOSFETs including calibration drift, angular dependence and the inability to know their exact position at the time of treatment, we consider them to be unsuitable for in vivo dosimetry in rectum for HDR brachytherapy.

  12. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  13. A quantitative analysis of two-dimensional manually segmented transrectal ultrasound axial images in planning high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabić-Stanković Kata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Prostate delineation, pre-planning and catheter implantation procedures, in high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT, are commonly based on the prostate manually segmented transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. The aim of this study was to quantitatively analyze the consistency of prostate capsule delineation, done by a single therapist, prior to each HDR-BT fraction and the changes in the shape of the prostate capsule during HDR-BT, using two dimensional (2D TRUS axial image. Methods. A group of 16 patients were treated at the Medical System Belgrade Brachytherapy Department with definitive HDRBT. The total applied median dose of 52 Gy was divided into four individual fractions, each fraction being delivered 2– 3 weeks apart. Real time prostate axial visualization and the manual segmentation prior to each fraction were performed using B-K Medical ultrasound. Quantitative analyses, analysis of an area and shape were applied on 2D-TRUS axial images of the prostate. Area analyses were used to calculate the average value of the cross-sectional area of the prostate image. The parameters of the prostate shape, the fractal dimension and the circularity ratio of the prostate capsule contour were estimated at the maximum axial cross section of the prostate image. Results. The sample group consisted of four phases, each phase being performed prior to the first, second, third and fourth HDR-BT fraction, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that during HDR-BT fractions there were no significant differences in the average value of area, as well as in the maximum shape of prostate capsule. Conclusions. Quantitative analysis of TRUS axial prostate segmented images shows a successful capsule delineation in the series of manually segmented TRUS images, and the prostate maximum shape remaining unchanged during HDR-BT fractions.

  14. Impact of delineation uncertainties on dose to organs at risk in CT-guided intracavitary brachytherapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duane, Frances K

    2014-08-07

    This study quantifies the inter- and intraobserver variations in contouring the organs at risk (OARs) in CT-guided brachytherapy (BT) for the treatment of cervical carcinoma. The dosimetric consequences are reported in accordance with the current Gynecological Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie\\/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology guidelines.

  15. Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy as salvage treatment of locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P T; Roed, H; Engelholm, S A

    1998-01-01

    presents the first clinical results from The Finsen Center with PDR-brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between June 1993 and August 1996, 34 patients with gynecologic malignancies (22 pelvic recurrences, 12 primary locally advanced) have...... gynecologic cancer, although substantial toxicity is observed in patients with large treatment volumes and recurrent disease....

  16. Image guided radiation therapy boost in combination with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianliang Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric and clinical feasibility of image guided radiation therapy (IGRT combined with high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT to improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment. Material and methods: For 42 cervical cancer patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scans were acquired after completion of whole pelvic irradiation 45-46 Gy and 5 fractions of B + I (ICBT + IGRT treatment were subsequently received. The high risk clinical target volume (HRCTV, intermediate risk clinical target volume (IRCTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were contoured on the computed tomography (CT scans. The total planning aim doses for HRCTV was D 90% > 85 Gy, whilst constraints for rectum and sigmoid were D 2cc < 75 Gy and D 2cc < 90 Gy for bladder in terms of an equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2 for external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and brachytherapy boost. The IGRT plan was optimized on top of the ICBT dose distribution. A dosimetric comparison was made between B + I and optimized ICBT (O-ICBT only. Results: The mean D 90% of HRCTV was comparable for B + I and O-ICBT (p = 0.82. For B + I plan, HRCTV D100%, IRCTV D 100% , and IRCTV D 90% were significantly increased by a mean of 10.52 Gy, 5.61 Gy, and 2.70 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The D 2cc for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were lower by a mean of 21.36, 6.78, and 10.65 Gy, respectively (p < 0.01. The mean rectum V60 Gy value over 42 patients was almost the same for both techniques but for bladder and sigmoid B + I had higher V60 Gy mean values as compared with the O-ICBT. Conclusions : B + I can improve dose distribution in cervical cancer treatment; it could be useful for tumors extended beyond the reach of intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy (IC/ISBT or for centers that are inexperienced or ill-equipped with IC/ISBT techniques. Additional confirmatory prospective studies with larger numbers of patients and longer follow

  17. Development of a high-precision xyz-measuring table for the determination of the 3D dose rate distributions of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, M; Krause, T; Flühs, D; Spaan, B

    2012-11-21

    An xyz-measuring table with a modular design has been developed for the determination of the individual 3D dose rate distributions of different brachytherapy sources requiring a high spatial resolution and reproducibility. The instrumental setup consists of a plastic scintillator detector system and the xyz-measuring table for guiding the detector across the radioactive sources. For this purpose, a micro positioning system with piezo inertial drives is chosen, providing a step width of 450 nm. To ensure a high reproducibility and accuracy better than 1 μm, an exposed linear encoder controls the positioning. The successful operation of the xyz-measuring table is exemplarily shown by measurements of dose profiles of two brachytherapy sources, an ophthalmic plaque and a radioactive seed. The setup allows a fully automated quality assurance of ophthalmic plaques and radioactive seeds under clinical conditions and can be extended to other (brachytherapy) sources of similar dimensions.

  18. Reduced dose to urethra and rectum with the use of variable needle spacing in prostate brachytherapy: a potential role for robotic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Shilpa; Le, Yi; Zhang, Zhe; Armour, Woody; Song, Daniel Y

    2015-08-01

    Several robotic delivery systems for prostate brachytherapy are under development or in pre-clinical testing. One of the features of robotic brachytherapy is the ability to vary spacing of needles at non-fixed intervals. This feature may play an important role in prostate brachytherapy, which is traditionally template-based with fixed needle spacing of 0.5 cm. We sought to quantify potential reductions in the dose to urethra and rectum by utilizing variable needle spacing, as compared to fixed needle spacing. Transrectal ultrasound images from 10 patients were used by 3 experienced planners to create 120 treatment plans. Each planner created 4 plan variations per patient with respect to needle positions: (125)I fixed spacing, (125)I variable spacing, (103)Pd fixed spacing, and (103)Pd variable spacing. The primary planning objective was to achieve a prostate V100 of 100% while minimizing dose to urethra and rectum. All plans met the objective of achieving prostate V100 of 100%. Combined results for all plans show statistically significant improvements in all assessed dosimetric variables for urethra (Umax, Umean, D30, D5) and rectum (Rmax, Rmean, RV100) when using variable spacing. The dose reductions for mean and maximum urethra dose using variable spacing had p values of 0.011 and 0.024 with (103)Pd, and 0.007 and 0.029 with (125)I plans. Similarly dose reductions for mean and maximum rectal dose using variable spacing had p values of 0.007 and 0.052 with (103)Pd, and 0.012 and 0.037 with (125)I plans. The variable needle spacing achievable by the use of robotics in prostate brachytherapy allows for reductions in both urethral and rectal planned doses while maintaining prostate dose coverage. Such dosimetric advantages have the potential in translating to significant clinical benefits with the use of robotic brachytherapy.

  19. Three-dimensional dose accumulation in pseudo-split-field IMRT and brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yang, Deshan; Esthappan, Jackie; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Price, Samantha; Mutic, Sasa; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W; Tanderup, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Dose accumulation of split-field external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy (BT) is challenging because of significant EBRT and BT dose gradients in the central pelvic region. We developed a method to determine biologically effective dose parameters for combined split-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and image-guided BT in locally advanced cervical cancer. Thirty-three patients treated with split-field-IMRT to 45.0-51.2 Gy in 1.6-1.8 Gy per fraction to the elective pelvic lymph nodes and to 20 Gy to the central pelvis region were included in this study. Patients received six weekly fractions of high-dose rate BT to 6.5-7.3 Gy per fraction. A dose tracker software was developed to compute the equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2) to gross tumor volume (GTV), organs-at-risk and point A. Total dose-volume histogram parameters were computed on the 3D combined EQD2 dose based on rigid image registration. The dose accumulation uncertainty introduced by organ deformations between IMRT and BT was evaluated. According to International Commission on Radiation Unit and Measurement and GEC European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology recommendations, D98, D90, D50, and D2cm3 EQD2 dose-volume histogram parameters were computed. GTV D98 was 84.0 ± 26.5 Gy and D2cc was 99.6 ± 13.9 Gy, 67.4 ± 12.2 Gy, 75.0 ± 10.1 Gy, for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. The uncertainties induced by organ deformation were estimated to be -1 ± 4 Gy, -3 ± 5 Gy, 2 ± 3 Gy, and -3 ± 5 Gy for bladder, rectum, sigmoid, and GTV, respectively. It is feasible to perform 3D EQD2 dose accumulation to assess high and intermediate dose regions for combined split-field IMRT and BT. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed Tomography–Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Treating Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.zolciak@wp.pl [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Gruszczynska, Ewelina; Bijok, Michal [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Jonska-Gmyrek, Joanna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Dabkowski, Mateusz [Department of Brachytherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Staniaszek, Jagna [Department of Teleradiotherapy, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Michalski, Wojciech [Department of Clinical Trials and Biostatistics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland); Kowalczyk, Adam; Milanowska, Katarzyna [Department of Medical Physics, The Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term results of computed tomography (CT)–planned high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) for treating cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: CT-planned HDR BT was performed according to the adapted Group European de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) recommendations in 216 consecutive patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB to IVA, who were treated with conformal external beam radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy. We analyzed outcomes and late side effects evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Subjective, Objective, Management, Analysis evaluation scoring system and compared them with the results from a historical group. Results: The median age was 56 years (range, 32-83 years). The median follow-up time for living patients was 52 months (range 37-63 months). The 5-year cumulative incidence function for the local recurrence rate for patients with FIGO II and III was 5.5% and 20%, respectively (P=.001). The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 66.4% and 58.5%, respectively. The relative risk of failure for OS and DFS for FIGO III in relation to FIGO II was 2.24 (P=.003) and 2.6 (P=.000) and for lymph node enlargement was 2.3 (P=.002) and 2 (P=.006), respectively. In 2 patients, rectovaginal fistula occurred, and in 1 patient, vesicovaginal fistula occurred without local progression. Comparison of late adverse effects in patients treated according to the GEC-ESTRO recommendations and in the historical group revealed a reduction in fistula formation of 59% and also a reduction in rectal grade 3 to 4 late toxicity of >59%. Conclusions: This is the largest report with mature data of CT-planned BT HDR for the treatment of cervical cancer with good local control and

  1. The investigation of prostatic calcifications using μ-PIXE analysis and their dosimetric effect in low dose rate brachytherapy treatments using Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D J; Cutajar, D L; George, S P; Guatelli, S; Bucci, J A; Enari, K E; Miller, S; Siegele, R; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-06-07

    Low dose rate brachytherapy is a widely used modality for the treatment of prostate cancer. Most clinical treatment planning systems currently in use approximate all tissue to water, neglecting the existence of inhomogeneities, such as calcifications. The presence of prostatic calcifications may perturb the dose due to the higher photoelectric effect cross section in comparison to water. This study quantitatively evaluates the effect of prostatic calcifications on the dosimetric outcome of brachytherapy treatments by means of Monte Carlo simulations and its potential clinical consequences.Four pathological calcification samples were characterised with micro-particle induced x-ray emission (μ-PIXE) to determine their heavy elemental composition. Calcium, phosphorus and zinc were found to be the predominant heavy elements in the calcification composition. Four clinical patient brachytherapy treatments were modelled using Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulations, in terms of the distribution of brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate. Dose reductions were observed to be up to 30% locally to the calcification boundary, calcification size dependent. Single large calcifications and closely placed calculi caused local dose reductions of between 30-60%. Individual calculi smaller than 0.5 mm in diameter showed minimal dosimetric impact, however, the effects of small or diffuse calcifications within the prostatic tissue could not be determined using the methods employed in the study. The simulation study showed a varying reduction on common dosimetric parameters. D90 showed a reduction of 2-5%, regardless of calcification surface area and volume. The parameters V100, V150 and V200 were also reduced by as much as 3% and on average by 1%. These reductions were also found to relate to the surface area and volume of calcifications, which may have a significant dosimetric impact on brachytherapy treatment, however, such impacts depend strongly on specific factors

  2. Image-guided high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy – a valuable salvage treatment approach for loco-regional recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report the treatment effect of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR interstitial brachytherapy for refractory recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC. Case report: This 66-year-old female presented with recurrence 5 years after thyroidectomy for PTC. Despite external irradiation and radioactive 131I, the lesion expanded as 3.7 × 3.0 × 2.3 cm3 and 2.0 × 1.5 × 1.5 cm3. The locoregional recurrent tumor was treated with image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy. The total dose of 30 Gy in 6 fractions were delivered on the whole recurrent tumor. Results: Removal of the recurrent tumor was securely achieved by HDR interstitial brachytherapy guided with ultrasound, computed tomography (CT, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanning. The refractory tumor in the patients healed uneventfully after HDR interstitial brachytherapy without recurrence during the 14 months of follow-up. Conclusions : The image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment approach for refractory recurrence of PTC.

  3. Urethra low-dose tunnels: validation of and class solution for generating urethra-sparing dose plans using inverse planning simulated annealing for prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Wang-Chesebro, Alice; Roach, Mack; Hsu, I-Chow

    2012-01-01

    Urethral dose is related to severity of genitourinary toxicity in patients treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This work describes a dose planning method that uses inverse planning to create a low-dose tunnel around the urethra and presents a class solution to achieve this additional dose sparing of the urethra. Fifteen patients on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0321 protocol were treated for prostate cancer with a high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose boost to an external beam radiation treatment regimen. All were treated with 9.5Gy for each of the two fractions after 45Gy of the external beam radiation. The inverse-planning algorithm, inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA), was used to create both the standard RTOG protocol (SRP) plan for treatment and the a posteriori urethra dose sparing (UDS) plan consisting of a dose tunnel along the urethra. Both plans maintained the protocol parameters: prostate V(100) (volume receiving 100% of prescribed dose)>90% and bladder and rectum V(75)90%, with mean for the SRP V(100)=93% versus UDS plan V(100)=90%. Prostate D(90) for SRP was 104% versus UDS plan D(90)=101%. For all patients, the UDS achieved a dose tunnel surrounding the length of the intraprostatic urethra. The class solution for generating UDS is presented. A urethral sparing-focused planning solution using IPSA reduces mean urethral dose by 34%, as compared with IPSA-generated plans based on the RTOG 0321 protocol. This is done while maintaining prostate coverage and critical structure dose. This technique can be applied to all patients in whom urethra toxicity is of particular concern. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SU-E-T-09: A Clinical Implementation and Optimized Dosimetry Study of Freiberg Flap Skin Surface Treatment in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Syh, J; Patel, B; Wu, H; Durci, M [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This case study was designated to confirm the optimized plan was used to treat skin surface of left leg in three stages. 1. To evaluate dose distribution and plan quality by alternating of the source loading catheters pattern in flexible Freiberg Flap skin surface (FFSS) applicator. 2. To investigate any impact on Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) of large superficial surface target volume coverage. 3. To compare the dose distribution if it was treated with electron beam. Methods: The Freiburg Flap is a flexible mesh style surface mold for skin radiation or intraoperative surface treatments. The Freiburg Flap consists of multiple spheres that are attached to each other, holding and guiding up to 18 treatment catheters. The Freiburg Flap also ensures a constant distance of 5mm from the treatment catheter to the surface. Three treatment trials with individual planning optimization were employed: 18 channels, 9 channels of FF and 6 MeV electron beam. The comparisons were highlighted in target coverage, dose conformity and dose sparing of surrounding tissues. Results: The first 18 channels brachytherapy plan was generated with 18 catheters inside the skin-wrapped up flap (Figure 1A). A second 9 catheters plan was generated associated with the same calculation points which were assigned to match prescription for target coverage as 18 catheters plan (Figure 1B). The optimized inverse plan was employed to reduce the dose to adjacent structures such as tibia or fibula. The comparison of DVH’s was depicted on Figure 2. External beam of electron RT plan was depicted in Figure 3. Overcall comparisons among these three were illustrated in Conclusion: The 9-channel Freiburg flap flexible skin applicator offers a reasonably acceptable plan without compromising the coverage. Electron beam was discouraged to use to treat curved skin surface because of low target coverage and high dose in adjacent tissues.

  5. Improving anatomical mapping of complexly deformed anatomy for external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy dose accumulation in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M., E-mail: e.vasquezosorio@erasmusmc.nl; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Schuring-Pereira, Monica; Zolnay, András; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam 3075 (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In the treatment of cervical cancer, large anatomical deformations, caused by, e.g., tumor shrinkage, bladder and rectum filling changes, organ sliding, and the presence of the brachytherapy (BT) applicator, prohibit the accumulation of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT dose distributions. This work proposes a structure-wise registration with vector field integration (SW+VF) to map the largely deformed anatomies between EBRT and BT, paving the way for 3D dose accumulation between EBRT and BT. Methods: T2w-MRIs acquired before EBRT and as a part of the MRI-guided BT procedure for 12 cervical cancer patients, along with the manual delineations of the bladder, cervix-uterus, and rectum-sigmoid, were used for this study. A rigid transformation was used to align the bony anatomy in the MRIs. The proposed SW+VF method starts by automatically segmenting features in the area surrounding the delineated organs. Then, each organ and feature pair is registered independently using a feature-based nonrigid registration algorithm developed in-house. Additionally, a background transformation is calculated to account for areas far from all organs and features. In order to obtain one transformation that can be used for dose accumulation, the organ-based, feature-based, and the background transformations are combined into one vector field using a weighted sum, where the contribution of each transformation can be directly controlled by its extent of influence (scope size). The optimal scope sizes for organ-based and feature-based transformations were found by an exhaustive analysis. The anatomical correctness of the mapping was independently validated by measuring the residual distances after transformation for delineated structures inside the cervix-uterus (inner anatomical correctness), and for anatomical landmarks outside the organs in the surrounding region (outer anatomical correctness). The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the

  6. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisei Okamoto

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. Material and methods : From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%, 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%, and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15% including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results : Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS rate of 95.5%. Conclusions : High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further.

  7. Construction of a anthropomorphic phantom for dose measurement in hands in brachytherapy procedures; Construccion de un fantoma antropomorfico para mediciones de dosis en manos en procedimientos de braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, Cinthia M., E-mail: cinthia_papp@yahoo.com.ar [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (IH/UNCUYO/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina). Universidad Nacional de Cuyo. Instituto Balseiro; Ortiz, Arnulfo; Alvarez, Guillermo, E-mail: arnot@gmail.com, E-mail: galvarez@fuesmen.edu.ar [Fundacion Escuela de Medicina Nuclear (FUESMEN), Mendoza (Argentina)

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to show the differences between the dose value measured by dosimeter endpoint and the values measured in different points inside the hand during brachytherapy procedures. For this, the procedures involved in the handling of sources were analyzed and the simulated using an anthropomorphic phantom hand.

  8. Comparison BIPM.RI(I)-K8 of high dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy standards for reference air kerma rate of the VSL and the BIPM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, J.T.; De Pooter, J.A.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2014-01-01

    An indirect comparison of the standards for reference air kerma rate for 192Ir high dose rate brachytherapy sources of the Dutch Metrology Institute (VSL), The Netherlands, and of the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) was carried out at the VSL in November 2009. The comparison resu...

  9. Doses of radiation in the environment of patients undergoing treatment of ophthalmic brachytherapy; Dosis de radiaciones en el entorno de pacientes sometidos a tratamientos de braquiterapia oftalmica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terron Leon, J. A.; Moreno Reyes, J. C.; Perales Molina, A.; Miras, H.; Ortiz, M.; Macias, J.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents results for measures of dose made to different patient undergoing treatment with ophthalmic brachytherapy. The aim of these measures has been, on the one hand, verify assessments relating to radiation protection in the memory of the installation and, on the other hand, experimental measures that can serve to reduce the perception of the radiological risk professionals have. (Author)

  10. High-dose-rate brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy for hormone-naïve low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer: A 7-year experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Aluwini (Shafak); P.H. van Rooij (Peter); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); P.P. Jansen (Peter); J. Praag (John); C.H. Bangma (Chris); I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naïve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between

  11. Fast dose calculation in magnetic fields with GPUMCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, S; Ozell, B [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 Chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Despres, P, E-mail: sami.hissoiny@polymtl.ca [Departement de physique, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    2011-08-21

    A new hybrid imaging-treatment modality, the MRI-Linac, involves the irradiation of the patient in the presence of a strong magnetic field. This field acts on the charged particles, responsible for depositing dose, through the Lorentz force. These conditions require a dose calculation engine capable of taking into consideration the effect of the magnetic field on the dose distribution during the planning stage. Also in the case of a change in anatomy at the time of treatment, a fast online replanning tool is desirable. It is improbable that analytical solutions such as pencil beam calculations can be efficiently adapted for dose calculations within a magnetic field. Monte Carlo simulations have therefore been used for the computations but the calculation speed is generally too slow to allow online replanning. In this work, GPUMCD, a fast graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation platform, was benchmarked with a new feature that allows dose calculations within a magnetic field. As a proof of concept, this new feature is validated against experimental measurements. GPUMCD was found to accurately reproduce experimental dose distributions according to a 2%-2 mm gamma analysis in two cases with large magnetic field-induced dose effects: a depth-dose phantom with an air cavity and a lateral-dose phantom surrounded by air. Furthermore, execution times of less than 15 s were achieved for one beam in a prostate case phantom for a 2% statistical uncertainty while less than 20 s were required for a seven-beam plan. These results indicate that GPUMCD is an interesting candidate, being fast and accurate, for dose calculations for the hybrid MRI-Linac modality.

  12. Comparison of focal boost high dose rate prostate brachytherapy optimisation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Carey, Brendan; Henry, Ann

    2015-12-01

    For HDR prostate brachytherapy treatments of 15 Gy to the whole gland plus focal boost, optimisation to either tumour plus margin (F-PTV) or involved sectors was compared. For 15 patients median F-PTV D90 and V150 were 21.0 Gy and 77.2% for F-PTV optimisation and 19.8 Gy and 75.6% for sector optimisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of treatment planning on dosimetric differences between 192Ir sources for high-dose rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Oh Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Mokpo Science University, Mokpo (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Woo Sang; KIm, Dae Yong; Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangenung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangenung (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Kyung Tae [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Dongam Health University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate whether the difference in geometrical characteristics between high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir sources would influence the dose distributions of intracavitary brachytherapy. Two types of microSelectron HDR 192Ir sources (classic and new models) were selected in this study. Two-dimensional (2D) treatment plans for classic and new sources were generated by using PLATO treatment planning system. We compared the point A, point B, and bladder and rectum reference points based on ICRU 38 recommendation. The radial dose function of the new source agrees with that of the classic source except difference of up to 2.6% at the nearest radial distance. The differences of anisotropy functions agree within 2% for r=1, 3, and 5 cm and 20°<θ<165°. The largest discrepancies of anisotropy functions reached up to 27% for θ<20° at r=0.25 cm and were up to 13%, 10%, and 7% at r=1, 3, and 5 cm for θ>170°, respectively. There were no significant differences in doses of point A, point B, and bladder point for the treatment plans between the new and classic sources. For the ICRU rectum point, the percent dose difference was on average 0.65% and up to 1.0%. The dose discrepancies between two treatment plans are mainly affected due to the geometrical difference of the source and the sealed capsule.

  14. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  15. Medically inoperable endometrial cancer in patients with a high body mass index (BMI): Patterns of failure after 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acharya, Sahaja; Esthappan, Jacqueline; Badiyan, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High BMI is a reason for medical inoperability in patients with endometrial cancer in the United States. Definitive radiation is an alternative therapy for these patients; however, data on patterns of failure after definitive radiotherapy are lacking. We describe...... the patterns of failure after definitive treatment with 3-D image-based high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for medically inoperable endometrial cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-three consecutive patients with endometrial cancer FIGO stages I-III were treated definitively with HDR brachytherapy...

  16. Long-Term Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose-Rate {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy in Low-, Intermediate-, and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, Jeffrey A.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Smith, Kristin L.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ulchaker, James; Angermeier, Kenneth; Campbell, Steven; Stephenson, Andrew; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wilkinson, D. Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Ciezki, Jay P., E-mail: ciezkij@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To report long-term efficacy and toxicity for a single-institution cohort of patients treated with low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy permanent implant (PI) monotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2007, 1989 patients with low-risk (61.3%), intermediate-risk (29.8%), high-intermediate-risk (4.5%), and high-risk prostate cancer (4.4%) were treated with PI and followed up prospectively in a registry. All patients were treated with {sup 125}I monotherapy to 144 Gy. Late toxicity was coded retrospectively according to a modified Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 scale. The rates of biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS), and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were calculated. We identified factors associated with late grade ≥3 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, bRFS, DMFS, OS, PCSM, and incontinence. Results: The median age of the patients was 67 years, and the median overall and prostate-specific antigen follow-up times were 6.8 years and 5.8 years, respectively. The overall 5-year rates for bRFS, DMFS, OS, and PCSM were 91.9%, 97.8%, 93.7%, and 0.71%, respectively. The 10-year rates were 81.5%, 91.5%, 76.1%, and 2.5%, respectively. The overall rates of late grade ≥3 GU and GI toxicity were 7.6% and 0.8%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, age and prostate length were significantly associated with increased risk of late grade ≥3 GU toxicity. The risk of incontinence was highly correlated with both pre-PI and post-PI transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusions: Prostate brachytherapy as monotherapy is an effective treatment for low-risk and low-intermediate-risk prostate cancer and appears promising as a treatment for high-intermediate-risk and high-risk prostate cancer. Significant long-term toxicities are rare when brachytherapy is performed as monotherapy.

  17. Dosimetric accuracy of tomotherapy dose calculation in thorax lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangili Paola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse limits and capabilities in dose calculation of collapsed-cone-convolution (CCC algorithm implemented in helical tomotherapy (HT treatment planning system for thorax lesions. Methods The agreement between measured and calculated dose was verified both in homogeneous (Cheese Phantom and in a custom-made inhomogeneous phantom. The inhomogeneous phantom was employed to mimic a patient's thorax region with lung density encountered in extreme cases and acrylic inserts of various dimensions and positions inside the lung cavity. For both phantoms, different lung treatment plans (single or multiple metastases and targets in the mediastinum using HT technique were simulated and verified. Point and planar dose measurements, both with radiographic extended-dose-range (EDR2 and radiochromic external-beam-therapy (EBT2 films, were performed. Absolute point dose measurements, dose profile comparisons and quantitative analysis of gamma function distributions were analyzed. Results An excellent agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was found in homogeneous media, both for point and planar dose measurements. Absolute dose deviations Conclusions Very acceptable accuracy was found for complex lung treatment plans calculated with CCC algorithm implemented in the tomotherapy TPS even in the heterogeneous phantom with very low lung-density.

  18. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma: short-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Daya Nand; Joshi, Nikhil P; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Haresh, Kunhi P; Gupta, Subhash; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) is a preferred treatment option over partial penectomy in selected patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma because of its organ preservation ability. Literature is mostly based on the use of low-dose-rate IBT, and experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) IBT is extremely limited. We studied the role of HDR-IBT alone in patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma. Between April 2010 and July 2013, 14 patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma were treated with HDR-IBT at our center. Size of the primary lesion ranged from 1.5 to 4.0cm. A two-to-four-plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42-51Gy in 14-17 fractions using twice-a-day fractionation schedule. Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of local control, survival, toxicity, and sexual function. At a median followup of 22 months, 2 patients developed recurrent disease at locoregional site. The 3-year overall survival was 83% with penis preservation rate of 93%. All patients developed acute Grade III skin toxicity that healed during 6-8-weeks time. Urethral stenosis and soft tissue necrosis was not seen in any of the patients. A total of 4 patients experienced mild asymptomatic fibrosis in the implanted area. Around 10 patients had satisfactory sexual function status at the last followup visit. Although it was a small sample size, our results have demonstrated excellent local control rate and acceptable toxicity with HDR-IBT in patients with T1-T2-stage penile carcinoma. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Intraoperative High Dose Rate 32P Brachytherapy for Diffuse Recalcitrant Conjunctival Neoplasms: A Retrospective Case Series and Report of Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Brian P.; Abramson, David H.; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Williamson, Matthew J.; McCormick, Beryl; Barker, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Adjunct treatments for conjunctival malignancies are needed when standard therapy provides limited benefits or fails. Objective To describe the results of patients with diffuse conjunctival neoplasms treated with a radioactive phosphorus (32P) impregnated flexible film. Design Retrospective case series between 2010 and 2013. Setting Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center – a tertiary referral center Participants The study was conducted on 7 eyes of 6 patients treated for diffuse conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, or lymphoma that had recurrent or residual disease after primary treatment. Intervention Patients underwent mapping biopsies and detailed conjunctival drawings to delineate the pathologic extent of the disease. The brachytherapy film used for treatment was the RIC Conformal Source Model 100 (RIC-100, R.I. Consultants, Hudson, NH). The RIC-100 is a flexible, thin (~0.5 mm) film made of a polymer chemically bound to 32P. The radioactive 32P film was placed intraoperatively, allowed to stay in place until the prescription dose was reached, and then removed. Median dose at the prescription point (1 mm from the surface of the film) was 15 Gy (range, 5–17 Gy). Main Outcome Measures Patients were tested for best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), recurrence-free survival, and adverse events scored by using the adult comorbidity evaluation-27 (ACE-27) scale. Results Between 2010 and 2013, 7 eyes of 6 patients were treated. Median age was 70 years old. All patients had a recurrent or persistent neoplasm. Four patients with squamous cell carcinoma, 1 with sebaceous carcinoma, and 1 with metachronous bilateral lymphomas were treated. Median treatment time was 19 minutes (range, 10–52 minutes). Median follow-up was 24.9 months (range, 3.1–38.2 months). Recurrence-free survival 24 months after brachytherapy was 75% (95% CI 19–89.1%). Two moderate adverse events and one severe adverse event occurred. Vision was stable or

  20. Comparison of (192) Ir, (169) Yb, and (60) Co high-dose rate brachytherapy sources for skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safigholi, Habib; Meigooni, Ali S; Song, William Y

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of utilizing the high-dose rate (HDR) (169) Yb and (60) Co sources, in addition to (192) Ir, for the treatment of skin malignancies with conical applicators. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to benchmark the dosimetric parameters of single (169) Yb (4140), (60) Co (Co0.A86), and (192) Ir (mHDR-V2) brachytherapy sources in a water phantom and compared their results against published data. A standard conical tungsten alloy Leipzig-style applicator (Stand.Appl) was used for determination of the dose distributions at various depths with a single dwell position of the HDR sources. The HDR sources were modeled with its long axis parallel to the treatment plane within the opening section of the applicator. The source-to-surface distance (SSD) was 1.6 cm, which included a 0.1 cm thick removable plastic end-cap used for clinical applications. The prescription depth was considered to be 0.3 cm in a water phantom following the definitions in the literature for this treatment technique. Dose distributions generated with the Stand.Appl and the (169) Yb and (60) Co sources have been compared with those of the (192) Ir source, for the same geometry. Then, applicator wall thickness for the (60) Co source was increased (doubled) in MC simulations in order to minimize the leakage dose and penumbra to levels that were comparable to that from the (192) Ir source. For each source-applicator combination, the optimized plastic end-cap dimensions were determined in order to avoid over-dosage to the skin surface. The normalized dose profiles at the prescription depth for the (169) Yb-Stand.Appl and the (60) Co-double-wall applicator were found to be similar to that of the (192) Ir-Stand.Appl, with differences percentage depth doses (PDD) for the (192) Ir-, (169) Yb- and (60) Co-Stand.Appl were found to be comparable to the values with the (60) Co-double-walled applicator, with differences depth were also comparable at 0.309, 0.316, and 0.298 (cGy/hU) for

  1. Clinical outcomes with high-dose-rate surface mould brachytherapy for intra-oral and skin malignancies involving head and neck region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Budrukkar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The literature and experience of high-dose-rate (HDR surface mould brachytherapy (SMB in head and neck cancer is sparse. We report our institutional experience of SMB for such tumours. Material and methods: Thirty-five patients with malignant localized early T1/T2, N0 (21 intra-oral and 14 skin tumours treated with SMB during 2008-2014 were analyzed. Treatment was delivered using HDR 192Ir source to a median dose of 49 Gy (range, 38.5-52.5 Gy as radical brachytherapy and 18 Gy (range, 15.5-30 Gy as boost with 3-4 Gy/fraction twice daily using customized surface mould. Results : Median follow-up was 52 months (range, 6 to 98 months. Local control (LC for skin tumours and intra-oral malignancies at 5 years were 92% and 76%, respectively. Five-year cause specific survival was 92%. For T1 and T2 tumours, 5 year LC was 94.2% and 68.2%, respectively. T stage (p < 0.04 and dose/fractions (p < 0.003 were the only significant prognostic factors for LC on univariate analysis. Conclusions : Surface mould brachytherapy results in excellent LC rates for skin tumours and T1 intraoral tumours when considered as radical treatment, and preferable to consider it as a boost for T2 intraoral tumours. Surface mould brachytherapy results in excellent organ and function preservation.

  2. Template guided transperineal saturation biopsy of the prostate: lessons for focal and urethra-sparing high-dose-rate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Nikolaevich Novikov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : The aim of this work is to evaluate results of prostate transperineal saturation biopsy as a guide for focal high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer (PCa. Material and methods: Template guided saturation biopsy was performed in 67 primary patients with suspicion for prostate cancer. Biopsy was performed under ultrasonography (US control with the help of brachytherapy grid and 5 mm distance between samples. We put special attention for accurate sampling of prostate in periurethral region. The number of cores varied from 17 to 81 (average 36 cores. Finally, in 40 patients with confirmed prostate cancer results of biopsy were used for brachytherapy planning. Results : Saturation biopsy revealed prostate cancer in 40 of 67 evaluated patients. The extent of biopsy core involvement varied from 5% to 100% (average: 57%. Focal nature of PCa (single unilateral tumor nodule was diagnosed in 10 (25%, multifocal – in another 30 (75% patients. Hemigland invasion was mentioned in 12 (30% cases. Saturation biopsy detected PCa in periurethral cores in 27 (67.5% of 40 evaluated patients. In 10 patients, the extent of involvement in periurethral cores varied between 10% and 50%; in another, 17 observations exceeded 50%. According to results obtained on saturation biopsy, we performed HDR brachytherapy with “urethra low dose tunnel” (D10ur ≤ 80-90% in 13 patients with noninvolved periurethral cores. Theoretically, hemigland brachytherapy was possible in 12 of 40 evaluated patients with PCa. Conclusions : In low risk patients with PCa results of template guided saturation biopsy indicates high frequency (75% of multifocal disease and high probability (67.5% of periurethral invasion. Suitable candidates for focal HDR brachytherapy or irradiation with additional sparing of urethra can be effectively determined with the help of saturation biopsy.

  3. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  4. The use of modified single pencil beam dose kernels to improve IMRT dose calculation accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alanah M; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2004-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is used to deliver highly conformal radiation doses to tumors while sparing nearby sensitive tissues. Discrepancies between calculated and measured dose distributions have been reported for regions of high dose gradients corresponding to complex radiation fluence patterns. For the single pencil beam convolution dose calculation algorithm, the ability to resolve areas of high dose structure is partly related to the shape of the pencil beam dose kernel (similar to how a photon detector's point spread function relates to imaging resolution). Improvements in dose calculation accuracy have been reported when the treatment planning system (TPS) is recommissioned using high-resolution measurement data as input. This study proposes to improve the dose calculation accuracy for IMRT planning by modifying clinical dose kernel shapes already present in the TPS, thus avoiding the need to reacquire higher resolution commissioning data. The in-house optimization program minimizes a cost-function based on a two-dimensional composite dose subtraction/distance-to-agreement (gamma) analysis. The final modified kernel shapes are reintroduced into the treatment planning system and improvements to the dose calcula tion accuracy for complex IMRT dose distributions evaluated. The central kernel value (radius =0 cm) has the largest effect on the dose calculation resolution and is the focus of this study.

  5. The evaluation of a 2D diode array in "magic phantom" for use in high dose rate brachytherapy pretreatment quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, A; Petasecca, M; Fuduli, I; Howie, A; Bucci, J; Corde, S; Jackson, M; Lerch, M L F; Rosenfeld, A B

    2015-02-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a treatment method that is used increasingly worldwide. The development of a sound quality assurance program for the verification of treatment deliveries can be challenging due to the high source activity utilized and the need for precise measurements of dwell positions and times. This paper describes the application of a novel phantom, based on a 2D 11 × 11 diode array detection system, named "magic phantom" (MPh), to accurately measure plan dwell positions and times, compare them directly to the treatment plan, determine errors in treatment delivery, and calculate absorbed dose. The magic phantom system was CT scanned and a 20 catheter plan was generated to simulate a nonspecific treatment scenario. This plan was delivered to the MPh and, using a custom developed software suite, the dwell positions and times were measured and compared to the plan. The original plan was also modified, with changes not disclosed to the primary authors, and measured again using the device and software to determine the modifications. A new metric, the "position-time gamma index," was developed to quantify the quality of a treatment delivery when compared to the treatment plan. The MPh was evaluated to determine the minimum measurable dwell time and step size. The incorporation of the TG-43U1 formalism directly into the software allows for dose calculations to be made based on the measured plan. The estimated dose distributions calculated by the software were compared to the treatment plan and to calibrated EBT3 film, using the 2D gamma analysis method. For the original plan, the magic phantom system was capable of measuring all dwell points and dwell times and the majority were found to be within 0.93 mm and 0.25 s, respectively, from the plan. By measuring the altered plan and comparing it to the unmodified treatment plan, the use of the position-time gamma index showed that all modifications made could be readily detected. The MPh was able to

  6. Reirradiation of head and neck cancer with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: a customizable intraluminal solution for postoperative treatment of tracheal mucosa recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Laura A; Harrison, Amy S; Cognetti, David; Xiao, Ying; Yu, Yan; Liu, Haisong; Ahn, Peter H; Anné, P Rani; Showalter, Timothy N

    2011-01-01

    Delivering adequate dose to tracheal mucosa recurrence after multiple prior courses of surgery and radiation presented a challenge for radiation delivery. Tumor bed location and size, combined with previous doses to surrounding areas, complicated the use of external beam therapy with either photons or electrons. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was explored to provide sufficient dose coverage. A 45-year-old gentleman presented with recurrent head and neck cancer. After undergoing additional excision of gross tumor in the tracheal region, radiation was recommended to improve local control. The region of residual tumor was confined to a small superficial lesion at the posterior-superior aspect of the trachea, involving mucosa located along the bend of the trachea, immediately deep to the stoma. External beam treatment was discussed but was not recommended based on recurrence location in the prior radiation field and patient's flexed chin position. HDR technique with a custom applicator was preferred. A three-dimensional HDR plan based on computed tomography used a single catheter optimized to cover gross tumor volume as delineated by physician. Prescribed dose was 5 Gy/fraction for six fractions (two fractions/wk). The applicator position was verified daily with computed tomography and physician setup approval before treatment. The patient was positioned on a wing board to allow access to the stoma. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated. Intraluminal HDR brachytherapy is a viable option for providing dose to region inside tracheal stoma. Advantages over photon and electron beam therapy include reduced dose to surrounding tissues previously irradiated, skin dose, and reproducibility of treatment delivery. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-F-T-14: Dosimetric Impacts of Various Uncertainties in Cervical Cancer HDR Brachytherapy: Are Conventional Point Doses Good Surrogates for 3D Dosimetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, X; Li, Z [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Zheng, D [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Zhang, X; Narayanasamy, G; Morrill, S; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the context of evaluating dosimetric impacts of a variety of uncertainties involved in HDR Tandem-and-Ovoid treatment, to study the correlations between conventional point doses and 3D volumetric doses. Methods: For 5 cervical cancer patients treated with HDR T&O, 150 plans were retrospectively created to study dosimetric impacts of the following uncertainties: (1) inter-fractional applicator displacement between two treatment fractions within a single insertion by applying Fraction#1 plan to Fraction#2 CT; (2) positional dwell error simulated from −5mm to 5mm in 1mm steps; (3) simulated temporal dwell error of 0.05s, 0.1s, 0.5s, and 1s. The original plans were based on point dose prescription, from which the volume covered by the prescription dose was generated as the pseudo target volume to study the 3D target dose effect. OARs were contoured. The point and volumetric dose errors were calculated by taking the differences between original and simulated plans. The correlations between the point and volumetric dose errors were analyzed. Results: For the most clinically relevant positional dwell uncertainty of 1mm, temporal uncertainty of 0.05s, and inter-fractional applicator displacement within the same insertion, the mean target D90 and V100 deviation were within 1%. Among these uncertainties, the applicator displacement showed the largest potential target coverage impact (2.6% on D90) as well as the OAR dose impact (2.5% and 3.4% on bladder D2cc and rectum D2cc). The Spearman correlation analysis shows a correlation coefficient of 0.43 with a p-value of 0.11 between target D90 coverage and H point dose. Conclusion: With the most clinically relevant positional and temporal dwell uncertainties and patient interfractional applicator displacement within the same insertion, the dose error is within clinical acceptable range. The lack of correlation between H point and 3D volumetric dose errors is a motivator for the use of 3D treatment planning in

  8. From point A to the sculpted pear: MR image guidance significantly improves tumour dose and sparing of organs at risk in brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Nyvang, Gitte-Bettina; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2010-02-01

    Brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer is still widely based on 2D standard dose planning, although 3D image guidance is available. The purpose of this study was to compare point doses to 3D dose volume parameters for tumour and organs at risk (OARs), and to evaluate the improvement of dose parameters with MR image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). MRI-based IGABT was performed in 72 consecutive patients. HR-CTV, IR-CTV, bladder, rectum and sigmoid were contoured according to GEC-ESTRO recommendations. BT standard dose planning was compared to MRI-based dose optimisation. HR-CTV dose (D90) was highly variable in standard plans with point A dose prescription. In small tumours (31 cc) the dose optimisation improved the HR-CTV D90 by a mean of 7 Gy resulting in full coverage in 72% of patients as compared to 25% for standard plans, even while reducing violation of OAR constraints. Point A dose is a poor surrogate of HR-CTV dose, and the use of 3D image-based dose planning is encouraged. MRI-based IGABT significantly improves target coverage and OAR dose. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-11-08

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  10. Permanent interstitial low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer. An interim analysis of 312 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, Harun; Graf, Reinhold; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter [University Hospital Berlin, Department for Radiation Oncology of Charite School of Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    The biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate after treatment with permanent iodine-125 seed implantation (PSI) or combined seeds and external beam radiotherapy (COMB) for clinical stage T1-T2 localized prostate cancer is a clinically relevant endpoint. The goal of this work was to evaluate the influence of relevant patient- and treatment-related factors. The study population comprised 312 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implantation. All patients were evaluable for analysis of overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS), 230 for bRFS, of which 192 were in the PSI group and 38 in the COMB group. The prescribed minimum peripheral dose was 145 Gy for PSI, for COMB 110 Gy implant and external beam radiotherapy of 45 Gy. The median follow-up time was 33 months (range 8-66 months). bRFS was defined as a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level ≤ 0.2 ng/ml at last follow-up. Overall, the actuarial bRFS at 50 months was 88.4 %. The 50-month bRFS rate for PSI and COMB was 90.9 %, and 77.2 %, respectively. In the univariate analysis, age in the categories ≤ 63 and > 63 years (p < 0.00), PSA nadir (≤ 0.5 ng/ml and > 0.5 ng/ml) and PSA bounce (yes/no) were the significant predicting factors for bRFS. None of the other patient and treatment variables (treatment modality, stage, PSA, Gleason score, risk group, number of risk factors, D90 and various other dose parameters) were found to be a statistically significant predictor of 50-month bRFS. The biochemical failure rates were low in this study. As a proof of principle, our large monocenteric analysis shows that low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective and safe procedure for patients with early stage prostate cancer. (orig.) [German] Das biochemisch rezidivfreie Ueberleben (bRFS) nach der Brachytherapie mit permanenter Iod-125-Seed-Implantation (PSI) oder in Kombination mit externer Radiotherapie (COMB) ist beim Patienten mit fruehem Prostatakarzinom (T1/T2) ein relevanter

  11. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  12. On the biological basis for competing macroscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage dosimetry: cellular dosimetry for brachytherapy and diagnostic radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. M.; Carlsson Tedgren, Å.; Williamson, J. F.

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate how alternative macroscopic dose descriptors track absorbed dose to biologically relevant subcellular targets via Monte Carlo (MC) analysis of cellular models for a variety of cancerous and normal soft tissues for kilovoltage radiation. The relative mass distributions of water, light inorganic elements, and protein components of nuclear and cytoplasm compartments for various tissues are determined from a literature review. These data are used to develop representative cell models to demonstrate the range of mass elemental compositions of these subcellular structures encountered in the literature from which radiological quantities (energy absorption and attenuation coefficients; stopping powers) are computed. Using representative models of cell clusters, doses to subcellular targets are computed using MC simulation for photon sources of energies between 20 and 370 keV and are compared to bulk medium dose descriptors. It is found that cells contain significant and varying mass fractions of protein and inorganic elements, leading to variations in mass energy absorption coefficients for cytoplasm and nuclear media as large as 10% compared to water for sub-50 keV photons. Doses to subcellular structures vary by as much as 23% compared to doses to the corresponding average bulk medium or to small water cavities embedded in the bulk medium. Relationships between cellular target doses and doses to the bulk medium or to a small water cavity embedded in the bulk medium are sensitive to source energy and cell morphology, particularly for lower energy sources, e.g., low energy brachytherapy (subcellular targets for the range of cellular morphologies and tissues considered.

  13. Dose to the non-involved uterine corpus with MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapru, Shantanu; Mohamed, Sandy; Fokdal, Lars; Nkiwane, Karen; Swamidas, Jamema; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard; Christian Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluates the impact of MRI guided adaptive brachytherapy (BT) on uterine corpus dose. 84 patients with median follow-up of 18 months were analysed. MRI based BT was done according to GEC-ESTRO guidelines. Non-involved uterine corpus at the time of BT was contoured and the uterine corpus dose (D90 and D98) was evaluated for (1) standard loading pattern with source loading to the tip of the tandem and (2) optimised dose plan. Tandem lengths and heights of the 85 Gy isodose were recorded. Dose optimisation resulted in a reduction of active tandem length of 0.4±0.4 cm leading to lowering the D90 to the non-involved uterine corpus from 63.8±9.5 Gy to 56.7±7.5 Gy EQD2 (p<0.0001). Mean active tandem length was 5.0±1.0 cm, and the height of the 85 Gy isodose was 5.7±1.0 cm in optimised plans. MRI guided dose optimisation lowered the dose to the uterine corpus. However, a total EBRT+BT dose larger than 50 Gy was obtained in 99% of patients. Assuming that 45-50 Gy is sufficient to eradicate microscopic disease, the lowering of uterus corpus dose is not expected to induce additional uterine corpus recurrences in the setting of MRI guided adaptive BT. This hypothesis should be tested in a larger number of patients as e.g. the EMBRACE study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Steven E.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Leu, Matthias; Nielsen, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    The Dose-Response Calculator for ArcGIS is a tool that extends the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS 10 Desktop application to aid with the visualization of relationships between two raster GIS datasets. A dose-response curve is a line graph commonly used in medical research to examine the effects of different dosage rates of a drug or chemical (for example, carcinogen) on an outcome of interest (for example, cell mutations) (Russell and others, 1982). Dose-response curves have recently been used in ecological studies to examine the influence of an explanatory dose variable (for example, percentage of habitat cover, distance to disturbance) on a predicted response (for example, survival, probability of occurrence, abundance) (Aldridge and others, 2008). These dose curves have been created by calculating the predicted response value from a statistical model at different levels of the explanatory dose variable while holding values of other explanatory variables constant. Curves (plots) developed using the Dose-Response Calculator overcome the need to hold variables constant by using values extracted from the predicted response surface of a spatially explicit statistical model fi