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Sample records for brachytherapy d-shaped applicators

  1. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software

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    Yang Yun; Melhus, Christopher S.; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Methods: Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Results: Agreement using the gamma-index test was {>=}99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Conclusions: Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  2. Treatment planning of a skin-sparing conical breast brachytherapy applicator using conventional brachytherapy software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Melhus, Christopher S; Sioshansi, Shirin; Rivard, Mark J

    2011-03-01

    AccuBoost is a noninvasive image-guided technique for the delivery of partial breast irradiation to the tumor bed and currently serves as an alternate to conventional electron beam boost. To irradiate the target volume while providing dose sparing to the skin, the round applicator design was augmented through the addition of an internally truncated conical shield and the reduction of the source to skin distance. Brachytherapy dose distributions for two types of conical applicators were simulated and estimated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods for radiation transport and a conventional treatment planning system (TPS). MC-derived and TPS-generated dose volume histograms (DVHs) and dose distribution data were compared for both the conical and round applicators for benchmarking purposes. Agreement using the gamma-index test was > or = 99.95% for distance to agreement and dose accuracy criteria of 2 mm and 2%, respectively. After observing good agreement, TPS DVHs and dose distributions for the conical and round applicators were obtained and compared. Brachytherapy dose distributions generated using Pinnacle for ten CT data sets showed that the parallel-opposed beams of the conical applicators provided similar PTV coverage to the round applicators and reduced the maximum dose to skin, chest wall, and lung by up to 27%, 42%, and 43%, respectively. Brachytherapy dose distributions for the conical applicators have been generated using MC methods and entered into the Pinnacle TPS via the Tufts technique. Treatment planning metrics for the conical AccuBoost applicators were significantly improved in comparison to those for conventional electron beam breast boost.

  3. Novel D-shaped fiber fabrication method for saturable absorber application in the generation of ultra-short pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Safaei, R.; Rezayi, M.; Amiri, I. S.

    2017-08-01

    A cost-efficient, time-saving and effective technique for the fabrication of D-shaped fibers is presented, to provide a platform with a strong evanescent field to be used as a saturable absorber (SA). This technique provides flexibility by removing the required portion of the fiber, and a small polished length which offers a unique opportunity to deposit SA on its surface by simply submerging it in the SA solution without high losses. A compact fiber laser utilizing a graphene oxide coating on a fabricated D-shaped fiber as an SA capable of generating ultrashort pulses is designed and verified. We report the generation of ultrafast pulses as short as 227 fs with a 34.7 MHz repetition rate, having a 3 dB bandwidth of 14 nm at the 1570 nm center wavelength.

  4. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

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    R. Chellappa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The “shape filter” has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  5. 3D Shape-Encoded Particle Filter for Object Tracking and Its Application to Human Body Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chellappa R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a nonlinear state estimation approach using particle filters, for tracking objects whose approximate 3D shapes are known. The unnormalized conditional density for the solution to the nonlinear filtering problem leads to the Zakai equation, and is realized by the weights of the particles. The weight of a particle represents its geometric and temporal fit, which is computed bottom-up from the raw image using a shape-encoded filter. The main contribution of the paper is the design of smoothing filters for feature extraction combined with the adoption of unnormalized conditional density weights. The "shape filter" has the overall form of the predicted 2D projection of the 3D model, while the cross-section of the filter is designed to collect the gradient responses along the shape. The 3D-model-based representation is designed to emphasize the changes in 2D object shape due to motion, while de-emphasizing the variations due to lighting and other imaging conditions. We have found that the set of sparse measurements using a relatively small number of particles is able to approximate the high-dimensional state distribution very effectively. As a measures to stabilize the tracking, the amount of random diffusion is effectively adjusted using a Kalman updating of the covariance matrix. For a complex problem of human body tracking, we have successfully employed constraints derived from joint angles and walking motion.

  6. A Brachytherapy Plan Evaluation Tool for Interstitial Applications

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    Surega Anbumani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiobiological metrics such as tumor control probability (TCP and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP help in assessing the quality of brachytherapy plans. Application of such metrics in clinics as well as research is still inadequate. This study presents the implementation of two indigenously designed plan evaluation modules: Brachy_TCP and Brachy_NTCP. Evaluation tools were constructed to compute TCP and NTCP from dose volume histograms (DVHs of any interstitial brachytherapy treatment plan. The computation module was employed to estimate probabilities of tumor control and normal tissue complications in ten cervical cancer patients based on biologically effective equivalent uniform dose (BEEUD. The tumor control and normal tissue morbidity were assessed with clinical followup and were scored. The acute toxicity was graded using common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE version 4.0. Outcome score was found to be correlated with the TCP/NTCP estimates. Thus, the predictive ability of the estimates was quantified with the clinical outcomes. Biologically effective equivalent uniform dose-based formalism was found to be effective in predicting the complexities and disease control.

  7. The application of Geant4 simulation code for brachytherapy treatment

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    Agostinelli, S; Garelli, S; Paoli, G; Nieminen, P; Pia, M G

    2000-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapeutic modality that makes use of radionuclides to deliver a high radiation dose to a well-defined volume while sparing surrounding healthy structures. At the National Institute for Cancer Research of Genova a High Dose Rate remote afterloading system provides Ir(192) endocavitary brachytherapy treatments. We studied the possibility to use the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit in brachytherapy for calculation of complex physical parameters, not directly available by experiment al measurements, used in treatment planning dose deposition models.

  8. Introduction of novel 3D-printed superficial applicators for high-dose-rate skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma-Louise; Tonino Baldion, Anna; Thomas, Christopher; Burrows, Tom; Byrne, Nick; Newton, Victoria; Aldridge, Sarah

    Custom-made surface mold applicators often allow more flexibility when carrying out skin brachytherapy, particularly for small treatment areas with high surface obliquity. They can, however, be difficult to manufacture, particularly if there is a lack of experience in superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy techniques or with limited resources. We present a novel method of manufacturing superficial brachytherapy applicators utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-printing techniques. We describe the treatment planning process and the process of applicator manufacture. The treatment planning process, with the introduction of a pre-plan, allows for an "ideal" catheter arrangement within an applicator to be determined, exploiting varying catheter orientations, heights, and curvatures if required. The pre-plan arrangement is then 3D printed to the exact specifications of the pre-plan applicator design. This results in improved target volume coverage and improved sparing of organs at risk. Using a pre-plan technique for ideal catheter placement followed by automated 3D-printed applicator manufacture has greatly improved the entire process of superficial high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment. We are able to design and manufacture flexible, well-fitting, superior quality applicators resulting in a more efficient and improved patient pathway and patient experience. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Density-Based 3D Shape Descriptors

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    Schmitt Francis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel probabilistic framework for the extraction of density-based 3D shape descriptors using kernel density estimation. Our descriptors are derived from the probability density functions (pdf of local surface features characterizing the 3D object geometry. Assuming that the shape of the 3D object is represented as a mesh consisting of triangles with arbitrary size and shape, we provide efficient means to approximate the moments of geometric features on a triangle basis. Our framework produces a number of 3D shape descriptors that prove to be quite discriminative in retrieval applications. We test our descriptors and compare them with several other histogram-based methods on two 3D model databases, Princeton Shape Benchmark and Sculpteur, which are fundamentally different in semantic content and mesh quality. Experimental results show that our methodology not only improves the performance of existing descriptors, but also provides a rigorous framework to advance and to test new ones.

  10. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman; Mourtada, Firas A.; Taylor, Russell H.

    1999-01-01

    . Dose rate calculations are based on the sosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes...

  11. A Monte Carlo dosimetry study using Henschke applicator for cervical brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Lee, Chung-Chi; Wu, Ching-Jung; Tung, Chuan-Jong

    2010-07-01

    In recent years the Henschke applicator has been widely used for gynecologic patients treated by brachytherapy in Taiwan. However, the commercial brachytherapy planning system did not properly evaluate the dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator. Since the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology advised that the effect of source shielding should be incorporated into the brachytherapy planning system, it required calculation and comparison of the dose distribution around the applicator. This study used the Monte Carlo MCNP code to simulate the dose distribution in a water phantom that contained the Henschke applicator with one tandem and two ovoids. Three dwell positions of a high dose rate 192Ir source were simulated by including and excluding the applicator. The mesh tally option of the MCNP was applied to facilitate the calculation of a large number of tallies in the phantom. The voxel size effect and the charge particle equilibrium were studied by comparing the results calculated with different tally options. The calculated results showed that the brachytherapy planning system overestimated the rectal dose and that the shielding material in the applicator contributed more than 40% to the rectal dose.

  12. Brachytherapy optimal planning with application to intravascular radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadegh, P; Mourtada, F A; Taylor, R H; Anderson, J H

    1999-09-01

    We have been studying brachytherapy planning with the objective of minimizing the maximum deviation of the delivered dose from prescribed dose bounds for treatment volumes. A general framework for optimal treatment planning is presented and the minmax optimization is formulated as a linear program. Dose rate calculations are based on the dosimetry formulation of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group 43. We apply the technique to optimal planning for intravascular brachytherapy of intimal hyperplasia using ultrasound data and 192Ir seeds. The planning includes determination of an optimal dwell-time sequence for a train of seeds that deliver radiation while stepping through the vessel lesion. The results illustrate the advantage of this strategy over the common approach of delivering radiation by positioning a single train of seeds along the whole lesion.

  13. 3D-printed applicators for high dose rate brachytherapy: Dosimetric assessment at different infill percentage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Rosalinda; Vavassori, Andrea; Bazani, Alessia; Ciardo, Delia; Pansini, Floriana; Spoto, Ruggero; Sammarco, Vittorio; Cattani, Federica; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja

    2016-12-01

    Dosimetric assessment of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicators, printed in 3D with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) at different infill percentage. A low-cost, desktop, 3D printer (Hamlet 3DX100, Hamlet, Dublin, IE) was used for manufacturing simple HDR applicators, reproducing typical geometries in brachytherapy: cylindrical (common in vaginal treatment) and flat configurations (generally used to treat superficial lesions). Printer accuracy was investigated through physical measurements. The dosimetric consequences of varying the applicator's density by tuning the printing infill percentage were analysed experimentally by measuring depth dose profiles and superficial dose distribution with Gafchromic EBT3 films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ). Dose distributions were compared to those obtained with a commercial superficial applicator. Measured printing accuracy was within 0.5mm. Dose attenuation was not sensitive to the density of the material. Surface dose distribution comparison of the 3D printed flat applicators with respect to the commercial superficial applicator showed an overall passing rate greater than 94% for gamma analysis with 3% dose difference criteria, 3mm distance-to-agreement criteria and 10% dose threshold. Low-cost 3D printers are a promising solution for the customization of the HDR brachytherapy applicators. However, further assessment of 3D printing techniques and regulatory materials approval are required for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

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    Reyes-Rivera, E., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Sosa, M., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Reyes, U., E-mail: eric-1985@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: uvaldoreyes@fisica.ugto.mx; Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de, E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Córdova, T., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx; Gil-Villegas, A., E-mail: bernal@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx, E-mail: gil@fisica.ugto.mx [División de Ciencias e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 León, Gto. (Mexico); Monzón, E., E-mail: emonzon@imss.gob.mx [Unidad de Alta Especialidad No.1, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Léon, Gto. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  15. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rivera, E.; Sosa, M.; Reyes, U.; Monzón, E.; de Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José; Córdova, T.; Gil-Villegas, A.

    2014-11-01

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  16. A real-time applicator position monitoring system for gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy

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    Xia, Junyi, E-mail: junyi-xia@uiowa.edu; Waldron, Timothy; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a real-time applicator position monitoring system (RAPS) for intracavitary brachytherapy using an infrared camera and reflective markers. Methods: 3D image-guided brachytherapy requires high accuracy of applicator localization; however, applicator displacement can happen during patient transfer for imaging and treatment delivery. No continuous applicator position monitoring system is currently available. The RAPS system was developed for real-time applicator position monitoring without additional radiation dose to patients. It includes an infrared camera, reflective markers, an infrared illuminator, and image processing software. After reflective markers are firmly attached to the applicator and the patient body, applicator displacement can be measured by computing the relative change in distance between the markers. The reflective markers are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible, which is suitable for MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy paradigm. In our prototype, a Microsoft Kinect sensor with a resolution of 640 by 480 pixels is used as an infrared camera. A phantom study was carried out to compare RAPS' measurements with known displacements ranging from −15 to +15 mm. A reproducibility test was also conducted. Results: The RAPS can achieve 4 frames/s using a laptop with Intel{sup ®} Core™2 Duo processor. When the pixel size is 0.95 mm, the difference between RAPS' measurements and known shift values varied from 0 to 0.8 mm with the mean value of 0.1 mm and a standard deviation of 0.44 mm. The system reproducibility was within 0.6 mm after ten reposition trials. Conclusions: This work demonstrates the feasibility of a real-time infrared camera based gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy applicator monitoring system. Less than 1 mm accuracy is achieved when using an off-the-shelf infrared camera.

  17. Custom-made micro applicators for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of chronic psoriasis

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    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we present the treatment of the psoriatic nail beds of patients refractory to standard therapies using high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. The custom-made micro applicators (CMMA were designed and constructed for radiation dose delivery to small curvy targets with complicated topology. The role of the HDR brachytherapy treatment was to stimulate the T cells for an increased immune response. Material and methods: The patient diagnosed with psoriatic nail beds refractory to standard therapies received monthly subunguinal injections that caused significant pain and discomfort in both hands. The clinical target was defined as the length from the fingertip to the distal interphalangeal joint. For the accurate and reproducible setup in the multi-fractional treatment delivery, the CMMAs were designed. Five needles were embedded into the dense plastic mesh and covered with 5 mm bolus material for each micro applicator. Five CMMAs were designed, resulting in the usage of 25 catheters in total. Results: The prescription dose was planned to the depth of the anterior surface of the distal phalanx, allowing for the sparing of the surrounding tissue. The total number of the active dwell positions was 145 with step size of 5 mm. The total treatment time was 115 seconds with a 7.36 Ci activity of the 192Ir source. The treatment resulted in good pain control. The patient did not require further injections to the nail bed. After this initial treatment, additional two patients with similar symptoms received HDR brachytherapy. The treatment outcome was favorable in all cases. Conclusions : The first HDR brachytherapy treatment of psoriasis of the nail bed is presented. The initial experience revealed that brachytherapy treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in adequate control of the disease. A larger cohort of patients will be required for additional conclusions related to the long-term clinical benefits.

  18. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

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    Sinha, Neeharika [Department of Sciences, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Cifter, Gizem [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sajo, Erno [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Electronic Materials Research Institute and Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ngwa, Wilfred, E-mail: wngwa@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application

  19. Evaluation of PC-ISO for customized, 3D Printed, gynecologic 192-Ir HDR brachytherapy applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, J Adam M; Mellis, Katherine; Sethi, Rajni; Siauw, Timmy; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Garg, Animesh; Goldberg, Ken; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation attenuation properties of PC-ISO, a commercially available, biocompatible, sterilizable 3D printing material, and its suitability for customized, single-use gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy applicators that have the potential for accurate guiding of seeds through linear and curved internal channels. A custom radiochromic film dosimetry apparatus was 3D-printed in PC-ISO with a single catheter channel and a slit to hold a film segment. The apparatus was designed specifically to test geometry pertinent for use of this material in a clinical setting. A brachytherapy dose plan was computed to deliver a cylindrical dose distribution to the film. The dose plan used an 192Ir source and was normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm from the channel. The material was evaluated by comparing the film exposure to an identical test done in water. The Hounsfield unit (HU) distributions were computed from a CT scan of the apparatus and compared to the HU distribution of water and the HU distribution of a commercial GYN cylinder applicator. The dose depth curve of PC-ISO as measured by the radiochromic film was within 1% of water between 1 cm and 6 cm from the channel. The mean HU was -10 for PC-ISO and -1 for water. As expected, the honeycombed structure of the PC-ISO 3D printing process created a moderate spread of HU values, but the mean was comparable to water. PC-ISO is sufficiently water-equivalent to be compatible with our HDR brachytherapy planning system and clinical workflow and, therefore, it is suitable for creating custom GYN brachytherapy applicators. Our current clinical practice includes the use of custom GYN applicators made of commercially available PC-ISO when doing so can improve the patient's treatment. 

  20. A novel system for commissioning brachytherapy applicators: example of a ring applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Van den Bosch, Michiel R.; Voncken, Robert; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-11-01

    A novel system was developed to improve commissioning and quality assurance of brachytherapy applicators used in high dose rate (HDR). It employs an imaging panel to create reference images and to measure dwell times and dwell positions. As an example: two ring applicators of the same model were evaluated. An applicator was placed on the surface of an imaging panel and a HDR 192Ir source was positioned in an imaging channel above the panel to generate an image of the applicator, using the gamma photons of the brachytherapy source. The applicator projection image was overlaid with the images acquired by capturing the gamma photons emitted by the source dwelling inside the applicator. We verified 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 cm interdwell distances for different offsets, applicator inclinations and transfer tube curvatures. The data analysis was performed using in-house developed software capable of processing the data in real time, defining catheters and creating movies recording the irradiation procedure. One applicator showed up to 0.3 cm difference from the expected position for a specific dwell position. The problem appeared intermittently. The standard deviations of the remaining dwell positions (40 measurements) were less than 0.05 cm. The second ring applicator had a similar reproducibility with absolute coordinate differences from expected values ranging from  ‑0.10 up to 0.18 cm. The curvature of the transfer tube can lead to differences larger than 0.1 cm whilst the inclination of the applicator showed a negligible effect. The proposed method allows the verification of all steps of the irradiation, providing accurate information about dwell positions and dwell times. It allows the verification of small interdwell positions (⩽0.1 cm) and reduces measurement time. In addition, no additional radiation source is necessary since the HDR 192Ir source is used to generate an image of the applicator.

  1. MO-A-BRC-00: TG167: Clinical Recommendations for Innovative Brachytherapy Devices and Applicators

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    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Although a multicenter, Phase III, prospective, randomized trial is the gold standard for evidence-based medicine, it is rarely used to evaluate innovative radiotherapy devices because of many practical and ethical reasons. It is usually sufficient to compare the dose distributions and dose rates for determining equivalence of the innovative device to an existing one. Thus, quantitative evaluation of the dosimetric characteristics of an innovative brachytherapy device or application is a critical part in which physicists are actively involved. The physicist’s role, along with physician colleagues, in this process is highlighted for innovative products or applications and includes evaluation of 1) dosimetric considerations for clinical implementation (including calibrations, dose calculations, and radiobiological aspects) to comply with existing societal dosimetric prerequisites for sources in routine clinical use, 2) risks and benefits from regulatory and safety perspectives, and 3) resource assessment and preparedness. Further, calibration methods should be traceable to a primary standards dosimetry laboratory such as NIST in the U.S. or to other primary standards dosimetry laboratory located elsewhere. Clinical users should follow standards as approved by their country’s regulatory agencies that approved such a brachytherapy device. Integration of this system into the medical source calibration infrastructure of secondary standard dosimetry laboratories such as the ADCLs is encouraged before a source is introduced into widespread routine clinical use. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO have developed guidelines for the safe and consistent application of brachytherapy using innovative brachytherapy devices and applications. The current report covers regulatory approvals, calibration, dose calculations, radiobiological issues, and overall safety concerns that should be addressed during the commissioning stage preceding clinical use. These guidelines are based on review of

  2. Synthesis of phosphosilicate matrix for application to brachytherapy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Aline B.F., E-mail: linebfs@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Santos, Ana M.M.; Ferraz, Wilmar B., E-mail: amms@cdtn.b, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b [Center of Nuclear Technology Development (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Brachytherapy with beta sources can be useful for in situ radiotherapy of cancers where tiny radioactive seeds are injected directly into the tumor. Phosphorus {sup 31}P can be activated to b-emitter {sup 32}P by neutron activation with a half-life of 14.3 days. In this work, phosphosilicate matrices were synthesized through sol-gel process by hydrolysis and condensation of the tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) under two different conditions of synthesis. In both conditions the phosphoric acid and drying control chemical additives (DCCA's) were the same. Three drying control chemical additives were utilized: propylene carbonate, N,N-dimethylformamide and ethylene glycol. The casting solutions were prepared with phosphorus content of 3.2 wt.% and xerogels were thermally treated at 900 deg C. Different microstructures were observed under different conditions of synthesis. The microstructures of phosphosilicate matrices obtained with ethylene glycol and without DCCA's have shown the presence of a globular structure regions with large amount of phosphorous. (author)

  3. Applicator Attenuation Effect on Dose Calculations of Esophageal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using EDR2 Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Daghigh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Interaluminal brachytherapy is one of the important methods of esophageal cancer treatment. The effect of applicator attenuation is not considered in dose calculation method released by AAPM-TG43. In this study, the effect of High-Dose Rate (HDR brachytherapy esophageal applicator on dose distribution was surveyed in HDR brachytherapy. Materials and Methods A cylindrical PMMA phantom was built in order to be inserted by various sizes of esophageal applicators. EDR2 films were placed at 33 mm from Ir-192 source and irradiated with 1.5 Gy after planning using treatment planning system for all applicators. Results The results of film dosimetry in reference point for 6, 8, 10, and 20 mm applicators were 1.54, 1.53, 1.48, and 1.50 Gy, respectively. The difference between practical and treatment planning system results was 0.023 Gy (

  4. Novel simple templates for reproducible positioning of skin applicators in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Silvia Rodríguez; Perez-Calatayud, Maria Jose; Bautista, Juan Antonio; Carmona, Vicente; Celada, Francisco; Tormo, Alejandro; García-Martinez, Teresa; Richart, José; Ortega, Manuel Santos; Silla, Magda; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Esteya and Valencia surface applicators are designed to treat skin tumors using brachytherapy. In clinical practice, in order to avoid errors that may affect the treatment outcome, there are two issues that need to be carefully addressed. First, the selected applicator for the treatment should provide adequate margin for the target, and second, the applicator has to be precisely positioned before each treatment fraction. In this work, we describe the development and use of a new acrylic templates named Template La Fe-ITIC. They have been designed specifically to help the clinical user in the selection of the correct applicator, and to assist the medical staff in reproducing the positioning of the applicator. These templates are freely available upon request. Templates that were developed by University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe (La Fe) and Hospital Clínica Benidorm (ITIC) in cooperation with Elekta, consist of a thin sheet made of transparent acrylic. For each applicator, a crosshair and two different circles are drawn on these templates: the inner one corresponds to the useful beam, while the outer one represents the external perimeter of the applicator. The outer circle contains slits that facilitate to draw a circle on the skin of the patient for exact positioning of the applicator. In addition, there are two perpendicular rulers to define the adequate margin. For each applicator size, a specific template was developed. The templates have been used successfully in our institutions for more than 50 patients' brachytherapy treatments. They are currently being used for Esteya and Valencia applicators. The template La Fe-ITIC is simple and practical. It improves both the set-up time and reproducibility. It helps to establish the adequate margins, an essential point in the clinical outcome.

  5. Novel simple templates for reproducible positioning of skin applicators in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rodríguez Villalba

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Esteya and Valencia surface applicators are designed to treat skin tumors using brachytherapy. In clinical practice, in order to avoid errors that may affect the treatment outcome, there are two issues that need to be carefully addressed. First, the selected applicator for the treatment should provide adequate margin for the target, and second, the applicator has to be precisely positioned before each treatment fraction. In this work, we describe the development and use of a new acrylic templates named Template La Fe-ITIC. They have been designed specifically to help the clinical user in the selection of the correct applicator, and to assist the medical staff in reproducing the positioning of the applicator. These templates are freely available upon request. Material and methods: Templates that were developed by University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe (La Fe and Hospital Clínica Benidorm (ITIC in cooperation with Elekta, consist of a thin sheet made of transparent acrylic. For each applicator, a crosshair and two different circles are drawn on these templates: the inner one corresponds to the useful beam, while the outer one represents the external perimeter of the applicator. The outer circle contains slits that facilitate to draw a circle on the skin of the patient for exact positioning of the applicator. In addition, there are two perpendicular rulers to define the adequate margin. For each applicator size, a specific template was developed. Results: The templates have been used successfully in our institutions for more than 50 patients’ brachytherapy treatments. They are currently being used for Esteya and Valencia applicators. Conclusions : The template La Fe-ITIC is simple and practical. It improves both the set-up time and reproducibility. It helps to establish the adequate margins, an essential point in the clinical outcome.

  6. High dose rate prostate brachytherapy: an overview of the rationale, experience and emerging applications in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challapalli, A; Jones, E; Harvey, C; Hellawell, G O; Mangar, S A

    2012-01-01

    The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy places this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in radiotherapy. This review article will explore the rationale for HDR brachytherapy as a highly conformal method of dose delivery and safe dose escalation to the prostate, in addition to the particular radiobiological advantages it has over low dose rate and external beam radiotherapy. The encouraging outcome data and favourable toxicity profile will be discussed before looking at emerging applications for the future and how this procedure will feature alongside stereotactic radiosurgery. PMID:23118099

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy with customized applicators for malignant facial skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumeau, R; Renard-Oldrini, S; Courrech, F; Buchheit, I; Oldrini, G; Vogin, G; Peiffert, D

    2016-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a well-known treatment in the management of skin tumors. For facial or scalp lesions, applicators have been developed to deliver non-invasive treatment. We present cases treated with customized applicators with high dose rate system. Patients with poor performance status treated for malignant skin lesions of the scalp or the facial skin between 2011 and 2014 were studied. Afterloading devices were chosen between Freiburg(®) Flap, silicone-mold or wax applicators. The clinical target volume (CTV) was created by adding margins to lesions (10mm to 20mm). The dose schedules were 25Gy in five fractions for postoperative lesions, 30Gy in six fractions for exclusive treatments and a single session of 8Gy could be considered for palliative treatments. In 30 months, 11 patients received a treatment for a total of 12 lesions. The median age was 80 years. The median follow-up was 17 months and the 2-year local control rate was 91%. The mean CTV surface was 41.1cm(2) with a mean thickness of 6.1mm. We conceived three wax applicators, used our silicone-mold eight times and the Freiburg(®) Flap one time. We observed only low-grade radiodermitis (grade I: 50%, grade II: 33%), and no high-grade skin toxicity. High dose rate brachytherapy with customized applicators for facial skin and scalp lesions is efficient and safe. It is a good modality to treat complex lesions in patients unfit for invasive treatment. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated high-dose rate brachytherapy treatment planning for a single-channel vaginal cylinder applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhong; Klages, Peter; Tan, Jun; Chi, Yujie; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Yang, Ming; Hrycushko, Brian; Medin, Paul; Pompos, Arnold; Jiang, Steve; Albuquerque, Kevin; Jia, Xun

    2017-06-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed manually and/or with aids of preplanned templates. In general, the standard of care would be elevated by conducting an automated process to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human error, and reduce plan quality variations. Thus, our group is developing AutoBrachy, an automated HDR brachytherapy planning suite of modules used to augment a clinical treatment planning system. This paper describes our proof-of-concept module for vaginal cylinder HDR planning that has been fully developed. After a patient CT scan is acquired, the cylinder applicator is automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. The target CTV is generated based on physician-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of the dose calculation point, apex point and vaginal surface point, as well as the central applicator channel coordinates, and the corresponding dwell positions are determined according to their geometric relationship with the applicator and written to a structure file. Dwell times are computed through iterative quadratic optimization techniques. The planning information is then transferred to the treatment planning system through a DICOM-RT interface. The entire process was tested for nine patients. The AutoBrachy cylindrical applicator module was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinical grade quality. Computation times varied between 1 and 3 min on an Intel Xeon CPU E3-1226 v3 processor. All geometric components in the automated treatment plans were generated accurately. The applicator channel tip positions agreed with the manually identified positions with submillimeter deviations and the channel orientations between the plans agreed within less than 1 degree. The automatically generated plans obtained clinically acceptable quality.

  9. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Søren; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Gelineck, John; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-05-01

    To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method was developed and evaluated in 19 patient MR examinations with ring applicator (plastic: 14, titanium: 5). MR applicator reconstruction uncertainties related to inter-observer variation were evaluated. The catheters were visible in the plastic applicator on T1-weighted images in phantom and in 14/14 clinical applications. On T2-weighted images, the catheters appeared weaker but still visible in phantom and in 13/14 MR clinical applications. In the titanium applicator, the catheters could not be separated from the artifacts from the applicator itself. However, these artifacts could be used to localize both titanium ring applicator (5/5 clinical applications) and needles (6/6 clinical applications). Standard deviations of inter-observer differences were below 2 mm in all directions. 3D applicator reconstruction based on MR imaging could be performed for plastic and titanium applicators. Plastic applicators proved well to be suited for MRI-based reconstruction. For improved practicability of titanium applicator reconstruction, development of MR applicator markers is essential. Reconstruction of titanium applicator and needles at 1.5 T MR requires geometric evaluations in phantoms before using the applicator in patients.

  10. 3D shape measurement system developed on mobile platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhoujie; Chang, Meng; Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Qican

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement technology based on structured light has become one hot research field inspired by the increasing requirements. Many methods have been implemented and applied in the industry applications, but most of their equipments are large and complex, cannot be portable. Meanwhile, the popularity of the smart mobile terminals, such as smart phones, provides a platform for the miniaturization and portability of this technology. The measurement system based on phase-shift algorithm and Gray-code pattern under the Android platform on a mobile phone is mainly studied and developed, and it has been encapsulated into a mobile phone application in order to reconstruct 3-D shape data in the employed smart phone easily and quickly. The experimental results of two measured object are given in this paper and demonstrate the application we developed in the mobile platform is effective.

  11. SU-F-T-25: Design and Implementation of a Multi-Purpose Applicator for Pelvic Brachytherapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogue, J; Parsai, E [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The current generation of inflatable multichannel brachytherapy applicators, such as the Varian Capri, have limited implementation to only vaginal and rectal cancers. While there are similar designs utilizing rigid, non-inflatable applicators, these alternatives could cause increased dose to surrounding tissue due to air gaps. Modification of the Capri could allow for easier treatment planning by reducing the number of channels and increased versatility by modifying the applicator to include an attachable single tandem for cervical or multiple tandems for endometrial applications. Methods: A Varian Capri applicator was simulated in water to replicate a patient. Multiple plans were optimized to deliver a prescribed dose of 100 cGy at 5mm away from the exterior of the applicator using six to thirteen existing channels. The current model was expanded upon to include a detachable tandem or multiple tandoms to increase its functionality to both cervical and endometrial cancers. Models were constructed in both threedimensional rendering software and Monte Carlo to allow prototyping and simulations. Results: Treatment plans utilizing six to thirteen channels produced limited dosimetric differences between channel arrangements, with a seven channel plan very closely approximating the thirteen channels. It was concluded that only seven channels would be necessary in future simulations to give an accurate representation of the applicator. Tandem attachments were prototyped for the applicator to demonstrate the ease of which they could be included. Future simulation in treatment planning software and Monte Carlo results will be presented to further define the ideal applicator geometry Conclusion: The current Capri applicator design could be easily modified to increase applicability to include cervical and endometrial treatments in addition to vaginal and rectal cancers. This new design helps in a more versatile single use applicator that can easily be inserted and to

  12. Reduction of MRI signal distortion from titanium intracavitary brachytherapy applicator by optimizing pulse sequence parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Thomas P; Harkenrider, Matthew M; Surucu, Murat; Wood, Abbie M; Yacoub, Joseph H; Shea, Steven M

    2017-11-22

    To demonstrate that optimized pulse sequence parameters for a T2-weighted (T2w) fast spin echo acquisition reduced artifacts from a titanium brachytherapy applicator compared to conventional sequence parameters. Following Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, seven patients were successfully imaged with both standard sagittal T2w fast spin echo parameters (voxel size of 0.98 × 0.78 × 4.0 mm 3 ; readout bandwidth of 200 Hz/px; repetition time of 2800 ms; echo time of 91 ms; echo train length of 15; 36 slices; and imaging time of 3:16 min) and an additional optimized T2w sequence (voxel size of 0.98 × 0.98 × 4.0 mm 3 ; readout bandwidth of 500 Hz/px; repetition time of 3610 ms; echo time of 91 ms; echo train length of 25; 18-36 slices; and imaging time of 1:15-2:30 min), which had demonstrated artifact reduction in prior phantom work. Visualized intracavitary tandem was hand-segmented by two of the authors. Three body imaging radiologists assessed image quality and intraobserver agreement scores were analyzed. The average segmented volume of the intracavitary applicator significantly (p parameters as compared to the standard pulse sequence. Comparison of experimental and standard T2w sequence qualitative scores for each reviewer showed no significant differences between the two techniques. This study demonstrated that pulse sequence parameter optimization can significantly reduce distortion artifact from titanium applicators while maintaining image quality and reasonable imaging times. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dose Modification Factor Analysis of Multi-Lumen Brachytherapy Applicator with Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Eric Alan

    Multi-lumen applicators like the Contura (SenoRx, Inc.) are used in partial breast irradiation (PBI) brachytherapy in instances where asymmetric dose distributions are desired, for example, when the applicator surface-to-skin thickness is small (<7mm). In these instances, the air outside the patient and the lung act as a poor scattering medium, scattering less dose back into the breast tissue which affects the dose distribution. Many commercial treatment planning systems do not correct for tissue heterogeneity, which results in inaccuracies in the planned dose distribution. This deviation has been quantified as the dose modification factor (DMF), equal to the ratio of the dose rate at 1cm beyond the applicator surface, with homogenous medium, to the dose rate at 1cm with heterogeneous medium. This investigation intends to model the Contura applicator with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code (MCNP, Los Alamos National Labs), determine a DMF through simulation, and correlate to previous measurements. Taking all geometrical considerations into account, an accurate model of the Contura balloon applicator was created in MCNP. This model was used to run simulations of symmetric and asymmetric plans. The dose modification factor was found to be dependent on the simulated water phantom geometry, with cuboid geometry yielding a max DMF of 1.0664. The same measurements taken using a spherical geometry water phantom gave a DMF of 1.1221. It was also seen that the difference in DMF between symmetric and asymmetric plans using the Contura applicator is minimal.

  14. TU-AB-201-07: Image Guided Endorectal HDR Brachytherapy Using a Compliant Balloon Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, G; Goodman, K [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy is an option to deliver a focal, high-dose radiotherapy to rectal tumors for patients undergoing non-operative management. We investigate a new multichannel, MR compatible applicator with a novel balloon-based design to provide improved treatment geometry. We report on the initial clinical experience using this applicator. Methods: Patients were enrolled on an IRB-approved, dose-escalation protocol evaluating the use of the anorectal (AR-1) applicator (Ancer Medical, Hialeah, FL), a multichannel applicator with two concentric balloons. The inner balloon supports 8 source lumens; the compliant outer balloon expands to separate the normal rectal wall and the source lumens, yet deforms around a firm, exophytic rectal mass, leading to dose escalation to tumor while sparing normal rectum. Under general anesthesia, gold fiducial markers were inserted above and below the tumor, and the AR applicator was placed in the rectum. MRI-based treatment plans were prepared to deliver 15 Gy in 3 weekly fractions to the target volume while sparing healthy rectal tissue, bladder, bowel and anal muscles. Prior to each treatment, CBCT/Fluoroscopy were used to place the applicator in the treatment position and confirm the treatment geometry using rigid registration of the CBCT and planning MRI. After registration of the applicator images, positioning was evaluated based on the match of the gold markers. Results: Highly conformal treatment plans were achieved. MR compatibility of the applicator enabled good tumor visualization. In spite of the non-rigid nature of the applicators and the fact that a new applicator was used at each treatment session, treatment geometry was reproducible to within 2.5 mm. Conclusions: This is the first report on using the AR applicator in patients. Highly conformal plans, confidence in MRI target delineation, in combination with reproducible treatment geometry provide encouraging feedback for continuation with

  15. Thermal Characteristics of ThermoBrachytherapy Surface Applicators (TBSA) for Treating Chestwall Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunachalam, K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Craciunescu, O. I.; Schlorff, J. L.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study temperature and thermal dose distributions of ThermoBrachytherapy Surface Applicators (TBSA) developed for concurrent or sequential high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and microwave hyperthermia treatment of chest wall recurrence and other superficial disease. Methods A steady state thermodynamics model coupled with the fluid dynamics of water bolus and electromagnetic radiation of hyperthermia applicator is used to characterize the temperature distributions achievable with TBSA applicators in an elliptical phantom model of the human torso. Power deposited by 915 MHz conformal microwave array (CMA) applicators is used to assess the specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions of rectangular (500 cm2) and L-shaped (875 cm2) TBSA. The SAR distribution in tissue and fluid flow distribution inside the Dual-Input Dual-Output (DIDO) water bolus are coupled to solve the steady state temperature and thermal dose distributions of rectangular TBSA (R-TBSA) for superficial tumor targets extending 10–15 mm beneath the skin surface. Thermal simulations are carried out for a range of bolus inlet temperature (Tb=38–43°C), water flow rate (Qb=2–4 L/min) and tumor blood perfusion (ωb=2–5 kg/m3/s) to characterize their influence on thermal dosimetry. Results Steady state SAR patterns of R- and L-TBSA demonstrate the ability to produce conformal and localized power deposition inside tumor target sparing surrounding normal tissues and nearby critical organs. Acceptably low variation in tissue surface cooling and surface temperature homogeneity was observed for the new DIDO bolus at 2 L/min water flow rate. Temperature depth profiles and thermal dose volume histograms indicate bolus inlet temperature (Tb) to be the most influential factor on thermal dosimetry. A 42 °C water bolus was observed to be the optimal choice for superficial tumors extending 10–15 mm from the surface even under significant blood perfusion. Lower bolus temperature may be chosen to

  16. Dosimetric optimization of a conical breast brachytherapy applicator for improved skin dose sparing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J. [Biomedical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Both the AccuBoost D-shaped and round applicators have been dosimetrically characterized and clinically used to treat patients with breast cancer. While the round applicators provide conformal dose coverage, under certain clinical circumstances the breast skin dose may be higher than preferred. The purpose of this study was to modify the round applicators to minimize skin dose while not substantially affecting dose uniformity within the target volume and reducing the treatment time. Methods: In order to irradiate the intended volume while sparing critical structures such as the skin, the current round applicator design has been augmented through the addition of an internal truncated cone (i.e., frustum) shield. Monte Carlo methods and clinical constraints were used to design the optimal cone applicator. With the cone applicator now defined as the entire assembly including the surrounding tungsten-alloy shell holding the HDR {sup 192}Ir source catheter, the applicator height was reduced to diminish the treatment time while minimizing skin dose. Monte Carlo simulation results were validated using both radiochromic film and ionization chamber measurements based on established techniques. Results: The optimal cone applicators diminished the maximum skin dose by 15%-32% (based on the applicator diameter and breast separation) with the tumor dose reduced by less than 3% for a constant exposure time. Furthermore, reduction in applicator height diminished the treatment time by up to 30%. Radiochromic film and ionization chamber dosimetric results in phantom agreed with Monte Carlo simulation results typically within 3%. Larger differences were outside the treatment volume in low dose regions or associated with differences between the measurement and Monte Carlo simulation environments. Conclusions: A new radiotherapy treatment device was developed and dosimetrically characterized. This set of applicators significantly reduces the skin dose and treatment time while

  17. Dosimetric optimization of a conical breast brachytherapy applicator for improved skin dose sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun; Rivard, Mark J

    2010-11-01

    Both the AccuBoost D-shaped and round applicators have been dosimetrically characterized and clinically used to treat patients with breast cancer. While the round applicators provide conformal dose coverage, under certain clinical circumstances the breast skin dose may be higher than preferred. The purpose of this study was to modify the round applicators to minimize skin dose while not substantially affecting dose uniformity within the target volume and reducing the treatment time. In order to irradiate the intended volume while sparing critical structures such as the skin, the current round applicator design has been augmented through the addition of an internal truncated cone (i.e., frustum) shield. Monte Carlo methods and clinical constraints were used to design the optimal cone applicator. With the cone applicator now defined as the entire assembly including the surrounding tungsten-alloy shell holding the HDR 192Ir source catheter, the applicator height was reduced to diminish the treatment time while minimizing skin dose. Monte Carlo simulation results were validated using both radiochromic film and ionization chamber measurements based on established techniques. The optimal cone applicators diminished the maximum skin dose by 15%-32% (based on the applicator diameter and breast separation) with the tumor dose reduced by less than 3% for a constant exposure time. Furthermore, reduction in applicator height diminished the treatment time by up to 30%. Radiochromic film and ionization chamber dosimetric results in phantom agreed with Monte Carlo simulation results typically within 3%. Larger differences were outside the treatment volume in low dose regions or associated with differences between the measurement and Monte Carlo simulation environments. A new radiotherapy treatment device was developed and dosimetrically characterized. This set of applicators significantly reduces the skin dose and treatment time while retaining uniform target dose.

  18. SU-F-T-08: Brachytherapy Film Dosimetry in a Water Phantom for a Ring and Tandem HDR Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B; Grelewicz, Z; Kang, Z; Cutright, D; Gopalakrishnan, M; Sathiaseelan, V; Zhang, H [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of dose measurement using new generation EBT3 film was explored in a water phantom for a ring and tandem HDR applicator for measurements tracking mucosal dose during cervical brachytherapy. Methods: An experimental fixture was assembled to position the applicator in a water phantom. Prior to measurement, calibration curves for EBT3 film in water and in solidwater were verified. EBT3 film was placed at different known locations around the applicator in the water tank. A CT scan of the phantom with applicator was performed using clinical protocol. A typical cervical cancer treatment plan was then generated by Oncentra brachytherapy planning system. A dose of 500 cGy was prescribed to point A (2 cm, 2 cm). Locations measured by film included the outer surface of the ring, measurement point A-m (2.2 cm, 2.2 cm), and profiles extending from point A-m parallel to the tandem. Three independent measurements were conducted. The doses recorded by film were carefully analyzed and compared with values calculated by the treatment planning system. Results: Assessment of the EBT3 films indicate that the dose at point A matches the values predicted by the planning system. Dose to the point A-m was 411.5 cGy, and the outer circumferential surface dose of the ring was between 500 and 1150 cGy. It was found that from the point A-m, the dose drops 60% within 4.5 cm on the line parallel to the tandem. The measurement doses agree with the treatment planning system. Conclusion: Use of EBT3 film is feasible for in-water measurements for brachytherapy. A carefully machined apparatus will likely improve measurement accuracy. In a typical plan, our study found that the ring surface dose can be 2.5 times larger than the point A prescription dose. EBT3 film can be used to monitor mucosal dose in brachytherapy treatments.

  19. MO-AB-BRA-02: Modeling Nanoparticle-Eluting Spacer Degradation During Brachytherapy Application with in Situ Dose-Painting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boateng, F [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy application with in situ dose-painting using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers has been proposed as an innovative approach to increase therapeutic efficacy during brachytherapy. This work investigates the dosimetric impact of slow versus burst release of GNP from next generation biodegradable spacers. Methods: Mathematical models were developed based on experimental data to study the release of GNP from a spacer designed with FDA approved poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer. The diffusion controlled released process and PLGA polymer degradation kinetics was incorporated in the calculations for the first time. An in vivo determined diffusion coefficient was used for determining the concentration profiles and corresponding dose enhancement based on initial GNP-loading concentrations of 7 mg/g. Results: The results showed that there is significant delay before the concentration profile of GNP diffusion in the tumor is similar to that when burst release is assumed as in previous studies. For example, in the case of burst release after spacer administration, it took up to 25 days for all the GNP to be released from the spacer using diffusion controlled release process only. However, it took up to 45 days when a combined model for both diffusion and polymer degradation processes was used. Based on the tumor concentration profiles, a significant dose enhancement factor (DEF >20%), could be attained at a tumor distances of 5 mm from a spacer loaded with 10 nm GNP sizes. Conclusion: The results highlight the need to take the slow release of GNP from spacers and factors such as biodegradation of polymers into account in research development of GNP-eluting spacers for brachytherapy applications with in-situ dose-painting using gold nanoparticles. The findings suggest that I-125 may be the more appropriate for such applications given the relatively longer half-live compared to other radioisotopes like Pd-103

  20. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O' Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  1. Clinical implementation of a novel applicator in high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Buzurovic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In this study, we present the clinical implementation of a novel transoral balloon centering esophageal applicator (BCEA and the initial clinical experience in high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy treatment of esophageal cancer, using this applicator. Material and methods: Acceptance testing and commissioning of the BCEA were performed prior to clinical use. Full performance testing was conducted including measurements of the dimensions and the catheter diameter, evaluation of the inflatable balloon consistency, visibility of the radio-opaque markers, congruence of the markers, absolute and relative accuracy of the HDR source in the applicator using the radiochromic film and source position simulator, visibility and digitization of the applicator on the computed tomography (CT images under the clinical conditions, and reproducibility of the offset. Clinical placement of the applicator, treatment planning, treatment delivery, and patient’s response to the treatment were elaborated as well. Results : The experiments showed sub-millimeter accuracy in the source positioning with distal position at 1270 mm. The digitization (catheter reconstruction was uncomplicated due to the good visibility of markers. The treatment planning resulted in a favorable dose distribution. This finding was pronounced for the treatment of the curvy anatomy of the lesion due to the improved repeatability and consistency of the delivered fractional dose to the patient, since the radioactive source was placed centrally within the lumen with respect to the clinical target due to the five inflatable balloons. Conclusions : The consistency of the BCEA positioning resulted in the possibility to deliver optimized non-uniform dose along the catheter, which resulted in an increase of the dose to the cancerous tissue and lower doses to healthy tissue. A larger number of patients and long-term follow-up will be required to investigate if the delivered optimized treatment can

  2. Initial clinical experience with the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant brachytherapy applicator for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashar, Catheryn M; Blair, Sarah; Wallace, Anne; Scanderbeg, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation is becoming increasingly popular. The Cianna single-entry high-dose-rate applicator, Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA), contains peripheral struts allowing greater planning flexibility for small-breasted women, technically easier insertion, and normal tissue exposure minimization. This study evaluates early clinical experience. Thirty patients treated with the SAVI with a median followup of 12 months were evaluated. The median age was 59.5. Tumor size averaged 0.9cm. Fifteen cancers were ductal carcinoma in situ (50%), 1 was invasive lobular (3.3%), 4 were tubular (6.7%), and the rest infiltrating ductal (40%). Most of them were estrogen receptor (ER) positive (90%). Nine women (30%) were premenopausal. Dosimetry was outstanding with median V90, V150, and V200 of 96.2%, 24.8, and 12.8cc. There were no symptomatic seromas, and one report of asymptomatic fat necrosis seen on mammogram at 1 year. In patients who had skin spacing of less than 1cm, the median skin dose was 245cGy/fraction. The median rib and lung dose per fraction for those patients with either structure less than 1cm was 340 and 255cGy (75% of prescribed dose), respectively. There have been no local recurrences to date. Early clinical experience with the SAVI demonstrates the ease of placement of a single-entry brachytherapy device combined with the increased dose modulation of interstitial brachytherapy. Dose to normal structures has remained exceedingly low. Almost half of evaluated patients were not candidates for other single-entry brachytherapy devices because of skin spacing or breast size, demonstrating an expansion of candidates for single-entry partial breast brachytherapy.

  3. SU-E-T-04: 3D Printed Patient-Specific Surface Mould Applicators for Brachytherapy Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumming, I; Lasso, A; Rankin, A; Fichtinger, G [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery, School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Joshi, C P; Falkson, C; Schreiner, L John [CCSEO, Kingston General Hospital and Department of Oncology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the feasibility of constructing 3D-printed patient-specific surface mould applicators for HDR brachytherapy treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: We propose using computer-aided design software to create 3D printed surface mould applicators for brachytherapy. A mould generation module was developed in the open-source 3D Slicer ( http://www.slicer.org ) medical image analysis platform. The system extracts the skin surface from CT images, and generates smooth catheter paths over the region of interest based on user-defined start and end points at a specified stand-off distance from the skin surface. The catheter paths are radially extended to create catheter channels that are sufficiently wide to ensure smooth insertion of catheters for a safe source travel. An outer mould surface is generated to encompass the channels. The mould is also equipped with fiducial markers to ensure its reproducible placement. A surface mould applicator with eight parallel catheter channels of 4mm diameters was fabricated for the nose region of a head phantom; flexible plastic catheters of 2mm diameter were threaded through these channels maintaining 10mm catheter separations and a 5mm stand-off distance from the skin surface. The apparatus yielded 3mm thickness of mould material between channels and the skin. The mould design was exported as a stereolithography file to a Dimension SST1200es 3D printer and printed using ABS Plus plastic material. Results: The applicator closely matched its design and was found to be sufficiently rigid without deformation during repeated application on the head phantom. Catheters were easily threaded into channels carved along catheter paths. Further tests are required to evaluate feasibility of channel diameters smaller than 4mm. Conclusion: Construction of 3D-printed mould applicators show promise for use in patient specific brachytherapy of superficial lesions. Further evaluation of 3D printing techniques and materials is required

  4. MRI-guided brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    The application of MRI-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the last two decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome with regard to local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate HDR and LDR brachytherapy has improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk (OAR) delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. PMID:24931089

  5. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S

    2010-10-01

    The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with +/- 5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within +/- 5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs to be measured for each case with

  6. Surface applicator calibration and commissioning of an electronic brachytherapy system for nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Yi; Welsh, James S. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States); Department of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 and University of Wisconsin Cancer Center-Riverview, Riverview Hospital Association, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 54494 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The Xoft Axxent x-ray source has been used for treating nonmelanoma skin cancer since the surface applicators became clinically available in 2009. The authors report comprehensive calibration procedures for the electronic brachytherapy (eBx) system with the surface applicators. Methods: The Xoft miniature tube (model S700) generates 50 kVp low-energy x rays. The new surface applicators are available in four sizes of 10, 20, 35, and 50 mm in diameter. The authors' tests include measurements of dose rate, air-gap factor, output stability, depth dose verification, beam flatness and symmetry, and treatment planning with patient specific cutout factors. The TG-61 in-air method was used as a guideline for acquiring nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface. A soft x-ray parallel-plate chamber (PTW T34013) and electrometer was used for the output commissioning. GafChromic EBT films were used for testing the properties of the treatment fields with the skin applicators. Solid water slabs were used to verify the depth dose and cutout factors. Patients with basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma were treated with eBx using a calibrated Xoft system with the low-energy x-ray source and the skin applicators. Results: The average nominal dose-rate output at the skin surface for the 35 mm applicator is 1.35 Gy/min with {+-}5% variation for 16 sources. The dose-rate output and stability (within {+-}5% variation) were also measured for the remaining three applicators. For the same source, the output variation is within 2%. The effective source-surface distance was calculated based on the air-gap measurements for four applicator sizes. The field flatness and symmetry are well within 5%. Percentage depth dose in water was provided by factory measurements and can be verified using solid water slabs. Treatment duration was calculated based on the nominal dose rate, the prescription fraction size, the depth dose percentage, and the cutout factor. The output factor needs

  7. Use of an electronic brachytherapy surface applicator to treat an epiglottal fibrosarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Charles A; Robinson, Katherine L

    2017-07-01

    Presented is the case of an epiglottal fibrosarcoma in a dog. The location of the mass resulted in challenges in the delivery of adequate dose to the tumor, and herein we describe the treatment using an electronic brachytherapy source. The treatment consisted of four Gy fractions, twice daily for a total of 10 fractions (40 Gy total). Visual reevaluation two weeks after treatment supported adequate spatial dose delivery, and the patient was reportedly improved six weeks after treatment. We demonstrate that plesiotherapy using an electronic brachytherapy device is feasible and may be useful in the treatment of carefully selected veterinary tumors. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. New era of electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-04-28

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun.

  9. New era of electronic brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Prabhakar

    2017-01-01

    Traditional brachytherapy refers to the placement of radioactive sources on or inside the cancer tissues. Based on the type of sources, brachytherapy can be classified as radionuclide and electronic brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy uses miniaturized X-ray sources instead of radionuclides to deliver high doses of radiation. The advantages of electronic brachytherapy include low dose to organs at risk, reduced dose to treating staff, no leakage radiation in off state, less shielding, and no radioactive waste. Most of these systems operate between 50 and 100 kVp and are widely used in the treatment of skin cancer. Intrabeam, Xoft and Papillon systems are also used in the treatment of intra-operative radiotherapy to breast in addition to other treatment sites. The rapid fall-off in the dose due to its low energy is a highly desirable property in brachytherapy and results in a reduced dose to the surrounding normal tissues compared to the Ir-192 source. The Xoft Axxent brachytherapy system uses a 2.25 mm miniaturized X-ray tube and the source almost mimics the high dose rate Ir-192 source in terms of dose rate and it is the only electronic brachytherapy system specifically used in the treatment of cervical cancers. One of the limiting factors that impede the use of electronic brachytherapy for interstitial application is the source dimension. However, it is highly anticipated that the design of miniaturized X-ray tube closer to the dimension of an Ir-192 wire is not too far away, and the new era of electronic brachytherapy has just begun. PMID:28529679

  10. Automatic Reconstruction of Spacecraft 3D Shape from Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelman, C.; Radtke, R.; Voorhees, H.

    We describe a system that computes the three-dimensional (3D) shape of a spacecraft from a sequence of uncalibrated, two-dimensional images. While the mathematics of multi-view geometry is well understood, building a system that accurately recovers 3D shape from real imagery remains an art. A novel aspect of our approach is the combination of algorithms from computer vision, photogrammetry, and computer graphics. We demonstrate our system by computing spacecraft models from imagery taken by the Air Force Research Laboratory's XSS-10 satellite and DARPA's Orbital Express satellite. Using feature tie points (each identified in two or more images), we compute the relative motion of each frame and the 3D location of each feature using iterative linear factorization followed by non-linear bundle adjustment. The "point cloud" that results from this traditional shape-from-motion approach is typically too sparse to generate a detailed 3D model. Therefore, we use the computed motion solution as input to a volumetric silhouette-carving algorithm, which constructs a solid 3D model based on viewpoint consistency with the image frames. The resulting voxel model is then converted to a facet-based surface representation and is texture-mapped, yielding realistic images from arbitrary viewpoints. We also illustrate other applications of the algorithm, including 3D mensuration and stereoscopic 3D movie generation.

  11. SU-G-201-04: Can the Dynamic Library of Flap Applicators Replace Treatment Planning in Surface Brachytherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O’Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Harris, T; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Contemporary brachytherapy treatment planning systems-(TPS) include the applicator model libraries to improve digitization; however, the library of surface-flap-applicators-(SFA) is not incorporated into the commercial TPS. We propose the dynamic library-(DL) for SFA and investigate if such library can eliminate applicator reconstruction, source activation and dose normalization. Methods: DL was generated for the SFA using the C++class libraries of the Visualization Toolkit-(VTK) and Qt-application framework for complete abstraction of the graphical interface. DL was designed such that the user can initially choose the size of the applicator that corresponds to the one clinically placed to the patient. The virtual applicator-(VA) has an elastic property so that it can be registered to the clinical CT images with a real applicator-(RA) on it. The VA and RA matching is performed by adjusting the position and curvature of the VA. The VA does not elongate or change its size so each catheter could always be at a distance of 5mm from the skin and 10mm apart from the closest catheter maintaining the physical accuracy of the clinical setup. Upon the applicator placement, the dwell positions were automatically activated, and the dose is normalized to the prescription depth. The accuracy of source positioning was evaluated using various applicator sizes. Results: The accuracy of the applicator placement was in the sub-millimeter range. The time-study reveals that up to 50% of the planning time can be saved depending on the complexity of the clinical setup. Unlike in the classic approach, the planning time was not highly dependent on the applicator size. Conclusion: The practical benefits of the DL of the SFA were demonstrated. The time demanding planning processes can be partially automated. Consequently, the planner can dedicate effort to fine tuning, which can result in the improvement of the quality of treatment plans in surface brachytherapy.

  12. Clinical implementation and failure mode and effects analysis of HDR skin brachytherapy using Valencia and Leipzig surface applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Elaine; Eldredge-Hindy, Harriet; Dinome, Jessie; Lockamy, Virginia; Harrison, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    The planning procedure for Valencia and Leipzig surface applicators (VLSAs) (Nucletron, Veenendaal, The Netherlands) differs substantially from CT-based planning; the unfamiliarity could lead to significant errors. This study applies failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to high-dose-rate (HDR) skin brachytherapy using VLSAs to ensure safety and quality. A multidisciplinary team created a protocol for HDR VLSA skin treatments and applied FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detectability. The clinical procedure was then revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Several key components were added to the protocol to minimize risk probability numbers. (1) Diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and setup are reviewed at weekly quality assurance rounds. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. (2) A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinic's electronic medical record system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planner as well as increases the detectability of an error. (3) A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. (4) To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display, facilitating data entry and verification. (5) VLSAs are color coded and labeled to match the electronic medical record prescriptions, simplifying in-room selection and verification. Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased detectability and reduced error probability during VLSA HDR brachytherapy. This clinical model may be useful to institutions implementing similar procedures. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TU-AB-201-01: A Comprehensive Planning Comparison Study Between a Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy Tandem Applicator and Conventional T&R Applicator for Image Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Liu, Z [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Tanderup, K [Aarhus University (Denmark); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Scanderbeg, D [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate that utilization of a novel, intensity modulation capable, direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator can improve plan quality compared with conventional T&R applicator during an image guided cervical cancer brachytherapy. Methods: 45 cervical cancer patients treated with PDR brachytherapy were reviewed. Of them, a) 27 were treated using T&R only, b) 9 were treated using T&R with needles attached to the ring, and c) the remaining 9 were treated using T&R with needles attached to the ring (AN) as well as additional free-hand-loaded needles (FN). The DMBT tandem design has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm diameter, grooved along a nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod, enclosed in a plastic sheath with total 6.0-mm diameter. An in-house-coded inverse planning system was used for planning DMBT and T&R cases. All typical clinical constraints including OAR dose limits, dwell times, and loading patterns were respected. For the DMBT and T&R applicators, the plans were optimized with the same conventional ring in place, but repeatedly planned with and without AN/FN needles. All generated plans were normalized to the same D90 of the clinically treated plans. Results: For the plans in category a), DMBT generally outperformed T&R with average reduction in D2cc of −2.39%, −5.21%, and −2.69% for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid, respectively. For the plans in category b) and c), DMBT generally outperformed T&R if the same needles in AN/FN were utilized in both cases with average reduction in D2cc of −1.82%, −3.40%, and −6.04%, respectively. For the cases where the needles were not utilized for both applicators, an average D2cc reduction of −7.45%, −7.61%, and 17.47% were observed, respectively. Conclusions: Under the same clinical conditions, with/without needles, the DMBT applicator tends to generate more favorable plans compared with the conventional T&R applicator, and hence, is a promising technology.

  14. SU-G-201-07: Dosimetric Verification of a 3D Printed HDR Skin Brachytherapy Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, K; Stanley, D; Eng, T; Kirby, N; Gutierrez, A; Stathakis, S; Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Baumgarten, A; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Feng, Y; Huang, Z; Ju, A [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Corbett, M [Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of radiation as a treatment modality for skin cancer has increased significantly over the last decade with standardized applicators. Utilizing 3D printing, the ability to make applicators specifically designed for each patient’s anatomy has become economically feasible. With this in mind it was the aim of this study to determine the dosimetric accuracy of a 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicator for the skin. Methods: A CT reference image was used to generate a custom applicator based on an anthropomorphic head and neck phantom. To create the applicator a 1cm expansion anteriorly with 0.5cmX0.5cm trenches on the outer surface that were spaced 1cm sup-inf to accommodate standard 6F flexible catheters. The applicator was printed using PLA material using a printrbot simple printer. A treatment plan optimized to deliver a clinically representative volume was created in Oncentra and delivered with a nucletron afterloader. Measurements were made using TLDs and EBT3 gafchromic film that were placed between the applicator and the phantom’s forehead. An additional piece of film was also used to qualitatively asses the dose distribution in the transverse plane. Using a standard vaginal cylinder and bolus, a standardized curve correlating TLD and film exposure-to-radiation dose was established by irradiating film to known doses (200,500,700 cGy) at a 3.5 cm radius distance. Results: Evaluated TLDs showed the absolute dose delivered to the skin surface using the 3-D printed bolus was 615cGy±6%, with a mean predicted TPS value in the measured area of 617.5±7%. Additionally, planar dose distributions had good qualitative agreement with calculated TPS isodoses. Conclusion: This work demonstrates patient specific 3-D printed HDR brachytherapy applicators for skin cancer treatments are practical and accurate in TPS calculations but additional measurements are needed to verify additional sites and dose at depth.

  15. 3D shaping of electron beams using amplitude masks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiloh, Roy, E-mail: royshilo@post.tau.ac.il; Arie, Ady

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Electron beams are shaped in 3D with examples of curves and lattices. • Computer generated holograms are manifested as binary amplitude masks. • Applications in electron-optical particle trapping, manipulation, and synthesis. • Electron beam lithography fabrication scheme explained in detail. • Measurement paradigms of 3D shaped beams are discussed. - Abstract: Shaping the electron wavefunction in three dimensions may prove to be an indispensable tool for research involving atomic-sized particle trapping, manipulation, and synthesis. We utilize computer-generated holograms to sculpt electron wavefunctions in a standard transmission electron microscope in 3D, and demonstrate the formation of electron beams exhibiting high intensity along specific trajectories as well as shaping the beam into a 3D lattice of hot-spots. The concepts presented here are similar to those used in light optics for trapping and tweezing of particles, but at atomic scale resolutions.

  16. Endocervical ultrasound applicator for integrated hyperthermia and HDR brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Hsu, I-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical success of hyperthermia adjunct to radiotherapy depends on adequate temperature elevation in the tumor with minimal temperature rise in organs at risk. Existing technologies for thermal treatment of the cervix have limited spatial control or rapid energy falloff. The objective of this work is to develop an endocervical applicator using a linear array of multisectored tubular ultrasound transducers to provide 3-D conformal, locally targeted hyperthermia concomitant to radiotherapy in the uterine cervix. The catheter-based device is integrated within a HDR brachytherapy applicator to facilitate sequential and potentially simultaneous heat and radiation delivery. Methods: Treatment planning images from 35 patients who underwent HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer were inspected to assess the dimensions of radiation clinical target volumes (CTVs) and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) surrounding the cervix and the proximity of organs at risk. Biothermal simulation was used to identify applicator and catheter material parameters to adequately heat the cervix with minimal thermal dose accumulation in nontargeted structures. A family of ultrasound applicators was fabricated with two to three tubular transducers operating at 6.6–7.4 MHz that are unsectored (360°), bisectored (2×180°), or trisectored (3×120°) for control of energy deposition in angle and along the device length in order to satisfy anatomical constraints. The device is housed in a 6 mm diameter PET catheter with cooling water flow for endocervical implantation. Devices were characterized by measuring acoustic efficiencies, rotational acoustic intensity distributions, and rotational temperature distributions in phantom. Results: The CTV in HDR brachytherapy plans extends 20.5±5.0 mm from the endocervical tandem with the rectum and bladder typically 5EM43 °C over 4–5 cm diameter with Tmaxconformal thermal delivery to the uterine cervix. Feasibility of heating

  17. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  18. Complete response of endemic Kaposi sarcoma lesions with high-dose-rate brachytherapy: treatment method, results, and toxicity using skin surface applicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Michael E; Richter, Sam; Warren, Nicholas; Benda, Rashmi; Shang, Charles; Ouhib, Zoubir

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the clinical outcome of Kaposi sarcoma skin lesions treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in patients with a minimum of 2 years of followup. Between February 2006 and July 2008, all patients with Kaposi sarcoma who received (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy using a skin surface applicator were evaluated for clinical response. Responses to treatment and toxicity were scored using standard criteria. Sixteen cases were collected. Treatment was delivered in four to six fractions, over a period of approximately 12 days. The specified dose ranged from 24 to 35Gy. Median followup the lesion was 41.4 months. No lesion was greater than 2cm. All patients had a complete response to treatment, with no evidence of local recurrence or tumor progression. Thirteen lesions developed Grade 1 and two lesions had Grade 2 acute skin reactions. One patient developed late skin changes with telangiectasias and hypopigmentation. HDR brachytherapy treatment seems to be an effective noninvasive option for patients with small cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma lesions, delivering excellent cosmesis and local control in our small series. Fewer fractions over a shorter period used in our group offer patients more convenience compared with other common regimens. Although HDR is being used more frequently for many surface applications, additional clinical studies with larger numbers of patients and longer followup are needed to confirm the general impression that it is an excellent option for many patients. Copyright © 2013 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. TU-AB-BRC-08: Egs-brachy, a Fast and Versatile Monte Carlo Code for Brachytherapy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamberland, M; Taylor, R; Rogers, D; Thomson, R [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce egs-brachy, a new, fast, and versatile Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy applications. Methods: egs-brachy is an EGSnrc user-code based on the EGSnrc C++ class library (egs++). Complex phantom, applicator, and source model geometries are built using the egs++ geometry module. egs-brachy uses a tracklength estimator to score collision kerma in voxels. Interaction, spectrum, energy fluence, and phase space scoring are also implemented. Phase space sources and particle recycling may be used to improve simulation efficiency. HDR treatments (e.g. stepping source through dwell positions) can be simulated. Standard brachytherapy seeds, as well as electron and miniature x-ray tube sources are fully modelled. Variance reduction techniques for electron source simulations are implemented (Bremsstrahlung cross section enhancement, uniform Bremsstrahlung splitting, and Russian Roulette). TG-43 parameters of seeds are computed and compared to published values. Example simulations of various treatments are carried out on a single 2.5 GHz Intel Xeon E5-2680 v3 processor core. Results: TG-43 parameters calculated with egs-brachy show excellent agreement with published values. Using a phase space source, 2% average statistical uncertainty in the PTV ((2mm){sup 3} voxels) can be achieved in 10 s for 100 {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd seeds in a 36.2 cm{sup 3} prostate PTV, 31 s for 64 {sup 103}Pd seeds in a 64 cm{sup 3} breast PTV, and 56 s for a miniature x-ray tube in a 27 cm{sup 3} breast PTV. Comparable uncertainty is reached in 12 s in a (1 mm){sup 3} water voxel 5 mm away from a COMS 16mm eye plaque with 13 {sup 103}Pd seeds. Conclusion: The accuracy of egs-brachy has been demonstrated through benchmarking calculations. Calculation times are sufficiently fast to allow full MC simulations for routine treatment planning for diverse brachytherapy treatments (LDR, HDR, miniature x-ray tube). egs-brachy will be available as free and open-source software to the

  20. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronowitz, Jesse N., E-mail: jesse.aronowitz@umassmemorial.org

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  1. Application of RADPOS in Vivo Dosimetry for QA of High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherpak, A.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Cygler, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The RADPOS in vivo dosimetry system combines an electromagnetic positioning sensor with MOSFET dosimetry, allowing for simultaneous online measurements of dose and spatial position. In this work, we assess the potential use of RADPOS for measurements of motion and dose during prostate HDR......Gy. Conclusions: In vivo dosimetry can potentially signal errors in catheter placement or numbering before entire dose is delivered. The demonstrated accuracy of RADPOS dose measurements and its ability to simultaneously measure displacement makes it a powerful tool for HDR brachytherapy treatments for prostate...

  2. Optimal application of the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter vacuum port to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Kenneth M; Cuttino, Laurie W; Vicini, Frank A; Arthur, Douglas W; Todor, Dorin A; Julian, Thomas B; Lyden, Maureen R

    2011-01-01

    The impact of using the Contura multilumen balloon (MLB) (SenoRx, Inc., Irvine, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter's vacuum port in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) was analyzed. Data from 32 patients at two sites were reviewed. Variables analyzed included the seroma fluid (SF):air volume around the MLB before and after vacuum port use and on its ability to improve (1) the eligibility of patients for APBI and (2) dose coverage of the planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) in eligible patients. The median SF/air volume before vacuum removal was 6.8 cc vs. 0.8 cc after vacuum removal (median reduction in SF/air volume was 90.5%). Before vacuum port use, the median SF/air volume expressed as percentage of the PTV_EVAL was 7.8% (range, 1.9-26.6) in all patients. After application of the vacuum, this was reduced to 1.2%. Before vacuum port use, 10 (31.3%) patients were not considered acceptable candidates for APBI because the SF/air volume:PTV_EVAL ratio (SF:PTV) was greater than 10% (range, 10.1-26.6%; median, 15.2%). After vacuum port use, the median SF:PTV ratio was 1.6% for a median reduction of 91.5%. In addition, the percentage of the prescribed dose covering greater than or equal to 90% of the PTV_EVAL proportionally increased a median of 8% (range, 3-10%) in eligible patients. Use of the Contura MLB vacuum port significantly improved the conformity of the target tissue to the balloon surface, leading to reproducible dose delivery and increased target volume coverage. In addition, application of the vacuum allowed the safe treatment of unacceptable patients with APBI. Copyright © 2011 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An intrauterine ultrasound applicator for targeted delivery of thermal therapy in conjunction with HDR brachytherapy to the cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, Jeffery H.; Juang, Titania; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.-Chow Joe; Diederich, Chris J.

    2009-02-01

    An intracavitary hyperthermia applicator for targeted heat delivery to the cervix was developed based on a linear array of sectored tubular ultrasound transducers that provides truly 3-D heating control (angular and along the length). A central conduit can incorporate an HDR source for sequential or simultaneous delivery of heat and radiation. Hyperthermia treatment volumes were determined from brachytherapy treatment planning data and used as a basis for biothermal simulations analyzing the effects of device parameters, tissue properties, and catheter materials on heating patterns. Devices were then developed with 1-3 elements at 6.5-8 MHz with 90-180° sectors and a 15-35 mm heating length, housed within a 6-mm diameter water-cooled PET catheter. Directional heating from sectored transducers could extend lateral penetration of therapeutic heating (41°C) >2 cm while maintaining rectum and bladder temperatures within 12 mm below thermal damage thresholds. Imaging artifacts were evaluated with standard CT, cone beam CT, and MR images. MR thermal imaging was used to demonstrate shaping of heating profiles in axial and coronal slices with artifact <2 mm from the device. The impact of the high-Z applicator materials on the HDR dose distribution was assessed using a well-type ionization chamber and was found to be less than 6% attenuation, which can readily be accounted for with treatment planning software. The intrauterine ultrasound device has demonstrated potential for 3-D conformal heating of clinical tumors in the delivery of targeted hyperthermia in conjunction with brachytherapy to the cervix.

  4. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-S?nchez, Rosa; Celada-?lvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Garc?a-Mart?nez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A.; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Mic?, Alejandro; Rodr?guez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applic...

  5. Modeling study for optimization of skin dose for partial breast irradiation using Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Hiatt, Jessica R; Cardarelli, Gene A; Wazer, David E

    2010-01-01

    Balloon brachytherapy with the MammoSite system (Hologic Inc., Bedford, MA) is a widely used approach for accelerated partial breast irradiation. Inherent to this approach, high skin doses can occur if the balloon to skin distance is small. This has been associated with late skin toxicity, particularly telangiectasia. The Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy balloon applicator (Xoft, Fremont, CA) is a novel device for accelerated partial breast irradiation. It is unique in that it uses an electronic 50-kV source. This source has a pronounced anisotropy with constriction of isodose distribution at the proximal end of the catheter. This anisotropy can be considered as an advantage to optimize skin dose when the cavity to skin distance is small. In this study, we simulated various balloon-insertion orientations to optimized skin surface dose. Breast phantoms were constructed of tissue-equivalent material. Xoft Axxent balloon catheters were inserted at a distance of 6mm from the surface. The catheter was placed at three different catheter to surface orientations: (1) perpendicular to the surface, (2) oblique to the surface (45 degrees), and (3) parallel to the surface. Three-dimensional treatment planning was then performed using Nucletron's Plato planning system (Nucletron, Columbia, MD). Multiple dwell positions were used, and the dose was optimized to the target volume. The target volume was defined as volume from the balloon surface to 1-cm distance from the balloon surface or to the phantom surface (if less then 1cm from the balloon surface). Target volume coverage was compared between plans using dose-volume histograms. Surface doses were compared using isodose line distribution and surface point doses. Plato planned surface doses were then verified by direct measurement using Landauer Dot InLight dosimeters (Landauer, Glenwood, IL). Excellent target coverage was obtained for all three catheter orientations with a D(95) of > or =95%. Surface dose was lowest for

  6. SU-E-T-232: Custom High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Surface Mold Applicators: The Importance Source to Skin Distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Demanes, J; Kamrava, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Surface mold applicators can be customized to fit irregular skin surfaces that are difficult to treat with other radiation therapy techniques. Optimal design of customized HDR skin brachytherapy is not well-established. We evaluated the impact of applicator thickness (source to skin distance) on target dosimetry. Methods: 27 patients had 34 treated sites: scalp 4, face 13, extremity 13, and torso 4. Custom applicators were constructed from 5–15 mm thick thermoplastic bolus molded over the skin lesion. A planar array of plastic brachytherapy catheters spaced 5–10 mm apart was affixed to the bolus. CT simulation was used to contour the target volume and to determine the prescription depth. Inverse planning simulated annealing followed by graphical optimization was used to plan and deliver 40–56 Gy in 8–16 fractions. Target coverage parameters (D90, Dmean, and V100) and dose uniformity (V110–200, D0.1cc, D1cc, and D2cc) were studied according to target depth (<5mm vs. ≥5mm) and applicator thickness (5–10mm vs. ≥10mm). Results: The average prescription depth was 4.2±1.5mm. The average bolus thickness was 9.2±2.4mm. The median CTV volume was 10.0 cc (0.2–212.4 cc). Similar target coverage was achieved with prescription depths of <5mm and ≥5mm (Dmean = 113.8% vs. 112.4% and D90 = 100.2% vs. 98.3%). The <5mm prescription depth plans were more uniform (D0.1cc = 131.8% vs. 151.8%). Bolus thickness <10mm vs. ≥10mm plans also had similar target coverage (Dmean = 118.2% vs. 110.7% and D90 = 100.1% vs. 99.0%). Applicators ≥10mm thick, however, provide more uniform target dosimetry (D0.1cc = 146.9% vs. 139.5%). Conclusion: Prescription depth is based upon the thickness of the lesion and upon the clinical needs of the patient. Applicators ≥10mm thick provide more dose uniformity than 5–10mm thick applicators. Applicator thickness is an important variable that should be considered during treatment planning to achieve optimal dose uniformity.

  7. Application of the MCNP5 code to the Modeling of vaginal and intra-uterine applicators used in intracavitary brachytherapy: a first approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardy, I; Tondeur, F [Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles, 150, Rue Royale, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Rodenas, J; Gallardo, S [Departamento de IngenierIa QuImica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Dycke, M Van [Clinique Saint Jean, Bld du Jardin Botanique, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: gerardy@isib.be

    2008-02-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy treatment where encapsulated radioactive sources are introduced within a patient. Depending on the technique used, such sources can produce high, medium or low local dose rates. The Monte Carlo method is a powerful tool to simulate sources and devices in order to help physicists in treatment planning. In multiple types of gynaecological cancer, intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR Ir-192 source) is used combined with other therapy treatment to give an additional local dose to the tumour. Different types of applicators are used in order to increase the dose imparted to the tumour and to limit the effect on healthy surrounding tissues. The aim of this work is to model both applicator and HDR source in order to evaluate the dose at a reference point as well as the effect of the materials constituting the applicators on the near field dose. The MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method has been used for the simulation. Dose calculations have been performed with *F8 energy deposition tally, taking into account photons and electrons. Results from simulation have been compared with experimental in-phantom dose measurements. Differences between calculations and measurements are lower than 5%.The importance of the source position has been underlined.

  8. Deep Nonlinear Metric Learning for 3-D Shape Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin; Dai, Guoxian; Zhu, Fan; Shao, Ling; Fang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Effective 3-D shape retrieval is an important problem in 3-D shape analysis. Recently, feature learning-based shape retrieval methods have been widely studied, where the distance metrics between 3-D shape descriptors are usually hand-crafted. In this paper, motivated by the fact that deep neural network has the good ability to model nonlinearity, we propose to learn an effective nonlinear distance metric between 3-D shape descriptors for retrieval. First, the locality-constrained linear coding method is employed to encode each vertex on the shape and the encoding coefficient histogram is formed as the global 3-D shape descriptor to represent the shape. Then, a novel deep metric network is proposed to learn a nonlinear transformation to map the 3-D shape descriptors to a nonlinear feature space. The proposed deep metric network minimizes a discriminative loss function that can enforce the similarity between a pair of samples from the same class to be small and the similarity between a pair of samples from different classes to be large. Finally, the distance between the outputs of the metric network is used as the similarity for shape retrieval. The proposed method is evaluated on the McGill, SHREC'10 ShapeGoogle, and SHREC'14 Human shape datasets. Experimental results on the three datasets validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela-Juan, C; Niatsetski, Y; van der Laarse, R; Granero, D; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J; Vijande, J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a (192)Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. The penelope2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a (192)Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth-dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable tool in clinical practice, making treatment of

  10. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Melanoma at the choroid region is the most common primary cancer that affects the eye in adult patients. Concave ophthalmic applicators with 106Ru/106Rh beta sources are the more used for treatment of these eye lesions, mainly lesions with small and medium dimensions. The available treatment planning system for 106Ru applicators is based on dose distributions on a homogeneous water sphere eye model, resulting in a lack of data in the literature of dose distributions in the eye radiosensitive structures, information that may be crucial to improve the treatment planning process, aiming the maintenance of visual acuity. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to calculate the dose distribution in a complete mathematical model of the human eye containing a choroid melanoma; considering the eye actual dimensions and its various component structures, due to an ophthalmic brachytherapy treatment, using 106Ru/106Rh beta-ray sources. Two possibilities were analyzed; a simple water eye and a heterogeneous eye considering all its structures. Two concave applicators, CCA and CCB manufactured by BEBIG and a complete mathematical model of the human eye were modeled using the MCNPX code. Results and Conclusion: For both eye models, namely water model and heterogeneous model, mean dose values simulated for the same eye regions are, in general, very similar, excepting for regions very distant from the applicator, where mean dose values are very low, uncertainties are higher and relative differences may reach 20.4%. For the tumor base and the eye structures closest to the applicator, such as sclera, choroid and retina, the maximum difference observed was 4%, presenting the heterogeneous model higher mean dose values. For the other eye regions, the higher doses were obtained when the homogeneous water eye model is taken into consideration. Mean dose distributions determined for the homogeneous water eye model are similar to those obtained for the

  11. Design and characterization of a new high-dose-rate brachytherapy Valencia applicator for larger skin lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candela-Juan, C., E-mail: ccanjuan@gmail.com [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and National Dosimetry Centre (CND), Valencia 46009 (Spain); Niatsetski, Y. [Elekta Brachytherapy, Veenendaal 3905 TH (Netherlands); Laarse, R. van der [Quality Radiation Therapy BV, Zeist 3707 HB (Netherlands); Granero, D. [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia 46014 (Spain); Ballester, F. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J. [Radiation Oncology Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026, Spain and Department of Radiotherapy, Clínica Benidorm, Benidorm 03501 (Spain); Vijande, J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and Instituto de Física Corpuscular (UV-CSIC), Burjassot 46100 (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were (i) to design a new high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy applicator for treating surface lesions with planning target volumes larger than 3 cm in diameter and up to 5 cm in size, using the microSelectron-HDR or Flexitron afterloader (Elekta Brachytherapy) with a {sup 192}Ir source; (ii) to calculate by means of the Monte Carlo (MC) method the dose distribution for the new applicator when it is placed against a water phantom; and (iii) to validate experimentally the dose distributions in water. Methods: The PENELOPE2008 MC code was used to optimize dwell positions and dwell times. Next, the dose distribution in a water phantom and the leakage dose distribution around the applicator were calculated. Finally, MC data were validated experimentally for a {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source by measuring (i) dose distributions with radiochromic EBT3 films (ISP); (ii) percentage depth–dose (PDD) curve with the parallel-plate ionization chamber Advanced Markus (PTW); and (iii) absolute dose rate with EBT3 films and the PinPoint T31016 (PTW) ionization chamber. Results: The new applicator is made of tungsten alloy (Densimet) and consists of a set of interchangeable collimators. Three catheters are used to allocate the source at prefixed dwell positions with preset weights to produce a homogenous dose distribution at the typical prescription depth of 3 mm in water. The same plan is used for all available collimators. PDD, absolute dose rate per unit of air kerma strength, and off-axis profiles in a cylindrical water phantom are reported. These data can be used for treatment planning. Leakage around the applicator was also scored. The dose distributions, PDD, and absolute dose rate calculated agree within experimental uncertainties with the doses measured: differences of MC data with chamber measurements are up to 0.8% and with radiochromic films are up to 3.5%. Conclusions: The new applicator and the dosimetric data provided here will be a valuable

  12. Modelling the radiobiological effect of intraoperative X-ray brachytherapy for breast cancer using an air-filled spherical applicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Armoogum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : We present a framework, in which we compare a conventional standard dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using electronic brachytherapy (eBT. We discuss how radiobiological modelling enables us to establish a framework, within which we can compare external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. This leads to a determination of the shell of isoeffect in breast tissue, at which very low kV eBT can be considered to be clinically equivalent to standard EBRT. Material and methods : To estimate relative biological effectiveness (RBE values as a function of dose and irradiation time, we used a modified linear quadratic (LQ approach, taking into account the ability of this new device, to deliver 20 Gy at the surface of a 40 mm diameter rigid, hollow spherical applicator in less than 2 minutes. In this study, we considered the radiobiological effectiveness of the Papillon+™ X-ray brachytherapy device operating at 30 kV, 0.3 mA producing dose rates in excess of 14 Gy/min. Results : Calculated clinical RBEs ranged from 1.154 at the surface of a 40 mm diameter applicator to 1.100 at 35 mm from the applicator surface for the Papillon+ device. The absolute physical dose D (abs 30 kV ranged from 20.00 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.20 at 35 mm distant. The product of the isoeffective single dose of 60Co reference radiation – (RBE60Co, and the RBE corrected standard 2 Gy equivalent dose fractions (EQD2 doses, EQD2(30 kV * (RBE60Co ranged from 98.62 Gy at the applicator surface to 1.13 at 35 mm. The ‘shell of isoeffect’, the value on the X-axis where the EQD2(30 kV * (RBE60Co line crosses the 50 Gy mark on the Y-axis, was found to be approximately 3.5 mm beyond the applicator surface. Conclusions : The ‘shell of isoeffect’ can serve as a useful metric with which to compare the radiobiological effectiveness of low kV eBT with various regimes of conventional EBRT.

  13. Optimization in Radiation Therapy: Applications in Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeachy, Philip David

    Over 50% of cancer patients require radiation therapy (RT). RT is an optimization problem requiring maximization of the radiation damage to the tumor while minimizing the harm to the healthy tissues. This dissertation focuses on two main RT optimization problems: 1) brachytherapy and 2) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The brachytherapy research involved solving a non-convex optimization problem by creating an open-source genetic algorithm optimizer to determine the optimal radioactive seed distribution for a given set of patient volumes and constraints, both dosimetric- and implant-based. The optimizer was tested for a set of 45 prostate brachytherapy patients. While all solutions met the clinical standards, they also benchmarked favorably with those generated by a standard commercial solver. Compared to its compatriot, the salient features of the generated solutions were: slightly reduced prostate coverage, lower dose to the urethra and rectum, and a smaller number of needles required for an implant. Historically, IMRT requires modulation of fluence while keeping the photon beam energy fixed. The IMRT-related investigation in this thesis aimed at broadening the solution space by varying photon energy. The problem therefore involved simultaneous optimization of photon beamlet energy and fluence, denoted by XMRT. Formulating the problem as convex, linear programming was applied to obtain solutions for optimal energy-dependent fluences, while achieving all clinical objectives and constraints imposed. Dosimetric advantages of XMRT over single-energy IMRT in the improved sparing of organs at risk (OARs) was demonstrated in simplified phantom studies. The XMRT algorithm was improved to include clinical dose-volume constraints and clinical studies for prostate and head and neck cancer patients were investigated. Compared to IMRT, XMRT provided improved dosimetric benefit in the prostate case, particularly within intermediate- to low-dose regions (≤ 40 Gy

  14. High dose rate brachytherapy using custom made superficial mould applicators and Leipzig applicators for non melanoma localized skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellizzon, A. Cassio A.; Miziara, Daniela; Lima, Flavia Pedroso de; Miziara, Miguel

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: advances in technology and the commercial production of Leipzig applicators allowed High Dose Rate after-load brachytherapy (HDR-BT) to address a number of the challenges associated with the delivery of superficial radiation to treat localized non melanoma skin cancer (NMSK). We reviewed our uni-institutional experience on the treatment of NMSK with HDR-BT. Methods: data were collected retrospectively from patients attending the Radiation Oncology Department at AV Carvalho Insitute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. HDR-BT was done using the stepping source HDR 192Ir Microselectron (Nucletron BV). The planning target volume consisted of the macroscopic lesion plus a 5mm to 10mm margin.The depth of treatment was 0.5 cm in smaller (< 2.0 cm) tumors and 10 to 15 mm for lesions bigger than that. Results: Thirteen patients were treated with HDR-BT from June, 2007 to June 2013. The median age and follow up time were 72 (38-90) years old and 36 (range, 7-73) months, respectively. There a predominance of males (61.5%) and of patients referred for adjuvant treatment due positive surgical margins or because they have had only a excision biopsy without safety margins (61.5%). Six (46.2%) patients presented with squamous cell carcinoma and 7 (53.8%) patients presented with basal cell carcinoma. The median tumor size was 20 (range, 5-42) mm. Patients were treated with a median total dose of 40 Gy (range, 20 -60), given in 10 (range, 2-15) fractions, given daily or twice a week. All patients responded very well to treatment and only one patient has failed locally so far, after 38 months of the end of the irradiation. The crude and actuarial 3-year local control rates were 100% and 80%, respectively. Moist desquamation, grade 2 RTOG, was observed in 4 (30.8%) patients. Severe late complication, radiation-induced dyspigmentation, occurred in 2 patients and 1 of the patients also showed telangiectasia in the irradiated area. The cosmetic result was considered good in 84% (11/13) patients

  15. Progressive 3D shape abstraction via hierarchical CSG tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyou; Tang, Jin; Li, Chenglong

    2017-06-01

    A constructive solid geometry(CSG) tree model is proposed to progressively abstract 3D geometric shape of general object from 2D image. Unlike conventional ones, our method applies to general object without the need for massive CAD models, and represents the object shapes in a coarse-to-fine manner that allows users to view temporal shape representations at any time. It stands in a transitional position between 2D image feature and CAD model, benefits from state-of-the-art object detection approaches and better initializes CAD model for finer fitting, estimates 3D shape and pose parameters of object at different levels according to visual perception objective, in a coarse-to-fine manner. Two main contributions are the application of CSG building up procedure into visual perception, and the ability of extending object estimation result into a more flexible and expressive model than 2D/3D primitive shapes. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. 3D-printed surface mould applicator for high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Mark; Lasso, Andras; Cumming, Ian; Rankin, Adam; Falkson, Conrad B.; Schreiner, L. John; Joshi, Chandra; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    In contemporary high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of superficial tumors, catheters are placed in a wax mould. The creation of current wax models is a difficult and time consuming proces.The irradiation plan can only be computed post-construction and requires a second CT scan. In case no satisfactory dose plan can be created, the mould is discarded and the process is repeated. The objective of this work was to develop an automated method to replace suboptimal wax moulding. We developed a method to design and manufacture moulds that guarantee to yield satisfactory dosimetry. A 3D-printed mould with channels for the catheters designed from the patient's CT and mounted on a patient-specific thermoplastic mesh mask. The mould planner was implemented as an open-source module in the 3D Slicer platform. Series of test moulds were created to accommodate standard brachytherapy catheters of 1.70mm diameter. A calibration object was used to conclude that tunnels with a diameter of 2.25mm, minimum 12mm radius of curvature, and 1.0mm open channel gave the best fit for this printer/catheter combination. Moulds were created from the CT scan of thermoplastic mesh masks of actual patients. The patient-specific moulds have been visually verified to fit on the thermoplastic meshes. The masks were visually shown to fit onto the thermoplastic meshes, next the resulting dosimetry will have to be compared with treatment plans and dosimetry achieved with conventional wax moulds in order to validate our 3D printed moulds.

  17. Magnetic resonance image guided brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Viswanathan, Akila N; Kirisits, Christian; Frank, Steven J

    2014-07-01

    The application of magnetic resonance image (MRI)-guided brachytherapy has demonstrated significant growth during the past 2 decades. Clinical improvements in cervix cancer outcomes have been linked to the application of repeated MRI for identification of residual tumor volumes during radiotherapy. This has changed clinical practice in the direction of individualized dose administration, and resulted in mounting evidence of improved clinical outcome regarding local control, overall survival as well as morbidity. MRI-guided prostate high-dose-rate and low-dose-rate brachytherapies have improved the accuracy of target and organs-at-risk delineation, and the potential exists for improved dose prescription and reporting for the prostate gland and organs at risk. Furthermore, MRI-guided prostate brachytherapy has significant potential to identify prostate subvolumes and dominant lesions to allow for dose administration reflecting the differential risk of recurrence. MRI-guided brachytherapy involves advanced imaging, target concepts, and dose planning. The key issue for safe dissemination and implementation of high-quality MRI-guided brachytherapy is establishment of qualified multidisciplinary teams and strategies for training and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Value of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without or With Applicator in Place for Target Definition in Cervix Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Federico, Mario [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Gran Canaria University Hospital, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fotina, Irina [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Physics and Technology, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Oblast (Russian Federation); Hegazy, Neamat [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Department of Clinical Oncology, Medical University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt); Schmid, Maximilian; Kirisits, Christian [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nesvacil, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.nesvacil@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To define, in the setting of cervical cancer, to what extent information from additional pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without the brachytherapy applicator improves conformity of CT-based high-risk clinical target volume (CTV{sub HR}) contours, compared with the MRI for various tumor stages (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stages I-IVA). Methods and Materials: The CTV{sub HR} was contoured in 39 patients with cervical cancer (FIGO stages I-IVA) (1) on CT images based on clinical information (CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub Clinical}) alone; and (2) using an additional MRI before brachytherapy, without the applicator (CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}). The CT contours were compared with reference contours on MRI with the applicator in place (CTV{sub HR}-MRI{sub ref}). Width, height, thickness, volumes, and topography were analyzed. Results: The CT-MRI{sub ref} differences hardly varied in stage I tumors (n=8). In limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors (n=19), CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}–MRI{sub ref} volume differences (2.6 cm{sup 3} [IIB], 7.3 cm{sup 3} [IIIB]) were superior to CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub Clinical}–MRI{sub ref} (11.8 cm{sup 3} [IIB], 22.9 cm{sup 3} [IIIB]), owing to significant improvement of height and width (P<.05). In advanced disease (n=12), improved agreement with MR volume, width, and height was achieved for CTV{sub HR}-CT{sub pre-BT} {sub MRI}. In 5 of 12 cases, MRI{sub ref} contours were partly missed on CT. Conclusions: Pre-BT MRI helps to define CTV{sub HR} before BT implantation appropriately, if only CT images with the applicator in place are available for BT planning. Significant improvement is achievable in limited-volume stage IIB and IIIB tumors. In more advanced disease (extensive IIB to IVA), improvement of conformity is possible but may be associated with geographic misses. Limited impact on precision of CTV{sub HR}-CT is expected in stage IB tumors.

  19. Dosimetric comparison of (192)Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy vs. 50 kV x-rays as techniques for breast intraoperative radiation therapy: conceptual development of image-guided intraoperative brachytherapy using a multilumen balloon applicator and in-room CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan; Libby, Bruce; Showalter, Shayna L; Brenin, David R; Wilson, David D; Schroen, Anneke; Morris, Monica; Reardon, Kelli A; Morrison, John; Showalter, Timothy N

    2014-01-01

    At our institution, the availability of a shielded procedure room with in-room CT-on-rails imaging allows for the exploration of a high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy approach for breast intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). We hypothesize that HDR brachytherapy will permit a higher prescription dose without increasing toxicity. In this study, we compare the dosimetry of intraoperative HDR brachytherapy, using multilumen balloon applicator, to IORT with a 50 kV source and then select a prescription dose for a subsequent clinical trial. The CT scans of 14 patients who had previously received multilumen balloon-based breast brachytherapy were replanned to a standard prescription to the target volume. The same 14 cases were planned to the specifications of a 50 kV x-ray system. Uniform volume optimization and prescription doses were used to permit direct comparisons. All plans were evaluated for the dose homogeneity index, tumor coverage, and dose to normal tissues, including skin, ribs, and heart (for left breast plans). The HDR brachytherapy plans were superior to 50 kV superficial photon plans for IORT in all dosimetric parameters except for the heart and rib dosimetric parameters. Prescription dose of 12.5 Gy to the planning target volume for evaluation yielded a dose to 95 percent of the balloon surface of 19.7 Gy. Image-guided HDR intraoperative brachytherapy with a multilumen balloon applicator provides superior target volume coverage compared with 50 kV photons, while maintaining doses within tolerance limits for normal tissues. An ongoing prospective clinical trial will evaluate the safety and feasibility of this technique. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-F-T-65: AutomaticTreatment Planning for High-Dose Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a VaginalCylinder Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Tan, J; Jiang, S; Albuquerque, K; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning is conventionally performed in a manual fashion. Yet it is highly desirable to perform computerized automated planning to improve treatment planning efficiency, eliminate human errors, and reduce plan quality variation. The goal of this research is to develop an automatic treatment planning tool for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator for vaginal cancer. Methods: After inserting the cylinder applicator into the patient, a CT scan was acquired and was loaded to an in-house developed treatment planning software. The cylinder applicator was automatically segmented using image-processing techniques. CTV was generated based on user-specified treatment depth and length. Locations of relevant points (apex point, prescription point, and vaginal surface point), central applicator channel coordinates, and dwell positions were determined according to their geometric relations with the applicator. Dwell time was computed through an inverse optimization process. The planning information was written into DICOM-RT plan and structure files to transfer the automatically generated plan to a commercial treatment planning system for plan verification and delivery. Results: We have tested the system retrospectively in nine patients treated with vaginal cylinder applicator. These cases were selected with different treatment prescriptions, lengths, depths, and cylinder diameters to represent a large patient population. Our system was able to generate treatment plans for these cases with clinically acceptable quality. Computation time varied from 3–6 min. Conclusion: We have developed a system to perform automated treatment planning for HDR brachytherapy with a cylinder applicator. Such a novel system has greatly improved treatment planning efficiency and reduced plan quality variation. It also served as a testbed to demonstrate the feasibility of automatic HDR treatment planning for more complicated cases.

  1. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  2. Optofluidic fabrication for 3D-shaped particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Kevin S.; di Carlo, Dino; Chung, Aram J.

    2015-04-01

    Complex three-dimensional (3D)-shaped particles could play unique roles in biotechnology, structural mechanics and self-assembly. Current methods of fabricating 3D-shaped particles such as 3D printing, injection moulding or photolithography are limited because of low-resolution, low-throughput or complicated/expensive procedures. Here, we present a novel method called optofluidic fabrication for the generation of complex 3D-shaped polymer particles based on two coupled processes: inertial flow shaping and ultraviolet (UV) light polymerization. Pillars within fluidic platforms are used to deterministically deform photosensitive precursor fluid streams. The channels are then illuminated with patterned UV light to polymerize the photosensitive fluid, creating particles with multi-scale 3D geometries. The fundamental advantages of optofluidic fabrication include high-resolution, multi-scalability, dynamic tunability, simple operation and great potential for bulk fabrication with full automation. Through different combinations of pillar configurations, flow rates and UV light patterns, an infinite set of 3D-shaped particles is available, and a variety are demonstrated.

  3. The effects of aging on haptic 2D shape recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overvliet, K.E.; Wagemans, J.; Krampe, R.T.

    2013-01-01

    We use the image-mediation model (Klatzky & Lederman, 1987) as a framework to investigate potential sources of adult age differences in the haptic recognition of two-dimensional (2D) shapes. This model states that the low-resolution, temporally sequential, haptic input is translated into a visual

  4. Volume Sculpting: Intuitive, Interactive 3D Shape Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    A system for interactive modelling of 3D shapes on a computer is presented. The system is intuitive and has a flat learning curve. It is especially well suited to the creation of organic shapes and shapes of complex topology. The interaction is simple; the user can either add new shape features...

  5. L1 Generalized Procrustes 2D Shape Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Eiriksson, Hrafnkell

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new method for resistant and robust alignment of sets of 2D shapes wrt. position, rotation, and isotropical scaling based on minimization of absolute distances. The shapes are represented by \\$k\\$ landmarks in two dimensions. It is formulated as a linear programming (LP) problem, th...

  6. Quantification of iodine in porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, non-radioactive iodine was incorporated in two types of biodegradable hydroxyapatite-based porous matrices (HA and HACL through impregnation process from sodium iodine aqueous solutions with varying concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol/L . The results revealed that both systems presented a high capacity of incorporating iodine into their matrices. The quantity of incorporated iodine was measured through Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA. The porous ceramic matrices based on hydroxyapatite demonstrated a great potential for uses in low dose rate (LDR brachytherapy.Materiais cerâmicos porosos à base de compostos de fosfatos de cálcio (CFC vêm sendo estudados e desenvolvidos para várias aplicações biomédicas tais como implantes, sistemas para liberação de drogas e fontes radioativas para braquiterapia. Dois tipos de matrizes porosas biodegradáveis de hidroxiapatita (HA e HACL foram avaliadas em termos da capacidade de incorporação de iodo em suas estruturas. Resultados revelaram que as matrizes porosas a base de hidroxiapatita apresentaram alta capacidade de incorporar iodo em sua estrutura. A quantidade de iodo foi mensurada através da técnica de Análise por Ativação Nêutronica (AAN. As matrizes cerâmicas porosas à base de hidroxiapatita demostraram ter grande potencial para aplicação em braquiterapia de baixa taxa de dose (LDR - Low Dose Rate.

  7. Characterization of Low-Energy Photon-Emitting Brachytherapy Sources with Modified Strengths for Applications in Focal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Joshua L.

    Permanent implants of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used to treat a variety of cancers. Individual source models must be separately characterized due to their unique geometry, materials, and radionuclides, which all influence their dose distributions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are often used for dose measurements around low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. TLDs are typically calibrated with higher energy sources such as 60Co, which requires a correction for the change in the response of the TLDs as a function of photon energy. These corrections have historically been based on TLD response to x ray bremsstrahlung spectra instead of to brachytherapy sources themselves. This work determined the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125I and 103Pd sources relative to 60Co, which allows for correction of TLD measurements of brachytherapy sources with factors specific to their energy spectra. Traditional brachytherapy sources contain mobile internal components and large amounts of high-Z material such as radio-opaque markers and titanium encapsulations. These all contribute to perturbations and uncertainties in the dose distribution around the source. The CivaString is a new elongated 103Pd brachytherapy source with a fixed internal geometry, polymer encapsulation, and lengths ranging from 1 to 6 cm, which offers advantages over traditional source designs. This work characterized the CivaString source and the results facilitated the formal approval of this source for use in clinical treatments. Additionally, the accuracy of a superposition technique for dose calculation around the sources with lengths >1 cm was verified. Advances in diagnostic techniques are paving the way for focal brachytherapy in which the dose is intentionally modulated throughout the target volume to focus on subvolumes that contain cancer cells. Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) are a promising candidate for use in focal

  8. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  9. SU-E-J-215: Towards MR-Only Image Guided Identification of Calcifications and Brachytherapy Seeds: Application to Prostate and Breast LDR Implant Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elzibak, A; Fatemi-Ardekani, A; Soliman, A; Mashouf, S; Safigholi, H; Ravi, A; Morton, G; Song, WY [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Han, D [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify and analyze the appearance of calcifications and brachytherapy seeds on magnitude and phase MRI images and to investigate whether they can be distinguished from each other on corrected phase images for application to prostate and breast low dose rate (LDR) implant dosimetry. Methods: An agar-based gel phantom containing two LDR brachytherapy seeds (Advantage Pd-103, IsoAid, 0.8mm diameter, 4.5mm length) and two spherical calcifications (large: 7mm diameter and small: 4mm diameter) was constructed and imaged on a 3T Philips MR scanner using a 16-channel head coil and a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence (2mm slices, 320mm FOV, TR/ TE= 26.5/5.3ms, 15 degree flip angle). The phase images were unwrapped and corrected using a 32×32, 2D Hanning high pass filter to remove background phase noise. Appearance of the seeds and calcifications was assessed visually and quantitatively using Osirix (http://www.osirix-viewer.com/). Results: As expected, calcifications and brachytherapy seeds appeared dark (hypointense) relative to the surrounding gel on the magnitude MRI images. The diameter of each seed without the surrounding artifact was measured to be 0.1 cm on the magnitude image, while diameters of 0.79 and 0.37 cm were measured for the larger and smaller calcifications, respectively. On the corrected phase images, the brachytherapy seeds and the calcifications appeared bright (hyperintense). The diameter of the seeds was larger on the phase images (0.17 cm) likely due to the dipole effect. Conclusion: MRI has the best soft tissue contrast for accurate organ delineation leading to most accurate implant dosimetry. This work demonstrated that phase images can potentially be useful in identifying brachytherapy seeds and calcifications in the prostate and breast due to their bright appearance, which helps in their visualization and quantification for accurate dosimetry using MR-only. Future work includes optimizing phase filters to best identify

  10. Use of a Flexible Inflatable Multi-Channel Applicator for Vaginal Brachytherapy in the Management of Gynecologic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel M Shin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluate use of novel multi-channel applicator (MC CapriTM to improve vaginal disease coverage achievable by single-channel applicator (SC and comparable to Syed plan simulation. Material and Methods: 28 plans were evaluated from 4 patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer in the vagina. Each received whole pelvis radiation, followed by 3 weekly treatments using HDR brachytherapy with a 13-channel MC. Upper vagina was treated to 5 mm depth to 1500 cGy/3 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost totaling 2100 cGy/3 fractions to tumor. Modeling of SC and Syed plans was performed using MC scans for each patient. Dosimetry for MC and SC plans was evaluated for PTV700 cGy coverage, maximum dose to 2cm3 to bladder, rectum as well as mucosal surface points. Dosimetry for Syed plans was calculated for PTV700 cGy coverage. Patients were followed for treatment response and toxicity.Results: Dosimetric analysis between MC and SC plans demonstrated increased tumor coverage (PTV700 cGy, with decreased rectal, bladder, and contralateral vaginal mucosa dose in favor of MC. These differences were significant (p<0.05. Comparison of MC and Syed plans demonstrated increased tumor coverage in favor of Syed plans which were not significant (p=0.71. Patients treated with MC had no cancer recurrence or ≥ grade 3 toxicity.Conclusion: Use of MC was efficacious and safe, providing superior coverage of tumor volumes ≤1cm depth compared to SC and comparable to Syed implant. MC avoids excess dose to surrounding organs compared to SC, and potentially less morbidity than Syed implants. For tumors extending ≤1cm depth, use of MC represents an alternative to an interstitial implant.

  11. D-shaped photonic crystal fiber refractive index sensor based on surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guowen; Hao, Xiaopeng; Li, Shuguang; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xuenan

    2017-08-20

    A type of D-shaped photonic crystal fiber sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is proposed for refractive index sensing and analyzed by the finite element method. The SPR effect between surface plasmon polariton modes and fiber core modes of the designed D-shaped photonic crystal fiber is used to measure the refractive index of the analyte. Numerical results show that the sensor can detect a range of refractive index ranging from 1.33 to 1.38. When the thickness of metal film is t=20  nm, the maximum sensitivity of 10,493  nm/RIU is obtained with a very high resolution of 9.53×10(-6)  RIU. The good sensing performance makes the proposed sensor a competitive candidate for environmental, biological, and biochemical sensing applications.

  12. D-shaped tilted fiber Bragg grating using magnetic fluid for magnetic field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yu; Zhang, Rui; Si, Guang-Yuan; Wang, Xin; Qi, Yuan-Wei

    2017-12-01

    In our work, a numerical investigation of a magnetic field sensor based on a D-shaped tilted fiber Bragg grating and magnetic fluid is performed. The sensing probe is constructed by placing the magnetic fluid film on the flat surface of the D-shaped tilted fiber Bragg grating. We investigate the resonance wavelengths of the proposed structure with different tilted angles of grating ranging from 0° to 20°, and analyze the magnetic field sensing characteristics. The simulation results show that the optical fiber sensor exhibits optimal transmission characteristics with a tilted angle of 8°. The wavelength sensitivity of the magnetic field sensor is as high as -0.18nm/Oe in the range of 30Oe-270Oe, and it demonstrates a linearity up to R2= -0.9998. Such sensor has potential applications in determining magnetic sensing field.

  13. SU-F-E-13: Design and Fabrication of Gynacological Brachytherapy Shielding & Non Shielding Applicators Using Indigenously Developed 3D Printing Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, S

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In this innovative work we have developed Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & Non Shielding Applicators and compared with the commercially available applicators by using the indigenously developed 3D Printing machine. Methods: We have successfully indigenously developed the 3D printing machine. Which contain the 3 dimensional motion platform, Heater unit, base plate, ect… To fabricate the Gynecological Brachytherapy shielding & non shielding applicators the 3D design were developed in the computer as virtual design. This virtual design is made in a CAD computer file using a 3D modeling program. Separate programme for the shielding & non shielding applicators. We have also provided the extra catheter insert provision in the applicator for the multiple catheter. The DICOM file of the applicator were then converted to stereo Lithography file for the 3D printer. The shielding & Non Shielding Applicators were printed on a indigenously developed 3D printer material. The same dimensions were used to develop the applicators in the acrylic material also for the comparative study. A CT scan was performed to establish an infill-density calibration curve as well as characterize the quality of the print such as uniformity and the infill pattern. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon beams and compared against water and soft tissue. Applicator were then scanned to confirm the placement of multiple catheter position. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated applicators. Results: The doses measured from the ion Chamber and X-Omat film test were within 2%. The shielded applicator reduce the rectal dose comparatively with the non shielded applicator. Conclusion: As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and tested dosimetrically. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be

  14. Modeling and Correspondence of Topologically Complex 3D Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Alhashim, Ibraheem

    2015-01-01

    3D shape creation and modeling remains a challenging task especially for novice users. Many methods in the field of computer graphics have been proposed to automate the often repetitive and precise operations needed during the modeling of detailed shapes. This report surveys different approaches of shape modeling and correspondence especially for shapes exhibiting topological complexity. We focus on methods designed to help generate or process shapes with large number of interconnected compon...

  15. An efficient memetic algorithm for 3D shape matching problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif Khan, Mohammad; Mohamad Ayob, Ahmad F.; Ray, Tapabrata

    2014-05-01

    Shape representation plays a vital role in any shape optimization exercise. The ability to identify a shape with good functional properties is dependent on the underlying shape representation scheme, the morphing mechanism and the efficiency of the optimization algorithm. This article presents a novel and efficient methodology for morphing 3D shapes via smart repair of control points. The repaired sequence of control points are subsequently used to define the 3D object using a B-spline surface representation. The control points are evolved within the framework of a memetic algorithm for greater efficiency. While the authors have already proposed an approach for 2D shape matching, this article extends it further to deal with 3D shape matching problems. Three 3D examples and a real customized 3D earplug design have been used as examples to illustrate the performance of the proposed approach and the effectiveness of the repair scheme. Complete details of the problems are presented for future work in this direction.

  16. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutinho, L.M., E-mail: moutinho@ua.pt [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Castro, I.F.C. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Peralta, L. [Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa (Portugal); Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Abreu, M.C. [Laboratório de Instrumentação e Física Experimental de Partículas (LIP), Lisboa (Portugal); Veloso, J.F.C.A. [i3N, Physics Department, University of Aveiro (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40–50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25–100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  17. Comprehensive brachytherapy physical and clinical aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Baltas, Dimos; Meigooni, Ali S; Hoskin, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy is one of the most important oncological treatment modalities requiring an integrated approach that utilizes new technologies, advanced clinical imaging facilities, and a thorough understanding of the radiobiological effects on different tissues, the principles of physics, dosimetry techniques and protocols, and clinical expertise. A complete overview of the field, Comprehensive Brachytherapy: Physical and Clinical Aspects is a landmark publication, presenting a detailed account of the underlying physics, design, and implementation of the techniques, along with practical guidance for practitioners. Bridging the gap between research and application, this single source brings together the technological basis, radiation dosimetry, quality assurance, and fundamentals of brachytherapy. In addition, it presents discussion of the most recent clinical practice in brachytherapy including prostate, gynecology, breast, and other clinical treatment sites. Along with exploring new clinical protocols, ...

  18. SU-F-E-02: A Feasibility Study for Application of Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques in MR-Guided Brachytherapy Gynecological Cancer with Titanium Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadbi, M [Philips healthtech, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Utilization of Titanium Tandem and Ring (T&R) applicators in MR-guided brachytherapy has become widespread for gynecological cancer treatment. However, Titanium causes magnetic field disturbance and susceptibility artifact, which complicate image interpretation. In this study, metal artifact reduction techniques were employed to improve the image quality and reduce the metal related artifacts. Methods: Several techniques were employed to reduce the metal artifact caused by titanium T&R applicator. These techniques include Metal Artifact Reduction Sequence (MARS), View Angle Tilting (VAT) to correct in-plane distortion, and Slice Encoding for Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) for through-plane artifact correction. Moreover, MARS can be combined with VAT to further reduce the in-plane artifact by reapplying the selection gradients during the readout (MARS+VAT). SEMAC uses a slice selective excitation but acquires additional z-encodings in order to resolve off-resonant signal and to reduce through-plane distortions. Results: Comparison between the clinical sequences revealed that increasing the bandwidth reduces the error in measured diameter of T&R. However, the error is larger than 4mm for the best case with highest bandwidth and spatial resolution. MARS+VAT with isotropic resolution of 1mm reduced the error to 1.9mm which is the least among the examined 2D sequences. The measured diameter of tandem from SEMAC+VAT has the closest value to the actual diameter of tandem (3.2mm) and the error was reduced to less than 1mm. In addition, SEMAC+VAT significantly reduces the blooming artifact in the ring compared to clinical sequences. Conclusion: A higher bandwidth and spatial resolution sequence reduces the artifact and diameter of applicator with a slight compromise in SNR. Metal artifact reduction sequences decrease the distortion associated with titanium applicator. SEMAC+VAT sequence in combination with VAT revealed promising results for titanium imaging and

  19. High-dose rate iridium-192 brachytherapy with flexible applicator. A trial toward decrease of stress during treatment and improvement of quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Keiji; Kasahara, Kotaro; Karashima, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichiro; Kariya, Shinji; Inomata, Taisuke; Yoshida, Shoji; Shuin, Taro [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We tried to improve the materials and methods of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer and evaluated the stress during the treatment in 20 patients with whom the therapy was performed. Rigid applicators made of stainless steel of 1.6 mm in diameter were indwelt with a template as usual for 30 hours in 14 patients (group A). Flexible applicators made of polyoxymethylene rosin (POM) of 2.0 mm in diameter were indwelt without a template for 30 hours after the applicator insertion in 6 patients (group B). We made inquiries about lumbago, inconvenience and necessity of assistant help and sleep in the course of therapy, and urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy as the QOL. The stress during the course of therapy in the patients of group B was obviously less than that of group A. There were no significant differences in urinary incontinence and erectile function after the course of therapy between group A and B. In this study, our trial successfully reduced the stress during the course of therapy in the patients with localized prostate cancer in the course of high-dose rate Iridium-192 brachytherapy. (author)

  20. Computed tomography-based treatment planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the tandem and ring applicator: influence of applicator choice on organ dose and inter-fraction adaptive planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional planning for high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in cervical cancer has been highly recommended by consensus guidelines such as the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO. In this document, we describe our experience with computed tomography (CT-based planning using the tandem/ring applicator. We discuss the influence of applicator geometry on doses to organs at risk (OARs, namely the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Through example cases with dose prescribed to point A, we demonstrate how adaptive planning can help achieve constraints to the OARs as per guidelines.

  1. Dosimetric characterization of a brachytherapy applicator using MCNP5 modelisation and in-phantom measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerardy, I. [Institut Superieur Industriel de Bruxelles, 150, Rue Royale, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: gerardy@isib.be; Rodenas, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Dycke, M. van [Clinique Saint Jean, Bld du Jardin Botanique, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Gallardo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ceccolini, Elisa [Facolta di ingegneria, Alma Mater Studiorum Universita di Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    A gynaecological applicator consisting of a metallic intra-uterine tube with a plastic vaginal applicator and an HDR Ir-192 source have been simulated with MCNP5 (Monte Carlo code). A solid phantom has been designed to perform measurements around the applicator with radiochromic films. The isodose curves obtained are compared with curves calculated with the F4MESH tally of MCNP5 with a good agreement. A pinpoint ionization chamber has been used to evaluate dose at some reference points.

  2. Does help structures play a role in reducing the variation of dwell time in IPSA planning for gynaecological brachytherapy application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamema, Swamidas; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, Dd; Sharma, Smriti; Shrivastava, Sk

    2011-09-01

    To report our experience of dosimetric comparison of IPSA and manual plans, with a focus on the use of help structures (HS) during optimization. 33 patients who underwent MR image-based HDR intracavitary-brachytherapy for cervix cancer based on GYN-ESTRO recommendations were selected for evaluation. Tandem/ovoid (T/O) and Vienna applicators were used. HS of diameter of 5 mm were drawn around the tandem/needles/ovoid and ring. Three plans were generated: manual optimized plan (MOPT), IPSA without help structures (IPSA_woHS) and IPSA with help structures (IPSA_wHS). Dose-volume parameters and the loading pattern were evaluated. For T/O, the use of HS did not make significant impact in the dose-volume parameters and in the loading of tandem and ovoids, however steep variation was found in the individual dwell time. In case of Vienna applicator, inclusion of HS in the optimization made a significant impact in loading of needles. The percentage ratio of total time of needles to the tandem (T(N/T%)) was found to be 14±2.5, 53±9, 22±6 for MOPT, IPSA_woHS and IPSA_wHS, respectively, which implies that in IPSA_woHS the dwell time in needles were half of the dwell time in the tandem, while in MOPT the needles were loaded only in 14%, and in IPSA_wHS it was 22% of the dwell time of tandem. Inclusion of HS in the optimization has reduced the contribution of dwell time of needle in IPSA_wHS. The individual variation of dwell time was also reduced in IPSA_wHS, however drawing of HS is a time consuming procedure and may not be practical for a routine practice. The role of HS was evaluated for IPSA for T/O and Vienna-applicator, the use of HS may be beneficial in case of combined intracavitary - interstitial approach.

  3. SU-F-J-163: In Vivo Quantification of Sequence Parameter Effect On Geometric Distortion Caused by Implanted Titanium Brachytherapy Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T; Diak, A; Surucu, M; Yacoub, J; Harkenrider, M; Shea, S [Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of MR to plan and evaluate brachytherapy treatment for cervical cancer is increasing given the availability of MR conditional or safe applicators and MRI’s proven superiority to CT for characterizing soft tissue lesions. The titanium applicators, however, cause geometric distortions or imaging artifacts, which reduce the utility of MRI for dosimetry. We sought to quantify the observed volume of the same applicator on a previously optimized T2 sequence in comparison to the conventional T2 sequence and CT obtained for brachytherapy planning. Methods: Prior work with testing in phantoms showed that increases in readout bandwidth yielded reductions in artifact area and distortion measurements even with voxel increases. Following IRB approval, nine patients with titanium tandem & ovoid applicator (Varian Medical Systems) in place were scanned with a standard periprocedural protocol which included sagittal T2 fast spin echo (FSE) acquisition (res 0.98×0.78×4.0 mm{sup 3}; BW 200Hz). An additional T2-weighted FSE sequence (res 0.98×0.98×3–4 mm{sup 3}; BW500Hz) with increased readout bandwidth, readout voxel size, and echo train length was added to the protocol. Volume measurements of the applicator (from tip to cervical stop) were hand-segmented in Velocity AI 3.1 (Velocity Medical Solutions) for the two T2 FSE sequences and a planning CT obtained shortly after MRI. Differences were analyzed using a paired t-test. Results: Average apparent volumes of the applicator on standard T2 sequence, decreased bandwidth T2 sequence and CT were 5.922±1.283 cm{sup 3}, 4.544±1.524 cm3, and 2.304±0.509 cm{sup 3} respectively. Conclusion: Apparent volumes of a brachytherapy applicator can be compared in vivo. The modified sequence results in decreased apparent size of the cervical applicator. Both MR sequence volumes were larger than the planning CT, which was expected. Future work will focus on the diagnostic quality of the new sequence and quantifying any

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of multilumen intracavitary balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongbok; Trombetta, Mark G

    2014-01-06

    The objective of this work is to evaluate dosimetric impact of multilumen balloon applicator rotation in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for breast cancer. Highly asymmetrical dose distribution was generated for patients A and B, depending upon applicator proximity to skin and rib. Both skin and rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for A; only rib spacing was ≤ 0.7 cm for B. Thirty-five rotation scenarios were simulated for each patient by rotating outer lumens every 10° over ± 180° range with respect to central lumen using mathematically calculated rotational matrix. Thirty-five rotated plans were compared with three plans: 1) original multidwell multilumen (MDML) plan, 2) multidwell single-lumen (MDSL) plan, and 3) single-dwell single-lumen (SDSL) plan. For plan comparison, planning target volume for evaluation (PTV_EVAL) coverage (dose to 95% and 90% volume of PTV_EVAL) (D95 and D90), skin and rib maximal dose (Dmax), and normal breast tissue volume receiving 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) of prescribed dose (PD) were evaluated. Dose variation due to device rotation ranged from -5.6% to 0.8% (A) and -6.5% to 0.2% (B) for PTV_EVAL D95; -5.2% to 0.4% (A) and -4.1% to 0.7% (B) for PTV_EVAL D90; -2.0 to 18.4% (A) and -7.8 to 17.5% (B) for skin Dmax; -11.1 to 22.8% (A) and -4.7 to 55.1% (B) of PD for rib Dmax, respectively. Normal breast tissue V150 and V200 variation was < 1.0 cc, except for -0.1 to 2.5cc (B) of V200. Furthermore, 30° device rotation increased rib Dmax over 145% of PD: 152.9% (A) by clockwise 30° rotation and 152.5% (B) by counterclockwise 30° rotation. For a highly asymmetric dose distribution, device rotation can outweigh the potential benefit of improved dose shaping capability afforded by multilumen and make dosimetric data worse than single-lumen plans unless it is properly corrected.

  5. Brachytherapy catheter spacing and stabilization technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanes, D Jeffrey; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Park, Sang-June; Steinberg, Michael L; Hayes, John K; Kamrava, Mitchell R

    2012-01-01

    To facilitate catheter spacing, implant stability, and patient comfort during multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy. Uniform and consistent spacing of multiple interstitial implant catheters can be difficult because individual catheters may become displaced during the course of treatment. The authors have developed a brachytherapy catheter fixation method using Jackson-Pratt (JP) drains that can be used within wounds to maintain catheter spacing or on the skin surface for applicator fixation. JP drains are threaded over the implant needles to space and stabilize the implant geometry. The needles are then replaced with the usual brachytherapy catheters. Surgically directed ("open") placement of implant catheters is less prone to displacement when a drain connects and spaces the catheters in the wound. Fixation on the skin surface can also be achieved with the JP drains, which make the friction buttons optional. The soft drain material helps avoid discomfort and pressure injury sometimes associated with hard plastic buttons. Small (10 French) round JP drains are suitable for breast, and head and neck sites and larger 7×10-mm flat JP drains for extremity sarcomas, abdominal, or thoracic tumors. The complex brachytherapy devices fashioned from widely available surgical drains effectively guide and maintain geometry for multicatheter interstitial implants. Stable implant geometry leads to more reliable implementation of brachytherapy dosimetry. Patient comfort is improved and soft tissue injury from hard-edged buttons is avoided. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Advancements in brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba

    2017-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherap...... in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications....

  7. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, ...

  8. Aesthetic preference recognition of 3D shapes using EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lin Hou; Teo, Jason; Mountstephens, James

    2016-04-01

    Recognition and identification of aesthetic preference is indispensable in industrial design. Humans tend to pursue products with aesthetic values and make buying decisions based on their aesthetic preferences. The existence of neuromarketing is to understand consumer responses toward marketing stimuli by using imaging techniques and recognition of physiological parameters. Numerous studies have been done to understand the relationship between human, art and aesthetics. In this paper, we present a novel preference-based measurement of user aesthetics using electroencephalogram (EEG) signals for virtual 3D shapes with motion. The 3D shapes are designed to appear like bracelets, which is generated by using the Gielis superformula. EEG signals were collected by using a medical grade device, the B-Alert X10 from advance brain monitoring, with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz and resolution of 16 bits. The signals obtained when viewing 3D bracelet shapes were decomposed into alpha, beta, theta, gamma and delta rhythm by using time-frequency analysis, then classified into two classes, namely like and dislike by using support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors (KNN) classifiers respectively. Classification accuracy of up to 80 % was obtained by using KNN with the alpha, theta and delta rhythms as the features extracted from frontal channels, Fz, F3 and F4 to classify two classes, like and dislike.

  9. Exploration of continuous variability in collections of 3D shapes

    KAUST Repository

    Ovsjanikov, Maks

    2011-07-01

    As large public repositories of 3D shapes continue to grow, the amount of shape variability in such collections also increases, both in terms of the number of different classes of shapes, as well as the geometric variability of shapes within each class. While this gives users more choice for shape selection, it can be difficult to explore large collections and understand the range of variations amongst the shapes. Exploration is particularly challenging for public shape repositories, which are often only loosely tagged and contain neither point-based nor part-based correspondences. In this paper, we present a method for discovering and exploring continuous variability in a collection of 3D shapes without correspondences. Our method is based on a novel navigation interface that allows users to explore a collection of related shapes by deforming a base template shape through a set of intuitive deformation controls. We also help the user to select the most meaningful deformations using a novel technique for learning shape variability in terms of deformations of the template. Our technique assumes that the set of shapes lies near a low-dimensional manifold in a certain descriptor space, which allows us to avoid establishing correspondences between shapes, while being rotation and scaling invariant. We present results on several shape collections taken directly from public repositories. © 2011 ACM.

  10. MO-B-BRD-04: Sterilization for 3D Printed Brachytherapy Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. [UC San Francisco (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session is designed so that the learning objectives are practical. The intent is that the attendee may take home an understanding of not just the technology, but also the logistical steps necessary to execute these 3D printing techniques in the clinic. Four practical 3D printing topics will be discussed: (i) Creating bolus and compensators for photon machines; (ii) tools for proton therapy; (iii) clinical applications in imaging; (iv) custom phantom design for clinic and research use. The use of 3D printers within the radiation oncology setting is proving to be a useful tool for creating patient specific bolus and compensators with the added benefit of cost savings. Creating the proper protocol is essential to ensuring that the desired effect is achieved and modeled in the treatment planning system. The critical choice of printer material (since it determines the interaction with the radiation) will be discussed. Selection of 3D printer type, design methods, verification of dose calculation, and the printing process will be detailed to give the basis for establishing your own protocol for electron and photon fields. A practical discussion of likely obstacles that may be encountered will be included. The diversity of systems and techniques in proton facilities leads to different facilities having very different requirements for beam modifying hardware and quality assurance devices. Many departments find the need to design and fabricate facility-specific equipment, making 3D printing an attractive technology. 3D printer applications in proton therapy will be discussed, including beam filters and compensators, and the design of proton therapy specific quality assurance tools. Quality control specific to 3D printing in proton therapy will be addressed. Advantages and disadvantages of different printing technology for these applications will also be discussed. 3D printing applications using high-resolution radiology-based imaging data will be presented. This data

  11. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate 192 Ir brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-11-01

    A joint working group was created by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the Australasian Brachytherapy Group (ABG) with the charge, among others, to develop a set of well-defined test case plans and perform calculations and comparisons with model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs). Its main goal is to facilitate a smooth transition from the AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dose calculation formalism, widely being used in clinical practice for brachytherapy, to the one proposed by Task Group No. 186 (TG-186) for MBDCAs. To do so, in this work a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) 192 Ir shielded applicator has been designed and benchmarked. A generic HDR 192 Ir shielded applicator was designed based on three commercially available gynecological applicators as well as a virtual cubic water phantom that can be imported into any DICOM-RT compatible treatment planning system (TPS). The absorbed dose distribution around the applicator with the TG-186 192 Ir source located at one dwell position at its center was computed using two commercial TPSs incorporating MBDCAs (Oncentra® Brachy with Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine, ACE™, and BrachyVision ACUROS™) and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) codes, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, egs_brachy, Geant4, MCNP6, and Penelope2008. TPS-based volumetric dose distributions for the previously reported "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test cases, and the new "source centered in applicator" test case, were analyzed here using the MCNP6 dose distribution as a reference. Volumetric dose comparisons of TPS results against results for the other MC codes were also performed. Distributions of local and global dose difference ratios are reported. The local dose differences among MC codes are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of the reference datasets for the "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test

  12. Commissioning of applicator-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy boost with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for advanced cervical cancer using radiochromic film dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldelaijan, Saad; Wadi-Ramahi, Shada; Nobah, Ahmad; Moftah, Belal; Devic, Slobodan; Jastaniyah, Noha

    To describe an EBT3 GAFCHROMIC film-based dosimetry method to be used in commissioning of a combined HDR brachytherapy (HDRB) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) boost for treatment of advanced cervical cancer involving extensive residual disease after external beam treatment. A cube phantom was designed to firmly fit an intrauterine tandem applicator and EBT3 radiochromic film pieces. A high-risk clinical target volume (CTVHR, Total) was contoured with an extended arm at one side. The HDRB treatment was planned to cover the proximal CTVHR, Total with 7 Gy and the distal volume, referred to as CTVHR, Distal, was planned by SBRT for dose augmentation. After HDRB treatment delivery, SBRT treatment was delivered within 1 hour by image guidance using the applicator geometry. Intentional 1D and 2D misalignments were introduced to evaluate the effect on target volumes. In addition, effect of film reirradiation at different time gaps and dose levels was evaluated. Film dosimetric accuracy, with up to 2 hours gap between irradiations, was shown to be unaffected. A 2%/2 mm gamma analysis between measured and planned doses showed agreement of >99%. Misalignments of more than 2 mm between applicator and SBRT isocenter resulted in suboptimal dose-volume histogram affecting mostly D98% and D90% of CTVHR, Distal. Visualizing how target dose-volume metrics are affected by minor misalignments between SBRT and HDRB dose gradients, in light of achievable phantom-based experimental quality assurance level, encourages the clinical applicability of this technique. Radiochromic film was shown to be a valuable tool to commission procedures combining two different treatment planning systems and modalities with varying dose rates and energy ranges. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dose comparison between TG-43-based calculations and radiochromic film measurements of the Freiburg flap applicator used for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatments of skin lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldelaijan, Saad; Bekerat, Hamed; Buzurovic, Ivan; Devlin, Phillip; DeBlois, Francois; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    Current high-dose-rate brachytherapy skin treatments with the Freiburg flap (FF) applicator are planned with treatment planning systems based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-43 data sets, which assume full backscatter conditions in dose calculations. The aim of this work is to describe an experimental method based on radiochromic film dosimetry to evaluate dose calculation accuracy during surface treatments with the FF applicator at different depths and bolus thicknesses. Absolute doses were measured using a reference EBT3 radiochromic film dosimetry system within a Solid Water phantom at different depths (0, 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cm) with respect to the phantom surface. The impact of bolus (up to 3-cm thickness) placed on top of the applicator was investigated for two clinical loadings created using Oncentra MasterPlan: 5 cm × 5 cm and 11 cm × 11 cm. For smaller loading and depths beyond 2 cm and for larger loading and depths beyond 1 cm, the dose difference was less than 3% (±4%). At shallower depths, differences of up to 6% (±4%) at the surface were observed if no bolus was added. The addition of 2-cm bolus for the smaller loading and 1 cm for larger loading minimized the difference to less than 3% (±4%). For typical FF applicator loading sizes, the actual measured dose was 6% (±4%) lower at the skin level when compared with TG-43. Additional bolus above the FF was shown to decrease the dose difference. The consideration of change in clinical practice should be carefully investigated in light of clinical reference data. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group: considerations and pitfalls in commissioning and applicator reconstruction in 3D image-based treatment planning of cervix cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Kirisits, Christian; Berger, Daniel; Pérez-Calatayud, José; De Brabandere, Marisol; De Leeuw, Astrid; Dumas, Isabelle; Hudej, Robert; Lowe, Gerry; Wills, Rachel; Tanderup, Kari

    2010-08-01

    Image-guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer is increasingly replacing X-ray based dose planning. In image-guided brachytherapy the geometry of the applicator is extracted from the patient 3D images and introduced into the treatment planning system; a process referred to as applicator reconstruction. Due to the steep brachytherapy dose gradients, reconstruction errors can lead to major dose deviations in target and organs at risk. Appropriate applicator commissioning and reconstruction methods must be implemented in order to minimise uncertainties and to avoid accidental errors. Applicator commissioning verifies the location of source positions in relation to the applicator by using auto-radiography and imaging. Sectional imaging can be utilised in the process, with CT imaging being the optimal modality. The results from the commissioning process can be stored as library applicators. The importance of proper commissioning is underlined by the fact that errors in library files result in systematic errors for clinical treatment plans. While the source channel is well visualised in CT images, applicator reconstruction is more challenging when using MR images. Availability of commercial dummy sources for MRI is limited, and image artifacts may occur with titanium applicators. The choice of MR sequence is essential for optimal visualisation of the applicator. Para-transverse imaging (oriented according to the applicator) with small slice thickness (< or =5 mm) is recommended or alternatively 3D MR sequences with isotropic voxel sizes. Preferably, contouring and reconstruction should be performed in the same image series in order to avoid fusion uncertainties. Clear and correct strategies for the applicator reconstruction will ensure that reconstruction uncertainties have limited impact on the delivered dose. Under well-controlled circumstances the reconstruction uncertainties are in general smaller than other brachytherapy uncertainties such as contouring and organ

  15. Reconstruction of hidden 3D shapes using diffuse reflections

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Otkrist; Willwacher, Thomas; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Raskar, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    We analyze multi-bounce propagation of light in an unknown hidden volume and demonstrate that the reflected light contains sufficient information to recover the 3D structure of the hidden scene. We formulate the forward and inverse theory of secondary and tertiary scattering reflection using ideas from energy front propagation and tomography. We show that using careful choice of approximations, such as Fresnel approximation, greatly simplifies this problem and the inversion can be achieved via a backpropagation process. We provide a theoretical analysis of the invertibility, uniqueness and choices of space-time-angle dimensions using synthetic examples. We show that a 2D streak camera can be used to discover and reconstruct hidden geometry. Using a 1D high speed time of flight camera, we show that our method can be used recover 3D shapes of objects "around the corner".

  16. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Abou El Majd

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available When solving a PDE problem numerically, a certain mesh-refinement process is always implicit, and very classically, mesh adaptivity is a very effective means to accelerate grid convergence. Similarly, when optimizing a shape by means of an explicit geometrical representation, it is natural to seek for an analogous concept of parameterization adaptivity. We propose here an adaptive parameterization for three-dimensional optimum design in aerodynamics by using the so-called “Free-Form Deformation” approach based on 3D tensorial Bézier parameterization. The proposed procedure leads to efficient numerical simulations with highly reduced computational costs.[How to cite this article:  Majd, B.A.. 2014. Parameterization adaption for 3D shape optimization in aerodynamics. International Journal of Science and Engineering, 6(1:61-69. Doi: 10.12777/ijse.6.1.61-69

  17. Advancements in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Ménard, Cynthia; Polgar, Csaba; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2017-01-15

    Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy modality associated with a highly focal dose distribution. Brachytherapy treats the cancer tissue from the inside, and the radiation does not travel through healthy tissue to reach the target as with external beam radiotherapy techniques. The nature of brachytherapy makes it attractive for boosting limited size target volumes to very high doses while sparing normal tissues. Significant developments over the last decades have increased the use of 3D image guided procedures with the utilization of CT, MRI, US and PET. This has taken brachytherapy to a new level in terms of controlling dose and demonstrating excellent clinical outcome. Interests in focal, hypofractionated and adaptive treatments are increasing, and brachytherapy has significant potential to develop further in these directions with current and new treatment indications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-F-BRA-09: New Efficient Method for Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy Source Calibration by Pre-Characterizing Surface Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, S [iCAD Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The objective is to improve the efficiency and efficacy of Xoft™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy (EBT) calibration of the source & surface applicator using AAPM TG-61 formalism. Methods: Current method of Xoft EBT source calibration involves determination of absolute dose rate of the source in each of the four conical surface applicators using in-air chamber measurements & TG61 formalism. We propose a simplified TG-61 calibration methodology involving initial characterization of surface cone applicators. This is accomplished by calibrating dose rates for all 4 surface applicator sets (for 10 sources) which establishes the “applicator output ratios” with respect to the selected reference applicator (20 mm applicator). After the initial time, Xoft™ Axxent™ source TG61 Calibration is carried out only in the reference applicator. Using the established applicator output ratios, dose rates for other applicators will be calculated. Results: 200 sources & 8 surface applicator sets were calibrated cumulatively using a Standard Imaging A20 ion-chamber in accordance with manufacturer-recommended protocols. Dose rates of 10, 20, 35 & 50mm applicators were normalized to the reference (20mm) applicator. The data in Figure 1 indicates that the normalized dose rate variation for each applicator for all 200 sources is better than ±3%. The average output ratios are 1.11, 1.02 and 0.49 for the 10 mm,35 mm and 50 mm applicators, respectively, which are in good agreement with the manufacturer’s published output ratios of 1.13, 1.02 and 0.49. Conclusion: Our measurements successfully demonstrate the accuracy of a new calibration method using a single surface applicator for Xoft EBT sources and deriving the dose rates of other applicators. The accuracy of the calibration is improved as this method minimizes the source position variation inside the applicator during individual source calibrations. The new method significantly reduces the calibration time to less

  19. Proof of principle: Applicator-guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI-based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenholt, Marianne S; Vestergaard, Anne; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Mohamed, Sandy; Nielsen, Søren K; Petersen, Jørgen B; Fokdal, Lars; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2014-01-01

    To describe a new technique involving high-precision stereotactic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) boost in combination with intracavitary-interstitial (IC-IS) brachytherapy (BT) in cervical tumors that cannot be sufficiently covered by IC-IS-BT due to extensive residual disease and/or difficult topography at the time of BT. Three patients with stage IIIB-IVA cervical cancer had significant residual disease at the time of BT. MRI-guided IC-IS-BT (pulsed-dose rate) was combined with a stereotactic IMRT boost guided according to the BT applicator in situ, using cone beam CT. The planning aim dose (total external beam radiotherapy and BT) for the high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) was D90 >70-85 Gy, whereas constraints for organs at risk were D2cm3 81 Gy were obtained in the central HR-CTV and D90 >69 Gy in the distal regions of HR-CTV. Image-guided set up of the IMRT boost with the applicator in situ was feasible. The dose plans were robust to intra-fraction uncertainties of 3 mm. Local control with acceptable morbidity was obtained at a followup of 3, 2.5, and 1 year, respectively. The combination of MRI-guided BT with an applicator-guided stereotactic IMRT boost is feasible. This technique seems to be useful in the few cases where HR-CTV coverage cannot be obtained even with IS-IC-BT. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayler, E; Harrison, A; Eldredge-Hindy, H; Dinome, J; Munro, S; Anne, R; Comber, E; Lockamy, V [Bodine Center for Cancer Treatment, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  1. Brachytherapy in lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovirosa-Casino, Angeles; Planas-Toledano, Isabel; Ferre-Jorge, Jorge; Oliva-Díez, José María; Conill-Llobet, Carlos; Arenas-Prat, Meritxell

    2006-05-01

    Lip cancer is one of the most prevalent skin tumours of the head and neck. The characteristics of the tumour relate to their exophyitic growth in an area of easy visual acces which allows their diagnosis in early stages. As a result, there is a better prognosis with the present treatments. In early stages the treatment can be performed by surgery or by brachytherapy, and the results are similar on local control; nevertheless brachytherapy offers the best functional and esthetic results. We are reporting on a review of the literature in relation to indications, techniques and results of brachytherapy for lip cancer.

  2. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  3. SU-G-TeP2-10: Feasibility of Newly Designed Applicator for High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Treatment of Patients with Vaginal Vault Recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V; Wong, M; Chan, M; Cheung, S; Leung, R; Lee, K; Law, G; Tung, S [Tuen Mun Hospital (Hong Kong); Huang, X; Chui, E; Leung, K [The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kwong, D [The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the dose of an in-house 3D-printed gynecology applicator (TMHGA) for vaginal vault recurrence of corpus cancer patients after operation for high dose rate brachytherapy treatment with commercially available applicators. Methods: A newly designed applicator is made from 3D-printing methods using ABSM30i. The isodose of the applicator is compared with Elekta multi-channel (MC) applicator and titanium Rotterdam applicator with coupling central tube and vaginal cylinder (RC). Three plans are created using three applicators in a CT set of water phantom. The applicators are anchored using the applicator library and implant library in the Elekta Oncentra treatment planning system (ver.4.5). The rectum is mimicked by creating a 2cm diameter cylinder, with a distance 1mm posteriorly away from the high risk CTV (HR-CTV). Similarly, the bladder is replicated by a 6cm diameter cylinder with distance 1mm anteriorly from the HR-CTV. Three plans are all normalized 1.5cm superior, 0.5cm anterior and 0.5cm posterior of the applicator surface. By fixing D90 of HR-CTV to 6Gy, the D2cc of rectum and bladder of three plans are compared. Results: The D2cc of the bladder for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 14.0% and 11.9% respectively. While the D2cc of the rectum for using TMHGA is lower than MC and RC by 18.9% and 12.4% respectively. The total treatment time of TMHGA plan is shorter than MC and RC by 11.2% and 12.9%. Conclusion: The applicator created via 3D printing delivers a lower dose to the bladder and the rectum while keeping the same coverage to HR-CTV as other commercially available applicators. Additionally, the new applicator resulted in a reduction of treatment time, which is always welcome.

  4. SU-E-T-297: Dosimetric Assessment of An Air-Filled Balloon Applicator in HDR Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy Using the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, H; Lee, Y; Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As an alternative to cylindrical applicators, air inflated balloon applicators have been introduced into HDR vaginal cuff brachytherapy treatment to achieve sufficient dose to vagina mucosa as well as to spare rectum and bladder. In general, TG43 formulae based treatment planning systems do not take into account tissue inhomogeneity, and air in the balloon applicator can cause higher delivered dose to mucosa than treatment plan reported. We investigated dosimetric effect of air in balloon applicator using the Monte Carlo method. Methods: The thirteen-catheter Capri applicator with a Nucletron Ir-192 seed was modeled for various balloon diameters (2cm to 3.5cm) using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Ir-192 seed was placed in both central and peripheral catheters to replicate real patient situations. Existence of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) with air balloon was evaluated by comparing kerma and dose at various distances (1mm to 70mm) from surface of air-filled applicator. Also mucosa dose by an air-filled applicator was compared with by a water-filled applicator to evaluate dosimetry accuracy of planning system without tissue inhomogeneity correction. Results: Beyond 1mm from air/tissue interface, the difference between kerma and dose was within 2%. CPE (or transient CPE) condition was deemed existent, and in this region no electron transport was necessary in Monte Carlo simulations. At 1mm or less, the deviation of dose from kerma became more apparent. Increase of dose to mucosa depended on diameter of air balloon. The increment of dose to mucosa was 2.5% and 4.3% on average for 2cm and 3.5cm applicators, respectively. Conclusion: After introduction of air balloon applicator, CPE fails only at the proximity of air/tissue interface. Although dose to mucosa is increased, there is no significant dosimetric difference (<5%) between air and water filled applicators. Tissue inhomogeneity correction is not necessary for air-filled applicators.

  5. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  6. Brachytherapy at the Institut Gustave-Roussy: Personalized vaginal mould applicator: technical modification and improvement; Curietherapie a l'Institut Gustave-Roussy: applicateur moule vaginal personnalise: modification et amelioration techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albano, M.; Dumas, I.; Haie-Meder, C. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Service de curietherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2008-12-15

    Brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of patients with gynaecological cancers. At the Institut Gustave-Roussy, the technique of vaginal mould applicator has been used for decades. This technique allows a personalized tailored irradiation, integrating tumour shape, size and extension and vaginal anatomy. Vaginal expansion reduces the dose to the vaginal mucosa and to the organs at risk. We report a modification of the material used for vaginal mould manufacture. The advantages of the new material are a lighter weight, and transparency allowing a better accuracy in the placement of catheters for radioactive sources. This material is applicable for low dose-rate, pulse dose-rate and high dose-rate brachytherapy. Since 2001, more than 700 vaginal moulds have been manufactured with this new approach without any intolerance. (authors)

  7. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of radionuclide-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Beth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Chadha, Manjeet; Mourtada, Firas; Demanes, D Jeffrey

    Brachytherapy is a radiation therapy method in which radionuclide sources are used to deliver a radiation dose at a distance of up to a few centimeters by surface, intracavitary, intraluminal, or interstitial application. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclides for brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses radionuclides such as iridium-192 at dose rates of 20 cGy per minute (12 Gy per hour) or more to a designated target point or volume. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is indicated for treating malignant or benign tumors where the treatment volume or targeted points are defined and accessible. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. MO-D-BRD-00: Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  9. SU-G-201-11: Exploring the Upper Limits of Dose Sculpting Capacity of the Novel Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Safigholi, H; Soliman, A [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore and quantify the upper limits in dose sculpting capacity of the novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator compared with conventional tandem design for {sup 192}Ir-based HDR planning. Methods: The proposed DMBT tandem applicator is designed for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT), especially MRI, of cervical cancer. It has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm width, grooved along a 5.4-mm diameter nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cc, capable of generating directional dose profiles – leading to enhanced dose sculpting capacity through inverse planning. The external dimensions are identical to that of conventional tandem design to ensure clinical compatibility. To explore the expansive dose sculpting capacity, we constructed a hypothetical circular target with 20-mm radius and positioned the DMBT and conventional tandems at the center. We then incrementally shifted the positions laterally away from the center of up to 15 mm, at 1-mm steps. The in-house coded gradient projection-based inverse planning system was then used to generate inverse optimized plans ensuring identical V100=100% coverage. Conformity index (CI) was calculated for all plans. Results: Overall, the DMBT tandem generates more conformal dose distributions than conventional tandem for all lateral positional shifts of 0-15 mm (CI=0.91–0.52 and 0.99–0.34, respectively), with an exception at the central position due to the ideal circular dose distribution, generated by the {sup 192}Ir, fitting tightly around the circular target (CI = 0.91 and 0.99, respectively). The DMBT tandem is able to generate dose conformity of CI>0.8 at up to 6-mm positional shift while the conventional tandem violates this past 2-mm shift. Also, the CI ratio (=DMBT/conv.) increases rapidly until about 8 mm and then stabilizes beyond. Conclusion: A substantial enhancement in the dose sculpting capacity has been demonstrated for the novel DMBT tandem applicator. While

  10. SU-F-T-30: Comprehensive Dosimetric Characterization of the Novel Direction Modulation Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, H; Mashouf, S; Soliman, Abraam; Owrangi, A; Song, W Y [Deprtment of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Han, D [Deprtment of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the dosimetric properties/distributions of the novel proposed direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator in combination with 192Ir HDR source, and compare against conventional tandem design, using Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The proposed DMBT tandem applicator is designed for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy, especially MRI, of cervical cancer. It has 6 peripheral holes of 1.3-mm width, grooved along a 5.4-mm diameter nonmagnetic tungsten alloy rod of density 18.0 g/cc, capable of generating directional dose profiles – leading to enhanced dose sculpting capacity through inverse planning. In-water dosimetric parameters for the DMBT and conventional tandems have been calculated for various radial distances away and around the tandems. For the DMBT tandem, the cumulative dose from the 192Ir source occupying 1) one and 2) all six holes in equal dwell times was calculated and normalized to match the dose rate of the open source (in conventional tandem) at 1 cm from the center. This is done to compare and contrast the characteristic dose distributions to that of the isotropic TG43-based 192Ir source. Results: All dose rates were normalized at 1-cm radius from the center of the applicators, containing source(s). The normalized dose rates at 0.5, 3.0, and 5.0-cm radiuses were then 388, 11.3, and 4.1% for conventional tandem, 657, 8.1, and 2.7% for DMBT tandem with the source in one hole at front entrance, and 436, 10.9, and 3.8% for DMBT tandem with the source in all six holes. For the DMBT tandem case with the source in one hole, the backside transmissions were 47, 2.4, and 0.9%, respectively. Conclusion: The DMBT tandem is able to generate closely similar dosimetric characteristics as that of the single-channel conventional tandem if needed (with the source occupying all six holes), at the same time, generate directional radiation profile(s) for favorably enabling 3D dose sculpting capability.

  11. Simultaneous acquisition of 3D shape and deformation by combination of interferometric and correlation-based laser speckle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekiff, Markus; Berssenbrügge, Philipp; Kemper, Björn; Denz, Cornelia; Dirksen, Dieter

    2015-12-01

    A metrology system combining three laser speckle measurement techniques for simultaneous determination of 3D shape and micro- and macroscopic deformations is presented. While microscopic deformations are determined by a combination of Digital Holographic Interferometry (DHI) and Digital Speckle Photography (DSP), macroscopic 3D shape, position and deformation are retrieved by photogrammetry based on digital image correlation of a projected laser speckle pattern. The photogrammetrically obtained data extend the measurement range of the DHI-DSP system and also increase the accuracy of the calculation of the sensitivity vector. Furthermore, a precise assignment of microscopic displacements to the object's macroscopic shape for enhanced visualization is achieved. The approach allows for fast measurements with a simple setup. Key parameters of the system are optimized, and its precision and measurement range are demonstrated. As application examples, the deformation of a mandible model and the shrinkage of dental impression material are measured.

  12. Inter-application variation of dose and spatial location of D(2cm(3)) volumes of OARs during MR image based cervix brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamema, Swamidas V; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Tanderup, Kari; Malvankar, Deepti; Sharma, Shilpa; Engineer, Reena; Chopra, Supriya; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2013-04-01

    Evaluation of Inter-application variation of doses and spatial location of D(2cm(3)) volumes of OARs during MR-image based cervix brachytherapy. Twenty-seven patients treated with EMBRACE protocol were analyzed. Every patient had two applications, one week apart. For each application patient had undergone MR-imaging (MR-1 and MR-2), volume delineation, reconstruction, treatment planning (plan-1 and plan-2) and dose evaluation. Both the image series were then co-registered with applicator as the reference coordinate system (Eclipse planning system v8.6.14). Inter-application dose, volume and spatial location of D(2cm(3)) variation were evaluated. The largest inter-application systematic and random dose variations were observed for sigmoid as compared to rectum and bladder. The mean (±SD) of the relative D(2cm(3)) variations were 0.6(±15.1)%, 0.9(±13.1)% and 11.9(±37.5)% for rectum, bladder and sigmoid respectively. The overlap of D(2cm(3)) volumes was more than 50% in 16(59%), 8(30%) and 3(11%) patients for rectum, bladder and sigmoid, respectively. The 2cm(3) volumes between the applications/fractions are quite stable in topography for bladder and rectum, and hence the current practice of cumulative addition of D(2cm(3)) dose is expected to be valid for bladder and rectum. For sigmoid, significant topographical changes were seen, which need further validation in a larger patient population and in multi-centric settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of hydroxyapatite porous matrixes for application as radiation sources in brachytherapy; Sintese e caracterizacao de matrizes porosas de hidroxiapatita para aplicacao como fontes radioativas em braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Kassio Andre; Lameiras, Fernando Soares; Silva, Viviane Viana [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: kassiolacerda@yahoo.com.br

    2006-04-15

    Porous ceramic materials based on calcium phosphate compounds (CPC) have been studied aiming at different biomedical applications such as implants, drug delivery systems and radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite (HAp) powders and their ceramic bodies were characterized by a combination of different techniques (X-rays diffraction and fluorescence, infrared spectrophotometry, BET method, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy) to evaluate their physico-chemical and microstructural characteristics in terms of chemical composition, segregated phases, microstructure, porosity, and chemical and thermal stability. The results revealed that these systems presented potential for use as porous biodegradable radioactive sources able to be loaded with a wide range of radionuclides for cancer treatment by the brachytherapy technique. (author)

  14. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Susovan Banerjee; Tejinder Kataria; Deepak Gupta; Shikha Goyal; Shyam Singh Bisht; Trinanjan Basu; Ashu Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of br...

  15. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assenholt, Marianne S.; Petersen, Joergen B.; Nielsen, Soeren K.; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Tanderup, Kari (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Purpose. Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Material and methods. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gyx25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gyx4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Results. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. Conclusion. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy

  16. A dose planning study on applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost in combination with 3D MRI based brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenholt, Marianne S; Petersen, Jørgen B; Nielsen, Søren K; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical cancer is usually treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy (BT). However, if response or tumour topography is unfavourable it may be difficult to reach a sufficient BT dose. The purpose of this study was to explore whether an applicator guided stereotactic IMRT boost could be combined with brachytherapy to improve dose volume parameters. Dose plans of 6 patients with HR CTV volumes of 31-100cc at the time of BT were analysed. MRI was performed with a combined intracavitary (IC)-interstitial (IS) ring applicator in situ. A radiotherapy schedule consisting of 45Gy (1.8Gy x 25) IMRT followed by boost of 28Gy (7Gy x 4fx) was modelled. Four different boost techniques were evaluated: IC-BT, IC/IS-BT, IC-BT+IMRT and IMRT. Dose plans were optimised for maximal tumour dose (D90) and coverage (V85Gy) while respecting DVH constraints in organs at risk: D2cc <75Gy in rectum and sigmoid and <90Gy in bladder (EQD2). In combined BT+IMRT dose plans, the IMRT plan was optimised on top of the BT dose distribution. Volumes irradiated to more than 60 Gy EQD2 (V60Gy) were evaluated. Median dose coverage in IC plans was 74% [66-93%]. By using IC/IS or IC-BT+IMRT boost, the median coverage was improved to 95% [78-99%], and to 96% [69-99%] respectively. For IMRT alone, a median coverage of 98% [90-100%] was achieved, but V60Gy volumes were significantly increased by a median factor of 2.0 [1.4-2.3] as compared to IC/IS. It depended on the individual tumour topography whether IC/IS-BT or IC-BT+IMRT boost was the most favourable technique. It is technically possible to create dose plans that combine image guided BT and IMRT. In this study the dose coverage could be significantly increased by adding IS-BT or IMRT boost to the intracavitary dose. Using IMRT alone for boost cannot be advocated since this results in a significant increase of the volume irradiated to 60Gy.

  17. SU-F-T-38: How Much Dose Is Given in MR Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy with the Ring and Tandem Applicators?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric metrics of HDR Ring and Tandem applicator Brachytherapy for primary cervical cancers. Methods: The dosimetric metrics of high-risk clinical target volumes (HDR-CTV) of 12 patients (in total 60 fractions/plans) treated with the HDR ring and tandem applicators were retrospectively analyzed. Ring diameter is from 2.6 to 3.4 cm, tandem length is from 4 to 6 cm, and the angle is either 45 or 60 degrees. The first fraction plan was MR guided, the MR images were then used as a reference for contouring the HR-CTV in CT images of following 4 fractions. The nominal prescription dose was between 5.2 and 5.8 Gy at the point A. The plans were adjusted to cover at least 90% of the HR-CTV by 90% of the prescription dose and to reduce the doses to the bladder, rectum and bowel-bag. Minimum target dose of D100 and D90 were converted into the biologically equivalent EBRT dose D90-iso and D100-iso (using α/β=10 Gy, 2 Gy/fx). Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) based on the average cancer killing across the target volume were calculated by the modified linear quadratic model (MLQ) from the differential dose volume histogram (DVH) tables. Results: The average D90iso of all plans is 8.1 Gy (ranging from 6.2 to 15 Gy, median 7.8 Gy); the average D100iso is just 4.1 Gy (ranging from 1.8 to 7.8 Gy; median 3.9 Gy). The average EUD is 7.0 Gy (ranging from 6.1 to 9.6 Gy, median 6.9 Gy), which is 87% of the D90iso, and 170% of the D100iso. Conclusion: The EUDs is smaller than D90iso but greater than D100iso. Because the EUD takes into account the intensive cancer cell killing in the high dose zone of HR-CTV, MLQ calculated EUD apparently is more relevant than D90 and D100 to describe the HDR brachytherapy treatment quality.

  18. Intratumorally Injected 177Lu-Labeled Gold Nanoparticles: Gold Nanoseed Brachytherapy with Application for Neoadjuvant Treatment of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Simmyung; Cai, Zhongli; Lu, Yijie; Winnik, Mitchell A; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Reilly, Raymond M

    2016-06-01

    inhibiting the growth of breast cancer tumors in CD-1 athymic mice and caused no normal organ toxicity. These results are promising for their application for neoadjuvant brachytherapy of LABC. Because EGFR targeting was not required, the approach is broadly applicable to LABC with different phenotypes. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Applications of a statistical model to the dosimetry of brachytherapy linear sources; Aplicaciones de un modelo estadistico a la dosimetria dde fuentes de braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabariego, M. P.; Lallena, A. M.; Porras, I.

    2011-07-01

    The dosimetry of photon brachytherapy sources often make use of simple analytical expressions with free parameters to fit experimental data or Monte Carlo simulation. Some planning systems make use of polynomials yi o exponential functions. By applying a statistical model developed by the authors-point source of photons that provides these functions, we try to describe the dosimetric parameters that characterize the linear brachytherapy sources by integrating them.

  20. 3D image-based adapted high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer with and without interstitial needles: measurement of applicator shift between imaging and dose delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Karlsson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Using 3D image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervical cancer treatment, it often means that patients are transported and moved during the treatment procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine the intra-fractional longitudinal applicator shift in relation to the high risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV by comparing geometries at imaging and dose delivery for patients with and without needles. Material and methods : Measurements were performed in 33 patients (71 fractions, where 25 fractions were without and 46 were with interstitial needles. Gold markers were placed in the lower part of the cervix as a surrogate for HR-CTV, enabling distance measurements between HR-CTV and the ring applicator. Shifts of the applicator relative to the markers were determined using planning computed tomography (CT images used for planning, and the radiographs obtained at dose delivery. Differences in the physical D90 for HR-CTV due to applicator shifts were simulated individually in the treatment planning system to provide the relative dose variation. Results : The maximum distances of the applicator shifts, in relation to the markers, were 3.6 mm (caudal, and –2.5 mm (cranial. There was a significant displacement of –0.7 mm (SD = 0.9 mm without needles, while with needles there was no significant shift. The relative dose variation showed a significant increase in D90 HR-CTV of 1.6% (SD = 2.6% when not using needles, and no significant dose variation was found when using needles. Conclusions : The results from this study showed that there was a small longitudinal displacement of the ring applicator and a significant difference in displacement between using interstitial needles or not.

  1. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  2. Canadian prostate brachytherapy in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Crook, Juanita; Morris, W. James; Morton, Gerard; Pickles, Tom; Usmani, Nawaid; Vigneault, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy can be used as a monotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk patients or in combination with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a form of dose escalation for selected intermediate- and high-risk patients. Prostate brachytherapy with either permanent implants (low dose rate [LDR]) or temporary implants (high dose rate [HDR]) is emerging as the most effective radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Several large Canadian brachytherapy programs were established in the mid- to late-1990s. Prostate brachytherapy is offered in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and New Brunswick. We anticipate the need for brachytherapy services in Canada will significantly increase in the near future. In this review, we summarize brachytherapy programs across Canada, contemporary eligibility criteria for the procedure, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen recurrence free survival (PRFS), as published from Canadian institutions for both LDR and HDR brachytherapy. PMID:23671495

  3. Image guided, adaptive, accelerated, high dose brachytherapy as model for advanced small volume radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haie-Meder, Christine; Siebert, Frank-André; Pötter, Richard

    2011-09-01

    Brachytherapy has consistently provided a very conformal radiation therapy modality. Over the last two decades this has been associated with significant improvements in imaging for brachytherapy applications (prostate, gynecology), resulting in many positive advances in treatment planning, application techniques and clinical outcome. This is emphasized by the increased use of brachytherapy in Europe with gynecology as continuous basis and prostate and breast as more recently growing fields. Image guidance enables exact knowledge of the applicator together with improved visualization of tumor and target volumes as well as of organs at risk providing the basis for very individualized 3D and 4D treatment planning. In this commentary the most important recent developments in prostate, gynecological and breast brachytherapy are reviewed, with a focus on European recent and current research aiming at the definition of areas for important future research. Moreover the positive impact of GEC-ESTRO recommendations and the highlights of brachytherapy physics are discussed what altogether presents a full overview of modern image guided brachytherapy. An overview is finally provided on past and current international brachytherapy publications focusing on "Radiotherapy and Oncology". These data show tremendous increase in almost all research areas over the last three decades strongly influenced recently by translational research in regard to imaging and technology. In order to provide high level clinical evidence for future brachytherapy practice the strong need for comprehensive prospective clinical research addressing brachytherapy issues is high-lighted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya(®) Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy.

  5. SU-G-201-02: Application of RayStretch in Clinical Cases: A Calculation for Heterogeneity Corrections in LDR Permanent I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueso-Gonzalez, F [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); Vijande, J [University of Valencia, Burjassot and IFIC (CSIC-UV) (Spain); Ballester, F [University of Valencia, Burjassot (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, and Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Siebert, F [Clinic of Radiotherapy (Radiooncology), Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tissue heterogeneities and calcifications have significant impact on the dosimetry of low energy brachytherapy (BT). RayStretch is an analytical algorithm developed in our institution to incorporate heterogeneity corrections in LDR prostate brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to study its application in clinical cases by comparing its predictions with the results obtained with TG-43 and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: A clinical implant (71 I-125 seeds, 15 needles) from a real patient was considered. On this patient, different volumes with calcifications were considered. Its properties were evaluated in three ways by i) the Treatment planning system (TPS) (TG-43), ii) a MC study using the Penelope2009 code, and iii) RayStretch. To analyse the performance of RayStretch, calcifications located in the prostate lobules covering 11% of the total prostate volume and larger calcifications located in the lobules and underneath the urethra for a total occupied volume of 30% were considered. Three mass densities (1.05, 1.20, and 1.35 g/cm3) were explored for the calcifications. Therefore, 6 different scenarios ranging from small low density calcifications to large high density ones have been discussed. Results: DVH and D90 results given by RayStretch agree within 1% with the full MC simulations. Although no effort has been done to improve RayStretch numerical performance, its present implementation is able to evaluate a clinical implant in a few seconds to the same level of accuracy as a detailed MC calculation. Conclusion: RayStretch is a robust method for heterogeneity corrections in prostate BT supported on TG-43 data. Its compatibility with commercial TPSs and its high calculation speed makes it feasible for use in clinical settings for improving treatment quality. It will allow in a second phase of this project, its use during intraoperative ultrasound planning. This study was partly supported by a fellowship grant from the Spanish Ministry of

  6. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Tejinder; Gupta, Deepak; Goyal, Shikha; Bisht, Shyam Singh; Basu, Trinanjan; Abhishek, Ashu

    2017-01-01

    Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG) serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D) USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT). The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites. PMID:28533803

  7. Use of ultrasound in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy: enumerations and arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susovan Banerjee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inherently, brachytherapy is the most conformal radiotherapeutic technique. As an aid to brachytherapy, ultrasonography (USG serves as a portable, inexpensive, and simple to use method allowing for accurate, reproducible, and adaptive treatments. Some newer brachytherapy planning systems have incorporated USG as the sole imaging modality. Ultrasonography has been successfully used to place applicator and dose planning for prostate, cervix, and anal canal cancers. It can guide placement of brachytherapy catheters for all other sites like breast, skin, and head and neck cancers. Traditional USG has a few limitations, but recent advances such as 3-dimensional (3D USG and contrast USG have enhanced its potential as a dependable guide in high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy (HDR-IGBT. The authors in this review have attempted to enumerate various aspects of USG in brachytherapy, highlighting its use across various sites.

  8. NOTE: Clinical application of a OneDose™ MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A.; Sharma, Pramod K.; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Mahantshetty, Umesh M.; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2006-07-01

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose™ in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  9. Clinical application of a OneDose MOSFET for skin dose measurements during internal mammary chain irradiation with high dose rate brachytherapy in carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Sharma, Pramod K; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M; Mahantshetty, Umesh M; Sarin, Rajiv; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2006-07-21

    In our earlier study, we experimentally evaluated the characteristics of a newly designed metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) OneDose in-vivo dosimetry system for Ir-192 (380 keV) energy and the results were compared with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). We have now extended the same study to the clinical application of this MOSFET as an in-vivo dosimetry system. The MOSFET was used during high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) of internal mammary chain (IMC) irradiation for a carcinoma of the breast. The aim of this study was to measure the skin dose during IMC irradiation with a MOSFET and a TLD and compare it with the calculated dose with a treatment planning system (TPS). The skin dose was measured for ten patients. All the patients' treatment was planned on a PLATO treatment planning system. TLD measurements were performed to compare the accuracy of the measured results from the MOSFET. The mean doses measured with the MOSFET and the TLD were identical (0.5392 Gy, 15.85% of the prescribed dose). The mean dose was overestimated by the TPS and was 0.5923 Gy (17.42% of the prescribed dose). The TPS overestimated the skin dose by 9% as verified by the MOSFET and TLD. The MOSFET provides adequate in-vivo dosimetry for HDRBT. Immediate readout after irradiation, small size, permanent storage of dose and ease of use make the MOSFET a viable alternative for TLDs.

  10. Role of brachytherapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to application of brachytherapy for treating the localized prostate cancer (PC. Statistics for incidence and detectability of this pathology and its dynamics for recent years are represented. Brief analysis of other methods which are conveniently used for treatment of PC, such as radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy, was performed. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods have been discussed. Brief history about the development of brachytherapy from first experience to wide-spread use in clinical practice is reported. The detailed review of series of large trials from Russia and other countries for efficiency and safety of brachytherapy in patients with prostate cancer for recent 15 years is also represented. Two types of brachytherapy in current clinical oncology i.e. low-dose technique with permanent implantation of microsources and high-dose temporary isotope implantation, specifics of its application in different groups of patients have been described. The procedure of brachytherapy and its three main steps i.e. planning, implantation and control assessment after implantation have been characterized in details. The conclusion about benefits of using of brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer as minimally invasive and efficient method was made. 

  11. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in (192)Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in (192)Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A modified dose calculation formalism for electronic brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWerd, Larry A; Culberson, Wesley S; Micka, John A; Simiele, Samantha J

    2015-01-01

    To propose a modification of the current dose calculation formalism introduced in the Task Group No. 43 Report (TG-43) to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. Electronic brachytherapy sources are miniature x-ray tubes emitting low energies with high-dose-rates. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has introduced a new primary air-kerma rate standard for one of these sources, in contrast to air-kerma strength. A modification of the TG-43 protocol for calculation of dose-rate distributions around electronic brachytherapy sources including sources in an applicator is presented. It cannot be assumed that the perturbations from sources in an applicator are negligible, and thus, the applicator is incorporated in the formalism. The modified protocol mimics the fundamental methodology of the original TG-43 formalism, but now incorporates the new NIST-traceable source strength metric of air-kerma rate at 50 cm and introduces a new subscript, i, to denote the presence of an applicator used in treatment delivery. Applications of electronic brachytherapy sources for surface brachytherapy are not addressed in this Technical Note since they are well documented in other publications. A modification of the AAPM TG-43 protocol has been developed to accommodate an air-kerma rate standard for electronic brachytherapy sources as an alternative to an air-kerma strength standard. The modified TG-43 formalism allows dose calculations to be performed using a new NIST-traceable source strength metric and introduces the concept of applicator-specific formalism parameters denoted with subscript, i. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of the 3D Shape Shearography Technique for Strain Inspection of Curved Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Anisimov, A.; Serikova, M.G.; Groves, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Practical development questions of 3D shape shearography technique for surface strain inspection of curved objects are discussed. Results of a global cameras-projector system calibration and different methods of shear distance estimation in 3D are presented

  14. Novel application of 3D printing in brachytherapy using MED610 3D printed insert for I-125 ROPES eye plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if MED610 3D printed material can be used as a surrogate for acrylic in the manufacturing of a replacement insert used in an eye plaque brachytherapy applicator. Measurement of the dose distributions from a standard acrylic insert were compared with dose obtained from MED610 3D printed replica using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films. The study used a 15 mm Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaque applicator loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds. GafChromic(®) EBT3 films were placed in a solid water phantom and dose distributions were measured three-dimensionally both along and perpendicular to a loaded ROPES eye plaque's central axis (CAX). Each measurement was performed with the stainless steel plaque backing attached to the eye plaque, to assess the variability of the dose distributions between the acrylic and MED 610 insert. Results of dose along the central axis were compared between acrylic and MED610 insert and the results found agreement within 1.5 %. Off-axis profiles were also compared between the acrylic insert and MED610 and were found to agree to within 7 % in the central 15 mm width centred on CAX at depths ranging from z = 2 mm to z = 8 mm in 2 mm increments. The aim of this investigation was to verify the consistency between doses profiles over a range of clinically relevant depths for a 15 mm loaded ROPES plaque using acrylic versus MED610 material. The results show an agreement between experimental measurements given the film uncertainty of 7 %.

  15. SU-F-T-35: Optimization of Bladder and Rectal Doses Using a Multi-Lumen Intracavitary Applicator for Gynecological Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laoui, S; Dietrich, S; Sehgal, V; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation dose delivery for endometrial cancer using HDR techniques is limited by dose to bladder and rectum. A dosimetric study was performed using Varian Capri vaginal brachytherapy applicator to determine the optimal channel configuration which minimizes dose to bladder and rectum, while providing good target coverage. Methods: A total of 17 patients, 63 plans clinically delivered, and 252 simulated plans using Varian BrachyVision planning system were generated to investigate optimal channel configuration which results in minimum dose to bladder and rectum while providing adequate target coverage. The Capri applicator consists of 13 lumens arranged in two concentric rings, one central lumen and six lumens per ring. Manual dose shaping is invariably required to lower the dose to critical organs. Three-dimensional plans were simulated for 4 channel arrangements, all 13 channels, channel 12 o’clock (close to bladder) and 6 o’clock (close to rectum) deactivated, central channel deactivated, and central channel in addition to 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock deactivated. A relationship between V100, the volume that receives the prescribed dose, and the amount of curie-seconds required to deliver it, was established. Results: Using all 13 channels results in maximum dose to bladder and rectum. Deactivating central channel in addition to 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock resulted in minimizing bladder and rectum doses but compromised target coverage. The relationship between V100, the volume that receives the prescribed dose, and the curie seconds was found to be linear. Conclusion: Deactivating channels 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock was shown to be the optimal configuration leading to minimum dose to bladder and rectum without compromising target coverage. The linear relationship between V100 and the curie- seconds can be used as a verification parameter.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of a combination of brachytherapy applicators for uterine cervix cancer with involvement of the distal vagina; Avaliacao dosimetrica de uma combinacao de aplicadores para braquiterapia de tumores do colo uterino com acometimento da porcao distal da vagina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues [Real e Benemerita Sociedade Portuguesa de Beneficencia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia Estereotactica; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Rubo, Rodrigo Augusto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Radioterapia], e-mail: handrade@hcnet.usp.br; Seraide, Rodrigo Migotto [Centro de Oncologia Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate an alternative brachytherapy technique for uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina, without increasing the risk of toxicity. Materials And Methods: Theoretical study comparing three different high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applicators: intrauterine tandem and vaginal cylinder (TC); tandem/ring applicator combined with vaginal cylinder (TR+C); and a virtual applicator combining both the tandem/ring and vaginal cylinder in a single device (TRC). Prescribed doses were 7 Gy at point A, and 5 Gy on the surface or at a 5 mm depth of the vaginal mucosa. Doses delivered to the rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon were kept below the tolerance limits. Volumes covered by the isodoses, respectively, 50% (V50), 100% (V100), 150% (V150) and 200% (V200) were compared. Results: Both the combined TR+C and TRC presented a better dose distribution as compared with the TC applicator. The TR+C dose distribution was similar to the TRC dose, with V150 and V200 being about 50% higher for TR+C (within the cylinder). Conclusion: Combined TR+C in a two-time single application may represent an alternative therapy technique for patients affected by uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina. (author)

  17. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Chengyu; Guo Bingqi; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Cheng, Chih-Yao, E-mail: shic@uthscsa.ed [Radiation Oncology Department, Oklahoma University Health Science Center, Oklahoma, OK 73104 (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent(TM) x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V{sub 100} reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as

  18. Applications of tissue heterogeneity corrections and biologically effective dose volume histograms in assessing the doses for accelerated partial breast irradiation using an electronic brachytherapy source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chengyu; Guo, Bingqi; Cheng, Chih-Yao; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-09-01

    A low-energy electronic brachytherapy source (EBS), the model S700 Axxent™ x-ray device developed by Xoft Inc., has been used in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) as an alternative to an Ir-192 source. The prescription dose and delivery schema of the electronic brachytherapy APBI plan are the same as the Ir-192 plan. However, due to its lower mean energy than the Ir-192 source, an EBS plan has dosimetric and biological features different from an Ir-192 source plan. Current brachytherapy treatment planning methods may have large errors in treatment outcome prediction for an EBS plan. Two main factors contribute to the errors: the dosimetric influence of tissue heterogeneities and the enhancement of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of electronic brachytherapy. This study quantified the effects of these two factors and revisited the plan quality of electronic brachytherapy APBI. The influence of tissue heterogeneities is studied by a Monte Carlo method and heterogeneous 'virtual patient' phantoms created from CT images and structure contours; the effect of RBE enhancement in the treatment outcome was estimated by biologically effective dose (BED) distribution. Ten electronic brachytherapy APBI cases were studied. The results showed that, for electronic brachytherapy cases, tissue heterogeneities and patient boundary effect decreased dose to the target and skin but increased dose to the bones. On average, the target dose coverage PTV V100 reduced from 95.0% in water phantoms (planned) to only 66.7% in virtual patient phantoms (actual). The actual maximum dose to the ribs is 3.3 times higher than the planned dose; the actual mean dose to the ipsilateral breast and maximum dose to the skin were reduced by 22% and 17%, respectively. Combining the effect of tissue heterogeneities and RBE enhancement, BED coverage of the target was 89.9% in virtual patient phantoms with RBE enhancement (actual BED) as compared to 95

  19. SU-G-IeP1-09: MRI Evaluation of a Direction-Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer On 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soliman, A; Safigholi, H [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Han, D [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Elzibak, A; Mashouf, S; Owrangi, A; Ravi, A [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada); Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess image quality and artifact extent of a novel direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator on a 3T MRI using various clinical imaging sequences. Methods: The tandem applicator is composed of a tungsten alloy with 6 peripheral grooves covered with a PEEK tip. An MR-compatible phantom with similar dimensions to the female pelvis was manufactured. To visually assess the spatial shift of the applicator’s tip, a mountable radial-fiducial with 4 plastic rods, each of 3mm diameter, was designed to tightly fit on the applicator. The rods are separated by 16 mm and mounted at 90-degree relative to one another. The pelvis phantom was filled with a solution of MnCl2 to mimic T2 relaxation time of the cervix (60-80 ms at 3T).Imaging was performed on a 3T Philips Achieva using a 16-channel Torso coil array. Four MR sequences were tested: T2-weighted fast spin-echo (T2w-FSE), proton density weighted FSE (PDw-FSE), T1-weighted FSE (T1w-FSE) and T1 weighted spoiled gradient echo (T1w-GE). The spatial resolution was kept the same between all sequences: 0.6 × 0.6 × 3 mm{sup 3} with no slice gaps. Para-sagittal images were acquired with the applicator fixed at a 30-degree angle anterior to the B0- field to mimic clinical settings. Results: Minimal artifacts were observed on T2w-FSE, PDw-FSE and T1-FSE, while significant artifacts were seen on T1w-GE images. Artifacts induced in all 3 FSE sequences did not hinder accurate localisation of the tip and the applicator boundaries. The drift of the applicator’s centreline from the radial fiducials was measured and found to be < 1 mm for the 3 FSE sequences. Conclusion: The tungsten–based DMBT applicator can be potentially used on 3T with various clinical sequences without inducing significant artifacts. Further validation on patients as well as the evaluation of relative SNR among the different sequences is required.

  20. Descriptor Based Analysis of Digital 3D Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna

    Analysis and processing of 3D digital shapes is a significant research area with numerous medical, industrial, and entertainment applications which has gained enormously in importance as optical scanning modalities have started to make acquired 3D geometry commonplace. The area holds many...... challenges. One such challenge, which is addressed in this thesis, is to develop computational methods for classifying shapes which are in agreement with the human way of understanding and classifying shapes. In this dissertation we first present a shape descriptor based on the process of diffusion...

  1. Whole 3D shape reconstruction of vascular segments under pressure via fringe projection techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Katia; Pappalettere, Carmine

    2006-12-01

    Understanding and modelling vascular wall mechanics is a primary issue in the study of circulatory diseases. Although theoretical and numerical studies on arteries compliance are continuously increasing, relatively little work has been documented on the use of non-invasive imaging techniques for monitoring 3D vascular wall deformations. Usually, 2D video dimension analyzer (VDA) systems recover diameter and length variations during inflation/extension tests by tracking position changes of few markers put on the blood vessel surface. Then, strain determination relies on the assumption of axisymmetric deformations. However, more rigorous evaluations of whole wall deformation map are required for properly modelling the highly anisotropic and inhomogeneous vascular tissue mechanical response. This paper describes the development and application of a fringe projection (FP)-based procedure for the 360° 3D shape reconstruction of tubular samples subjected to internal pressure. A specially designed fixture for mounting and inflating the tubular segment allows specimen rotation about its axis. Movement is controlled by a high-precision rotational stage. This yields accurate positioning of the surface to be investigated with respect to the viewing direction. Data point clouds obtained from multiple recorded images are then processed and merged in a CAD environment, thus providing the whole shape of the sample with very high spatial resolution. The entire procedure has successfully been applied to latex specimens and porcine vascular segments. Further improvements will make the present procedure suitable for in vitro tests under more closely reproduced physiological conditions.

  2. Reducing the pressure drag of a D-shaped bluff body using linear feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Longa, L.; Morgans, A. S.; Dahan, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The pressure drag of blunt bluff bodies is highly relevant in many practical applications, including to the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles. This paper presents theory revealing that a mean drag reduction can be achieved by manipulating wake flow fluctuations. A linear feedback control strategy then exploits this idea, targeting attenuation of the spatially integrated base (back face) pressure fluctuations. Large-eddy simulations of the flow over a D-shaped blunt bluff body are used as a test-bed for this control strategy. The flow response to synthetic jet actuation is characterised using system identification, and controller design is via shaping of the frequency response to achieve fluctuation attenuation. The designed controller successfully attenuates integrated base pressure fluctuations, increasing the time-averaged pressure on the body base by 38%. The effect on the flow field is to push the roll-up of vortices further downstream and increase the extent of the recirculation bubble. This control approach uses only body-mounted sensing/actuation and input-output model identification, meaning that it could be applied experimentally.

  3. WE-F-16A-01: Commissioning and Clinical Use of PC-ISO for Customized, 3D Printed, Gynecological Brachytherapy Applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J; Sethi, R; Mellis, K; Siauw, T; Sudhyadhom, A; Hsu, I; Pouliot, J [UC San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: (1) Evaluate the safety and radiation attenuation properties of PCISO, a bio-compatible, sterilizable 3D printing material by Stratasys, (2) establish a method for commissioning customized multi- and single-use 3D printed applicators, (3) report on use of customized vaginal cylinders used to treat a series of serous endometrial cancer patient. Methods: A custom film dosimetry apparatus was designed to hold a Gafchromic radio film segment between two blocks of PC-ISO and 3D-printed using a Fortus 400mc (StrataSys). A dose plan was computed using 13 dwell positions at 2.5 mm spacing and normalized to 1500 cGy at 1 cm. Film exposure was compared to control tests in only air and only water. The average Hounsfield Unit (HU) was computed and used to verify water equivalency. For the clinical use cases, the physician specifies the dimensions and geometry of a custom applicator from which a CAD model is designed and printed. Results: The doses measured from the PC-ISO Gafchromic film test were within 1% of the dose measured in only water between 1cm and 6cm from the channel. Doses increased 7–4% measured in only air. HU range was 11–43. The applicators were sterilized using the Sterrad system multiple times without damage. As of submission 3 unique cylinders have been designed, printed, and used in the clinic. A standardizable workflow for commissioning custom 3D printed applicators was codified and will be reported. Conclusions: Quality assurance (QA) evaluation of the PC-ISO 3D-printing material showed that PC-ISO is a suitable material for a gynecological brachytherapy vaginal cylinder in a clinical setting. With the material commissioning completed, if the physician determines that a better treatment would Result, a customized design is fabricated with limited additional QA necessary. Although this study was specific to PC-ISO, the same setup can be used to evaluate other 3D-printing materials.

  4. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part II: Monte Carlo and experimental verification of a multiple source dwell position plan employing a shielded applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrokokkinos, L.; Zourari, K.; Pantelis, E.; Moutsatsos, A.; Karaiskos, P.; Sakelliou, L.; Seimenis, I.; Georgiou, E.; Papagiannis, P. [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece); Department of Physics, Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, Ilisia, 157 71 Athens (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 2nd Building of Preclinical Section, University Campus, Alexandroupolis 68100 (Greece); Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 115 27 Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the dosimetric validation of a deterministic radiation transport based treatment planning system (BRACHYVISION v. 8.8, referred to as TPS in the following) for multiple {sup 192}Ir source dwell position brachytherapy applications employing a shielded applicator in homogeneous water geometries. Methods: TPS calculations for an irradiation plan employing seven VS2000 {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) source dwell positions and a partially shielded applicator (GM11004380) were compared to corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results, as well as experimental results obtained using the VIP polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging three-dimensional dosimetry method with a custom made phantom. Results: TPS and MC dose distributions were found in agreement which is mainly within {+-}2%. Considerable differences between TPS and MC results (greater than 2%) were observed at points in the penumbra of the shields (i.e., close to the edges of the ''shielded'' segment of the geometries). These differences were experimentally verified and therefore attributed to the TPS. Apart from these regions, experimental and TPS dose distributions were found in agreement within 2 mm distance to agreement and 5% dose difference criteria. As shown in this work, these results mark a significant improvement relative to dosimetry algorithms that disregard the presence of the shielded applicator since the use of the latter leads to dosimetry errors on the order of 20%-30% at the edge of the ''unshielded'' segment of the geometry and even 2%-6% at points corresponding to the potential location of the target volume in clinical applications using the applicator (points in the unshielded segment at short distances from the applicator). Conclusions: Results of this work attest the capability of the TPS to accurately account for the scatter conditions and the increased attenuation involved in HDR brachytherapy applications

  5. Contemporary Toxicity Profile of Breast Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation After Lumpectomy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Shaitelman, Simona F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Grace L., E-mail: glsmith@mdanderson.org [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We compared toxicities after brachytherapy versus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in contemporary breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan healthcare claims, we identified 64,112 women treated from 2003 to 2012 with lumpectomy followed by radiation (brachytherapy vs EBRT). Brachytherapy was further classified by multichannel versus single-channel applicator approach. We identified the risks and predictors of 1-year infectious and noninfectious postoperative adverse events using logistic regression and temporal trends using Cochran-Armitage tests. We estimated the 5-year Kaplan-Meier cumulative incidence of radiation-associated adverse events. Results: A total of 4522 (7.1%) patients received brachytherapy (50.2% multichannel vs 48.7% single-channel applicator). The overall risk of infectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.34, P<.001). However, over time, the frequency of infectious adverse events after brachytherapy decreased, from 17.3% in 2003 to 11.6% in 2012, and was stable after EBRT at 9.7%. Beyond 2007, there were no longer excess infections with brachytherapy (P=.97). The overall risk of noninfectious adverse events was higher after brachytherapy than after EBRT (OR=2.27; 95% CI 2.09-2.47, P<.0001). Over time, the frequency of noninfectious adverse events detected increased: after multichannel brachytherapy, from 9.1% in 2004 to 18.9% in 2012 (Ptrend = .64); single-channel brachytherapy, from 12.8% to 29.8% (Ptrend<.001); and EBRT, from 6.1% to 10.3% (Ptrend<.0001). The risk was significantly higher with single-channel than with multichannel brachytherapy (hazard ratio = 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=.03). Of noninfectious adverse events, 70.9% were seroma. Seroma significantly increased breast pain risk (P<.0001). Patients with underlying diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and treatment with chemotherapy had increased

  6. Parallelized patient-specific quality assurance for high-dose-rate image-guided brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography-on-rails brachytherapy suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Showalter, Timothy N; Watkins, W Tyler; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    To describe a parallelized patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program designed to ensure safety and quality in image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in an integrated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails brachytherapy suite. A patient-specific QA program has been modified for the image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) program in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite. In the modification of the QA procedures of Task Group-59, the additional patient-specific QA procedures are included to improve rapid IGBT workflow with applicator placement, imaging, planning, treatment, and applicator removal taking place in one room. The IGBT workflow is partitioned into two groups of tasks that can be performed in parallel by two or more staff members. One of the unique components of our implemented workflow is that groups work together to perform QA steps in parallel and in series during treatment planning and contouring. Coordinating efforts in this systematic way enable rapid and safe brachytherapy treatment while incorporating 3-dimensional anatomic variations between treatment days. Implementation of these patient-specific QA procedures in an integrated CT-on-rails brachytherapy suite ensures confidence that a rapid workflow IGBT program can be implemented without sacrificing patient safety or quality and deliver highly-conformal dose to target volumes. These patient-specific QA components may be adapted to other IGBT environments that seek to provide rapid workflow while ensuring quality. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genetic Fuzzy Prediction of Mass Perception in Non-Functional 3D Shapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiche, Sofiane

    2010-01-01

    and their perception by observers. The link between geometry and human perception is created using a genetic learning algorithm combined with a fuzzy logic decision support system. Human evaluations of the non-functional 3D shapes against two contrary perception adjectives (massive versus lightweight) are used...... as the learning data set. The non-functional 3D shapes were designed by engineering design students from the Technical University of Denmark who were asked to design non-functional 3D shapes evoking either the adjective massive or light. Eight fuzzy models were developed: three (3) models constructed manually...... by the author and five (5) genetically generated. The fuzzy models were constructed using different sets of inputs of quantitative geometric properties. Combination of the different inputs resulted in different sets of fuzzy rules that can eventually be used as design guidelines for designers. The results...

  8. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and (226)Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  9. Modulation measuring profilometry with cross grating projection and single shot for dynamic 3D shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingteng; Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; You, Zhisheng; Zhong, Min

    2016-12-01

    In order to determine Dynamic 3-D shape with vertical measurement mode, a fast modulation measuring profilometry (MMP) with a cross grating projection and single shot is proposed. Unlike the previous methods, in our current projection system, one cross grating is projected by a special projection lens consisting of a common projection lens and a cylindrical lens. Due to the characteristics of cylindrical lens, the image of the vertical component and the horizontal component of the cross grating is separated in the image space, and the measuring range is just the space between the two image planes. Through a beam splitter, the CCD camera can coaxially capture the fringe pattern of the cross grating modulated by the testing object's shape. In one fringe pattern, by applying Fourier transform, filtering and inverse Fourier transform, the modulation corresponding to the vertical and horizontal components of the cross grating can be obtained respectively. Then the 3-D shape of the object can be reconstructed according to the mapping relationship between modulation and height, which was established by calibration process in advance. So the 3-D shape information can be recorded at the same speed of the frame rate of the CCD camera. This paper gives the principle of the proposed method and the set-up for measuring experiment and system calibration. The 3-D shape of a still object and a dynamic process of liquid vortex were measured and reconstructed in the experiments, and the results proved the method's feasibility. The advantage of the proposed method is that only one fringe pattern is needed to extract the modulation distribution and to reconstruct the 3-D shape of the object. Therefore, the proposed method can achieve high speed measurement and vertical measurement without shadow and occlusion. It can be used in the dynamic 3-D shape measurement and vibration analysis.

  10. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Hee Kam, Stéphanie; Rivera, Sofia; Hennequin, Christophe; Lourenço, Nelson; Chirica, Mircea; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Quéro, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate outcomes after exclusive salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) intraluminal esophageal brachytherapy given to previously irradiated patients with recurrent esophageal cancer. We reviewed medical records of 30 patients who were treated by salvage HDR brachytherapy for local esophageal cancer. Brachytherapy delivered four to six fractions of 5-7 Gy at 5 mm from the applicator surface and 20 mm above and below the macroscopic tumor volume. Eighty percentage of patients received treatment as initially planned. Complete response rate, evaluated 1 month after brachytherapy by endoscopy and biopsy, was 53%. Squamous histology and complete endoscopic tumor response at 1 month were significantly associated with better local tumor control. Median local progression-free survival was 9.8 months. Overall survival was 31.5% and 17.5% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. On univariate analysis, preserved performance status and limited weight loss (brachytherapy were associated with better overall survival. Severe toxicity (Grade ≥3) occurred in 7 patients (23%). Although esophageal cancer in previously irradiated patients is associated with poor outcomes, HDR brachytherapy may be a valuable salvage treatment for inoperable patients with locally limited esophageal cancer, particularly in the subset of patients with preserved performance status and limited weight loss (≤10%) before salvage brachytherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance analysis of 3-D shape measurement algorithm with a short baseline projector-camera system

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianyang; Li, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    A number of works for 3-D shape measurement based on structured light have been well-studied in the last decades. A common way to model the system is to use the binocular stereovision-like model. In this model, the projector is treated as a camera, thus making a projector-camera-based system unified with a well-established traditional binocular stereovision system. After calibrating the projector and camera, a 3-D shape information is obtained by conventional triangulation. However, in such a...

  12. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Todor, D [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  13. (106)Ruthenium brachytherapy for retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphaël; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of (106)Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with (106)Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. A total of 63 tumors were treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. (106)Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which (106)Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. (106)Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with (106)Ru brachytherapy.

  14. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  15. Pediatric peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent Wilms’ tumor using a reconstructed Freiburg flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Flower

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To report peri-operative fractionated high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with a 3D customized Freiburg flap applicator to treat locally recurrent Wilms’ tumor, followed by immediate hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy for a 16-year-old with a second recurrence of nephroblastoma (Wilms’ tumor. Material and methods: The tumor was excised and surgical bed was treated with fractionated HDR brachytherapy using a Freiburg flap applicator. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy was performed immediately after the removal of brachytherapy applicator. Results: The Freiburg flap was successfully reconstructed to enable delivery of conformable peri-operative HDR brachytherapy. The clinical target volume (CTV D90 was 26 Gy in 5 fractions. Conclusions : Peri-operative fractionated HDR brachytherapy with a customized Freiburg flap applicator was delivered successfully across a large multi-disciplinary team.

  16. 3D shape shearography with integrated structured light projection for strain inspection of curved objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Andrei G.; Groves, Roger M.

    2015-05-01

    Shearography (speckle pattern shearing interferometry) is a non-destructive testing technique that provides full-field surface strain characterization. Although real-life objects especially in aerospace, transport or cultural heritage are not flat (e.g. aircraft leading edges or sculptures), their inspection with shearography is of interest for both hidden defect detection and material characterization. Accurate strain measuring of a highly curved or free form surface needs to be performed by combining inline object shape measuring and processing of shearography data in 3D. Previous research has not provided a general solution. This research is devoted to the practical questions of 3D shape shearography system development for surface strain characterization of curved objects. The complete procedure of calibration and data processing of a 3D shape shearography system with integrated structured light projector is presented. This includes an estimation of the actual shear distance and a sensitivity matrix correction within the system field of view. For the experimental part a 3D shape shearography system prototype was developed. It employs three spatially-distributed shearing cameras, with Michelson interferometers acting as the shearing devices, one illumination laser source and a structured light projector. The developed system performance was evaluated with a previously reported cylinder specimen (length 400 mm, external diameter 190 mmm) loaded by internal pressure. Further steps for the 3D shape shearography prototype and the technique development are also proposed.

  17. Programming 2D/3D shape-shifting with hobbyist 3D printers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, T.; Janbaz, S.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Materials and devices with advanced functionalities often need to combine complex 3D shapes with functionality-inducing surface features. Precisely controlled bio-nanopatterns, printed electronic components, and sensors/actuators are all examples of such surface features. However, the vast majority

  18. Synthesis of image sequences for Korean sign language using 3D shape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mun-Ho; Choi, Chang-Seok; Kim, Chang-Seok; Jeon, Joon-Hyeon

    1995-05-01

    This paper proposes a method for offering information and realizing communication to the deaf-mute. The deaf-mute communicates with another person by means of sign language, but most people are unfamiliar with it. This method enables to convert text data into the corresponding image sequences for Korean sign language (KSL). Using a general 3D shape model of the upper body leads to generating the 3D motions of KSL. It is necessary to construct the general 3D shape model considering the anatomical structure of the human body. To obtain a personal 3D shape model, this general model is to adjust to the personal base images. Image synthesis for KSL consists of deforming a personal 3D shape model and texture-mapping the personal images onto the deformed model. The 3D motions for KSL have the facial expressions and the 3D movements of the head, trunk, arms and hands and are parameterized for easily deforming the model. These motion parameters of the upper body are extracted from a skilled signer's motion for each KSL and are stored to the database. Editing the parameters according to the inputs of text data yields to generate the image sequences of 3D motions.

  19. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis.

  20. Estimates of relative doses of {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh of spherical applicators used in ophthalmic brachytherapy; Estimativas de doses relativas de aplicadores esfericos de {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh usados em braquiterapia oftalmologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Eduardo de, E-mail: edup2112@gmail.com, E-mail: epaiva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Fisica Medica

    2016-11-01

    Spherical ophthalmic applicators containing the beta emitter {sup 106}Ru / {sup 106}Rh are much used in brachytherapy for the treatment of various eye diseases. However, there is great difficulty in dosimetry these sources because of its geometric shape, the short range of the beta particles and the large dose gradient, and because of that calculation methods of dose distributions around these sources take on a great importance. In this work an analytical / numerical method is used to estimate the dose rates for a function of depth for spherical sources containing {sup 106}Ru / {sup 106}Rh. The results of the doses on along the central axis for applicators models CXS, CCX, CCY, CCZ, CCD and CGD and CCC are compared with published values calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and measurement results.

  1. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T., E-mail: ryan-flynn@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center for the Engineering Arts and Sciences, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  2. Developing a Verification and Training Phantom for Gynecological Brachytherapy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbobeh Nazarnejad

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Dosimetric accuracy is a major issue in the quality assurance (QA program for treatment planning systems (TPS. An important contribution to this process has been a proper dosimetry method to guarantee the accuracy of delivered dose to the tumor. In brachytherapy (BT of gynecological (Gyn cancer it is usual to insert a combination of tandem and ovoid applicators with a complicated geometry which makes their dosimetry verification difficult and important. Therefore, evaluation and verification of dose distribution is necessary for accurate dose delivery to the patients. Materials and Methods The solid phantom was made from Perspex slabs as a tool for intracavitary brachytherapy dosimetric QA. Film dosimetry (EDR2 was done for a combination of ovoid and tandem applicators introduced by Flexitron brachytherapy system. Treatment planning was also done with Flexiplan 3D-TPS to irradiate films sandwiched between phantom slabs. Isodose curves obtained from treatment planning system and the films were compared with each other in 2D and 3D manners. Results The brachytherapy solid phantom was constructed with slabs. It was possible to insert tandems and ovoids loaded with radioactive source of Ir-192 subsequently. Relative error was 3-8.6% and average relative error was 5.08% in comparison with the films and TPS isodose curves. Conclusion Our results showed that the difference between TPS and the measurements is well within the acceptable boundaries and below the action level according to AAPM TG.45. Our findings showed that this phantom after minor corrections can be used as a method of choice for inter-comparison analysis of TPS and to fill the existing gap for accurate QA program in intracavitary brachytherapy. The constructed phantom also showed that it can be a valuable tool for verification of accurate dose delivery to the patients as well as training for brachytherapy residents and physics students.

  3. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Certain brachytherapy dose distributions, such as those for LDR prostate implants, are readily modeled by treatment planning systems (TPS) that use the superposition principle of individual seed dose distributions to calculate the total dose distribution. However, dose distributions for brachytherapy treatments using high-Z shields or having significant material heterogeneities are not currently well modeled using conventional TPS. The purpose of this study is to establish a new treatment planning technique (Tufts technique) that could be applied in some clinical situations where the conventional approach is not acceptable and dose distributions present cylindrical symmetry. Dose distributions from complex brachytherapy source configurations determined with Monte Carlo methods were used as input data. These source distributions included the 2 and 3 cm diameter Valencia skin applicators from Nucletron, 4-8 cm diameter AccuBoost peripheral breast brachytherapy applicators from Advanced Radiation Therapy, and a 16 mm COMS-based eye plaque using {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs seeds. Radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions were obtained by positioning the coordinate system origin along the dose distribution cylindrical axis of symmetry. Origin:tissue distance and active length were chosen to minimize TPS interpolation errors. Dosimetry parameters were entered into the PINNACLE TPS, and dose distributions were subsequently calculated and compared to the original Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. The new planning technique was able to reproduce brachytherapy dose distributions for all three applicator types, producing dosimetric agreement typically within 2% when compared with Monte Carlo-derived dose distributions. Agreement between Monte Carlo-derived and planned dose distributions improved as the spatial resolution of the fitted dosimetry parameters improved. For agreement within 5% throughout the clinical volume, spatial resolution of

  4. A flattening filter for brachytherapy skin irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Haque, Mamoon; Foulkes, Kristie; Jeraj, Robert

    2002-03-01

    Radioactive sources in close contact offer an alternative to superficial radiation in the treatment of skin lesions. A flattening filter was designed for a lead surface applicator to improve the skin dose distribution of a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy unit (Nucletron). At three heights from the opening (10, 15 and 25 mm) of the cylindrical applicator, the 192Ir source can be driven into the centre of the applicator. Thin sheets of lead foil (0.2 mm) were cut into circular shapes and placed in the opening to build a cylindrical cone that acts as a flattening filter. The shape of the cone was optimized in an iterative process using a spreadsheet and the resulting dose distribution under the applicator was determined using radiosensitive film. The use of the filter improved the dose distribution in a plane perpendicular to the beam axis to be within +/-5% of the central axis dose. The present applicator and flattening filter together with an HDR brachytherapy unit offer an alternative for skin irradiation where a superficial unit is not available or will be replaced with a more flexible device. As the depth dose characteristics can be modified using different source-to-surface distances, the dose throughout the patient's skin can be shaped as desired by the radiation oncologist using a compensator design type approach.

  5. Conformal treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, G. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Hebbinghaus, D. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Dennert, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kohr, P. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Wilhelm, R. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie); Kimmig, B. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie)

    1996-09-01

    Quality of a brachytherapy application depends on the choice of the target volume, on the dose distribution homogeneity and radiation injury on critical tissue, which should be postulated by advanced brachytherapy treatment planning systems. Basic imaging method for conformal treatment planning is the cross-sectional imaging. The clinical applicatibility of a new type 3D planning system using CT and/or MRT-simulation or US-simulation for planning purposes was studied. The planning system developed at Kiel University differs from usual brachytherapy planning systems because of the obligatory use of cross-sectional imaging as basic imaging method for reconstruction of structures of interest. Dose distribution and normal anatomy can be visualized on each CT/MRT/US slice as well as coronal, sagittal, axial and free chosen reconstructions (3D), as well as dose-volume histogram curves and special colour-coded visualization of dose homogeneity in the target can be analyzed. Because of the experience in the clinical routine, as well as on the base of 30 simultaneous planning procedures on both 2D (semi-3D) and 3D planning systems we observed similar time consumption. Advantages of 3D planning were the better interpretation of target delineation, delineation of critical structures as well as dose distribution, causing more accurate volume optimisation of dose distribution. Conformal brachytherapy treatment planning for interstitial brachytherapy means significant advantages for the clinical routine compared to 2D or semi-3D methods. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Qualitaet einer Brachytherapieapplikation ist abhaengig von der Zielvolumenwahl, der homogenen Dosisverteilung und der Schonung kritischer Organe. Diese Voraussetzungen koennen am besten mit Hilfe eines 3D-Planungssystem erfuellt werden. Als Planungsvorlage fuer die Konformationstherapieplanung sind am besten Schnittbilder (CT, MRT, US) geeignet. Es wurde die Anwendbarkeit eines auf CT- (oder MRT-)Simulation oder geeignete

  6. Major causes of impractical brachytherapy in elderly patients with uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanazume, Yumi; Yanazume, Shintaro; Iio, Kazuto; Yonekura, Ryuji; Kojima, Nobuko; Uchida, Natsuko; Koriyama, Chihaya; Douchi, Tsutomu

    2014-06-01

    Incomplete brachytherapy is a major risk factor for recurrence. However, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy has not been assessed adequately in elderly patients with invasive cervical cancer. The present study investigated the clinical importance of intracavitary brachytherapy and risk factors of incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy in elderly patients with cervical cancer. Subjects were 76 patients aged 70-89 years old with invasive cervical cancer. All subjects were recruited between January 1997 and September 2010, and were planning to receive external beam radiation therapy followed by high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Survival rates and the incidence of complications were compared between the 70s and 80s age groups. Risk factors for recurrence in elderly patients were evaluated using multivariate analysis, and risk factors for impractical intracavitary brachytherapy were also estimated. No significant differences were observed in 3-year progression-free survival rates or the incidence of complications in the two age groups. Cox multivariate analysis showed that histology (non-squamous cell carcinoma), incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy, and lymph node swelling were significant prognostic factors for recurrence. Impractical application was the major reason for incomplete treatment. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that a previous history without vaginal births (P = 0.016) was an independent risk factor for the impractical application, independent of tumor diameter ≥ 4 cm (P = 0.007). Incomplete intracavitary brachytherapy decreased the survival rates of elderly patients. Larger tumors and patients without a history of vaginal births were the two major causes of impractical intracavitary brachytherapy, which may be fatal, especially in elderly patients with bulky tumors. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    As introduction a short overview of the history of brachytherapy (BT) is given, with a focus on the evolution in the photon sources that have been used over the years. A major step in this evolution was the introduction of the automatic afterloading devices, which could be compared to the introduction of linear accelerators in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). The modern afterloaders allow for optimization of the dose delivery and the use of different dose rates (low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed dose rate) in function of tumor biology and patient comfort. Still today new sources are under investigation, and these developments together with the improvements in treatment planning and treatment techniques will enforce the role and place of BT as a valuable alternative for or supplementary to EBRT.

  8. Verification and analysis of the positioning of a source of brachytherapy high dose within an applicator gynecological interstitial fletcher Utrecht TC/RM; Verificacion y analysis del posicionamiento de una fuente de braquiterapia de alta tasa de dosis dentro de un aplicador ginecologico fletcher intersticial UTRECHT TC/RM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panedo Cobos, J. M.; Garcia castejon, M. A.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Gomez-Tejedor Alonso, S.; Rincon Perez, M.; Luna Tirado, J.; Perez Casas, A. M.

    2013-07-01

    Applicators are guides that circulate and are located within the patient brachytherapy sources. Applicators can suffer mechanical deformations due to processes of sterilization or shock, which may result in that the source do not place within these very precise and coincides with the planned. In these cases the planned treatment deviate actually managed. The object of this study is to verify that the position of the source into the dispenser coincides with the planned position, with a procedure that is described. (Author)

  9. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper ME

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Kasper,1,2 Ahmed A Chaudhary3 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, 2Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University, FL, 3North Main Radiation Oncology, Warren Alpert School of Medicine, Brown University, RI, USA Abstract: Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, superficial radiotherapy, skin surface brachytherapy, electron beam therapy, nonmelanoma skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma

  10. 3D shape representation with spatial probabilistic distribution of intrinsic shape keypoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Vijaya K.; Checchin, Paul; Malaterre, Laurent; Trassoudaine, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    The accelerated advancement in modeling, digitizing, and visualizing techniques for 3D shapes has led to an increasing amount of 3D models creation and usage, thanks to the 3D sensors which are readily available and easy to utilize. As a result, determining the similarity between 3D shapes has become consequential and is a fundamental task in shape-based recognition, retrieval, clustering, and classification. Several decades of research in Content-Based Information Retrieval (CBIR) has resulted in diverse techniques for 2D and 3D shape or object classification/retrieval and many benchmark data sets. In this article, a novel technique for 3D shape representation and object classification has been proposed based on analyses of spatial, geometric distributions of 3D keypoints. These distributions capture the intrinsic geometric structure of 3D objects. The result of the approach is a probability distribution function (PDF) produced from spatial disposition of 3D keypoints, keypoints which are stable on object surface and invariant to pose changes. Each class/instance of an object can be uniquely represented by a PDF. This shape representation is robust yet with a simple idea, easy to implement but fast enough to compute. Both Euclidean and topological space on object's surface are considered to build the PDFs. Topology-based geodesic distances between keypoints exploit the non-planar surface properties of the object. The performance of the novel shape signature is tested with object classification accuracy. The classification efficacy of the new shape analysis method is evaluated on a new dataset acquired with a Time-of-Flight camera, and also, a comparative evaluation on a standard benchmark dataset with state-of-the-art methods is performed. Experimental results demonstrate superior classification performance of the new approach on RGB-D dataset and depth data.

  11. Programming 2D/3D shape-shifting with hobbyist 3D printers

    OpenAIRE

    van Manen, T.; Janbaz, S.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    Materials and devices with advanced functionalities often need to combine complex 3D shapes with functionality-inducing surface features. Precisely controlled bio-nanopatterns, printed electronic components, and sensors/actuators are all examples of such surface features. However, the vast majority of the refined technologies that are currently available for creating functional surface features work only on flat surfaces. Here we present initially flat constructs that upon triggering by high ...

  12. 3D shape reconstruction of teeth by shadow speckle correlation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianxin; Xu, Wei; Geng, Jianping

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for 3D shape reconstruction in computer-aided dental prosthetics. A specklegram is projected onto the tooth to be measured. This shadow speckle image is recorded and then processed by a digital image correlation method, which enables the computation of 2D shapes based on the similar principle of shadow moiré method. By repeating the procedure for all the sides, i.e., one crown and several side surfaces, local 2D shapes can be measured precisely. Afterwards, these local 2D profiles are merged to form a 3D model, during which certain constraints such as the widths along perpendicular directions are introduced to guide the process. As the height information within an entire image field is recorded instantly, it has the potential to be employed in an intra-oral environment, which would make the patient feel more comfortable during the restoration process. In vitro experiments were carried out on gypsum teeth models and the results proved the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. A study on the accuracy of source position in HDR brachytherapy according to the curvature of universal application transfer tube and applicator type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeon Kyung; Lee, Sang Kyoo; Kim, Joo Ho; Cho, Jeong Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The goal of this study was to verify and analyze the source position according to the curvature of the universal applicator and 4 different angle applicators when using RALS(Remote After Loading System). An interval of 1 cm and 15 second dwell times in each source position were applied for plan. To verify the accuracy of source position, we narrowed the distance between MultiSource container and GAFCHROMIC? EBT3 film by 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm so that the universal applicator transfer tube had some curvature. Also 4 applicators(Intrauterine tube: 0° , 15°, 30° , Ovoid tube: 65° ) were used in the same condition. The differences between desired and actual source position were measured by using Image J. In case of using 4 different angles of applicator with the straight universal applicator transfer tube, the average error was the lowest for 0°applicator, greatest for 65°applicator. However, All average errors were within ±2 mm recommended in TG-56. When MultiSource container was moved 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm towards the EBT3 film, the average errors were beyond ±2 mm. The first dwell position was relatively located in accuracy, while the second and third dwells were displaced by an increasing magnitude with increasing curvature of the transfer tube. Furthermore, with increasing the angle of applicators, the error of all other dwell positioning was increased. The results of this study showed that both the curvature of universal applicator transfer tube and the angle of applicators affect the source dwell position. It is recommended that using straight universal applicator transfer tubes is followed in all cases, in order to avoid deviations in the delivered source dwell position. Also, It is advisable to verify the actual dwell position, using video camera quality control tool prior to all treatments.

  14. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy – is it the right way?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Skowronek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed dose rate (PDR-BT treatment is a brachytherapy modality that combines physical advantages of high-doserate (HDR-BT technology (isodose optimization, radiation safety with the radiobiological advantages of low-dose-rate (LDR-BT brachytherapy. Pulsed brachytherapy consists of using stronger radiation source than for LDR-BT and producing series of short exposures of 10 to 30 minutes in every hour to approximately the same total dose in the sameoverall time as with the LDR-BT. Modern afterloading equipment offers certain advantages over interstitial or intracavitaryinsertion of separate needles, tubes, seeds or wires. Isodose volumes in tissues can be created flexibly by a combinationof careful placement of the catheter and the adjustment of the dwell times of the computerized stepping source.Automatic removal of the radiation sources into a shielded safe eliminates radiation exposures to staff and visitors.Radiation exposure is also eliminated to the staff who formerly loaded and unloaded multiplicity of radioactive sources into the catheters, ovoids, tubes etc. This review based on summarized clinical investigations, analyses the feasibility and the background to introduce this brachytherapy technique and chosen clinical applications of PDR-BT.

  15. Preventing Complications from High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy when Treating Mobile Tongue Cancer via the Application of a Modular Lead-Lined Spacer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Murakami

    Full Text Available To point out the advantages and drawbacks of high-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of mobile tongue cancer and indicate the clinical importance of modular lead-lined spacers when applying this technique to patients.First, all basic steps to construct the modular spacer are shown. Second, we simulate and evaluate the dose rate reduction for a wide range of spacer configurations.With increasing distance to the source absorbed doses dropped considerably. Significantly more shielding was obtained when lead was added to the spacer and this effect was most pronounced on shorter (i.e. more clinically relevant distances to the source.The modular spacer represents an important addition to the planning and treatment stages of mobile tongue cancer using HDR-ISBT.

  16. Brachytherapy in oesophageal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, J.T.; Kuan, R. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    Patients with recurrent or locally advanced oesophageal carcinoma have a poor prognosis. Relief of dysphagia is often the goal of any further treatment. Several methods, including laser re-canalization, prosthetic intubation, dilatation, external beam irradiation (EBI) and intraluminal brachytherapy (IBT) can be used to alleviate dysphagia. In this retrospective review of 11 patients, eight with recurrent tumour and three newly diagnosed patients were treated with low dose rate IBT. Relief of dysphagia was achieved in nine patients, all of whom were able to maintain swallowing of at least a semi-solid diet until death or last follow-up. Toxicity was minimal, but survival was poor, with a median survival of only 3 months. IBT presents several advantages over other palliative methods, especially in recurrent tumours where re-treatment with EBI is often difficult because of normal tissue tolerance. Low dose rate IBT takes only 1-2 days to deliver, is highly effective, has little morbidity and the palliation achieved is relatively durable. 19 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  17. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sean Guo-Dong; Kim, Sangho; Hon, Jimmy Kim Fatt; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve) has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation. PMID:27258099

  18. A D-Shaped Bileaflet Bioprosthesis which Replicates Physiological Left Ventricular Flow Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Guo-Dong Tan

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that in a healthy heart, there exist a large asymmetric vortex structure that aids in establishing a steady flow field in the left ventricle. However, the implantation of existing artificial heart valves at the mitral position is found to have a negative effect on this physiological flow pattern. In light of this, a novel D-shaped bileaflet porcine bioprosthesis (GD valve has been designed based on the native geometry mitral valve, with the hypothesis that biomimicry in valve design can restore physiological left ventricle flow patterns after valve implantation. An in-vitro experiment using two dimensional particle velocimetry imaging was carried out to determine the hemodynamic performance of the new bileaflet design and then compared to that of the well-established St. Jude Epic valve which functioned as a control in the experiment. Although both valves were found to have similar Reynolds shear stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy levels, the novel D-shape valve was found to have lower turbulence intensity and greater mean kinetic energy conservation.

  19. Avaliação da biodegradação de matrizes porosas à base de hidroxiapatita para aplicação como fontes radioativas em braquiterapia Evaluation of the biodegradation of porous hydroxyapatite matrices for application as radioactive sources in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kássio André Lacerda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous ceramic materials based on calcium phosphate compounds (CPC have been studied aiming at different biomedical applications such as implants, drug delivery systems and radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Two kinds of hydroxyapatite (HAp powders and their ceramic bodies were characterized by a combination of different techniques (XRF, BET method, SEM, ICP/AES and neutron activation analysis - NAA to evaluate their physico-chemical and microstructural characteristics in terms of chemical composition, segregated phases, microstructure, porosity, chemical and thermal stability, biodegradation and incorporation of substances in their structures. The results revealed that these systems presented potential for use as porous biodegradable radioactive sources able to be loaded with a wide range of radionuclides for cancer treatment by the brachytherapy technique.

  20. Iodine-125 brachytherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, Clare; Maree, Gerrie; Tovey, Susan; Hunter, Alistair; Wetter, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy is an acknowledged modality for treating head and neck cancers and has moved from low-dose-rate (LDR) to high-dose-rate remote afterloading to reduce staff exposure. Iodine-125 ((125)I) is a low-energy source and can be used for LDR brachytherapy with minimal staff exposure. The results of treating with this isotope at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are reported here. (125)I brachytherapy was used to treat 114 tumors from 1994 to 2010. Brachytherapy alone was used for 72 tumors, 39 postsurgery and 33 de novo. A brachytherapy boost together with external beam radiotherapy was used for 42 tumors, eight postsurgery and 34 de novo. Tumors were in the tongue, floor of mouth, soft palate, and tonsil, and mainly T1 or T2 classification. Brachytherapy was administered via an applicator or in plastic tubes implanted into the soft tissues or through the submandibular region. Local control rates of 80.7% at 5 years and 80% at 10 years were comparable to LDR, pulsed-dose-rate, and high-dose-rate results with iridium-192, likewise the 5- and 10-year disease-specific survival rate of 74.3%. Complications of soft tissue ulceration occurred in 21 patients (18.4%) and healed spontaneously in 20 patients. There was no mandibular necrosis. (125)I can be used as the sole treatment or as a boost to external beam radiotherapy, with or without surgery for early mouth cancer. It combines the radiobiological advantages of LDR brachytherapy with minimum staff exposure. It is a flexible system. Local control is excellent with acceptable morbidity, and the treatment time is short. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiation recall reaction with docetaxel administration after accelerated partial breast irradiation with electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sea S; Strauss, Jonathan B; Shah, Anand P; Rao, Ruta D; Bernard, Damien A; Griem, Katherine L

    2009-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) offers several advantages over whole breast irradiation. Electronic brachytherapy may further reduce barriers to breast conserving therapy by making APBI more available. However, its toxicity profile is not well characterized. A 60-year-old woman was treated with APBI using Axxent (Xoft, Sunnyvale, CA) electronic brachytherapy. One month after APBI, a cycle of docetaxel and cyclophosphamide was given. Within 3 weeks, the patient developed an ulcerative radiation recall reaction in the skin overlying the lumpectomy cavity. To investigate this toxicity, the skin dose from electronic brachytherapy was compared with the dose that would have been delivered by an iridium-192 ((192)Ir) source. Additionally, a dose equivalent was estimated by adjusting for the increased relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of low energy photons generated by the electronic source. Using electronic brachytherapy, the skin dose was 537cGy per fraction compared with 470cGy for an (192)Ir source. Given an RBE for a 40kV source of 1.28 compared with (192)Ir, the equivalent dose at the skin for an electronic source was 687cGy-equivalents, a 46% increase. We present a case of an ulcerative radiation recall reaction in a patient receiving APBI with electronic brachytherapy followed by chemotherapy. Our analysis shows that the use of electronic brachytherapy resulted in the deposition of significantly higher equivalent dose at the skin compared with (192)Ir. These findings suggest that standard guidelines (e.g., surface-to-skin distance) that apply to (192)Ir-based balloon brachytherapy may not be applicable to electronic brachytherapy.

  2. Geometric, Statistical, and Topological Modeling of Intrinsic Data Manifolds: Application to 3D Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    on the other hand define an intrinsic dimensionality using K-nearest neighbors graphs [70]. In [71], Levina et al. adopt a local estimate for the...graphs. In IEEE Workshop on Statistical Signal Processing (SSP), Bordeaux (2005). [71] E. Levina and P.J. Bickel, Maximum likelihood estimation of

  3. 3D shape reconstruction from relief calculation: application to human body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle V.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In experimental mechanics especially in experimental biomechanics, evaluating a volume object is a major research axe. In mechanics, 3D reconstruction is made from different optical methods like stereovision [1] or structured light methods. In biomechanics, it is achieved from tomography techniques or from models which divide human body into 15, 16 and 17 polyarticulated solids [2][3]. Those solids are simple volumes (cylinders, spheres. In this review, a method of 3D reconstruction from two calculated relief is proposed. Then, the geometric parameters are extracted using an algorithm and compared to the real dimension of various objects. The first test consist in studying the feasibility of the 3D reconstruction using a real upper arm and a mannequin. In a second test an analysis of a sphere and two cylinders which have different dimensions is performed. The aim of those last tests is to evaluate the performances of the proposed method, to show distortion volume problems and to propose solutions.

  4. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraam S. Soliman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  5. Fast dose optimization for rotating shield brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung; Wu, Xiaodong; Dadkhah, Hossein; Yi, Jirong; Flynn, Ryan T; Kim, Yusung; Xu, Weiyu

    2017-10-01

    To provide a fast computational method, based on the proximal graph solver (POGS) - A convex optimization solver using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), for calculating an optimal treatment plan in rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). RSBT treatment planning has more degrees of freedom than conventional high-dose-rate brachytherapy due to the addition of emission direction, and this necessitates a fast optimization technique to enable clinical usage. The multi-helix RSBT (H-RSBT) delivery technique was investigated for five representative cervical cancer patients. Treatment plans were generated for all patients using the POGS method and the commercially available solver IBM ILOG CPLEX. The rectum, bladder, sigmoid colon, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV), and HR-CTV boundary were the structures included in our optimization, which applied an asymmetric dose-volume optimization with smoothness control. Dose calculation resolution was 1 × 1 × 3 mm3 for all cases. The H-RSBT applicator had 6 helices, with 33.3 mm of translation along the applicator per helical rotation and 1.7 mm spacing between dwell positions, yielding 17.5° emission angle spacing per 5 mm along the applicator. For each patient, HR-CTV D90 , HR-CTV D100 , rectum D2cc , sigmoid D2cc , and bladder D2cc matched within 1% for CPLEX and POGS methods. Also, similar EQD2 values between CPLEX and POGS methods were obtained. POGS was around 18 times faster than CPLEX. For all patients, total optimization times were 32.1-65.4 s for CPLEX and 2.1-3.9 s for POGS. POGS reduced treatment plan optimization time approximately 18 times for RSBT with similar HR-CTV D90 , organ at risk (OAR) D2cc values, and EQD2 values compared to CPLEX, which is significant progress toward clinical translation of RSBT. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Micro Fourier Transform Profilometry (μFTP): 3D shape measurement at 10,000 frames per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Tao, Tianyang; Feng, Shijie; Huang, Lei; Asundi, Anand; Chen, Qian

    2018-03-01

    Fringe projection profilometry is a well-established technique for optical 3D shape measurement. However, in many applications, it is desirable to make 3D measurements at very high speed, especially with fast moving or shape changing objects. In this work, we demonstrate a new 3D dynamic imaging technique, Micro Fourier Transform Profilometry (μFTP), which can realize an acquisition rate up to 10,000 3D frame per second (fps). The high measurement speed is achieved by the number of patterns reduction as well as high-speed fringe projection hardware. In order to capture 3D information in such a short period of time, we focus on the improvement of the phase recovery, phase unwrapping, and error compensation algorithms, allowing to reconstruct an accurate, unambiguous, and distortion-free 3D point cloud with every two projected patterns. We also develop a high-frame-rate fringe projection hardware by pairing a high-speed camera and a DLP projector, enabling binary pattern switching and precisely synchronized image capture at a frame rate up to 20,000 fps. Based on this system, we demonstrate high-quality textured 3D imaging of 4 transient scenes: vibrating cantilevers, rotating fan blades, flying bullet, and bursting balloon, which were previously difficult or even unable to be captured with conventional approaches.

  7. Rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shimul A; Cima, Robert R; Benoit, Eric; Breen, Elizabeth L; Bleday, Ronald

    2004-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is gaining wide popularity as an alternative to resection for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. Rectal-urethral fistula after prostate brachytherapy is a rare but serious complication, and its incidence, presentation, risk factors, and clinical management have not been well described. From January 1997 to October 2002, seven patients with rectal-urethral fistulas were referred to two institutions (Brigham and Women's Hospital and West Roxbury Veteran's Administration Hospital) of a major teaching referral center. Clinical presentation, risk factors, prostate staging, and clinical management were examined in a retrospective fashion. Seven rectal-urethral fistulas developed from roughly 700 (1 percent) patients treated with prostate brachytherapy for prostate cancer. The average patient age was 67.7 years, preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 7.1, and Gleason score was 3+3. Symptoms occurred at a mean of 27.3 months after prostate brachytherapy was started and included anorectal pain (57 percent), clear mucous discharge (57 percent), diarrhea (43 percent), and rectal ulceration (43 percent). Coronary artery disease was a common comorbidity (71 percent). Previous transurethral resection of prostate (28 percent) and pelvic irradiation or external beam radiation therapy (14 percent) were not associated with increased risk of rectal-urethral fistula. All patients underwent a diverting colostomy (86 percent) or ileostomy (14 percent), and four patients went on to have definitive therapy. Definitive resection was performed between 5 and 43 months after diverting ostomy and was chosen on the basis of comorbid disease, quality of life, and degree of operation. Two patients required a second diversion after definitive resection because of anorectal pain and a colocutaneous fistula. Postoperative complications included myocardial infarction (14 percent), blood transfusion (14 percent), and bowel perforation (14 percent). Patients

  8. 3D shape measurement of shoeprint impression with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianyu; Cao, Yiping; Xiang, Liqun; Chen, Wenjing

    2002-06-01

    The shoeprint impressions of suspect left at the crime scene can sometimes tell investigators what type of shoes to be looked for. These shoeprint impressions as one of the important evidence are useful in the detection of criminals. In this paper we propose a novel technique for identifying and analyzing the 3D characteristics of shoeprint impressions. We also design 3D shoeprint impression analysis system based on the combination the 3D shape measurement with structured illumination and fringe pattern analysis. We give a detail discussion on the principle and configuration of the system. Laboratory experiments show the technique is efficient in the detection of shoeprint and in the offering the reference for judicial evidence.

  9. 3-D shape measurement based on complementary Gray-code light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qican; Su, Xianyu; Xiang, Liqun; Sun, Xuezhen

    2012-04-01

    A combination of phase-shift with Gray-code light projection into a three-dimensional (3-D) measurement system has been exploited to digitalize 3-D shape information of a tested object, even with a discontinuous surface. Unfortunately, the phase unwrapping will fall into an error, when an improper value of Gray coding is caused by mistake at the partial boundary of two adjacent binary words. To this end, a new complementary Gray-code method is proposed in this paper as well as the corresponding phase-unwrapping method. This problem of phase unwrapping could be cleverly solved by projecting an additional Gray-code pattern to extend this code and using the different and complementary boundary locations of the traditional and additional codes. The results of computer simulation and experiment confirm that this proposed method based on complementary Gray-code can reliably reconstruct the nature phase distribution of the tested object with only one extra fringe pattern.

  10. A surface plasmon resonance sensor based on a single mode D-shape polymer optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasior, Katarzyna; Martynkien, Tadeusz; Napiorkowski, Maciej; Zolnacz, Kinga; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2017-02-01

    For the first time to our knowledge, we report a successful fabrication of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors in a specially developed single-mode birefringent polymer D-shape fiber with a core made of PMMA/PS copolymer. A small distance between the core and the cladding boundary allows to deposit a gold layer directly onto the flat fiber surface, which significantly simplifies the sensors fabrication process. The developed SPR sensor exhibits a sensitivity of 2765 nm RIU-1 for the refractive index of external medium equal to 1.410, which is similar to the sensitivity of the SPR sensors based on conventional side-polished single-mode silica fibers. Using the finite element method, we also numerically studied the sensor performance. The sensor characteristics obtained in the simulations are in a relatively good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Full-field 3D shape measurement of specular object having discontinuous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Huang, Shujun; Gao, Nan; Gao, Feng; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a novel Phase Measuring Deflectometry (PMD) method to measure specular objects having discontinuous surfaces. A mathematical model is established to directly relate the absolute phase and depth, instead of the phase and gradient. Based on the model, a hardware measuring system has been set up, which consists of a precise translating stage, a projector, a diffuser and a camera. The stage locates the projector and the diffuser together to a known position during measurement. By using the model-based and machine vision methods, system calibration is accomplished to provide the required parameters and conditions. The verification tests are given to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed system. 3D (Three-Dimensional) shapes of a concave mirror and a monolithic multi-mirror array having multiple specular surfaces have been measured. Experimental results show that the proposed method can obtain 3D shape of specular objects having discontinuous surfaces effectively

  12. Aspects of dosimetry and clinical practice of skin brachytherapy: The American Brachytherapy Society working group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouhib, Zoubir; Kasper, Michael; Perez Calatayud, Jose; Rodriguez, Silvia; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Pai, Sujatha; Strasswimmer, John

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common type of human malignancy. Although surgical techniques are the standard treatment, radiation therapy using photons, electrons, and brachytherapy (BT) (radionuclide-based and electronic) has been an important mode of treatment in specific clinical situations. The purpose of this work is to provide a clinical and dosimetric summary of the use of BT for the treatment of NMSC and to describe the different BT approaches used in treating cutaneous malignancies. A group of experts from the fields of radiation oncology, medical physics, and dermatology, who specialize in managing cutaneous malignancies reviewed the literature and compiled their clinical experience regarding the clinical and dosimetric aspects of skin BT. A dosimetric and clinical review of both high dose rate ((192)Ir) and electronic BT treatment including surface, interstitial, and custom mold applicators is given. Patient evaluation tools such as staging, imaging, and patient selection criteria are discussed. Guidelines for clinical and dosimetric planning, appropriate margin delineation, and applicator selection are suggested. Dose prescription and dose fractionation schedules, as well as prescription depth are discussed. Commissioning and quality assurance requirements are also outlined. Given the limited published data for skin BT, this article is a summary of the limited literature and best practices currently in use for the treatment of NMSC. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative model for the generic 3D shape of ICMEs at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démoulin, P.; Janvier, M.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Interplanetary imagers provide 2D projected views of the densest plasma parts of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs), while in situ measurements provide magnetic field and plasma parameter measurements along the spacecraft trajectory, that is, along a 1D cut. The data therefore only give a partial view of the 3D structures of ICMEs. Aims: By studying a large number of ICMEs, crossed at different distances from their apex, we develop statistical methods to obtain a quantitative generic 3D shape of ICMEs. Methods: In a first approach we theoretically obtained the expected statistical distribution of the shock-normal orientation from assuming simple models of 3D shock shapes, including distorted profiles, and compared their compatibility with observed distributions. In a second approach we used the shock normal and the flux rope axis orientations together with the impact parameter to provide statistical information across the spacecraft trajectory. Results: The study of different 3D shock models shows that the observations are compatible with a shock that is symmetric around the Sun-apex line as well as with an asymmetry up to an aspect ratio of around 3. Moreover, flat or dipped shock surfaces near their apex can only be rare cases. Next, the sheath thickness and the ICME velocity have no global trend along the ICME front. Finally, regrouping all these new results and those of our previous articles, we provide a quantitative ICME generic 3D shape, including the global shape of the shock, the sheath, and the flux rope. Conclusions: The obtained quantitative generic ICME shape will have implications for several aims. For example, it constrains the output of typical ICME numerical simulations. It is also a base for studying the transport of high-energy solar and cosmic particles during an ICME propagation as well as for modeling and forecasting space weather conditions near Earth.

  14. SU-D-19A-05: The Dosimetric Impact of Using Xoft Axxent® Electronic Brachytherapy Source TG-43 Dosimetry Parameters for Treatment with the Xoft 30 Mm Diameter Vaginal Applicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simiele, S; Micka, J; Culberson, W; DeWerd, L [University of WI-Madison/ADCL, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A full TG-43 dosimetric characterization has not been performed for the Xoft Axxent ® electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft, a subsidiary of iCAD, San Jose, CA) within the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. Currently, dose calculations are performed using the bare-source TG-43 parameters and do not account for the presence of the applicator. This work focuses on determining the difference between the bare-source and sourcein- applicator TG-43 parameters. Both the radial dose function (RDF) and polar anisotropy function (PAF) were computationally determined for the source-in-applicator and bare-source models to determine the impact of using the bare-source dosimetry data. Methods: MCNP5 was used to model the source and the Xoft 30 mm diameter vaginal applicator. All simulations were performed using 0.84p and 0.03e cross section libraries. All models were developed based on specifications provided by Xoft. The applicator is made of a proprietary polymer material and simulations were performed using the most conservative chemical composition. An F6 collision-kerma tally was used to determine the RDF and PAF values in water at various dwell positions. The RDF values were normalized to 2.0 cm from the source to accommodate the applicator radius. Source-in-applicator results were compared with bare-source results from this work as well as published baresource results. Results: For a 0 mm source pullback distance, the updated bare-source model and source-in-applicator RDF values differ by 2% at 3 cm and 4% at 5 cm. The largest PAF disagreements were observed at the distal end of the source and applicator with up to 17% disagreement at 2 cm and 8% at 8 cm. The bare-source model had RDF values within 2.6% of the published TG-43 data and PAF results within 7.2% at 2 cm. Conclusion: Results indicate that notable differences exist between the bare-source and source-in-applicator TG-43 simulated parameters. Xoft Inc. provided partial funding for this work.

  15. Radiation Protection in Brachytherapy. Report of the SEFM Task Group on Brachytherapy; Proteccion radiologica en Braquiterapia. Informe del grupo de trabajo de Braquiterapia de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Calatayud, J.; Corredoira Silva, E.; Crispin Contreras, V.; Eudaldo Puell, T.; Frutos Baraja, J. de; Pino Sorroche, F.; Pujades Claumarchirant, M. C.; Richart Sancho, J.

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the report of the Brachytherapy Task Group of the Spanish Society of Medical Physics. It is dedicated to the radiation protection aspects involved in brachytherapy. The aim of this work is to include the more relevant aspects related to radiation protection issues that appear in clinical practice, and for the current equipment in Spain. Basically this report focuses on the typical contents associated with high dose rate brachytherapy with {sup 1}92Ir and {sup 6}0Co sources, and permanent seed implants with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}03Pd and {sup 1}31Cs, which are the most current and widespread modalities. Ophthalmic brachytherapy (COMS with {sup 1}25I, {sup 1}06Ru, {sup 9}0Sr) is also included due to its availability in a significant number of spanish hospitals. The purpose of this report is to assist to the medical physicist community in establishing a radiation protection program for brachytherapy procedures, trying to solve some ambiguities in the application of legal requirements and recommendations in clinical practice. (Author)

  16. Intravascular brachytherapy for peripheral vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTA through balloon dilatation with or without stenting, i.e. vessel expansion through balloons with or without of implantation of small tubes, called stents, are used in the treatment of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD. The intravascular vessel irradiation, called intravascular brachytherapy, promises a reduction in the rate of repeated stenosis (rate of restenosis after PTA. Research questions: The evaluation addresses questions on medical efficacy, cost-effectiveness as well as ethic, social and legal implications in the use of brachytherapy in PAOD patients. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in August 2007 in the most important medical electronic databases for publications beginning from 2002. The medical evaluation included randomized controlled trials (RCT. The information synthesis was performed using meta-analysis. Health economic modeling was performed with clinical assumptions derived from the meta-analysis and economical assumptions derived from the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG-2007. Results: Medical evaluation: Twelve publications about seven RCT on brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy were included in the medical evaluation. Two RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six and/or twelve months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after successful balloon dilatation, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.46 to 0.84. At five years, time to recurrence of restenosis was significantly delayed after brachytherapy. One RCT showed a significant reduction in the rate of restenosis at six months for brachytherapy vs. no brachytherapy after PTA with optional stenting, the relative risk in the meta-analysis was 0.76 (95% CI: 0.61 to 0.95. One RCT observed a significantly higher rate of late thrombotic occlusions after brachytherapy in the subgroup of stented patients. A single RCT for brachytherapy

  17. 3T MR-Guided Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Malignancies

    CERN Document Server

    Kapur, Tina; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N; 10.1016/j.mri.2012.06.003

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes a combination of external beam radiation, followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is benefitial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose, and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR-guidance in gynecologic brachtherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This has been used in 18 cases to date in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. It is comprised of state of the art methods for MR imaging, image analysis, and treatment plann...

  18. Monte Carlo dose calculations for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using GPU-accelerated processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, M; Hrycushko, B; Albuquerque, K; Jiang, S B; Jia, X

    2016-01-01

    Current clinical brachytherapy dose calculations are typically based on the Association of American Physicists in Medicine Task Group report 43 (TG-43) guidelines, which approximate patient geometry as an infinitely large water phantom. This ignores patient and applicator geometries and heterogeneities, causing dosimetric errors. Although Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation is commonly recognized as the most accurate method, its associated long computational time is a major bottleneck for routine clinical applications. This article presents our recent developments of a fast MC dose calculation package for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, gBMC, built on a graphics processing unit (GPU) platform. gBMC-simulated photon transport in voxelized geometry with physics in (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy energy range considered. A phase-space file was used as a source model. GPU-based parallel computation was used to simultaneously transport multiple photons, one on a GPU thread. We validated gBMC by comparing the dose calculation results in water with that computed TG-43. We also studied heterogeneous phantom cases and a patient case and compared gBMC results with Acuros BV results. Radial dose function in water calculated by gBMC showed GPU-based MC dose calculation package, gBMC, for HDR brachytherapy make it attractive for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Contribution of disparity to the perception of 3D shape as revealed by bistability of stereoscopic Necker cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelens, C J

    2012-01-01

    The Necker cube is a famous demonstration of ambiguity in visual perception of 3D shape. Its bistability is attributed to indecisiveness because monocular cues do not allow the observer to infer one particular 3D shape from the 2D image. A remarkable but not appreciated observation is that Necker cubes are bistable during binocular viewing. One would expect disparity information to veto bistability. To investigate the effect of zero and non-zero disparity on perceptual bistability in detail, perceptual dominance durations were measured for luminance- and disparity-defined Necker cubes. Luminance-defined Necker cubes were bistable for all tested disparities between the front and back faces of the cubes. Absence of an effect of disparity on dominance durations suggested the suppression of disparity information. Judgments of depth between the front and back sides of the Necker cubes, however, showed that disparity affected perceived depth. Disparity-defined Necker cubes were also bistable but dominance durations showed different distributions. I propose a framework for 3D shape perception in which 3D shape is inferred from pictorial cues acting on luminance- and disparity-defined 2D shapes.

  20. Evaluation after Applicated a Mold to a Paraneoplastic Autoimmune Multiorgan Syndrome Patient with Hypervascular Ulcer in the Oral Cavity during Treatment with Mold Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Kyeong; Lee, Sun Young; Lim, Seok Geon; Kwak, Geun Tak; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim Yang Su; Hwang, Ho In; Cha, Seok Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    Evaluate the mold we have made to improve the reproducibility of the patient position and make homogeneous dose distribution to the treatment volume effectively when treating the patient who has hypervascular ulcer on her tongue caused by paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome by mold brachytherapy. The mold is consisted of upper and lower parts. We inserted 2 mm of lead sheet on the gums toward the oral cavity to protect them from unnecessary irradiation during the treatment. We had planned on orthogonal images obtained the patient. 200 cGy was delivered in every fraction with a total dose of 3000 cGy. To evaluate the effect of the lead sheet, we made a measurement with a phantom that has gums and tongue made of tissue with an equivalent material (bolus). Five of TLDs were placed on the interesting points of gums to measure the dose during irradiation with lead sheet and without lead sheet for three times respectively. The result of the measurement without lead sheet are A: 33.9 cGy, B: 30.1 cGy, C: 31.8 cGy, D: 23.3 cGy, E: 24.1 cGy. The results of measurement with lead sheet are A: 20.6 cGy, B: 18.8 cGy, C: 19.6 cGy, D: 14.7 cGy, E: 15.1 cGy. Since we are using the mold made in our department during the treatment of the patient with hypervascular ulcer on tongue, we could deliver a proper dose to the treatment volume. In addition, the mold provided highly accurate and reproducible treatment and reduced the dose to the gums and teeth. Therefore, the possibility of side effects could be decreased significantly.

  1. Interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue using a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Imai, Michiko; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Kazunori; Nozue, Masashi; Kaneko, Masao; Mukodaka, Hiroyuki; Asai, Yoshihiro [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    We have applied an interstitial brachytherapy employing a high dose rate {sup 192}Ir remote afterloader to five patients with cancer of the base of tongue since December 1994. Insertion of applicators was carried out with tracheotomy under general anesthesia. Brachytherapy was delivered twice a day with a 6-hour interval. Irradiation dose was estimated at the point of 5 mm from outer applicators. HDR brachytherapy was well tolerated for 4-5 days in all patients and acute radiation reaction was minimal. Local control were observed in two cases. In conclusion, our preliminary experience suggests that HDR brachytherapy may be an option in the radiotherapy for carcinoma of the base of tongue. Optimal dose-fractionation protocol should be established. (author)

  2. Substantial advantage of CT-planned HDR brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients compared to a historical series with regard to local control and toxicity?; Substantieller Vorteil durch CT-geplante HDR-Brachytherapie bei Zervixkarzinompatientinnen im Vergleich zu historischen Serien bezueglich lokaler Kontrolle und Toxizitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, Simone [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie der Uniklinik Koeln, Medizinische Fakultaet der Universitaet zu Koeln, CyberKnife Centrum, Koeln (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    The primary radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for patients with nodal positive and/or locally advanced cervical carcinoma. The therapy consists of percutaneous radiotherapy, simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and an intracervical brachytherapy. The application of highly standardized brachytherapy based on NMR imaging allowed an improved local contol and a considerable reduction of toxicity.

  3. Intraoperative HDR Brachytherapy: Present and Future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractRadiotherapy is one of the most effective modalities in cancer treatment, and can be applied either by external beam radiotherapy or by brachytherapy. Brachytherapy is a treatment modality in which tumors are irradiated by positioning radioactive sources very close to or in the tumor

  4. Brachytherapy in breast cancer: an effective alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicheł, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery (BCS) with following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of the conserved breast has become widely accepted in the last decades for the treatment of early invasive breast cancer. The standard technique of EBRT after BCS is to treat the whole breast up to a total dose of 42.5 to 50 Gy. An additional dose is given to treated volume as a boost to a portion of the breast. In the early stage of breast cancer, research has shown that the area requiring radiation treatment to prevent the cancer from local recurrence is the breast tissue that surrounds the area where the initial cancer was removed. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an approach that treats only the lumpectomy bed plus a 1-2 cm margin rather than the whole breast and as a result allows accelerated delivery of the radiation dose in four to five days. There has been a growing interest for APBI and various approaches have been developed under phase I-III clinical studies; these include multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy, balloon catheter brachytherapy, conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-EBRT) and intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT). Balloon-based brachytherapy approaches include MammoSite, Axxent electronic brachytherapy, Contura, hybrid brachytherapy devices. Another indication for breast brachytherapy is reirradiation of local recurrence after mastectomy. Published results of brachytherapy are very promising. We discuss the current status, indications, and technical aspects of breast cancer brachytherapy. PMID:26327829

  5. HDR brachytherapy for superficial non-melanoma skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauden, Ruth; Pracy, Martin; Avery, Anne-Marie; Hodgetts, Ian; Gauden, Stan

    2013-04-01

    Our initial experience using recommended high dose per fraction skin brachytherapy (BT) treatment schedules, resulted in poor cosmesis. This study aimed to assess in a prospective group of patients the use of Leipzig surface applicators for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, for the treatment of small non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) using a protracted treatment schedule. Treatment was delivered by HDR brachytherapy with Leipzig applicators. 36 Gy, prescribed to between 3 to 4 mm, was given in daily 3 Gy fractions. Acute skin toxicity was evaluated weekly during irradiation using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Local response, late skin effects and cosmetic results were monitored at periodic intervals after treatment completion. From March 2002, 200 patients with 236 lesions were treated. Median follow-up was 66 months (range 25-121 months). A total of 162 lesions were macroscopic, while in 74 cases, BT was given after resection because of positive microscopic margins. There were 121 lesions that were basal cell carcinomas, and 115 were squamous cell carcinomas. Lesions were located on the head and neck (198), the extremities (26) and trunk (12). Local control was 232/236 (98%). Four patients required further surgery to treat recurrence. Grade 1 acute skin toxicity was detected in 168 treated lesions (71%) and grade 2 in 81 (34%). Cosmesis was good or excellent in 208 cases (88%). Late skin hypopigmentation changes were observed in 13 cases (5.5%). Delivering 36 Gy over 2 weeks to superficial NMSC using HDR brachytherapy is well tolerated and provides a high local control rate without significant toxicity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Implementing MRI-based target delineation for cervical cancer treatment within a rapid workflow environment for image-guided brachytherapy: A practical approach for centers without in-room MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce; Feuerlein, Sebastian; Kim, Taeho; Garda, Allison; Watkins, W Tyler; Erickson, Sarah; Ornan, Afshan; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based intracavitary brachytherapy offers several advantages over computed tomography (CT)-based brachytherapy, but many centers are unable to offer it at the time of brachytherapy because of logistic and/or financial considerations. We have implemented a method of integrating MRI into a CT-guided, high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy workflow in clinics that do not have immediately available MRI capability. At our institution, patients receiving high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy as a component of the definitive treatment of cervical cancer have a Smit sleeve placed during the first brachytherapy fraction in a dedicated suite with in-room CT-on-rails. After the first fraction of brachytherapy, an MRI is obtained with the Smit sleeve, but no applicator, in place. For each subsequent fraction, CT scans are coregistered to the MRI scan by the Smit sleeve. The gross target volume is defined by MRI and overlaid on the CT images for each brachytherapy treatment for dose optimization. This MRI-integrated workflow adds workflow is a feasible compromise to preserve an efficient workflow while integrating MRI target delineation, and it provides many of the advantages of both MRI- and CT-based brachytherapy. The future collection and analysis of clinical data will serve to compare the proposed approach to non-MRI containing techniques. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  8. MRT letter: a total variation based method for 3D shape recovery of microscopic objects through image focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Muhammad Tariq

    2013-09-01

    Generally, shape from focus methods use a single focus measure to compute focus quality and to obtain an initial depth map of an object. However, different focus measures perform differently in diverse conditions. Therefore, it is hard to get accurate 3D shape based on a single focus measure. In this article, we propose a total variation based method for recovering 3D shape of an object by combining multiple depth hypothesis obtained through different focus measures. Improved performance of the proposed method is evaluated by conducting several experiments using images of synthetic and real microscopic objects. Comparative analysis demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. High-beta analytic equilibria in circular, elliptical, and D-shaped large aspect ratio axisymmetric configurations with poloidal and toroidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, O. E.; Guazzotto, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Grad-Shafranov-Bernoulli system of equations is a single fluid magnetohydrodynamical description of axisymmetric equilibria with mass flows. Using a variational perturbative approach [E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 024504 (2013)], analytic approximations for high-beta equilibria in circular, elliptical, and D-shaped cross sections in the high aspect ratio approximation are found, which include finite toroidal and poloidal flows. Assuming a polynomial dependence of the free functions on the poloidal flux, the equilibrium problem is reduced to an inhomogeneous Helmholtz partial differential equation (PDE) subject to homogeneous Dirichlet conditions. An application of the Green's function method leads to a closed form for the circular solution and to a series solution in terms of Mathieu functions for the elliptical case, which is valid for arbitrary elongations. To extend the elliptical solution to a D-shaped domain, a boundary perturbation in terms of the triangularity is used. A comparison with the code FLOW [L. Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11(2), 604-614 (2004)] is presented for relevant scenarios.

  10. Polarization detection analysis of dual-channel surface plasmon resonance sensing for silicone oils based on the D-shaped fiber with a central hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li; Shuai, Binbin; Li, Wei; Liu, Deming

    2012-08-01

    We present and numerically characterize a dual channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a D-shaped fiber with a central hole for silicone oil detections. The proposed design incorporates two metalized channels to facilitate the simultaneous detection of one group of silicone oils, which can consist of two different species. It has been demonstrated that the p-polarized input light can induce two peaks among surface plasmon resonance places, which come from the coupling between the core-guided mode and the fundamental surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the D-shaped surface and around the central hole surface. However, the s-polarized input light can only induce one peak among surface plasmon resonance places, which comes from the coupling between the core-guided mode and the fundamental SPP mode around the central hole surface. The simulation results show that the characteristic responses of two channels independently correspond to the refractive index variations in the silicone oils with which they are in contact. A maximum sensitivity of 3500 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4400 nm/RIU are achieved for channel A and B, respectively. This kind of sensor structure and polarization related demodulation method is promising in the simultaneous multi-analytes sensing applications in the future.

  11. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Dadkhah, Hossein [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Iowa, 1402 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong, E-mail: xiaodong-wu@uiowa.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  12. Quantification of lacrimal function after D-shaped field irradiation for retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imhof, S.M.; Tan, K.E.W.P. (Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Ophthalmology); Hofman, P. (Utrecht Univ. Hospital (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-08-01

    To study the quantitative effects of mega-voltage external beam irradiation in a D-shaped field in patients with retinoblastoma, biomicroscopy was performed in 61 patients and tear function tests (Schirmer-lactoferrin and lysozyme tests) on 45 eyes in 34 irradiated patients. The results were compared with those obtained in 25 non-irradiated control eyes. The Schirmer test was significantly diminished in irradiated eyes, as were the lactoferrin and lysozyme values. A mild to severe keratitis was found in 17 of the 61 patients (28%). A significant correlation (p<0.005) was found between the severe keratitis and the mean Schirmer values; the mean lactoferrin and lysozyme values were diminished in all patients but did not correlate significantly with the corneal abnormalities. These quantitative data, obtained in patients treated for retinoblastoma, affirm the qualitative data found in patients irradiated for other reasons such as orbital or sinus tumours. Irradiation for retinoblastoma is not a harmless treatment and serious late side effects have to be considered. (Author).

  13. Statistical 3D shape analysis of gender differences in lateral ventricles

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing; Karpman, Dmitriy; Duan, Ye

    2010-03-01

    This paper aims at analyzing gender differences in the 3D shapes of lateral ventricles, which will provide reference for the analysis of brain abnormalities related to neurological disorders. Previous studies mostly focused on volume analysis, and the main challenge in shape analysis is the required step of establishing shape correspondence among individual shapes. We developed a simple and efficient method based on anatomical landmarks. 14 females and 10 males with matching ages participated in this study. 3D ventricle models were segmented from MR images by a semiautomatic method. Six anatomically meaningful landmarks were identified by detecting the maximum curvature point in a small neighborhood of a manually clicked point on the 3D model. Thin-plate spline was used to transform a randomly selected template shape to each of the rest shape instances, and the point correspondence was established according to Euclidean distance and surface normal. All shapes were spatially aligned by Generalized Procrustes Analysis. Hotelling T2 twosample metric was used to compare the ventricle shapes between males and females, and False Discovery Rate estimation was used to correct for the multiple comparison. The results revealed significant differences in the anterior horn of the right ventricle.

  14. Two conformational states in D-shaped DNA: Effects of local denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, O.-Chul; Kim, Cheolhee; Kim, Jae-Yeol; Lee, Nam Ki; Sung, Wokyung

    2016-06-01

    The bending of double-stranded(ds) DNA on the nano-meter scale plays a key role in many cellular processes such as nucleosome packing, transcription-control, and viral-genome packing. In our recent study, a nanometer-sized dsDNA bent into a D shape was formed by hybridizing a circular single-stranded(ss) DNA and a complementary linear ssDNA. Our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurement of D-DNA revealed two types of conformational states: a less-bent state and a kinked state, which can transform into each other. To understand the origin of the two deformed states of D-DNA, here we study the presence of open base-pairs in the ds portion by using the breathing-DNA model to simulate the system. We provide strong evidence that the two states are due to the emergence of local denaturation, i.e., a bubble in the middle and two forks at ends of the dsDNA portion. We also study the system analytically and find that the free-energy landscape is bistable with two minima representative of the two states. The kink and fork sizes estimated by the analytical calculation are also in excellent agreement with the results of the simulation. Thus, this combined experimental-simulation-analytical study corroborates that highly bent D-DNA reduces bending stress via local denaturation.

  15. Drag of a D-shaped bluff body under small amplitude harmonic actuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Open-loop flow control method was used to affect the development of a turbulent wake behind a D-shaped bluff body. Loud speakers were embedded inside the bluff body to produce two zero-net-mass-flux jets through 2 mm-wide span-wise slots located along the upper and lower edges on the rear wall. The drag forces for different actuation amplitudes (Cμ, the ratio between the momentum of the actuating jets and the moment deficit caused by the bluff body and frequencies (StA were examined. The effects of the phase difference in the two jets (0 and π were also studied. It was found that when Cμ was 0.1%, a drag reduction up to 5% was achieved when the velocities of the two jets varied in phase at a frequency of StA=0.16. When the velocities of the two jets varied π out of phase, significant drag increase was observed.

  16. Lung lobe segmentation by graph search with 3D shape constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2001-05-01

    The lung lobes are natural units for reporting image-based measurements of the respiratory system. Lobar segmentation can also be used in pulmonary image processing to guide registration and drive additional segmentation. We have developed a 3D shape-constrained lobar segmentation technique for volumetric pulmonary CT images. The method consists of a search engine and shape constraints that work together to detect lobar fissures using gray level information and anatomic shape characteristics in two steps: (1) a coarse localization step, (2) a fine tuning step. An error detecting mechanism using shape constraints is used in our method to correct erroneous search results. Our method has been tested in four subjects, and the results are compared to manually traced results. The average RMS difference between the manual results and shape-constrained segmentation results is 2.23 mm. We further validated our method by evaluating the repeatability of lobar volumes measured from repeat scans of the same subject. We compared lobar air and tissue volume variations to show that most of the lobar volume variations are due to difference in air volume scan to scan.

  17. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying-Ting; Wang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Guo-Ming; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Chengrong; Jiang, Jun

    2016-10-04

    Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG) sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index)-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  18. KOALA: 3-D shape of asteroids from multi-data inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carry, B.; Kaasalainen, M.; Merline, W. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Durech, J.; Berthier, J.; Conrad, A.

    2011-10-01

    We describe our on-going observing program to determine the physical properties of asteroids from groundbased facilities. We combine disk-resolved images from adaptive optics, optical lightcurves, and stellar occultations to put tighter constraints on the spin, 3-D shape, and size of asteroids. We will discuss the relevance of the determination of physical properties to help understand the asteroid population (e.g., density, composition, and non-gravitational forces). We will then briefly describe our multi-data inversion algorithm KOALA (Carry et al. 2010a, Kaasalainen 2011, see also Kaasalainen et al., same meeting), which allows the determination of certain physical properties of an asteroid from the combination of different techniques of observation. A comparison of results obtained with KOALA on asteroid (21) Lutetia, prior to the ESA Rosetta flyby, with the high spatial resolution images returned from that flyby, will then be presented, showing the high accuracy of KOALA inversion. Finally, we will describe our current development of the algorithm, and focus on examples of other asteroids currently being studied with KOALA.

  19. Recommendations of the Spanish brachytherapy group (GEB) of Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) and the Spanish Society of Medical Physics (SEFM) for high-dose rate (HDR) non melanoma skin cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, S; Arenas, M; Gutierrez, C; Richart, J; Perez-Calatayud, J; Celada, F; Santos, M; Rovirosa, A

    2017-08-14

    Clinical indications of brachytherapy in non-melanoma skin cancers, description of applicators and dosimetry recommendations are described based on the literature review, clinical practice and experience of Spanish Group of Brachytherapy and Spanish Society of Medical Physics reported in the XIV Annual Consensus Meeting on Non Melanoma Skin Cancer Brachytherapy held in Benidorm, Alicante (Spain) on October 21st, 2016. All the recommendations for which consensus was achieved are highlighted in blue. Regular and small surfaces may be treated with Leipzig, Valencia, flap applicators or electronic brachytherapy (EBT). For irregular surfaces, customized molds or interstitial implants should be employed. The dose is prescribed at a maximum depth of 3-4 mm of the clinical target volume/planning target volume (CTV/PTV) in all cases except in flaps or molds in which 5 mm is appropriate. Interstitial brachytherapy should be used for CTV/PTV >5 mm. Different total doses and fraction sizes are used with very similar clinical and toxicity results. Hypofractionation is very useful twice or 3 times a week, being comfortable for patients and practical for Radiotherapy Departments. In interstitial brachytherapy 2 fractions twice a day are applied.

  20. American Brachytherapy Society: Brachytherapy treatment recommendations for locally advanced cervix cancer for low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Gita; Brown, Derek; Chang, Amy; Erickson, Beth; Fidarova, Elena; Grover, Surbhi; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Nag, Subir; Narayan, Kailash; Bvochora-Nsingo, Memory; Viegas, Celia; Viswanathan, Akila N; Lin, Ming Yin; Gaffney, David

    Most cervix cancer cases occur in low-income and middle-income countries (LMIC), and outcomes are suboptimal, even for early stage disease. Brachytherapy plays a central role in the treatment paradigm, improving both local control and overall survival. The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) aims to provide guidelines for brachytherapy delivery in resource-limited settings. A panel of clinicians and physicists with expertise in brachytherapy administration in LMIC was convened. A survey was developed to identify practice patterns at the authors' institutions and was also extended to participants of the Cervix Cancer Research Network. The scientific literature was reviewed to identify consensus papers or review articles with a focus on treatment of locally advanced, unresected cervical cancer in LMIC. Of the 40 participants invited to respond to the survey, 32 responded (response rate 80%). Participants were practicing in 14 different countries including both high-income (China, Singapore, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and United States) and low-income or middle-income countries (Bangladesh, Botswana, Brazil, India, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam). Recommendations for modifications to existing ABS guidelines were reviewed by the panel members and are highlighted in this article. Recommendations for treatment of locally advanced, unresectable cervical cancer in LMIC are presented. The guidelines comment on staging, external beam radiotherapy, use of concurrent chemotherapy, overall treatment duration, use of anesthesia, applicator choice and placement verification, brachytherapy treatment planning including dose and prescription point, recommended reporting and documentation, physics support, and follow-up. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Combination of brachytherapy and external beam radiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Soni, Payal D; McLaughlin, Patrick W; Merrick, Gregory S; Stock, Richard G; Blasko, John C; Zelefsky, Michael J

    To review outcomes for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy (CMRT) utilizing external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with a brachytherapy boost. The available literature for high-risk prostate cancer treated with combined modality radiation therapy was reviewed and summarized. At this time, the literature suggests that the majority of high-risk cancers are curable with multimodal treatment. Several large retrospective studies and three prospective randomized trials comparing CMRT to dose-escalated EBRT have demonstrated superior biochemical control with CMRT. Longer followup of the randomized trials will be required to determine if this will translate to a benefit in metastasis-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Although greater toxicity has been associated with CMRT compared to EBRT, recent studies suggest that technological advances that allow better definition and sparing of critical adjacent structures as well as increasing experience with brachytherapy have improved implant quality and the toxicity profile of brachytherapy. The role of androgen deprivation therapy is well established in the external beam literature for high-risk disease, but there is controversy regarding the applicability of these data in the setting of dose escalation. At this time, there is not sufficient evidence for the omission of androgen deprivation therapy with dose escalation in this population. Comparisons with surgery remain limited by differences in patient selection, but the evidence would suggest better disease control with CMRT compared to surgery alone. Due to a series of technological advances, modern combination series have demonstrated unparalleled rates of disease control in the high-risk population. Given the evidence from recent randomized trials, combination therapy may become the standard of care for high-risk cancers. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  2. Redesign of process map to increase efficiency: Reducing procedure time in cervical cancer brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damato, Antonio L; Lee, Larissa J; Bhagwat, Mandar S; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cormack, Robert A; Finucane, Susan; Hansen, Jorgen L; O'Farrell, Desmond A; Offiong, Alecia; Randall, Una; Friesen, Scott; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2015-01-01

    To increase intraprocedural efficiency in the use of clinical resources and to decrease planning time for cervical cancer brachytherapy treatments through redesign of the procedure's process map. A multidisciplinary team identified all tasks and associated resources involved in cervical cancer brachytherapy in our institution and arranged them in a process map. A redesign of the treatment planning component of the process map was conducted with the goal of minimizing planning time. Planning time was measured on 20 consecutive insertions, of which 10 were performed with standard procedures and 10 with the redesigned process map, and results were compared. Statistical significance (p brachytherapy treatments were identified. The process map showed that in standard procedures, the treatment planning tasks were performed sequentially. The process map was redesigned to specify that contouring and some planning tasks are performed concomitantly. Some quality assurance tasks were reorganized to minimize adverse effects of a possible error on procedure time. Test dry runs followed by live implementation confirmed the applicability of the new process map to clinical conditions. A 29% reduction in planning time (p brachytherapy was generated. The treatment planning component of the process map was redesigned, resulting in a 29% decrease in planning time and a streamlining of the quality assurance process. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Object Recognition in Flight: How Do Bees Distinguish between 3D Shapes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Werner

    Full Text Available Honeybees (Apis mellifera discriminate multiple object features such as colour, pattern and 2D shape, but it remains unknown whether and how bees recover three-dimensional shape. Here we show that bees can recognize objects by their three-dimensional form, whereby they employ an active strategy to uncover the depth profiles. We trained individual, free flying honeybees to collect sugar water from small three-dimensional objects made of styrofoam (sphere, cylinder, cuboids or folded paper (convex, concave, planar and found that bees can easily discriminate between these stimuli. We also tested possible strategies employed by the bees to uncover the depth profiles. For the card stimuli, we excluded overall shape and pictorial features (shading, texture gradients as cues for discrimination. Lacking sufficient stereo vision, bees are known to use speed gradients in optic flow to detect edges; could the bees apply this strategy also to recover the fine details of a surface depth profile? Analysing the bees' flight tracks in front of the stimuli revealed specific combinations of flight maneuvers (lateral translations in combination with yaw rotations, which are particularly suitable to extract depth cues from motion parallax. We modelled the generated optic flow and found characteristic patterns of angular displacement corresponding to the depth profiles of our stimuli: optic flow patterns from pure translations successfully recovered depth relations from the magnitude of angular displacements, additional rotation provided robust depth information based on the direction of the displacements; thus, the bees flight maneuvers may reflect an optimized visuo-motor strategy to extract depth structure from motion signals. The robustness and simplicity of this strategy offers an efficient solution for 3D-object-recognition without stereo vision, and could be employed by other flying insects, or mobile robots.

  4. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LU, Fokdal; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC...

  5. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Madsen, Mikkel Lænsø; Traberg, Anders; Meisner, Bjarne; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Tanderup, Kari; Spejlborg, Harald; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Nørrevang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary-interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented and exemplified by a stage IVA cervical cancer with superior dose distribution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Individualised 3D printed vaginal template for MRI guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Lænsø Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2016-01-01

    Intracavitary–interstitial applicators for MRI guided brachytherapy are becoming increasingly important in locally advanced cervical cancer. The 3D printing technology enables a versatile method for obtaining a high degree of individualisation of the implant. Our clinical workflow is presented...

  7. Clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer employing MRI with a tandem/ring applicator in situ and virtual preplanning of the interstitial component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokdal, Lars; Tanderup, Kari; Hokland, Steffen Bjerre; Røhl, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Paludan, Merete; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the reproducibility of virtually planned needles, changes in DVH parameters and clinical feasibility of combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer based on 3D MRI preplanning. Fifty-eight consecutively patients accrued in the EMBRACE study were included. Treatment was initiated with external beam radiotherapy and cisplatin. Three BT implants and MRI with the applicator in situ were performed in all patients, i.e. week 5 (BT0), week 6 (BT1) and week 7 (BT2) of the treatment. BT0 was only used for preplanning of subsequent implantations, whereas BT1 and BT2 comprised 2 equal sized fractions of PDR BT. Based on BT0, 24 patients (41%) were selected for a combined IC/IS implant at BT1 and BT2. Patients treated with IC/IS BT had significantly larger tumours compared with patients treated with IC BT only (p<0.03). Additional time in general anaesthesia for the IC/IS component was on average 16 min. The number of preplanned virtual needles was 5.3±2.7 compared to 5.3±2.9 and 5.4±3.0 needles implanted at BT1 and BT2, respectively (p=0.72). Planned needle implantation depth was 33±15 mm compared to 30±10 mm at BT1 and 29±11 mm at BT2 (p=0.04). In the 24 patients selected for IC/IS BT both the virtual IC/IS plan (BT0) and the actually delivered plan (BT1+BT2) significantly increased D90 and D100 for HR CTV (p<0.01) and reduced D2cc for sigmoid (p<0.01) and bowel (p=0.04) compared to the optimised IC preplan (BT0). IC/IS BT was only associated with minor morbidity, which was resolved at a 3-month follow up. Combined IC/IS BT based on full 3D MRI preplanning is clinically feasible. The virtual preplanned needle positions are reproducible at subsequent BT applications leading to significantly improved DVH parameters and a clinically feasible and fast implant procedure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensor for In-Motion Continuous 3D Shape Measurement Based on Dual Line-Scan Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of three-dimensional surface data plays an increasingly important role in the industrial sector. Numerous 3D shape measurement techniques have been developed. However, there are still limitations and challenges in fast measurement of large-scale objects or high-speed moving objects. The innovative line scan technology opens up new potentialities owing to the ultra-high resolution and line rate. To this end, a sensor for in-motion continuous 3D shape measurement based on dual line-scan cameras is presented. In this paper, the principle and structure of the sensor are investigated. The image matching strategy is addressed and the matching error is analyzed. The sensor has been verified by experiments and high-quality results are obtained.

  9. Evanescent-coupling fiber optic pollution monitoring system using etched D-shape E-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shing M.; Yang, Changjie; Pan, Wei P.

    1996-12-01

    Surface contamination of insulators in high voltage transmission and distribution systems may lead to troublesome flashovers which interrupt service. Insulator contamination may be monitored using direct measurement of equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD), which directly relates to the flashover voltage. A fiber-optic evanescent- coupling fiber-optic ESDD monitor is presented. The use of a piece of D-shape E-core fiber as sensor head can provide a sensitive and large area ESDD monitoring system. We have demonstrated the use of D-shape fiber in monitoring ESDD on insulator surfaces. A simple process has been developed to precisely etch the D-fiber. The polarimetric and evanescent loss sensors have been investigated. The evanescent loss sensor is particularly suitable for in-situ ESDD monitoring in power transmission lines and substations.

  10. Radiochromic film-based quality assurance for CT-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharizadeh, Saeid; Bekerat, Hamed; Syme, Alasdair; Aldelaijan, Saad; DeBlois, François; Vuong, Té; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Devic, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    In the past, film dosimetry was developed into a powerful tool for external beam radiotherapy treatment verification and quality assurance. The objective of this work was the development and clinical testing of the EBT3 model GafChromic film based brachytherapy quality assurance (QA) system. Retrospective dosimetry study was performed to test a patient-specific QA system for preoperative endorectal brachytherapy that uses a radiochromic film dosimetry system. A dedicated phantom for brachytherapy applicator used for rectal cancer treatment was fabricated enabling us to compare calculated-to-measured dose distributions. Starting from the same criteria used for external beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy QA (3%, 3 mm), passing criteria for high- and low-dose gradient regions were subsequently determined. Finally, we investigated the QA system's sensitivity to controlled source positional errors on selected patient plans. In low-dose gradient regions, measured dose distributions with criteria of 3%, 3 mm barely passed the test, as they showed 95% passing pixels. However, in the high-dose gradient region, a more stringent condition could be established. Both criteria of 2%, 3 mm and 3%, 2 mm with gamma function calculated using normalization to the same absolute dose value in both measured and calculated dose distributions, and matrix sizes rescaled to match each other showed more than 95% of pixels passing, on average, for 15 patient plans analyzed. Although the necessity of the patient-specific brachytherapy QA needs yet to be justified, we described a radiochromic film dosimetry-based QA system that can be a part of the brachytherapy commissioning process, as well as yearly QA program. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D base: a geometrical data base system for the analysis and visualisation of 3D-shapes obtained from parallel serial sections including three different geometrical representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, F. J.; de Groot, M. M.; Huijsmans, D. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Young, I. T.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a geometrical data base that includes three different geometrical representations of one and the same reconstructed 3D shape: the contour-pile, the voxel enumeration, and the triangulation of a surface. The data base is tailored for 3D shapes obtained from plan-parallel

  12. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of a...

  13. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of a...

  14. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406... Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of brachytherapy source accountability required by § 35.406 for 3 years. (b) For temporary implants, the record must...

  15. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35....406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all times... area. (c) A licensee shall maintain a record of the brachytherapy source accountability in accordance...

  16. Development of a Remote Handling Robot for the Maintenance of an ITER-Like D-Shaped Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic operation is one of the major challenges in the remote maintenance of ITER vacuum vessel (VV and future fusion reactors as inner operations of Tokamak have to be done by robots due to the internal adverse conditions. This paper introduces a novel remote handling robot (RHR for the maintenance of ITER-like D-shaped vessel. The modular designed RHR, which is an important part of the remote handling system for ITER, consists of three parts: an omnidirectional transfer vehicle (OTV, a planar articulated arm (PAA, and an articulated teleoperated manipulator (ATM. The task of RHR is to carry processing tools, such as the viewing system, leakage detector, and electric screwdriver, to inspect and maintain the components installed inside the D-shaped vessel. The kinematics of the OTV, as well as the kinematic analyses of the PAA and ATM, is studied in this paper. Because of its special length and heavy payload, the dynamics of the PAA is also investigated through a dynamic simulation system based on robot technology middleware (RTM. The results of the path planning, workspace simulations, and dynamic simulation indicate that the RHR has good mobility together with satisfying kinematic and dynamic performances and can well accomplish its maintenance tasks in the ITER-like D-shaped vessel.

  17. Double-pattern triangular pulse width modulation technique for high-accuracy high-speed 3D shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajun; Jiang, Chufan; Zhang, Song

    2017-11-27

    Using 1-bit binary patterns for three-dimensional (3D) shape measurement has been demonstrated as being advantageous over using 8-bit sinusoidal patterns in terms of achievable speeds. However, the phase quality generated by binary pattern(s) typically are not high if only a small number of phase-shifted patterns are used. This paper proposes a method to improve the phase quality by representing each pattern with the difference of two binary patterns: the first binary pattern is generated by triangular pulse width modulation (TPWM) technique, and the second being π shifted from the first pattern that is also generated by TPWM technique. The phase is retrieved by applying a three-step phase-shifting algorithm to the difference patterns. Through optimizing the modulation frequency of the triangular carrier signal, we demonstrate that a high-quality phase can be generated for a wide range of fringe periods (e.g., from 18 to 1140 pixels) with only six binary patterns. Since only 1-bit binary patterns are required for 3D shape measurement, this paper will present a real-time 3D shape measurement system that can achieve 30 Hz.

  18. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  19. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanderup, Kari [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Beddar, Sam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo [Center of Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Cygler, Joanna E. [Department of Physics, Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  20. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, FMIPA Institut Teknologi Bandung, Physics Buildings, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  1. MO-D-BRD-04: NIST Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitch, M. [Nat’l Institute of Standards & Technology (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  2. MO-D-BRD-03: Radiobiology and Commissioning of Electronic Brachytherapy for IORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [Oregon Health & Science Univ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  3. MO-D-BRD-01: Clinical Implementation of An Electronic Brachytherapy Program for the Skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouhib, Z. [Lynn Regional Cancer Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  4. MO-D-BRD-02: Radiological Physics and Surface Lesion Treatments with Electronic Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulkerson, R.

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  5. High-precision real-time 3D shape measurement using a bi-frequency scheme and multi-view system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tianyang; Chen, Qian; Feng, Shijie; Hu, Yan; Da, Jian; Zuo, Chao

    2017-05-01

    High-speed and high-precision 3D shape measurement plays a central role in diverse applications such as automatic online inspection, robotics control, and human-computer interaction. Conventional multi-frame phase-shifting-based fringe projection profilometry techniques face inherent trade-offs between the speed and measurement precision, which are fundamentally limited by the fringe density and extra pattern projections used for de-ambiguity of fringe orders. Increasing the frequency of the projection fringes can obviously improve the measurement precision; however, it creates difficulties in the subsequent phase unwrapping. For this reason, to date, the frequency of the fringes in typical real-time 3D shape measurement techniques is generally less than 30 to guarantee a reasonable reliability of phase unwrapping. To overcome this limitation, a bi-frequency phase-shifting technique based on a multi-view fringe projection system is proposed, which significantly enhances the measurement precision without compromising the measurement speed. Based on the geometric constraints in a multi-view system, the unwrapped phase of the low-frequency (10-period) fringes can be obtained directly, which serves as a reference to unwrap the high-frequency phase map with a total number of periods of up to 160. Besides, the proposed scheme with 10-period and 160-period fringes is suitable for slightly defocusing projection, allowing a higher projection rate and measurement speed. Experiments on both static and dynamic scenes are performed, verifying that our method can achieve high-speed and high-precision 3D measurement at 300 frames per second with a precision of about 50 μm.

  6. SU-G-201-12: Investigation of Beta-Emitter 90Sr-90Y Dose Distribution Using Gafchromic EBT3 Film for Application On Conformal Skin Brachytherapy Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, C; Johnson, D; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Rasmussen, K [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y as a high dose rate (HDR) source for application in a conformal skin brachytherapy (CSBT) device. The CSBT device has been previously developed to provide patient specific treatment for small inoperable lesions and irregular surfaces. Methods: A popular beta emitter, {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y was tested for feasibility in a CSBT device. A 1 cm diameter plaque was used to deliver dose to a solid water phantom containing EBT3 Gafchromic films arranged at the surface and perpendicular to it. Additionally, a 1 cm diameter 6 MeV electron beam was used to irradiate EBT3 film at 100 cm SSD with a 0.5 cm bolus. Films were digitized with an Epson Expression 10000 XL scanner and calibrated with a 6 MeV electron specific dose curve. Normalized percent depth doses (PDD) and dose profiles for both techniques were analyzed using ImageJ. Results: Dose distributions achieved with the {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y sources were compared with those of external electron beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Penumbra (20%- 80%) for EBRT and 90Sr-90Y were 4.3 mm and 1.6 mm, respectively. PDD values of 50% (normalized to 2 mm) were 10.1 mm and 2.8 mm for electron and {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y, respectively. Flatness (80% of the central beam profile) was 14.1% at a 5 mm depth for EBRT and 4.0% at surface for the {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y. Conclusion: As expected, the PDDs of {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y in water are shallower than that of external electron beams for the same field size. {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y can be used in CSBT to provide patient specific treatment where shallower depth doses than that provided by electron external beams may be required: e.g. eyelids, nose, lips, ears, etc. The customizability of EBRT could be replicated by using multiple adjacent {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y plaque placements.

  7. SU-F-T-50: Evaluation of Monte Carlo Simulations Performance for Pediatric Brachytherapy Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzipapas, C; Kagadis, G [University Patras, Rion, Ahaia (Greece); Papadimitroulas, P [BET Solutions, Athens, Attiki (Greece); Loudos, G [Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Attiki (Greece); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pediatric tumors are generally treated with multi-modal procedures. Brachytherapy can be used with pediatric tumors, especially given that in this patient population low toxicity on normal tissues is critical as is the suppression of the probability for late malignancies. Our goal is to validate the GATE toolkit on realistic brachytherapy applications, and evaluate brachytherapy plans on pediatrics for accurate dosimetry on sensitive and critical organs of interest. Methods: The GATE Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit was used. Two High Dose Rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy sources were simulated (Nucletron mHDR-v1 and Varian VS2000), and fully validated using the AAPM and ESTRO protocols. A realistic brachytherapy plan was also simulated using the XCAT anthropomorphic computational model .The simulated data were compared to the clinical dose points. Finally, a 14 years old girl with vaginal rhabdomyosarcoma was modelled based on clinical procedures for the calculation of the absorbed dose per organ. Results: The MC simulations resulted in accurate dosimetry in terms of dose rate constant (Λ), radial dose gL(r) and anisotropy function F(r,θ) for both sources.The simulations were executed using ∼1010 number of primaries resulting in statistical uncertainties lower than 2%.The differences between the theoretical values and the simulated ones ranged from 0.01% up to 3.3%, with the largest discrepancy (6%) being observed in the dose rate constant calculation.The simulated DVH using an adult female XCAT model was also compared to a clinical one resulting in differences smaller than 5%. Finally, a realistic pediatric brachytherapy simulation was performed to evaluate the absorbed dose per organ and to calculate DVH with respect to heterogeneities of the human anatomy. Conclusion: GATE is a reliable tool for brachytherapy simulations both for source modeling and for dosimetry in anthropomorphic voxelized models. Our project aims to evaluate a variety of pediatric

  8. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J., E-mail: dscanderbeg@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Rebecca and John Moores Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Alksne, John F. [Division of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Lawson, Joshua D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies, Rebecca and John Moores Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Murphy, Kevin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  9. Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of energy, called ionizing radiation, to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy ... a grain of rice) in or near the tumor and leaving them there permanently. ... the radioactivity level of the implants eventually diminishes to nothing. ...

  10. A review of the recommendations governing quality assurance of ultrasound systems used for guidance in prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrea Jane; King, Deirdre M; Browne, Jacinta E

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound guided brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer has become a routine treatment option, due to many benefits including patient recovery and dose localisation [1]; however it is not clear whether the standards which govern the image quality for these systems are adequate. Upon review of the recommended standards for ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy procedures, the recommended tests do not appear to be specific to the clinical application of ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy. Rather they are generic and similar to those recommended for other clinical applications such as general abdominal scanning [2]. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that these tests should be specific to the clinical application [3,4] in order to gain meaningful data about the performance of the system for the application, and also to detect clinically relevant changes in quality control results. An additional problem is that there are no clinically relevant test phantom recommended for the quality assurance of ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy. The image quality for this application of ultrasound needs to be monitored to ensure consistent levels of confidence in the procedure. This paper reviews the currently recommended test guidelines and test phantoms for ultrasound systems used in prostate brachytherapy from the different standard bodies and professional organisations. A critical analysis of those tests which are most reflective of the imaging and guidance tasks undertaken in an ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy procedure will also be presented to inform the design of a TRUS quality assurance protocol. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  12. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: Adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy for early-stage endometrial cancer: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Block, Alec M; Alektiar, Kaled M; Gaffney, David K; Jones, Ellen; Klopp, Ann; Viswanathan, Akila N; Small, William

    This article aims to review the risk stratification of endometrial cancer, treatment rationale, outcomes, treatment planning, and treatment recommendations of vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in the postoperative management of endometrial cancer patients. The authors performed a thorough review of the literature and reference pertinent articles pertaining to the aims of this review. Adjuvant VBT for early-stage endometrial cancer patients results in very low rates of vaginal recurrence (0-3.1%) with low rates of late toxicity which are primarily vaginal in nature. Post-Operative Radiation Therapy in Endometrial Cancer 2 (PORTEC-2) supports that VBT results in noninferior rates of vaginal recurrence compared to external beam radiotherapy for the treatment of high-intermediate risk patients. VBT as a boost after external beam radiotherapy, in combination with chemotherapy, and for high-risk histologies have shown excellent results as well though randomized data do not exist supporting VBT boost. There are many different applicators, dose-fractionation schedules, and treatment planning techniques which all result in favorable clinical outcomes and low rates of toxicity. Recommendations have been published by the American Brachytherapy Society and the American Society of Radiation Oncology to help guide practitioners in the use of VBT. Data support that patients and physicians prefer joint decision making regarding the use of VBT, and patients often desire additional treatment for a marginal benefit in risk of recurrence. Discussions regarding adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer are best performed in a multidisciplinary setting, and patients should be counseled properly regarding the risks and benefits of adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. American Brachytherapy Task Group Report: A pooled analysis of clinical outcomes for high-dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Viswanathan, Akila; Liu, Yu; Li, Chin-Shang; Albuquerque, Kevin; Damato, Antonio L; Beriwal, Sushil; Erickson, Beth

    Advanced imaging used in combination with brachytherapy (BT) has revolutionized the treatment of patients with cervical cancer. We present a comprehensive review of the literature for definitive radiation with high-dose-rate (HDR) BT. In addition, we investigate potential outcome improvement with image-based brachytherapy (IBBT) compared to studies using traditional Point A dosing. This review extensively investigates acute and late toxicities. This study reviews the literature from 2000 to 2015 with an emphasis on modern approaches including concurrent chemotherapy (chemoRT), radiation, and HDR BT and IBBT. Descriptive statistics and pelvic control (PC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) outcomes were calculated using weighted means to report pooled analysis of outcomes. Literature search yielded 16 prospective, 51 retrospective studies that reported survival outcomes, and 13 retrospective studies that focused on acute and late toxicity outcomes regardless of applicator type. There are 57 studies that report Point A dose specification with 33 having chemoRT, and 10 studies that use IBBT, 8 with chemoRT. Patients receiving radiation and chemoRT with HDR BT in the prospective studies, with >24 months followup, rates of PC were: for RT: 73%, SD: 11; CRT: 82%, SD: 8; DFS-RT: 55%, SD: 10; CRT: 65%, SD: 7; OS-RT: 66%, SD: 7; CRT: 70%, SD: 11. In the retrospective studies, the PC rates (weighted means) for the radiation and chemoradiation outcomes are 75% vs. 80%, and for DFS, the values were 55% vs. 63%, respectively. Comparing patients receiving chemoRT and IBBT to traditional Point A dose specification, there is a significant improvement in PC (p Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Redesign of Process Map to Increase Efficiency: Reducing Procedure Time 1 in Cervical-Cancer Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Bhagwat, Mandar S.; Buzurovic, Ivan; Finucane, Susan; Hansen, Jorgen L.; O’Farrell, Desmond A.; Offiong, Alecia; Randall, Una; Friesen, Scott; Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To increase intra-procedural efficiency in the use of clinical resources and to decrease planning time for cervical-cancer brachytherapy treatments through redesign of the procedure’s process map. Methods and Materials A multi-disciplinary team identified all tasks and associated resources involved in cervical-cancer brachytherapy in our institution, and arranged them in a process map. A redesign of the treatment planning component of the process map was conducted with the goal of minimizing planning time. Planning time was measured on 20 consecutive insertions, of which 10 were performed with standard procedures and 10 with the redesigned process map, and results compared. Statistical significance (p brachytherapy treatments were identified. The process map showed that in standard procedures, the treatment planning tasks were performed sequentially. The process map was redesigned to specify that contouring and some planning tasks are performed concomitantly. Some quality assurance (QA) tasks were reorganized to minimize adverse effects of a possible error on procedure time. Test “dry runs” followed by live implementation confirmed the applicability of the new process map to clinical conditions. A 29% reduction in planning time (p brachytherapy was generated. The treatment planning component of the process map was redesigned, resulting in a 29% decrease in planning time and a streamlining of the QA process. PMID:25572438

  15. A Comparison of Skin Dose Delivered with MammoSite and Multicatheter Breast Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oshaghi M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Accelerated partial breast irradiation via interstitial balloon brachytherapy is a fast and effective treatment method for certain early stage breast cancers however skin, chest wall and Lung doses are correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy. Objective: To investigate the percentage of the dose received by critical organ (skin, thermoluminescence detector was used in MammoSite brachytherpy and the ability to control skin dose between MammoSite and MultiCatheter brachytherapy was compared with each other. Method: Dosimetry is carried out using a female-equivalent mathematical chest phantom and Ir-192 source for brachytherapy application. Results: Our initial results has shown good agreement with surface doses between those calculated from the treatment planning results and those measured by the thermoluminescence detector. The mean skin dose for the experimental dosimetry in MammoSite was 2.3 Gy (56.76% of prescription dose. Conclusion: The results show that the MultiCatheter method is associated with signifcantly lower mean skin and chest wall dose than is the MammoSite. The MultiCatheter technique is quite flexible and can be applied to any size of breast or lumpectomy cavity, But in MammoSite technique, verifcation of balloon symmetry, balloon/ cavity conformance and overlying skin thickness is essential to assure target coverage and toxicity avoidance.

  16. Real-time photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2012-06-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a popular prostate cancer treatment option that involves the permanent implantation of radioactive seeds into the prostate. However, contemporary brachytherapy procedure is limited by the lack of an imaging system that can provide real-time seed-position feedback. While many other imaging systems have been proposed, photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a potential ideal modality to address this need, since it could easily be incorporated into the current ultrasound system used in the operating room. We present such a photoacoustic imaging system built around a clinical ultrasound system to achieve the task of visualizing and localizing seeds. We performed several experiments to analyze the effects of various parameters on the appearance of brachytherapy seeds in photoacoustic images. We also imaged multiple seeds in an ex vivo dog prostate phantom to demonstrate the possibility of using this system in a clinical setting. Although still in its infancy, these initial results of a photoacoustic imaging system for the application of prostate brachytherapy seed localization are highly promising.

  17. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  18. The American Brachytherapy Society consensus guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To present the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) guidelines for plaque brachytherapy of choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma. An international multicenter Ophthalmic Oncology Task Force (OOTF) was assembled to include 47 radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and ophthalmic oncologists from 10 countries. The ABS-OOTF produced collaborative guidelines, based on their eye cancer-specific clinical experience and knowledge of the literature. This work was reviewed and approved by the ABS Board of Directors as well as within the journal's peer-reivew process. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that ophthalmic plaque radiation therapy is best performed in subspecialty brachytherapy centers. Quality assurance, methods of plaque construction, and dosimetry should be consistent with the 2012 joint guidelines of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and ABS. Implantation of plaque sources should be performed by subspecialty-trained surgeons. Although there exist select restrictions related to tumor size and location, the ABS-OOTF agreed that most melanomas of the iris, ciliary body, and choroid could be treated with plaque brachytherapy. The ABS-OOTF reached consensus that tumors with gross orbital extension and blind painful eyes and those with no light perception vision are unsuitable for brachytherapy. In contrast, only select retinoblastomas are eligible for plaque brachytherapy. Prescription doses, dose rates, treatment durations, and clinical methods are described. Plaque brachytherapy is an effective eye and vision-sparing method to treat patients with intraocular tumors. Practitioners are encouraged to use ABS-OOTF guidelines to enhance their practice. Copyright © 2014 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of jitter noise in 3D shape recovery from image focus by using Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hoon-Seok; Muhammad, Mannan Saeed; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2018-02-01

    In regard to Shape from Focus, one critical factor impacting system application is mechanical vibration of the translational stage causing jitter noise along the optical axis. This noise is not detectable by simply observing the image. However, when focus measures are applied, inaccuracies in the depth occur. In this article, jitter noise and focus curves are modeled by Gaussian distribution and quadratic function, respectively. Then Kalman filter is designed and applied to eliminate this noise in the focus curves, as a post-processing step after the focus measure application. Experiments are implemented with simulated objects and real objects to show usefulness of proposed algorithm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Learning about Properties of 2-D Shapes from the Inside out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Sue; Cook, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Geometer Sketchpad is far from a new innovation, but its potential in the classroom is probably still understated. The application described here can be replicated in any classroom, and the impact on learning is likely to be significant. The experiences documented are "real", and show how a software package can enhance an area of the mathematics…

  1. A novel methodology to model the cooling processes of packed horticultural produce using 3D shape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruyters, Willem; Verboven, Pieter; Rogge, Seppe; Vanmaercke, Simon; Ramon, Herman; Nicolai, Bart

    2017-10-01

    Freshly harvested horticultural produce require a proper temperature management to maintain their high economic value. Towards this end, low temperature storage is of crucial importance to maintain a high product quality. Optimizing both the package design of packed produce and the different steps in the postharvest cold chain can be achieved by numerical modelling of the relevant transport phenomena. This work presents a novel methodology to accurately model both the random filling of produce in a package and the subsequent cooling process. First, a cultivar-specific database of more than 100 realistic CAD models of apple and pear fruit is built with a validated geometrical 3D shape model generator. To have an accurate representation of a realistic picking season, the model generator also takes into account the biological variability of the produce shape. Next, a discrete element model (DEM) randomly chooses surface meshed bodies from the database to simulate the gravitational filling process of produce in a box or bin, using actual mechanical properties of the fruit. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is then developed with the final stacking arrangement of the produce to study the cooling efficiency of packages under several conditions and configurations. Here, a typical precooling operation is simulated to demonstrate the large differences between using actual 3D shapes of the fruit and an equivalent spheres approach that simplifies the problem drastically. From this study, it is concluded that using a simplified representation of the actual fruit shape may lead to a severe overestimation of the cooling behaviour.

  2. An accurate 3D shape context based non-rigid registration method for mouse whole-body skeleton registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Zahra, David; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Berghofer, Paula; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Wimberley, Catriona; Gregoire, Marie C.; Salvado, Olivier

    2011-03-01

    Small animal image registration is challenging because of its joint structure, and posture and position difference in each acquisition without a standard scan protocol. In this paper, we face the issue of mouse whole-body skeleton registration from CT images. A novel method is developed for analyzing mouse hind-limb and fore-limb postures based on geodesic path descriptor and then registering the major skeletons and fore limb skeletons initially by thin-plate spline (TPS) transform based on the obtained geodesic paths and their enhanced correspondence fields. A target landmark correction method is proposed for improving the registration accuracy of the improved 3D shape context non-rigid registration method we previously proposed. A novel non-rigid registration framework, combining the skeleton posture analysis, geodesic path based initial alignment and 3D shape context model, is proposed for mouse whole-body skeleton registration. The performance of the proposed methods and framework was tested on 12 pairs of mouse whole-body skeletons. The experimental results demonstrated the flexibility, stability and accuracy of the proposed framework for automatic mouse whole body skeleton registration.

  3. Automatic and rapid whole-body 3D shape measurement based on multinode 3D sensing and speckle projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiping; Peng, Xiang; Li, Ameng; Liu, Xiaoli; Yu, Jiping

    2017-11-01

    Automatic and rapid whole-body 3D shape measurement has attracted extensive attention in recent years and been widely used in many fields. Rapid 3D reconstruction, automatic 3D registration, and dedicated system layout are critical factors to enable an excellent 3D measurement system. In this paper, we present an automatic and rapid whole- body 3D measurement system that is based on multinode 3D sensors using speckle projection. A rapid algorithm for searching homologous point pairs is suggested, which takes advantage of the optimized projective rectification and simplified subpixel matching techniques, leading to an improved time efficiency of 3D reconstruction. Meanwhile, a low-cost automatic system with a flexible setup and an improved calibration strategy are proposed, where system parameters of each node sensor can be simultaneously estimated with the assistance of a cubic and a planar target. Furthermore, an automatic range data registration strategy by employing two aided cameras is investigated. Experiment results show that the presented approach can realize automatic whole-body 3D shape measurement with high efficiency and accuracy.

  4. Determining Tooth Occlusal Surface Relief Indicator by Means of Automated 3d Shape Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboutchian, A. V.; Knyaz, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    Determining occlusal surface relief indicator plays an important role in odontometric tooth shape analysis. An analysis of the parameters of surface relief indicators provides valuable information about closure of dental arches (occlusion) and changes in structure of teeth in lifetime. Such data is relevant for dentistry or anthropology applications. Descriptive techniques commonly used for surface relief evaluation have limited precision which, as a result, does not provide for reliability of conclusions about structure and functioning of teeth. Parametric techniques developed for such applications need special facilities and are time-consuming which limits their spread and ease to access. Nevertheless the use of 3D models, obtained by photogrammetric techniques, allows attaining required measurements accuracy and has a potential for process automation. We introduce new approaches for determining tooth occlusal surface relief indicator and provide data on efficiency in use of different indicators in natural attrition evaluation.

  5. Shape 4.0: 3D Shape Modeling and Processing Using Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Michela

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, sensor, communication, and computing technologies have advanced rapidly, producing dramatic changes in our daily lives and in a variety of application domains. Emerging technologies are leading us to a gradual, but inescapable integration of our material and digital realities and the advent of cyber-physical worlds. Although attaining visual realism is within the grasp of current 3D modeling approaches, it is less clear whether current modeling techniques will accommodate the needs of human communication and of the applications that we can already envisage in those futuristic worlds. Inspired by the evolution trends of the Web, this article describes the evolution of shape modeling from the Shape 1.0 geometry-only, mesh-based stage to the forthcoming semantics-driven Shape 4.0 era.

  6. Late coronary occlusion after intracoronary brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Costa (Marco); M. Sabaté (Manel); I.P. Kay (Ian Patrick); P. Cervinka; J.M.R. Ligthart (Jürgen); P. Serrano (Pedro); V.L.M.A. Coen (Veronique); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); P.C. Levendag (Peter); W.J. van der Giessen (Wim)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Intracoronary brachytherapy appears to be a promising technology to prevent restenosis. Presently, limited data are available regarding the late safety of this therapeutic modality. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence of late (>1 month)

  7. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study aims to report the incidence of treatment-induced acute toxicities, local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy concomitant with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy. Methods: Forty patients with FIGO Stages IB2 ...

  8. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayanan, Thilagam; Subbaiah, K V; Thayalan, K; Kannan, S E

    2010-04-01

    Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS) is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR). TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC) results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i) Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT) low dose rate (LDR) applicator and (ii) Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii) Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR) applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron). The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5.5% for

  9. Suitability of point kernel dose calculation techniques in brachytherapy treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Thilagam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS is necessary to estimate the dose to target volume and organ at risk (OAR. TPS is always recommended to account for the effect of tissue, applicator and shielding material heterogeneities exist in applicators. However, most brachytherapy TPS software packages estimate the absorbed dose at a point, taking care of only the contributions of individual sources and the source distribution, neglecting the dose perturbations arising from the applicator design and construction. There are some degrees of uncertainties in dose rate estimations under realistic clinical conditions. In this regard, an attempt is made to explore the suitability of point kernels for brachytherapy dose rate calculations and develop new interactive brachytherapy package, named as BrachyTPS, to suit the clinical conditions. BrachyTPS is an interactive point kernel code package developed to perform independent dose rate calculations by taking into account the effect of these heterogeneities, using two regions build up factors, proposed by Kalos. The primary aim of this study is to validate the developed point kernel code package integrated with treatment planning computational systems against the Monte Carlo (MC results. In the present work, three brachytherapy applicators commonly used in the treatment of uterine cervical carcinoma, namely (i Board of Radiation Isotope and Technology (BRIT low dose rate (LDR applicator and (ii Fletcher Green type LDR applicator (iii Fletcher Williamson high dose rate (HDR applicator, are studied to test the accuracy of the software. Dose rates computed using the developed code are compared with the relevant results of the MC simulations. Further, attempts are also made to study the dose rate distribution around the commercially available shielded vaginal applicator set (Nucletron. The percentage deviations of BrachyTPS computed dose rate values from the MC results are observed to be within plus/minus 5

  10. GPU-assisted high-resolution, real-time 3-D shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Royer, Dale; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-assisted real-time three-dimensional shape measurement system. Our experiments demonstrated that the absolute coordinates calculation and rendering speed of a GPU is more than four times faster than that of a dual CPU workstation with the same graphics card. By implementing the GPU into our system, we realized simultaneous absolute coordinate acquisition, reconstruction and display at 30 frames per second with a resolution of approximately 266K points per frame. Moreover, a 2+1 phase-shifting algorithm was employed to alleviate the measurement error caused by motion. Applications of the system include medical imaging, manufacturing, entertainment, and security.

  11. Three-year clinical outcome using the Contura multilumen balloon breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI): improving radiation standards for the optimal application of APBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Philip Z; Robbins, Angela; Shroff, Paulomi; Brown, Sheree; McLaughlin, Mark; Pope, Keith

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed our institution's 3-year clinical experience in treating patients with the Contura multilumen balloon (SenoRx, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Forty-six patients treated with breast-conserving therapy received adjuvant radiation using the Contura catheter (34Gy in 3.4Gy fractions). Fourteen patients had Stage 0, 24 had Stage I, and 8 had Stage II breast cancer. Median follow-up was 36 months (range, 1-44 months). Only one local recurrence developed (2%). The rate of persistent seroma formation at latest reported follow-up was 4.3% (2 patients) and the incidence of any clinically detectable telengiectasias was 2.2%. No major toxicities (0% Grade III) have occurred. The median skin dose (% of the prescribed dose) was 99.7. The median dose to 95% of the planning target volume for evaluation was 98.8%. The percentage of patients with excellent/good cosmetic results at 24 (n=23) and 36 (n=22) months was 100% and 97%, respectively. Adjuvant APBI using the Contura multilumen balloon catheter exhibited similar locoregional control, cosmesis, and toxicities to other forms of APBI with similar lengths of follow-up. In addition, improved radiation standards for the delivery of APBI were demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, James Edward; Yarney, Joel; Vanderpuye, Verna; Akpakli, Evans; Tagoe, Samuel; Sasu, Evans

    2016-10-01

    This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years). The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months). Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6%) experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2). One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3) following banding for hemorrhoids. Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively performed in a resource challenged environment if adequate training

  13. Prostate brachytherapy in Ghana: our initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Edward Mensah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study presents the experience of a brachytherapy team in Ghana with a focus on technology transfer and outcome. The team was initially proctored by experienced physicians from Europe and South Africa. Material and methods : A total of 90 consecutive patients underwent either brachytherapy alone or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma between July 2008 and February 2014 at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana. Patients were classified as low-risk, intermediate, and high-risk according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN criteria. All low-risk and some intermediate risk group patients were treated with seed implantation alone. Some intermediate and all high-risk group patients received brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy. Results: The median patient age was 64.0 years (range 46-78 years. The median follow-up was 58 months (range 18-74 months. Twelve patients experienced biochemical failure including one patient who had evidence of metastatic disease and died of prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure rates for low, intermediate, and high-risk cases were 95.4%, 90.9%, and 70.8%, respectively. Clinical parameters predictive of biochemical outcome included: clinical stage, Gleason score, and risk group. Pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA was not a statistically significant predictor of biochemical failure. Sixty-nine patients (76.6% experienced grade 1 urinary symptoms in the form of frequency, urgency, and poor stream. These symptoms were mostly self-limiting. Four patients needed catheterization for urinary retention (grade 2. One patient developed a recto urethral fistula (grade 3 following banding for hemorrhoids. Conclusions : Our results compare favorably with those reported by other institutions with more extensive experience. We believe therefore that, interstitial permanent brachytherapy can be safely and effectively

  14. MO-FG-210-03: Intraoperative Ultrasonography-Guided Positioning of Plaque Brachytherapy in the Treatment of Choroidal Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, J. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medical practice. Since US imaging offers real-time imaging capability, it has becomes an excellent option to provide image guidance for brachytherapy (IGBT). (1) The physics and the fundamental principles of US imaging are presented, and the typical steps required to commission an US system for IGBT is provided for illustration. (2) Application of US for prostate HDR brachytherapy, including partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound co-registration to enable a focused treatment on the disease within the prostate is also presented. Prostate HDR with US image guidance planning can benefit from real time visualization of the needles, and fusion of the ultrasound images with T2 weighted MR allows the focusing of the treatment to the specific areas of disease within the prostate, so that the entire gland need not be treated. Finally, (3) ultrasound guidance for an eye plaque program is presented. US can be a key component of placement and QA for episcleral plaque brachytherapy for ocular cancer, and the UCLA eye plaque program with US for image guidance is presented to demonstrate the utility of US verification of plaque placement in improving the methods and QA in episcleral plaque brachytherapy. Learning Objectives: To understand the physics of an US system and the necessary aspects of commissioning US for image guided brachytherapy (IGBT). To understand real time planning of prostate HDR using ultrasound, and its application in partial prostate treatments using MR-ultrasound fusion to focus treatment on disease within the prostate. To understand the methods and QA in applying US for localizing the target and the implant during a episcleral plaque brachytherapy procedures.

  15. Automated construction of an intraoperative high-dose-rate treatment plan library for the Varian brachytherapy treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deufel, Christopher L; Furutani, Keith M; Dahl, Robert A; Haddock, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to create treatment plans for intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy is limited by lack of imaging and time constraints. An automated method for creation of a library of high-dose-rate brachytherapy plans that can be used with standard planar applicators in the intraoperative setting is highly desirable. Nonnegative least squares algebraic methods were used to identify dwell time values for flat, rectangular planar applicators. The planar applicators ranged in length and width from 2 cm to 25 cm. Plans were optimized to deliver an absorbed dose of 10 Gy to three different depths from the patient surface: 0 cm, 0.5 cm, and 1.0 cm. Software was written to calculate the optimized dwell times and insert dwell times and positions into a .XML plan template that can be imported into the Varian brachytherapy treatment planning system. The user may import the .XML template into the treatment planning system in the intraoperative setting to match the patient applicator size and prescribed treatment depth. A total of 1587 library plans were created for IOHDR brachytherapy. Median plan generation time was approximately 1 minute per plan. Plan dose was typically 100% ± 1% (mean, standard deviation) of the prescribed dose over the entire length and width of the applicator. Plan uniformity was best for prescription depths of 0 cm and 0.5 cm from the patient surface. An IOHDR plan library may be created using automated methods. Thousands of plan templates may be optimized and prepared in a few hours to accommodate different applicator sizes and treatment depths and reduce treatment planning time. The automated method also enforces dwell time symmetry for symmetrical applicator geometries, which simplifies quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D shape of asteroid (6) Hebe from VLT/SPHERE imaging: Implications for the origin of ordinary H chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsset, M.; Carry, B.; Dumas, C.; Hanuš, J.; Viikinkoski, M.; Vernazza, P.; Müller, T. G.; Delbo, M.; Jehin, E.; Gillon, M.; Grice, J.; Yang, B.; Fusco, T.; Berthier, J.; Sonnett, S.; Kugel, F.; Caron, J.; Behrend, R.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The high-angular-resolution capability of the new-generation ground-based adaptive-optics camera SPHERE at ESO VLT allows us to assess, for the very first time, the cratering record of medium-sized (D 100-200 km) asteroids from the ground, opening the prospect of a new era of investigation of the asteroid belt's collisional history. Aims: We investigate here the collisional history of asteroid (6) Hebe and challenge the idea that Hebe may be the parent body of ordinary H chondrites, the most common type of meteorites found on Earth ( 34% of the falls). Methods: We observed Hebe with SPHERE as part of the science verification of the instrument. Combined with earlier adaptive-optics images and optical light curves, we model the spin and three-dimensional (3D) shape of Hebe and check the consistency of the derived model against available stellar occultations and thermal measurements. Results: Our 3D shape model fits the images with sub-pixel residuals and the light curves to 0.02 mag. The rotation period (7.274 47 h), spin (ECJ2000 λ, β of 343°, +47°), and volume-equivalent diameter (193 ± 6 km) are consistent with previous determinations and thermophysical modeling. Hebe's inferred density is 3.48 ± 0.64 g cm-3, in agreement with an intact interior based on its H-chondrite composition. Using the 3D shape model to derive the volume of the largest depression (likely impact crater), it appears that the latter is significantly smaller than the total volume of close-by S-type H-chondrite-like asteroid families. Conclusions: Our results imply that (6) Hebe is not the most likely source of H chondrites. Over the coming years, our team will collect similar high-precision shape measurements with VLT/SPHERE for 40 asteroids covering the main compositional classes, thus providing an unprecedented dataset to investigate the origin and collisional evolution of the asteroid belt. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory

  17. Deformable anatomical templates for brachytherapy treatment planning in radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Chao, K. S. C.; Miller, Michael I.; So, F. B.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a new method to register serial, volumetric x-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets for tracking soft-tissue deformation caused by insertion of intracavity brachytherapy applicators to treat cervical cancer. 3D CT scans collected from the same patient with and without a brachytherapy applicator are registered to aid in computation of the radiation dose to tumor and normal tissue. The 3D CT image volume of pelvic anatomy with the applicator. Initial registration is accomplished by rigid alignment of the pelvic bones and non-rigid alignment of gray scale CT data and hand segmentations of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum. A viscous fluid transformation model is used for non-rigid registration to allow for local, non-linear registration of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum without disturbing the rigid registration of the bony pelvis and adjacent structures. Results are presented in which two 3D CT data sets of the same patient - imaged with and without a brachytherapy applicator - are registered.

  18. Analysis and enhancement of 3D shape accuracy in a single-shot LIDAR sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Munhyun; Choi, Gudong; Song, Minhyup; Seo, Hongseok; Mheen, Bongki

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy of timing jitter is of prime importance in the prevalent utilization of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology for the real-time high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) image sensor, especially for relatively small object detection in various applications, such as in the fully automated car navigation and military surveillance. To assess the accuracy of timing, that is, the accuracy of the distance or three-dimensional shape, the standard deviation method can be used in the Time-of-Flight (ToF) LiDAR technology. While most timing jitter analyses are mainly based on a fiber-network or open space at a relatively short range distance, more accurate analyses are required to extract more information about the timing jitter at in a 3D image sensor long-range free space conditions for extended LiDAR-related applications. In this paper, utilizing a Single-Shot LiDAR System (SSLs) model with a 400 MHz wideband InGaAs Avalanche Photodiode and a 1550 nm 2 nsec full width at half maximum MOPA fiber laser, we analyzed the precise timing jitter for the implemented SSLs to characterize the measurement results. Additionally, we report the enhanced results for the resolution and precision in the given SSLs using the spline interpolation method from the measured results, and multiple-shot averaging (MSA). Finally, by adapting the proposed method to an implemented high resolution 3D LiDAR prototype, called the STUD LiDAR prototype, which can be understood as one kind of SSLs because it has a single source and a single detector as in a SSLs, we observed and analyzed the 3D resolution enhancement.

  19. Study of encapsulated {sup 170}Tm sources for their potential use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain) and IFIC, CSIC, University of Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, La Fe University Hospital, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Medical Physics, Instituut Verbeeten, Tilburg 5000LA (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    emitted gammas and characteristic x rays. Moreover, the electron spectrum contribution to the dose was significant up to 4 mm from the source center compared to the photon contribution. The dose-rate constant {Lambda} of the cylindrical source was 1.23 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The behavior of the radial dose function showed promise for applications in brachytherapy. Due to the electron spectrum, the anisotropy was large for r<6 mm. Variations in manufacturing tolerances did not significantly influence the final dosimetry data when expressed in cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. For typical capsule dimensions, maximum reference dose rates of about 0.2, 10, and 2 Gy min{sup -1} would then be obtained for {sup 170}Tm, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb, respectively, resulting in treatment times greater than those for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy. Conclusions: The dosimetric characteristics of source designs exploiting the low photon energy of {sup 170}Tm were studied for potential application in HDR-brachytherapy. Dose-rate distributions were obtained for cylindrical and simplified spherical {sup 170}Tm source designs (stainless steel and platinum capsule materials) using MC calculations. Despite the high activity of {sup 170}Tm, calculated treatment times were much longer than for {sup 192}Ir.

  20. Pulsed dose rate brachytherapy (PDR): an analysis of the technique at 2 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thienpont, M. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Van Eijkeren, M.; Van Hecke, H.; Boterberg, T.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    A total of 154 applications was analysed using a pulsed dose brachytherapy technique for 138 patients over a 2 year period with emphasis on technical aspects influencing the overall treatment time. Vaginal ovoids were used in 59 cases, plastic tubes in 52, a Fletcher-type in 18, vaginal cylinders in 14 and a perineal template in 11 cases. Pulses were given at hourly intervals with a median dose rate of 0.6 Gy per pulse (range 0.4 to 3 Gy). The number of pulses per application varied from 3 to 134 (median 32). The number of dwell positions varied from 1 to 542 over 1 to 18 catheters. Patient related problems were few. The room was entered almost every 77 minutes. We noted 561 status codes in 147 applications. Of the 25 different codes, the most frequent one was due to the door left open when a pulse had to be given (35%) or due to constriction of the plastic catheters at the transfer tube junction (26%). However, the median total treatment time was increased by only 5 minutes. With pulsed dose rate brachytherapy at hourly pulses we can treat our patients within the planned time despite frequent room entrance and occurrence of an appreciable number of status codes. This technique seems to fulfill its promise to replace low dose rate brachytherapy.

  1. Retrospective analysis of role of interstitial brachytherapy using template (MUPIT in locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandwani Pooja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this retrospective study was to assess treatment outcomes for patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies being treated with interstitial brachytherapy using Martinez universal perineal interstitial template (MUPIT and to study the acute and late sequelae and survival after treatment by this technique. Materials and Methods : Ninety seven patients untreated with histopathological confirmation of carcinoma of cervix (37 vault (40 and vagina (20 were treated by combination of external beam RT (EBRT using megavoltage irradiation to pelvis to dose of 4000-5000 cGy followed by interstitial brachytherapy using MUPIT between September 2001 to March 2005. Median age was 46 years. Only those patients who were found unsuitable for conventional brachytherapy or in whom intracavitatory radiotherapy was found to be unlikely to encompass a proper dose distribution were treated by interstitial template brachytherapy using MUPIT application and were enrolled in this study. The dose of MUPIT was 1600-2400 cGy in 4-6# with 400 cGy /# and two fractions a day with minimum gap of six hours in between two fractions on micro-HDR. Criteria for inclusion of patients were as follows: Hb minimum 10 gm/dl, performance status - 70% or more (Karnofsy scale, histopathological confirmation FIGO stage IIB-IIIB (excluding frozen pelvis. Results : Among the 97 patients studied, 12 patients lost to follow-up and hence they were excluded from the study. Follow-up of rest of the patients was then done up to September 2006. The duration of follow-up was in the range of 20-60 months. Parameters studied were local control rate, complication rate, mortality rate and number of patients developing systemic metastasis. Local control was achieved in 56/85 (64.7% and complication rate was 15/85 (17.6%. Local control was better for nonbulky tumors compared bulky tumors irrespective of stage of disease. Local control was better in patients with good regression of

  2. PubChem3D: Shape compatibility filtering using molecular shape quadrupoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sunghwan

    2011-07-01

    by the 3-D neighbor set. At an ST ≥ 0.8, a filtering efficiency of 40.4% of true negatives was achieved with only 32 false negatives out of 24 million true positives, when applying the separate Qx, Qy, and Qz maps in a series (Qxyz. This efficiency increased linearly as a function of ST threshold in the range 0.8-0.99. The Qx filter was consistently the most efficient followed by Qy and then by Qz. Use of a monopole volume showed the best overall performance, followed by the self-overlap volume and then by the analytic volume. Application of the monopole-based Qxyz filter in a "real world" test of 3-D neighboring of 4,218 chemicals of biomedical interest against 26.1 million molecules in PubChem reduced the total CPU cost of neighboring by between 24-38% and, if used as the initial filter, removed from consideration 48.3% of all conformer pairs at almost negligible computational overhead. Conclusion Basic shape descriptors, such as those embodied by size, length, width, and height, can be highly effective in identifying shape incompatible compound conformer pairs. When performing a 3-D search using a shape similarity cut-off, computation can be avoided by identifying conformer pairs that cannot meet the result criteria. Applying this methodology as a filter for PubChem 3-D neighboring computation, an improvement of 31% was realized, increasing the average conformer pair throughput from 154,000 to 202,000 per second per CPU core.

  3. Adjuvant brachytherapy for endometrial cancer: advantages of the vaginal mold technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Clement; Dumas, Isabelle; Tailleur, Anne; Morice, Philippe; Haie-Meder, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of endometrial carcinoma in the adjuvant setting includes in most cases vaginal brachytherapy. In our institution, we use the customized vaginal mold technique. Herein, we report the advantages of this personalized applicator in terms of target coverage, normal tissue preservation, the incidence of air pockets, and its potential impact on dosimetry. A total of 15 patients receiving postoperative vaginal cuff high-dose-rate brachytherapy with the mold applicator technique were enrolled in this prospective data collection study. Patients were treated with either two or four fractions of 5 Gy prescribed to the clinical target volume, which consisted of an irradiation of the vaginal cuff and the upper third of the vagina. Target coverage; dose to organs at risk, in addition to the volume; and the dosimetric impact of air pockets surrounding the mold were evaluated. In 15 patients, a total of 27 air pockets were identified. The average number of air pockets per patient was 1.8 (range, 0-4), with the average total air pocket volume being 0.1 cc (range, 0.01-0.54). The average dose reduction at 5mm from the air pocket was 26% (range, 6-45%). The minimal clinical target volume coverage reported was 95% and the maximal dose received by 2 cc of the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid never exceeded 110% of the prescribed dose. Vaginal cuff high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the molded applicator provides personalized tailored treatment in terms of anatomical conformity. This translates into a dosimetrical advantage with smaller and fewer air pockets than reported in the literature with the use of cylinders. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources for...

  5. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual physical...

  6. Development of prostate voxel models for brachytherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano M.; Reis, Lucas P.; Grynberg, Suely E., E-mail: amsantos@cdtn.b [Center for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The tools developed recently in the areas of computer graphics and animation movies to computer games allow the creation of new voxel anthropomorphic phantoms with better resolution and thus, more anatomical details. These phantoms can be used in nuclear applications, especially in radiation protection for estimating doses in cases of occupational or accidental radioactive incidents, and in medical and biological applications. For dose estimates, the phantoms are coupled to a Monte Carlo code, which will be responsible for the transport of radiation in this environment. This study aimed to develop a computational tool to estimate the isodose curves in the prostate after brachytherapy seed implants. For this, we have created a model called FANTPROST in the shape of a 48 mm side cube, with a standard prostate inserted in the center of this cube with different distributions of brachytherapy seeds in this volume. The prostate, according to this model, was obtained from the phantom voxels MASH2 developed by Numerical Dosimetry Group, Department of Nuclear Energy - Federal University of Pernambuco. The modeling of the seeds, added to FANTPROST, was done through the use of geometric information of Iodine-125 Amersham 6711 commercial seed. The simulations were performed by the code MCNP5 for spatial distributions containing different amounts of seeds within the FANTPROST. The obtained curves allowed an estimation of the behavior of the maximum dose that decreases with distance, showing that this tool can be used for a more accurate analysis of the effects produced by the presence of such seeds in the prostate and its vicinity. (author)

  7. Plastic optical fibre sensor for in-vivo radiation monitoring during brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre sensor is presented for applications in real-time in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose a cancer patient receives during seed implantation in Brachytherapy. The sensor is based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material is embedded in the core of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. Three scintillation materials are investigated: thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl), terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb) and europium-doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu). Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide was identified as being the most suitable scintillator and further testing demonstrates its measureable response to different activities of Iodine-125, the radio-active source commonly used in Brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  8. Anthropomorphic phantom to investigate the bladder dose in gynecological high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R M V; Belinato, W; Macedo, L E; Souza, D N

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a prototype of a phantom appropriate for experimental bladder dosimetry. This work presents details of the phantom construction and dosimetric results obtained using radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs). The phantom was constructed of polymethyl methacrylate. Two artificial bladders were three-dimensional printed using previous computed tomography images. Radiochromic films and OSLDs were positioned on the artificial bladder walls, and the applicators were placed according to the original computed tomography image. The prototype phantom simulated the behavior of the dose on the bladder surface, enabling bladder movement in all directions. The dosimetric study that was performed using radiochromic film and OSLDs exhibited concordance, in most cases, with the results obtained from the planning system. The methodology presented offers conditions for researchers to investigate more accurately the behavior of the dose on the bladder surface during intracavitary brachytherapy procedures. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. dose in cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Siavashpour

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the optimum organ filling point for organs at risk (OARs dose in cervical cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy. Material and methods : In a retrospective study, 32 locally advanced cervical cancer patients (97 insertions who were treated with 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy during 2010-2013 were included. Rotterdam HDR tandem-ovoid applicators were used and computed tomography (CT scanning was performed after each insertion. The OARs delineation and GEC-ESTRO-based clinical target volumes (CTVs contouring was followed by 3D forward planning. Then, dose volume histogram (DVH parameters of organs were recorded and patients were classified based on their OARs volumes, as well as their inserted tandem length. Results : The absorbed dose to point A ranged between 6.5-7.5 Gy. D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³ of the bladder significantly increased with the bladder volume enlargement (p value < 0.05. By increasing the bladder volume up to about 140 cm3, the rectum dose was also increased. For the cases with bladder volumes higher than 140 cm3, the rectum dose decreased. For bladder volumes lower than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose decreased; however, for bladder volumes higher than 75 cm3, the sigmoid dose increased. The D 2cm ³ of the bladder and rectum were higher for longer tandems than for shorter ones, respectively. The divergence of the obtained results for different tandem lengths became wider by the extension of the bladder volume. The rectum and sigmoid volume had a direct impact on increasing their D 0.1cm ³ and D 2cm ³, as well as decreasing their D 10 , D 30 , and D 50 . Conclusions : There is a relationship between the volumes of OARs and their received doses. Selecting a bladder with a volume of about 70 cm3 or less proved to be better with regards to the dose to the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid.

  10. Development of a brachytherapy audit checklist tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, Joann; Hadley, Scott; Jolly, Shruti; Lee, Choonik; Roberson, Peter; Roberts, Donald; Ritter, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    To develop a brachytherapy audit checklist that could be used to prepare for Nuclear Regulatory Commission or agreement state inspections, to aid in readiness for a practice accreditation visit, or to be used as an annual internal audit tool. Six board-certified medical physicists and one radiation oncologist conducted a thorough review of brachytherapy-related literature and practice guidelines published by professional organizations and federal regulations. The team members worked at two facilities that are part of a large, academic health care center. Checklist items were given a score based on their judged importance. Four clinical sites performed an audit of their program using the checklist. The sites were asked to score each item based on a defined severity scale for their noncompliance, and final audit scores were tallied by summing the products of importance score and severity score for each item. The final audit checklist, which is available online, contains 83 items. The audit scores from the beta sites ranged from 17 to 71 (out of 690) and identified a total of 7-16 noncompliance items. The total time to conduct the audit ranged from 1.5 to 5 hours. A comprehensive audit checklist was developed which can be implemented by any facility that wishes to perform a program audit in support of their own brachytherapy program. The checklist is designed to allow users to identify areas of noncompliance and to prioritize how these items are addressed to minimize deviations from nationally-recognized standards. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  12. An Active Mammosite For Breast Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudjoe, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment that uses radioactive sources inside or in close proximity to cancerous tumors, thus minimizing exposure to neighboring healthy cells. This radiation oncology treatment unlike many others is localized and precise. The latest involvement of the Brachytherapy research group of the medical physics program at Hampton University is in the development of a scintillator fiber based detector for the breast cancer specific Mammosite (balloon device) from Cytyc Inc. Radioactive sources are inserted into a small plastic catheter (shaft) and pushed at the end of the tube. At that location, a water filled balloon surrounds the source and allow uniform gamma emission into cancer tumors. There is presently no capability for this device to provide measurements of the location of the source, as well as the radiation emitted from the source. Recent data were acquired to evaluate the possibility of measuring the dose distribution during breast Brachytherapy cancer treatments with this device. A high activity ^192Ir radioactive source and a 0.5 and 1 mm^2 scintillating fibers were used. Results will be presented and discussed.

  13. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Flynn, R; Kim, Y [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  14. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robyn Banerjee,1 Mitchell Kamrava21Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer.Keywords: cervical cancer, brachytherapy, image-guided brachytherapy

  15. Improving the efficiency of image guided brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Otter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Brachytherapy is an essential component of the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancers. It enables the dose to the tumor to be boosted whilst allowing relative sparing of the normal tissues. Traditionally, cervical brachytherapy was prescribed to point A but since the GEC-ESTRO guidelines were published in 2005, there has been a move towards prescribing the dose to a 3D volume. Image guided brachytherapy has been shown to reduce local recurrence, and improve survival and is optimally predicated on magnetic resonance imaging. Radiological studies, patient workflow, operative parameters, and intensive therapy planning can represent a challenge to clinical resources. This article explores the ways, in which 3D conformal brachytherapy can be implemented and draws findings from recent literature and a well-developed hospital practice in order to suggest ways to improve the efficiency and efficacy of a brachytherapy service. Finally, we discuss relatively underexploited translational research opportunities.

  16. Two years results of electronic brachytherapy for basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Ballester-Sánchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The use of radiation therapy (RT for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC has been changing throughout the last century. Over the last decades, the use of radiotherapy has surged with the development of new techniques, applicators, and devices. In recent years, electronic brachytherapy (eBT devices that use small x-ray sources have been introduced as alternative to radionuclide dependence. Nowadays, several devices have been incorporated, with a few series reported, and with a short follow-up, due to the recent introduction of these systems. The purpose of this work is to describe the clinical results of our series after two years follow-up with a specific eBT system. Material and methods: This is a prospective single-center, non-randomized pilot study, to assess clinical results of electronic brachytherapy in basal cell carcinoma using the Esteya® system. In 2014, 40 patients with 60 lesions were treated. Patient follow-up on a regular basis was performed for a period of two years. Results: Twenty-six patients with 44 lesions achieved two years follow-up. A complete response was documented in 95.5% of cases. Toxicity was mild (G1 or G2 in all cases, caused by erythema, erosion, or alopecia. Cosmesis was excellent in 88.6% of cases, and good in the rest. Change in pigmentation was the most frequent cosmetic alteration. Conclusions : This work is special, since the equipment’s treatment voltage was 69.5 kV, and this is the first prospective study with long term follow-up with Esteya®. These preliminary report show excellent results with less toxicity and excellent cosmesis. While surgery has been the treatment of choice, certain patients might benefit from eBT treatment. These are elderly patients with comorbidities or undergoing anticoagulant treatment as well as those who simply refuse surgery or might have other contraindications.

  17. Shape optimization of active and passive drag-reducing devices on a D-shaped bluff body

    CERN Document Server

    Semaan, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Shape optimization of an active and a passive drag-reducing device on a two-dimensional D-shaped bluff body is performed. The two devices are: Coanda actuator, and randomly-shaped trailing-edge flap. The optimization sequence is performed by coupling the genetic algorithm software DAKOTA to the mesh generator Pointwise and to the CFD solver OpenFOAM. For the the active device the cost functional is the power ratio, whereas for the passive device it is the drag coefficient. The optimization leads to total power savings of $\\approx 70\\%$ for the optimal Coanda actuator, and a 40\\% drag reduction for the optimal flap. This reduction is mainly achieved through streamlining the base flow and suppressing the vortex shedding. The addition of either an active or a passive device creates two additional smaller recirculation regions in the base cavity that shifts the larger recirculation region away from the body and increases the base pressure. The results are validated against more refined URANS simulations for selec...

  18. American Brachytherapy Society consensus report for accelerated partial breast irradiation using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Arthur, Douglas; Shaitelman, Simona; Polgár, Csaba; Todor, Dorin; Zoberi, Imran; Kamrava, Mitchell; Major, Tibor; Yashar, Catheryn; Wazer, David E

    To develop a consensus report for the quality practice of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy (IMB). The American Brachytherapy Society Board appointed an expert panel with clinical and research experience with breast brachytherapy to provide guidance for the current practice of IMB. This report is based on a comprehensive literature review with emphasis on randomized data and expertise of the panel. Randomized trials have demonstrated equivalent efficacy of APBI using IMB compared with whole breast irradiation for select patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several techniques for placement of interstitial catheters are described, and importance of three-dimensional planning with appropriate optimization is reviewed. Optimal target definition is outlined. Commonly used dosing schemas include 50 Gy delivered in pulses of 0.6-0.8 Gy/h using pulsed-dose-rate technique and 34 Gy in 10 fractions, 32 Gy in eight fractions, or 30 Gy in seven fractions using high-dose-rate technique. Potential toxicities and strategies for toxicity avoidance are described in detail. Dosimetric constraints include limiting whole breast volume that receives ≥50% of prescription dose to skin dose to ≤100% of prescription dose (≤60-70% preferred), chest wall dose to ≤125% of prescription dose, Dose Homogeneity Index to >0.75 (>0.85 preferred), V150 Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Geometric stability of intracavitary pulsed dose rate brachytherapy monitored by in vivo rectal dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Christensen, Jens Juul; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-04-01

    To evaluate geometric stability of applicator and rectum during pulsed dose rate (PDR) intracavitary brachytherapy. A total of 14 patients with cervical cancer (stages IIB-IVA) were analysed retrospectively. A dose of 10 Gy to point A was prescribed per brachytherapy session, and PDR was given with 1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h, using a ring applicator (Varian). A rectal dosimeter consisting of five diodes spaced by 1.5 cm was routinely placed in the rectum. The diodes detected the progression of each pulse of radiation, as the stepping source was advanced through the applicator. A mathematical model has been developed for spatial analysis of the pattern of the dose readings. The model transforms dose measurement into a quantification of the geometric relationship between rectum diodes and applicator. The model could be used for all treatment sessions, and the relative positions of diodes and applicator were calculated for each pulse of radiation. The SD of displacements during the treatment was below 2.8mm in all directions for all patients. The mean SD in lateral, longitudinal and anterior-posterior directions were 1.2 +/- 0.7, 1.2 +/- 0.7 and 0.9 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively. The mean measurement uncertainty was below 0.8 +/- 0.5 mm in all directions. A new mathematical method has been developed, enabling us to quantitate and monitor relative positions of applicator and rectal diodes during a PDR treatment. The spatial relation between rectal dosimeter and applicator was very stable during extended PDR treatments suggesting that the geometric stability of PDR treatment is at the same level as the stability reported for HDR brachytherapy.

  20. Multicatheter hybrid breast brachytherapy: a potential alternative for patients with inadequate skin distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriwal, Sushil; Coon, Devin; Kim, Hayeon; Haley, Marsha; Patel, Rakesh; Das, Rupak

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the ClearPath (CP) multicatheter hybrid device was able to achieve acceptable dosimetry in patients in whom the proximity of the breast surgical cavity to the skin precluded treatment with intracavitary MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. The study consisted of 11 patients who had the MS catheter placed and who were subsequently not treated due to inadequate skin distance. A phantom scan of the CP multicatheter hybrid device was superimposed on the MS CT scan and a dosimetric comparison was performed. The median MS balloon size, diameter, and minimum skin distance were 40 cc, 4.1cm, and 5mm, respectively. The D(90), V(100), V(150), and V(200) with MS vs. CP were 95.29% vs. 97.06%, 88.8% vs. 91.3%, 35.7% vs. 38.0%, and 9.4% vs. 9.6%, respectively. The median maximum skin dose was 5.5 Gy vs. 3.9 Gy (p skin dose significantly without compromising the planning target volume coverage, DHI, or dose to other critical organs. The use of this device has the potential to increase the applicability of accelerated partial breast brachytherapy (APBI) in patients with a surgical cavity close to skin compared with balloon brachytherapy.

  1. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  3. Assessing changes to the brachytherapy target for cervical cancer using a single MRI and serial ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Schneider, Michal; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    To assess changes to the brachytherapy target over the course of treatment and the impact of these changes on planning and resources. Patients undergoing curative treatment with radiotherapy between January 2007 and March 2012 were included in the study. Intrauterine applicators were positioned in the uterine canal while patients were under anesthesia. Images were obtained by MRI and ultrasound at Fraction 1 and ultrasound alone at Fractions 2, 3, and 4. Cervix and uterine dimensions were measured on MRI and ultrasound and compared using Bland-Altman plots and repeated measures one-way analysis of variance. Of 192 patients who underwent three fractions of brachytherapy, 141 of them received four fractions. Mean differences and standard error of differences between MRI at Fraction 1 and ultrasound at Fraction 4 for anterior cervix measurements were 2.9 (0.31), 3.5 (0.25), and 4.2 (0.27) mm and for posterior cervix 0.8 (0.3), 0.3 (0.3), and 0.9 (0.3) mm. All differences were within clinically acceptable limits. The mean differences in the cervix over the course of brachytherapy were less than 1 mm at all measurement points on the posterior surface. Replanning occurred in 11 of 192 (5.7%) patients, although changes to the cervix dimensions were not outside clinical limits. There were small changes to the cervix and uterus over the course of brachytherapy that were not clinically significant. Use of intraoperative ultrasound as a verification aid accurately assesses the target at each insertion, reduces uncertainties in treatment delivery, and improves efficiency of the procedure benefiting both the patient and staff. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiobiological equivalent of low/high dose rate brachytherapy and evaluation of tumor and normal responses to the dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the biological equivalent of low-dose-rate (LDR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in terms of the more recent linear quadratic (LQ) model, which leads to theoretical estimation of biological equivalence. One of the key features of the LQ model is that it allows a more systematic radiobiological comparison between different types of treatment because the main parameters alpha/beta and micro are tissue-specific. Such comparisons also allow assessment of the likely change in the therapeutic ratio when switching between LDR and HDR treatments. The main application of LQ methodology, which focuses on by increasing the availability of remote afterloading units, has been to design fractionated HDR treatments that can replace existing LDR techniques. In this study, with LDR treatments (39 Gy in 48 h) equivalent to 11 fractions of HDR irradiation at the experimental level, there are increasing reports of reproducible animal models that may be used to investigate the biological basis of brachytherapy and to help confirm theoretical predictions. This is a timely development owing to the nonavailability of sufficient retrospective patient data analysis. It appears that HDR brachytherapy is likely to be a viable alternative to LDR only if it is delivered without a prohibitively large number of fractions (e.g., fewer than 11). With increased scientific understanding and technological capability, the prospect of a dose equivalent to HDR brachytherapy will allow greater utilization of the concepts discussed in this article.

  5. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podder, Tarun K., E-mail: tarun.podder@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44122 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Univ de Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Caldwell, Barrett [Schools of Industrial Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Crass, Jostin B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Imaging Research, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Fichtinger, Gabor [School of Computer Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Meltsner, Michael A. [Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, Wisconsin 53711 (United States); Moerland, Marinus A. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3508 GA (Netherlands); Nath, Ravinder [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Salcudean, Tim [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Song, Danny Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Thomadsen, Bruce R. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  6. Error Analysis of non-TLD HDR Brachytherapy Dosimetric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoush, Ahmad

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report43 (AAPM-TG43) and its updated version TG-43U1 rely on the LiF TLD detector to determine the experimental absolute dose rate for brachytherapy. The recommended uncertainty estimates associated with TLD experimental dosimetry include 5% for statistical errors (Type A) and 7% for systematic errors (Type B). TG-43U1 protocol does not include recommendation for other experimental dosimetric techniques to calculate the absolute dose for brachytherapy. This research used two independent experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to investigate and analyze uncertainties and errors associated with absolute dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy for a Tandem applicator. An A16 MicroChamber* and one dose MOSFET detectors† were selected to meet the TG-43U1 recommendations for experimental dosimetry. Statistical and systematic uncertainty analyses associated with each experimental technique were analyzed quantitatively using MCNPX 2.6‡ to evaluate source positional error, Tandem positional error, the source spectrum, phantom size effect, reproducibility, temperature and pressure effects, volume averaging, stem and wall effects, and Tandem effect. Absolute dose calculations for clinical use are based on Treatment Planning System (TPS) with no corrections for the above uncertainties. Absolute dose and uncertainties along the transverse plane were predicted for the A16 microchamber. The generated overall uncertainties are 22%, 17%, 15%, 15%, 16%, 17%, and 19% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm, 4cm, and 5cm, respectively. Predicting the dose beyond 5cm is complicated due to low signal-to-noise ratio, cable effect, and stem effect for the A16 microchamber. Since dose beyond 5cm adds no clinical information, it has been ignored in this study. The absolute dose was predicted for the MOSFET detector from 1cm to 7cm along the transverse plane. The generated overall uncertainties are 23%, 11%, 8%, 7%, 7%, 9%, and 8% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm

  7. Consequences of random and systematic reconstruction uncertainties in 3D image based brachytherapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Lang, Stefan; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Pötter, Richard; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of random and systematic applicator reconstruction uncertainties on DVH parameters in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Dose plans were analysed for 20 cervical cancer patients with MRI based brachytherapy. Uncertainty of applicator reconstruction was modelled by translating and rotating the applicator. Changes in DVH parameters per mm of applicator displacement were evaluated for GTV, CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. These data were used to derive patient population based estimates of delivered dose relative to expected dose. Deviations of DVH parameters depend on direction of reconstruction uncertainty. The most sensitive organs are rectum and bladder where mean DVH parameter shifts are 5-6% per mm applicator displacement in ant-post direction. For other directions and other DVH parameters, mean shifts are below 4% per mm. By avoiding systematic reconstruction errors, uncertainties on DVH parameters can be kept below 10% in 90% of a patient population. Systematic errors of a few millimetres can lead to significant deviations. Comprehensive quality control of afterloader, applicators and imaging procedures should be applied to prevent systematic errors in applicator reconstruction. Random errors should be minimised by using small slice thickness. With careful reconstruction procedures, reliable DVH parameters for target and OAR's can be obtained.

  8. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Review of clinical brachytherapy uncertainties: Analysis guidelines of GEC-ESTRO and the AAPM☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirisits, Christian; Rivard, Mark J.; Baltas, Dimos; Ballester, Facundo; De Brabandere, Marisol; van der Laarse, Rob; Niatsetski, Yury; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Tanderup, Kari; Venselaar, Jack L.M.; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose A substantial reduction of uncertainties in clinical brachytherapy should result in improved outcome in terms of increased local control and reduced side effects. Types of uncertainties have to be identified, grouped, and quantified. Methods A detailed literature review was performed to identify uncertainty components and their relative importance to the combined overall uncertainty. Results Very few components (e.g., source strength and afterloader timer) are independent of clinical disease site and location of administered dose. While the influence of medium on dose calculation can be substantial for low energy sources or non-deeply seated implants, the influence of medium is of minor importance for high-energy sources in the pelvic region. The level of uncertainties due to target, organ, applicator, and/or source movement in relation to the geometry assumed for treatment planning is highly dependent on fractionation and the level of image guided adaptive treatment. Most studies to date report the results in a manner that allows no direct reproduction and further comparison with other studies. Often, no distinction is made between variations, uncertainties, and errors or mistakes. The literature review facilitated the drafting of recommendations for uniform uncertainty reporting in clinical BT, which are also provided. The recommended comprehensive uncertainty investigations are key to obtain a general impression of uncertainties, and may help to identify elements of the brachytherapy treatment process that need improvement in terms of diminishing their dosimetric uncertainties. It is recommended to present data on the analyzed parameters (distance shifts, volume changes, source or applicator position, etc.), and also their influence on absorbed dose for clinically-relevant dose parameters (e.g., target parameters such as D90 or OAR doses). Publications on brachytherapy should include a statement of total dose uncertainty for the entire

  10. Review of clinical brachytherapy uncertainties: analysis guidelines of GEC-ESTRO and the AAPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirisits, Christian; Rivard, Mark J; Baltas, Dimos; Ballester, Facundo; De Brabandere, Marisol; van der Laarse, Rob; Niatsetski, Yury; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Tanderup, Kari; Venselaar, Jack L M; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-01-01

    A substantial reduction of uncertainties in clinical brachytherapy should result in improved outcome in terms of increased local control and reduced side effects. Types of uncertainties have to be identified, grouped, and quantified. A detailed literature review was performed to identify uncertainty components and their relative importance to the combined overall uncertainty. Very few components (e.g., source strength and afterloader timer) are independent of clinical disease site and location of administered dose. While the influence of medium on dose calculation can be substantial for low energy sources or non-deeply seated implants, the influence of medium is of minor importance for high-energy sources in the pelvic region. The level of uncertainties due to target, organ, applicator, and/or source movement in relation to the geometry assumed for treatment planning is highly dependent on fractionation and the level of image guided adaptive treatment. Most studies to date report the results in a manner that allows no direct reproduction and further comparison with other studies. Often, no distinction is made between variations, uncertainties, and errors or mistakes. The literature review facilitated the drafting of recommendations for uniform uncertainty reporting in clinical BT, which are also provided. The recommended comprehensive uncertainty investigations are key to obtain a general impression of uncertainties, and may help to identify elements of the brachytherapy treatment process that need improvement in terms of diminishing their dosimetric uncertainties. It is recommended to present data on the analyzed parameters (distance shifts, volume changes, source or applicator position, etc.), and also their influence on absorbed dose for clinically-relevant dose parameters (e.g., target parameters such as D90 or OAR doses). Publications on brachytherapy should include a statement of total dose uncertainty for the entire treatment course, taking into account the

  11. Comparison of treatment using teletherapy (external beam radiation) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samea, Renato; Lourenco, Laercio Gomes, E-mail: renatosamea@globo.com [Department of Surgical Oncology of Dr. Arnaldo Vieira de Carvalho Hospital, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Background - Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is still a difficult tumor to treat with very poor prognosis. Aim - To compare the response to teletherapy treatment (external beam radiotherapy) alone versus teletherapy combined with brachytherapy for patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Methods - Were studied 49 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus on clinical stage III (TNM-1999). They were separated into two groups. The first, underwent radiation therapy alone with linear accelerator of particles, average dose of 6000 cGy and the second to external beam radiation therapy at a dose of 5040 cGy combined with brachytherapy with Iridium 192 at a dose of 1500 cGy. Brachytherapy started one to two weeks after the end of teletherapy, and it was divided into three weekly applications of 500 cGy. Age, gender, race, habits (smoking and drinking), body mass index (BMI), complications with treatment benefits (pain relief and food satisfaction) and survival were analyzed. Results - The quality of life (food satisfaction, and pain palliation of dysphagia) were better in the group treated with external beam radiation therapy combined with brachytherapy. Survival was higher in the brachytherapy combined with external beam radiation therapy alone. Conclusion - Although the cure rate of squamous cell cancer of the esophagus is almost nil when treated with irradiation alone, this therapy is a form of palliative treatment for most patients in whom surgical contraindication exists. (author)

  12. Stereotactic radiotherapy as an alternative to plaque brachytherapy in retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldebawy, Eman; Patrocinio, Horacio; Evans, Michael; Hashem, Rania; Nelson, Sylvie; Sidi, Rubina; Freeman, Carolyn

    2010-12-01

    Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role for selected patients with retinoblastoma. Newer non-invasive radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCR) that uses highly accurate positioning to deliver treatment with small beams may be an interesting alternative to brachytherapy. We report a case treated with SCR and compare the dosimetry with that achievable with brachytherapy. With advantages and disadvantages to both, SCR should more often be considered in the management of RB because of the more homogeneous dose within the target volume and similar or lower doses to surrounding normal tissues.

  13. Flap reconstruction and interstitial brachytherapy in nonextremity soft tissue sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vineeta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is an integral component of management of high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. Interstitial brachytherapy is used to deliver a boost or radical dose with several advantages over external beam radiotherapy. There has always been a concern to use brachytherapy with flap reconstruction of skin defects after wide excision. We preset our initial experience with interstitial brachytherapy in two patients of recurrent high-grade non-extremity sarcomas treated with surgical excision and soft tissue reconstruction of surgical defect.

  14. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Nathan H J; Orio, Peter F; Merrick, Gregory S; Prestidge, Bradley R; Hartford, Alan Charles; Rosenthal, Seth A

    Transperineal permanent brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) has produced practice parameters for LDR prostate brachytherapy. These practice parameters define the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric guidelines, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these parameters can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. American Brachytherapy Society Task Group Report: Long-term control and toxicity with brachytherapy for localized breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitelman, Simona F; Amendola, Beatriz; Khan, Atif; Beriwal, Sushil; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Kim, Leonard H; Cuttino, Laurie

    There has been significant controversy regarding the equivalency of accelerated partial breast irradiation to whole-breast irradiation. With the recent publication of a large, randomized trial comparing these two treatment modalities, an update on the current state of knowledge of brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation, with respect to local control and toxicities, would be useful to practitioners and patients. A systematic literature review was conducted examining articles published between January 2000 and April 2016 on the topics "brachytherapy" and "breast." A total of 67 articles met inclusion criteria, providing outcomes on local tumor control and/or toxicity for breast brachytherapy. Reported 5-year local failure rates were 1.4-6.1% for multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy (MIB) and 0-5.7% for single-entry brachytherapy catheters when delivered to patients with standard selection criteria. Toxicity profiles are acceptable, with cosmetic outcomes comparable to whole-breast irradiation. The reported rates of infection were 0-12%. Symptomatic fat necrosis was found in 0-12% and 0-3.2% of patients treated with MIB and single-entry brachytherapy catheters, respectively. Late Grade ≥3 telangiectasias and fibrosis were reported in 0-8% and 0-9.1% of patients treated with MIB, respectively. These side effects were less common with single-entry brachytherapy catheters (0-2.0% and 0%, respectively). Breast brachytherapy is a treatment technique that provides acceptable rates of local control in select patients, as demonstrated by Level I evidence. The side effect profile of this treatment is well documented and should be shared with patients when considering this treatment modality. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Does the entire uterus need to be treated in cancer of the cervix? Role of adaptive brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Christopher J; Cachoeira, Charles V; Boucher, Kenneth M; Rankin, Jim; Gaffney, David K

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate local control and toxicity by use of a method of adaptive cervical brachytherapy (ACB). From 1998 to 2008, we identified 65 cervical cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Stage IB1-IVA disease who received definitive external beam radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. As tumors regressed, 45 of 65 patients had the tandem source retracted from the uterine fundus at successive brachytherapy insertions, thus decreasing the number of (192)Ir dwell positions. Tests of trend and Fisher's exact test were used to identify the effect of ACB on disease control and toxicity. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate disease control and late complications. The median follow-up was 24.5 months. Of the patients, 92% received chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival, 3-year disease-free survival, 3-year distant metastasis-free survival, and local control rates were 67%, 76%, 79%, and 97%, respectively. There was only 1 isolated local failure, and there were no local failures beyond 1 year. Distant failure was involved in 93% of recurrences. No significant trend was identified regarding the extent of retraction of the tandem source start position with either failure or toxicity. Acute and actuarial 3-year late Grade 3 toxicity or greater occurred in 24.6% and 17% of patients, respectively. ACB determined by clinical response yielded excellent local control rates. These data indicate that ACB may be useful in decreasing late toxicities from high-dose rate brachytherapy. With the advent of three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy, additional methods to adapt treatment technique to changes in tumor volume warrant investigation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patterns of care study for brachytherapy: results of the questionnaire for the years 2002 and 2007 in The Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Londres

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The goal of the ESTRO Patterns of Care study for Brachytherapy in Europe (PCBE 2002 was to develop an aid to analyse brachytherapy practices. A 2nd version of the PCB questionnaire was created for 2007. Data over 2007 were collected at the radiotherapy institutions in The Netherlands and compared with those from 2002. The aim of this study is to describe national brachytherapy practices, to demonstrate trends, and to provide data for rational health care planning.Material and methods: Data were collected using a web-based questionnaire. For each centre, a local coordinator, responsible for coordinating the questionnaires and support of the further analysis was assigned. Data from the national cancer incidence registry was used for comparison with the data from the 21 Dutch departments.Results: There was a decrease in low-dose rate equipment in parallel to an increase in both pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate equipment. The use of 3D CT and MR based imaging techniques showed a slow rise. The most common clinical procedures were for prostate, gynaecological, and oesophageal tumours. A large increase (146% in permanent implant prostate applications using 125I seeds was observed. The numbers of oesophageal and gynaecological treatmentsremained stable. There is concern on the low numbers of cases treated in some institutions for a few complex treatment sites. For head and neck, anal canal, paediatrics, bladder and eye interventions it ranged from 3-20 patients per year per institution.Conclusions: The increase in number of patient treated with brachytherapy is in accordance with the increases in cancer incidence. The percentage of all radiotherapy patients treated with brachytherapy (approximately 5% remained stable. The survey identified certain trends in resources and techniques, as well as areas of expected improvement and possible gain in clinical outcome. Data reported from this survey can be used for further planning of resources

  18. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  19. Coatings of nanoparticles applied to brachytherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Andreza A.D.C.C.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Souza, Daiane C.B.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Nogueira, Beatriz R., E-mail: ccg.andreza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brachytherapy is a treatment for cancer in which the radiation is placed close or in contact with the region to be treated saving the surrounding healthy tissues. Nanotechnology is the science that studies the properties of nanometric materials. Nanobrachytherapy in a new field that unites the advantages of brachytherapy with the small size in the nanoparticle, resulting in an even less invasive treatment. In view of the synthesis of the nanoparticles and their use, there is a fundamental role that is made by the coatings, which not only have the function of avoiding the aggregation of particles, but also stabilize and control their functional properties. Among the range of coatings, the most outstanding are polyethylene glycol (PEG) and gum arabica (GA). PEG improves the surface properties of nanoparticles and presents high stability under biomedical conditions. After the synthesis of gold nanoparticles was developed, PEG and gum arabica were successfully incorporated into the surface. In a vial of pyrex, 1 ml of coating agent and 1 ml of nanoparticles was left under gentle shaking for 2 hours. Incorporation was confirmed by DLS and HRTEM. GA requires further study. (author)

  20. A study of brachytherapy for intraocular tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yung Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Ko, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Tae Won; Lee, Sung Koo; Choi, Moon Sik [Korea Cancer Center Hospital of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-01

    Our purpose of this study is to perform brachytherapy for intraocular tumor. The result were as followed. 1. Eye model was determined as a 25 mm diameter sphere. Ir-192 was considered the most appropriate as radioisotope for brachytherapy, because of the size, half, energy and availability. 2. Considering the biological response with human tissue and protection of exposed dose, we made the plaques with gold, of which size were 15 mm, 17 mm and 20 mm in diameter, and 1.5 mm in thickness. 3. Transmission factor of plaques are all 0.71 with TLD and film dosimetry at the surface of plaques and 0.45, 0.49 at 1.5 mm distance of surface, respectively. 4. As compared the measured data for the plaque with Ir-192 seeds to results of computer dose calculation model by Gary Luxton et al. and CAP-PLAN (Radiation Treatment Planning System), absorbed doses are within {+-}10% and distance deviations are within 0.4 mm. Maximum error is -11.3% and 0.8 mm, respectively. 7 figs, 2 tabs, 28 refs. (Author).

  1. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkenrider, Matthew M., E-mail: mharkenrider@lumc.edu; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  2. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  3. Brachytherapy in thetreatment of the oral and oropharyngeal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Zhumankulov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the methods of radiotherapy of malignant tumors of oral cavity and oropharyngeal region today is interstitial radiation therapy – brachytherapy, allowing you to create the optimum dose of irradiation to the tumor, necessary for its destruction, without severe radiation reactions in the surrounding tissues unchanged. Brachytherapy has the following advantages: high precision – the ability of the local summarization of high single doses in a limited volume of tissue; good tolerability; a short time of treatment. At this time, brachytherapy is the method of choice used as palliative therapy and as a component of radical treatment.Objective: The purpose of this article is a literature review about the latest achievements of interstitial brachytherapy in malignant tumors of the oral cavity and oropharynx.

  4. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  5. The Preliminary Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy Equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Satmoko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary prototype of a brachytherapy equipment has been constructed. The work started by developing conceptual design, followed by basic design and detailed design. In the conceptual design, design requirements are stated. In the basic design, technical specifications for main components are determined. In detailed design, general drawings are discussed. The prototype consists of three main systems: a mechanical system, an instrumentation system, and a safety system. The mechanical system assures the movement mechanism of the isotope source position beginning from the standby position until the applicators. It consists of three main modules: a position handling module, a container module, and a channel distribution module. The position handling module serves to move the isotope source position. As shielding, the second module is to store the source when the equipment is in standby position. The prototype provides 12 output channels. The channel selection is performed by the third module. The instrumentation system controls the movement of source position by handling motor operations. It consists of several modules. A microcontroller module serves as a control center whose task includes both controlling motors and communicating with computer. A motor module serves to handle motors. 10 sensors, including their signal conditionings, are introduced to read the environment conditions of the equipment. LEDs are used to display these conditions. In order to facilitate the operators’ duty, communication via RS232 is provided. The brachytherapy equipment can therefore be operated by using computer. Interface software is developed using C# language. To complete both mechanical and instrumentation systems performance, a safety system is developed to make sure that the safety for operator and patients from receiving excessive radiation. An interlock system is introduced to guard against abnormal conditions. In the worst case, a manual intervention

  6. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  7. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic tracking (EMT is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  8. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Doggett; James Brazil; Marketa Limova; Leah Press; Sidney Smith; Jeremy Peck

    2017-01-01

    Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX), an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California). All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up...

  9. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Christoph Bert; Markus Kellermeier; Kari Tanderup

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes the main issues of EMT and error detection in brachytherapy. The potential and complementarity of EMT as treatment verification technology will be discussed in relation to in vivo dosimetry and imaging.

  10. Re-distribution of brachytherapy dose using a differential dose prescription adapted to risk of local failure in low-risk prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rylander, Susanne; Polders, Daniel; Steggerda, Marcel J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We investigated the application of a differential target- and dose prescription concept for low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy (LDR-BT), involving a re-distribution of dose according to risk of local failure and treatment-related morbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Our stud...

  11. Comparing digital-light-processing (DLP) and liquid-crystal-on-silicon (LCoS) technologies for high-quality 3D shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chen; Li, Beiwen; Harding, Kevin G.; Zhang, Song

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a thorough comparison between the digital-light-processing (DLP) technology and liquid-crystal-onsilicon (LCoS) technology on high-quality 3D shape measurement. Specifically, we will study not only each individual color, but also the combination of different color (i.e., white light). The binary defocusing and focused sinusoidal fringe projection methods will be evaluated under all these scenarios. Experimental data demonstrated that for slow speed measurements, DLP has better fringe contrast and thus higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) for better quality 3D shape measurement when the binary defocusing method is employed, or when proper synchronization is present when the focus sinusoidal method is used; and LCoS provides more flexibility for system development when the focus sinusoidal method is employed.

  12. Avaliação dosimétrica de uma combinação de aplicadores para braquiterapia de tumores do colo uterino com acometimento da porção distal da vagina Dosimetric evaluation of a combination of brachytherapy applicators for uterine cervix cancer with involvement of the distal vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Guilherme Rodrigues Guimarães

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar uma alternativa de braquiterapia para tumores do colo uterino acometendo a porção distal da vagina, sem aumentar os riscos de toxicidade. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo teórico comparando três diferentes aplicadores de braquiterapia intracavitária de alta taxa de dose: sonda intrauterina e cilindro vaginal (SC; sonda e anel associado ao cilindro vaginal (SA+C e um aplicador virtual com sonda, anel e cilindro vaginal em um único conjunto (SAC. Foram prescritas doses de 7 Gy no ponto A e 5 Gy na superfície ou a 5 mm de profundidade na mucosa vaginal, mantendo as doses nos pontos de reto, bexiga e sigmoide abaixo dos limites de tolerância. Foram comparados os volumes englobados pelas isodoses de 50% (V50, 100% (V100, 150% (V150 e 200% (V200, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Tanto SA+C quanto SAC apresentaram melhor distribuição de dose quando comparados ao aplicador SC. A distribuição de dose obtida com SA+C foi semelhante à do aplicador SAC, sendo V150 e V200 cerca de 50% maiores para SA+C, todavia, dentro do cilindro. CONCLUSÃO: A utilização de SA+C em uma única aplicação em dois tempos pode ser uma alternativa de tratamento para pacientes que apresentam tumores de colo uterino com acometimento distal da vagina.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate an alternative brachytherapy technique for uterine cervix cancer involving the distal vagina, without increasing the risk of toxicity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Theoretical study comparing three different high-dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy applicators: intrauterine tandem and vaginal cylinder (TC; tandem/ring applicator combined with vaginal cylinder (TR+C; and a virtual applicator combining both the tandem/ring and vaginal cylinder in a single device (TRC. Prescribed doses were 7 Gy at point A, and 5 Gy on the surface or at a 5 mm depth of the vaginal mucosa. Doses delivered to the rectum, bladder and sigmoid colon were kept below the tolerance limits. Volumes covered by the

  13. Electronic brachytherapy management of atypical fibroxanthoma: report of 8 lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Doggett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the suitability of treating atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX, an uncommon skin malignancy, with electronic brachytherapy. Material and methods : From Feb 2013 to Sep 2014, we were referred a total of 8 cases of AFX in 7 patients, all involving the scalp. All of them were treated with electronic brachytherapy 50 Kev radiations (Xoft Axxent®, Fremont, California. All lesions received 40 Gy in two fractions per week with 5mm margins. Results : At a median follow-up of 23.7 months, the local recurrence rate is 12.5%. The single lesion that failed was not debulked surgically prior to electronic brachytherapy. Conclusions : To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature on the use of radiation therapy as curative primary treatment for AFX. No contraindication to the use of radiations is found in the literature, with surgery being the sole treatment for AFX noted. Our recurrence rate is 0% for debulked lesions. Risk of recurrence is mitigated with surgical debulking prior to brachytherapy. Electronic brachytherapy appears to be a safe and effective treatment for debulked AFX. Multiple excisions, skin grafting, and wound care can be avoided in elderly patients by the use of electronic brachytherapy.

  14. MO-B-BRC-01: Introduction [Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prisciandaro, J. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Brachytherapy has proven to be an effective treatment option for prostate cancer. Initially, prostate brachytherapy was delivered through permanently implanted low dose rate (LDR) radioactive sources; however, high dose rate (HDR) temporary brachytherapy for prostate cancer is gaining popularity. Needle insertion during prostate brachytherapy is most commonly performed under ultrasound (U/S) guidance; however, treatment planning may be performed utilizing several imaging modalities either in an intra- or post-operative setting. During intra-operative prostate HDR, the needles are imaged during implantation, and planning may be performed in real time. At present, the most common imaging modality utilized for intra-operative prostate HDR is U/S. Alternatively, in the post-operative setting, following needle implantation, patients may be simulated with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each imaging modality and workflow provides its share of benefits and limitations. Prostate HDR has been adopted in a number of cancer centers across the nation. In this educational session, we will explore the role of U/S, CT, and MRI in HDR prostate brachytherapy. Example workflows and operational details will be shared, and we will discuss how to establish a prostate HDR program in a clinical setting. Learning Objectives: Review prostate HDR techniques based on the imaging modality Discuss the challenges and pitfalls introduced by the three imagebased options for prostate HDR brachytherapy Review the QA process and learn about the development of clinical workflows for these imaging options at different institutions.

  15. A method for verification of treatment times for high-dose-rate intraluminal brachytherapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Asghar Gadhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was aimed to increase the quality of high dose rate (HDR intraluminal brachytherapy treatment. For this purpose, an easy, fast and accurate patient-specific quality assurance (QA tool has been developed. This tool has been implemented at Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO, Bahawalpur, Pakistan.Methods: ABACUS 3.1 Treatment planning system (TPS has been used for treatment planning and calculation of total dwell time and then results were compared with the time calculated using the proposed method. This method has been used to verify the total dwell time for different rectum applicators for relevant treatment lengths (2-7 cm and depths (1.5-2.5 cm, different oesophagus applicators of relevant treatment lengths (6-10 cm and depths (0.9 & 1.0 cm, and a bronchus applicator for relevant treatment lengths (4-7.5 cm and depth (0.5 cm.Results: The average percentage differences between treatment time TM with manual calculation and as calculated by the TPS is 0.32% (standard deviation 1.32% for rectum, 0.24% (standard deviation 2.36% for oesophagus and 1.96% (standard deviation 0.55% for bronchus, respectively. These results advocate that the proposed method is valuable for independent verification of patient-specific treatment planning QA.Conclusion: The technique illustrated in the current study is an easy, simple, quick and useful for independent verification of the total dwell time for HDR intraluminal brachytherapy. Our method is able to identify human error-related planning mistakes and to evaluate the quality of treatment planning. It enhances the quality of brachytherapy treatment and reliability of the system.

  16. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieszko, Dariusz; Brzozowska, Anna; Kordzin’ska-Cisek, Izabela; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT)-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy). Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90) was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED) and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2) median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months), 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher). Conclusions Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy. PMID:28115962

  17. A review of the clinical experience in pulsed dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgobind, Brian V; Koedooder, Kees; Ordoñez Zúñiga, Diego; Dávila Fajardo, Raquel; Rasch, Coen R N

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a treatment modality that combines physical advantages of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate brachytherapy. The aim of this review was to describe the effective clinical use of PDR brachytherapy worldwide in different tumour locations. We found 66 articles reporting on clinical PDR brachytherapy including the treatment procedure and outcome. Moreover, PDR brachytherapy has been applied in almost all tumour sites for which brachytherapy is indicated and with good local control and low toxicity. The main advantage of PDR is, because of the small pulse sizes used, the ability to spare normal tissue. In certain cases, HDR resembles PDR brachytherapy by the use of multifractionated low-fraction dose. PMID:26290399

  18. 3D shape optimization of fan vanes for multiple operating regimes subject to efficiency and noise-related excellence criteria and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Marinić-Kragić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fully generic 3D shapes of centrifugal roof fan vanes are explored based on a custom-developed numerical workflow with the ability to vary the vane 3D shape by manipulating the control points of parametric surfaces and change the number of vanes and rotation speed. An excellence formulation is based on design flow efficiency, multi-regime operational conditions and noise criteria for various cases, including multi-objective optimization. Multiple cases of optimization demonstrate the suitability of customized and individualized fan designs for specific working environments according to the selected excellence criteria. Noise analysis is considered as an additional decision-making tool for cases where multiple solutions of equal efficiency are generated and as an additional criteria for multi-objective optimization. The 3D vane shape enables further gains in efficiency compared to 2D shape optimization, while multi-objective optimization with noise as an additional criterion shows potential to greatly reduce the roof fan noise with only small losses in efficiency. The developed workflow which comprises (i a 3D parametric shape modeler, (ii an evolutionary optimizer and (iii a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulator can be viewed as an integral tool for optimizing the designs of roof fans under custom conditions.

  19. [First experience with intrasurgical brachytherapy in the combined treatment for locally advanced laryngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'chenko, I L; Vinogradov, V M; Pastushenko, D A; Samsonova, N N; Iudin, A L

    2011-01-01

    Results of combined radiosurgical treatment with larynx preservation, and pre- and postoperative distant external irradiation, were evaluated. Forty-eight patients with locally advanced laryngeal cancer received single-step individually-tailored tissue application, followed by high-dose brachytherapy. Discriminative function of the larynx was restored in all patients within 2 days involving swallowing disturbances in 8%. Breathing function was restored in 98% within 2 days to 6 months after completion of treatment. Three-year relapse-free survival was 95.8%.

  20. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsythe, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Burri, Ryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States); Stone, Nelson [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Stock, Richard G., E-mail: richard.stock@moutsinai.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  1. [HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in treatment of basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid and inner angle - our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furdová, A; Lukačko, P; Lederleitner, D

    2013-06-01

    First experience and evaluation of relapses in group of patients after surgery with applied adjuvant HDR brachytherapy for recurrent tumor after incomplete excision of basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid and inner angle. Patients with recurrent basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid in year 2010. In 3 male patients with recurrent finding of basal cell after surgery we applied adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. The isodose curve chosen to prescribe the dose was 5 mm away from the skin surface. In the year 2010 we applied adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy in 3 male patients with recurrent basal cell carcinoma. The average age was 58 years (52 to 75 years). From group of 41 patients with non melanotic malignant tumors of the eyelids in 3 patients (7.3 %) with relapse after incomplete excision of the basal cell carcinoma of the lower eyelid we applied after removal of stitches after surgery adjuvant HDR 192Ir brachytherapy. For each patient was made individual orfit mask that bore plastic applicators. Tungsten eye shield applicator was applied to protect the eye globe. Treatment of 10 fractions of 4.5 Gy single dose (5 times weekly) were scheduled within 2 weeks. Patients received outpatient treatment. Acute toxicity postradiation erythema of eyelid and skin around relieved by standard symptomatic treatment within a few days after completion of radiation therapy. In 2 year interval after HDR 192Ir brachytherapy we did not record the occurrence of late complications such as corneal ulcers. Our preliminary experience shows excellent early skin tolerance. After 2 years of follow-up at 6 month interval we did not recognize relapse in our group of patients. The proposed technique of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy after surgery should be considered a new clinical treatment in patients with recurrent non melanotic eyelid cancer. Its main advantage lies in the usefulness in all types of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma and sebaceous carcinoma of the eyelids, without

  2. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P., E-mail: ppapagi@phys.uoa.gr [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias, 11527 Athens (Greece); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel 24105 (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  3. 78 FR 41125 - Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... COMMISSION Interim Enforcement Policy for Permanent Implant Brachytherapy Medical Event Reporting AGENCY...'s permanent implant brachytherapy program. This interim policy affects NRC licensees that are authorized to perform permanent implant brachytherapy. DATES: This policy revision is effective July 9, 2013...

  4. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after the...

  5. Interstitial brachytherapy in carcinoma of the penis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, A.J.; Ghosh, S.; Bhalavat, R.L. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kulkarni, J.N. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Surgery; Sequeira, B.V.E. [Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Keeping in line with the increasing emphasis on organ preservation, we at the Tata Memorial Hospital have evaluated the role of Ir-192 interstitial implant as regards local control, functional and cosmetic outcome in early as well as locally recurrent carcinoma of the distal penis. Patients and Methods: From October 1988 to December 1996, 23 patients with histopathologically proven cancer of the penis were treated with radical radiation therapy using Ir-192 temporary interstitial implant. Our patients were in the age group of 20 to 60 years. The primary lesions were T1 and 7, T2 in 7 and recurrent in 9 patients. Only 7 patients had palpable groin nodes at presentation, all of which were pathologically negative. The median dose of implant was 50 Gy (range 40 to 60 Gy), using the LDR afterloading system and the Paris system of implant rules for dosimetry. Follow-up ranged from 4 to 117 months (median 24 months). Results: At last follow-up 18 of the 23 patients remained locally controlled with implant alone. Three patients failed only locally, 2 locoregionally and 1 only at the groin. Of the 5 patients who failed locally, 4 were successfully salvaged with partial penectomy and remained controlled when last seen. Local control with implant alone at 8 years was 70% by life table analysis. The patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome. We did not record any case of skin or softtissue necrosis. Only 2 patients developed meatal stenosis, both of which were treated endoscopically. Conclusion: Our results lead us to interpret that interstitial brachytherapy with Ir-192 offers excellent local control rates with preservation of organ and function. Penectomy can be reserved as a means for effective salvage. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Das Prinzip des Organerhalts gewinnt in der Onkologie zunehmend an Bedeutung. Ziel dieser Untersuchung war es, die Rolle der interstitiellen Brachytherapie mit Ir-192 zur Behandlung des fruehen und rezidivierten Peniskarzinoms zu

  6. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos, E-mail: nccf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.br, E-mail: reissc@cdtn.br, E-mail: amms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, BH (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  7. Calibration of Photon Sources for Brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, Alex

    Source calibration has to be considered an essential part of the quality assurance program in a brachytherapy department. Not only it will ensure that the source strength value used for dose calculation agrees within some predetermined limits to the value stated on the source certificate, but also it will ensure traceability to international standards. At present calibration is most often still given in terms of reference air kerma rate, although calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water would be closer to the users interest. It can be expected that in a near future several standard laboratories will be able to offer this latter service, and dosimetry protocols will have to be adapted in this way. In-air measurement using ionization chambers (e.g. a Baldwin—Farmer ionization chamber for 192Ir high dose rate HDR or pulsed dose rate PDR sources) is still considered the method of choice for high energy source calibration, but because of their ease of use and reliability well type chambers are becoming more popular and are nowadays often recommended as the standard equipment. For low energy sources well type chambers are in practice the only equipment available for calibration. Care should be taken that the chamber is calibrated at the standard laboratory for the same source type and model as used in the clinic, and using the same measurement conditions and setup. Several standard laboratories have difficulties to provide these calibration facilities, especially for the low energy seed sources (125I and 103Pd). Should a user not be able to obtain properly calibrated equipment to verify the brachytherapy sources used in his department, then at least for sources that are replaced on a regular basis, a consistency check program should be set up to ensure a minimal level of quality control before these sources are used for patient treatment.

  8. Vaginal cuff brachytherapy in endometrial cancer - a technically easy treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Sebastià; Andres, Ignacio; Lopez-Honrubia, Veronica; Berenguer, Roberto; Sevillano, Marimar; Jimenez-Jimenez, Esther; Rovirosa, Angeles; Arenas, Meritxell

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological cancers among women in the developed countries. Vaginal cuff is the main location of relapses after a curative surgical procedure and postoperative radiation therapy have proven to diminish it. Nevertheless, these results have not translated into better survival results. The preeminent place of vaginal cuff brachytherapy (VCB) in the postoperative treatment of high- to intermediate-risk EC was given by the PORTEC-2 trial, which demonstrated a similar reduction in relapses with VCB than with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), but VCB induced less late toxicity. As a result of this trial, the use of VCB has increased in clinical practice at the expense of EBRT. A majority of the clinical reviews of VCB usually address the risk categories and patient selection but pay little attention to technical aspects of the VCB procedure. Our review aimed to address both aspects. First of all, we described the risk groups, which guide patient selection for VCB in clinical practice. Then, we depicted several technical aspects that might influence dose deposition and toxicity. Bladder distension and rectal distension as well as applicator position or patient position are some of those variables that we reviewed.

  9. Development of irradiation support devices for production of brachytherapy seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Fabio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Souza, Carla D.; Moura, Joao A.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Karan Junior, Dib; Feher, Anselmo; Oliveira, Tiago B.; Benega, Marcos A.G., E-mail: tiagooliveira298@gmail.com, E-mail: mattos.fr@gmail.com, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: czeituni@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: jamoura@ipen.br, E-mail: ernandopeleias@gmail.com, E-mail: s, E-mail: dib.karan@usp.br, E-mail: afeher@ipen.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Ophthalmic tumors treatment with brachytherapy sources has been widely used as a primary or secondary therapy for non-malignant or malignant tumors, for example, choroid melanoma, and retinoblastoma. Ruthenium-106, Iodine-125, Palladium -103, Gold-198 and Iridium-192, are some radionuclides that can be applied for treatment of ocular tumors. These sources are in small sizes (a few millimeters) and different shapes (rods, wires, disks). To ensure high accuracy during treatment, they are positioned in eye applicators, specially designed to fit on the surface of tumor. The Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN) in a partnership with Paulista Medicine School (UNIFESP) created a project that aims to develop a prototype of Iridium-192 seeds for treatment of eye cancer. This seed consists in a core of Ir -Pt alloy (20%-80%) with a length of 3 mm, to be activated in IPEN's IEA-R1 Reactor, and a titanium capsule sealing the core. It was imperative to develop a sustainer device for irradiation. This piece is used to avoid overlapping of one cores and, therefore, avoiding the 'shadow effect' that does not allow full activation of each core due to the high density. (author)

  10. Endovascular brachytherapy to prevent restenosis after angioplasty; Endovaskulaere Brachytherapie in der Restenoseprophylaxe nach Angioplastie und Stentimplantation: Eine Uebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Bohndorf, K. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2003-02-01

    Endovascular radiotherapy is the first effective prophylaxis of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting. The FDA recently approved two devices for the delivery of intracoronary radiation following coronary artery stenting. Published multicenter, double-blind, randomized trials of intracoronary radiation therapy report good results for preventing in-stent restenosis, while the data for the peripheral circulation are still inconclusive. Beta-emitters are easier applicable and probably also safer, whereas gamma-emitters have been more extensively evaluated clinically so far. Primary indication for endovascular brachytherapy are patients at high risk for restenosis, such as previous restenoses, in-stent hyperplasia, long stented segment, long PTA lesion, narrow residual vascular lumen and diabetes. Data from coronary circulation suggest a safety margin of at least 4 to 10 mm at both ends of the angioplastic segment to avoid edge restenosis. To prevent late thrombosis of the treated coronary segment, antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin are recommended for at least 6 months after PTA and for 12 months after a newly implanted stent. An established medication regimen after radiotherapy of peripheral arteries is still lacking. (orig.) [German] Die endovaskulaere Radiotherapie stellt das erste erfolgreiche Therapiekonzept in der Restenoseprophylaxe nach PTA und Stentimplantation dar. Am 3.11.2000 hat die amerikanische Food and Drug Administration erstmalig zwei Brachytherapiegeraete zur Restenoseprophylaxe nach Koronararterien-Stenting zugelassen. Grosse multizentrische, kontrollierte Studien wurden fuer das koronare Stromgebiet mit positiven Ergebnissen publiziert, die Datenlage im peripheren Stromgebiet ist noch ungenuegend. Beta-Strahler bieten Vorteile in der Anwendung, moeglicherweise auch in der Sicherheit, Gamma-Strahler dagegen sind besser klinisch evaluiert. Die primaere Indikation zur endovaskulaeren Brachytherapie

  11. Skin surface brachytherapy: A survey of contemporary practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhacheva, Anna O; Devlin, Phillip M; Shirvani, Shervin M; Barker, Christopher A; Beron, Phillip; Bhatnagar, Ajay; Doggett, Stephen W; Hochman, Lawrence; Hsu, Charles; Kasper, Michael; Keisch, Martin; Mutyala, Subhakar; Prestidge, Bradley; Rodriguez Villalba, Silvia; Shukla, Vershalee; Sundararaman, Srinath; Kamrava, Mitchell

    The aim of this study was to define current patterns of care among radiation oncologists who use skin surface brachytherapy for the treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in academic and community settings. A 30-question electronic survey was administered to clinician members of the American Brachytherapy Society. The respondents were asked to provide details regarding their clinical practice and their approach to skin surface brachytherapy. A total of 16 surveys were returned. Among the respondents, aggregate experience varied from 8 to 1800 cases. Most preferred brachytherapy over external beam radiation because of shorter treatment course, conformality of treatment for irregular or curved targets, and shallow dose deposition. Of the total, 60% of respondents routinely estimated lesion depth via ultrasound before initiating treatment. Treatment margin on gross disease varied widely (range, 3-15 mm; median, 5 mm). Hypofractionation was the preferred dose schedule. Prescribed doses ranged from 30 Gy in five fractions to 64 Gy in 32 fractions (EQD2, 40 Gy-65 Gy). There was a tendency to increase the number of fractions for larger targets, although some used the same fractionation regardless of anatomic location or lesion size. There was no consensus on dosimetric constraints, and some respondents reported cases of severe toxicity, particularly when treating the pretibial skin. This pattern of care study suggests that skin brachytherapy can be a convenient and safe tool for treatment of BCC and cSCC. Prospective trials and the development of expert consensus guidelines would be beneficial for optimizing skin surface brachytherapy and reducing practice variation. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-F-BRA-02: Electromagnetic Tracking in Brachytherapy as An Advanced Modality for Treatment Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermeier, M; Herbolzheimer, J; Kreppner, S; Lotter, M; Strnad, V [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Bert, C [University Clinic Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, DE (Germany); GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research, Darmstadt, DE (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the use of Electromagnetic Tracking (EMT) for quality assurance in brachytherapy by means of phantom studies and to assess the clinical applicability of EMT during HDR breast brachytherapy. Methods: An EMT system was investigated to examine its suitability for clinical applications in brachytherapy. A field generator served as electromagnetic field emitter. Sensors (magnetic sensitive only), connected to a control unit, were used and their respective position and orientation inside a pre-defined measurement volume (500 mm cube length) determined. Up to three 6DoF sensors were placed on the phantom’s surface to obtain additional reference coordinates used to derive relative measured positions of a smaller 5DoF sensor inserted in the 6F catheters of the implant. The catheters were successively measured by manual displacement of the sensor at ∼40 mm/s. The measured catheter tracks, acquired multiple times at various locations (CT and treatment room), were smoothed, divided into intervals (2.5 mm dwell step size), registered (rigid Iterative Closest Point transformation) and compared against the known phantom geometry. Results: The reference coordinates were used to exclude the influence of external (e.g., respiratory-induced) motion. Precision tests in a clinical setting showed variances below 1 mm (translational) and 1° (rotational), respectively. Our method for catheter reconstruction preserved the length of the tracked catheter (within 1 mm). The measured tracking accuracy was 1±0.3 mm (maximum: 2 mm). The results are less accurate in environments potentially interfering with the magnetic field, e.g., in the vicinity of ferromagnetic table components. Conclusion: Our EMT system is able to perform reproducible and accurate catheter tracking and reconstruction. Currently, measurements of the implant geometry in HDR breast treatments are initiated. Online implant monitoring by means of EM tracking may be a first step towards advanced

  13. The role of brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre of Khartoum (RICK)

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A M

    2000-01-01

    As there are many efforts devoted in order to manage the cancer, here the researcher handle one of these efforts that play a major part in treating the cancer internationally, it is a brachytherapy system. Brachytherapy was carried out mostly with radium sources, but recently some artificial sources are incorporated in this mode of treatment such as Cs-137, Ir-192, Au-198, P-32, Sr-90 and I-125. The research cover history of brachytherapy and radioactive sources used in, techniques of implementation, radiation protection and methods of brachytherapy dose calculation, as well as brachytherapy in radiation and isotopes centre in Khartoum.

  14. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Grace L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Huo, Jinhai [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Giordano, Sharon H. [Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Breast Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hunt, Kelly K. [Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Buchholz, Thomas A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: bsmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Health Services Research, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  15. Understanding the Relationship Between Interactive Optimisation and Visual Analytics in the Context of Prostate Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Dwyer, Tim; Marriott, Kim; Millar, Jeremy; Haworth, Annette

    2018-01-01

    The fields of operations research and computer science have long sought to find automatic solver techniques that can find high-quality solutions to difficult real-world optimisation problems. The traditional workflow is to exactly model the problem and then enter this model into a general-purpose "black-box" solver. In practice, however, many problems cannot be solved completely automatically, but require a "human-in-the-loop" to iteratively refine the model and give hints to the solver. In this paper, we explore the parallels between this interactive optimisation workflow and the visual analytics sense-making loop. We assert that interactive optimisation is essentially a visual analytics task and propose a problem-solving loop analogous to the sense-making loop. We explore these ideas through an in-depth analysis of a use-case in prostate brachytherapy, an application where interactive optimisation may be able to provide significant assistance to practitioners in creating prostate cancer treatment plans customised to each patient's tumour characteristics. However, current brachytherapy treatment planning is usually a careful, mostly manual process involving multiple professionals. We developed a prototype interactive optimisation tool for brachytherapy that goes beyond current practice in supporting focal therapy - targeting tumour cells directly rather than simply seeking coverage of the whole prostate gland. We conducted semi-structured interviews, in two stages, with seven radiation oncology professionals in order to establish whether they would prefer to use interactive optimisation for treatment planning and whether such a tool could improve their trust in the novel focal therapy approach and in machine generated solutions to the problem.

  16. SU-E-P-05: Electronic Brachytherapy: A Physics Perspective On Field Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, S; Ayyalasomayajula, S; Lee, S [iCAD Inc., Los Gatos, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We want to summarize our experience implementing a successful program of electronic brachytherapy at several dermatology clinics with the help of a cloud based software to help us define the key program parameters and capture physics QA aspects. Optimally developed software helps the physicist in peer review and qualify the physical parameters. Methods: Using the XOFT™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy system in conjunction with a cloud-based software, a process was setup to capture and record treatments. It was implemented initially at about 10 sites in California. For dosimetric purposes, the software facilitated storage of the physics parameters of surface applicators used in treatment and other source calibration parameters. In addition, the patient prescription, pathology and other setup considerations were input by radiation oncologist and the therapist. This facilitated physics planning of the treatment parameters and also independent check of the dwell time. From 2013–2014, nearly1500 such calculation were completed by a group of physicists. A total of 800 patients with multiple lesions have been treated successfully during this period. The treatment log files have been uploaded and documented in the software which facilitated physics peer review of treatments per the standards in place by AAPM and ACR. Results: The program model was implemented successfully at multiple sites. The cloud based software allowed for proper peer review and compliance of the program at 10 clinical sites. Dosimtery was done on 800 patients and executed in a timely fashion to suit the clinical needs. Accumulated physics data in the software from the clinics allows for robust analysis and future development. Conclusion: Electronic brachytherapy implementation experience from a quality assurance perspective was greatly enhanced by using a cloud based software. The comprehensive database will pave the way for future developments to yield superior physics outcomes.

  17. Dose volume uniformity index: a simple tool for treatment plan evaluation in brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Prabhakar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In radiotherapy treatment planning, dose homogeneity inside the target volume plays a significant role in the final treatment outcome. Especially in brachytherapy where there is a steep dose gradient in the dose distribution inside the target volume, comparing the plans based on the dose homogeneity helps in assessing the high dose volume inside the final treatment plan. In brachytherapy, the dose inhomogeneity inside the target volume depends on many factors such as the type of sources, placement of these radioactive sources, distance between the applicators/implanttubes, dwell time of the source, etc. In this study, a simple index, the dose volume uniformity index (DVUI, has been proposed to study the dose homogeneity inside the target volume. This index gives the total dose volume inhomogeneity inside a given prescription isoline.Material and methods: To demonstrate the proposed DVUI in this study, a single plane implant (breast: 6 catheters, a double plane implant (breast: 9 catheters and a tongue implant (5 catheters were selected. The catheters were reconstructed from the CT image datasets in the Plato treatment planning system. The doses for the single, double and tongue implants were prescribed to the reference dose rate as per the Paris technique. DVUI was computed from the cumulative dose volume histogram.Results: For a volume receiving a uniform dose inside the prescription isoline, the DVUI is 1. Any value of DVUI > 1 shows the presence of a relatively high dose volume inside the prescription isoline. In addition to the concept of DVUI, a simple conformality index, the dose volume conformality index (DVCI, has also been proposed in this study based on the DVUI.Conclusion: The DVUI and the proposed DVCI in this study provide an easy way of comparing the rival plans in brachytherapy.

  18. System for radiation delivery applied to brachytherapy using a polymeric vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa Junior, Iorque L.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). PCA 1 - Anexo Engenharia]. E-mail: iorque@eng-nucl.mest.ufmg.br; campos@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    This work describes a system for radiation delivery applied to brachytherapy using radioactive macroaggregate produced by sol-gel route incorporating Samarium-153 loaded in a polymeric vehicle. The polymer Poly Vinyl Alcohol, PVA, was selected as vehicle. It presents high biocompatibility and is suitable for low temperature handling. The PVA is the water-soluble synthetic resin more produced in the world being used in several applications including controlled drugs delivery. The developed polymeric delivery system is presented as flexible flat surface with a load of macroaggregate in the form of micro seeds or dispersed dust. Such device fits in various brachytherapy applications, especially in interstitial or intracavitary implants and intraoperative radiation therapy. These systems provide mechanical sustainment for the radioactive macroaggregates in well defined spatial distribution improving the conformation of the absorbed dose in the organ or tumor and it can be set up during surgery quickly and safely, reducing the radiation exposition of the medical crew. The degradation time in physiological solution are presented. (author)

  19. Progress on system for applying simultaneous heat and brachytherapy to large-area surface disease (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Schlorff, Jaime L.; Juang, Titania; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Pouliot, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that thermal enhancement of radiation response increases substantially for higher thermal dose (approaching 100 CEM43) and when hyperthermia and radiation are delivered simultaneously. Unfortunately, equipment capable of delivering uniform doses of heat and radiation simultaneously has not been available to test the clinical potential of this approach. We present recent progress on the clinical implementation of a system that combines the uniform heating capabilities of flexible printed circuit board microwave array applicators with an array of brachytherapy catheters held a fixed distance from the skin for uniform radiation of tissue brachytherapy source. The system is based on the Combination Applicator which consists of an array of up to 32 Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) apertures driven at 915 MHz for heating tissue, coupled with an array of 1 cm spaced catheters for HDR therapy. Efforts to optimize the clinical interface and move from rectangular to more complex shape applicators that accommodate the entire disease in a larger number of patients are described. Improvements to the system for powering and controlling the applicator are also described. Radiation dosimetry and experimental performance results of a prototype 15 x 15 cm dual-purpose applicator demonstrate dose distributions with good homogeneity under large contoured surfaces typical of diffuse chestwall recurrence of breast carcinoma. Investigations of potential interaction between heat and brachytherapy components of a Combination Applicator demonstrate no perceptible perturbation of the heating field from an HDR source or leadwire, no perceptible effect of a scanning HDR source on fiberoptic thermometry, and <0.5% variation of radiation dose delivered through the CMA applicator. By applying heat and radiation simultaneously for maximum synergism of modalities, this dual therapy system should expand the number of patients that can benefit from effective

  20. SU-E-T-169: Characterization of Pacemaker/ICD Dose in SAVI HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalavagunta, C; Lasio, G; Yi, B; Zhou, J; Lin, M [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It is important to estimate dose to pacemaker (PM)/Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) before undertaking Accelerated Partial Breast Treatment using High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Kim et al. have reported HDR PM/ICD dose using a single-source balloon applicator. To the authors knowledge, there have so far not been any published PM/ICD dosimetry literature for the Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI, Cianna Medical, Aliso Viejo, CA). This study aims to fill this gap by generating a dose look up table (LUT) to predict maximum dose to the PM/ICD in SAVI HDR brachytherapy. Methods: CT scans for 3D dosimetric planning were acquired for four SAVI applicators (6−1-mini, 6−1, 8−1 and 10−1) expanded to their maximum diameter in air. The CT datasets were imported into the Elekta Oncentra TPS for planning and each applicator was digitized in a multiplanar reconstruction window. A dose of 340 cGy was prescribed to the surface of a 1 cm expansion of the SAVI applicator cavity. Cartesian coordinates of the digitized applicator were determined in the treatment leading to the generation of a dose distribution and corresponding distance-dose prediction look up table (LUT) for distances from 2 to 15 cm (6-mini) and 2 to 20 cm (10–1).The deviation between the LUT doses and the dose to the cardiac device in a clinical case was evaluated. Results: Distance-dose look up table were compared to clinical SAVI plan and the discrepancy between the max dose predicted by the LUT and the clinical plan was found to be in the range (−0.44%, 0.74%) of the prescription dose. Conclusion: The distance-dose look up tables for SAVI applicators can be used to estimate the maximum dose to the ICD/PM, with a potential usefulness for quick assessment of dose to the cardiac device prior to applicator placement.

  1. Applying gold nanoparticles as tumor-vascular disrupting agents during brachytherapy: estimation of endothelial dose enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I, E-mail: mmakrigiorgos@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics and Biophysics, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-11-07

    brachytherapy, with lower energy sources. Such ablative magnitude dose enhancement in a relatively small endothelial volume may rapidly disrupt or cause severe biological damage to tumor endothelial cells, without increased toxicity to healthy tissues not containing AuNPs. The findings provide significant impetus for considering the application of AuNPs as VDAs during brachytherapy.

  2. In vivo dose verification method in catheter based high dose rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaselskė, Evelina; Adlienė, Diana; Rudžianskas, Viktoras; Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Inčiūra, Arturas

    2017-12-01

    In vivo dosimetry is a powerful tool for dose verification in radiotherapy. Its application in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy is usually limited to the estimation of gross errors, due to inability of the dosimetry system/ method to record non-uniform dose distribution in steep dose gradient fields close to the radioactive source. In vivo dose verification in interstitial catheter based HDR brachytherapy is crucial since the treatment is performed inserting radioactive source at the certain positions within the catheters that are pre-implanted into the tumour. We propose in vivo dose verification method for this type of brachytherapy treatment which is based on the comparison between experimentally measured and theoretical dose values calculated at well-defined locations corresponding dosemeter positions in the catheter. Dose measurements were performed using TLD 100-H rods (6 mm long, 1 mm diameter) inserted in a certain sequences into additionally pre-implanted dosimetry catheter. The adjustment of dosemeter positioning in the catheter was performed using reconstructed CT scans of patient with pre-implanted catheters. Doses to three Head&Neck and one Breast cancer patient have been measured during several randomly selected treatment fractions. It was found that the average experimental dose error varied from 4.02% to 12.93% during independent in vivo dosimetry control measurements for selected Head&Neck cancer patients and from 7.17% to 8.63% - for Breast cancer patient. Average experimental dose error was below the AAPM recommended margin of 20% and did not exceed the measurement uncertainty of 17.87% estimated for this type of dosemeters. Tendency of slightly increasing average dose error was observed in every following treatment fraction of the same patient. It was linked to the changes of theoretically estimated dosemeter positions due to the possible patient's organ movement between different treatment fractions, since catheter reconstruction was

  3. Feasibility and full-course dosimetry of an intraoperatively placed multichannel brachytherapy catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stish, Bradley J; Pafundi, Deanna H; Hieken, Tina J; Whitaker, Thomas J; Furutani, Keith M; Jakub, James W; Boughey, Judy C; Degnim, Amy C; McLemore, Luke B; Mou, Benjamin; Mutter, Robert W; Park, Sean S

    Determine feasibility and resultant dosimetry of an intraoperatively placed multichannel intracavitary brachytherapy catheter for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Patients with breast cancer underwent intraoperative brachytherapy catheter placement based on frozen section analysis with immediate postoperative APBI. The planning target volume evaluation (PTVEval) and organs at risk were contoured on daily pretreatment CT scans for each patient, and the original treatment plan was applied to assess full-course dosimetry. Of the first 21 patients consented for intraoperative catheter placement, 20 (95%) were able to proceed with treatment as planned. The mean volume of PTVEval receiving 90% of prescription dose (V90%) and mean percentage of prescription dose to 90% of the PTVEval (D90%) on initial planning were 96.7 (±1.1%) and 100.2 (±2.1%), respectively. Full-course dose coverage remained excellent with a mean PTVEval V90% and D90% of 95.0 (±4.4%) and 100.2 (±9.6%), respectively. Mean full-course maximum dose constraints for chest wall and skin were met by 70% and 95% of patients, respectively. Air accumulation >1 cc during treatment increased the risk of a daily fraction with PTVEval coverage below goal (odds ratio, 9.8; p = 0.05), whereas those with applicators Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Validation and comparison of the two Kattan nomograms in patients with prostate cancer treated with (125) iodine brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan; German, Larissa; Chen, Juza; Matzkin, Haim; Mabjeesh, Nicola J

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Prognostic (cohort) Level of Evidence 2b What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Nomograms are based on large patient population. Their applicability should be externally validated. Among 747 brachytherapy patients we evaluated two Kattan nonograms and conclude that they have limited value to predict PSA-free survival. To validate and compare the preoperative and postoperative Kattan prediction nonograms for prostate cancer recurrence after brachytherapy. Patients (n= 747) treated with (125) I-brachytherapy were evaluated. Both nomograms were used to calculate the prediction of 5-year biochemical-freedom from failure (BFFF) based on clinical stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, receipt of androgen deprivation therapy and the post-implant dosimetry variable D90 (values of the minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume). The predicted values using the Kattan nomograms and the observed values were compared. Predictive accuracy was determined using the concordance index. The 5-year BFFF probability was 94% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92-96%) for the modified American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) definition and 97% (95% CI, 95-98%) for the Phoenix definition using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The predicted values of BFFF using both Kattan nomograms were lower than the observed rates in our cohort. The concordance index values were 0.51 and 0.52 for preoperative and postoperative nomograms, respectively. Concordance correlation coefficient between the two nomograms was 0.15. In our population, the 5-year BFFF outcomes rates were superior to nomogram predictions. Neither nomogram predicted outcomes after (125) I-brachytherapy in this non-US cohort. The postoperative nomogram was also a poor predictor, although it included D90 dosimetry values, as a variable of treatment quality. Strict inclusion criteria, perhaps more favourable than the ones on which the Kattan nomograms were based, could be the

  5. Radioactive seed migration following parotid gland interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yi; Huang, Ming-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jiao; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the incidence and associated factors of pulmonary seed migration after parotid brachytherapy using a novel migrated seed detection technique. Patients diagnosed with parotid cancer who underwent permanent parotid brachytherapy from January 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Head and neck CT scans and chest X-rays were evaluated during routine follow-up. Mimics software and Geomagic Studio software were used for seed reconstruction and migrated seed detection from the original implanted region, respectively. Postimplant dosimetry analysis was performed after seeds migration if the seeds were still in their emitting count. Adverse clinical sequelae from seed embolization to the lung were documented. The radioactive seed implants were identified on chest X-rays in 6 patients. The incidence rate of seed migration in 321 parotid brachytherapy patients was 1.87% (6/321) and that of individual seed migration was 0.04% (6/15218 seeds). All migrated seeds were originally from the retromandibular region. No adverse dosimetric consequences were found in the target region. Pulmonary symptoms were not reported by any patient in this study. In our patient set, migration of radioactive seeds with an initial radioactivity of 0.6-0.7 mCi to the chest following parotid brachytherapy was rare. Late migration of a single seed from the central target region did not affect the dosimetry significantly, and patients did not have severe short-term complications. This study proposed a novel technique to localize the anatomical origin of the migrated seeds during brachytherapy. Our evidence suggested that placement of seeds adjacent to blood vessels was associated with an increased likelihood of seed migration to the lungs. Copyright © 2017 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois [Ecole polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie informatique et genie logiciel, 2500 chemin de Polytechnique, Montreal, QC, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de radio-oncologie, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, QC, G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de physique, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada) and Departement de radio-oncologie and Centre de recherche du CHUM, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Montreal, QC, H2L 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  7. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  8. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  9. Lead-oriented synthesis: Investigation of organolithium-mediated routes to 3-D scaffolds and 3-D shape analysis of a virtual lead-like library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüthy, Monique; Wheldon, Mary C; Haji-Cheteh, Chehasnah; Atobe, Masakazu; Bond, Paul S; O'Brien, Peter; Hubbard, Roderick E; Fairlamb, Ian J S

    2015-06-01

    Synthetic routes to six 3-D scaffolds containing piperazine, pyrrolidine and piperidine cores have been developed. The synthetic methodology focused on the use of N-Boc α-lithiation-trapping chemistry. Notably, suitably protected and/or functionalised medicinal chemistry building blocks were synthesised via concise, connective methodology. This represents a rare example of lead-oriented synthesis. A virtual library of 190 compounds was then enumerated from the six scaffolds. Of these, 92 compounds (48%) fit the lead-like criteria of: (i) -1⩽AlogP⩽3; (ii) 14⩽number of heavy atoms⩽26; (iii) total polar surface area⩾50Å(2). The 3-D shapes of the 190 compounds were analysed using a triangular plot of normalised principal moments of inertia (PMI). From this, 46 compounds were identified which had lead-like properties and possessed 3-D shapes in under-represented areas of pharmaceutical space. Thus, the PMI analysis of the 190 member virtual library showed that whilst scaffolds which may appear on paper to be 3-D in shape, only 24% of the compounds actually had 3-D structures in the more interesting areas of 3-D drug space. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurements using stereo-digital image correlation and a single color high-speed camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Pan, Bing

    2017-08-01

    Full-frame, high-speed 3D shape and deformation measurement using stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) technique and a single high-speed color camera is proposed. With the aid of a skillfully designed pseudo stereo-imaging apparatus, color images of a test object surface, composed of blue and red channel images from two different optical paths, are recorded by a high-speed color CMOS camera. The recorded color images can be separated into red and blue channel sub-images using a simple but effective color crosstalk correction method. These separated blue and red channel sub-images are processed by regular stereo-DIC method to retrieve full-field 3D shape and deformation on the test object surface. Compared with existing two-camera high-speed stereo-DIC or four-mirror-adapter-assisted singe-camera high-speed stereo-DIC, the proposed single-camera high-speed stereo-DIC technique offers prominent advantages of full-frame measurements using a single high-speed camera but without sacrificing its spatial resolution. Two real experiments, including shape measurement of a curved surface and vibration measurement of a Chinese double-side drum, demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed technique.

  11. 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL: Hardware and Software Solution for Integrated Digitization of 3D Shape, Multispectral Color and BRDF for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sitnik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a new 3D measurement system along with the study on 3D printing technology is presented from the perspective of quality of reproduction. In the first part of the paper the 3DMADMAC|SPECTRAL system which integrates 3D shape with additional color and angular reflectance measurement capabilities is presented (see Figure 1. The shape measurement system is based on structured light projection with the use of a DLP projector. The 3D shape measurement method is based on sinusoidal fringes and Gray codes projection. Color is being measured using multispectral images with a set of interference filters to separate spectral channels. Additionally the set up includes an array of compact light sources for measuring angular reflectance based on image analysis and 3D data processing. All three components of the integrated system use the same greyscale camera as a detector. The purpose of the system is to obtain complete information about shape, color and reflectance characteristic of mea sured surface, especially for cultural heritage objects - in order to create high quality 3D documentation. In the second part of the paper the 3D printing technology will be tested on real measured cultural heritage objects. Tests allow to assess measurement and color accuracy of reproduction by selected 3D printing technology and shed some light on how current 3D printing technology can be applied into cultural heritage.

  12. Endoluminal brachytherapy for recurrent laryngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, M.M. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, (Australia). Dept of Radiotherapy; Smart, G.P.; Hedland-Thomas, B. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA, (Australia). Dept of Medical Physics; Harper, C.S. [Royal Perth Hospital, WA (Australia). Radiation Oncology Centre

    1997-11-01

    Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx is usually treated with local field radiotherapy. Surgery is used for salvage following recurrence. Further recurrences present a more difficult therapeutic problem which requires individualized management. The aims of local control, survival, maintenance of function and minimizing side effects all need to be balanced according to the site and extent of disease. The present case study looks at the management of a 54-year-old man with multiple recurrences from a squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx. It describes a technique of endoluminal brachytherapy using an iridium-192 wire spiraled around the outer part of a tracheotomy tube that achieves good local control while enabling self-insertion and self-cleaning during the procedure. The dose given was 2500 cGy at 5 mm over 25.2 h and was achieved with minimal early or delayed side effects. The patient had no further symptoms relating to the stomal recurrence until his death from metastatic disease 6 months later. (authors). 8 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Evaluation of minimally invasive excisional brain biopsy and intracranial brachytherapy catheter placement in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Rebecca A; Freeman, Lynetta J; Miller, Margaret A; Fauber, Amy E; Morrison, Wallace B

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate a technique for minimally invasive excisional brain biopsy and intracranial brachytherapy catheter placement in dogs. 5 healthy adult female dogs. Computed tomographic guidance was used to plan a biopsy trajectory to a selected area of brain with reference to a localizer grid. The procedure was performed through a 1-cm skin incision and 6-mm burr hole by use of a 9-gauge biopsy device. Five cylindrical samples (3 to 4 mm in diameter and 7 to 12 mm in length) were removed over 5 cycles of the vacuum-assisted tissue excision system, leaving approximately a 2-cm³ resection cavity. A balloon-tipped intracranial brachytherapy catheter was placed through the burr hole into the resection cavity, expanded with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, and explanted 7 days later. 4 of 5 dogs survived the procedure. The fifth died because of iatrogenic brain damage. Neurologic deficits were unilateral and focal. Twenty-four hours after surgery, all surviving dogs were ambulatory, 2 dogs exhibited ipsiversive circling, 4 had contralateral proprioceptive deficits, 3 had contralateral menace response deficits, 2 had a reduced contralateral response to noxious nasal stimulation, and 1 had dull mentation with intermittent horizontal nystagmus and ventrolateral strabismus. Neurologic status improved throughout the study period. Histologic quality of biopsy specimens was excellent. This technique enabled histologic diagnosis from high-quality biopsy specimens obtained through a minimally invasive technique and has potential applications for multimodal treatment of deep brain tumors in dogs.

  14. A dose verification method for high-dose-rate brachytherapy treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sharma, S D; Vijaykumar, C; Deshpande, Sudesh; Sharma, P K; Vandana, S; Philomena, A; Chilkulwar, Ravi H

    2008-01-01

    To evolve a fast dose verification method for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment plans and to demonstrate its applicability in different clinical cases. We developed a software tool in VC++ for the Varisource HDR unit for HDR dosimetry plan verification using TG-43 parameters. HDR treatment dosimetry of a number clinical cases using Varisource was verified by comparison with the treatment planning system (TPS). A number of different types of clinical cases treated by Varisource were evaluated. TPS calculated dose values and verification code calculated dose values were found to agree to within 3% for most of the dose calculation points. We have validated with clinical cases a fast and independent dose verification method of the dosimetry at selected points for HDR brachytherapy treatments plan using TG-43 parameters. This can be used for the verification of the TPS calculated dose at various points. The code is written to work with Varisource, but it can conceivably be modified for other sources also by using the fitted constant of the respective source.

  15. The drag and terminal velocity of volcanic ash and lapilli with 3D shape obtained by X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Mele, Daniela; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Dürig, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    New experiments of falling volcanic particles were performed in order to define drag and terminal velocity models applicable in a wide range of Reynolds number Re. Experiments were carried out with fluids of various viscosities and with particles that cover a wide range of size, density and shape. Particle shape, which strongly influences fluid drag, was measured in 3D by High-resolution X-ray microtomography, by which sphericity and fractal dimension were obtained, the latter used for quantifying the aerodynamic drag of irregular particles for the first time. With this method, the measure of particle shape descriptors proved to be easier and less operator dependent than previously used 2D image particle analyses. Drag laws that make use of the new 3D parameters were obtained by fitting particle data to the experiments, and single-equation terminal velocity models were derived. They work well both at high and low Re (3x10-2 scientists to model particle transportation of explosive eruptions. Some volcanological application examples are finally presented.

  16. Spinal anaesthesia for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting and subjects: Forty female patients, presenting to Groote Schuur Hospital for brachytherapy for carcinoma of the cervix, were randomised to receive either 5 mg or 9 mg (1 ml or 1.8 ml) of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, plus 15 μg fentanyl via the L3/L4 interspace. Results: Patients receiving the lower dose could be ...

  17. Electromagnetic tracking for treatment verification in interstitial brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bert, Christoph; Kellermeier, Markus; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic tracking (EMT) is used in several medical fields to determine the position and orientation of dedicated sensors, e.g., attached to surgical tools. Recently, EMT has been introduced to brachytherapy for implant reconstruction and error detection. The manuscript briefly summarizes...

  18. Factors influencing outcome of I-125 prostate cancer brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinnen, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Brachytherapy is becoming an increasingly popular prostate cancer treatment, probably due to the specific advantages of the procedure, such as the minimal invasiveness and the lower chance of impotence and incontinence. Nonetheless, because of the long follow-up that is required to obtain prostate

  19. Calculation of the Transit Dose in HDR Brachytherapy Based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Monte Carlo method, which is the gold standard for accurate dose calculations in radiotherapy, was used to obtain the transit doses around a high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant with thirteen dwell points. The midpoints of each of the inter-dwell separations, of step size 0.25 cm, were representative of the ...

  20. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Rosenfeld, A.; Beddar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD...

  1. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  2. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Grace L; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A; Smith, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast brachytherapy after lumpectomy is controversial in younger patients, as effectiveness is unclear and selection criteria are debated. Methods Using MarketScan® healthcare claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (ages 18–64), treated from 2003–2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3,134) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups, based on age (Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: In patients Agebrachytherapy patients were Agebrachytherapy patients were Endocrine- vs. 44% of WBI patients (P=0.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Agebrachytherapy vs. 9.0% after WBI (Hazard ratio[HR]=2.18, 1.37–3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs. 4.9%; HR=1.76, 1.26–2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Agebrachytherapy vs. WBI and therefore may be useful for selecting appropriate younger brachytherapy candidates. PMID:26279027

  3. A Scintillating Fiber Dosimeter for Radiology and Brachytherapy with photodiode readout

    CERN Document Server

    Rêgo, Florbela; Abreu, Maria da Conceição

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: For more than a decade that plastic optical fiber based dosimeters have been developed for medical applications. The feasibility of dosimeters using optical fibers that are almost Cherenkov light free has been demonstrated in some prototypes, particularly suitable for photon high-energy beams. In the energy range up to a few hundred keV, where the production of Cherenkov light by secondary electrons is negligible or small, the largest source of background are the fluorescence mechanisms. Methods: In recent years our group has developed an optical fiber dosimeter with photodiode readout named DosFib, which has small energy dependence in the range below 100 keV relevant for radiology. Photodiodes are robust photodetectors, presenting good stability over time and enough sensitivity to allow the use of an electrometer as a measuring device without extra electronics. Results: In-vitro tests using a High Dose Rate 192Ir source have demonstrated its suitability for brachytherapy applications using this impo...

  4. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  5. The American College of Radiology and the American Brachytherapy Society practice parameter for the performance of low-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Erickson, Beth A; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Small, William; Eifel, Patricia J

    Brachytherapy is the use of radionuclides to treat malignancies or benign conditions by means of a radiation source placed close to or into the tumor or treatment site. This practice parameter refers only to the use of radionuclide brachytherapy. Brachytherapy alone or combined with external beam therapy plays an important role in the management and treatment of patients with cancer. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has traditionally been used for treating prostate, head and neck, breast, cervical, and endometrial cancers as well as obstructive bile duct, esophageal, or bronchial lesions. It has been practiced for over a century with a variety of sources including radium-226, cesium-137, and, more recently, iridium- 192, iodine-125, and palladium-103. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy can be given as interstitial, intracavitary, intraluminal, and/or plesiotherapy to a wide variety of treatment sites. This practice parameter addresses sealed sources as they are used for LDR brachytherapy. It is recognized that unsealed sources (e.g., yttrium-90) are also a form of LDR brachytherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society and American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  7. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  8. Dose optimisation in single plane interstitial brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Honoré, Henriette Benedicte; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Olsen, Dag Rune; Grau, Cai; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2006-10-01

    Brachytherapy dose distributions can be optimised by modulation of source dwell times. In this study dose optimisation in single planar interstitial implants was evaluated in order to quantify the potential benefit in patients. In 14 patients, treated for recurrent rectal and cervical cancer, flexible catheters were sutured intra-operatively to the tumour bed in areas with compromised surgical margin. Both non-optimised, geometrically and graphically optimised CT -based dose plans were made. The overdose index (OI), homogeneity index (HI), conformal index (COIN), minimum target dose, and high dose volumes were evaluated. The dependence of OI, HI, and COIN on target volume and implant regularity was evaluated. In addition, 12 theoretical implant configurations were analyzed. Geometrical and graphical optimisation improved the dose plans significantly with graphical optimisation being superior. Graphically optimised dose plans showed a significant decrease of 18%+/-9% in high dose volume (p<0.001). HI, COIN, and OI were significantly improved from 0.50+/-0.05 to 0.60+/-0.05, from 0.65+/-0.04 to 0.71+/-0.04, and from 0.19+/-0.03 to 0.15+/-0.03, respectively (p<0.001 for all). Moreover, minimum target dose increased significantly from 71%+/-5% to 80%+/-5% (p<0.001). The improvement in OI and HI obtained by optimisation depended on the regularity of the implant, such that the benefit of optimisation was larger for irregular implants. OI and HI correlated strongly with target volume limiting the usability of these parameters for comparison of dose plans between patients. Dwell time optimisation significantly improved the dose distribution regarding homogeneity, conformity, minimum target dose, and size of high dose volumes. Graphical optimisation is fast, reproducible and superior to geometric optimisation.

  9. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Cisek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods : The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR bra­chytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy. Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results: Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90 was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2 median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months, 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher. Conclusions : Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy.

  10. Surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kim; Sneed, Penny K; Kunwar, Sandeep; Kragten, Annemarie; Larson, David A; Berger, Mitchel S; Chan, Albert; Pouliot, Jean; McDermott, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of surgical resection and permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy without adjuvant whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Forty patients were treated with permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy at the time of resection of brain metastases from 1997 to 2003. Actuarial freedom from progression (FFP) and survival were measured from the date of surgery and estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with censoring at last imaging for FFP endpoints. The median survival was 11.3 months overall, 12.0 months in 19 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases and 7.3 months in 21 patients with recurrent brain metastases. Twenty-two patients (55%) remained free of progression of brain metastases, three failed at the resection cavity (including one with leptomeningeal dissemination), two failed with leptomeningeal spread only, and 13 failed elsewhere in the brain including two who also had leptomeningeal disease. The 1-year resection cavity FFP probabilities were 92%, 86% and 88%; and brain FFP probabilities were 29%, 43% and 37% for the newly diagnosed, recurrent and all patients, respectively. Symptomatic necrosis developed 7.4-40.0 months (median, 19.5 months) after brachytherapy in 9 patients (23%), confirmed by resection in 6 patients. Excellent local control was achieved using permanent iodine-125 brachytherapy for brain metastasis resection cavities, although there is a high risk of radiation necrosis over time. These data support consideration of permanent brachytherapy without adjuvant WBRT as a treatment option in patients with symptomatic or large newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases.

  11. A study on the variation of bladder and rectal doses with respiration in intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Karuna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In cervical intracavitary brachytherapy, it is mandatory to evaluate if the doses to bladder and rectum are within tolerance limits. In this study, an effort has been made to evaluate the effect of respiration on the doses to bladder and rectum in patients undergoing brachytherapy.Material and methods: Fifteen patients with cervix cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation followed by intracavitary brachytherapy were included in this study. At the time of brachytherapy, all patients underwent 4D computed tomography (CT imaging. Five out of fifteen patients were scanned with empty bladder while the rest had full bladder during sectional imaging. Four sets of pelvic CT image datasets with applicators in place were acquired at equal interval in a complete respiratory cycle. Treatment plans were generated for all the CT datasets on a PlatoTM Sunrise planning system. A dose of 7 Gy was prescribed to Point A. Doses to ICRU (Report No.38 bladder (IBRP and rectal (IRRP reference points were calculated in all the CT datasets.Results: The mean of maximum dose to IBRP at four different respiratory phases for full and empty bladder were 53.38 ± 19.20%, 55.75 ± 16.71%, 56.13 ± 17.70%, 57.50 ± 17.48% and 60.93 ± 15.18%, 60.29 ± 16.28%, 60.86 ± 15.90%, 60.82 ± 15.42% of the prescribed dose respectively. Similarly, maximum dose to IRRP for full and empty bladder were 55.50 ± 18.66%, 57.38 ± 14.81%, 58.00 ± 14.97%, 58.38 ± 17.28% and 71.96 ± 6.90%, 71.58 ± 7.52%, 68.92 ± 6.21%, 71.45 ± 7.16% respectively.Conclusions: Our study shows that respiration affects the dose distribution to the bladder and rectum in intracavitary brachytherapy of cervix cancer. It is advisable to reduce the critical organ dose to account for the dose variation introduced by respiratory motion.

  12. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Magee-Womens Hospital of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI

  13. The Fountain of Age: A Remarkable 3D Shape that Portrays Health and Functional Differences among the European Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef van Buuren

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are very few norms to evaluate and monitor the health and functioning of the elderly. This paper proposes a compact spatial representation of 25 health measurements of European citizens older than 50 years. Data from 44,285 unique individuals were obtained from the EU-wide Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe(SHARE data collected in 2004–2007 and were analyzed by homogeneity analysis, a form of non-linear principal components analysis. The resulting configuration of persons shows a remarkable three-dimensional shape that resembles a fountain. The three components explain 13.7, 5.8 and 4.6 percent of the total variation, respectively. Component 1 is driven by age and by the disabilities that come with old age. Component 2 portrays differences in health that are independent of age, with the high scores in relatively good health, given age. Component 3 distinguishes specific types of functional decline from general complaints that impact on daily life. The shape suggests that the elderly keep on maturing as they grow older, actually becoming more diverse as a group. We show how the solution may be used to develop and support profiles for the elderly. Another potential application is to track the individual development of the elderly, thereby objectifying personalized medicine.

  14. Real-time microscopic 3D shape measurement based on optimized pulse-width-modulation binary fringe projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian; Feng, Shijie; Tao, Tianyang; Li, Hui; Zuo, Chao

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in 3D measurement techniques, contributing to the realization of faster and more accurate 3D measurement. As a representative of these techniques, fringe projection profilometry (FPP) has become a commonly used method for real-time 3D measurement, such as real-time quality control and online inspection. To date, most related research has been concerned with macroscopic 3D measurement, but microscopic 3D measurement, especially real-time microscopic 3D measurement, is rarely reported. However, microscopic 3D measurement plays an important role in 3D metrology and is indispensable in some applications in measuring micro scale objects like the accurate metrology of MEMS components of the final devices to ensure their proper performance. In this paper, we proposed a method which effectively combines optimized binary structured patterns with a number-theoretical phase unwrapping algorithm to realize real-time microscopic 3D measurement. A slight defocusing of our optimized binary patterns can considerably alleviate the measurement error based on four-step phase-shifting FPP, providing the binary patterns with a comparable performance to ideal sinusoidal patterns. The static measurement accuracy can reach 8 μm, and the experimental results of a vibrating earphone diaphragm reveal that our system can successfully realize real-time 3D measurement of 120 frames per second (FPS) with a measurement range of 8~\\text{mm}× 6~\\text{mm} in lateral and 8 mm in depth.

  15. All fiber-optic ultra-sensitive temperature sensor using few-layer MoS2 coated D-shaped fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, J.; Velmurugan, V.; Sathiyan, S.; Sivabalan, S.

    2018-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel all fiber-optic temperature sensor using Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets coated D-shaped fiber (DSF). The DSF exhibits a strong evanescent field interaction with the MoS2 nanosheets which in turn has good optical absorption that results in very high sensitivity. In addition, a few layer MoS2 exhibit high thermal conductivity and therefore highly suitable for temperature sensing. The proposed all fiber temperature sensor was investigated in the temperature range of 26 °C - 83 °C and achieved a maximum optical output power variation of 7 dB. Further, the experimental results show an ultrahigh sensitivity of 0.1211 dB/∘C, a linear correlation coefficient of 99.6 % and a better precision of 0.04 °C. Therefore, the proposed fiber-optic sensor is capable of measuring dynamic temperatures in a harsh environment.

  16. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  17. Dynamic 3D shape of the plantar surface of the foot using coded structured light: a technical report

    KAUST Repository

    Thabet, Ali Kassem

    2014-01-23

    Background The foot provides a crucial contribution to the balance and stability of the musculoskeletal system, and accurate foot measurements are important in applications such as designing custom insoles/footwear. With better understanding of the dynamic behavior of the foot, dynamic foot reconstruction techniques are surfacing as useful ways to properly measure the shape of the foot. This paper presents a novel design and implementation of a structured-light prototype system providing dense three dimensional (3D) measurements of the foot in motion. The input to the system is a video sequence of a foot during a single step; the output is a 3D reconstruction of the plantar surface of the foot for each frame of the input. Methods Engineering and clinical tests were carried out to test the accuracy and repeatability of the system. Accuracy experiments involved imaging a planar surface from different orientations and elevations and measuring the fitting errors of the data to a plane. Repeatability experiments were done using reconstructions from 27 different subjects, where for each one both right and left feet were reconstructed in static and dynamic conditions over two different days. Results The static accuracy of the system was found to be 0.3 mm with planar test objects. In tests with real feet, the system proved repeatable, with reconstruction differences between trials one week apart averaging 2.4 mm (static case) and 2.8 mm (dynamic case). Conclusion The results obtained in the experiments show positive accuracy and repeatability results when compared to current literature. The design also shows to be superior to the systems available in the literature in several factors. Further studies need to be done to quantify the reliability of the system in clinical environments.

  18. Manifestation pattern of early-late vaginal morbidity after definitive radiation (chemo)therapy and image-guided adaptive brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: an analysis from the EMBRACE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Nout, Remi A.; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Westerveld, Henrike; Haie-Meder, Christine; Petrič, Primož; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer has changed substantially because of the introduction of combined intracavitary/interstitial applicators and an adaptive target concept, which is the focus of the prospective, multi-institutional EMBRACE study (www.embracestudy.dk)

  19. Implementation of the technique of partial irradiation accelerated the breast with high doses (HDR) brachytherapy; Puesta en marcha de la tecnica de irradiacion parcial acelerada de la mama con braquterapia de alta tasa de dosis (HDR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Pardo Perez, E.; Castro Novais, J.; Martinez Ortega, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Cerro Penalver, E. del

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is presents procedure carried out in our Centre for the implementation of the accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI, accelerated partial-breast irradiation) with high-rate brachytherapy (HDR), using plastic tubes as applicators. Carried out measures, the evaluation of the dosimetric parameters analyzing and presenting the results. (Author)

  20. Time-resolved in vivo luminescence dosimetry for online error detection in pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Claus E; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate a dose-verification protocol for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy based on in vivo time-resolved (1 s time resolution) fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry. Five cervix cancer patients undergoing PDR brachytherapy (Varian GammaMed Plus with 192Ir) were monitored. The treatments comprised from 10 to 50 pulses (1 pulse/h) delivered by intracavitary/interstitial applicators (tandem-ring systems and/or needles). For each patient, one or two dosimetry probes were placed directly in or close to the tumor region using stainless steel or titanium needles. Each dosimeter probe consisted of a small aluminum oxide crystal attached to an optical fiber cable (1 mm outer diameter) that could guide radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from the crystal to special readout instrumentation. Positioning uncertainty and hypothetical dose-delivery errors (interchanged guide tubes or applicator movements from +/-5 to +/-15 mm) were simulated in software in order to assess the ability of the system to detect errors. For three of the patients, the authors found no significant differences (P>0.01) for comparisons between in vivo measurements and calculated reference values at the level of dose per dwell position, dose per applicator, or total dose per pulse. The standard deviations of the dose per pulse were less than 3%, indicating a stable dose delivery and a highly stable geometry of applicators and dosimeter probes during the treatments. For the two other patients, the authors noted significant deviations for three individual pulses and for one dosimeter probe. These deviations could have been due to applicator movement during the treatment and one incorrectly positioned dosimeter probe, respectively. Computer simulations showed that the likelihood of detecting a pair of interchanged guide tubes increased by a factor of 10 or more for the considered patients when going from integrating to time

  1. Time-resolved in vivo luminescence dosimetry for online error detection in pulsed dose-rate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Claus E.; Nielsen, Soeren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Tanderup, Kari [Radiation Research Division, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present and evaluate a dose-verification protocol for pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy based on in vivo time-resolved (1 s time resolution) fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry. Methods: Five cervix cancer patients undergoing PDR brachytherapy (Varian GammaMed Plus with {sup 192}Ir) were monitored. The treatments comprised from 10 to 50 pulses (1 pulse/h) delivered by intracavitary/interstitial applicators (tandem-ring systems and/or needles). For each patient, one or two dosimetry probes were placed directly in or close to the tumor region using stainless steel or titanium needles. Each dosimeter probe consisted of a small aluminum oxide crystal attached to an optical fiber cable (1 mm outer diameter) that could guide radioluminescence (RL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) from the crystal to special readout instrumentation. Positioning uncertainty and hypothetical dose-delivery errors (interchanged guide tubes or applicator movements from {+-}5 to {+-}15 mm) were simulated in software in order to assess the ability of the system to detect errors. Results: For three of the patients, the authors found no significant differences (P>0.01) for comparisons between in vivo measurements and calculated reference values at the level of dose per dwell position, dose per applicator, or total dose per pulse. The standard deviations of the dose per pulse were less than 3%, indicating a stable dose delivery and a highly stable geometry of applicators and dosimeter probes during the treatments. For the two other patients, the authors noted significant deviations for three individual pulses and for one dosimeter probe. These deviations could have been due to applicator movement during the treatment and one incorrectly positioned dosimeter probe, respectively. Computer simulations showed that the likelihood of detecting a pair of interchanged guide tubes increased by a factor of 10 or more for the considered patients when

  2. Electronic brachytherapy as adjuvant therapy for early stage breast cancer: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C Dooley

    2011-01-01

    or more risk factors for breast cancer (80.6%. Tumor sizes were 0.1 cm to 3.5 cm (mean 1.3 cm. Median follow-up was 7 months (1 to 18 months post-EBT. Balloon applicators were implanted 0 to 85 days (mean 13.4 days post-lumpectomy/re-excision. The most common adverse events were erythema, rash dermatitis, and pain or breast tenderness. No recurrences were reported. Dosimetric analyses demonstrated comparable target coverage, increased high-dose regions, and a significantly reduced dose to the ipsilateral breast and lungs as well as the heart with EBT as compared with the iridium-192 treatment plans.Conclusion: This retrospective, multicenter study showed that postsurgical adjuvant radiation therapy for early stage breast cancer can be administered using the EBT system with similar toxicity outcomes to those reported with iridium-192 brachytherapy. EBT offers a convenient, portable, nonisotope alternative to HDR brachytherapy using iridium-192.Keywords: electronic brachytherapy, breast cancer, radiation therapy

  3. Advantages of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy in treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokov, A. A.; Vanina, E. A.; Tseluyko, S. S.

    2017-09-01

    One of the modern methods of preserving organs radiation treatment is brachytherapy. This article analyzes the results of prostate brachytherapy. These studies of the advantages of high dose brachytherapy lead to the conclusion that this method of radiation treatment for prostate cancer has a favorable advantage in comparison with remote sensing methods, and is competitive, preserving organs in comparison to surgical methods of treatment. The use of the method of polyfocal transperineal biopsy during the brachytherapy session provides information on the volumetric spread of prostate cancer and adjust the dosimetry plan taking into account the obtained data.

  4. The usefulness of fleet rectal enemas on high-dose-rate intracavitary cervical cancer brachytherapy. A prospective trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Andres

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effects of rectal enemas on rectal doses during radical high-dose-rate (HDR intracavitary cervical brachytherapy (BT. Material and methods : Twenty patients suffering from cervical cancer and treated with external beam radiotherapy and HDR-BT were included in a prospective trial. The first brachytherapy fraction was considered the basal status, and patients were instructed to self-administer two rectal cleansing enemas before the second fraction. Dose-volume histogram (DVH values were generated for the rectum and correlated with rectal volume variation. Brachytherapy was carried out with a Fletcher or Utrecht applicator. Results : No significant rectal volume differences were observed between fractions with or without rectal enemas (without, 52.64 ± 15.92 cc; with, 53.16 ± 19.28 cc. There was a significant correlation between both rectal volumes (r = 0.722, p = 0.001. No significant differences were observed in analyzed DVH parameters (median values: ΔD 0.1cc , 4.17 vs. 3.61 Gy; ΔD 1cc , 3.23 vs. 2.87 Gy; Δ D2cc , 2.9 vs. 2.54 Gy; ΔD 5cc , 2.35 vs. 2.05 Gy, for no enema and enema fraction, respectively. No significant rectal volume differences nor DVH parameter differences were observed according the applicator type. Conclusions : Our rectal enemas protocol prior to HDR-BT was ineffective in significantly modifying rectal DVH parameters. No differences were observed according to the type of applicator used.

  5. SU-C-16A-03: Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for HDR Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D; Webster, M; Scanderbeg, D; Yashar, C; Choi, D; Song, B; Song, W [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Devic, S [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ravi, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new Directional Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) intra-uterine tandem using various 192-Ir after-loaders. Methods: Dose distributions from the 192-Ir sources were modulated using a 6.3mm diameter tungsten shield (18.0g/cm3). The source moved along 6 longitudinal grooves, each 1.3mm in diameter, evenly spaced along periphery of the shield, The tungsten rod was enclosqed by 0.5mm thick Delrin (1.41g/cc). Monte Carlo N particle (MCNPX) was used to calculate dose distributions. 51million particles were calculated on 504 cores of a supercomputer. Fifteen different patients originally treated with a traditional tandem-and-ovoid applicator, with 5 fractions each, (15 patients X 5 fxs = 75 plans) were re-planned with the DMBT applicator combined with traditional ovoids, on an in-house developed HDR brachytherapy planning platform, which used intensity modulated planning capabilities using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. For all plans the prescription dose was 6 Gy and they were normalized to match the clinical treated V100. Results: Generally, the DMBT plan quality was a remarkable improvement from conventional T and O plans because of the anisotropic dose distribution of DMBT. The largest difference was to the bladder which had a 0.59±0.87 Gy (8.5±28.7%) reduction in dose. This was because of the the horseshoe shape (U-shape) of the bladder. The dose reduction to rectum and sigmoid were 0.48±0.55 Gy (21.1±27.2%) and 0.10±0.38 Gy (40.6±214.9%), respectively. The D90 to the HRCTV was 6.55±0.96 Gy (conventional T and O) and 6.59±1.06 Gy (DMBT). Conclusion: For image guided adaptive brachytherapy, greater flexibility of radiation intensity is essential and DMBT can be the solution.

  6. Biliary Interventions: Tools and Techniques of the Trade, Access, Cholangiography, Biopsy, Cholangioscopy, Cholangioplasty, Stenting, Stone Extraction, and Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Osman; Mathevosian, Sipan; Arslan, Bulent

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic access to the biliary system is generally limited to endoscopic or percutaneous approaches. A variety of percutaneous transhepatic biliary interventions are applicable for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary system pathologies, the majority of which may be performed in conjunction with one another. The backbone of nearly all of these interventions is percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography for opacification of the biliary tree, after which any number of therapeutic or diagnostic modalities may be pursued. We describe an overview of the instrumentation and technical approaches for several fundamental interventional procedures, including percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and internal/external biliary drainage, endobiliary biopsy techniques, cholangioscopy, cholangioplasty and biliary stenting, biliary stone extraction, and intraluminal brachytherapy.

  7. Dose verification in HDR brachytherapy and IMRT with Fricke gel-layer dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Negri, A.; Bartesaghi, G.; Pirola, L. [Department of Physics, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Italy (Italy); Carrara, M.; Gambini, I.; Tomatis, S.; Fallai, C.; Zonca, G. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy (Italy); Stokucova, J. [Faculty Hospital Na Bulovce, Prague, Czech Republic (Czech Republic)

    2009-10-15

    At the Department of Physics of the Universita degli Studi di Milano in collaboration with the Medical Physics Unit and the Radiotherapy Unit of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori di Milano the research of a dosimetric technique based on Fricke gel layers and optical analysis in under study. In fact, Fricke gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) have various advantages such as the tissue-equivalence for photons in the clinical energy interval, the possibility to obtain the spatial information about continuous dose distribution and not only a point dose distribution as it is for example in the case of ionization chambers, TLD or diodes and the possibility to obtain the information about 3D dose distributions. In this work, specific applications of FGLD to absolute dosimetry in radiotherapy have been studied, i.e. in-phantom measurements of complex intensity modulated radiation therapy fields (IMRT) and complex brachytherapy fields. (Author)

  8. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.2067 Section 35.2067 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources... of the semi-annual physical inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources required by § 35.67...

  9. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy with combined intracavitary and interstitial technique improves the therapeutic ratio in locally advanced cervical cancer: Analysis from the retroEMBRACE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokdal, Lars; Sturdza, Alina; Mazeron, Renaud; Haie-Meder, Christine; Tan, Li Tee; Gillham, Charles; Šegedin, Barbara; Jürgenliemk-Schultz, Ina; Kirisits, Christian; Hoskin, Peter; Pötter, Richard; Lindegaard, Jacob C; Tanderup, Kari

    2016-09-01

    Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) using intracavitary applicators (IC) has led to a significant improvement of local control in locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Further improvement has been obtained with combined intracavitary/interstitial (IC/IS) applicators. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the impact on local control and late morbidity of application of combined IS/IC brachytherapy in a large multicentre population. 610 patients with LACC from the retroEMBRACE study were included. Patients were divided into an IC group (N=310) and an IC/IS group (N=300). The IC/IS group was defined from the time point, when a centre performed IC/IS brachytherapy in more than 20% of cases. With systematic usage of IC/IS the D90 of CTV HR increased from 83±14Gy to 92±13Gy (p<0.01). No difference in doses to organs at risk was found. The 3-year local control rate in patients having a CTV HR volume⩾30cm 3 was 10% higher (p=0.02) in the IC/IS group. No difference was found for CTV HR <30cm 3 (p=0.50). No significant difference in late morbidity was found between the IC/IS group and IC group. Combined IC/IS brachytherapy improves the therapeutic ratio in LACC by enabling a tumour specific dose escalation resulting in significantly higher local control in large tumours without adding treatment related late morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kathy, E-mail: Kathy.Han@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pintilie, Melania [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sungjae; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Tanaka, Eiichi; Sumida, Iori; Tamari, Keisuke; Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a salvage therapy for vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. From 1997 to 2012, salvage HDR brachytherapy was performed in 43 patients. The median age was 64 years (range, 41-88 years). HDR brachytherapy was performed by interstitial brachytherapy in 34 patients (79%) and by intracavity brachytherapy in nine patients (21%). Seventeen (40%) of the 43 patients were treated with external beam radiotherapy. The median followup period was 58 months (range, 6-179 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates (LC) were 84%, 52%, and 78%, respectively. Patients who received brachytherapy with external beam radiotherapy experienced no nodal recurrence (0 of 17 patients), whereas 23% of the patients (6 of 26 patients) who received brachytherapy alone experienced nodal recurrence (p = 0.047). The pathologic grade at the time of initial surgery (G1-2 vs. G3) was found to be a significant prognostic factor for both OS and PFS. The respective 5-year OS was 96% vs. 40% (p brachytherapy vs. intracavity brachytherapy) were significant prognostic factors for LC. The respective 5-year LC was 74% vs. 100% (p = 0.020) and 85% vs. 56% (p = 0.035). HDR brachytherapy is effective and feasible in patients with isolated vaginal recurrence of endometrial cancer. Pathologic grade, age, and modality were significant prognostic factors. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-C-16A-07: Sculpting Isodose Lines: Design of An Internally Shielded Tandem for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M; Yue, N; Zou, J [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Mo, X [21st Century Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the prescription method moving from point A to 3D volume based in cervical cancer HDR brachytherapy, the traditional pear-shaped isodose lines are desired to be sculptured to conform to the irregular shaped target. The standard single channel tandem cannot generate asymmetric isodose lines. Most of the directionally shielded sources proposed in literature are challenging to manufacture and operate. In this study, we proposed a novel internally shielded tandem applicator design which gave users more freedom to manipulate isodose lines while planning. Methods: The proposed tandem design has one centrally located lead cylindrical rod of 8 mm in diameter serving as the internal shield. Multiple source channels with the diameter of 2 mm are evenly spaced and engraved on the central cylindrical rod. The overall diameter of the tandem with polymer encapsulation was kept to be 10 mm. Various number of channels and engraving depths have been tested in the design process. Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit was used for dose calculation assuming a Varian VS2000 source was placed inside the applicator. A Monte Carlo based planning system has been developed in-house to generate brachytherapy plans. Test plans by using this internally shielded tandem were generated for 3 clinical cases. Results: Water phantom results shown the dose distribution from a VS2000 source in the tandem was strongly distorted towards one direction due to the presence of shielding material. Conformal plans with asymmetric isodose distributions around the tandem can be generated by optimizing dwell times in different channels. Conclusion: An effective and easy-to-use internally shielded tandem was developed. It gave user the freedom to sculpt isodose lines to generate conformal plans for cervical cancer brachytherapy.

  13. The initial experience of electronic brachytherapy for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Ajay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Millions of people are diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC worldwide each year. While surgical approaches are the standard treatment, some patients are appropriate candidates for radiation therapy for NMSC. High dose rate (HDR brachytherapy using surface applicators has shown efficacy in the treatment of NMSC and shortens the radiation treatment schedule by using a condensed hypofractionated approach. An electronic brachytherapy (EBT system permits treatment of NMSC without the use of a radioactive isotope. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from patients treated from July 2009 through March 2010. Pre-treatment biopsy was performed to confirm a malignant cutaneous diagnosis. A CT scan was performed to assess lesion depth for treatment planning, and an appropriate size of surface applicator was selected to provide an acceptable margin. An HDR EBT system delivered a dose of 40.0 Gy in eight fractions twice weekly with 48 hours between fractions, prescribed to a depth of 3-7 mm. Treatment feasibility, acute safety, efficacy outcomes, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results Thirty-seven patients (mean age 72.5 years with 44 cutaneous malignancies were treated. Of 44 lesions treated, 39 (89% were T1, 1 (2% Tis, 1 (2% T2, and 3 (7% lesions were recurrent. Lesion locations included the nose for 16 lesions (36.4%, ear 5 (11%, scalp 5 (11%, face 14 (32%, and an extremity for 4 (9%. Median follow-up was 4.1 months. No severe toxicities occurred. Cosmesis ratings were good to excellent for 100% of the lesions at follow-up. Conclusions The early outcomes of EBT for the treatment of NMSC appear to show acceptable acute safety and favorable cosmetic outcomes. Using a hypofractionated approach, EBT provides a convenient treatment schedule.

  14. Unified registration framework for cumulative dose assessment in cervical cancer across external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sharmili; Totman, John J.; Choo, Bok A.

    2016-03-01

    Dose accumulation across External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Brachytherapy (BT) treatment fractions in cervical cancer is extremely challenging due to structural dissimilarities and large inter-fractional anatomic deformations between the EBRT and BT images. The brachytherapy applicator and the bladder balloon, present only in the BT images, introduce missing structural correspondences for the underlying registration problem. Complex anatomical deformations caused by the applicator and the balloon, different rectum and bladder filling and tumor shrinkage compound the registration difficulties. Conventional free-form registration methods struggle to handle such topological differences. In this paper, we propose a registration pipeline that first transforms the original images to their distance maps based on segmentations of critical organs and then performs non-linear registration of the distance maps. The resulting dense deformation field is then used to transform the original anatomical image. The registration accuracy is evaluated on 27 image pairs from stage 2B-4A cervical cancer patients. The algorithm reaches a Hausdorff distance of close to 0:5 mm for the uterus, 2:2 mm for the bladder and 1:7 mm for the rectum when applied to (EBRT,BT) pairs, taken at time points more than three months apart. This generalized model-free framework can be used to register any combination of EBRT and BT images as opposed to methods in the literature that are tuned for either only (BT,BT) pair, or only (EBRT,EBRT) pair or only (BT,EBRT) pair. A unified framework for 3D dose accumulation across multiple EBRT and BT fractions is proposed to facilitate adaptive personalized radiation therapy.

  15. egs_brachy: a versatile and fast Monte Carlo code for brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Marc J. P.; Taylor, Randle E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2016-12-01

    egs_brachy is a versatile and fast Monte Carlo (MC) code for brachytherapy applications. It is based on the EGSnrc code system, enabling simulation of photons and electrons. Complex geometries are modelled using the EGSnrc C++ class library and egs_brachy includes a library of geometry models for many brachytherapy sources, in addition to eye plaques and applicators. Several simulation efficiency enhancing features are implemented in the code. egs_brachy is benchmarked by comparing TG-43 source parameters of three source models to previously published values. 3D dose distributions calculated with egs_brachy are also compared to ones obtained with the BrachyDose code. Well-defined simulations are used to characterize the effectiveness of many efficiency improving techniques, both as an indication of the usefulness of each technique and to find optimal strategies. Efficiencies and calculation times are characterized through single source simulations and