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Sample records for brachial artery

  1. Validation of brachial artery pressure reconstruction from finger arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guelen, Ilja; Westerhof, Berend E.; van der Sar, Gertrude L.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Wesseling, Karel H.; Bos, Willem Jan W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Measurement of finger artery pressure with Finapres offers noninvasive continuous blood pressure, which, however, differs from brachial artery pressure. Generalized waveform filtering and level correction may convert the finger artery pressure waveform to a brachial waveform. An upper-arm

  2. Brachial artery approach for outpatient arteriography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jai Kyung; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae Hwan [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of brachial approach arteriography for outpatients, with particular regard to safety and image quality. The angiographic findings and follow-up medical records of 131 brachial approach arteriographies in 121 outpatients were retrospectively analysed. 5 F pigtail catheters were used in 125 cases and 5-F OCU-A catheters were used in three cases of renal arteriography, and three of upper extremity arteriography without catheter. Except for three cases of brachial artery puncture failure, all procedures were performed successfully. One hundred and fifteen of 119 lower extremity arteriographies were visualized down to the level of the tibioperoneal artery. The non-visualized cases were three in which there was multiple obstruction at the distal common iliac artery and one with insufficient contrast amount due to renal failure In four cases there were complications : two involved arterial thrombosis, one was an intramuscular hematoma, and one an A-V fistula. For outpatients, brachial approach arteriography can replace the femoral approach. Its image quality is excellent, there are time-cost benefits, and the rate of complications is relatively low.

  3. HIGH BIFURCATION OF THE BRACHIAL ARTERY - A COMMON VARIANT

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    Sesi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 28 cadavers were dissected for variations in the bifurcation of brachial artery bilaterally {n=56} at the department of anatomy, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada, A.P. from 2010 to 2015 . Found variations during routine dissections for first year MBBS students. The findings have thrown light on the common as well as rare variants in the anatomy of brachial artery bifurcation and the course of radial and ulnar arteries in current study

  4. Reconstruction of brachial artery pressure from noninvasive finger pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, W. J.; van Goudoever, J.; van Montfrans, G. A.; van den Meiracker, A. H.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse wave distortions, mainly caused by reflections, and pressure gradients, caused by flow in the resistive vascular tree, may cause differences between finger and brachial artery pressures. These differences may limit the use of finger pressure measurements. We investigated whether brachial

  5. Arterial function of carotid and brachial arteries in postmenopausal vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su T

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ta-Chen Su1, Pao-Ling Torng2, Jiann-Shing Jeng3, Ming-Fong Chen1, Chiau-Suong Liau1,41Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Cardiovascular Center, Taipei Buddist Tzu-Chi Hospital, Hsin-Dian, Taipei, TaiwanBackground: Vegetarianism is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. However, studies of arterial function in vegetarians are limited.Methods: This study investigated arterial function in vegetarianism by comparing 49 healthy postmenopausal vegetarians with 41 age-matched omnivores. The arterial function of the common carotid artery was assessed by carotid duplex, while the pulse dynamics method was used to measure brachial artery distensibility (BAD, compliance (BAC, and resistance (BAR. Fasting blood levels of glucose, lipids, lipoprotein (a, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, homocysteine, and vitamin B12 were also measured.Results: Vegetarians had significantly lower serum cholesterol, high-density and low-density lipoprotein, and glucose compared with omnivores. They also had lower vitamin B12 but higher homocysteine levels. Serum levels of lipoprotein (a and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were no different between the two groups. There were no significant differences in carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD between the two groups even after adjustment for associated covariates. However, BAR was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivores. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that age and pulse pressure were two important determinants of carotid beta stiffness index and BAD. Vegetarianism is not associated with better arterial elasticity.Conclusion: Apparently healthy postmenopausal vegetarians are not significantly better in terms of carotid beta stiffness index, BAC, and BAD, but have significantly decreased BAR than

  6. Reconstruction of brachial pressure from finger arterial pressure during orthostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogert, Lysander W J; Harms, Mark P M; Pott, Frank

    2004-01-01

    In patients with recurrent syncope, monitoring of intra-arterial pressure during orthostatic stress testing is recommended because of the potentially sudden and rapid development of hypotension. Replacing brachial arterial pressure (BAP) by the non-invasively obtained finger arterial pressure (Fin...

  7. Surgical significance of brachial arterial variants in a Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a cadaveric dissection study of 162 upper limbs at the Department of Human Anatomy University of Nairobi, Kenya. The brachial artery was exposed entirely from the lower border of teres major to its point of termination. The course in relation to the median nerve and the level of termination were recorded ...

  8. Median nerve neuropraxia by a large false brachial artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijftogt, Niki; Cancrinus, Ernst; Hoogervorst, Erwin L J; van de Mortel, Rob H W; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2014-10-01

    Peripheral nerve compression is a rare complication of an iatrogenic false brachial artery aneurysm. We present a 72-year-old patient with median nerve compression due to a false brachial artery aneurysm after removal of an arterial catheter. Surgical exclusion of the false aneurysm was performed in order to release traction of the median nerve. At 3-month assessment, moderate hand recovery in function and sensibility was noted. In the case of neuropraxia of the upper extremity, following a history of hospital stay and arterial lining or catheterization, compression due to pseudoaneurysm should be considered a probable cause directly at presentation. Early recognition and treatment is essential to avoid permanent neurological deficit. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Delayed presentation of a traumatic brachial artery pseudoaneurysm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Forde, James C

    2009-09-01

    Delayed presentation of a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm following penetrating trauma is infrequently reported. We report the case of a 23-year-old male who presented three months following a penetrating trauma to his antecubital fossa with a sudden exacerbation of swelling and tenderness of his elbow. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography arteriography confirmed the presence of a large pseudoaneurysm. Surgical reconstruction was performed using the long saphenous vein as an interposition vein graft, restoring normal arterial circulation.

  10. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Higaki, Tadanao; Shimonaga, Takashi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-09-15

    Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation, is measured for the assessment of vascular smooth muscle cell function or alterations of vascular structure. Both coronary and brachial artery responses to nitroglycerine have been demonstrated to be independent prognostic markers of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in the same patients. We measured nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in 30 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent coronary angiography (19 men and 11 women; mean age, 69.0±8.8years; age range, 42-85years). The mean values of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and left circumflex coronary artery were 12.6±5.2%, 11.6±10.3%, and 11.9±11.0%, respectively. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery correlated significantly with that in the left anterior descending coronary artery (r=0.43, P=0.02) and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.49, P=0.006). There was also a significant correlation between nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the left anterior descending coronary artery and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.72, Parteries and that in coronary arteries are simultaneously present. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery could be used as a surrogate for that in a coronary artery and as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Brachial artery reactivity in patients with severe sepsis: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Wexler, Orren; M Morgan, Mary Anne; Gough, Michael S.; Steinmetz, Sherry D; Mack, Cynthia M.; Darling, Denise C.; Doolin, Kathleen P.; Apostolakos, Michael J.; Graves, Brian T; Frampton, Mark W.; Chen, Xucai; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound measurements of brachial artery reactivity in response to stagnant ischemia provide estimates of microvascular function and conduit artery endothelial function. We hypothesized that brachial artery reactivity would independently predict severe sepsis and severe sepsis mortality. Methods This was a combined case-control and prospective cohort study. We measured brachial artery reactivity in 95 severe sepsis patients admitted to the medical and surgical intensive care un...

  12. DOES BRACHIAL ARTERY FMD PROVIDE A BIOASSAY FOR NITRIC OXIDE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, D. Walter; Witman, Melissa A. H.; Ives, Stephen J.; McDaniel, John; Trinity, Joel D.; Conklin, Jamie D.; Supiano, Mark A.; Richardson, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to better define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in young, healthy humans. Brachial artery blood velocity and diameter were determined (ultrasound Doppler) in eight volunteers (26 ± 1 yrs) before and after 5-min forearm circulatory occlusion with and without intra-arterial infusion of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor L-NMMA (0.48 mg/dl/min). Control (CON) and L-NMMA trials were performed with the occlusion cuff placed in the traditional distal position, as well as proximal to the measurement site. FMD was significantly reduced, but not abolished, by L-NMMA in the distal cuff trial (8.9 ± 1.3 to 6.0 ± 0.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.02), with no effect of L-NMMA on FMD with proximal cuff placement (10.6 ± 1.2 to 12.4 ± 1.7%, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.39). When the reduction in shear stimulus following L-NMMA was taken into account, no drug difference was observed for either distal (0.26 ± 0.02 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.40) or proximal (0.23 ± 0.08 to 0.23 ± 0.03, CON vs. L-NMMA, P = 0.89) FMD trials. These findings challenge the assertion that NO is obligatory for brachial artery FMD, and call into question the sensitivity of this procedure for non-invasive determination of NO bioavailability in young, healthy humans. PMID:23774225

  13. Impact of age, sex and exercise on brachial and popliteal artery remodelling in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Swart, A.; Exterkate, A.; Naylor, L.H.; Black, M.A.; Cable, N.T.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of age, sex and exercise on wall thickness and remodelling in the popliteal and brachial arteries. METHODS: We compared wall thickness, lumen diameter and wall:lumen ratios in the brachial and popliteal arteries of 15 young (Y, 25.4+/-0.8 yr; 7M 8W) and 16 older

  14. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in Hypertension Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Qain, Yuesheng; Tang, Xiaofeng; Ling, Huawei; Chen, Kemin; Li, Yan; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang

    2016-08-01

    Intracranial arterial stenosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke in Asians. We therefore sought to explore the relationship of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and intracranial arterial stenosis in 834 stroke-free hypertensive patients. Intracranial arterial stenosis was evaluated through computerized tomographic angiography. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured by an automated cuff device. The top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly associated with intracranial arterial stenosis (P = .027, odds ratio = 1.82; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-3.10). The patients with the top decile of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity showed 56% higher risk for the presence of intracranial arterial stenosis to the whole population, which was more significant in patients younger than 65 years old. We also found that brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity related to both intracranial arterial stenosis and homocysteine. Our study showed the association of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity with asymptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis in hypertension patients, especially in relative younger subjects. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity might be a relatively simple and repeatable measurement to detect hypertension patients in high risk of intracranial arterial stenosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Arterial compliance across the spectrum of ankle-brachial index: the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, Scott M; Jacobs, David R; Kronmal, Richard; Bluemke, David A; Criqui, Michael; Lima, Joao; Allison, Matthew; Duprez, Daniel; Segers, Patrick; Chirinos, Julio A

    2014-04-01

    A low ankle-brachial index is associated with cardiovascular disease and reduced arterial compliance. A high ankle-brachial index is also associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with a high ankle-brachial index demonstrate a lower arterial compliance. In addition, we assessed whether pulse pressure amplification is increased among subjects with a high ankle-brachial index. We studied 6814 adults enrolled in the Multiethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who were, by definition, free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Differences in total arterial compliance (ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure), aortic and carotid distensibility (measured with magnetic resonance imaging and duplex ultrasound, respectively) were compared across ankle-brachial index subclasses (≤0.90, 0.91-1.29; ≥1.30) with analyses adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Peripheral arterial disease was detected in 230 (3.4%) and high ABI in 648 (9.6%) of subjects. Those with high ankle-brachial index demonstrated greater aortic/radial pulse pressure amplification than those with a normal ankle-brachial index. In adjusted models aortic and carotid distensibility as well as total arterial compliance, were lowest among those with ankle-brachial index≤0.9 (p<0.01 vs. all), but were not reduced in subjects with an ankle-brachial index≥1.3. Lower aortic, carotid and total arterial compliance is not present in subjects free of overt cardiovascular disease and with a high ankle-brachial index. However, increased pulse pressure amplification contributes to a greater ankle-brachial index in the general population and may allow better characterization of individuals with this phenotype. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Diagnostic value of ankle-brachial index and toe-brachial index in arterial disease of lower extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lan; ZHAO, ZHI-GANG; Zhen-cheng YAN; Yin-xing NI; Sun, Fang; Sun, Jin; Xing-sen XU; Yu, Hao; Ying-sha LI; Dao-yan LIU; Zhi-ming ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To investigate the clinical application and its influencing factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and toe-brachial index (TBI) in the diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity. Methods  ABI and TBI were measured in 800 limbs of 402 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension hospitalized from July 2010 to February 2011. The patients were divided into narrow group (ABI < 0.9), normal group (0.9≤ABI < 1.3), and calcification group (ABI≥1.3) according to the value of ABI, and al...

  17. New technique for CT during arterial portography performed with left brachial artery approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Kawakami, S. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, M. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Konishi, J. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    A new technique of CT during arterial portography (CTAP) performed with a left brachial artery approach is presented. We used 4-F, 50-cm J-shaped sheath introducer with a straight dilator and angled 4-F catheter with side holes. Catheter insertion to the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) can be performed without any trouble by the help of a J-shaped long sheath introducer positioned in the aortic arch. In our experience, 10 min compression of the puncture site and 2 h observation after catheter removal brought no local complication. This method can be performed safely on outpatient basis. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of brachial artery vasoreactivity in elite power athletes and age-matched controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Welsch

    Full Text Available Elite endurance athletes typically have larger arteries contributing to greater skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen and nutrient delivery and improved physical performance. Few studies have examined structural and functional properties of arteries in power athletes.To compare the size and vasoreactivity of the brachial artery of elite power athletes to age-matched controls. It was hypothesized brachial artery diameters of athletes would be larger, have less vasodilation in response to cuff occlusion, but more constriction after a cold pressor test than age-matched controls.Eight elite power athletes (age = 23 ± 2 years and ten controls (age = 22 ± 1 yrs were studied. High-resolution ultrasonography was used to assess brachial artery diameters at rest and following 5 minutes of forearm occlusion (Brachial Artery Flow Mediated Dilation = BAFMD and a cold pressor test (CPT. Basic fitness measures included a handgrip test and 3-minute step test.Brachial arteries of athletes were larger (Athletes 5.39 ± 1.51 vs.3.73 ± 0.71 mm, p0.05 and 1 minute recovery (Athletes: 88 ± 21 vs.98 ± 26 bpm, p>0.05 following the step test.Elite power athletes have larger brachial arteries, and greater vasoreactivity (greater vasodilatory and constrictor responses than age-matched controls, contributing to a significantly greater VOR. These data extend the existence of an 'athlete's artery' as previously shown for elite endurance athletes to elite power athletes, and presents a hypothetical explanation for the functional significance of the 'power athlete's artery'.

  19. Acute Brachial Artery Thrombosis in a Neonate Caused by a Peripheral Venous Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Berzel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes the diagnostic testing and management of an acute thrombosis of the brachial artery in a female neonate. On day seven of life, clinical signs of acutely decreased peripheral perfusion indicated an occlusion of the brachial artery, which was confirmed by high-resolution Doppler ultrasound. Imaging also showed early stages of collateralization so that surgical treatment options could be avoided. Unfractionated heparin was used initially and then replaced by low-molecular-weight heparin while coagulation parameters were monitored closely. Within several days, brachial artery perfusion was completely restored. Acetylsalicylic acid was given for additional six weeks to minimize the risk of recurring thrombosis. If inadequately fixated in a high-risk location, a peripheral venous catheter can damage adjacent structures and thus ultimately cause arterial complications.

  20. Median nerve and brachial artery entrapment in the tendinous arch of coracobrachialis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues V

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variation in the pattern of muscle insertion and possible neurovascular entrapment is important for orthopedic surgeons, plastic surgeons and physiotherapists. We found a variation in the insertion pattern of coracobrachialis and entrapped median nerve and brachial artery by the tendinous arch of the muscle, in relation to the neurovascular bundle. The coracobrachialis had an additional insertion in the form of a tendinous arch which extended from the lower part of the muscle to the medial intermuscular septum. The median nerve, brachial artery, its venae commitantes and a muscular branch from brachial artery passed deep to this arch. The abnormality reported here might result in neurovascular compression symptoms in upper limb.

  1. Arterial cutdown reduces complications after brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kret, Marcus R; Dalman, Ronald L; Kalish, Jeffrey; Mell, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    Factors influencing risk for brachial access site complications after peripheral vascular intervention are poorly understood. We queried the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative to identify unique demographic and technical risks for such complications. The Vascular Quality Initiative peripheral vascular intervention data files from years 2010 to 2014 were analyzed to compare puncture site complication rates and associations encountered with either brachial or femoral arterial access for peripheral vascular intervention. Procedures requiring multiple access sites were excluded. Complications were defined as wound hematoma or access vessel stenosis/occlusion. Univariate and hierarchical logistic regression was used to identify independent factors associated with site complications after brachial access. Of 44,634 eligible peripheral vascular intervention procedures, 732 (1.6%) were performed through brachial access. Brachial access was associated with an increased complication rate compared with femoral access (9.0% vs 3.3%; P access site stenosis/occlusion (2.1% vs 0.4%; P access complications included age, female gender, and sheath size. Complications occurred less frequently after arterial cutdown (4.1%) compared with either ultrasound-guided (11.8%) or fluoroscopically guided percutaneous access (7.3%; P = .07 across all variables). Neither surgeons' overall peripheral vascular intervention experience nor prior experience with brachial access predicted likelihood of adverse events. By multivariate analysis, male gender (odds ratio [OR], 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.84; P access complications. Larger sheath sizes (>5F) were associated with increased risk of complications (OR, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.07-4.49; P = .03). Brachial access for peripheral vascular intervention carries significantly increased risks for access site occlusion or hematoma formation. Arterial cutdown and smaller sheath diameters are associated with lower

  2. Brachial artery diameter is related to cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media thickness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holewijn, S.; Heijer, M. den; Swinkels, D.W.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.; Graaf, J. de

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports showed inconsistent results about the potential role of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in cardiovascular(CV) risk prediction. Few data are available about the role of nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NMD), but recently, brachial artery diameter(BAD) appeared to have

  3. Adherence to guidelines strongly improves reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greyling, A.; Mil, A.C.C.M. van; Zock, P.L.; Green, D.J.; Ghiadoni, L.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial artery FMD is widely used as a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Adherence to expert guidelines is believed to be of vital importance to obtain reproducible measurements. We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting on the reproducibility of the FMD in order

  4. Diagnostic value of ankle-brachial index and toe-brachial index in arterial disease of lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan LI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the clinical application and its influencing factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI and toe-brachial index (TBI in the diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity. Methods  ABI and TBI were measured in 800 limbs of 402 patients with diabetes and/or hypertension hospitalized from July 2010 to February 2011. The patients were divided into narrow group (ABI < 0.9, normal group (0.9≤ABI < 1.3, and calcification group (ABI≥1.3 according to the value of ABI, and also into narrow group (TBI < 0.7 and normal group (TBI≥0.7 according to the value of TBI. The correlation of ABI with TBI was analyzed, and the differences in age, obesity parameters, biochemical indicators and other factors were compared between the groups. Influence of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP on ABI and TBI was further analyzed. Results  Only when ABI < 0.9, ABI and TBI have significant correlation (r=0.826, P < 0.01. W hen the group comparison based on ABI values, it was shown that the age and hs-CRP were significantly higher in the narrow group than in the normal group and calcification group (P < 0.01. The comparison between groups based on TBI values indicated that the age, systolic blood pressure and hs-CRP in the narrow group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05. ABI and TBI in the normal hs-CRP group were significantly higher than those in high hs-CRP group (P < 0.05. Conclusion  Hs-CRP may play an important role in the development and progression in peripheral arterial atherosclerosis. Therefore, ABI and TBI measurements in combination with hs-CRP level can improve early diagnosis of arterial disease of lower extremity.

  5. Impact of age, sex and exercise on brachial and popliteal artery remodelling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Swart, Anne; Exterkate, Anne; Naylor, Louise H; Black, Mark A; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2010-06-01

    To examine the impact of age, sex and exercise on wall thickness and remodelling in the popliteal and brachial arteries. We compared wall thickness, lumen diameter and wall:lumen ratios in the brachial and popliteal arteries of 15 young (Y, 25.4+/-0.8 yr; 7M 8W) and 16 older sedentary (OS, 58.8+/-1.1 yr; 8M 8W) subjects, with 12 of the OS group also studied following 12 and 24 weeks exercise training. Wall thickness and lumen diameter were higher in the popliteal than the brachial artery for both groups (P<0.05); wall:lumen ratio was similar between arteries. Comparison of the Y and OS groups revealed no impact on wall thickness, whereas diameter values were higher in OS subjects (P<0.05). Whilst there were no significant differences in wall thickness between men and women in the Y or OS groups, diameter was larger in men than in women for both arteries (P<0.05). After 24 weeks of training the wall thickness of both arteries decreased (P<0.01) and the wall:lumen ratio of the brachial (P<0.01) and the popliteal (P<0.05) decreased. The cross-sectional results suggest that ageing was associated with increased lumen diameter, although wall:lumen ratio remained unchanged. Wall:lumen ratio was higher in women than men, irrespective of subject age or the artery studied. This related primarily to differences in lumen diameter between the sexes, as wall thickness did not significantly differ between men and women. Our longitudinal data strongly suggest that exercise training is associated with beneficial effects on conduit artery wall thickness and wall:lumen ratio in both upper and lower limbs in humans. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional MRI in peripheral arterial disease: arterial peak flow versus ankle-brachial index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the success rate of successful arterial peak flow (APF and ankle-brachial index (ABI measurements in patients with suspected or known peripheral arterial disease (PAD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 183 patients with varying degrees of PAD were included. All subjects underwent ABI measurements and MR imaging of the popliteal artery to determine APF. Proportions of patients with successful APF and ABI measurements were compared and the discriminative capability was evaluated. RESULTS: APF was successfully measured in 91% of the patients, whereas the ABI could be determined in 71% of the patients (p<0.01. Success rates of APF and ABI were significantly higher in patients with intermittent claudication (95% and 80%, respectively than in patients with critical ischemia (87% and 62%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the assessment of PAD severity with ABI, the success rate of MRI-based APF measurements in patients with a clinical indication for MRA is 20% higher, with similar discriminatory capacity for disease severity. Therefore, APF is an especially convenient and valuable measure to assess severity in PAD patients scheduled to undergo MR angiography to obtain additional functional information concerning the vascular status.

  7. Measuring FMD in the brachial artery: how important is QRS gating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakekuttu, Tinoy J; Gutterman, David D; Phillips, Shane A; Jurva, Jason W; Arthur, Emily I L; Das, Emon; Widlansky, Michael E

    2010-10-01

    Recommendations for the measurement of brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) typically suggest images be obtained at identical times in the cardiac cycle, usually end diastole (QRS complex onset). This recommendation presumes that inter-individual differences in arterial compliance are minimized. However, published evidence is conflicting. Furthermore, ECG gating is not available on many ultrasound systems; it requires an expensive software upgrade or increased image processing time. We tested whether analysis of images acquired with QRS gating or with the more simplified method of image averaging would yield similar results. We analyzed FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD) in 29 adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus and in 31 older adults and 12 young adults without diabetes, yielding a range of brachial artery distensibility. FMD and NMD were measured using recommended QRS-gated brachial artery diameter measurements and, alternatively, the average brachial diameters over the entire R-R interval. We found strong agreement between both methods for FMD and NMD (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.88-0.99). Measuring FMD and NMD using average diameter measurements significantly reduced post-image-processing time (658.9 ± 71.6 vs. 1,024.1 ± 167.6 s for QRS-gated analysis, P FMD and NMD measurements based on average diameter measurements can be performed without reducing accuracy. This finding may allow for simplification of FMD measurement and aid in the development of FMD as a potentially useful clinical tool.

  8. Exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow and vascular function is impaired in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machin, Daniel R; Clifton, Heather L; Garten, Ryan S; Gifford, Jayson R; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter; Frech, Tracy M; Donato, Anthony J

    2016-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disease characterized by debilitating fibrosis and vascular dysfunction; however, little is known about the circulatory response to exercise in this population. Therefore, we examined the peripheral hemodynamic and vasodilatory responses to handgrip exercise in 10 patients with SSc (61 ± 4 yr) and 15 age-matched healthy controls (56 ± 5 yr). Brachial artery diameter, blood flow, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined at rest and during progressive static-intermittent handgrip exercise. Patients with SSc and controls were similar in body stature, handgrip strength, and MAP; however, brachial artery blood flow at rest was nearly twofold lower in patients with SSc compared with controls (22 ± 4 vs. 42 ± 5 ml/min, respectively; P exercise, there were no differences in MAP between the groups, exercise-induced hyperemia and therefore vascular conductance were ∼35% lower at all exercise workloads in patients with SSc (P exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow and conduit arterial vasodilatory dysfunction during handgrip exercise in SSc and suggest that elevated oxidative stress may play a role.

  9. Brachial artery injury following opened elbow dislocation associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elbow dislocations are the most frequently encountered after shoulder dislocations. In their vast majority, these injuries carry a good prognosis. Although, concomitant arterial injury is rare and make them more serious. In this paper, we report a case of a 17 year old woman with opened elbow dislocation with arterial injury ...

  10. A comparison of brachial artery-brachial vein arteriovenous fistulas with arteriovenous grafts in patients with poor superficial venous anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Xuan-Binh D; Kim, Jerry J; Ihenachor, Ezinne J; Parrish, Aaron B; Bleck, Jenny D; Kaji, Amy H; Koopmann, Matthew C; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-02-01

    The autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) has been shown to be superior to the arteriovenous graft (AVG) with respect to cost, complications, and primary patency. Therefore, the National Kidney Foundation Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines recommend reserving AVGs for patients who do not have adequate superficial venous anatomy to support AVF placement. The brachial artery-brachial vein arteriovenous fistula (BVAVF) has emerged as an autologous last-effort alternative. However, there are limited data comparing BVAVFs and AVGs in patients who are otherwise not candidates for a traditional AVF. Patients who received a BVAVF from July 2009 to July 2014 were compared with those who received an AVG during the same period. At our institution, BVAVF and AVG are only performed in patients with poor superficial venous anatomy. Patient demographic data, operative details, and subsequent follow-up were collected. BVAVFs were performed with a two-stage approach, with initial arteriovenous anastomosis, followed by delayed superficialization or transposition. Our primary outcome measure was primary functional assisted patency at 1 year. Patients lost to follow-up were excluded. A subgroup analysis was also performed for patients in whom the BVAVF or the AVG was their first hemodialysis access surgery. During the study period, 29 patients underwent BVAVF and 32 underwent AVG. There were no differences in age, gender, or presence of diabetes between the two groups. The median days to cannulation from the initial operation were 141 (interquartile range, 94-214) in the BVAVF group and 29 (interquartile range, 14-33) in the AVG group (P functional assisted primary patency rates at 1 year (45% vs 25%; P = .1). Subgroup analysis demonstrated greater 1-year primary functional assisted primary patency (52% vs 19%; P functional maturation expected compared with AVG. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Upper limb amputation due to a brachial arterial embolism associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Tsuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute mesenteric ischemia due to an embolism of the superior mesenteric artery is associated with a high mortality rate. Over 20 percent of acute mesenteric embolism cases consist of multiple emboli, and the long-term prognosis depends on the incidence of subsequent embolic events at other sites. The incidence of emboli in the upper extremity associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism has rarely been described. The signs and symptoms of ischemic change in the upper limb can be masked by other circumstances, such as postoperative conditions or complications. In these cases, a late presentation or delayed diagnosis and treatment can result in limb loss. Case presentation We present a rare case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with atrial fibrillation who developed an embolic occlusion of the brachial artery associated with a superior mesenteric arterial embolism. She developed gangrene in her right hand, which had progressed to the point that amputation was necessary by the time the gastrointestinal surgeon had consulted the Department of Orthopedic Surgery. The brachial arterial embolism diagnosis was delayed by the severe abdominal symptoms and shock conditions that followed the emergency enterectomy, resulting in amputation of the upper limb despite anticoagulation therapy. In this case, multiple infarctions of the spleen were also observed, indicating a shower embolism. Conclusions When treating a superior mesenteric arterial embolism in a patient with atrial fibrillation, the possibility of recurrent or multiple arterial thromboembolic events should be considered, even after the procedure is completed.

  12. Impact of age, sex, and exercise on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Mark A; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2009-09-01

    Flow-mediated dilatation (%FMD), an index of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilator function, is regarded as a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease. Aging is associated with endothelial dysfunction, but underlying sex-related differences may exist and the effects of fitness and exercise on endothelial dysfunction in men (M) and women (W) are poorly understood. We compared %FMD of the brachial artery in 18 young [Y, 26 +/- 1 yr; 9 M and 9 W], 12 older fit (OF, 57 +/- 2 yr; 6 M and 6 W), and 16 older sedentary (OS, 59 +/- 2 yr; 8 M and 8 W) subjects. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) administration was used to assess endothelium-independent vasodilatation, and the FMD-to-GTN ratio was calculated to characterize NO dilator function in the context of smooth muscle cell sensitivity. Brachial %FMD in Y (7.1 +/- 0.8%) was significantly higher compared with OS (4.8 +/- 0.7%, P < 0.05), but not OF (6.4 +/- 0.7%). Differences between Y and OS subjects were due primarily to lower FMD in the OS women (4.3 +/- 0.6%). OS women exhibited significantly lower FMD-to-GTN ratios compared with Y (P < 0.05) and OF women (P < 0.05), whereas these differences were not apparent in men. Exercise training improved brachial artery NO dilator function (FMD-to-GTN ratio) after 24 wk (P < 0.05) in OS women, but not men. These findings indicate that maintaining a high level of fitness, or undertaking exercise training, prevents the age-related decline in the brachial artery vasodilator function evident in women. In OS men, who had relatively preserved NO dilator function, no training adaptations were observed. This study has potential implications for the prevention of conduit artery endothelial dysfunction in men and women.

  13. The importance of community screening of asymptomatic elderly for peripheral arterial disease by Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keven, Ayşe; Durmaz, Mehmet Sedat

    2017-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is an atherosclerotic disease characterized by an increase in morbidity and mortality. For these reasons early diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease is important. Ankle-brachial systolic pressure index measurement is frequently used in screening studies. Evaluating waveforms of distal lower extremities with Doppler ultrasound can be used as a screening program and provides more accurate information on peripheral arterial disease. We investigate the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, compare the efficacy of Doppler ultrasound evaluation of distal lower extremity waveforms and ankle-brachial systolic pressure index measurement in screening programs, and discuss the importance of early diagnosis of asymptomatic cases. A total of 457 patients over the age of 65 (between 65 and 94, mean age: 71.4) including 270 males and 187 females were examined with Doppler ultrasound, had ankle-brachial systolic pressure index measurement taken and were screened for peripheral arterial disease. The correlation between Doppler ultrasound findings and ankle-brachial systolic pressure index was examined. According to the Doppler ultrasound findings, in the aortoiliac ( r = 0.648) and femoropopliteal ( r = 0.564) area, there is a medium level of correlation between severe stenosis and occlusions and a low ankle-brachial systolic pressure index value, and a low level of correlation between such abnormalities in the tibioperoneal region ( r = 0.116) and a low ankle-brachial systolic pressure index value. Therefore, while the sensitivity of ankle-brachial systolic pressure index increases in proximal stenosis, it decreases in distal stenosis. Despite the fact that ankle-brachial systolic pressure index is a diagnostic test commonly used in screening studies, evaluation of distal arteries by means of Doppler ultrasound provides more accurate information in terms of the identification of peripheral arterial disease.

  14. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Naoki Miyazaki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault.

  15. The effect of acute hyperglycaemia on brachial artery flow mediated dilatation in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagg, W; Whalley, G A; Sathu, A; Gamble, G; Sharpe, N; Braatvedt, G D

    2000-06-01

    Endothelial function is known to be abnormal in patients with diabetes and acute hyperglycaemia may play an aetiological role. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to determine if acute systemic hyperglycaemia impairs endothelial function in normal subjects. Endothelial function was assessed by the change in brachial artery diameter in response to forearm ischaemia using B-mode ultrasound in ten healthy subjects (eight male) aged 19-35 years. Brachial artery blood flow velocity and diameter were measured before and after five minutes of forearm ischaemia. Measurements were performed in the supine position after an overnight fast, before and after 60 minute infusions of 0.9% saline or 10% dextrose. Measurements were made on two separate occasions at least 24 hours apart, and subjects were randomised to saline first or dextrose first. The largest diameter measured after ischaemia was divided by the resting arterial diameter to calculate percent dilatation of the artery from baseline, and is reported as flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). Dextrose infusion resulted in a significant rise in mean (SD) serum glucose 5.2 (0.1) to 9.2 (0.3) mmol/L and insulin concentration 6.3 (1.4) to 20.6 (3.7) mU/L p<0.002. Brachial artery blood flow velocity and diameter increased significantly from baseline after ischaemia (p<0.002). Mean FMD (SEM) before and after infusion were not, however, significantly different (p=0.4) (pre-saline 7.3 [1.0]%, post saline 5.2 [1.5]% and predextrose 8.1 [2.0]%, post dextrose 5.9 [1.7]%). These data suggest that acute hyperglycaemia does not impair FMD in normal subjects.

  16. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M., E-mail: sehgalc@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Section of Vascular Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  17. Brachial artery Doppler flux parameters before and after hot flush in Mexican postmenopausal women: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza-Lira, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Karina Vázquez; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-03-01

    To analyse brachial artery flux parameters in postmenopausal women before and after hot flush. Two groups of postmenopausal women were studied: Group I, without vasomotor symptoms (n = 10) and Group II, with vasomotor symptoms (n = 10). In all them a brachial artery Doppler ultrasound was done, measuring before and after hyperaemic stimulus of the arterial diameter (AD), the pulsatility index (PI), and the resistive index (RI). In Group I, measurements were done at baseline and five minutes after. In Group II, measurements were at baseline, and one and five minutes after the hot-flush. Comparison between the groups was done with Mann-Whitney U test, and within the groups with Wilcoxon test. No differences were found among the groups in Doppler parameters. When comparing each group separately, in Group I, at baseline and at five minutes measurements, the AD was greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before it. In group II at baseline, the PI was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. At the first and fifth minute, the AD was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. No differences were found between those who did not have and those who had hot flushes.

  18. Hubungan Hipertensi dan Penyakit Arteri Perifer Berdasarkan Nilai Ankle-Brachial Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Thendria

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit arteri perifer (PAP merupakan penyakit vaskular yang memiliki morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Pasien dengan PAP memiliki resiko tinggi menderita infark miokard, stroke iskemik dan kematian. Hipertensi merupakan salah satu faktor risiko PAP dan belum pernah dilakukan penelitian tentang hipertensi dan PAP di RSU Dokter Soedarso Pontianak. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan hipertensi dan PAP berdasarkan nilai ankle-brachialindex (ABI. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian observasional dengan rancangan cross-sectional. Sebanyak 58 sampel penelitian dipilih dengan teknik consecutive sampling berdasarkan kriteria inklusi dan eksklusi. Data dikumpulkan dari wawancara, rekam medis, pemeriksaan tekanan darahdan ABI. Diagnosis PAP ditegakkan jika ditemukan nilai ABI ≤0,9 pada salah satu kaki. Prevalensi PAP pada pasien hipertensi ditemukan sebesar 21% (IK95% 11-31%. Kejadian PAP paling banyak ditemukan pada kelompok umur 60-69 tahun yakni sebesar 48%. Terdapat hubungan yang bermakna antara hipertensi dan PAP berdasarkan nilai ABI (p=0,000. Hipertensi berhubungan dengan penyakit arteri perifer berdasarkan nilai ankle-brachial index. Kata kunci: penyakit arteri perifer, faktor resiko, hipertensi, ankle-brachial index

  19. Utility of Toe-brachial Index for Diagnosis of Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Chul Park

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ankle brachial pressure index (ABI is a simple, useful method for diagnosing peripheral artery disease (PAD. Although the ABI is an objective diagnostic method, it has limited reliability in certain scenarios. The aim of the present study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of the toe brachial index (TBI as a diagnostic tool for detecting stenosis in PAD, associated with normal or low ABI values.MethodsABI and TBI values were measured in 15 patients with diabetic gangrene who were suspected of having lower extremity arterial insufficiency. The ABI and TBI values were measured using a device that allowed the simultaneous measurement of systolic blood pressure in the upper and lower extremities. In addition, the ABI and TBI values were compared pre- and post-angiography.ResultsPatients with an ABI of 0.9-1.3 showed almost no difference between the 2 measurements. The patients with TBI >0.6 had no arterial insufficiency. The patients with TBI <0.6 required vascular intervention with ballooning. After the angiography, the gangrenous wounds decreased in size more rapidly than they did prior to the intervention.ConclusionsOur findings suggest that TBI is the method of choice for evaluating lower limb perfusion disorders. This result requires further studies of TBI in a larger number of patients. Future long-term studies should therefore evaluate the utility of TBI as a means of screening for PAD and the present findings should be regarded as preliminary outcomes.

  20. True Brachial Artery Aneurysm after Arteriovenous Fistula for Hemodialysis: Five Cases and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendri, Jihene; Palcau, Laura; Cameliere, Lucie; Coffin, Olivier; Felisaz, Aurelien; Gouicem, Djelloul; Dufranc, Julie; Laneelle, Damien; Berger, Ludovic

    2017-02-01

    The donor artery after a long-standing arteriovenous fistula (AVF) for hemodialysis usually evolves exceptionally toward a true aneurysmal degeneration (AD). The purpose of this article was to describe true brachial artery AD in end-stage renal disease patients after AVF creation, as well as its influencing factors and treatment strategies. We present a retrospective, observational, single-center study realized in Caen University Hospital's Vascular Surgery Department from May 1996 to November 2015. The inclusion criteria were true AD of the brachial artery after a vascular access for hemodialysis. A literature research, using the same criteria, was performed on the articles published between 1994 and 2015. The used databases included MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE via OVID, Cochrane Library Database, and ResearchGate. Our series includes 5 patients. Twenty-one articles were found in the literature: 17 case reports, 3 series, and 1 review. The same triggering factors for AD (high flow and immunosuppressive treatment) were found. The mean age at the time of AVF creation, first renal transplantation, and AD's diagnosis were respectively 26 (range 15-49), 29.2, and 48.6 years (range 37-76) in our series versus 34 (range 27-39), 40.4 (range 28-55), and 55.5 years (range 35-75) in cases found in the literature. The time spread after AVF creation and aneurysmal diagnosis was about 20.6 years (range 18-25) in our study versus 20.5 years (range 9-29) in the case reports. Our surgical attitude corresponds principally to that described in the literature. Nevertheless, we describe for the first time one case of arterial transposition to exclude the brachial aneurysm using superficial femoral artery. Arterial aneurysm is a rare, but significant complication after a long-term creation of hemodialysis access. High flow and immunosuppression may accelerate this process. Young age of the patients may act as a benefic factor and delay the AD. Arterial transposition could be an

  1. Oscillometric measurement of brachial artery cross-sectional area and its relationship with cardiovascular risk factors and arterial stiffness in a middle-aged male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Toshiaki; Munakata, Ryo; Kato, Katsuhito; Kodani, Eitaro; Ibuki, Chikao; Kusama, Yoshiki; Seino, Yoshihiko; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2013-10-01

    An enlarged arterial diameter is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. This study examined the relationship of noninvasively measured brachial artery cross-sectional area with cardiovascular risk factors and arterial stiffness in a middle-aged male population. Absolute volumetric changes of the brachial artery were measured with a newly developed oscillometric method during a general health examination in 387 men (mean age: 38±9 years) without known cardiovascular disease. Based on the measurement, the estimated area (eA) of the brachial artery at end-diastole was obtained. Brachial artery volume elastic modulus (VE) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) were simultaneously measured as indices of arterial stiffness by the same device. The relationships of eA with cardiovascular risk factors, including age, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose/diabetes mellitus (IFG/DM), hyperuricemia, smoking and their associated continuous variables, as well as VE and baPWV, were examined. Overall, the mean eA was 12.9 ± 2.9 mm². The eA was significantly higher in subjects with obesity, hypertension or IFG/DM than in those without each of these risk factors. In a multiple linear regression analysis, body mass index (β=0.31, P<0.001), age (β=0.25, P<0.001), systolic blood pressure (β=0.16, P=0.004) and pulse rate (β=-0.13, P=0.005) were independent determinants of eA. In contrast, neither VE nor baPWV were selected as independent determinants of eA. In conclusion, enlarged brachial artery cross-sectional area was significantly associated with cardiovascular risk factors such as age, body mass index and systolic blood pressure, but it was not associated with increased arterial stiffness.

  2. Comparison of ultrasound assessment of flow-mediated dilatation in the radial and brachial artery with upper and forearm cuff positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agewall, S; Doughty, R N; Bagg, W; Whalley, G A; Braatvedt, G; Sharpe, N

    2001-01-01

    In the published literature relating to flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), there are substantial differences between centres in terms of normal FMD amongst healthy subjects. This present study attempts to identify the effect of differing methodologies on FMD. High frequency ultrasound was used to measure blood flow and percentage brachial and radial artery dilatation after reactive hyperaemia induced by forearm or upper arm cuff occlusion in 24 healthy subjects, less than 40 years, without known cardiovascular risk factors. FMD of the brachial artery was significantly higher after upper arm occlusion, compared with forearm occlusion, 6.4 (3.3) and 3.9 (2.6)% (P<0.05), respectively. FMD of the radial artery was significantly higher after forearm occlusion, compared with upper arm occlusion, 10.0 (4.6) and 7.9 (3.5)% (P<0.05), respectively. The percentage blood flow increase in the brachial and radial arteries after forearm and upper arm occlusion were similar. After forearm and upper arm occlusion, the radial artery percentage dilatation was greater than the brachial artery. In conclusion dilatation of the brachial artery, after reactive hyperaemia induced by upper arm occlusion, was significantly more pronounced compared with dilatation of the brachial artery after forearm occlusion, despite a similar percentage blood flow increase. The local ischaemia of the brachial artery with a proximal occlusion may explain why the brachial artery dilated more after upper arm occlusion compared with after forearm occlusion. The study has also shown that FMD of the radial artery could be assessed by B-mode ultrasound technique. FMD was greater using the radial artery compared with the brachial artery, suggesting that the radial artery may be a useful way to assess FMD in future clinical studies.

  3. Brachial artery adaptation to lower limb exercise training: role of shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Gurpreet K; Dawson, Ellen A; Atkinson, Ceri; Haynes, Andrew; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2012-05-01

    Lower limb exercise increases upper limb conduit artery blood flow and shear stress, and leg exercise training can enhance upper limb vascular function. We therefore examined the contribution of shear stress to changes in vascular function in the nonexercising upper limbs in response to lower limb cycling exercise training. Initially, five male subjects underwent bilateral brachial artery duplex ultrasound to measure blood flow and shear responses to 30-min cycling exercise at 80% of maximal heart rate. Responses in one forearm were significantly (P 0.05) across the 8-wk intervention period. Our data suggest that lower limb cycle training induces a transient increase in upper limb vascular function in healthy young humans, which is, at least partly, mediated via shear stress.

  4. Detection of positional brachial plexus injury by radial arterial line during spinal exposure before neuromonitoring confirmation: a retrospective case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengyong; Chen, Leo; Kwon, Paul; Montez, Michele; Voegeli, Thomas; Bueff, Hans

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate the potential usefulness of radial arterial line monitoring in detection of brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery. Multiple neuromonitoring modalities including SEPs, MEPs and EMG were performed for a posterior thoracicolumbar surgery. Radial arterial line (A-line) was placed on the right wrist for arterial blood pressure monitoring. Reliable ulnar nerve SEPs, hand muscle MEPs and arterial blood pressure readings were obtained after patient was placed in a prone position. A-line malfunction was noted about 15 min after incision. Loss of ulnar nerve SEPs and hand muscle MEPs with a cold hand on the right was noticed when neuromonitoring resumed after spine exposure. SEPs, MEPs, A-line readings and hand temperature returned after modification of the right arm position. Radial arterial line monitoring may help detect positional brachial plexus injury in spinal surgery when continuous neuromonitoring is interrupted during spine exposure in prone position.

  5. Characterizing Methods of Measuring Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Brachial Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Ariane R.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is one of the many important functions of the vascular endothelium. Endothelial dysfunction is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and occurs in the absence of angiographic disease. Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique commonly used to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans and gauge the health of the cardiovascular system. Reductions in brachial artery FMD have been strongly correlated with disease progression and are predictive of future cardiac events. The flow stimulus for brachial artery FMD occurs as a result of the increased shear stress following deflation of an occlusion cuff around the upper arm. Using 2-dimensional ultrasound, changes in arterial diameter up to 5-minutes following cuff deflation are calculated from baseline image measurements. Along with pulsed Doppler measures of flow velocity through the artery, flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be assessed. There is debate among investigators, however, about the proper positioning of the occlusion cuff during FMD testing. It is thought that placement of the cuff around the upper arm may not accurately reflect the impact of nitric oxide, a critically important molecule released as a result of the increased shear stress created by the FMD technique. Data suggest that the production of other endogenous metabolites may also contribute to FMD-related changes when positioning the cuff around the upper arm. To overcome the potential influence of such molecules, researchers now suggest that the occlusion cuff be placed below the elbow allowing a more precise estimate of nitric oxide mediated dilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in FMD between the two methodologies of occlusion cuff placement. In addition, this study will determine the method that is easier for ultrasound technicians to perform and will produce a low coefficient of variance between technicians. Ultimately

  6. Prediction of preeclampsia by means of Doppler flowmetry of uterine artery and flow-mediated dilation of brachial artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Costa Calixto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the association of Doppler of uterine artery and flow-mediated dilation of brachial artery (FMD in the assessment of placental perfusion and endothelial function to predict preeclampsia. Materials and Methods A total of 91 patients considered as at risk for developing preeclampsia were recruited at the prenatal unit of the authors' institution. All the patients underwent FMD and Doppler of uterine arteries between their 24th and 28th gestational weeks. Calculations of sensitivity and specificity for both isolated and associated methods were performed. Results Nineteen out of the 91 patients developed preeclampsia, while the rest remained normotensive. Doppler flowmetry of uterine arteries with presence of bilateral protodiastolic notch had sensitivity of 63.1% and specificity of 87.5% for the prediction of preeclampsia. Considering a cutoff value of 6.5%, FMD showed sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity of 73.6%. In a parallel analysis, as the two methods were associated, sensitivity was 94.2% and specificity, 64.4%. Conclusion The association of Doppler study of uterine arteries and FMD has proved to be an interesting clinical strategy for the prediction of preeclampsia, which may represent a positive impact on prenatal care of patients considered as at high-risk for developing such a condition.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure among children residing near an oil refinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Urbina, Elaine M; Khoder, Mamdouh; Alghamdi, Mansour; Shabaj, Ibrahim; Alam, Mohammed S; Harrison, Roy M; Shamy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are produced by the burning and processing of fuel oils, and have been associated with oxidant stress, insulin resistance and hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined whether adolescents are susceptible to cardiovascular effects of PAHs. To study associations of PAH exposure with blood pressure (BP) and brachial artery distensibility (BAD), an early marker of arterial wall stiffness, in young boys attending three schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in varying proximity to an oil refinery. Air samples collected from the three schools were analyzed for PAHs. PAH metabolites (total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene) were measured in urine samples from 184 adolescent males, in whom anthropometrics, heart rate, pulse pressure, brachial artery distensibility and blood pressure were measured. Descriptive, bivariate and multivariable analyses were performed to assess relationships of school location and urinary PAH metabolites with cardiovascular measures. Total suspended matter was significantly higher (444 ± 143 μg/m(3)) at the school near the refinery compared to a school located near a ring road (395 ± 65 μg/m(3)) and a school located away from vehicle traffic (232 ± 137 μg/m(3)), as were PAHs. Systolic (0.47 S D units, p = 0.006) and diastolic (0.53 SD units, p refinery, with a 4.36-fold increase in prehypertension (p = 0.001), controlling for confounders. No differences in pulse pressure, BAD and heart rate were noted in relationship to school location. Urinary total hydroxyphenanthrenes and 1-hydroxypyrene were not associated with cardiovascular outcomes. Proximity to an oil refinery in Saudi Arabia is associated with prehypertension and increases in PAH and particulate matter exposures. Further study including insulin resistance measurements, better control for confounding, and longitudinal measurement is indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of retrograde shear rate on brachial and superficial femoral artery flow-mediated dilation in older subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Green, D.J.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    An inverse, dose-dependent relationship between retrograde shear rate and brachial artery endothelial function exists in young subjects. This relationship has not been investigated in older adults, who have been related to lower endothelial function, higher resting retrograde shear rate and higher

  9. Dorsal Scapular Artery Variations and Relationship to the Brachial Plexus, and a Related Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenna, Anne-Marie A; Alexandru, Daniela; Karimi, Afshin; Brown, Justin M; Bove, Geoffrey M; Daly, Frank J; Pastore, Anthony M; Pearson, Helen E; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Knowledge of the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery (DSA) with the brachial plexus is limited. Objective We report a case of a variant DSA path, and revisit DSA origins and under-investigated relationship with the plexus in cadavers. Methods The DSA was examined in a male patient and 106 cadavers. Results In the case, we observed an unusual DSA compressing the lower plexus trunk, that resulted in intermittent radiating pain and paresthesia. In the cadavers, the DSA originated most commonly from the subclavian artery (71%), with 35% from the thyrocervical trunk. Nine sides of eight cadavers (seven females) had two DSA branches per side, with one branch from each origin. The most typical DSA path was a subclavian artery origin before passing between upper and middle brachial plexus trunks (40% of DSAs), versus between middle and lower trunks (23%), or inferior (4%) or superior to the plexus (1%). Following a thyrocervical trunk origin, the DSA passed most frequently superior to the plexus (23%), versus between middle and lower trunks (6%) or upper and middle trunks (4%). Bilateral symmetry in origin and path through the brachial plexus was observed in 13 of 35 females (37%) and 6 of 17 males (35%), with the most common bilateral finding of a subclavian artery origin and a path between upper and middle trunks (17%). Conclusion Variability in the relationship between DSA and trunks of the brachial plexus has surgical and clinical implications, such as diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome.

  10. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, van Anke C.C.M.; Greyling, Arno; Zock, Peter L.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Hopman, Maria T.; Mensink, Ronald P.; Reesink, Koen D.; Green, Daniel J.; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. Methods: Volunteer-related and

  11. Flow-associated dilatory capacity of the brachial artery is intact in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Peter; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Iversen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is associated with endothelial dysfunction of resistance arteries. This study tested whether endothelial dysfunction is also present in the conduit arteries in patients with preserved renal function. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients (9...... females and 18 males, age 36 +/- 10 years) with polycystic kidney disease and normal renal function were compared to 27 healthy controls. The dilatory responses of the brachial artery to postischemic increased blood flow [endothelium-dependent flow-associated dilatation (FAD)] and to nitroglycerin...... and the plasma concentration of NOx was reduced in patients with polycystic kidney disease. CONCLUSION: Biochemical markers confirm an association between polycystic kidney disease and endothelial dysfunction. However, a normal FAD of the brachial artery suggests that the endothelial dysfunction does not involve...

  12. Remote ischemic preconditioning prevents reduction in brachial artery flow-mediated dilation after strenuous exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Tom G; Birk, Gurpreet K; Cable, N Timothy; Atkinson, Greg; Green, Daniel J; Jones, Helen; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2012-09-01

    Strenuous exercise is associated with an immediate decrease in endothelial function. Repeated bouts of ischemia followed by reperfusion, known as remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC), is able to protect the endothelium against ischemia-induced injury beyond the ischemic area. We examined the hypothesis that RIPC prevents the decrease in endothelial function observed after strenuous exercise in healthy men. In a randomized, crossover study, 13 healthy men performed running exercise preceded by RIPC of the lower limbs (4 × 5-min 220-mmHg bilateral occlusion) or a sham intervention (sham; 4 × 5-min 20-mmHg bilateral occlusion). Participants performed a graded maximal treadmill running test, followed by a 5-km time trial (TT). Brachial artery endothelial function was examined before and after RIPC or sham, as well as after the 5-km TT. We measured flow-mediated dilation (FMD), an index of endothelium-dependent function, using high-resolution echo-Doppler. We also calculated the shear rate area-under-the-curve (from cuff deflation to peak dilatation; SR(AUC)). Data are described as mean and 95% confidence intervals. FMD changed by 0.30). In the sham trial, FMD changed from 5.1 (4.4-5.9) to 3.7% (2.6-4.8) following the 5-km TT (P = 0.02). In the RIPC trial, FMD changed negligibly from 5.4 (4.4-6.4) post-IPC and 5.7% (4.6-6.8) post 5-km TT (P = 0.60). Baseline diameter, SR(AUC), and time-to-peak diameter were all increased following the 5-km TT (P < 0.05), but these changes did not influence the IPC-mediated maintenance of FMD. In conclusion, these data indicate that strenuous lower-limb exercise results in an acute decrease in brachial artery FMD of ~1.4% in healthy men. However, we have shown for the first time that prior RIPC of the lower limbs maintains postexercise brachial artery endothelium-dependent function at preexercise levels.

  13. Short- and long-term influence of diet and simvastatin on brachial artery endothelial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Thayssen, Per; Petersen, Knud Erik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD) has often been studied in patients with hypercholesterolemia without overt coronary atherosclerosis where an improvement after statin treatment has been documented within few weeks. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term effect of diet...... as well as short- and long-term effect of simvastatin on EDD in patients with hypercholesterolemia and ischemic heart disease. METHODS: In 43 male patients with hypercholesterolemia and ischemic heart disease, EDD of the brachial artery was measured at baseline, after 3 months on a lipid-lowering diet......, and after another 1, 3 and 12 months on simvastatin at 40 mg/day. RESULTS: Three months changes in EDD were neither influenced by diet nor short-term simvastatin therapy (4.9% vs. 4.9% vs. 4.8%, p=ns). Twelve months simvastatin treatment, however, significantly improved EDD by 32.7% (4.9% vs. 6.5%, p=0...

  14. Assessment of endothelial function by brachial artery flow mediated dilatation in microvascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Otikunta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac syndrome X is an important therapeutic and diagnostic challenge to physician. Study of Csx patients may help to understand the pathophysiology of coronary microcirculation and to gain an insight on the management of these group patients. Methods We measured the flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery both endothelium dependent and independent vasodilatation by high resolution ultrasound in 30 cardiac syndrome X patients and matched with 30 healthy control subjects. Results Significantly decreased flow mediated dilatation was observed in patients when compared to control (9.42 ± 7.20 vs 21.11 ± 9.16 p 11.11(p Conclusions The study suggests impairment of endothelial function in cardiac syndrome X patients. Increased Systolic blood pressure and body mass index may increase the risk of impairment of endothelial function in this group of patients.

  15. Comparing Two Ovulation Induction Methods by Brachial Artery Ultrasonography in Infertile Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghorbani Yekta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial dysfunction can influence fertility rate in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS as flow mediated dilatation (FMD is impaired in patients with the disease. The aim of this study was to compare two methods of ovulation induction by letrozole or letrozole plus human menopausal gonadotropins (HMGs in infertile women with PCOS who were resistant to clomiphene citrate based on brachial artery ultrasound findings.Methods: In this double -blind randomized clinical trial, 59 infertile women who had the inclusion criteria for PCOS were evaluated in the Infertility Clinic of Shariati Hospital in Tehran, Iran in 2010-2011. The patients were assigned to two letrozole and letrozole plus HMG groups and were evaluated for FMD in the brachial artery by transvaginal ultrasonography. Later, the values were recorded and analyzed statistically.Results: In the letrozole group, infertility treatment was successful in 15 (57.7% but it failed in 11 (42.3% patients. In letrozole plus HMG group, the treatment was successful in 18 (54.5% while it failed in 15 (45.5% patients. The mean FMD values in the groups with successful and unsuccessful treatment results were 19.42±10% and 18.57±7.2%, respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.712. Moreover, the average endometrial thickness in groups with successful and unsuccessful treatment results were 8.4±1.3 mm and 9.8±3.9 mm, respectively but the difference was not significant either (P=0.06.Conclusion: In infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome that are resistant to clomiphene, letrozole or letrozole combined with gonadotropin can be equally effective for ovulation induction.

  16. Estimation of the maximum flow-mediated brachial artery response using local regression methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, M E; Li, S; Fekedulegn, D; Dorn, J; Joseph, P N; Violanti, J; Burchfiel, C M

    2007-10-01

    We consider methods for estimating the maximum from a sequence of measurements of flow-mediated diameter of the brachial artery. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) is represented using the maximum change from a baseline diameter measurement after the release of a blood pressure cuff that has been inflated to reduce flow in the brachial artery. The influence of the measurement error on the maximum diameter from raw data can lead to overestimation of the average maximum change from the baseline for a sample of individuals. Nonparametric regression models provide a potential means for dealing with this problem. When using this approach, it is necessary to make a judicious choice of regression methods and smoothing parameters to avoid overestimation or underestimation of FMD. This study presents results from simulation studies using kernel-based local linear regression methods that characterize the relationship between the measurement error, smoothing and bias in estimates of FMD. Comparisons between fixed or constant smoothing and automated smoothing parameter selection using the generalized cross validation (GCV) statistic are made, and it is shown that GCV-optimized smoothing may over-smooth or under-smooth depending on the heart rate, measurement error and measurement frequency. We also present an example using measured data from the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress (BCOPS) pilot study. In this example, smoothing resulted in lower estimates of FMD and there was no clear evidence of an optimal smoothing level. The choice to use smoothing and the appropriate smoothing level to use may depend on the application.

  17. Factors affecting the validity of the oscillometric ankle brachial index to detect peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herráiz-Adillo, Ángel; Cavero-Redondo, Iván; Álvarez-Bueno, Celia; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Pozuelo-Carrascosa, Diana P; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca

    2017-09-08

    The use of oscillometric ankle brachial index (ABI) to diagnose peripheral arterial disease (PAD) has raised concern, especially due to a lack of agreement and sensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate those factors affecting the validity of oscillometric ABI in comparison to Doppler ABI to detect PAD. Through univariate and multivariate linear regression, we studied those factors affecting the differences between oscillometric and Doppler ABI; through univariate and multivariate logistic regression we analyzed the false negative rate of oscillometric ABI to detect PAD. We analyzed 197 consecutive subjects (394 legs) from two settings: Primary Care and Vascular Service. The means of oscillometric ABI and Doppler ABI were 1.094 (95%CI: 0.843-1.345) and 1.073 (95%CI: 0.769-1.374) (poscillometric and Doppler ABI were Doppler ankle blood pressure (β=‒0.610, poscillometric brachial blood pressure (β=0.136, p=0.037); in women, those were weight (β=0.351, pblood pressure (β=‒0.318, poscillometric ABI to detect PAD were 80.6% and 97.4%, respectively, and covariates explaining the rate of false negatives in PAD population were setting (Exp(β)=17.21, p=0.009) and tobacco (packs/year) (Exp(β)=1.049, p=0.002). Although some factors influencing the lack of agreement between oscillometric and Doppler ABI were identified, the correction of oscillometric ABI seems impractical, since Doppler is needed, the bias is not always uniformly distributed and its clinical relevance is small. According to sensitivity, borderline oscillometric ABI in Primary Care settings and smokers suggest PAD.

  18. Does brachial artery flow-mediated dilation scale to anthropometric characteristics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, N D; Green, D J; Tinken, T M; Sutton, L; McWhannell, N; Cable, N T; Stratton, G; George, K

    2010-09-01

    Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) assesses the health of the vascular endothelium. Despite widespread adoption of scaling practices in cardiac research, scaling for body size or composition has not been used for FMD. The present study investigated the relationships between brachial FMD and body composition in 129 children aged 9-10 (75 female symbol, 54 male symbol), and 50 men aged 16-49. Body composition variables (total, lean, fat mass in the whole body, arm, forearm) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, FMD was measured in the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound. FMD was scaled using simple ratios (y/x) and allometric approaches (y/x ( b )) after log-log least squares linear regression produced allometric exponents (b). Size independence was confirmed via bivariate correlations (x:y/x; x:y/x ( b )). No relationships were evident between FMD and body composition variables in adults. Small correlations existed between FMD and measures of segmental fat mass in children (r = -0.18 to -0.19, p < 0.05), there were no significant relationships between FMD and measures of lean or total mass in children. For all significant relationships, b-exponents were different from 1 (CIs -0.36 to 0.07), suggesting ratio scaling approaches were flawed. This was confirmed when ratio scaling produced negative residual size correlations, whereas allometric scaling produced size-independent indices. Correlations between FMD and body composition were weak in children and insignificant in adults. As the results of this study are limited to the populations examined, our findings do not support the adoption of scaling procedures to correct FMD.

  19. Influence of exercise intensity on respiratory muscle fatigue and brachial artery blood flow during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Ade, Carl J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Skutnik, Benjamin C; Barstow, Thomas J; Wong, Brett J; Harms, Craig A

    2014-08-01

    During high intensity exercise, both respiratory muscle fatigue and cardiovascular reflexes occur; however, it is not known how inactive limb blood flow is influenced. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of moderate and high exercise intensity on respiratory muscle fatigue and inactive limb muscle and cutaneous blood flow during exercise. Twelve men cycled at 70 and 85 % [Formula: see text] for 20 min. Subjects also performed a second 85 % [Formula: see text] test after ingesting 1,800 mg of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which has been shown to reduce respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF). Maximum inspiratory pressures (P Imax), brachial artery blood flow (BABF), cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), and mean arterial pressure were measured at rest and during exercise. Significant RMF occurred with 85 % [Formula: see text] (P Imax, -12.8 ± 9.8 %), but not with 70 % [Formula: see text] (P Imax, -5.0 ± 5.9 %). BABF and BA vascular conductance were significantly lower at end exercise of the 85 % [Formula: see text] test compared to the 70 % [Formula: see text] test. CVC during exercise was not different (p > 0.05) between trials. With NAC, RMF was reduced (p RMF, decreases in inactive arm blood flow, and vascular conductance, but not cutaneous blood flow.

  20. Serum amyloid P (SAP) is associated with impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in chronically HIV-1 infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Mitchell, Brooks I; Stein, James H; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Nakamoto, Beau; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Souza, Scott A; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial dysfunction (ED), as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis utilizing baseline data of 135 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular (HAHC-CVD) study who had available baseline inflammatory biomarkers and brachial artery FMD measurements. We observed significant associations between brachial artery FMD and baseline brachial artery diameter, age, male gender, traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as BMI, waist to hip ratio, hypertension, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and LDL cholesterol, and 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS). Of all biomarkers tested, higher level of C-reactive protein (CRP) (beta =  - 0.695, P = 0.030) and serum amyloid P (SAP) (beta =  - 1.318, P = 0.021) were significantly associated with lower brachial artery FMD in univariable regression analysis. After adjusting for baseline brachial artery diameter, age, and selected traditional CVD risk factors in multivariable model, SAP remained significantly associated with brachial artery FMD (beta =  - 1.094, P = 0.030), while CRP was not (beta =  - 0.391, P = 0.181). Serum amyloid P was independently associated with impaired brachial artery FMD and may potentially relate to ED and increased CVD risk in HIV-infected patients on stable ART.

  1. Changes of Blood Flow Volume in the Superior Mesenteric Artery and Brachial Artery with Abdominal Thermal Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Takayama

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine, moxibustion is a local thermal therapy that is used for several conditions. Quantifying the effects of moxibustion therapy has been difficult because the treatment temperature depends on the physician's experience, and the temperature distribution in the target area is not uniform. This prospective observational study aims to quantify the effect of local thermal stimulation to the abdomen. We developed a heat transfer control device (HTCD for local thermal stimulation. Twenty-four healthy subjects were enrolled and they underwent abdominal thermal stimulation to the para-umbilical region with the device for 20 min. Blood flow volume in the superior mesenteric artery (SMA and brachial artery (BA, the heart rate and the blood pressure were measured at rest, 15 min after starting thermal stimulation and 10, 20, 30 and 40 min after completing thermal stimulation. Blood flow parameters were measured by high-resolution ultrasound. In the SMA, blood flow volume was significantly increased during thermal stimulation (, as well as at 10 min ( and 20 min ( after stimulation. In the BA, blood flow volume decreased at 40 min after stimulation (. In conclusion we could quantify the effect of local thermal stimulation with an HTCD and high-resolution ultrasound. Thermal stimulation of the para-umbilical region increased blood flow in the SMA 20 min after stimulation in healthy subjects.

  2. Brachial artery blood flow responses to different modalities of lower limb exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; Black, Mark A; Hopman, Maria T E; Cable, Nigel T; Green, Daniel J

    2009-05-01

    Cycling is associated with a reproducible systolic anterograde and diastolic retrograde flow pattern in the brachial artery (BA) of the inactive upper limb, which results in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) release. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of different types and intensities of lower limb exercise on the BA flow pattern. We examined BA blood flow and shear rate patterns during cycling, leg kicking, and walking exercise in 12 young subjects (24 +/- 3 yr). BA diameter, blood flow, and shear rate were assessed at baseline (1 min) and at three incremental intensity levels of cycling (60, 80, and 120 W), bilateral leg kicking (5, 7.5, and 10 kg), and walking (3, 4, and 5 km x h(-1)), performed for 3 min each. Edge detection and wall tracking of high-resolution B-mode arterial ultrasound images, combined with synchronized Doppler waveform envelope analysis, were used to calculate conduit artery diameter and anterograde/retrograde blood flow and shear rate continuously across the cardiac cycle. BA mean blood flow and shear rate increased significantly throughout each exercise protocol (P < 0.001), and BA anterograde blood flow and shear rate showed comparable increases throughout each protocol (P < 0.001). Retrograde blood flow and shear rate, however, demonstrated a significant increase during cycling and walking (P < 0.001) but not during leg kicking. Rhythmic lower limb exercise (cycling and walking) results in an increase in BA systolic anterograde blood flow and shear rate, directly followed by a large retrograde flow and shear rate. This typical pattern, previously linked with endothelial NO release, is not present during a different type of exercise such as leg kicking.

  3. Evaluation of the brachial artery endothelial function in chronic alcohol consumption among males by high-frequency ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Runlan; Shen, Jiaqi; Zhou, Qiao; Liu, Yue; Li, Guangsen

    2017-02-01

    There is evidence suggesting that different volumes of chronic alcohol consumption have different effects on the endothelium. Therefore, using high-frequency ultrasonography, we evaluate the effects of the different volume and duration of alcohol intake on brachial artery endothelial function in chronic drinkers. Ninety-two male chronic episodic alcoholics were grouped by alcohol intake amount and duration: mild (group B, n=30); ≤90 mg ethanol daily, 3-5 days/wk for 5-8 years; moderate (group C, n=30); 90-150 mg ethanol daily, 3-5 days/wk for 9-20 years; and severe (group D, n=32); ≥150 mg ethanol daily, 6-7 days/wk for more than 10 years. Thirty male nondrinkers were recruited as the control group A. High-frequency ultrasonography was used to measure brachial artery diameter during rest, during reactive hyperemia and following the administration of nitroglycerin. Endothelial-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and endothelial-independent brachial artery nitrate-mediated dilatation (NMD) were calculated. Flow-mediated dilatation values for group C and D were significantly lower than those for group A and B (VC =7.63±0.22, VD =5.85±0.23 vs VA =13.35±0.35, VB =12.81±0.36, Pconsumption caused endothelial dysfunction, even damaging vascular smooth muscle cells in cases of heavy alcohol consumption, while abstinence and chronic mild alcoholics caused no effect on endothelial function. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of endothelial function in patients with limited systemic sclerosis by use of brachial artery Doppler ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Tatiana Melo; Bica, Blanca Elena Gomes; Villela, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Salles, Elizabeth Figueiredo; Azevedo, Mario Newton Leitão de; Papi, José Angelo de Souza; Martins, Rosângela Aparecida Gomes

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the brachial artery endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent dilating responses in patients with limited systemic sclerosis (LSSc) with those of healthy subjects of the same gender, age and color. Twenty adult, non-obese, non-smoker, non-diabetic, non-dyslipidemic, and non-hypertensive women, who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for the diagnosis of SSc, were submitted to right brachial artery Doppler ultrasound. The vasodilating responses were analyzed as follows: the endothelium-dependent dilating response, after a 5-minute ischemia in the right arm; and the endothelium-independent dilating response, after administering 300 mcg of nitroglycerin (NTG) sublingually. The results were compared with the response obtained in healthy subjects. Brachial artery longitudinal diameter was significantly low at baseline 1: 3.57 ± 0.52 mm and 3.93 ± 0.39 mm for the LSSc group and the control group, respectively, P = 0.005. The vascular reactivity after the ischemia/reactive hyperemia and the NTG showed no significant difference between the groups (8.60 ± 5.45 mm vs. 9.26 ± 5.91 mm and 25.01 ± 12.55 mm vs. 19.59 ± 7.94 mm for the LSSc and control groups, respectively). Also, no statistically significant difference was found between red blood cell velocity (RBCV) after reactive hyperemia and NTG (110.2 ± 43.86 cm/s vs. 102.0 ± 25.89 cm/s and 63.80 ± 17.69 cm/s vs. 65.4 ± 12.90 cm/s in the LSSc and control groups, respectively). Although the LSSc group showed lower brachial artery diameter, the endothelium-dependent and the endothelium-independent dilating responses were preserved in both groups.

  5. Ankle-brachial index, a screening for peripheral obstructive arterial disease, and migraine - a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurno, Mauro Eduardo; Chevtchouk, Liliana; Nunes, Aida Aguilar; de Rezende, Dilermando Fazito; Jevoux, Carla da Cunha; de Souza, Jano Alves; Moreira Filho, Pedro Ferreira

    2010-04-01

    Epidemiological studies support the association between migraine, especially migraine with aura, and vascular disorders. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is largely used as a surrogate of peripheral obstructive arterial disorders (POAD). Accordingly, in this study we contrasted the ABI in individuals with migraine and in controls. We investigated 50 migraineurs and 38 controls and obtained the ABI (ratio between the systolic arterial pressure obtained in the legs and in the arms) using digital sphygmomanometry. As per validation studies, we used the cut-off of 0.9 as the normal limit for the ABI. We adjusted for gender, use of contraceptive hormones, tabagism, and other cardiovascular risk factors. We found abnormal values of ABI, suggestive of mild or moderate POAD, in 31 individuals (35.2%). Mean value was 0.96 (standard deviation = 0.10). None of our patients had ABI < 0.4, which would suggest severe POAD. Mean ABI for migraineurs was 0.94 (0.11), and for controls it was 0.99 (0.09). Difference was significant (t = 2.21 and P = .022). After adjustments, ABI remained significantly associated with migraine status (P = .024). Adjustments were reasonably effective (chi(2) of Hosmer-Lemeshow = 1.06, P = .590). Our findings suggest that decreased values of ABI are more common in migraineurs than in controls. Although causality was not assessed by us, the relationship is of importance per se. Doctors should measure the ABI in individuals with migraine as an easy way to screen for cardiovascular risk.

  6. Brachial artery diameter as a marker for cardiovascular risk assessment: FMD-J study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Soga, Junko; Fujimura, Noritaka; Idei, Naomi; Mikami, Shinsuke; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Kajikawa, Masato; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Hashimoto, Haruki; Aibara, Yoshiki; Yusoff, Farina Mohamad; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Noma, Kensuke; Nakashima, Ayumu; Goto, Chikara; Tomiyama, Hirofumi; Takase, Bonpei; Kohro, Takahide; Suzuki, Toru; Ishizu, Tomoko; Ueda, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Furumoto, Tomoo; Kario, Kazuomi; Inoue, Teruo; Koba, Shinji; Watanabe, Kentaro; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Hano, Takuzo; Sata, Masataka; Ishibashi, Yutaka; Node, Koichi; Maemura, Koji; Ohya, Yusuke; Furukawa, Taiji; Ito, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Hisao; Yamashina, Akira; Higashi, Yukihito

    2018-01-01

    Baseline brachial artery (BBA) diameter has been reported to be a potential confounding factor of flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between BBA diameter and cardiovascular risk factors and compare the diagnostic accuracy of BBA diameter in subjects without cardiovascular risk factors and patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) with that of FMD. We measured BBA diameter and FMD in 5695 male subjects. In addition, we retrospectively investigated the incidence of cardiovascular events using another population sample consisting of 440 male subjects, to compare the accuracy of BBA diameter with that of FMD in predicting cardiovascular events. BBA diameter and FMD significantly correlated with age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose as well as Framingham risk score. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and CVD increased with the increase in BBA diameter and FMD. Area under the curve (AUC) value of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for BBA diameter to diagnose subjects without cardiovascular risk factors (0.59 vs. 0.62, p = 0.001) or patients with CVD (0.58 vs. 0.64, p FMD. In the retrospective study, the AUC value of the ROC curve for BBA diameter to predict first major cardiovascular events was significantly lower than that of FMD (0.50 vs. 0.62, p = 0.03). In men, BBA diameter was inferior to FMD for assessment of cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Concordance between 3 methods of measurement the ankle-brachial index to diagnose peripheral artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forés, Rosa; Alzamora, Maria Teresa; Pera, Guillem; Torán, Pere; Urrea, Magalí; Heras, Antonio

    2014-10-21

    To determine the concordance of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) determined by automatic measurements (sphygmomanometer Omron and the triple cuff device) using doppler as the gold-standard, computing as well as sensitivity and specificity. ARTPER population cohort subjects, classified as peripheral arterial disease (PAD) if ABI<0.9, calcified if ABI≥1.4 and healthy otherwise. To asses concordance we used kappa index using the 3 categories and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for ABI continuous values. Eighty-eight participants, 52% women, 57-87 years. It was possible to calculate the ABI using doppler for 100%, 97% using Omron and 95% using triple. ABI means (standard deviation) were: doppler 1.089 (0.236), Omron 1.082 (0.110), triple 1.146 (0.134), with poor agreement (ICC doppler/Omron=0.27, doppler/triple=0.13, and triple/Omron=0.39). Categorizing ABI as PAD-healthy-calcified 13.6% (doppler), 6.8% (Omron) and 3.4% (triple) were PAD and 9.1% (doppler), 1.1% (Omron) and 9.1% (triple) were calcified. Kappa indexes were weak (doppler/Omron=0.22, doppler/triple=0.01, triple/Omron=0.17). Both triple and Omron were highly specific (97%) but had very low sensitivity (8 and 33%, respectively) compared to doppler. Concordance of ABI automatic measurements as Omron and triple with doppler was poor, and they do not seem suitable for screening for PAD in primary care consultations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of particulate air pollution and secondhand smoke on endothelium-dependent brachial artery dilation in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hashemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to determine the association of particulate matters with endothelial function, measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD of brachial artery, in children with or without exposure to secondhand smoke. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to March 2011 in Isfahan, which is the second large and air-polluted city in Iran. The areas of the city with lowest and highest air pollution were determined, and in each area, 25 prepubescent boys with or without exposure to daily tobacco smoke in home were selected, i.e. 100 children were studied in total. Results: FMD was significantly smaller in those living in high-polluted area and those exposed to secondhand smoke. Multiple linear regression analysis, adjusted for age and body mass index, showed that both passive smoking status and living area in terms of particulate air pollution were effective determinants of the brachial artery diameter. The standardized coefficient of passive smoking status was –0.36 (SD = 0.09, P < 0.0001 showing negative association with percent increase in FMD. Likewise, the percent increase in brachial artery diameter was lower in passive smoker children. Similar relationship was documented for PM 10 concentration with a regression coefficient of –0.32 (SD = 0.04, P < 0.0001. Without considering passive smoking variable, PM 10 concentration has significant independent effect on FMD level. Conclusion: Our findings provide evidence on the association of environmental factors on endothelial dysfunction from early life. Studying such associations among healthy children may help identify the underlying mechanisms. The clinical implications of environmental factors on early stages of atherosclerosis should be confirmed in longitudinal studies.

  9. Variations in brachial plexus and the relationship of median nerve with the axillary artery: a case report

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    Rao Vani

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial Plexus innervates the upper limb. As it is the point of formation of many nerves, variations are common. Knowledge of these is important to anatomists, radiologists, anesthesiologists and surgeons. The presence of anatomical variations of the peripheral nervous system is often used to explain unexpected clinical signs and symptoms. Case Presentation On routine dissection of an embalmed 57 year old male cadaver, variations were found in the formation of divisions and cords of the Brachial Plexus of the right side. Some previously unreported findings observed were; direct branches to the muscles Pectoralis Minor and Latissimus dorsi from C6, innervation of deltoid by C6 and C7 roots and the origin of lateral pectoral nerve from the posterior division of upper trunk. The median nerve was present lateral to axillary artery. The left side brachial plexus was also inspected and found to have normal anatomy. Conclusion The probable cause for such variations and their embryological basis is discussed in the paper. It is also concluded that although these variations may not have affected the functioning of upper limb in this individual, knowledge of such variations is essential in evaluation of unexplained sensory and motor loss after trauma and surgical interventions to the upper limb.

  10. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  11. Retraction Statement: Unrecognized High Brachial Artery Bifurcation is Associated with Higher Rate of Dialysis Access by Dr. Lee Kirksey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The above article from Seminars in Dialysis, published online on 4 September 2011 in Wiley Online Library (http://wileyonlinelibrary.com) has been retracted by agreement among the journal's Editor-in-Chief, Richard A. Sherman MD, the journal's North American editor of ASDIN content at the time, Arif Asif MD, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The decision to retract was agreed upon following notification by Dr. HeeJun Yang, the author of an article published in 2008, "Variations of the Superficial Brachial Artery in Korean Cadavers." Figure 1 (A & B) and Figure 2 (A-C) in the Kirksey article (1), which originally appeared in the 2008 article by Dr. Yang, were used without authorization or permission from Dr. Yang or the article's publisher. Reference Kirksey L: Unrecognized high brachial artery bifurcation is associated with higher rate of dialysis access. Semin Dial 24(6):698-702, 2011. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-139X.2011.00923.x. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The impact of a cold pressor test on brachial artery handgrip exercise-induced flow-mediated dilation.

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    Stuckless, Troy J R; Pyke, Kyra E

    2015-10-01

    It is unknown how endothelial-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) stimulated by a sustained, exercise-induced increase in shear stress (EX-FMD) is affected by a simultaneous sympathoexcitatory painful stimulus. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a cold pressor test (CPT) on brachial artery EX-FMD elicited by a handgrip exercise-induced increase in shear stress. Participants were healthy males (age 21±2 years) (n=28; 16 Experimental group, 12 Control). Brachial artery diameter and blood velocity were measured using echo and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Shear stress was estimated by shear rate (shear rate = blood velocity / diameter) and targeted to reach 75 s(-1) in each of two EX-FMD trials in all subjects. In the Experimental group, the second EX-FMD trial was accompanied by simultaneous foot immersion in ice water (simultaneous CPT). The shear rate stimulus did not differ between groups (p=0.823) or trials (p=0.726) (group × trial interaction: p=0.646) (average exercise shear rate (mean ± SD): 67.6±6.2 s(-1)). The CPT (experienced during EX-FMD trial 2 in the Experimental group) increased mean arterial pressure (pgroup. %EX-FMD was not different between groups (p=0.508) or trials (p=0.592) (group × trial interaction: p=0.879) (EX-FMD: Experimental group trial 1: 5.4±3.4%, trial 2: 5.6±2.6%; Control group trial 1: 6.0±3.7%, trial 2: 6.4±2.2%). In conclusion, the CPT did not impact concurrent EX-FMD, and this indicates that an acute painful stimulus does not interfere with conduit artery FMD responses during exercise in young healthy men. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Brachial artery constriction during brachial artery reactivity testing predicts major adverse clinical outcomes in women with suspected myocardial ischemia: results from the NHLBI-sponsored women's ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE Study.

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    Tara L Sedlak

    Full Text Available Limited brachial artery (BA flow-mediated dilation during brachial artery reactivity testing (BART has been linked to increased cardiovascular risk. We report on the phenomenon of BA constriction (BAC following hyperemia.To determine whether BAC predicts adverse CV outcomes and/or mortality in the women's ischemic Syndrome Evaluation Study (WISE. Further, as a secondary objective we sought to determine the risk factors associated with BAC.We performed BART on 377 women with chest pain referred for coronary angiography and followed for a median of 9.5 years. Forearm ischemia was induced with 4 minutes occlusion by a cuff placed distal to the BA and inflated to 40mm Hg > systolic pressure. BAC was defined as >4.8% artery constriction following release of the cuff. The main outcome was major adverse events (MACE including all-cause mortality, non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, or hospitalization for heart failure.BA diameter change ranged from -20.6% to +44.9%, and 41 (11% women experienced BAC. Obstructive CAD and traditional CAD risk factors were not predictive of BAC. Overall, 39% of women with BAC experienced MACE vs. 22% without BAC (p=0.004. In multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression, BAC was a significant independent predictor of MACE (p=0.018 when adjusting for obstructive CAD and traditional risk factors.BAC predicts almost double the risk for major adverse events compared to patients without BAC. This risk was not accounted for by CAD or traditional risk factors. The novel risk marker of BAC requires further investigation in women.

  14. Radial artery pulse pressure variation correlates with brachial artery peak velocity variation in ventilated subjects when measured by internal medicine residents using hand-carried ultrasound devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J Matthew; Blair, John E A; Hampole, Chetan; Goonewardena, Sascha; Vasaiwala, Samip; Shah, Dipak; Spencer, Kirk T; Schmidt, Gregory A

    2007-05-01

    Rapid prediction of the effect of volume expansion is crucial in unstable patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Both radial artery pulse pressure variation (DeltaPP) and change of aortic blood flow peak velocity are accurate predictors but may be impractical point-of-care tools. We sought to determine whether respiratory changes in the brachial artery blood flow velocity (DeltaVpeak-BA) as measured by internal medicine residents using a hand-carried ultrasound (HCU) device could provide an accurate corollary to DeltaPP in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Thirty patients passively receiving volume-control ventilation with preexisting radial artery catheters were enrolled. The brachial artery Doppler signal was recorded and analyzed by blinded internal medicine residents using a HCU device. Simultaneous radial artery pulse wave and central venous pressure recordings (when available) were analyzed by a blinded critical care physician. A Doppler signal was obtained in all 30 subjects. The DeltaVpeak-BA correlated well with DeltaPP (r = 0.84) with excellent agreement (weighted kappa, 0.82) and limited intraobserver variability (2.8 +/- 2.8%) [mean +/- SD]. A DeltaVpeak-BA cutoff of 16% was highly predictive of DeltaPP > or = 13% (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 95%). A poor correlation existed between the CVP and both DeltaVpeak-BA (r = - 0.21) and DeltaPP (r = - 0.16). The HCU Doppler assessment of the DeltaVpeak-BA as performed by internal medicine residents is a rapid, noninvasive bedside correlate to DeltaPP, and a DeltaVpeak-BA cutoff of 16% may prove useful as a point-of-care tool for the prediction of volume responsiveness in patients receiving mechanical ventilation.

  15. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation: analysis of 672 individual repeated measurements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mil, A.C.C.M. van; Greyling, A.; Zock, P.L.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Mensink, R.P.; Reesink, K.D.; Green, D.J.; Ghiadoni, L.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. METHODS: Volunteer-related and

  16. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  17. Factors affecting the validity of ankle-brachial index in the diagnosis of peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Su Chung; Han, Seung Hwan; Lim, Sang Hyun; Hong, You Sun; Won, Je Hwan; Bae, Jae Ik; Jo, Joon

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated 158 legs from 79 consecutive patients who had undergone both ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements and angiography for claudication symptoms between January 2007 and December 2008. The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the individual legs was established by angiography. Ankle-brachial index was considered abnormal if it was <0.9. The sensitivity and specificity of ABI was 61% and 87%, respectively. To assess the factors affecting the validity of ABI in the diagnosis of PAD, multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. The odds ratios (ORs) for the false negative result of ABI were 4.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-13.92) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), 3.41 (95% CI 1.10-10.48) in patients with distal lesions, 3.02 (95% CI 1.07-8.49) in elderly patients, and 1.13 (95% CI 0.34-3.42) in patients with mild stenosis. Although ABI is the method of choice for the primary diagnosis of PAD, other supplementary investigations should be considered when there is clinical suspicion of PAD but an ABI <0.9.

  18. [Ankle-brachial index screening for peripheral artery disease in high cardiovascular risk patients. Prospective observational study of 370 asymptomatic patients at high cardiovascular risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, C; Oummou, S; Merzouk, F; Amarir, B; Boussabnia, G; Bougrini, H; Benzaroual, D; Elkarimi, S; Elhattaoui, M

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a marker of systemic atherosclerosis; it is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease by measuring the ankle-brachial pressure index in patients at high cardiovascular risk and to study the risk factors associated with this disease. This was a descriptive and analytic cross-sectional study which focused on 370 patients seen at the medical consultation for atherosclerosis prevention. The ankle-brachial index was measured with a portable Doppler (BIDOP 3) using 4 and 8Hz dual frequency probes. The standards were: normal ankle-brachial index 0.9 to 1.3; peripheral artery obstructive disease ankle-brachial index less than 0.9; poorly compressible artery (medial arterial calcification) ankle-brachial index greater than 1.3. Cardiovascular risk factors were also studied. Three hundred and seventy subjects (mean age 65.5±8.7years) were screened Cardiovascular risk factors were: sedentary lifestyle (91.5 %), hypertension (68.1 %), elevated LDL-cholesterolemia (36.3 %), diabetes (48.3 %) and tobacco smoking (33.8 %). The prevalence of peripheral artery disease was 32.4 % of which 77.5 % were asymptomatic. We found a significant correlation with smoking, diabetes, dyslipidemia and the presence of coronary artery disease or vascular cerebral disease. Screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with the ankle-brachial index has increased the percentage of polyvascular patients from 6.2 to 29 %. Factors independently associated with PAD were advanced age, presence of cardiovascular disease, smoking and glycated hemoglobin. PAD is a common condition in people at high cardiovascular risk, the frequency of asymptomatic forms justifies the screening with pocket Doppler which is a simple, inexpensive and effective test to assess the overall cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Changes in brachial artery endothelial function and resting diameter with moderate-intensity continuous but not sprint interval training in sedentary men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenouda, Ninette; Gillen, Jenna B; Gibala, Martin J; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2017-10-01

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) improves peripheral artery function in healthy adults, a phenomenon that reverses as continued training induces structural remodeling. Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits physiological adaptations similar to MICT, despite a lower exercise volume and time commitment; however, its effect on peripheral artery function and structure is largely unexplored. We compared peripheral artery responses to 12 wk of MICT and SIT in sedentary, healthy men (age = 27 ± 8 yr). Participants performed MICT (45 min of cycling at 70% peak heart rate; n = 10) or SIT (3 × 20-s "all out" cycling sprints with 2 min of recovery; n = 9), and responses were compared with a nontraining control group (CTL, n = 6). Allometrically scaled brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) increased 2.2% after 6 wk of MICT and returned to baseline levels by 12 wk, but did not change in SIT or CTL (group × time interaction, P = 0.04). Brachial artery diameter increased after 6 and 12 wk (main effect, P = 0.03), with the largest increases observed in MICT. Neither training protocol affected popliteal relative FMD and diameter, or central and lower limb arterial stiffness (carotid distensibility, central and leg pulse wave velocity) (P > 0.05 for all). Whereas earlier and more frequent measurements are needed to establish the potential presence and time course of arterial responses to low-volume SIT, our findings suggest that MICT was superior to the intense, but brief and intermittent SIT stimulus at inducing brachial artery responses in healthy men.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We compared the effects of 12 wk of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) and sprint interval training (SIT) on peripheral artery endothelial function and diameter, and central and lower limb stiffness in sedentary, healthy men. Whereas neither training program affected the popliteal artery or stiffness indexes, we observed changes in brachial artery function and diameter with MICT but not SIT

  20. Change in Elasticity Caused by Flow-Mediated Dilation Measured Only for Intima-Media Region of Brachial Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masataka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of arteriosclerosis [R. Ross: N. Engl. J. Med. 340 (2004) 115]. For the assessment of the endothelium function, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) caused by increased blood flow has been evaluated with ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. In the case of conventional methods, the change in artery diameter caused by FMD is measured [M. Hashimoto et al.: Circulation 92 (1995) 3431]. Although the arterial wall has a layered structure (intima, media, and adventitia), such a structure is not taken into account in conventional methods because the change in diameter depends on the characteristic of the entire wall. However, smooth muscle present only in the media contributes to FMD, whereas the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not contribute. In this study, we measure the change in elasticity of only the intima-media region including smooth muscle using the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791]. From the change in elasticity, FMD measured only for the intima-media region by our proposed method was found to be more sensitive than that measured for the entire wall by the conventional method.

  1. Arterial stiffness in patients after Kawasaki disease without coronary artery involvement: Assessment by performing brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio-ankle vascular index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Ryo; Kuwata, Seiko; Kurishima, Clara; Saiki, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Yoichi; Sugimoto, Masaya; Ishido, Hirotaka; Masutani, Satoshi; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    It remains unclear whether systemic arterial beds other than the coronary arteries are truly healthy in patients without coronary artery lesions (CAL) after Kawasaki disease (KD). We tested the hypothesis that patients with KD without echocardiographic evidence of CAL during the acute phase of the disease have abnormal mechanical properties in systemic arteries later. We studied 201 consecutive patients with KD (age 2-23 years, mean 10±4 years; 109 male, 92 female) without CAL during the acute phase. Data were compared with those in 129 control subjects (age 2-25 years, mean 10±4 years; 73 male, 56 female; control group). We examined arterial stiffness by using the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI). The baPWV in the KD group was significantly higher than that in the control group (913±121cm/s vs. 886±135cm/s, p=0.04). In contrast, there was no significant difference in CAVI (4.0±1.0 vs. 4.2±1.0, p=0.9) between the two groups. Multivariate analysis indicated a highly significant difference in baPWV (higher baPWV in patients with KD than in controls, p=0.004), after controlling for age, gender, body height and weight, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, but no difference in CAVI between the groups. Years after KD occurs in patients without apparent CAL during the acute phase, there is a small but significant change in systemic arterial properties, characterized by increased wall stiffness. The clinical importance of these findings must be clarified by performing long-term follow-up studies. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p’s revascularization (p revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization. PMID:25993299

  3. Evaluation of Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease by Ankle-brachial Index in Patients with Concomitant Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Vakili

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. As such, it is found that screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD improves risk assessment. Thus, intensive risk factor modification and medical treatment in these patients are necessary. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease in patients with concomitant coronary arterial disease. Methods: Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease was investigated in 400 patients (60% males, 40% females, aged 59.7± 11.3 with a documented coronary arterial disease. Results: Among patients with documented CAD, 12% had asymptomatic PAD with the ABI ratio of less than 0.9. Conclusions: It is advisable to screen for PAD not only as a disease but also as a risk assessment method for atherosclerosis.

  4. ROLE OF NON INVASIVE STUDY OF BRACHIAL ARTERY FLOW MEDIATED VASODILATATION WITH CORRELATION TO ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS

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    Srikanth Bodepudi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The endothelium is an early target of cardiovascular diseases like hypertension and Diabetes mellitus (DM. In hypertension, endothelial dysfunction has been shown at the level of both resistance and conduit arteries. The fact that Forearm's Brachial artery endothelial dysfunction is a marker of future cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension stresses the importance of the clinical evaluation of endothelial function. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study of hypertensive patients admitted in King George Hospital of Andhra Medical College, Visakhapatnam, India during May 2015 to August 2016 and diagnosed as per the criteria laid down by JNC 7 Classification. Patients of Diabetes Mellitus, Hyperthyroidism, Heart Failure, Coronary Artery Disease, Smokers and Peripheral Vascular Disease which are known to affect endothelial dysfunction were excluded from the study. RESULTS The study group comprised of 50 subjects and the control group had 30 subjects. There are 18 males (59.4% and 12 females (39.6% among Controls and 31 males (62% and 19 females (38% in the Cases group. In this study, the mean age among the controls is (55.6±13.63 and among the cases is (56.4±15.24. Mean FMD (Flow-mediated dilation among Cases is 8.15 and mean FMD among controls is 19.3. Mean Hyperemic Flow among Cases is 70.1 and among Controls is 121. 26% of the males have Endothelial Dysfunction and 9% of the females among cases have Endothelial Dysfunction. CONCLUSION FMD% is a diagnostic aid for evaluation of endothelial function. It is an experimental tool to measure endothelial dysfunction which is a fundamental basis for atherogenesis and CAD. It is a user friendly, non- invasive, cheap, reliable, reproducible technique for risk stratification of CAD.

  5. Association of the Cardioankle Vascular Index and Ankle-Brachial Index with Carotid Artery Intima Media Thickness in Hemodialysis Patients

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    Tomohito Gohda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study are (1 to compare the cardioankle vascular index (CAVI, ankle-brachial index (ABI, and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT between HD patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D or prevalence of cardiovascular (CV disease and (2 also to evaluate the relationship of these indices with CA-IMT in these patients according to ABI levels. This study consisted of 132 HD patients with T2D and the same number of patients without T2D. The patients with diabetes or prevalence of CV disease had significantly higher CA-IMT and lower ABI values than those without diabetes or prevalence of CV disease, respectively. Although diabetic patients had higher CAVI than those without diabetes, CAVI did not differ between patients with or without prevalence of CV disease. In univariate analysis, CA-IMT was more strongly correlated with ABI than CAVI. However, the opposite was true in patients with an ABI value of more than 0.95. Both indices were significantly correlated with CA-IMT although ABI was a powerful determinant than CAVI. It appears that both indices are associated with CA-IMT in HD patients, especially with an ABI value of more than 0.95.

  6. Association of the cardioankle vascular index and ankle-brachial index with carotid artery intima media thickness in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohda, Tomohito; Gotoh, Hiromichi; Gotoh, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Saori; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the present study are (1) to compare the cardioankle vascular index (CAVI), ankle-brachial index (ABI), and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT) between HD patients with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D) or prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease and (2) also to evaluate the relationship of these indices with CA-IMT in these patients according to ABI levels. This study consisted of 132 HD patients with T2D and the same number of patients without T2D. The patients with diabetes or prevalence of CV disease had significantly higher CA-IMT and lower ABI values than those without diabetes or prevalence of CV disease, respectively. Although diabetic patients had higher CAVI than those without diabetes, CAVI did not differ between patients with or without prevalence of CV disease. In univariate analysis, CA-IMT was more strongly correlated with ABI than CAVI. However, the opposite was true in patients with an ABI value of more than 0.95. Both indices were significantly correlated with CA-IMT although ABI was a powerful determinant than CAVI. It appears that both indices are associated with CA-IMT in HD patients, especially with an ABI value of more than 0.95.

  7. Impact of eight weeks of repeated ischaemic preconditioning on brachial artery and cutaneous microcirculatory function in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Helen; Nyakayiru, Jean; Bailey, Tom G; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Sprung, Victoria S; Hopkins, Nicola D; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2015-08-01

    Ischaemic preconditioning has well-established cardiac and vascular protective effects. Short interventions (one week) of daily ischaemic preconditioning episodes improve conduit and microcirculatory function. This study examined whether a longer (eight weeks) and less frequent (three per week) protocol of repeated ischaemic preconditioning improves vascular function. Eighteen males were randomly allocated to either ischaemic preconditioning (22.4 ± 2.3 years, 23.7 ± 3.1 kg/m(2)) or a control intervention (26.0 ± 4.8 years, 26.4 ± 1.9 kg/m(2)). Brachial artery endothelial-dependent (FMD), forearm cutaneous microvascular function and cardiorespiratory fitness were assessed at zero, two and eight weeks. A greater improvement in FMD was evident following ischaemic preconditioning training compared with control at weeks 2 (2.24% (0.40, 4.08); p=0.02) and 8 (1.11% (0.13, 2.10); p=0.03). Repeated ischaemic preconditioning did not change cutaneous microcirculatory function or fitness. These data indicate that a feasible and practical protocol of regular ischaemic preconditioning episodes improves endothelial function in healthy individuals within two weeks, and these effects persist following repeated ischaemic preconditioning for eight weeks. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  8. Impact of handgrip exercise intensity on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atkinson, C.L.; Carter, H.H.; Dawson, E.A.; Naylor, L.H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Previous studies that have examined the impact of exercise intensity on conduit artery endothelial function have involved large muscle group exercise which induces local and systemic effects. The aim of this study was to examine flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after incremental

  9. How to assess mean blood pressure properly at the brachial artery level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Willem J. W.; Verrij, Elisabeth; Vincent, Hieronymus H.; Westerhof, Berend E.; Parati, Gianfranco; van Montfrans, Gert A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Mean arterial pressure at the upper arm is traditionally calculated by adding one-third of the pulse pressure to the diastolic pressure. We questioned the general validity of this formula. METHODS: We used previously recorded resting intrabrachial pressure and Riva-Rocci Korotkoff blood

  10. The impact of an acute oral phosphate load on endothelium dependent and independent brachial artery vasodilation in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Brendan M; Adams, Michael A; Pyke, Kyra E

    2017-12-01

    Serum phosphate levels are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the general population and endothelial dysfunction may be mechanistically involved. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute phosphate supplementation on endothelial-dependent (flow-mediated dilation; FMD) and -independent (glyceryl trinitrate; GTN)) vasodilation in young, healthy males. Seventeen healthy male participants (age, 23 ± 3 years) were exposed to an oral load of phosphate (PHOS; liquid supplement containing 1200 mg of phosphorous) and placebo (PLAC) over 2 experimental days. A brachial artery FMD test was performed pre-ingestion and at 20 min, 60 min, and 120 min following the ingestion of the phosphate load or the placebo. GTN tests were performed pre- and 140 min post-ingestion. Serum phosphate was not impacted differently by phosphate versus placebo ingestion (p = 0.780). In contrast, urinary phosphate excretion was markedly increased in the PHOS (p < 0.001) but not in the PLAC condition (p = 0.130) (Δ fractional excretion of phosphate in PHOS (29.2%) vs. PLAC (9.3%)). This indicates that circulating phosphate levels were homeostatically regulated. GTN-mediated vasodilation was not significantly affected by phosphate ingestion. In primary analysis no impact of phosphate ingestion on FMD was detected. However, when the shear stress stimulus was added as a covariate in a subset of participants, exploratory pairwise comparisons revealed a significantly lower FMD 20 min post-phosphate ingestion versus placebo (p = 0.024). The effects of phosphate ingestion on FMD and serum phosphate are in contrast with previous findings and the mechanisms that underlie the disparate results require further investigation.

  11. Can a combination of handgrip exercise and prolonged forearm occlusion elicit a maximal brachial artery FMD response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jennifer; McEvoy, Alana; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-06-01

    The upper limit of brachial artery (BA) flow-mediated dilation (FMD) has not been thoroughly interrogated, and long duration occlusion + handgrip exercise may create larger shear stress stimuli than previous manipulations. To determine whether novel combinations of occlusion + handgrip exercise can extend the range of FMD stimulus-response relationship characterization and permit identification of a BA-FMD response ceiling. Ten healthy subjects performed eight reactive hyperemia (RH) FMD trials: 5, 10, and 15 min of occlusion (5RH, 10RH, 15RH); 5, 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min ischemic exercise (IE) (5IE, 10IE, 15IE); 10 and 15 min of occlusion + 3-min IE + 4-min post-occlusion exercise (PE) (10IEPE, 15IEPE). Shear stress was estimated as shear rate (SR = blood velocity/BA diameter; (ultrasound assessment)) (SR stimulus = area under the curve (AUC) until peak diameter). Data are mean ± SE. There were no differences in SR-AUC among IE and IEPE trials (p > 0.70), however, IE consistently increased the SR-AUC (IE + IEPE trial average 17,845.1 ± 2,023.3 a.u.) vs. the 5RH and 10RH trials (4,943.0 ± 428.4 a.u., 6,800.6 ± 805.9 a.u.) (p FMD ranged from 7.3 ± 0.8% (5RH) to 19.1 ± 2.0% (15IEPE) (p 0.16). FMD increased with increasing SR-AUC (all subjects, all trials: r(2) 0.36, p FMD response did not clearly plateau with increasing stimulus magnitude; however, the FMD capacity was shown to be more than double the FMD magnitude that was elicited with a standard 5-min occlusion test.

  12. Ankle-brachial pressure index estimated by laser Doppler in patients suffering from peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludyga, Tomasz; Kuczmik, Waclaw B; Kazibudzki, Marek; Nowakowski, Przemyslaw; Orawczyk, Tomasz; Glanowski, Michal; Kucharzewski, Marcin; Ziaja, Damion; Szaniewski, Krzysztof; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2007-07-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements are widely used for evaluating the functional state of circulation in the lower limbs. However, there is some evidence that the value of ABI does not accurately reflect the degree of walking impairment in symptomatic patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). We investigated the diagnostic value of ABI estimated by means of laser Doppler flowmetry (IT) for evaluating limb ischemia. We wanted to know whether laser Doppler could be more sensitive than the Doppler method in predicting walking capacity in patients with stable intermittent claudication. We analyzed a group of 30 patients with intermittent claudication (Fontain II, II/III) who were admitted for reconstructive treatment. There were 21 men and 9 women, aged 46-74 (mean 61) years. All patients underwent the treadmill test, and pain-free walking distances were measured. In each patient, we measured ABI using the two different methods: Doppler ultrasound device (ABI-Doppler) and laser Doppler (ABI-laser Doppler). The claudication distances were 25-200 m (mean 73 +/- 50.2 m). ABI-Doppler was 0.2-0.7 (0.582 +/- 0.195). ABI-laser Doppler measurements were 0.581 (+/-0.218). A correlation was found between ABI-Doppler and claudication distance (r = 0.46, P = 0.009). Also, ABI-laser Doppler values significantly correlated with claudication distances (r = 0.536, P = 0.002). The ABI evaluated by laser Doppler correlated well with claudication distances in patients with PAOD. Comparison of Doppler and laser Doppler measurements used for determining ABI showed that both methods have similar predictive power for walking capacity; however, higher correlation was observed between claudication distances and ABI measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. ABI-laser Doppler measurements are easier, are quicker, and seem to be better suited for noncompliant patients. Further investigation should be undertaken to determine whether laser Doppler is superior to the Doppler

  13. Management of cold and pulseless hand after closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of pediatric humerus supracondylar fracture: Is it really necessary to explore brachial artery?

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    Tolga Ege

    2015-04-01

    Results: We verified anatomical reduction using plain radiographs. However, all patients had cold and pulseless hands. Therefore, papaverine was injected subcutaneously and the operated extremities were warmed and elevated for at least 1 hour. During this period, serial doppler examinations were performed. After a mean period of 30 minutes (range of 15 to 90 minutes, we detected brachial and radial arterial flow upon doppler examination, along with warm hands. Patients were followed for at least two days in the clinic and all of the patients healed without any complications. Conclusions: We advise initial conservative management of cold and pale hands after reduction of a supracondylar fracture, including warming, elevation and papaverine-HCL injection within at least 30 minutes following surgery. If this treatment fails, emergency arterial exploration is needed. Additionally, if the patient has a cold and pale hand before the operation, arterial exploration is needed along with reduction. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 12-15

  14. Interrelationships Among Flow-Mediated Vasodilation, Nitroglycerine-Induced Vasodilation, Baseline Brachial Artery Diameter, Hyperemic Shear Stress, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Kajikawa, Masato; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Hashimoto, Haruki; Aibara, Yoshiki; Yusoff, Farina Mohamad; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Noma, Kensuke; Nakashima, Ayumu; Goto, Chikara; Hida, Eisuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2017-12-29

    Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) of the brachial artery has been used for the assessment of endothelial function. Considering the mechanism underlying the vasodilatory response of the brachial artery to reactive hyperemia, hyperemic shear stress (HSS), a stimulus for FMD; nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation (NID), an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation; and baseline brachial artery diameter (BAD) are also involved in vasodilatory response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interrelationships among FMD, HSS, NID, baseline BAD, and cardiovascular risk factors. We measured FMD, HSS, NID, and baseline BAD simultaneously in 1033 participants (633 men and 400 women; mean age: 58.6±17.0 years). Framingham risk score was negatively correlated with FMD, HSS, and NID and was positively correlated with baseline BAD. HSS and NID were positively correlated with FMD, and baseline BAD was negatively correlated with FMD. In participants with normal NID, FMD was correlated with HSS, NID, and baseline BAD, all of which were independent variables of FMD in multivariate analysis. In participants with impaired NID, FMD was correlated with NID and baseline BAD, both of which were independent variables of FMD in multivariate analysis, but there was no association between FMD and HSS. NID and baseline BAD were independent variables of FMD regardless of the status of endothelium-independent vasodilation, whereas there was a significant association between FMD and HSS in participants with normal NID but not in those with impaired NID. The influence of HSS on FMD seems to be dependent on the status of endothelium-independent vasodilation. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These nerves ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation ... associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may include: ...

  16. The impact of menstrual phase on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation during handgrip exercise in healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urzo, Katrina A; King, Trevor J; Williams, Jennifer S; Silvester, Morgan D; Pyke, Kyra E

    2018-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? The aim of this study was to determine the influence of menstrual phase on flow-mediated dilatation in response to sustained, exercise-induced increases in shear stress. What is the main finding and its importance? We showed, for the first time, that in healthy, premenopausal women the flow-mediated dilatation stimulated by exercise-induced increases in shear stress did not fluctuate across two phases of the menstrual cycle, despite significant fluctuations in oestrogen. This suggests that endothelial function is not consistently augmented in the high-oestrogen phase. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in response to a sustained shear-stress stimulus (e.g. via handgrip exercise; HGEX) is emerging as a useful tool for assessing endothelial function; however, the impact of menstrual phase on HGEX-FMD is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HGEX-FMD fluctuates with cyclical changes in oestrogen concentrations over two discrete phases (low and high oestrogen) of the menstrual cycle. Brachial artery (BA) diameter and blood velocity were assessed with two-dimesional and Doppler ultrasound, respectively. Shear stress was estimated using shear rate (SR = BA blood velocity/BA diameter). Participants (12 healthy, regularly cycling women, 21 ± 2 years of age) completed two experimental visits: (i) low oestrogen (early follicular, EF); and (ii) high oestrogen (late follicular, LF). Reactive hyperaemia-stimulated FMD (RH-FMD) and HGEX-FMD (6 min of handgrip exercise) were assessed during each visit. Results are mean values ± SD. Oestrogen increased from the EF to LF phase (EF, 33 ± 9 pg ml -1 ; LF, 161 ± 113 pg ml -1 , P = 0.003). However, neither the SR stimuli (HGEX, P = 0.501; RH, P = 0.173) nor the FMD responses differed between phases (EF versus LF: HGEX-FMD, 4.8 ± 2.8 versus 4.6 ± 2.2%, P = 0.601; RH-FMD, 7.9 ± 4.3 versus 6.4 ± 3.1%, P = 0.071). These results extend

  17. Brachial plexopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish V Khadilkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury can occur as a result of trauma, inflammation or malignancies, and associated complications. The current topic is concerned with various forms of brachial plexopathy, its clinical features, pathophysiology, imaging findings, and management. Idiopathic brachial neuritis (IBN, often preceded with antecedent events such as infection, commonly present with abruptonset painful asymmetric upper limb weakness with associated wasting around the shoulder girdle and arm muscles. Idiopathic hypertrophic brachial neuritis, a rare condition, is usually painless to begin with, unlike IBN. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of paralysis and sensory disturbances in an affected limb, which is preceded by severe pain. While the frequency of the episodes tends to decrease with age, affected individuals suffer from residual deficits. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome affects the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. It is diagnosed on the basis of electrophysiology and is amenable to surgical intervention. Cancer-related brachial plexopathy may occur secondary to metastatic infiltration or radiation therapy. Traumatic brachial plexus injury is commonly encountered in neurology, orthopedic, and plastic surgery set-ups. Trauma may be a direct blow or traction or stretch injury. The prognosis depends on the extent and site of injury as well as the surgical expertise.

  18. Aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial após endocardite infecciosa de valva mitral Infected aneurysm of brachial artery after mitral valve infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo Guedis Lobo Filho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos um caso de aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial em paciente com endocardite infecciosa por Streptococcus bovis. Homem de 49 anos de idade se apresentou com febre, dispnéia e sopro regurgitativo em foco mitral com irradiação para axila. O ecocardiograma demonstrou vegetação em valva mitral nativa. Após troca valvar mitral com implante de prótese biológica, observou-se massa pulsátil de cinco centímetros de diâmetro em fossa antecubital direita. Foi feito o diagnóstico de aneurisma infectado de artéria braquial, e o tratamento cirúrgico foi realizado com sucesso. O objetivo desse relato de caso é apresentar uma complicação pouco comum após endocardite infecciosa.We present a case of brachial artery infected aneurysm in a patient with infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis. A 49-year-old man presented with fever dyspnea and a pansystolic murmur with irradiation to axilla. The echocardiogram revealed vegetation in native mitral valve. After mitral valve replacement with bioprosthesis, it was observed pulsatile mass of five centimeters in diameter at antecubital fossa of right upper limb. It was made the diagnosis of infected aneurysm of the brachial artery, and the surgery was performed successfully. The aim of this case report is to show a rare complication after infective endocarditis.

  19. Impact of volunteer-related and methodology-related factors on the reproducibility of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation: analysis of 672 individual repeated measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mil, Anke C C M; Greyling, Arno; Zock, Peter L; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Hopman, Maria T; Mensink, Ronald P; Reesink, Koen D; Green, Daniel J; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H

    2016-09-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a popular technique to examine endothelial function in humans. Identifying volunteer and methodological factors related to variation in FMD is important to improve measurement accuracy and applicability. Volunteer-related and methodology-related parameters were collected in 672 volunteers from eight affiliated centres worldwide who underwent repeated measures of FMD. All centres adopted contemporary expert-consensus guidelines for FMD assessment. After calculating the coefficient of variation (%) of the FMD for each individual, we constructed quartiles (n = 168 per quartile). Based on two regression models (volunteer-related factors and methodology-related factors), statistically significant components of these two models were added to a final regression model (calculated as β-coefficient and R). This allowed us to identify factors that independently contributed to the variation in FMD%. Median coefficient of variation was 17.5%, with healthy volunteers demonstrating a coefficient of variation 9.3%. Regression models revealed age (β = 0.248, P measurements (β = 0.318, P measurements, hypertension, baseline FMD% and lab experience with FMD independently predicted brachial artery variability (total R = 0.202). Although FMD% showed good reproducibility, larger variation was observed in conditions with longer time between measurements, hypertension, less experience and lower baseline FMD%. Accounting for these factors may improve FMD% variability.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction and brachial intima-media thickness: long term cardiovascular risk with claudication related to peripheral arterial disease: a prospective analysis.

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    Franz Hafner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the development, progression, and clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis, and in symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction and enlarged intima-media thickness might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Flow-mediated dilatation and serologic parameters are used to evaluate individual endothelial function. Brachial intima-media thickness, a less recognized parameter of cardiovascular risk, is independently associated with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of ultrasound and serologic parameters of endothelial function in relation to cardiovascular mortality in peripheral arterial disease. DESIGN: monocentric, prospective cohort study. METHODS: Flow mediated dilatation and brachial intima-media thickness were assessed in 184 (124 male patients with peripheral arterial disease (Rutherford stages 2-3. Serologic parameters of endothelial function included asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA, and L-homoarginine. Cardiovascular events were recorded during a follow-up of 99.1±11.1 months. Subjects who died of noncardiovascular causes were excluded from further analysis. RESULTS: Eighty-two patients (44.6% died during follow-up after a mean duration of 49.7±28.3 months. There were 49 cardiovascular deaths (59.8% and 33 other deaths (40.2%. Flow mediated dilatation was associated with cardiovascular death [1.17% (0.0, 4.3 vs. 4.1% (1.2, 6.4, p<0.001]. Intima-media thickness was greater in patients who succumbed to cardiovascular disease [0.37 mm (0.30, 0.41] than in survivors [0.21 mm (0.15, 0.38, p<0.001]. Brachial intima-media thickness above 0.345 mm was most predictive of cardiovascular death, with sensitivity and specificity values of 0.714 and 0.657, respectively (p<0.001. Furthermore, ADMA levels above 0.745 µmol/l and SDMA levels above 0.825 µmol/l were significantly

  1. [Screening for asymptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the lower limbs by measuring the ankle-brachial index in the general population (Senegal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessinaba, S; Mbaye, A; Kane, Ad; Guene, B D; Mbaye Ndour, M; Niang, K; Jobe, M; Cazaubon, M; Mathieu, J-B S; Kane, M; Sow, D Diagne; Diack, B; Kane, A

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAOD) and cardiovascular risk factors associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in Senegalese patients aged 40 years and over. We prospectively studied a random sample of Senegalese aged 40 years and older, residing in the city of St.-Louis, Senegal. The ABI was measured with a portable doppler (DIADOP 50) using 4 and 8Hz dual frequency probes. The standards were: normal ABI 0.9 to 1.3; peripheral artery obstructive disease (PAOD) ABI less than 0.9; incompressible artery ABI greater than 1.3. Cardiovascular risk factors were also studied. Seven hundred and seventy-one subjects (mean age 57 ± 11.2 years, 559 women) were examined. Cardiovascular risk factors were: sedentary lifestyle (76.4%), hypertension (68%), obesity (32.1%), elevated LDL-cholesterolemia (27.8%), diabetes (18.3%) and tobacco smoking (6.9%). Ninety-three subjects (12.1%) had PAOD and 37 subjects (4.8%) had an incompressible artery. PAOD was significantly more common in sedentary subjects (P=0.008), in the elderly (P=0.0006) and in patients with a history of coronary artery disease (P=0.04). Smoking was not strongly associated with PAOD. PAOD is common in Senegalese and is associated with high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius associated with a brachial artery injury: A new pathological condition of traumatic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo Lahoz, L; Lamas Gomez, C; Sarasquete Reiriz, J; de Caso Rodriguez, J; Proubasta Renart, I

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius and a brachial artery injury is an uncommon traumatic entity. The two references of this injury combination appeared in 2015, although both authors did not realise that they were the first two cases published in the medical literature. Although mentioned in the text of the articles, no mention was made of the fracture of the distal radius in the titles. The purpose of this paper is to present three cases with this new traumatic pathological entity, explaining its pathogenetic mechanism, the treatment used, and the results obtained. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Brachial plexopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-01-01

    or days/week, most physical exposures, in particular upper limb posture and repetition, were significant risk indicators with clear dose–response relationships. These findings were supported by psychophysical responses that also identified perceived work pace and the use of force as risk indicators...... occupational physical exposures and brachial plexopathy. Methods 80 patients with brachial plexopathy according to defined criteria and 65 controls of similar age and sex without upper limb complaints were recruited by general practitioners. Patients and controls completed a questionnaire on physical....... The identified psychosocial relations were limited to measures reflecting physical exposures. Conclusions While the identified risk indicators have previously been associated to upper limb symptoms as well as to diagnosed disorders other than brachial plexopathy, this study indicates an association between...

  4. The effect of α1 -adrenergic blockade on post-exercise brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation at sea level and high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymko, Michael M; Tremblay, Joshua C; Hansen, Alex B; Howe, Connor A; Willie, Chris K; Stembridge, Mike; Green, Daniel J; Hoiland, Ryan L; Subedi, Prajan; Anholm, James D; Ainslie, Philip N

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to quantify endothelial function (via brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation) at sea level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m) at rest and following both maximal exercise and 30 min of moderate-intensity cycling exercise with and without administration of an α1 -adrenergic blockade. Brachial endothelial function did not differ between sea level and high altitude at rest, nor following maximal exercise. At sea level, endothelial function decreased following 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and this decrease was abolished with α1 -adrenergic blockade. At high altitude, endothelial function did not decrease immediately after 30 min of moderate-intensity exercise, and administration of α1 -adrenergic blockade resulted in an increase in flow-mediated dilatation. Our data indicate that post-exercise endothelial function is modified at high altitude (i.e. prolonged hypoxaemia). The current study helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms associated with high-altitude acclimatization, and provides insight into the relationship between sympathetic nervous activity and vascular endothelial function. We examined the hypotheses that (1) at rest, endothelial function would be impaired at high altitude compared to sea level, (2) endothelial function would be reduced to a greater extent at sea level compared to high altitude after maximal exercise, and (3) reductions in endothelial function following moderate-intensity exercise at both sea level and high altitude are mediated via an α1 -adrenergic pathway. In a double-blinded, counterbalanced, randomized and placebo-controlled design, nine healthy participants performed a maximal-exercise test, and two 30 min sessions of semi-recumbent cycling exercise at 50% peak output following either placebo or α1 -adrenergic blockade (prazosin; 0.05 mg kg( -1) ). These experiments were completed at both sea-level (344 m) and high altitude (3800 m). Blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography

  5. Relationship between resistant hypertension and arterial stiffness assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the older patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung CM

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Min Chung,1,2 Hui-Wen Cheng,2 Jung-Jung Chang,2 Yu-Sheng Lin,2 Ju-Feng Hsiao,2 Shih-Tai Chang,1 Jen-Te Hsu2,31School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 2Division of Cardiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 3Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan County, TaiwanBackground: Resistant hypertension (RH is a common clinical condition associated with increased cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in older patients. Several factors and conditions interfering with blood pressure (BP control, such as excess sodium intake, obesity, diabetes, older age, kidney disease, and certain identifiable causes of hypertension are common in patients resistant to antihypertensive treatment. Arterial stiffness, measured by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, is increasingly recognized as an important prognostic index and potential therapeutic target in hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between RH and arterial stiffness. Methods: This study included 1,620 patients aged ≥65 years who were referred or self-referred to the outpatient hypertension unit located at a single cardiovascular center. They were separated into normotensive, controlled BP, and resistant hypertension groups. Home BP, blood laboratory parameters, echocardiographic studies and baPWV all were measured. Results: The likelihood of diabetes mellitus was significantly greater in the RH group than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 2.114, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.194–3.744, P=0.010. Systolic BP was correlated in the RH group significantly more than in the group with controlled BP (odds ratio 1.032, 95% CI 1.012–1.053, P=0.001. baPWV (odds ratio 1.084, 95% CI 1.016–1.156, P=0.015 was significantly correlated with the presence of RH. The other factors were negatively correlated with the existence of RH.Conclusion: In

  6. Is plasma-soluble CD36 associated with density of atheromatous plaque and ankle-brachial index in early-onset coronary artery disease patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rać, Monika; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Rać, Michał; Safranow, Krzysztof; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Goschorska, Marta; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    CD36 is a major macrophage scavenger receptor for oxidised low-density lipoprotein particles. Soluble CD36 (sCD36) is circulating as a ligand-bound complex and may be present in microparticles shed from cells such as platelets, monocytes/macrophages, or adipocytes. Positive association of plasma sCD36 with insulin resistance has been reported, and it has been proposed that sCD36 might represent a marker of macrophage activation and inflammation leading to atherosclerosis. Recently we have identified an association between CD36 polymorphism and low thickness of atheromatous plaque, suggesting its protective effect against atherosclerosis development. To obtain insight into the relationship between plasma concentration of sCD36 and radiological parameters of atherosclerosis in patients with early-onset coronary artery disease (CAD). The study group comprised 70 clinically stable patients (18 women and 52 men) with early CAD (aged no more than 50 years for men and 55 years for women). Fasting blood sample was taken for serum glucose, lipid profile, ApoA1, ApoB, Lp(a), and plasma sCD36 protein measurements. Each subject's weight, height, waist and hip circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured, and the body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and mean arterial pressure were calculated. Doppler ultrasound examinations of carotid and peripheral arteries were performed in all patients. Thickness of intima-media complex (IMC) of common carotid (CCA) and brachial arteries, as well as density and thickness of atheromatous plaque at CCA bifurcation, were measured with M'Ath programme. Plasma concentrations of CD36 antigen were measured by ELISA. Correlations between quantitative variables and sCD36 plasma concentration were assessed with the Spearman rank correlation coefficient (Rs). Associations between qualitative variables and sCD36 plasma concentration were tested with the Mann-Whitney U test. We observed no significant correlations between sCD36

  7. Peripheral arterial disease and ankle-brachial index abnormalites in young and middle-aged HIV-positive patients in lower Silesia, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV-positive patients. One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV-positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV-positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level was demonstrated. In young and middle-aged HIV-positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV-positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV-negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL-C levels and metabolic syndrome.

  8. Pulse Pressure and Upstroke Time Are Useful Parameters for the Diagnosis of Peripheral Artery Disease in Patients With Normal Ankle Brachial Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Shunsuke; Hisatake, Shinji; Watanabe, Ippei; Toda, Mikihito; Kabuki, Takayuki; Oka, Takashi; Dobashi, Shintaro; Ikeda, Takanori

    2016-10-01

    Some peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients have normal ankle brachial index (ABI) (0.9 - 1.4), although ABI is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of PAD. We investigated whether other parameters of ABI report sheet are useful to detect these patients. We initially enrolled 3,912 patients (7,824 limbs) who underwent ABI for the first time. Subjects who have normal ABI were divided into the PAD group (n = 136) and the non-PAD group (n = 240) by lower extremity ultrasonography. We investigated blood pressures (BP) (systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean (mBP) and pulse pressure (PP)), heart rate, upstroke time (UT), and %mean arterial pressure (%MAP). SBP, mBP, PP, UT, and %MAP in the PAD group were significantly higher. A multivariate analysis showed that mBP, DBP, PP, UT and %MAP were independently associated with the presence of PAD (mBP: odds ratio (OR) 2.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22 - 4.37, P = 0.010; DBP: OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.28 - 0.97, P = 0.039; PP: OR 1.30, 95% CI 0.69 - 2.46, P = 0.041; UT: OR 3.40, 95% CI 2.03 - 5.83, P normal ABI. The measurement of BPs could provide additional information for the diagnosis of PAD.

  9. CD36 gene is associated with thickness of atheromatous plaque and ankle-brachial index in patients with early coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rać, Monika Ewa; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rać, Michał; Kurzawski, Grzegorz; Krzystolik, Andrzej; Sagasz-Tysiewicz, Dagmara; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    CD36 is a multifunctional molecule engaged in the removal of oxidised LDL from plasma. It is unclear whether mutation of the CD36 gene protects against, or increases, the risk of hypercholesterolaemia, atherosclerosis and its complications. To search for associations between the CD36 gene polymorphisms and radiological markers of atherosclerosis progress in Caucasian patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosed at a young age. The study group comprised 70 patients with early CAD. Doppler ultrasound of carotid and peripheral arteries was carried out and genomic DNA was isolated from each patient. We found two single nucleotide substitutions in introns (IVS3-6 T/C - rs3173798 and IVS4-10 G/A - rs3211892) and two synonymous polymorphisms in exon 6 (G573A - rs5956 and A591T). The allele frequencies were: 10.7% for the IVS3-6C, 3.6% for the IVS4-10A, 3.6% for the 573A, and 2.1% for the 591T. The 573A allele of CD36 rs5956 polymorphism is associated with low thickness of atheromatous plaque. The 591T allele is associated with lower ankle-brachial index. The 573A allele has a protective effect against atherosclerosis development and the 591T allele is a cardiovascular risk factor. Assessment of their functional implications requires further research.

  10. [Ultrasonographic evaluation of selected parameters of the endothelial function in brachial arteries and IMT measurements in carotid arteries in children with diabetes type 1 using personal insulin pumps--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tołwińska, Joanna; Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Urban, Mirosława; Florys, Bozena; Peczyńska, Jadwiga

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a known risk factor for arterial atherosclerosis. The first symptoms can be found even in childhood. The ultrasonographic measurements of intimal plus medial thickness in carotid arteries (IMT) and flow mediated dilatation (FMD) evaluated in brachial arteries, play a known role in the detection in these cases. The diabetes treatment intensification is an important factor in delaying early atherosclerotic changes. Currently, intensive treatment of children's diabetes with use of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion with personal insulin pumps is gaining more and more popularity. THE AIM OF THIS STUDY was the evaluation of IMT and FMD indexes in children suffering from type 1 diabetes in the context of treatment intensification (multidose insulin injections v. personal insulin pumps). We examined 64 children (29 boys and 35 girls) in the mean age 15.5 years treated with the multidose insulin injections method and 10 children using personal insulin pumps (4 girls and 6 boys) in the mean age 14.5 years. Using high resolution ultrasonography we evaluated IMT values in carotid arteries and FMD parameters in brachial arteries. In our analysis we estimated the blood concentration of lipid parameters, values of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, the age of diabetes onset, duration time of the illness and the values of HbA1c as a marker of metabolic control. We noticed significantly higher FMD values in patients treated with personal insulin pumps (13.7 vs. 5.5%, p=0.001). IMT values were similar in both groups (0.52 vs. 0.5 mm, p=0. 41). The level of HDL cholesterol was higher and triglycerides lower in the group with treatment intensification. The metabolic control was the same in both groups. In patients treated by the multidose insulin injections IMT correlated with systolic blood pressure values. We didn't notice any correlation between IMT and FMD in any group. 1. Treatment intensification (personal insulin pumps) influences better vascular

  11. Effect of chronic stress and sleep deprivation on both flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery and the intracellular magnesium level in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Bonpei; Akima, Takashi; Uehata, Akimi; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Kurita, Akira

    2004-04-01

    Chronic mental and physical stress has been suggested to be a trigger for cardiovascular events. In addition, a reduction in levels of intracellular magnesium has been reported to cause vasoconstriction while enhancing platelet-dependent thrombosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether chronic stress affects endothelial function and intracellular magnesium levels in humans. Flow-mediated dilation (endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and sublingual nitroglycerin-induced dilation (0.3 mg, endothelium-independent vasodilation) were measured in the brachial artery in 30 healthy male college students, aged 22 +/- 1 years, using high-resolution ultrasound both before and immediately after a 4-week final term examination period. Erythrocyte magnesium concentration was measured simultaneously. All students had chronic sleep deprivation for 4 weeks, during which sleep lasted students were under great stress to pass the examination. This condition was considered to be chronic stress. Chronic stress decreased flow-mediated dilation and erythrocyte magnesium concentration (from 7.4 +/- 3.0 to 3.7 +/- 2.3%, p < 0.05; from 5.7 +/- 0.4 to 5.5 +/- 0.4 mg/ml, p < 0.05, respectively). The change in flow-mediated dilation correlated significantly with that of the erythrocyte magnesium concentration (r = 0.43, p < 0.05), but not with nitroglycerin-induced dilation. Chronic stress was found to attenuate endothelial function, which may also be associated with a reduction in the intracellular magnesium level in humans.

  12. Effect of cocoa/chocolate ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and its relevance to cardiovascular health and disease in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D

    2012-11-15

    Prospective studies indicate that high intake of dietary flavanols, such as those contained in cocoa/chocolate, are associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in humans. Numerous mechanisms may underlie these associations such as favorable effects of flavanols on blood pressure, platelet aggregation, thrombosis, inflammation, and the vascular endothelium. The brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) technique has emerged as a robust method to quantify endothelial function in humans. Collectively, the preponderance of evidence indicates that FMD is a powerful surrogate measure for firm cardiovascular endpoints, such as cardiovascular-related mortality, in humans. Thus, literally thousands of studies have utilized this technique to document group differences in FMD, as well as to assess the effects of various interventions on FMD. In regards to the latter, numerous studies indicate that both acute and chronic ingestion of cocoa/chocolate increases FMD in humans. Increases in FMD after cocoa/chocolate ingestion appear to be dose-dependent such that greater increases in FMD are observed after ingestion of larger quantities. The mechanisms underlying these responses are likely diverse, however most data suggest an effect of increased nitric oxide bioavailability. Thus, positive vascular effects of cocoa/chocolate on the endothelium may underlie (i.e., be linked mechanistically to) reductions in cardiovascular risk in humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anomalous origin of the deep brachial artery (profunda brachii observed in bilateral arms: case report Origem anômala da artéria braquial profunda (profunda brachii observada em braços bilaterais: relato de caso

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    Rafael Cisne de Paula

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During an ordinary dissection, a cadaver showed a bilateral anomalous origin of the deep brachial artery, where this vessel appeared like a branching of the subscapular artery with common trunk, which included the posterior circumflex humeral artery. The course and distribution of the deep brachial artery in the back compartment were relatively consistent with previous reports. Arterial variations can be damaged through iatrogenic means if not properly documented. The knowledge of this case is very important in clinical medicine and in surgeries in this compartment to prevent any injury.Durante dissecação em prática usual, um cadáver apresentou origem anômala da artéria braquial profunda, na qual este vaso apareceu como um ramo da artéria subescapular com um tronco comum, que incluiu a artéria circunflexa posterior do úmero. O curso e a distribuição da artéria braquial profunda no compartimento posterior foram relativamente coincidentes com relatos prévios. Variações arteriais podem ser danificadas de maneira iatrogênica se não forem adequadamente documentadas. O conhecimento desse caso é muito importante na prática clínica e em cirurgias nesse compartimento para prevenção de qualquer injúria.

  14. Toe Pressure and Toe Brachial Index are Predictive of Cardiovascular Mortality, Overall Mortality, and Amputation Free Survival in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickström, J-E; Laivuori, M; Aro, E; Sund, R T; Hautero, O; Venermo, M; Jalkanen, J; Hakovirta, H

    2017-05-01

    Peripheral haemodynamic parameters are used to assess the presence and severity of peripheral artery disease (PAD). The prognostic value of ankle brachial index (ABI) has been thoroughly delineated. Nonetheless, the relative usefulness of ankle pressure (AP), ABI, toe pressure (TP), and toe brachial index (TBI) in assessing patient outcome has not been investigated in a concurrent study setting. This study aimed to resolve the association of all four non-invasive haemodynamic parameters in clinically symptomatic patients with PAD with cardiovascular mortality, overall mortality, and amputation free survival (AFS). In total, 732 symptomatic patients with PAD admitted to the Department of Vascular Surgery for conventional angiography at Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland, between January 2009 and August 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Demographic factors, cardiovascular mortality, all-cause mortality, and above foot level amputations were obtained and assessed in relation to AP, ABI, TP, and TBI by means of Kaplan-Meier life tables and a multivariate Cox regression model. The haemodynamic parameter that was associated with poor 36 month general outcome was TP < 30 mmHg. Univariate Cox regression analysis of stratified values showed that TP and TBI associated significantly with mortality. In multivariate analysis both TP and TBI were associated with a significant risk of death. For TP < 30 mmHg and TBI < 0.25 the risk of cardiovascular mortality was hazard ratio [HR] 2.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75-4.61 [p<.001]; HR 3.68, 95% CI 1.48-9.19 [p=.050], respectively; all-cause mortality (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.44-2.92 [p<.001]; HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.35-4.74 [p=.040], respectively); and amputation or death (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.52-2.98 [p<.001]; HR 2.46, 95% CI 1.38-4.40 [p=.050], respectively)... Among non-invasive haemodynamic measurements and pressure indices both TP and TBI appear to be associated with cardiovascular and overall mortality and AFS for patients

  15. Association of Far-Infrared Radiation Therapy and Ankle-Brachial Index of Patients on Hemodialysis with Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Kuo, I-Ching; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recognized to be a good marker for atherosclerosis, and is useful in the diagnosis of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) which is prevalent among patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This randomized trial aimed to evaluate the effect of far-infrared radiation (FIR) therapy on ABI in HD patients with PAOD. PAOD was defined as patients with ABI < 0.95. One hundred and eight HD patients were enrolled, including 50 in the control group and 58 in the FIR group. A WS TY101 FIR emitter was applied for 40 minutes during each HD session, three times per week for six months. The ABI was measured before and after the FIR therapy. Results: Regardless of FIR therapy, the bilateral ABI decreased (in the FIR group, left: 0.88±0.22 to 0.85±0.24, p = 0.188; right: 0.92±0.20 to 0.90±0.23, p = 0.372; in control group, left: 0.91±0.23 to 0.88±0.21, p = 0144; right: 0.93±0.17 to 0.89±0.21, p = 0.082). Multivariate logistic analysis of the FIR group revealed that high uric acid (odds ratio [OR]: 2.335; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.117-4.882; p=0.024) and aspirin use (OR: 16.463; 95% CI: 1.787-151.638; p=0.013) were independently associated with increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that ABI is not increased after FIR therapy in HD patients with PAOD. However, in the FIR group, patients with higher uric acid level or those who used aspirin have increased bilateral ABI after FIR therapy.

  16. Fish oil induced increase in walking distance, but not ankle brachial pressure index, in peripheral arterial disease is dependent on both body mass index and inflammatory genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Jacqueline; Brunner, Andreas; Dastur, Neville D; Tan, Rebecca M; Nash, Gerard B; Rainger, G Ed; Shearman, Cliff P; Calder, Philip C; Grimble, Robert F

    2007-06-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic disease. Evidence suggests that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition and long chain n-3 fatty acids, found in oily fish and fish oils, have been shown to reduce inflammation. Genetic and lifestyle factors such as body mass index (BMI) also influence inflammation. In this study we have examined the effect of fish oil in patients with claudication secondary to PAD. Fish oil supplementation, providing 1g EPA and 0.7 g DHA per day for 12 weeks, increased walking distance on a treadmill set at 3.2 km/h with a 7% incline. Walking distance to first pain increased from 76.2+/-8.5 m before fish oil to 140.6+/-25.5 m after fish oil (mean+/-SEM, p=0.004) and total distance walked increased from 160.0+/-21.5 m before fish oil to 242.1+/-34.5 m after fish oil (p=0.002). Fish oil supplementation also improved ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) from 0.599+/-0.017 before fish oil to 0.776+/-0.030 after fish oil (p<0.001). The increase in walking distance was dependent on both BMI and genotype for single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin (IL)-1beta and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (detected using amplification refractory mutation system polymerase chain reaction). Neither BMI nor any of the genotypes examined affected the ability of fish oil to increase ABPI. The mechanisms by which fish oil affects walking distance and ABPI do not appear to be the same.

  17. Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index Measured Using an Automated Oscillometric Method as a Predictor of the Severity of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Ho-Ming Su

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI measured using a conventional Doppler method is an independent predictor of the number of coronary vessels affected in coronary artery disease (CAD. Recently, a new clinical device has been developed to measure ABI using an oscillometric method. It is unclear whether ABI measured using this device is a significant predictor of the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. We retrospectively included 87 patients from our outpatient clinic who had ever undergone coronary angiography. ABI was determined in all subjects using the new ABI-form device. The lower value of ABI in either limb was used for analysis. We divided our subjects into two groups, with either ABI less than 0.9 or at least 0.9, and compared basal characteristics between groups. We analyzed the relationship between ABI and the severity of CAD. In addition, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of ABI less than 0.9 in predicting multivessel (two-vessel + three-vessel involvement in our patients. There were 15 patients with ABI less than 0.9 and 72 with ABI at least 0.9. Patients with ABI less than 0.9 were older and had higher plasma levels of uric acid. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, and diuretic use was significantly higher in patients with ABI less than 0.9. In addition, the group with ABI less than 0.9 had a lower prevalence of one-vessel CAD and higher prevalence of three-vessel or multivessel CAD. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of ABI less than 0.9 in predicting multivessel CAD were 22%, 96%, 93%, and 34%, respectively. In conclusion, ABI measured using the automated oscillometric method can be used to predict the severity of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with CAD.

  18. Assessment of flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery: effects of technical aspects of the FMD measurement on the FMD response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Michiel L; Westerink, Jan; Rabelink, Ton J; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2005-02-01

    The ability to assess endothelial function non-invasively with B-mode ultrasound has lead to its widespread application in a variety of studies. However, the absolute values obtained using this approach vary considerably across studies. We studied whether technical aspects of the methodology can explain the wide variety in absolute values across studies. A literature search was performed to identify published reports on flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery published between 1992 and 2001. Information on type of equipment (wall track/B-mode), location of the measurement (antecubital fossa/upper arm), occlusion site (lower/upper arm), occlusion duration (min), and occlusion pressure was extracted. Patient characteristics were also extracted. For the healthy populations, mean FMD varied from 0.20 to 19.2%; for the coronary heart disease (CHD) patients FMD varied from -1.3 to 14%; for subjects with diabetes mellitus FMD varied from 0.75 to 12%. Compared with occlusion at the upper arm, lower arm occlusion was related to decreased FMD (mean difference in FMD -2.47%; 95% CI 0.55-4.39). An occlusion duration of > or =4.5 min was related to an increased FMD compared with an occlusion time of FMD differs widely between studies. There is a great overlap between populations (healthy, CHD, diabetics). Our findings suggest that the technical aspects of the measurements, the location, and the duration of the occlusion may explain some of these differences, whereas type of equipment, location of the measurement, and occlusion pressure do not.

  19. High-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of the endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in a brachial artery: normative ranges in a group of low CV risk subjects of different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryliskyte, Ligita; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Plantinga, Yvonne; Janaviciene, Silvija; Petrulioniene, Zaneta; Laucevicius, Aleksandras; Gintautas, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in a brachial artery, as non-invasive technique, was used for the clinical evaluation of endothelial function (EF) in 115 subjects (ages 44.19+/-12.23 (26 to 83) free of coronary heart disease or its equivalents. Our aim was to study the normative ranges for FMD in subjects of different age groups with low cardiovascular risk factors. The mean FMD was 8.23+/-4.51% (0 to 20.9). Multivariate analysis revealed that there were only two independent predictors of FMD: resting vessel diameter (r = -0.45, pFMD = 25.5-0.17 x age-2.6 x resting vessel diameter. Our study demonstrates that FMD in low cardiovascular risk patients inversely correlates with age as well as brachial artery diameter. Normative ranges of FMD could be predicted for different age groups. In addition to conventional methods for the assessment of cardiovascular risk by using a population-based approach (score indexes such as SCORE, FRAMINGH, PROCAM), high-frequency ultrasonographic imaging of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in the brachial artery is now becoming an accepted method for the assessment of an individual patient's cardiovascular risk. Although preliminary guidelines have been published, this technique has interpretive limitations. In a study that was published earlier, the authors estimated diameter-related normal ranges of FMD. Several articles reported cut points between control and diseased groups. Data about the impact of age on FMD are also available in the literature. However, this is the first attempt to classify normal values into groups according to age and diameter.

  20. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Cuff-Based Oscillometric Central and Brachial Blood Pressures Obtained Through ABPM are Similarly Associated with Renal Organ Damage in Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llama, Patricia; Pareja, Júlia; Yun, Sergi; Vázquez, Susana; Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Blanch, Pedro; Calero, Francesca; Sierra, Cristina; de la Sierra, Alejandro

    2017-12-04

    Central blood pressure (BP) has been suggested to be a better estimator of hypertension-associated risks. We aimed to evaluate the association of 24-hour central BP, in comparison with 24-hour peripheral BP, with the presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. Brachial and central (calculated by an oscillometric system through brachial pulse wave analysis) office BP and ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) were measured in 208 hypertensive patients. Renal organ damage was evaluated by means of the albumin to creatinine ratio and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Fifty-four patients (25.9%) were affected by renal organ damage, displaying either microalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion ≥30 mg/g creatinine) or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Compared to those without renal abnormalities, hypertensive patients with kidney damage had higher values of office brachial systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP), and 24-h, daytime, and nighttime central and brachial SBP and PP. They also had a blunted nocturnal decrease in both central and brachial BP, and higher values of aortic PWV. After adjustment for age, gender, and antihypertensive treatment, only ABPM-derived BP estimates (both central and brachial) showed significant associations with the presence of renal damage. Odds ratios for central BP estimates were not significantly higher than those obtained for brachial BP. Compared with peripheral ABPM, cuff-based oscillometric central ABPM does not show a closer association with presence of renal organ damage in hypertensive patients. More studies, however, need to be done to better identify the role of central BP in clinical practice. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can happen because of shoulder trauma, tumors, or ... the nerves stretch or tear. Some brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are ...

  3. Brachial plexus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise to ... in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  4. Doença arterial obstrutiva periférica e índice tornozelo-braço em pacientes submetidos à angiografia coronariana Peripheral arterial occlusive disease and ankle-brachial index in patients who had coronary angiography

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    Sthefano Atique Gabriel

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência de doença arterial obstrutiva periférica (DAOP em coronariopatas. Avaliar a relação entre Índice Tornozelo-Braço (ITB e doença coronariana, e sua correlação com fatores de risco cardiovascular. MÉTODO: ITB investigado com ultra-sonografia Doppler. Características clínicas pesquisadas: idade, sexo, diabetes mellitus, hipertensão arterial sistêmica, etilismo, tabagismo e obesidade. População: 113 pacientes submetidos à angiografia coronariana. Primeira análise: 2 grupos - ausência e presença de coronariopatia. Segunda análise: 3 grupos - Grupo 1 - ausência de lesão coronariana; Grupo 2 - estenose 70%. Terceira análise: 2 grupos - ausência e presença de DAOP. RESULTADOS: 90,76% dos coronariopatas apresentaram DAOP. Houve diferença significante quanto à faixa etária (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD in patients with coronary arterial disease. To evaluate the relation between ankle-brachial index (ABI and coronary arterial disease, and its correlation with cardiovascular risk factors. METHOD: ABI investigated with Doppler ultrasonic device. Clinical characteristics researched: age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, alcoholism, smoking and obesity. Population: 113 patients who had coronary angiography. First analyses: 2 groups - absence and presence of coronary arterial disease. Second analyses: 3 groups - Group 1 - absence of coronary lesion; Group 2 - stenosis 70%. Third analyses: 2 groups - absence and presence of PAD. RESULTS: 90.76% of patients with coronary arterial disease presented PAD. There were significant difference including age (p<0.001, hypertension (p<0.001. smoking (p<0.001, body mass index (BMI (p<0.001, systolic blood pressure (SBP (p<0.001, diastolic blood pressure (DBP (p<0.001 and pulse pressure (PP (p<0.001 and ABI (p<0.001 between patients with and without coronary lesion. There were significant difference including age (p<0

  5. Investigating the complex genetic architecture of ankle-brachial index, a measure of peripheral arterial disease, in non-Hispanic whites

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    Turner Stephen T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD affects 8–10 million people in the United States and is associated with a marked impairment in quality of life and an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Noninvasive assessment of PAD is performed by measuring the ankle-brachial index (ABI. Complex traits, such as ABI, are influenced by a large array of genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. We attempted to characterize the genetic architecture of ABI by examining the main and interactive effects of individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and conventional risk factors. Methods We applied linear regression analysis to investigate the association of 435 SNPs in 112 positional and biological candidate genes with ABI and related physiological and biochemical traits in 1046 non-Hispanic white, hypertensive participants from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy (GENOA study. The main effects of each SNP, as well as SNP-covariate and SNP-SNP interactions, were assessed to investigate how they contribute to the inter-individual variation in ABI. Multivariable linear regression models were then used to assess the joint contributions of the top SNP associations and interactions to ABI after adjustment for covariates. We reduced the chance of false positives by 1 correcting for multiple testing using the false discovery rate, 2 internal replication, and 3 four-fold cross-validation. Results When the results from these three procedures were combined, only two SNP main effects in NOS3, three SNP-covariate interactions (ADRB2 Gly 16 – lipoprotein(a and SLC4A5 – diabetes interactions, and 25 SNP-SNP interactions (involving SNPs from 29 different genes were significant, replicated, and cross-validated. Combining the top SNPs, risk factors, and their interactions into a model explained nearly 18% of variation in ABI in the sample. SNPs in six genes (ADD2, ATP6V1B1, PRKAR2B, SLC17A2, SLC22A3

  6. Impact of repeated increases in shear stress via reactive hyperemia and handgrip exercise: no evidence of systematic changes in brachial artery FMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, K E; Jazuli, F

    2011-03-01

    Reactive hyperemia (RH) creates an uncontrolled, transient increase in brachial artery (BA) shear stress (SS) for flow-mediated dilation (FMD) assessment. In contrast, handgrip exercise (HGEX) can create similar, sustained SS increases over repeated trials. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of repeated SS elevation via RH or HGEX and the relationship between RH and HGEX %FMD. BA diameter and blood velocity were assessed with echo and Doppler ultrasound in 20 healthy subjects. Visit A consisted of four 6-min HGEX trials (HGEX trials 1-4) at the intensity required to achieve a shear rate (SR = mean blood velocity/BA diameter; an estimate of SS) of 65 s(-1). Visit B consisted of four RH trials (RH trials 1-4). The RH SR area under the curve (AUC) was higher in trial 1 versus trial 3 and trial 4 (P = 0.019 and 0.047). The HGEX mean SR was similar across trials (mean SR = 66.1 ± 5.8 s(-1), P = 0.152). There were no differences in %FMD across trials or tests (RH trial 1: 6.9 ± 3.5%, trial 2: 6.9 ± 2.3%, trial 3: 7.1 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 7.0 ± 2.8%; HGEX trial 1: 7.3 ± 3.6%, trial 2: 7.0 ± 3.6%, trial 3: 6.5 ± 3.5%, and trial 4: 6.8 ± 2.9%, P = 0.913). No relationship between subject's RH %FMD and HGEX %FMD was detected (r(2) = 0.12, P = 0.137). However, with response normalization, a relationship emerged (RH %FMD/SR AUC vs. HGEX %FMD/mean SR, r(2) = 0.44, P = 0.002). In conclusion, with repeat trials, there were no systematic changes in RH or HGEX %FMD. The relationship between normalized RH and HGEX %FMD suggests that endothelial responses to different SS profiles provide related information regarding endothelial function.

  7. Brachial Plexus Injuries

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    ... as a result of shoulder trauma, tumors, or inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which ... as a result of shoulder trauma, tumors, or inflammation. There is a rare syndrome called Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, or brachial plexitis , which ...

  8. Avaliação da circulação arterial pela medida do índice tornozelo/braço em doentes de úlcera venosa crônica Evaluation of arterial circulation using the ankle/brachial blood pressure index in patients with chronic venous ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Noronha Bergonse

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: As úlceras venosas dos membros inferiores são freqüentes e têm grande impacto na qualidade de vida e produtividade do indivíduo, além de alto custo para a saúde pública. OBJETIVOS: Detecção de alterações arteriais em pacientes de úlcera venosa crônica dos membros inferiores com emprego de método não invasivo, de modo a discriminar aqueles em que estaria contra-indicado o tratamento compressivo. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 40 doentes portadores de úlcera venosa crônica, com o intuito de se avaliar a presença de doença arterial periférica pela medida do índice tornozelo/braço por doppler-ultra-som. RESULTADOS: O índice tornozelo/braço mostrou-se alterado (menor que 1 em 9/22 (40,9% doentes com úlcera venosa crônica e hipertensão arterial concomitante, e apenas em 1/13 (7,7% doentes de úlcera venosa crônica sem hipertensão arterial. CONCLUSÕES: Doentes de úlcera venosa crônica e hipertensão arterial concomitantes devem ser submetidos rotineiramente à medida do índice tornozelo/braço para detecção de possível insuficiência arterial periférica associada.BACKGROUND: Chronic venous ulcers are extremely frequent and have a significant impact on quality of life and work productivity of individuals, in addition to high costs to public health. OBJECTIVES: Detection of arterial circulation alterations in chronic venous ulcer legs using a non-invasive method to discriminate patients not indicated to have compressive treatment. METHODS: Forty patients with chronic venous ulcers were investigated for the presence of peripheral arterial disease with measurement of the ankle/brachial index by Doppler ultrasound. RESULTS: The resting ankle/brachial pressure index was abnormal (lower than 1 in 9/22 (40.9% patients with concomitant chronic venous ulcers and hypertension and only in one out of 13 (7.7% patients with chronic venous ulcers and no hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with concomitant chronic venous

  9. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  10. Validación del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico comparado con eco-Doppler arterial de miembros inferiores para enfermedad arterial Validation of oscillometric measurement of ankle-brachial index compared with arterial lower limb echo-doppler for arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid N Páez E

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: estudios previos reportan la validación y correspondencia, o ambas, del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico frente al índice tobillo brazo con Doppler, pero este último no corresponde al patrón de oro. OBJETIVO: determinar la validez de criterio del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico comparado con la ecografía dúplex arterial de miembros inferiores para detectar enfermedad arterial periférica. METODOLOGÍA: estudio de evaluación de tecnologías diagnósticas realizado por muestreo transversal. De manera consecutiva, se reclutaron 101 personas del Instituto del Corazón de Bucaramanga con mínimo un factor de riesgo cardiovascular. Se midió el índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico con equipo OMRON® M7 HEM 780 y posteriormente se hizo ecografía dúplex arterial de miembros inferiores, esta última patrón de oro; los evaluadores estaban enmascarados. RESULTADOS: las mediciones repetidas de la presión arterial en cada miembro, mostraron una reproducibilidad casi perfecta, pues sus coeficientes de correlación intraclase son superiores a 0,86 y el acuerdo del método fue adecuado ± 15 mm Hg, para la mayoría de las mediciones. Según el análisis de la curva ROC, el punto de corte 90,48%, sensibilidad regular ( 70,37%, razón de probabilidad positiva cercana o superior al ideal (7-10, moderada calidad de la sensibilidad (0,58, sustancial calidad de la especificidad (0,66-0,78 y eficiencia o capacidad discriminatoria (0,62-0,67. CONCLUSIÓN: los hallazgos permiten recomendar la medición del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico en personas con factores de riesgo cardiovasculares, como una prueba de rutina, bien sea para tamizaje (punto de corte INTRODUCTION: previous studies reported validation and/or correspondence of ankle-brachial index measured by OMRON (ABIO versus an ABI measured by Doppler, but the latter is not the gold standard. Objective: to determine the criterion validity of ABIO versus arterial duplex

  11. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  12. Accuracy of Physical Examination, Ankle-Brachial Index, and Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Arterial Injury in Patients With Penetrating Extremity Trauma: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Ian S; Benabbas, Roshanak; McKee, Sean; Zangbar, Bardiya; Jain, Ashika; Paladino, Lorenzo; Boudourakis, Leon; Sinert, Richard

    2017-08-01

    Penetrating Extremity Trauma (PET) may result in arterial injury, a rare but limb- and life-threatening surgical emergency. Timely, accurate diagnosis is essential for potential intervention in order to prevent significant morbidity. Using a systematic review/meta-analytic approach, we determined the utility of physical examination, Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI), and Ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of arterial injury in emergency department (ED) patients who have sustained PET. We applied a test-treatment threshold model to determine which evaluations may obviate CT Angiography (CTA). We searched PubMed, Embase, and Scopus from inception to November 2016 for studies of ED patients with PET. We included studies on adult and pediatric subjects. We defined the reference standard to include CTA, catheter angiography, or surgical exploration. When low-risk patients did not undergo the reference standard, trials must have specified that patients were observed for at least 24 hours. We used the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) to evaluate bias and applicability of the included studies. We calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) of physical examination ("hard signs" of vascular injury), US, and ABI. Using established CTA test characteristics (sensitivity = 96.2%, specificity = 99.2%) and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method, we developed a test-treatment threshold model (testing threshold = 0.14%, treatment threshold = 72.9%). We included eight studies (n = 2,161, arterial injury prevalence = 15.5%). Studies had variable quality with most at high risk for partial and double verification bias. Some studies investigated multiple index tests: physical examination (hard signs) in three studies (n = 1,170), ABI in five studies (n = 1,040), and US in four studies (n = 173). Due to high heterogeneity (I(2)  > 75%) of the results, we could not calculate LR+ or LR- for hard signs or LR+ for ABI. The

  13. Relationship of lower extremity skin blood flow to the ankle brachial index in patients with peripheral arterial disease and normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otah, Kenneth E; Otah, Eseroghene; Clark, Luther T; Salifu, Moro O

    2005-08-03

    Changes in posture of the lower extremities induce changes in skin blood flow, known as veno-arteriolar response (VAR). We investigated the relationship between ankle brachial index (ABI) and VAR in patients (ABInormal controls (ABI>1). We measured ankle pressure, ABI at rest, and post-exercise ABI. Using laser Doppler flowmetry, skin blood flow was measured with the lower extremity in extended and flexed positions and the fractional change (extended-flexed/extended) in blood flow (VAR) was calculated. With external pressure applied serially to the lower extremity in the extended position using a sphygmomanometer, the pressure (PVAR) at which the VAR was similar to that in the flexed position was recorded. Patients and controls did not differ by age or comorbidity, except higher cigarette smoking in patients (95.8% vs. 4.3%, p=0.001). VAR and PVAR were significantly lower in patients than controls (0.42+/-0.16 vs. 0.65+/-0.11 flux/min, p=0.001 and 29+/-8 vs. 48+/-9 mm Hg, p=0.001, respectively). There was significant correlation between ABI-post and VAR (r=0.6, p=0.01) and between the VAR and PVAR (r=0.8, p=0.001). VARblood flow by this method correlates with the presence and severity of an abnormal ABI. This may offer a method of monitoring the effect of therapy and regression of peripheral atherosclerosis.

  14. The run-off resistance (ROR) assessed on MR angiograms may serve as a valid scoring system in patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and correlates with the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorny, O; Santner, W; Fraedrich, G; Jaschke, W; Greiner, A; Schocke, M F

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the correlation between the hemodynamic parameter ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) and the run-off resistance (ROR) assessed on MR angiograms (MRA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) Fontaine Stage I and II and its potential as reliable reporting system in clinical routine. Contrast-enhanced MRA was performed in 321 PAD patients using a 1.5T MR scanner with moving bed technique. The ROR and resting ABI were determined in each patient's leg and correlation analysis was performed using the Pearson test. A significant negative correlation (r = -.513; pROR (mean 11.03±5.42) and resting ABI (mean .81±.26) was identified. An even more pronounced correlation was found in patients younger than median age who had higher ABI values (r = -.608; pROR scoring system evaluated in this series correlates better with the ABI than previously published scoring systems and could be suggested as reporting system for routine MRA evaluation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Avaliação da dilatação máxima da artéria braquial em gestantes e não gestantes, fumantes e não fumantes Maximum dilation of the brachial artery in smoking and nonsmoking pregnant and non-pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Guilherme Carvalho Nicolau

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar, por meio da dilatação mediada por fluxo da artéria braquial, em que tempo ocorre a máxima dilatação da artéria braquial e se existe diferença nesta avaliação ao comparar mulheres gestantes e não gestantes, fumantes e não fumantes. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, no qual o diâmetro da artéria braquial foi avaliado em quatro tempos após estímulo pressórico (30, 60, 90 e 120 segundos em quatro grupos de mulheres entre 20 e 30 anos de idade assim distribuídos: mulheres gestantes entre 24 e 28 semanas de idade gestacional não fumantes (n = 47 e fumantes (n = 33, e mulheres não gestantes não fumantes (n = 34 e fumantes (n = 19. RESULTADOS: A avaliação da dilatação da artéria braquial nos diferentes tempos após o estímulo pressórico foi máxima para todos os grupos no tempo "60 segundos" após a desinsuflação (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the time required to achieve maximum brachial artery dilation by means of flow-mediated dilation, as well as the differences in such dilation as four groups of smoking and nonsmoking pregnant and non-pregnant women are compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study where the brachial artery diameter was measured considering four time spans following pressoric stimulus (30, 60, 90 and 120 seconds in four groups of women in the age range between 20 and 30 years as follows: nonsmoking pregnant women (n = 47 and smoking pregnant women (n = 33 with gestational age between 24 and 28 weeks, nonsmoking (n = 34 and smoking (n = 19 non-pregnant women. RESULTS: The evaluation of dilation of the brachial artery at the different time spans following pressoric stimulus demonstrated maximum dilation for all the groups at "60 seconds" following the cuff deflation (p < 0.01. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was greater among nonsmoking pregnant women as compared with smoking ones (p = 0.03, as well as in the group of nonsmoking, non-pregnant women as compared with

  16. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  17. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes to iden...

  18. Comparison of Two Techniques of Brachial Plexus Block for Upper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared trans-arterial approach and mid-humeral technique of axillary brachial plexus block in terms of the clinical benefit of each method; adequacy of block, onset of sensory and motor block, duration of block and complications. .In a prospective randomized study, axillary plexus block was carried out in 50 ...

  19. Resting and Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Index Measurements to Diagnose Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease in Middle Aged and Elderly Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Brokop, Michael; Cave, Andrew; Rowe, Brian H; Wong, Eric; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at risk for asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) because smoking is a risk factor for COPD and PAD. The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of COPD patients with asymptomatic PAD and to investigate whether the estimated risk of asymptomatic PAD in subjects with COPD differs using resting and exercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) in smokers. Using a cross-sectional study design, consecutive smokers > 50 years old were recruited over 2 months from the inpatient units and the outpatient clinics. Subjects previously diagnosed with PAD, unstable angina, recent (< 3 months) myocardial infarction or abdominal, intracranial, eye or lung surgery, and palliative care patients were excluded. Vascular risk factors, ABI (supine and post-3-minute walk supine), self-reported PAD symptoms, and spirometry were obtained. Two measurements of systolic blood pressure on all limbs were obtained using a sphygmomanometer and a Doppler ultrasound, and the ABI was calculated. Data were expressed as means ± standard deviation (SD). Dichotomous outcomes were assessed using Chi-square statistics; P-values of < 0.05 were considered significant. Thirty patients with no previous diagnosis of PAD were recruited. Mean age was 67.7 years (SD: 10.5). Overall, 21 subjects (70%) had spirometry-proven COPD. Significant ABI for PAD (< 0.9) was seen in 7/21 COPD (33.5%) and 0/9 non-COPD subjects in the supine resting position (P = 0.07), and in 9/21 COPD (42.9%) vs. 0/9 non-COPD subjects after exercise (P = 0.03). A significant proportion of patients with spirometry-proven COPD screened positive for asymptomatic PAD after exercise. Resting ABI may not be very sensitive to diagnose asymptomatic PAD in COPD subjects. ABI may be a reliable, sensitive and practical screening tool to assess cardiovascular risk in COPD patients. Future large-scale studies are required to confirm this finding.

  20. Parental smoking in childhood and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation in young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study and the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juonala, Markus; Magnussen, Costan G; Venn, Alison; Gall, Seana; Kähönen, Mika; Laitinen, Tomi; Taittonen, Leena; Lehtimäki, Terho; Jokinen, Eero; Sun, Cong; Viikari, Jorma S A; Dwyer, Terence; Raitakari, Olli T

    2012-04-01

    Passive smoking has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. The present study aimed to examine the long-term effects of childhood exposure to tobacco smoke on endothelium-dependent vasodilation in adults. The analyses were based on 2171 participants in the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns (N=2067) and Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (N=104) studies who had measures of conventional risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, adiposity, socioeconomic status) and self-reported parental smoking status when aged 3 to 18 years at baseline. They were re-examined 19 to 27 years later when aged 28 to 45 years. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation was measured at follow-up with ultrasound. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, and childhood risk factors, flow-mediated dilatation was reduced among participants who had parents that smoked in youth compared to those whose parents did not smoke (Young Finns: 9.2 ± 0.1% (mean ± SEM) versus 8.6 ± 0.1%, P=0.001; Childhood Determinants of Adult Health: 7.4 ± 0.6% versus 4.9 ± 0.9%, P=0.04). These effects remained after adjustment for adult risk factors including own smoking status (Young Finns, P=0.003; Childhood Determinants of Adult Health, P=0.03). Parental smoking in youth is associated with reduced flow-mediated dilatation in young adulthood measured over 20 years later. These findings suggest that passive exposure to cigarette smoke among children might cause irreversible impairment in endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  1. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI, also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI, is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases.

  2. Relationship of levels of Vitamin D with flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery in patients of myocardial infarction and healthy control: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarthak Malik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD remain the leading cause of death worldwide. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased risk of adverse CV events. Vitamin D deficiency may be responsible for endothelial dysfunction which in turn affects the onset and progression of coronary artery disease and its risk factors, directly or indirectly through various mechanisms. Materials and Methods: It was case-control study. A total of 50 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI (aged 40-60 years, admitted to medicine emergency/CCU, were taken as per ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines. An equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were also taken. Risk factors of AMI, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD, and 25(OHD levels were studied in all cases and controls. Correlation was also studied between FMD and 25(OHD. Results: The mean values of FMD were 18.86 ± 5.39% and 10.35 ± 4.90% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05. The endothelial dilatation after glyceryl trinitrate (GTN was also studied and was found to be 26.175 ± 4.25% and 18.80 ± 5.72% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05. The mean levels of 25(OHD in controls and cases were 25.45 ± 12.17 and 14.53 ± 8.28 ng/ml, respectively. In this study, 56% of subjects were Vitamin D deficient, 25% were Vitamin D insufficient, and only 19% had Vitamin D in normal range. A positive correlation coefficient was found between FMD and 25(OH Vitamin D levels (r = 0.841, P < 0.01. In this study, a positive correlation coefficient was also found between endothelial dilatation after GTN and 25(OHD levels (r = 0.743, P < 0.01. Conclusion: In this study, it was found that FMD was markedly impaired in patients of AMI when compared to controls. It was also found that majority of the study population was Vitamin D deficient; however, the deficiency was more severe in patients of AMI. We also found out that FMD was positively correlated (r = 0.841 to the deficiency state of Vitamin D in all the study

  3. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  4. Isosorbide dinitrate and pulsatile arterial haemodynamic variables in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, J; Simon, A; Bouthier, J; Benetos, A; Safar, M E

    1986-10-01

    The effect of a sustained-release oral isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) preparation on cerebral and forearm circulation was determined in 16 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Measurements were made by pulsed Doppler velocimetry in the common carotid and the brachial arteries. Pulse wave velocity of the forearm was simultaneously recorded by means of strain gauge arterial mechanography allowing non-invasive evaluation of compliance and characteristic impedance of the brachial artery. Four hours after ISDN ingestion, the patients exhibited a significant decrease in blood pressure without a change in heart rate. An increase in carotid and brachial artery diameter was shown whereas blood flow increased only in the forearm. Resistance decreased significantly in both carotid and brachial vascular beds but only in the brachial vascular bed was the baseline resistance directly correlated with the change in brachial bed resistance. Concerning pulsatile large artery parameters, pulse wave velocity and characteristic impedance diminished, and brachial artery compliance increased significantly. The tangential tension of carotid and brachial arteries did not change. An increase in plasma renin activity was observed and related to the vasodilating effect on small arteries of the brachial vascular bed. This study showed that the antihypertensive effects of ISDN were accompanied by a strong vasodilatory action on small and large arteries and by an improvement in the pulsatile behaviour of large arteries.

  5. Risk factors of normal ankle-brachial index and low toe-brachial index in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakajima, Fumitaka; Yurugi, Takatomi; Morita, Tatsuyori; Jo, Fusakazu; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Maki, Kei

    2009-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease is high in patients with terminal renal failure, and it is a major problem in those on dialysis. A low ankle-brachial index (ABI) suggests the presence of arterial stenotic lesions between the aorta and the ankle joint, while a low toe-brachial index (TBI) suggests stenotic lesions between the aorta and the toes. Therefore, a normal ABI (> or =0.9) and a low TBI ( or =0.6) (N group) were compared. Low ankle-brachial and toe-brachial indices were detected in 13% and 22% of the patients, respectively. Comparison of the background factors and laboratory data between the N and L groups showed that the ratio of diabetes mellitus, interdialytic body weight gain, and Hb(A1c) values were significantly higher in the L group than in the N group. It was clarified that diabetes and excess body weight gain are involved as risk factors in dialysis patients with normal ABI/low TBI.

  6. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  7. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  8. Anatomic Basis for Brachial Plexus Block at the Costoclavicular Space: A Cadaver Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Reina, Miguel Angel; Pangthipampai, Pawinee; Karmakar, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The costoclavicular space (CCS), which is located deep and posterior to the midpoint of the clavicle, may be a better site for infraclavicular brachial plexus block than the traditional lateral paracoracoid site. However, currently, there is paucity of data on the anatomy of the brachial plexus at the CCS. We undertook this cadaver anatomic study to define the anatomy of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS and thereby establish the anatomic basis for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block at this proximal site. The anatomy and topography of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS was evaluated in 8 unembalmed (cryopreserved), thawed, fresh adult human cadavers using anatomic dissection, and transverse anatomic and histological sections, of the CCS. The cords of the brachial plexus were located lateral and parallel to the axillary artery at the CCS. The topography of the cords, relative to the axillary artery and to one another, in the transverse (axial) plane was also consistent at the CCS. The lateral cord was the most superficial of the 3 cords and it was always anterior to both the medial and posterior cords. The medial cord was directly posterior to the lateral cord but medial to the posterior cord. The posterior cord was the lateral most of the 3 cords at the CCS and it was immediately lateral to the medial cord but posterolateral to the lateral cord. The cords of the brachial plexus are clustered together lateral to the axillary artery, and share a consistent relation relative to one another and to the axillary artery, at the CCS.

  9. The association between ankle-brachial index and quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ching; Kuo, Li-Ying; Tsao, Yu-Feng; Hong, Ling-Show; Wang, Chin-Suey; Lee, Chia-Chi; Lin, Lih-Jen; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsieng, Yu-Hsiung

    2010-08-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is an important indicator of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and PAD has a negative impact on quality of life (QOL). However, the correlation between ABI and QOL is unknown among chronic hemodialysis patients. Ankle-brachial index was measured, and WHOQOL-BRIEF (TW) questionnaire was completed. The association between ABI and QOL was analyzed using linear regression. A total of 54 chronic hemodialysis patients (mean age of 56.2 +/- 14.6 years) were included. Ankle-brachial index was positively associated with QOL (r = .448, P = .001). The QOL scores were 3.1 +/- 2.9 and 2.6 +/- 0.4 for 37 patients with an ABI more than 0.9 and 17 patients with an ABI less than 0.9 or more than 1.3 (p Ankle-brachial index is positively correlated to QOL among chronic hemodialysis patients.

  10. Validación del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico comparado con eco-Doppler arterial de miembros inferiores para enfermedad arterial Validation of oscillometric measurement of ankle-brachial index compared with arterial lower limb echo-doppler for arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Astrid N Páez E; Myriam Oróstegui A; Héctor J Hernández G; Laura I Valencia A; Carlos I Reyes S; Luis F Tapias V; Luis C. Orozco V

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: estudios previos reportan la validación y correspondencia, o ambas, del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico frente al índice tobillo brazo con Doppler, pero este último no corresponde al patrón de oro. OBJETIVO: determinar la validez de criterio del índice tobillo brazo oscilométrico comparado con la ecografía dúplex arterial de miembros inferiores para detectar enfermedad arterial periférica. METODOLOGÍA: estudio de evaluación de tecnologías diagnósticas realizado por muestreo t...

  11. Comparison of atherosclerotic indicators between cardio ankle vascular index and brachial ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinaka, Shigeo; Yabe, Akihisa; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Hara, Hitoshi; Iemua, Tomoyuki; Matsuoka, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity has been used for evaluating atherosclerosis. Recently, the development of the volume plethysmographic method has made it possible to easily measure the index of the pulse wave velocity. The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio ankle vascular index are used for estimating the extent of atherosclerosis. The diagnostic usefulness of these indexes in predicting coronary artery disease was examined. The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity, the cardio ankle vascular index, and the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured in 696 patients who had chest pain and underwent coronary angiography. Measurement values of brachial ankle pulse wave velocity were compared with those of cardio ankle vascular index in terms of the baseline covariates and the number of major coronary vessels involved (vessel disease). The brachial ankle pulse wave velocity was significantly correlated with age, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure but not with the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The cardio ankle vascular index was correlated only with age and the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. The average of both brachial ankle pulse wave velocity and cardio ankle vascular index values was greater in 3 vessel disease group than in 0 vessel disease group. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the diagnostic accuracy of coronary artery disease was significantly higher in the cardio ankle vascular index than in the brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (area under the curve +/- standard error: 0.691 +/- 0.025 vs. 0.584 +/- 0.026; P cardio ankle vascular index are useful and that cardio ankle vascular index may have some advantages in its application to patients taking blood pressure-lowering medication because of the minimum effect of blood pressure on its measurement values. The cardio ankle vascular index has increased performance over brachial ankle pulse wave velocity in predicting the coronary artery disease.

  12. Relationship between upper and lower limb conduit artery vasodilator function in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Rowley, Nicola; Padilla, Jaume; Simmons, Grant H; Laughlin, M Harold; Whyte, Greg; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a strong predictor of future cardiovascular disease and is believed to represent a "barometer" of systemic endothelial health. Although a recent study [Padilla et al. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 235: 1287-1291, 2010] in pigs confirmed a strong correlation between brachial and femoral artery endothelial function, it is unclear to what extent brachial artery FMD represents a systemic index of endothelial function in humans. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from our laboratory to evaluate relationships between the upper (i.e., brachial artery) vs. lower limb (superficial femoral n = 75; popliteal artery n = 32) endothelium-dependent FMD and endothelium-independent glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated dilation in young, healthy individuals. We also examined the relationship between FMD assessed in both brachial arteries (n = 42). There was no correlation between brachial and superficial femoral artery FMD (r(2) = 0.008; P = 0.46) or between brachial and popliteal artery FMD (r(2) = 0.003; P = 0.78). However, a correlation was observed in FMD between both brachial arteries (r(2) = 0.34; P < 0.001). Brachial and superficial femoral artery GTN were modestly correlated (r(2) = 0.13; P = 0.007), but brachial and popliteal artery GTN responses were not (r(2) = 0.08; P = 0.11). Collectively, these data indicate that conduit artery vasodilator function in the upper limbs (of healthy humans) is not predictive of that in the lower limbs, whereas measurement of FMD in one arm appears to be predictive of FMD in the other. These data do not support the hypothesis that brachial artery FMD in healthy humans represents a systemic index of endothelial function.

  13. Comparison between Central and Brachial Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Elderly Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Bordin Pelazza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the values of central and brachial systemic blood pressure (SBP between women and men over 60 years of age with systemic arterial hypertension. Methods. This study was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study with elderly patients admitted to and selected from spontaneous and scheduled demand at basic health units in Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil, between March 2013 and March 2014. We included 69 study participants and compared central and brachial SBP using a Sphygmocor® XCEL device (AtCor Medical, Sydney, Australia. Results. Significant differences were found in the blood pressure values of the whole population in the central versus brachial systolic blood pressure (SP [140(21 versus 153(23 mmHg] and in the central versus brachial pulse pressure (PP [55(18 versus 70(18 mmHg]. Additionally, females exhibited higher blood pressure levels than males [central SP 144(23 versus 134(16 mmHg and brachial SP 161(26 versus 148(18 mmHg and central PP 62(17 versus 45(14 mmHg and brachial PP 80(21 versus 63(15 mmHg, resp.]. Conclusion. Elderly women exhibited higher blood pressure values than elderly hypertensive men.

  14. The correlation between the ankle-brachial index and the metabolic syndrome. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitu, F; Mitu, O; Leon, Maria-Magdalena; Jitaru, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    On a global scale, the cardiovascular diseases constitute the prime factor of death and invalidity. The premature mortality percentage caused by these varies from 4% in high developed countries to 40% in underdeveloped countries. Atherosclerosis is the most important etiological factor. The presence of various degrees of atherosclerosis in a certain vascular area (in our case, the lower limb arteries), increases the probability of affecting other areas as well (coronary, cerebral, renal, mesenteric arteries). The evaluation and description of the correlations between the ankle-brachial index levels and the cardiovascular risk factors, taken individually or as part of the metabolic syndrome. The values of the ankle-brachial index were divided in normal and abnormal. The evaluated cardiovascular risk factors were: age, sex, arterial hypertension, obesity, smoking, high levels of cholesterol and basal glucose, low levels of HDL-cholesterol. There were significant statistical differences between the normal ankle-brachial index lot and the one with abnormal values, specifically in patients with diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. More so, the study demonstrates that the ankle-brachial index is considerably smaller in patients with metabolic syndrome. The simple measurement of the afore mentioned index, as a atherosclerosis marker for the lower limb arteries, represents an independent prediction over the metabolic syndrome and the conventional risk factors, in the development of the cardiovascular diseases. The routine measurement of this parameter in medical practice might imply the early diagnosis of high risk manifested cardiovascular disease patients.

  15. Reflex systemic sympatho-neural response to brachial adenosine infusion in treated heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijeysundera, H.C.; Parmar, G.; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.; Floras, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: In healthy men, brachial artery adenosine infusion elicits a reflex increase in total body norepinephrine (NE) spillover (TBS) that is blunted by oral angiotensin AT(1) receptor blockade. Our objectives were to determine whether a similar reflex is active in treated heart failure (HF) patients

  16. The reliability of toe systolic pressure and the toe brachial index in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrin Byron M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ankle Brachial Index is a useful clinical test for establishing blood supply to the foot. However, there are limitations to this method when conducted on people with diabetes. As an alternative to the Ankle Brachial Index, measuring Toe Systolic Pressures and the Toe Brachial Index have been recommended to assess the arterial blood supply to the foot. This study aimed to determine the intra and inter-rater reliability of the measurement of Toe Systolic Pressure and the Toe Brachial Index in patients with diabetes using a manual measurement system. Methods This was a repeated measures, reliability study. Three raters measured Toe Systolic Pressure and the Toe Brachial Index in thirty participants with diabetes. Measurement sessions occurred on two occasions, one week apart, using a manual photoplethysmography unit (Hadeco Smartdop 45 and a standardised measurement protocol. Results The mean intra-class correlation for intra-rater reliability for toe systolic pressures was 0.87 (95% LOA: -25.97 to 26.06 mmHg and the mean intra-class correlation for Toe Brachial Indices was 0.75 (95% LOA: -0.22 to 0.28. The intra-class correlation for inter-rater reliability was 0.88 for toe systolic pressures (95% LOA: -22.91 to 29.17.mmHg and 0.77 for Toe Brachial Indices (95% LOA: -0.21 to 0.22. Conclusion Despite the reasonable intra-class correlation results, the range of error (95% LOA was broad. This raises questions regarding the reliability of using a manual sphygmomanometer and PPG for the Toe Systolic Pressure and Toe Brachial Indice.

  17. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    1997-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial

  18. Avaliação da função endotelial em pacientes com esclerose sistêmica limitada por meio do eco Doppler da artéria braquial Evaluation of endothelial function in patients with limited systemic sclerosis by use of brachial artery Doppler ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Melo Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a resposta dilatadora dependente e independente do endotélio em pacientes portadores de esclerose sistêmica limitada (ESL com aquela de indivíduos sadios de mesmo gênero, idade e cor. MÉTODOS: Vinte mulheres adultas, não obesas, não tabagistas, não diabéticas, não dislipidêmicas, não hipertensas, que preencheram os critérios para esclerose sistêmica (ES segundo o American College of Rheumatology, foram submetidas ao exame de Doppler de artéria braquial do membro superior direito. Foi analisada a resposta dilatadora, dependente do endotélio, após isquemia induzida com esfigmomanômetro por cinco minutos no braço direito, e a resposta dilatadora, independente do endotélio, após administração de 300 mcg de nitroglicerina (NTG sublingual. Esses resultados foram comparados com a resposta obtida em indivíduos sadios. RESULTADOS: O diâmetro longitudinal da artéria braquial (DAB foi significativamente menor na fase basal 1 nos pacientes com ESL (3,57 ± 0,52 mm e 3,93 ± 0,39 mm, respectivamente no grupo paciente (P e grupo-controle (C, P = 0,005. Não foi encontrada diferença estatisticamente significativa entre a velocidade das hemácias (VH após isquemia/hiperemia reativa (HR e após NTG (110,2 ± 43,86 cm/s vs. 102,0 ± 25,89 cm/s e 63,80 ± 17,69 cm/s vs. 65,4 ± 12,90 cm/s nos grupos P e C, após HR e NTG, respectivamente. Também não foi encontrada diferença significativa entre o DAB após HR e após NTG (3,77 ± 0,59 mm vs. 4,14 ± 0,49 mm e 4,44 ± 0,64 mm vs. 4,70 ± 0,58 mm nos grupos P e C, após HR e NTG, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Embora o grupo de pacientes com ESL tenha apresentado menor DAB basal, a resposta dilatadora dependente e independente do endotélio se manteve preservada em ambos os grupos.OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the brachial artery endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent dilating responses in patients with limited

  19. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  1. Effects of Mechanical Pumping on the Arterial Pulse Wave Velocity: Peripheral Artery and Micro-Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    EFFECTS OF MECHANICAL PUMPING ON THE ARTERIAL PULSE WAVE VELOCITY : PERIPHERAL ARTERY AND MICRO -VESSELS Shu-Mei Wu*†, Yio-Wha Shau**, Bor-Shyh...was contributed from the results of BA-RA, the PWV for the micro -vessels (BA-finger) on the contrary was increased. Keywords- Mechanical Pumping ...arterial conduit (brachial artery-radial artery; BA-RA) and the micro -vessels (RA-ring finger) to mechanical pumping was evaluated. II

  2. Non-invasive determination of instantaneous brachial blood flow using the oscillometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hong; Wang, Jia-Jung; Cheng, Da-Chuan

    2009-08-01

    The oscillometric method has been widely used to measure arterial systolic and diastolic blood pressures, but its potential for arterial blood flow measurements still remains to be explored. The aim of this study was to non-invasively determine arterial blood flow using an oscillometric blood flow measurement system. The system consists of a pneumatic elastic cuff, an air-pumping motor, a releaser valve, a pressure transducer, and an airflow meter. To build a non-linear cuff model, we measured airflow pumped into the pneumatic cuff and cuff pressure using an airflow meter and pressure transducer during the inflation period, respectively. During the deflation period, only the pressure transducer was used to record cuff pressure. Based on the cuff model, the oscillometric blood flow waveform was obtained by integrating the oscillometric pressure waveform. We compared arterial blood flow derived from the maximum amplitude of the oscillometric blood flow waveform with Doppler-measured blood flow calculated with the diameters and blood velocities of the brachial arteries in 32 subjects who underwent diagnostic evaluations for peripheral arterial embolism. A linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.716 was found between the oscillometry- and Doppler-based blood flow measurements in the 32 subjects. These results suggest that blood flow passing through the brachial artery can be quantified non-invasively using the oscillometric approach after appropriate calibration.

  3. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  4. Asociación entre enfermedad periodontal y disfunción endotelial valorada por vasodilatación mediada por flujo en la arteria braquial: Estudio piloto Association between periodontal disease and endothelial dysfunction assessed by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery: Pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro J Ruiz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: evaluar la disfunción endotelial a través de la vasodilatación mediada por flujo (VMF en la arteria braquial en pacientes fumadores con periodontitis crónica avanzada y compararla con pacientes fumadores sin enfermedad periodontal, para determinar si hay diferencias en cuando a disfunción endotelial entre quienes presentan o no periodontitis crónica avanzada. Métodos: se incluyeron 30 pacientes con hábito de tabaquismo, 15 con periodontitis crónica avanzada y 15 sin periodontitis. Se realizó historia clínica completa, exámenes de laboratorio y prueba de vasodilatación mediada por flujo de la arteria braquial. Resultados: el estudio mostró que había diferencias significativas en los diámetros finales, resultantes de vasodilatación mediada por flujo (p=0,0328, con menores valores finales para quienes tenían enfermedad periodontal. Las diferencias en las respuestas porcentuales y en el número de personas con disfunción determinada dicotómicamente, no alcanzaron significación estadística. Conclusión: se observó que el grupo de pacientes con periodontitis crónica avanzada tuvo diámetros resultantes luego de la prueba que fueron significativamente menores que los del grupo de controles. Aunque al evaluar las diferencias en porcentajes no se alcanzó significación estadística, el estudio mostró una respuesta claramente menor en vasodilatación en el grupo con enfermedad periodontal.Objective: To evaluate endothelial dysfunction through flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD in the brachial artery in smokers with advanced chronic periodontitis and compare it with smokers without periodontal disease, to determine whether there are differences in endothelial dysfunction among those with or without advanced chronic periodontitis. Methods: We included 30 patients with smoking habit, 15 with advanced chronic periodontitis and 15 without periodontal disease. We performed a complete medical history, laboratory tests and flow

  5. Are the complications of arteriovenous fistulas associated with an abnormal Ankle-Brachial Index in hemodialysis patients?

    OpenAIRE

    XHIGNESSE, Patricia; Saint-Remy, Annie; Dubois, Bernard; Philips, Jean-Christophe; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The peripheral artery disease is frequent among patients undergoing hemodialysis much more than in the general population. The ankle-brachial index (AB!) is a potent tool to screen this pathology. We analysed the relationship between ABI abnormal values and arteriovenous fistulas (AVF) complications such as stenosis and thrombosis among chronically hemodialysis pat ients (HD). Peer reviewed

  6. Exercise-Ankle Brachial Pressure Index with One-Minute Treadmill Walking in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuyuki, Kazuo; Kohno, Kenji; Ebine, Kunio; Obara, Takehiro; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Muto, Atsuhiko; Ninomiya, Kenji; Kumagai, Kenta; Yokouchi, Itaru; Yazaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is widely used as a standard screening method for arterial occlusive lesion above the knee. However, the sensitivity of ABI is low in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exercise stress (Ex-ABI) may reduce the false negative results.

  7. Casein improves brachial and central aortic diastolic blood pressure in overweight adolescents: a randomised, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnberg, Karina; Larnkjær, Anni; Michaelsen, Kim F.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, blood pressure (BP) and blood lipids may be improved by milk in adults and the effects may be mediated via proteins. However, limited is known about the effects of milk proteins on central aortic BP and no studies have examined the effects in children. Therefore, the present...... trial examined the effect of milk and milk proteins on brachial and central aortic BP, blood lipids, inflammation and arterial stiffness in overweight adolescents. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in 193 overweight adolescents aged 12–15 years. They were randomly assigned to drink 1 litre...... of water, skimmed milk, whey or casein for 12 weeks. The milk-based test drinks contained 35 g protein/l. The effects were compared with the water group and a pretest control group consisting of thirty-two of the adolescents followed 12 weeks before the start of the intervention. Outcomes were brachial...

  8. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiological risk factors for brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudić, Igor; Fatusić, Zlatan; Sinanović, Osman; Skokić, Fahrija

    2006-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for brachial plexus palsy in newborns. We analyzed 45 544 live-born children, born over a nine-year period from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2004. The analysis was retrospective and based on the medical documentation of the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinic for Neurology, and Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of the University Clinical Center Tuzla. We compared study and control groups of newborns. Rates among groups were compared using Chi-square, with significance at p labor pattern itself, it was found that the highest factors of risk for brachial plexus injury were birth weight of over 4000 g, a precipitous second stage of labor (labor. Brachial plexus palsy was more frequent when the mothers were overweight, with a body mass index >or=29 kg/m2. None of the parturient women, whose newborns were diagnosed with brachial plexus palsy, had external conjugate diameter <18 cm. Newborns delivered vaginally were not diagnosed with a higher frequency of brachial plexus palsy when compared to newborns who were delivered by cesarean section, but newborns who were vaginal breech-delivered were diagnosed to have a higher incidence of brachial plexus palsy. Newborns whose mothers were older than 35 years were diagnosed to have brachial plexus palsy more frequently, but a statistically significant difference between primiparas and multiparas was not found. A total of 39 newborns (45.2%) were diagnosed with a fracture of the clavicle, which was the most frequently combined damage with brachial plexus injury. Forty-two newborns (48.8%) had an Apgar score of brachial plexus damage was 3858.1+/-587.7 g, which for an average gestational age of 38.8+/-1.8 weeks, corresponds to eutrophic newborns. Both male and female newborns were

  10. Arterial compression during overhead throwing: a risk for arterial injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Claire H; Elias, Jade; Green, Danny J; Cable, N Tim; George, Keith P

    2010-08-01

    Case studies reporting aneurysm formation in the axillary artery have been described in overhead throwing athletes, possibly due to repetitive arterial compression by the humeral head that has been transiently observed during sonographic diagnostic arm manoeuvres. Whether compression negatively alters arterial health has not been investigated and was the focus of this study. The throwing arm of elite overhead athletes was screened for inducible axillary artery compression. Compressors (COMP, n = 11, mean age: 20 (SD: 2) year, 7 male, 4 female) were age and sex matched with noncompressing (NONCOMP) athlete controls. Four indices of arterial health (flow mediated dilation [FMD], conduit artery vasodilatory capacity [CADC], glyceryl-trinitrate [GTN]-induced vasodilation and intima-media thickness [IMT]) were assessed with high-resolution ultrasound at the brachial and the axillary, artery. No significant between-group differences were observed at the brachial, or axillary, artery for FMD (brachial: COMP: mean (SD) 6.2 (3.1)%, NONCOMP: 6.1 (3.5)%, p = 0.967, axillary: COMP: 8.0 (5.5)%, NONCOMP: 9.0 (3.6)%, p = 0.602), CADC (brachial: COMP: 10.4 (3.4)%, NONCOMP: 10.4 (5.4)%, p = 0.999, axillary: COMP: 9.6 (4.2)%, NONCOMP: 8.5 (3.2)%, p = 0.492), GTN-induced vasodilation (brachial: COMP: 17.9 (5.1)%, NONCOMP:14.1 (7.2)%, p = 0.173, axillary: COMP: 9.5 (4.3)%, NONCOMP: 7.7 (3.1)%, p = 0.302) or IMT (brachial: p = 0.084, axillary: p = 0.581). These results suggest that transient arterial compression, observed during diagnostic arm manoeuvres in overhead throwing athletes, is not associated with abnormal indices of artery function or structure and that other mechanisms must be responsible for the published cases of aneurysm formation in elite athletes performing overhead throwing actions. Copyright 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of invasive and brachial cuff-based noninvasive measurements for the assessment of blood pressure amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Atsushi; Okada, Sho; Shoji, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Yoshio

    2017-03-01

    Our aim was to assess the discrepancy in the blood pressure amplification (BPA) value defined as the aortic-to-brachial increase in systolic BP (SBP) between invasive and noninvasive brachial cuff-based methods. In 45 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, BP in the brachial artery and ascending aorta were measured with an invasive catheter and a brachial cuff-based oscillometric device. To calculate aortic SBP, brachial waveforms were calibrated by the brachial systolic and diastolic BP (DBP) (C1 calibration) or by the brachial mean BP and DBP (C2 calibration). C1 calibration underestimated aortic SBP (-17.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: -21.9 to -13.5)), whereas C2 calibration generated an approximately accurate aortic SBP (1.8 mm Hg (-2.4 to 5.9)). Regarding brachial SBP, noninvasively measured values were markedly underestimated (22.2 mm Hg (-26.4 to -18.0)), resulting in a slightly low BPA value in C1 calibration (11.9±6.3 mm Hg) and a paradoxical negative BPA value in C2 calibration (-7.6±6.7 mm Hg). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the cuff-catheter difference of BPA was positively correlated with the cuff-catheter difference of brachial SBP in both calibrations (C1 calibration: β=0.51; C2 calibration: β=0.50; both Pinvasively measured BPA only in C1 calibration (r=0.33, P=0.03), when using invasively measured brachial SBP instead of a cuff-based measurement, the BPA was well associated with invasively measured BPA in both calibrations (C1 calibration: r=0.57; C2 calibration: r=0.52; both P<0.001). In conclusion, there was a trade-off in accuracy between brachial cuff-based noninvasive aortic SBP and BPA because of the inherent inaccuracies in the cuff-based method. This finding should be fully considered in establishing standardized reference values for aortic BP.

  12. Consistency of Toe Systolic Pressures, Brachial Systolic Pressures, and Toe-Brachial Indices in People with and without Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevethan, Robert

    2018-01-22

    Toe systolic blood pressures (TSPs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) have been identified as useful adjuncts in the identification of pedal ischemia, peripheral artery occlusive diseases, and risk for either nonhealing of lower extremity wounds or for amputation. Valid measurement of TSPs and TBIs is therefore essential. However, it could be jeopardized by rater, instrument, and intratestee inconsistency. These three sources of inconsistency were examined in this research. Five publications addressing TSP and TBI consistency were identified and their results were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficients. Moderate variability in TSPs was found across all studies; greater variability was evidenced in brachial systolic pressure, particularly for people who had diabetes; and TBI values also exhibited considerable variability, but little difference between people who did and did not have diabetes. These findings provide qualified evidence of consistency regarding measurement of TSPs but challenge the TBI as a valid and useful indicator in screening, prognostic, and monitoring contexts, particularly for people who have diabetes. However, there is a prospect that TBI assessment could be improved by adherence to standardized protocols and by obtaining multiple measurements from toes and arms on a single occasion as well as on different occasions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus

  14. Rare high origin of the radial artery: a bilateral, symmetrical case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arterial variations in the upper limb can occur at the level of the axillary, brachial, radial and ulnar arteries as well as the palmar arches. This is a report of bilateral, symmetrical high origin of the radial artery from the axillary artery. Knowledge of such variations is important in vascular and reconstructive surgery. (Nig J Surg ...

  15. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  16. Comparison of ankle-brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity between patients with chronic kidney disease and hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Lin, Feng-Hsien; Su, Ho-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are highly predisposed to atherosclerosis. However, there is limited data about the direct comparison of atherosclerosis between patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hemodialysis. The aim of this study was to compare ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) between patients with CKD and hemodialysis and thus examined the status of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and arterial stiffness between them. We enrolled 169 patients with CKD stage 3-5 and 225 hemodialysis patients in one regional hospital. ABI and baPWV were measured by using an ABI-form device (VP1000, Colin). A higher prevalence of ABI hemodialysis patients than in CKD patients (15.6 vs. 8.3%, p = 0.030). After a multivariate analysis, ABI hemodialysis treatment. The baPWV was positively associated with age, DM, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and negatively with body mass index. However, after adjusting for other variables, baPWV was comparable between patients with CKD and hemodialysis. The study revealed that PAOD might be more prevalent in patients with hemodialysis than in patients with CKD, but arterial stiffness might be comparable between them. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. ... In all patients, a radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula was created by an experienced surgeon using a standard surgical technique. In both groups 20 ml of 0.375% ...

  18. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, New Delhi (India). NMR Research Center); Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.).

  19. Obstetric brachial plexus lesions: CT myelography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Pondaag, W.; Malessy, M.J.; Verbist, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the value of computed tomographic (CT) myelography in the detection of root damage and differentiation of root avulsions from neurotmesis in a large cohort of patients with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was

  20. Variação do diâmetro da artéria braquial em crianças obesas: presente e futuro Variación del diámetro de la arteria braquial en niños obesos: presente y futuro Variation of the brachial artery diameter in obese children: present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Cristina M. Costa

    2012-09-01

    como predictor de riesgo para enfermedades cardiovasculares, tales como aterosclerosis y enfermedad cardíaca coronariana, puesto que la lesión endotelial es un importante evento en la fisiopatología de tales enfermedades. CONCLUSIONES: La dilatación de la arteria braquial mediada por flujo se muestra importante como herramienta diagnóstica y pronóstica en la evaluación de la función endotelial de niños y adolescentes con exceso de peso, por ser un método no invasivo, con buena aplicabilidad respecto al costo, a la inclusión y al beneficio.OBJECTIVE: Literature review on the use of the variation measure of the brachial artery diameter by high-resolution ultrasound (flow-mediated dilation as a predictor of cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCE: Survey of studies indexed in Medline/Pubmed, which were published between 2002 and 2011 using the following keywords in various combinations:"endothelium," "child", "ultrasonography" and "obesity", as well as classic texts on the subject. We found 54 publications and 32 were included in this review. SYNTHESIS OF DATA: The study of endothelial dysfunction has been used as a predictor of risk for cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, since endothelial injury is an important event in the physiopathology of these diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery seems to be important as a diagnostic and prognostic tool to assess endothelial function in children and adolescents who are overweight, because it is a noninvasive method with good profile regarding cost, safety, and benefits.

  1. Roles of the Microsurgeon and Anesthesiologist in the Treatment of Neonatal Upper Extremity Arterial Thrombosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Alexandra M; Santosa, Katherine B; Shahrawat, Sonia M; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K

    2017-10-17

    We present a rare case of a newborn with spontaneous, noniatrogenic arterial thromboembolism in the right brachial artery and accompanying ischemic changes to the right upper extremity, who was successfully treated with microsurgical intervention and ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with a continuous infusion of ropivacaine for 48 hours. This case report highlights the emerging role of both the microsurgeon and anesthesiologist in management of spontaneous neonatal arterial thromboembolism.

  2. Unilateral high bifurcation of brachial artery: a case report | Auwal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access. Featuring journals from 32 Countries: Algeria (5); Benin (2); Botswana (3); Burkina Faso (3); Cameroon (8); Congo, Republic (1); Côte d'Ivoire (4); Egypt, Arab Rep. (14); Eritrea (1); Ethiopia (30) ...

  3. Validity and reliability of the ankle-brachial index by oscillometric blood pressure and automated ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongthawonsatid, Sukanya; Dutsadeevettakul, Somchai

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI) by oscillometric blood pressure (BP) measurement as compared with an automated ABI as a gold standard. This study was conducted at Golden Jubilee Medical Center, Thailand. All the data were collected from 303 patients at risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who were 45 years of age or above and who underwent treatment at the outpatient medical clinic between June and December 2015. Patients who were followed up at the medical clinic had both oscillometric BP measurement (Terumo, ES-P600) and an automated ABI (oscillometric method) at the same time. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the oscillometric BP measurements to predict an abnormal ABI (oscillometric BP method for determining an ABI (cutoff point oscillometric BP method by Kappa statistics was 0.84 on the right side and 0.77 on the left side (P = 0.000). The oscillometric BP method is a reliable and useful alternative to conventional automated ABI determination in patients with no severe arterial occlusion for estimation of the prevalence and screening of PAD in primary health-care settings.

  4. MR neurography in traumatic brachial plexopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyaya, Vaishali, E-mail: vshali77@yahoo.co.in [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Upadhyaya, Divya N. [Department of Plastic Surgery, King George Medical University, Shah Meena Road, Chowk, Lucknow 226 003 (India); Kumar, Adarsh [Department of Plastic Surgery, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India); Gujral, Ratni B. [Department of Radiology, Vivekananda Polyclinic and Institute of Medical Sciences, Vivekanandapuri, Lucknow 226 007 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • MR neurography is the imaging modality of choice in patients who have sustained brachial plexus injury. It is helpful in determining the level and extent of injury. • The authors have used a Visual Per-operative Scoring system to assess the usefulness of MR neurography in delineating the level and type of the lesion. • The imaging findings were classified based on the level of injury—root, trunk or cord. These findings were correlated with those seen on surgical exploration. A good correlation was found in the majority (65%) of patients and average correlation (30%) in others. - Abstract: Objectives: Imaging of the brachial plexus has come a long way and has progressed from plain radiography to CT and CT myelography to MRI. Evolution of MR imaging sequences has enabled good visualization of the small components of the plexus. The purpose of our study was to correlate the results of MR neurography (MRN) in patients with traumatic brachial plexopathy with their operative findings. We wanted to determine the usefulness of MRN and how it influenced surgical planning and outcome. Methods: Twenty patients with features of traumatic brachial plexopathy who were referred to the MRI section of the Department of Radiology between September 2012 and January 2014 and subsequently underwent exploration were included in the study. MR neurography and operative findings were recorded at three levels of the brachial plexus—roots, trunks and cords. Results: Findings at the level of roots and trunks were noted in 14 patients each and at the level of the cords in 16 patients. 10 patients had involvement at all levels. Axillary nerve involvement as a solitary finding was noted in two patients. These patients were subsequently operated and their studies were assigned a score based on the feedback from the operating surgeons. The MRN study was scored as three (good), two (average) or one (poor) depending on whether the MR findings correlated with operative

  5. Are changes in conduit artery function associated with intima-medial thickness in young subjects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopkins, N.D.; Munckhof, I. van den; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Tinken, T.M.; Cable, N.T.; Stratton, G.; Green, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired brachial artery endothelial function, assessed by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), provides a strong prognostic index of cardiovascular events in asymptomatic adults and those with cardiovascular disease. However, the relationship between FMD and carotid intima-medial thickness

  6. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; den Heijer, Martin; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Doerr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R.; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O'Connell, Jeff; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Campbell, Harry; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Muenzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian; Dorr, M.; Munzel, T.; Volker, U.

    Background-Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.

  7. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) screening in the asymptomatic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Falk, Erling

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) was developed to assess peripheral artery disease (PAD) in patients with symptoms of peripheral ischemia being present at rest or only functionally dependent (intermittent claudication). Reduced ABI is caused by arterial obstruction between the aortic arch...

  8. Effect of SR manipulation on conduit artery dilation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, H.H.; Dawson, E.A.; Birk, G.K.; Spence, A.L.; Naylor, L.H.; Cable, N.T.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Green, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of manipulating shear stress on conduit artery vasodilation has not been comprehensively described in vivo. We hypothesized that manipulation of SR through the brachial and radial arteries would be associated with corresponding changes in diameter. We performed a series of studies

  9. Surgical anatomy of the profunda brachii artery | Pulei | Anatomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variations in the origin and termination of the profunda brachii artery (PBA) are rarely described in literature. Knowledge of this unusual anatomy is important during brachial artery catheterization and harvesting of lateral arm flaps. One hundred and forty four arms from 72 cadavers of black Kenyans were dissected and ...

  10. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  11. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kelle; Filiz Koc

    2012-01-01

    Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000): 247-250

  12. Ankle-Brachial Index: A Simple Way to Predict Mortality among Patients on Hemodialysis - A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zaida Noemy Cabrera Jimenez; Benedito Jorge Pereira; João Egidio Romão; Sonia Cristina da Silva Makida; Hugo Abensur; Rosa Maria Affonso Moyses; Rosilene Motta Elias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Ankle-brachial index (ABI) can access peripheral artery disease and predict mortality in prevalent patients on hemodialysis. However, ABI has not yet been tested in incident patients, who present significant mortality. Typically, ABI is measured by Doppler, which is not always available, limiting its use in most patients. We therefore hypothesized that ABI, evaluated by a simplified method, can predict mortality in an incident hemodialysis population. Methodology/Principal Finding...

  13. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Szu-Chia Chen; Mei-Yueh Lee; Jiun-Chi Huang; Ming-Chen Paul Shih; Jer-Ming Chang; Hung-Chun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcificati...

  14. Blood urea level and diabetes duration are independently associated with ankle-brachial index in type 2 diabetic patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosevski, M.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors of ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a population of patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    Material and methods

    370 patients (mean age 60.3 ± 8.3 years and diabetes duration 8.6 ± 6.2 years) with type 2

  15. Brachial blood flow under relative levels of blood flow restriction is decreased in a nonlinear fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouser, J Grant; Ade, Carl J; Black, Christopher D; Bemben, Debra A; Bemben, Michael G

    2017-04-12

    Blood flow restriction (BFR), the application of external pressure to occlude venous return and restrict arterial inflow, has been shown to increase muscular size and strength when combined with low-load resistance exercise. BFR in the research setting uses a wide range of pressures, applying a pressure based upon an individual's systolic pressure or a percentage of occlusion pressure; not a directly determined reduction in blood flow. The relationship between relative pressure and blood flow has not been established. To measure blood flow in the arm under relative levels of BFR. Forty-five people (18-40 years old) participated. Arterial occlusion pressure in the right arm was measured using a 5-cm pneumatic cuff. Blood flow in the brachial artery was measured at rest and at pressures between 10% and 90% of occlusion using ultrasound. Blood flow decreased in a nonlinear, stepped fashion. Blood flow decreased at 10% of occlusion and remained constant until decreasing again at 40%, where it remained until 90% of occlusion. The decrease in brachial blood flow is not proportional to the applied relative pressure. The prescription of blood flow restriction should take into account the stimulus provided at each relative level of blood flow. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Time and reliability issues associated with automatic vs. manual measurements of Ankle to Brachial pressure Index (ABI) following heavy load exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congnard, Florian; Bruneau, Antoine; Abraham, Pierre; Colas-Ribas, Christophe; Picquet, Jean; Noury-Desvaux, Benedicte

    2015-11-01

    Ankle to brachial index after heavy load exercise is the most accurate way of diagnosing minor arterial lesions in athletes, such as endofibrosis. The reliability and practical aspects of ankle to brachial index measurements after heavy-load exercise have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to analyze the interest of oscillometric automatic vs. manual Doppler measurements, for the calculation of ankle to brachial index, after heavy-load exercise in athletes. Prospective single-center study. Fifteen healthy trained athletes performed an incremental test twice. Ankle to brachial index measurements were performed at Rest, as soon as possible after exercise (Rec-0), and then started at the 3rd minute of recovery (Rec-3), by two operators using each one of the two ankle to brachial index measurement methods. Mean times for automatic vs. manual ankle to brachial availability were 99 ± 18 s vs. 113 ± 25 s (p = 0.005) and 44 ± 25 s vs. 53 ± 12 s (p = 0.001) respectively at Rec-0 and Rec-3. Ankle to brachial index values from the two methods were highly correlated (r = 0.89). Mean absolute differences of automatic vs. manual ankle to brachial values from test-retest were 0.04 ± 0.05 vs. 0.08 ± 0.08 (p > 0.05) and 0.07 ± 0.05 vs. 0.09 ± 0.10 (p > 0.05) at Rest and Rec-0. Automatic method allows obtaining faster and simultaneously post-exercise ankle to brachial index measurement compare to the manual Doppler. This time issue does not result in a significant change in absolute ankle to brachial index values, nor in the absolute differences of these in test-retest. Nevertheless, the test-retest variability of post-exercise ankle to brachial index results seems smaller with the automatic than the manual method. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe aortic coarctation in an adult patient with normal brachial blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leetmaa, Tina H; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Mølgaard, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The present case shows that a normal brachial blood pressure (BP) does not exclude severe coarctation and should be considered in normotensive patients presenting with a systolic murmur and/or unexplained severe left ventricular hypertrophy. Congenital coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing...... of the descending aorta, usually located distal to the origin of the subclavian artery, causing hypertension in the upper part of the body. This condition may be undiagnosed until adult life where the clinical presentation most often is high BP in the upper extremities. A 57-year-old patient with severe aortic...

  18. Ankle-brachial index by automated method and renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pereira Silva

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The Ankle-brachial index (ABI is a non-invasive method used for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD. Aims To determine the clinical features of patients submitted to ABI measurement by automatic method. To investigate association between ABI and renal function. Methods The present is a cross-sectional study. The study was performed in a private clinic in the city of Fortaleza (Ce- Brazil. For ABI analysis, we utilized automatic methodology using a Microlife device. Data collection took place from March 2012 to January 2016. During this period, ABI was measured in 375 patients aged >50 years, who had a diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes or vascular disease. Results Of the 375 patients, 18 were categorized as having abnormal ABI (4.8 per cent and 357 were normal ABI (95.2 per cent. Patients with abnormal ABI showed older mean age when compared to patients with normal ABI. Among patients with normal renal function, only 0.95 per cent showed abnormal ABI; among patients with abnormal renal function, 6 per cent showed abnormal ABI. Conclusion 1 No differences were observed when comparing the groups regarding gender or the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia or CAD. 2 Group with abnormal ABI had renal function greater impairment.

  19. Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative

  20. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy : impact throughout the lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der M.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a nerve injury to the brachial plexus which controls arm-movements. This thesis describes the impact of this injury on the lives of patients in terms of quality of life, participation, healthcare use and treatment outcomes. Findings in this thesis

  1. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of variations that occur in the supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus in a. Kenyan population. Study design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and methods: Ninety-four brachial plexuses from forty-seven formalin fixed cadavers were displayed by gross

  2. Anomalous patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    block Background: Structural variations in the patterns of formation and distribution of the brachial plexus have drawn attentions both in anatomy and anaesthesia. Method: An observational study. Results: The brachial plexus was carefully inspected in both the right and left arms in 90 Nigerian cadavers, comprising of 74 ...

  3. hoarseness and Horner's after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to compressive effects on the axillary fascial sheath. However, further studies are required to prove this. Keywords: combined incidence, Horner's syndrome, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Introduction. Supraclavicular block is performed at the level of divisions of the brachial plexus.

  4. Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index Demonstrates Altered Endothelial Function in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI, the ratio of the systolic blood pressure of the ankle to the systolic brachial pressure, is commonly measured at rest, but ABI values post-exercise enhance the sensitivity of the test and can be used to identify atherosclerotic vascular damage. However, it has not been established whether or not enhanced post-exercise ABI is also associated with endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesized that a decrease in post-exercise ABI is related to impaired endothelial function. Purpose To investigate alterations in post-exercise ABI values and endothelial dysfunction in the elderly. Methods The study population comprised 35 men and women aged 51–77 years (mean age: 66 years. Patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of heart failure were excluded. The ABI was estimated at rest and immediately after exercise. The exercise protocol comprised 2.5 min of active pedal flexion exercises at a speed of 60 times/min. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD in the brachial artery using ultrasound imaging. Results No correlation was found between FMD and the ABI at rest. However, a weak correlation was found between FMD and post-exercise ABI (r = 0.46, P = 0.06. A strong correlation was observed between FMD and a decrease in post-exercise ABI compared to baseline readings (r = –0.52, P = 0.01. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to generate a prediction equation for FMD using the percentage decrease in post-exercise ABI. Significant correlations were observed between the ultrasound imaging-measured FMD and the predicted FMD (R 2 = 0.27, P = 0.001. Conclusions Post-exercise ABI appears to be a simple surrogate marker for endothelial function in the elderly, although larger studies are required for validation.

  5. Heterogeneity in conduit artery function in humans: impact of arterial size.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Black, M.A.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether conduit artery size affects functional responses, we compared the magnitude, time course, and eliciting shear rate stimulus for flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in healthy men (n = 20; 31 +/- 7 yr). Upper limb (brachial and radial) and lower limb (common and superficial femoral) FMD

  6. A comparison between brachial and echocardiographic systolic time intervals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Ming Su

    Full Text Available Systolic time interval (STI is an established noninvasive technique for the assessment of cardiac function. Brachial STIs can be automatically determined by an ankle-brachial index (ABI-form device. The aims of this study are to evaluate whether the STIs measured from ABI-form device can represent those measured from echocardiography and to compare the diagnostic values of brachial and echocardiographic STIs in the prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF <50%. A total of 849 patients were included in the study. Brachial pre-ejection period (bPEP and brachial ejection time (bET were measured using an ABI-form device and pre-ejection period (PEP and ejection time (ET were measured from echocardiography. Agreement was assessed by correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman plot. Brachial STIs had a significant correlation with echocardiographic STIs (r = 0.644, P<0.001 for bPEP and PEP; r  = 0.850, P<0.001 for bET and ET; r = 0.708, P<0.001 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The disagreement between brachial and echocardiographic STIs (brachial STIs minus echocardiographic STIs was 28.55 ms for bPEP and PEP, -4.15 ms for bET and ET and -0.11 for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET. The areas under the curve for bPEP/bET and PEP/ET in the prediction of LVEF <50% were 0.771 and 0.765, respectively. Brachial STIs were good alternatives to STIs obtained from echocardiography and also helpful in prediction of LVEF <50%. Brachial STIs automatically obtained from an ABI-form device may be helpful for evaluation of left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

  7. Validity and reliability of the ankle-brachial index by oscillometric blood pressure and automated ankle-brachial index

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    Sukanya Chongthawonsatid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of ankle-brachial index (ABI by oscillometric blood pressure (BP measurement as compared with an automated ABI as a gold standard. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at Golden Jubilee Medical Center, Thailand. All the data were collected from 303 patients at risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD who were 45 years of age or above and who underwent treatment at the outpatient medical clinic between June and December 2015. Patients who were followed up at the medical clinic had both oscillometric BP measurement (Terumo, ES-P600 and an automated ABI (oscillometric method at the same time. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the oscillometric BP measurements to predict an abnormal ABI (<0.90 were determined using the automated ABI as the gold standard. Results: ABI values were similar between the two methods. The oscillometric BP method for determining an ABI (cutoff point <0.90 on the right side had a sensitivity of 88.89%, specificity of 99.32%, an accuracy of 99.01%, a positive predictive value of 80%, and a negative predictive value of 99.32% whereas ABI on the left side had a sensitivity of 69.23%, a specificity of 99.66%, an accuracy of 98.35%, a positive predictive value of 90%, and a negative predictive value of 98.63%. Reliability of the oscillometric BP method by Kappa statistics was 0.84 on the right side and 0.77 on the left side (P = 0.000. Conclusion: The oscillometric BP method is a reliable and useful alternative to conventional automated ABI determination in patients with no severe arterial occlusion for estimation of the prevalence and screening of PAD in primary health-care settings.

  8. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP.

  9. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  10. Chronic vitamin E administration improves brachial reactivity and increases intracellular magnesium concentration in type II diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolisso, G; Tagliamonte, M R; Barbieri, M; Zito, G A; Gambardella, A; Varricchio, G; Ragno, E; Varricchio, M

    2000-01-01

    Vascular disease accounts for the majority of the clinical complications in diabetes mellitus. As an exaggerated oxidative stress degree has been postulated as the link between diabetes mellitus and endothelial function, a possible positive effect of plasma vitamin E (Vit.E) administration on brachial reactivity could be postulated. Our study aims at investigating the possible effect of chronic Vit.E administration on brachial reactivity, oxidative stress indexes, and intracellular magnesium and calcium content in type II diabetic patients free of diabetic complications. Forty adult, type II diabetic patients were enrolled in the study, which was deigned as a double blind, randomized vs. placebo trial. At baseline all patients underwent the following tests: 1) anthropometric and metabolic examinations, 2) evaluation of oxidative stress indexes, 3) intracellular magnesium and calcium measurements, and 4) determination of arterial compliance and distensibility. Then, all patients were randomly assigned to Vit.E treatment at a dose of 600 mg/day (Evion Forte; n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) over 8 weeks. At the end of this treatment period, a complete reevaluation of the patients was made. Vit.E treatment was associated with a significant improvement in the percent change in brachial artery diameter (Pmagnesium and calcium). After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and wait/hip ratio, all of these correlations remained significant (Preactivity in patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Such an effect seems mediated by a reduction in oxidative stress and a regulation of intracellular calcium and magnesium contents.

  11. Platelet to Lymphocyte Percentage Ratio Is Associated With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) is highly prevalent and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In HD, inflammation is one of the major causes of increased arterial stiffness. Activation of platelets and decreased lymphocyte percentage (LYMPH%) may exhibit inflammation. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between platelet to LYMPH% ratio and arterial stiffness in HD patients.A total of 220 patients receiving HD were enrolled in this study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an ankle-brachial index form device. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relations of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio and baPWV. The value of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio was 59.2 ± 33.3 (10 cells/L/%). After multivariate stepwise analysis, diabetes (β: 163.973, P = 0.02), high systolic blood pressure (per 1 mm Hg, β: 9.010, P < 0.001), high platelet to LYMPH% ratio (per 10 cells/L/%, β: 3.334, P < 0.01), and low albumin (per 0.1 mg/dL, β: -55.912, P < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased baPWV. Furthermore, high white blood cells (per 10 cells/L, β: 3.941, P < 0.001), high neutrophil percentage (per 1%, β: 1.144, P < 0.001), and high CRP (per 1 mg/L, β: 9.161, P = 0.03) were independently associated with an increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio.An increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio is associated with an increased baPWV in HD patients. An easy and inexpensive laboratory measure of platelet to LYMPH% ratio may provide an important information regarding arterial stiffness in patients with HD.

  12. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  13. Peripheral arterial stenosis and coronary artery disease coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghasemi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic slow-developing condition affecting medium-size and large blood vessels. It is the principal underlying pathology of coronary heart disease and stroke. In some countries, coronary artery disease (CAD is the cause of nearly half (48% of the deaths and, loss of productivity life. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is defined as atherosclerosis in peripheral arteries instead of coronary arteries. CAD and PAD have same risk factors and underlying pathophysiological processes. Therefore, patient with CAD should be considered for PAD. Ankle brachial index (ABI, duplex sonography, and some other non-invasive techniques are recommended for PAD diagnosis in patients with the history of CAD. Pharmacotherapy, endovascular interventions, and surgical management could be chosen according to the patient’s situation. Cardiologists and general practitioners should consider PAD in a patient with CAD or DM as a strong correlated disease.      

  14. Exercise-ankle brachial pressure index with one-minute treadmill walking in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Kazuo; Kohno, Kenji; Ebine, Kunio; Obara, Takehiro; Aoki, Toshiyuki; Muto, Atsuhiko; Ninomiya, Kenji; Kumagai, Kenta; Yokouchi, Itaru; Yazaki, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is widely used as a standard screening method for arterial occlusive lesion above the knee. However, the sensitivity of ABI is low in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Exercise stress (Ex-ABI) may reduce the false negative results. After measuring resting ABI and toe-brachial pressure index (TBI), ankle pressure and ABI immediately after walking (Post-AP, Post-ABI) were measured using one-minute treadmill walking in 52 lower limbs of 26 HD patients. The definition of peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAD) required an ABI value of less than 0.90, TBI value of less than 0.60, and decrease of more than 15% of the Post-ABI value and 20 mmHg of Post-AP in Ex-ABI. Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed in 32 lower limbs of 16 HD patients. PAD is defined as presence of stenosis of more than 75% in the case of lesions from an iliac artery to knee on CTA. The accuracy of Ex-ABI (Sensitivity, 85.7%; Specificity, 77.7%) was higher than those of ABI (Sensitivity, 42.9%; Specificity, 83.3%) or TBI (Sensitivity, 78.6%; Specificity, 61.1%). Ex-ABI with one-minute treadmill walking is the most useful tool for the screening of arterial occlusive lesions above the knee in maintenance HD patients.

  15. Role of ultrasound-guided continuous brachial plexus block in the management of neonatal ischemia in upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrushali C Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal upper limb ischemia due to accidental arterial damage remains a major concern, which can lead to devastating complications if untreated. The primary objective of this case report is to emphasize the role of continuous infraclavicular brachial plexus block, the issues related with block performance in an ischemic hand, and the importance of ultrasound guidance in this particular case scenario. A 1.1 kg infant suffered from distal forearm ischemia due to accidental arterial damage, which was treated with brachial plexus block. An ultrasound-guided single shot block with 0.5 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine was followed by ultrasound-guided catheter placement in the target area. A continuous infusion of 0.03% of bupivacaine at the rate of 0.5 mL/kg/hr (approx. 0.15 mg/kg/h of bupivacaine was administered for 36 h. This treatment resulted in reversal of ischemia. Permanent ischemic damage was eventually confined to the tips of 4 fingers. We conclude that ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block has a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hand ischemia due to arterial damage and subsequent arterial spasm in neonates with added benefits.

  16. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana revisited: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kachlik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis, a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery. Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection.

  17. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troupis, Theodore G; Michalinos, Adamantios; Manou, Vasiliki; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Demesticha, Theano; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area's regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion.

  18. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; van den Munckhof, Inge C L; Tinken, Toni M; den Drijver, Evert; Hopkins, Nicola; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an 8-wk period of bilateral handgrip training. Unilaterally, shear rate was attenuated by cuff inflation around the forearm to 60 mmHg. Grip strength, forearm volume, and girth improved similarly between the limbs. Acute bouts of handgrip exercise increased shear rate (P < 0.005) in the noncuffed limb, whereas cuff inflation successfully decreased exercise-induced increases in shear. Brachial blood pressure responses similarly increased during exercise in both the cuffed and noncuffed limbs. Handgrip training had no effect on baseline brachial artery diameter, blood flow, or shear rate but significantly decreased brachial artery wall thickness after 6 and 8 wk (ANOVA, P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio after week 8 (ANOVA, P = 0.005). The magnitude of decrease in brachial artery wall thickness and wall-to-lumen ratio after exercise training was similar in the noncuffed and cuffed arms. These results suggest that exercise-induced changes in shear rate are not obligatory for arterial wall remodeling during a period of 8 wk of exercise training in healthy humans.

  19. Ankle-brachial index in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martos Francisco

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prognosis for patients with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has improved with the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Evidence over recent years suggests that the incidence of cardiovascular disease is increasing in HIV patients. The ankle-brachial index (ABI is a cheap and easy test that has been validated in the general population. Abnormal ABI values are associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. To date, six series of ABI values in persons with HIV have been published, but none was a prospective study. No agreement exists concerning the risk factors for an abnormal ABI, though its prevalence is clearly higher in these patients than in the general population. Whether this higher prevalence of an abnormal ABI is associated with a higher incidence of vascular events remains to be determined.

  20. Direct electrical injury to brachial plexus

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    Maksud Mubarak Devale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical current can cause neurological damage directly or by conversion to thermal energy. However, electrical injury causing isolated brachial plexus injury without cutaneous burns is extremely rare. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy who sustained accidental electrical injury to left upper extremity with no associated entry or exit wounds. Complete motor and sensory loss in upper limb were noted immediately after injury. Subsequently, the patient showed partial recovery in muscles around the shoulder and in ulnar nerve distribution at 6 months. However, there was no improvement in muscles supplied by musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves. On exploration at 6 months after trauma, injury to the infraclavicular plexus was identified. Reconstruction of musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves by means of sural nerve cable grafts was performed. The patient has shown excellent recovery in musculocutaneous nerve function with acceptable recovery of radial nerve function at 1-year post-injury.

  1. Acute brachial diplegia due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorson, Kenneth C; Kolb, David A; Marks, Donald S; Hayes, Michael T; Baquis, George D

    2011-01-01

    to describe acute brachial diplegia as the initial manifestation of Lyme disease. bilateral, predominantly motor, cervical radiculoplexus neuropathy, the "dangling arm syndrome," has not been reported as a complication of acute Lyme infection. retrospective series of 5 patients from 2 tertiary neuromuscular centers. there were 4 men and 1 woman with an average age of 69 years. One recalled a tick bite, and preceding constitutional symptoms included headache (2) and fever, arthralgias, and fatigue in 1 patient each. Proximal arm weakness and acute pain developed within 3 weeks from onset; pain was bilateral in 3 patients and unilateral in 2 patients, and was described as severe throbbing. Arm weakness was bilateral at onset in 3 patients, and right sided in 2 patients followed by spread to the left arm within days. All the patients had weakness in the deltoid and biceps that was 3/5 or less (Medical Research Council scale), with variable weakness of the triceps and wrist extensors; 1 patient had a flail right arm and moderate (4/5) weakness of the proximal left arm muscles. Light touch was normal in the regions of weakness, and 1 patient had mildly reduced pin sensation over the forearm. Serum IgM Lyme titers were elevated in all the patients and were detected in the cerebrospinal fluid in 4 tested patients. The cerebrospinal fluid protein ranged between 135 and 176 mg/dL with lymphocytic pleocytosis (range, 42 to 270 cells). Electrodiagnostic studies showed normal median and ulnar motor potentials with asymmetrically reduced sensory amplitudes in the median (4), ulnar (3), and radial, and lateral antebrachial cutaneous potentials in 1 patient each. Two patients had acute denervation in the cervical or proximal arm muscles. There was full recovery after antibiotic therapy in 4 patients and considerable improvement in 1 patient after 2 months. acute brachial diplegia is a rare manifestation of acute Lyme infection and responds promptly to antibiotic therapy.

  2. Oscillometric measurement of the ankle-brachial index

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Andrea M; Tandon, Vikas; Wilson, Merne P; Wilson, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Peripheral arterial disease is a coronary risk equivalent; a low ankle-brachial index (ABI) is indicative of systemic vascular disease, and should place a patient in the high-risk category. Few physicians measure ABI because it is technically challenging and time consuming. Oscillometric blood pressure monitors are readily available and easy to use. The use of a simple method of documenting ABI was assessed and compared with the conventional method. METHODS The oscillometric ABI (OABI) was measured for normal volunteers, patients attending a cardiovascular risk clinic (Cardiovascular Risk Factor Reduction Unit [CRFRU] at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon) and patients referred to a vascular laboratory (vasc lab). The latter group had Doppler ABI (DABI) measurements and served to validate OABI. An Omron HEM 711C oscillometric system (Omron Canada Inc) with appropriate cuff size for arm and leg circumference was used. RESULTS The mean ± SEM OABI was 1.13±0.08 in normal volunteers (n=26), 1.10±0.10 in CRFRU patients (n=11, P not significant) and 1.03±0.14 in vasc lab patients (n=57, P<0.05 compared with normal volunteers). No difference was found between sexes, and there was no correlation with age. In the vasc lab group, the correlation with DABI was 0.71 (P<0.05). The sensitivity of OABI to detect DABI of less than 0.9 was 0.71, and the specificity was 0.89. OABI was found to be less sensitive at detecting low values in patients with nonpalpable pulses on physical examination. CONCLUSION The OABI is feasible and operator-independent, but does not detect low ABI efficiently. If OABI is abnormal, low DABI is likely. The OABI is less likely to detect disease in patients with nonpalpable peripheral pulses. Such patients are better referred directly to a vascular laboratory for DABI testing. PMID:18209769

  3. Radial Nerve Injury after Brachial Nerve Block - Case Series

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    Szederjesi Janos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adding epinephrine to local anesthetics is recommended to extend the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. We describe in this article two cases of radial nerve injury possible due to coadministration of epinephrine during brachial plexus block.

  4. Pharyngeal-Cervical-Brachial Variant of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap; John J Millichap

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from National University Hospital, Singapore, review the clinical features of 13 cases of pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and outline new diagnostic criteria.

  5. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  6. Case Report- Une cause rare de plexopathie brachiale : une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 50 ans ayant une histoire de cancer du sein et qui accuse une symptomatologie d'atteinte du plexus brachial. L'IRM montre une masse qui envahie le plexus brachial compatible avec une métastase. L'IRM est très utile pour le diagnostic et l'orientation thérapeutique des ...

  7. Heterogeneity in conduit artery function in humans: impact of arterial size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A; Black, Mark A; Hopman, Maria T E; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2008-11-01

    To determine whether conduit artery size affects functional responses, we compared the magnitude, time course, and eliciting shear rate stimulus for flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in healthy men (n = 20; 31 +/- 7 yr). Upper limb (brachial and radial) and lower limb (common and superficial femoral) FMD responses were simultaneously assessed, whereas popliteal responses were measured in the same subjects during a separate visit. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated responses were similarly examined. Edge detection and wall tracking of high-resolution B-mode arterial ultrasound images, combined with synchronized Doppler waveform envelope analysis, were used to calculate conduit artery diameter, blood flow, and shear rate continuously across the cardiac cycle. Baseline artery size correlated inversely with the FMD response (r = -0.57, P < 0.001). Within-artery comparisons revealed a significant inverse correlation between artery size and FMD% for the radial (r = -0.66, P = 0.001), brachial (r = -0.55, P = 0.01), and popliteal artery (r = -0.48, P = 0.03), but not for the superficial and common femoral artery. Normalization of FMD responses for differences in eliciting shear rate did not abolish the between-artery relationship for artery function and size (r = -0.48, P < 0.001), suggesting that differences between artery function responses were not entirely due to size-related differences in shear rate. This was reinforced by a significant between-artery correlation for GTN responses and baseline artery size (r = -0.74, P < 0.001). In summary, systematic differences exist in vascular function responses of conduit arteries that differ in size. This raises the possibility that differences in artery size within or between individuals may influence functional responses.

  8. 5-Fluorouracil induces arterial vasocontractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Südhoff, T; Enderle, M-D; Pahlke, M; Petz, C; Teschendorf, C; Graeven, U; Schmiegel, W

    2004-04-01

    From 2% to 10% of cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) will develop symptomatic cardiotoxicity. Nevertheless, the underlying pathophysiology is mostly unknown. We investigated the influence of intravenous chemotherapy (CTX) on the diameter of the brachial artery using high resolution ultrasound in patients with malignant tumors, mostly gastrointestinal cancer. Cytostatic drugs included 30 cases with 5-FU and 30 cases with non-5-FU CTX (cis/carboplatin, anthracycline and cyclophosphamide). In addition, plasma levels of big endothelin were assessed prior to and after CTX. Fifteen of 30 patients (50%) showed a contraction of the brachial artery after the end of 5-FU application (median 11%, range 4.3-18.5), whereas no single contraction was noticed in 30 patients following non-5-FU-based CTX. Vessel tonus generally normalized within 30 min after stopping 5-FU. Five patients positive for 5-FU associated vessel contraction were repeatedly exposed to 5-FU. Vessel contractions reoccurred in 86% (18/21) of these administrations. When patients with 5-FU bolus application were pre-treated with glyceroltrinitrate no contraction of the brachial artery was detected in five out of five occasions. There was a trend towards increased big endothelin plasma levels after 5-FU application (median 1.52 versus 1.99 fmol/ml; P = 0.07), whereas big endothelin levels remained unchanged after non-5-FU CTX (1.83 versus 1.83 fmol/ml; P = 0.99). Application of 5-FU is commonly accompanied by arterial vessel contractions, which is likely to represent the first step in 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity. 5-FU-associated vessel contractions were highly reproducible on re-exposure and were in the case of bolus application completely preventable by glyceroltrinitrate.

  9. Índice tornozelo-braço em pacientes hemodialíticos Ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Torres Uchôa

    2012-12-01

    . The ankle-brachial index was calculated for each artery of the lower limb. It was considered normal ankle-brachial index from 0.9 to 1.3. RESULTS: We diagnosed peripheral arterial disease and poorly compressible arteries in 26.9 and 30.8% of hemodialysis patients and in 33 and 22.7% of the Control Group. In hemodialysis patients, we found abnormal ankle-brachial index in 75% of symptomatic patients (p=0.005, in 67.3% of men and 31% of women (p<0.005, in 78.6% of the elderly, 34.8% of young adults (p<0.01, and 76.9% of diabetics (p<0.005 versus nondiabetic. These patients had a higher prevalence of severe peripheral arterial disease than the Control Group. CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal ankle-brachial index was very prevalent in the groups studied; however, hemodialysis patients had more severe changes, when compared to the Control Group. Diabetes mellitus, male gender, and advanced age were important risk factors for abnormal ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients. The ankle-brachial index was a good method of screening for the studied changes; therefore, we suggest the routine use in the management of hemodialysis patients.

  10. The brachio-brachial arteriovenous fistula: mid-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobantu, Lucian Florin; Iliescu, Vlad Anton; Stiru, Ovidiu; Bubenek, Serban; Novelli, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the mid-term results of the brachio-brachial arteriovenous fistula in patients without adequate superficial venous circulation in the upper limb. Retrospective analysis included 49 patients, in whom a brachio-brachial fistula had been created in an end-to-side configuration. After the maturation period (1 month), the brachial vein was transposed into the subcutaneous tissue. Follow-up study was performed in patients with functional brachio-brachial fistula after the superficialization. Forty-nine patients underwent 49 brachio-brachial fistula constructions. All fistulas were functional. One month after surgery, 40 (81.6%) of these patients had a functional fistula, but in only 39 (79.6%) cases was the fistula suitable for hemodialysis (HD) following transposition to subcutaneous tissue. During the 1-month maturation period, the fistula became occluded in nine patients, and in one case the vein was permeable, so the fistula was functional, but too small to permit HD. Seventeen patients developed temporary edema of the forearm during the first month, in three cases the edema was extended to the entire arm, but no other complications were associated with the procedure. Follow-up lasted 18.0 +/- 11.1 (3-37) months, during which 7/39 patients presented with fistula occlusion. Three patients died and another three were out of the study for various reasons. The brachio-brachial fistula is a good alternative to prosthetic grafts in patients without superficial venous circulation in the upper limb.

  11. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index : A meta-analysis of a cardiovascular candidate gene 50K SNP panel in the candidate gene association resource (CARe) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassel, Christina L.; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay; Coassin, Stefan; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jacobs, David R.; Franceschini, Nora; Papanicolaou, George J.; Gibson, Quince; Yanek, Lisa R.; van der Harst, Pim; Ferguson, Jane F.; Crawford, Dana C.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Allison, Matthew A.; Criqui, Michael H.; McDermott, Mary M.; Mehra, Reena; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Redline, Susan; Kaplan, Robert C.; Heiss, Gerardo; Rotter, Jerome I.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Taylor, Herman A.; Eraso, Luis H.; Haun, Margot; Li, Mingyao; Meisinger, Christa; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shuldineri, Alan R.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Kollerits, Barbara; Rantner, Barbara; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Stadler, Marietta; Mueller, Thomas; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Klein-Weigel, Peter; Summerer, Monika; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Navis, Gerjan; Mateo Leach, Irene; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Goodloe, Robert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Becker, Diane M.; Cooke, John P.; Absher, Devin M.; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Mohler, Emile R.; North, Kari E.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Kronenberg, Florian; Murabito, Joanne M.

    Background: Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of similar to 50,000 SNPs across similar to

  12. Exercise-mediated changes in conduit artery wall thickness in humans: role of shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Dawson, E.A.; Munckhof, I.C. van den; Tinken, T.M.; Drijver, E. den; Hopkins, N.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic increases in shear stress have been proposed as a mechanism that induces training-induced adaptation in arterial wall remodeling in humans. To address this hypothesis in humans, we examined bilateral brachial artery wall thickness using high-resolution ultrasound in healthy men across an

  13. Independent association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and global longitudinal strain of left ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-A; Zo, Joo-Hee

    2015-12-01

    Data regarding the influence of arterial stiffness on left ventricular (LV) long-axis function has been scarce. This study was performed to investigate the association between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and LV global longitudinal strain (GLS). A total of 248 subjects (mean age 59.2 ± 12.3 years; 50% were men) without structural heart problems were retrospectively evaluated. LV GLS was measured by 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography. baPWV measurements were made on the same day of echocardiography. The incidences of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were 51.2, 19.4, and 22.2%, respectively. The mean value of baPWV was 1557 ± 285 cm/s. In simple linear regression analysis, baPWV had a significant positive association with LV GLS (β = 0.215, P = 0.001). In multiple linear regression analysis, baPWV was independently associated with LV GLS even after controlling for potential confounders, including age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, HbA1c, total cholesterol, estimated glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular mass index, E/A, septal e' velocity and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (β = 0.211, P = 0.028). The results of this study suggest that baPWV may be independently associated with LV GLS, supporting the evidence of a close interaction between arterial stiffness and LV function. Increased arterial stiffness may result in impaired LV longitudinal function.

  14. Muscle contraction induced arterial shear stress increases endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Darren P; Ueda, Kenichi; Wegman-Points, Lauren; Pierce, Gary L

    2017-10-01

    We determined if local increases in brachial artery shear during repetitive muscle contractions induce changes in protein expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and/or phosphorylated (p-)eNOS at Ser1177, the primary activation site on eNOS, in endothelial cells (ECs) of humans. Seven young male subjects (25 ± 1 yr) performed 20 separate bouts (3 min each) of rhythmic forearm exercise at 20% of maximum over a 2-h period. Each bout of exercise was separated by 3 min of rest. An additional six male subjects (24 ± 1 yr) served as time controls (no exercise). ECs were freshly isolated from the brachial artery using sterile J-wires through an arterial catheter at baseline and again after the 2-h exercise or time control period. Expression of eNOS or p-eNOS Ser1177 in ECs was determined via immunofluorescence. Brachial artery mean shear rate was elevated compared with baseline and the time control group throughout the 2-h exercise protocol (P 0.05 for both). Our novel results suggest that elevations in brachial artery shear increase eNOS Ser1177 phosphorylation in the absence of changes in total eNOS in ECs of young healthy male subjects, suggesting that this model is sufficient to alter posttranslational modification of eNOS activity in vivo in humans.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Elevations in brachial artery shear in response to forearm exercise increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase Ser1177 phosphorylation in brachial artery endothelial cells of healthy humans. Our present study provides the first evidence in humans that muscle contraction-induced increases in conduit arterial shear lead to in vivo posttranslational modification of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in endothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Rate of ankle-brachial index decline predicts cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Michio; Hasumi, Syoko; Mandai, Shintaro; Tanaka, Tomomi; Shikuma, Satomi; Akita, Wataru; Mori, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Sei

    2014-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity of cardiovascular events (CVEs). We obtained baseline data regarding blood biochemistry, ankle-brachial index (ABI), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and echocardiographic parameters from 300 patients on hemodialysis in 2005. We also measured ABI and baPWV annually from June 2005 until June 2012 and calculated rates of changes in ABI and baPWV to identify factors associated with CVEs. Seventy-three patients died of cardiovascular disease and 199 CVEs occurred in 164 patients during the study period. Cardiac, cerebrovascular and peripheral artery disease (PAD) events occurred in 124, 43 and 32 patients, respectively, and 30 patients had more than two types of CVEs. Analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that a higher rate of decline in ABI (hazard ratio [HR], 4.034; P hemodialysis in Japan. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  16. Ankle-Brachial Index: Nurses Strategy To Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Identification

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    Daniela Luisa Maggi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Elevated risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events is associated with high prevalence of peripheral arterial disease, with assessment through the ankle-brachial index (ABI. This study aimed to demonstrate that the ABI and the Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire are tools to be used by nurses in prevention and/or treatment of CVD (cardiovascular disease. A cross-sectional study was carried out with patients from a cardiovascular clinic. The Edinburgh Claudication Questionnaire was applied and the ABI was measured with the formula (ABI= Blood Pressure Ankle/Blood Pressure Brachial. A total of 115 patients were included, most were females (57.4%, aged 60.6 ± 12.5 years. The most prevalent risk factors were hypertension (64.3%, physical inactivity (48.7% and family history (58.3%. The study showed that abnormal ABI was frequently found and 42.6% of the patients with abnormal ABI showed intermittent claudication. The method to evaluate the ABI associated to the Edinburg Claudication Questionnaire, can be easily used by nurses in the clinical evaluation of asymptomatic and symptomatic CVD patients.

  17. Atherosclerotic burden in coronary and peripheral arteries in patients with first clinical manifestation of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjec, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the atherosclerotic burden in patients with the first symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 100 consecutive patients (new-onset severe angina or myocardial infarction) and 70 age and sex matched asymptomatic volunteers. Functional and morphologic atherosclerotic markers were sought in carotid, brachial and femoral arteries of all individuals by means of high-resolution ultrasonography, whereas coronary arteriography was performed in the CAD patients only. A total of 347 coronary lesions [230 (66%) obstructive] were discovered in the CAD patients as well as 105 peripheral plaques [26 (25%) obstructive]. The mean percentage diameter stenosis of the culprit coronary lesion was 83.8 ± 15.8%, the mean vessel score 1.7 (range 0-3), the mean stenosis score 19.8 (range 1.5-89.0), and the mean extent score 49.1% (range 10-65%). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as assessed by the brachial flow-mediated response (FMR), was reduced by 50% in the CAD patients (P peripheral arteries of the CAD patients (P arteries of the CAD patients by 43%, in brachial arteries by 20% and in femoral arteries by 57% (P peripheral arteries of our patients with the first clinical presentation of CAD.

  18. Intermediate Type of Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-12-01

    Data of 829 infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were reviewed to identify any cases that could not be fitted into the any of the well-known types of palsy. These unusual cases were studied in detail with regard to clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings as well as management and spontaneous motor recovery. Erb's, extended Erb's, and total palsies were seen in 42.8%, 28.8%, and 28.0% of cases, respectively. Three cases (0.4%) did not fit into any of the classic types. One case had bilateral palsy, and the remaining 2 cases had unilateral palsy. All affected limbs presented with "abducted arms," "flexed forearms," and electrophysiological evidence of denervation of shoulder adductors and triceps. All cases had excellent spontaneous recovery within 6-12 months. It was concluded that these cases represent mild "intermediate" types of palsy in which the C7 root was the predominant site of injury. Good spontaneous recovery is expected. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Interrater and intrarater reliability of photoplethysmography for measuring toe blood pressure and toe-brachial index in people with diabetes mellitus

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    Scanlon Christopher

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable tool to measure arterial flow to the feet in people with diabetes is required given that they are particularly prone to peripheral arterial disease. Traditionally, the ankle brachial index (ABI has been used to measure arterial circulation, but its application is limited due to calcification of larger arteries. More recently, toe pressure and the toe brachial index (TBI has been suggested as superior to ABI measurements because they assess smaller digital arteries less prone to arterial calcification. However, reliability studies for the clinical use of photoplethysmography (PPG in people with diabetes are lacking. Methods Sixty people with diabetes mellitus (35 males and 25 females, mean age 59.6 yrs consented to take part in the study. The majority (92% had type 2 diabetes and 8% had type 1 diabetes. Forty-three percent were diagnosed as having peripheral neuropathy when tested using a biothesiometer and 15% were current smokers (10 – 40/day. A podiatrist and a diabetes educator measured toe and brachial blood pressure independently and in a random order using PPG. These measurements were repeated again seven days later, and subsequently analysed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC, 95% confidence intervals (CI and standard error of measurement (SEM. Results The intrarater reliability of measuring toe pressures was excellent (ICC3,1 =0.78-0.79, SEM 8 mmHg and interrater reliability was also excellent (ICC2,2 = 0.93, SEM 4 mmHg. The intrarater reliability for measuring brachial pressures was generally poor (ICC3,1 = 0.40 – 0.42, SEM 19 mmHg and interrater reliability was fair-good (ICC2,2. 0.65, SEM 14 mmHg. The TBI intrarater reliability was fair-good (ICC3,1 = 0.51-0.72, SEM 0.08, whilst the interrater reliability of TBI was excellent (ICC2,2 = 0.85, SEM 0.07. Conclusions Based on these results, interrater and intrarater reliability of PPG is excellent for measuring toe

  20. Double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraa, Mourad; Sehli, Heithem; Mahjoub, Sabri; Dridi, Moez; Mbarek, Mondher

    2015-12-01

    Vascular and nervous complications are rare after shoulder dislocation. We report the case of a double level arterial injury with neuropraxia following anterior shoulder dislocation that was diagnosed by MultiDetector-row Computed Tomographic (MDCT) angiography and treated by surgical bypass graft and embolectomy. Our case is original, not only because of the rarity of these complications, but also because of the thromboembolism of brachial artery which could be undiagnosed and could compromise prognosis.

  1. Ankle-brachial index and bone turnover in patients on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guérin, Alain P; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2015-02-01

    An association between atherosclerosis and osteoporosis has been reported in several studies. This association could result from local intraosseous atherosclerosis and ischemia, which is shown by limb osteoporosis in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but also could result from bidirectional communication between the skeleton and blood vessels. Systemic bone disorders and PAD are frequent in ESRD. Here, we investigated the possible interaction of these disorders. For 65 prevalent nondiabetic patients on hemodialysis, we measured ankle-brachial pressure index (ABix) and evaluated mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometry. In prevalent patients on hemodialysis, PAD (ABix1.4/incompressible) was associated with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is indicated by decreased double-labeled surface and osteoblast surface (Phemodialysis vintage. These results indicate that, in prevalent nondiabetic patients with ESRD, PAD associates with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to PTH. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproducibility of Brachial Vascular Changes with Alterations in End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Justin R; Evanoff, Nicholas G; Kelly, Aaron S; Chernin, Michael A; Stoltman, Matthew G; Dengel, Donald R

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the reproducibility of the peripheral vascular response to hypercapnia. Healthy college-aged men (n = 7) and women (n = 10) underwent an iso-oxic 10-mm Hg increase in PetCO2 for 12 min. Brachial artery diameter changes were measured using ultrasound imaging. Two tests were completed on day 1 with 15 min of rest between tests. Tests were repeated on day 2. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots and intra-class correlations (ICCs) determined reproducibility. There were no significant differences in peak dilation within day (5.33 ± 3.73% vs. 4.52 ± 2.49%, p = 0.378). The within-day ICC was poor (0.213). Within-day time-to-peak dilation did not significantly differ (660.0 ± 231.8 s vs. 602.7 ± 259.9 s, p = 0.379), and the ICC was fair (0.416, p = 0.113). Between-day peak dilation did not significantly differ (5.24 ± 3.84% vs. 4.71 ± 3.17%, p = 0.123), and the ICC was fair (0.419). Hypercapnia-induced brachial artery dilation is similar within day and between days. The ICC for peak dilation suggests the methodology is not reproducible. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimating central systolic blood pressure during oscillometric determination of blood pressure: proof of concept and validation by comparison with intra-aortic pressure recording and arterial tonometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Sally Emma; Guilcher, Antoine; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2012-06-01

    Central systolic blood pressure is usually estimated by transformation of a peripheral arterial waveform obtained by tonometry and calibrated from conventional measurements of brachial artery blood pressure from a brachial cuff using the oscillometric principle. We investigated whether central blood pressure could be obtained directly from a brachial cuff waveform, allowing the measurement of central blood pressure to be incorporated into the standard oscillometric determination of blood pressure. Values of central systolic blood pressure obtained from a brachial cuff waveform were compared with those obtained using a pressure-tipped intra-aortic catheter in 29 individuals undergoing cardiac catheterization. To remove errors introduced by the measurement of peripheral blood pressure, transformed brachial waveforms were calibrated using values of mean and diastolic pressure from the intra-aortic catheter. In a second study, the values obtained from the brachial cuff were compared with those obtained using a noninvasive tonometric method using calibration from mean and diastolic and from systolic and diastolic blood pressure derived from a standard oscillometric algorithm in 100 individuals (46 women, 19-81 years) with blood pressure ranging from 89/52 to 230/117 mmHg. In study 1, the mean difference ± SD of brachial cuff-derived values and intra-aortic values was 0.0 ± 5.9 mmHg. In study 2, the mean difference for brachial cuff-derived values and tonometer values was -0.6 ± 3.9 and 1.6 ± 4.5 mmHg when calibrated using brachial mean and diastolic and brachial systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively. Central systolic blood pressure can be obtained from a brachial cuff waveform with an accuracy comparable to that of a tonometer.

  5. ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX AND LDL-RECEPTOR GENE IN ASYMPTOMATIC SEVERE HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA

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    L. Vladimirova-Kitova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue with the different levels of ankle-brachial index, as screening for LDL-receptor defective gene in newly detected asymptomatic severe hypercholesterolemia is less studied, but quite interesting. There have not been any studies on ankle-brachial index in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia in Bulgaria. Aim: To examine the difference between patients with severe hypercholesterolemia, who are carriers and non-carriers of LDL-R defective gene, with respect to their structural (ankle-brachial index characteristics of arterial wall. Methods and materials: 60 patients with documented severe hypercholesterolemia >7.5 mmol/l satisfying the Simon-Broom criteria for clinically established and probable Familial Hypercholesterolemia were studied. All of the patients had a negative stress echocardiography and not known coronary artery disease. The laboratory used was the Clinical Laboratory at the Medical University Plovdiv. The total cholesterol and triglycerides were measured with enzyme-colorimetry and cholesterol in high density lipoprotein and cholesterol in low density lipoprotein with direct automatic analyses. Apolipoproteins were calculated by immunoturbodimetric method. The biochemical analyzer Konelab 60i was used in all the measurements. Results: According to whether there were or were not molecular defects, patients were assigned to two groups: carriers (11 patients, 18 % and non-carriers (49 patients, 82 %.There was a statistically significant difference (p 0.05. We found no statistically significant difference between non-carriers and carriers with respect to body mass index (25.30 ± 0.40 vs 24.63 ± 0.45, respectively, t = 0.50; p > 0.05. There was not a statistically significant difference in levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol between carries (p>0.05. The cholesterol x years. score was significantly higher in the carries (440.36 ± 0.25 mmol-y/L, than in the non-carries (390.30 ± 0

  6. Associated Risk Factors for Abnormal Ankle-brachial Index in Hemodialysis Patients in a Hospital

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    Szu-Chia Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ankle-brachial index (ABI is a marker for peripheral artery disease and can predict mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, it is seldom studied in southern Taiwan, an area with high prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors for peripheral artery disease in the ESRD population in a hospital. All routine hemodialysis patients in one regional hospital were included except for six patients who refused ABI examinations and four patients with atrial fibrillation. Finally, 225 patients formed our study group. ABI was measured using an ABI-form device (Colin VP1000. The prevalence of ABI < 0.9 and 3 1.3 was 15.6% and 5.8%, respectively. ABI < 0.9 was independently associated with advanced age (p = 0.027, increased pulse pressure (p = 0.005, increased hemat-ocrit (p = 0.008 and decreased serum albumin level (p = 0.009. In addition, ABI 3 1.3 was significantly associated with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.019. This study demonstrated the associated risk factors of peripheral artery disease in patients with hemodialysis in a hospital. ESRD patients of advanced age and with increased pulse pressure, increased hematocrit and decreased serum albumin level had a relatively high risk for ABI < 0.9 and patients with diabetes had a relatively high risk for ABI 3 1.3.

  7. Associated risk factors for abnormal ankle-brachial index in hemodialysis patients in a hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Su, Ho-Ming; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Chiu-Yueh; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2008-09-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a marker for peripheral artery disease and can predict mortality in hemodialysis patients. However, it is seldom studied in southern Taiwan, an area with high prevalence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors for peripheral artery disease in the ESRD population in a hospital. All routine hemodialysis patients in one regional hospital were included except for six patients who refused ABI examinations and four patients with atrial fibrillation. Finally, 225 patients formed our study group. ABI was measured using an ABI-form device (Colin VP1000). The prevalence of ABI or = 1.3 was 15.6% and 5.8%, respectively. ABI or = 1.3 was significantly associated with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.019). This study demonstrated the associated risk factors of peripheral artery disease in patients with hemodialysis in a hospital. ESRD patients of advanced age and with increased pulse pressure, increased hematocrit and decreased serum albumin level had a relatively high risk for ABI or = 1.3.

  8. Subacute brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus myelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Sahar F; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2012-06-01

    Brachial diplegia is a clinical term used to describe weakness restricted to the upper extremities. We report a case of brachial diplegia associated with West Nile virus infection. A 48-year-old man developed severe painless bilateral upper extremity weakness within a few weeks of a flu-like illness. Clinical examination revealed marked periscapular, shoulder girdle, and humeral muscle atrophy and bilateral scapular winging, with near symmetrical bilateral hypotonic upper extremity weakness. This was associated with clinical signs of an encephalomyelopathy without cognitive or sensory deficits. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated a subacute disorder of motor neurons, their axons or both, involving the cervical and thoracic myotomes, with ongoing denervation. Serological studies confirmed recent West Nile virus (WNV) infection. Gradual improvement occurred following conservative supportive therapies. Progressive brachial diplegia is a rare neuromuscular presentation of WNV neuroinvasive disease. This case report adds to the clinical spectrum of WNV-induced neurologic sequelae. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Prognostic value of thumb pain sensation in birth brachial plexopathy

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    Carlos O. Heise

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prognostic value of absent thumb pain sensation in newborns and young infants with birth brachial plexopathy. METHODS: We evaluated 131 patients with birth brachial plexopathy with less than two months of age. Pain sensation was evoked by thumb nail bed compression to evaluate sensory fibers of the upper trunk (C6. The patients were followed-up monthly. Patients with less than antigravity elbow flexion at six months of age were considered to have a poor outcome. RESULTS: Thirty patients had absent thumb pain sensation, from which 26 showed a poor outcome. Sensitivity of the test was 65% and specificity was 96%. CONCLUSION: Evaluation of thumb pain sensation should be included in the clinical assessment of infants with birth brachial plexopathy.

  10. Association of diabetes and hemodialysis with ankle pressure and ankle-brachial index in Japanese patients with critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneto, Hideaki; Iida, Osamu; Katakami, Naoto; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki; Ikeda, Masahiko; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2012-10-01

    To investigate whether diabetes and regular hemodialysis are associated with false elevation of ankle systolic blood pressure and ankle-brachial systolic pressure index (ABI) because of their arterial calcification in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We recruited 269 Japanese patients who underwent endovascular therapy for CLI. Ankle systolic blood pressure and ABI were assessed before endovascular therapy. Arterial stenosis and calcification were evaluated angiographically. We investigated the associations among clinical comorbidities, arterial calcification, and measurements of ankle systolic blood pressure and ABI. Ankle systolic blood pressure was 85 ± 56 mmHg, and ABI was 0.59 ± 0.37. Arterial calcification was observed in 69% of the patients. The prevalence of diabetes and regular hemodialysis was 71 and 47%. Diabetes and regular hemodialysis were both significantly associated with the presence of arterial calcification; their adjusted odds ratios were 2.33 (P = 0.01) and 7.40 (P hemodialysis were significantly associated with arterial calcification, but not with elevated measurements of ankle systolic blood pressure or ABI, in CLI patients.

  11. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  12. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  14. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Broad band spectral analysis of 24 h continuous finger blood pressure: Comparison with intra-arterial recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castiglioni, P.; Parati, G.; Omboni, S.; Mancia, G.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Rienzo, M. di

    1999-01-01

    The present study compares the spectral characteristics of 24-h blood pressure variability estimated invasively at the brachial artery level with those estimated by measurement of blood pressure at the finger artery using the non-invasive Portapres device. Broad-band spectra (from 3 x

  16. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and

  17. Obesity, arterial function and arterial structure ? a systematic review and meta?analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ne, J. Y. A.; Cai, T. Y.; Celermajer, D S; Caterson, I D; Gill, T.; Lee, C M Y; Skilton, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective Obesity is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which obesity affects cardiovascular risk have not been fully elucidated. This paper reports a comprehensive systematic review and meta?analysis on obesity and two key aspects of vascular health using gold?standard non?invasive measures ? arterial endothelial function (brachial flow?mediated dilatation) and subclinical atherosclerosis (carotid intima?media thickness). Methods Electronic searc...

  18. Sedentary Behavior and Light Physical Activity Are Associated with Brachial and Central Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerage, A. M.; Benedetti, T. R. B.; Farah, B. Q.

    2015-01-01

    their physical activity assessed over a 7 day period using an accelerometer and the time spent in sedentary activities, light physical activities, moderate physical activities and moderate-to-vigorous physical activities was obtained. The primary outcomes were brachial and central blood pressure. Arterial...... stiffness parameters (augmentation index and pulse wave velocity) and cardiac autonomic modulation (sympathetic and parasympathetic modulation in the heart) were also obtained as secondary outcomes. Results Sedentary activities and light physical activities were positively and inversely associated......-to-vigorous physical activities. Arterial stiffness parameters and cardiac autonomic modulation were not associated with the time spent in sedentary activities and in light physical activities (P > 0.05). Conclusion Lower time spent in sedentary activities and higher time spent in light physical activities...

  19. Brachial plexus block in phantom limb pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Sandra; Dietrich, Caroline; Meissner, Winfried; Huonker, Ralph; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this case report is twofold: first, to present evidence of long-lasting relief in a patient suffering from phantom limb pain after pharmacologically blocking his plexus brachialis and, second, to replicate results from a previous study focusing on cortical reorganization and phantom limb pain. Before regional anesthesia, the patient suffered from a phantom hand that cramped and was immovable. We performed a diagnostic axillary blockade of the brachial plexus to differentiate peripheral from more central contributions to phantom limb pain. During blockade of the brachial plexus, the patient reported a reduction of phantom limb pain for the first time following years of suffering and a complete loss of cramping together with muscle relaxation of the phantom hand. Additionally, we found cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex (re-reorganization). Strikingly, the relaxed phantom limb together with the reduction of phantom limb pain remained preserved even 6 months after blockade of the brachial plexus. A single temporary blockade of the brachial plexus may relieve phantom limb pain and unpleasant phantom feelings (cramping) for an extended period. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  1. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  2. Shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in obstetrical brachial plexus injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Dijkstra, Piet; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Beelen, Anita; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of and the association between shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in a cohort of children with an obstetrical brachial plexus injury and to identify the risk factors for these complications. In a retrospective cohort study, all

  3. Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: incidence, natural course and shoulder contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, A. F.; Wolf, H.; Oei, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) was investigated and the natural course of this disorder and the frequency of shoulder contracture described. Between 1988 and 1997 13,366 children with a gestational age of 30 weeks or more, were born at the Academic Medical Center,

  4. [Bilateral brachial plexus block. Case report and systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Terrazas, Gabriel Enrique; Garduño-Juárez, María de Ángeles; Limón-Muñoz, Marisol; Torres-Maldonado, Areli Seir; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The bilateral brachial plexus block is considered a contraindication, due to the possible development of complications, such as: toxicity from local anaesthetics or bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. However, with the real time visualisation provided by the ultrasound scan, these complications have decreased and it is a safer procedure. Four cases are presented where the bilateral block was performed using guided ultrasound, as the patients were unable to receive general anaesthesia due to a history of adverse effects or the use of opioids in the post-operative or by the prediction of a difficult airway associated with obesity. A systematic review of the literature from January 1993 to June 2013, was also performed by using a search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, ARTEMISA, LILACS, Google data bases, in Spanish and English language with the following words: bilateral brachial plexus block, bilateral interscalene block, bilateral infraclavicular block, bilateral supraclavicular block, bilateral lateral supraclavicular block, bilateral axillary block, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block. Based on the evidence found, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block in selected patients and expert hands, is no longer a contraindication. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines...

  6. Brachial Plexus Blocks for Upper Extremity Surgeries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic for surgical procedures. Until recently (July 2008), only general anaesthesia was employed in our ...

  7. Transarterial Brachial Plexus Anaesthesia for Upper Limb Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We present our experience with the transarterial brachial plexus anaesthesia as a technique of choice for upper limb procedure in developing countries where nerve stimulator may not be readily available. Methods: For all consenting patients, the axillary block was instituted using a 23G hypodermic needle and ...

  8. Ultrasound of the cervical roots and brachial plexus in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Semmekrot, B.; Meulstee, J.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this exploratory study we investigated whether ultrasound can visualize the neonatal cervical roots and brachial plexus. METHODS: In 12 healthy neonates <2 days old, the neck region was studied unilaterally with ultrasound using a small-footprint 15-7-MHz transducer. RESULTS: The

  9. Use Of Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Facilitates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the successful use of continuous axillary brachial plexus block in the assessment of muscle functions during tendon repair. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife between November 2006 and December 2007. The study included ...

  10. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon.

  11. Brachial versus central blood pressure and vascular stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Hansen, Tine; Frimodt-Møller, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) estimates the true load imposed on the left ventricle to a higher degree than does brachial BP. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) and central BP are risk markers for cardiovascular disease. Both can be measured by simple and noninvasive methods. Guidelines re...... are still lacking. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-8...

  12. Anatomical variations of the brachial plexus terminal branches in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical variations are clinically significant, but many are inadequately described or quantified. Variations in anatomy of the brachial plexus are important to surgeons and anesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. It is also important for radiologists who interpret plain and ...

  13. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Brachial plexus 3D reconstruction from MRI with dissection validation: a baseline study for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Bogaert, Stephanie; Vandemaele, Pieter; Huysse, Wouter; Achten, Eric; Leijnse, Joris; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to establish a baseline for detailed 3D brachial plexus reconstruction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Concretely, the goal was to determine the individual brachial plexus anatomy with maximum detail and accuracy achievable, as yet irrespective of whether the methods used could be economically and practically applied in the clinical setting. Six embalmed cadavers were randomly taken for MRI imaging of the brachial plexus. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) segmentation for all brachial plexus parts was done. The 2D brachial plexus segmentations were 3D reconstructed using Mimics(®) software. Then, these 3D reconstructions were anatomically validated by dissection of the cadavers. After finalising the cadaver experiments, brachial plexus MRIs were obtained in three healthy male volunteers and the same reconstruction procedure as in vitro was followed. A procedure was developed for brachial plexus 3D reconstruction based on MRI without the use of any contrast agent. Anatomical validation of six cadaver brachial plexus reconstructions showed high correspondence with the dissected brachial plexuses. Anatomical variations of the main branches were equally present in the 3D reconstructions generated. However, there were also some differences that related to the difference between the surface anatomy of the nerve and the internal nerve structure. In vivo, it was possible to reconstruct the complete brachial plexus in such a manner that normal-appearing BPs were derived in a reproducible way. This study showed that the described procedure results in accurate and reproducible brachial plexus 3D reconstructions.

  15. Spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Lee, J S; Kim, Y H; Kim, T W; Kwon, K M

    2017-06-27

    We investigated the spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). A total of 25 cases of non-operated traumatic BPI were analysed by retrospective review of medical records; in all cases, consecutive electrodiagnostic studies (ES) were conducted from 1 to 4 months and 18 to 24 months post-trauma. Injury severity was assessed using a modified version of Dumitru and Wilbourn's scale (DWS) based on ES. Spontaneous recovery of brachial plexus components per subject was analysed using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A two-tailed Fisher's exact or Pearson's Chi-square test was used to examine the associations between initial injury severity (DWS grade 2 vs. 3, complete vs. incomplete), accompanying injury type (open vs. closed), main lesion location (supraclavicular vs. infraclavicular lesion), and spontaneous recovery. The most common cause of BPI was traffic accident (TA) (15 cases, 60%), and the most common type of TA-induced BPI was a motorcycle TA (5 cases), accounting for 20% of all injuries. The second most common type of injury was an occupational injury (6 cases, 24%). Thirty-eight (69%) of 55 injured brachial components in 25 cases had DWS grade 3 and 17 brachial components (31%) had grade 2. The DWS grade of brachial plexus components per subject significantly differed between the first and follow-up ES (p = 0.000). However, initial injury severity, accompanying injury type, and main lesion location were not statistically associated with spontaneous recovery (p > 0.05). Spontaneous recovery may be possible even in severe traumatic BPI. Multiple factors should be considered when predicting the clinical course of traumatic BPI.

  16. [Randomized prospective study of three different techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo Henirque Cunha; Takeda, Alexandre; Sousa, Paulo César Castello Branco de; Mehlmann, Fernanda Moreira Gomes; Junior, Jorge Kiyoshi Mitsunaga; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis

    2017-06-23

    Randomized prospective study comparing two perivascular techniques with the perineural technique for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block (US-ABPB). The primary objective was to verify if these perivascular techniques are noninferior to the perineural technique. 240 patients were randomized to receive the techniques: below the artery (BA), around the artery (AA) or perineural (PN). The anesthetic volume used was 40mL of 0.375% bupivacaine. All patients received a musculocutaneous nerve blockade with 10mL. In BA technique, 30mL were injected below the axillary artery. In AA technique, 7.5mL were injected at 4 points around the artery. In PN technique, the median, ulnar, and radial nerves were anesthetized with 10mL per nerve. Confidence interval analysis showed that the perivascular techniques studied were not inferior to the perineural technique. The time to perform the blockade was shorter for the BA technique (300.4±78.4sec, 396.5±117.1sec, 487.6±172.6sec, respectively). The PN technique showed a lower latency time (PN - 655.3±348.9sec; BA -1044±389.5sec; AA-932.9±314.5sec), and less total time for the procedure (PN-1132±395.8sec; BA -1346.2±413.4sec; AA 1329.5±344.4sec). TA technique had a higher incidence of vascular puncture (BA - 22.5%; AA - 16.3%; PN - 5%). The perivascular techniques are viable alternatives to perineural technique for US-ABPB. There is a higher incidence of vascular puncture associated with the BA technique. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. Radial artery approach for transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seung Hun; Shim, Hyung Jin; Kwak, Byung Kook; Kim, Gi Hyun; Lee, Hwa Yeon; Song, In Sup; Kim, Yang Soo [College of Medicine, Chungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of the transradial approach for intra-arterial chemoembolization therapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinomas. Twenty-nine patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent intra-arterial chemoembolization via the radial artery approach were involved in this study. All underwent Allen's test to check ulnar arterial patency. In all cases, we used the radial approach hepatic artery (RHA) catheter designed by ourselves, evaluating the selection ability of the hepatic artery using an RHA cathter, the number of punctures, the procedure time, and compression time at the puncture site as well as complications occurring during and after the procedure. Except for three in which puncture failure, brachial artery variation or hepatic artery variation occurred, all procedures were successful. The mean number of punctures was 3.5 and the average duration of the whole procedure was one and half hours. This gradually decreased as the number of procedures increased. The average duration at a compression of puncture site was 12 minutes. There were no major complications. Minor complications included minimal intimal dissection of the radial artery (3.8%), reversible vasospasm of the radial artery (7.7%), hematoma at a puncture site (7.7%) and transient neurologic deficit (3.8%). The transradial approach using an RHA catheter for intra-arterial chemoembolization theraphy in patients with hepatocellular carcinomas was technically feasible, with acceptable levels of safety. It may be a good alternative to absolute bed rest with a sand bag after the femoral approach.

  18. Identification of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories for patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocil, Erich; Gruther, Wolfgang; Steiner, Irene; Schuhfried, Othmar

    2014-07-01

    Disease-specific categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health have not yet been described for patients with chronic peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAD). The authors examined the relationship between the categories of the Brief Core Sets for ischemic heart diseases with the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire and the ankle-brachial index to determine which International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories are most relevant for patients with PAD. This is a retrospective cohort study including 77 patients with verified PAD. Statistical analyses of the relationship between International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories as independent variables and the endpoints Peripheral Artery Questionnaire or ankle-brachial index were carried out by simple and stepwise linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, and leg (left vs. right). The stepwise linear regression model with the ankle-brachial index as dependent variable revealed a significant effect of the variables blood vessel functions and muscle endurance functions. Calculating a stepwise linear regression model with the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire as dependent variable, a significant effect of age, emotional functions, energy and drive functions, carrying out daily routine, as well as walking could be observed. This study identifies International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories in the Brief Core Sets for ischemic heart diseases that show a significant effect on the ankle-brachial index and the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire score in patients with PAD. These categories provide fundamental information on functioning of patients with PAD and patient-centered outcomes for rehabilitation interventions.

  19. [Peripheral arterial disease and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, R; Chovanec, V

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a disease characterised by narrowing and blockade of peripheral arteries, usually based on underlying obliterating atherosclerosis. According to the results of large epidemiological studies, the risk of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is fourfold higher compared to non-diabetic population. Patients with DM and PAD have a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Diabetes worsens the prognosis of patients with PAD; the onset of PAD in diabetics occurs at an earlier age, the course is faster than in non-diabetic patients and the disease is often diagnosed at its advanced stages. All these factors reduce the likelihood of revascularisation in DM patients with PAD. A range of factors (higher age, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity, hyperfibrinogenaemia, insulin resistance etc.) contribute to the development of PAD in DM. Diabetes control is an independent risk factor of PAD as every 1% increase of hemoglobin A1C is associated with 28% increase of PAD. There are different clinical signs of PAD in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. In addition to the history of claudications, PAD diagnostic criteria include the presence of murmur over the large arteries, signs of chronic ischemia on the skin and distal ulcerations and gangrene. Among the imaging techniques, non-invasive investigations including Doppler pressure measurement, ankle brachial pressure index, color duplex ultrasonography, plethysmography, transcutaneous tension measurement, MR and CT angiography are preferred. Ankle brachial pressure index measurement is the easiest and the main investigation technique. The key principles of PAD treatment in diabetic patients include modification of risk factors, pharmacotherapy and revascularisation interventions aimed at improving clinical signs and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Antiplatelet treatment may prevent PAD progression and reduce cardiovascular events in DM patients. Early

  20. Effect of SR manipulation on conduit artery dilation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Howard H; Dawson, Ellen A; Birk, Gurpreet K; Spence, Angela L; Naylor, Louise H; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    The impact of manipulating shear stress on conduit artery vasodilation has not been comprehensively described in vivo. We hypothesized that manipulation of SR through the brachial and radial arteries would be associated with corresponding changes in diameter. We performed a series of studies involving the following: (1) leg cycle exercise at increasing intensities (≈70 and 85% maximum heart rate [HRmax]) with simultaneous bilateral measurement of SR in the radial arteries; (2) leg cycle exercise for 30 minutes at 80% HRmax with simultaneous bilateral measurement of velocity and diameter in the brachial arteries; and (3) bilateral forearm heating for 30 minutes with simultaneous bilateral measurement of brachial artery diameter and blood velocity. Cycling and forearm heating interventions were performed in the presence of unilateral cuff inflation throughout the experiment, or starting during the intervention (15 minutes), to manipulate SR responses. Cuff placement was associated with lower radial artery SR responses (cuffed versus uncuffed, 248±49 versus 349±105 L/s 85% HRmax; P<0.01), and diameter responses were similarly attenuated (2.45±0.30 versus 2.78±0.20 mm 85% HRmax; P<0.05). Exercise performed at 80% HRmax in the presence of unilateral cuff inflation also reduced brachial artery SR (cuffed versus uncuffed; 258±107 versus 454±157 L/s; P<0.01) and diameter (3.96±0.39 versus 4.20±0.45 mm). Finally, cuff inflation decreased the impact of forearm heating on brachial SR (cuffed versus uncuffed; 262±97 versus 440±106 L/s; P<0.01) and diameter (4.35±0.54 versus 4.87±0.47 mm; P<0.05). Similar significant differences between the cuffed and uncuffed limbs in SR and diameter were observed when cuff inflation occurred during exercise or heating. Our findings strongly implicate SR as an important stimulus to increase conduit artery diameter in humans.

  1. An Integrative Model of the Cardiovascular System Coupling Heart Cellular Mechanics with Arterial Network Hemodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung

    2013-01-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements. PMID:23960442

  2. An integrative model of the cardiovascular system coupling heart cellular mechanics with arterial network hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-08-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements.

  3. EXERCISE-INDUCED ARTERIAL ADAPTATIONS IN ELITE JUDO ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Karagounis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine exercise-induced arterial adaptations in elite Judo male and female athletes. 27 male Judo athletes (age 24.06 ± 2 years, 11 female Judoka (age 24.27 ± 1 years, 27 sedentary healthy men (age 24.01 ± 2 years and 11 women (age 24.21 ± 1 years participated in the current study. The examined vessels included brachial, radial, ulnar, popliteal, anterior and posterior tibial arteries. The experimental parameters were recorded with the use of Duplex ultrasound at rest. Diastolic diameter and blood mean flow velocity of the examined arteries in Judo athletes were found to be both significantly increased (p < 0.05 compared to the findings of the control groups. In male Judo athletes the brachial (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and anterior tibial artery (p < 0.001 presented the highest difference on the diastolic diameter, compared with the control male group. In female Judo athletes, ulnar (p < 0.001, radial (p < 0.001, and brachial (p < 0.001 arteries illustrated the highest diastolic diameter. The highest blood mean flow velocity was recorded in ulnar (p < 0.001 and popliteal arteries (p < 0.001 of the Judo athletes groups. Recording differences between the two genders, male participants presented larger arteries than females. Conclusively, Judo has been found to be a highly demanding physical sport, involving upper and lower limbs leading to significant arterial adaptations. Obtaining vascular parameters provide a useful tool to the medical team, not only in the direction of enhancement of the efficacy of physical training, but in unknown so far parameters that may influence athletic performance of both male and female elite Judokas

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarteifio, E., E-mail: erick.amarteifio@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wormsbecher, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, M. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Konstanz (Germany); Demirel, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, S. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, S. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, M.-A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time-CEUS-intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t{sub max}), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC{sub post}), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p < 0.014). In PAD, t{sub max} was delayed (31.2 {+-} 13.6 vs. 16.7 {+-} 8.5 s, p < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with ankle-brachial-index (r = -0.65). m was decreased in PAD (4.3 {+-} 4.6 mL/s vs. 13.1 {+-} 8.4 mL/s, p < 0.0001) and had highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity/specificity, 75%/93%) for detection of diminished muscular micro-perfusion in PAD (cut-off value, m < 5{approx}mL/s). Discriminant analysis and ROC curves revealed m, and AUC{sub post} as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  5. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Wray, Sandra; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy.

  6. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmundo Cabrera Fischer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase, others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy.

  7. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  8. Upper Trunk Brachial Plexus Palsy Following Chiropractic Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cunningham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Upper trunk brachial plexus palsy can result from high energy trauma and has never been reported following spinal manipulation.Background:The case is presented of a patient who developed an acute brachial plexus upper trunk palsy following spinal manipulative therapy. Discussion:Discussion is made on the incidence of complications following manipulation and recommendations to prospectively capture all serious complications.Concluding Remarks:Risks exist with spinal manipulative therapy. Neurological injury can occur. Risk assessment and re-examination should occur at every visit. Large rigorous prospective studies are required to identify the true incidence of serious complications resulting from manipulative therapy and the benefit:risk ratio.

  9. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  10. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  11. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Coroneos, Christopher J.; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R.; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and childr...

  12. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, Sho; Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tanefumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enla...

  13. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

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    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  14. Rhabdomyolysis resulting in concurrent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Susan C.; Geannette, Christian; Sneag, Darryl B. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Wolfe, Scott W. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Hand and Upper Extremity, Department of Orthopedics, New York, NY (United States); Feinberg, Joseph H. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This case report describes a 29-year-old male who presented with immediate onset of Horner's syndrome and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy after sleeping with his arm dangling outside a car window for 8 h. Outside workup and imaging revealed rhabdomyolysis of the left neck musculature. Subsequent electrodiagnostic testing and high-resolution brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging at the authors' institution attributed the Horner's syndrome and concurrent brachial plexopathy to rhabdomyolysis of the longus colli and scalene musculature, which had compressed - and consequently scar tethered - the cervical sympathetic trunk and brachial plexus. This case of co-existent Horner's syndrome and brachial plexopathy demonstrates the role of high-resolution brachial plexus MRI in diagnosing plexopathy and the importance of being familiar with plexus and paravertebral muscle anatomy. (orig.)

  15. Intrapartum risk factors for permanent brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Sarah H; Stallings, Shawn P; Ghidini, Alessandro; Spong, Catherine Y; Deering, Shad H; Allen, Robert H

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maternal, neonatal, and second stage of labor characteristics in shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in permanent brachial plexus injury with shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in no injury. Our cases were culled from a database of deliveries that resulted in permanent brachial plexus injuries and matched to control cases that were taken from a database of consecutive shoulder dystocia deliveries from one hospital. Deliveries that resulted in injury were excluded from the control cases; those cases with no recorded shoulder dystocia were excluded from the cases. Matching was for birth weight (+/-250 g), parity, and diabetic status. Rates of precipitous and prolonged second stage, operative delivery, neonatal depression, and average number of shoulder dystocia maneuvers used were compared between the two groups with chi(2) test, Fisher exact test, and the Student t test; a probability value of precipitous second stage rate, and sex were not significant between groups. The rates of precipitous second stage for both groups (28.0% injured and 35.0% uninjured) were more than triple the rates of prolonged second stage (9.5% injured and 11.3% uninjured). No characteristic of second-stage of labor predicts permanent brachial plexus injury. Precipitous second stage is the most prevalent labor abnormality that is associated with shoulder dystocia.

  16. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  17. A small reduction in the ankle-brachial index is associated with increased mortality in patients on chronic hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Akihiko; Takita, Takako; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Kumagai, Hiromichi; Hishida, Akira

    2010-01-01

    High pulse wave velocity (PWV) and a low ankle-brachial index (ABI) are associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Recently, the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was developed as a novel index of arterial stiffness independent of blood pressure. We compared brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV), the ABI and the CAVI as predictors of mortality in 194 HD patients (age 64 +/- 12 years; time on HD 111 +/- 96 months) during a follow-up period of 39 +/- 4 months (range 31-46). The ABI was significantly positively correlated with serum albumin and negatively with log-transformed highly sensitive C-reactive protein (p 1.1; hazard ratio 3.50 (95% confidence interval 1.20-10.20); p = 0.02]. In contrast, baPWV and the CAVI were not associated with mortality. These findings suggest that a small reduction in the ABI (<1.0) is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in chronic HD patients. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The association between cholesterol levels and brachial/aortic augmentation index versus cognitive status in patients with cardiovascular risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joacabine Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular pathology appears to have a major impact in cognitive decline, and early identification and correction of cardiovascular morbidity could have a major protective impact on cognitive functioning. However, it is not clear how the risk factors for vascular disease can also be risk factors for a general cognitive decline. Regarding cholesterol, its implications in cognitive decline are not very well understood, considering that a high level of cholesterol has been associated with both an increased and decreased risk of dementia. In the present context, we decided to study correlations between cholesterol concentration and the various subdomains of some main psychometric tests, such as MMSE (Mini-Mental State Examination and MoCA (The Montreal Cognitive Assessment, as well as some measurements for systemic arterial stiffness (brachial and aortic augmentation index and how they correlate with the aforementioned psychometric parameters. Our results provide additional evidence for a correlation between cholesterol levels and cognitive subdomains (with special focus on orientation, attention, recent memory and long-term memory. Additionally, a significant correlation was found between the brachial and aortic augmentation index and the results of both MMSE and MOCA tests.

  19. Correlations between geriatric nutritional risk index and peripheral artery disease in elderly coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamiya, Toshiki; Suzuki, Susumu; Ishii, Hideki; Hirayama, Kenshi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Yohei; Tatami, Yosuke; Harata, Shingo; Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Kunimura, Ayako; Takayama, Yohei; Shimbo, Yusaku; Osugi, Naohiro; Yamamoto, Dai; Ota, Tomoyuki; Kono, Chikao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-07-01

    Malnutrition is associated with the development of atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients. The present study aimed to investigate the association between the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), a simple nutritional assessment tool, and the prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in elderly coronary artery disease patients. We evaluated 228 elderly coronary artery disease patients (mean age 74.0 ± 5.7 years). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements were routinely carried out to investigate the prevalence of lower extremity PAD. Patients showing ABI risk of having PAD than those with high GNRI and low C-reactive protein levels. GNRI values showed a strong relationship with PAD in elderly coronary artery disease patients. These data reinforce the utility of GNRI as a screening tool in clinical practice. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1057-1062. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Detection of Peripheral Artery Disease by Duplex Ultrasonography among Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Kumata-Maeta, Chiaki; Shishido, Kanji; Mizobuchi, Masahide; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Koiwa, Fumihiko; Kinugasa, Eriko; Akizawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a known predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality among hemodialysis patients. Although ankle-brachial BP index (ABI) is a simple and reliable test for PAD screening, its sensitivity has been suggested to decrease among dialysis patients.

  1. Screen or not to screen for peripheral arterial disease: Guidance from a decision model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Vaidya (Anil); M.A. Joore (Manuela); A.J. Ten Cate-Hoek (Arina J); H. ten Cate (Hugo); J.L. Severens (Hans)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is associated with greater risk of acute cardiovascular events. This study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of one time only PAD screening using Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) test and subsequent anti

  2. A case of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery presenting with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    He was inconsolable, had marked respiratory distress, cool extremities, central and peripheral cyanosis oxygen. The radial and brachial pulses were absent. The mean arterial pressure was 65mmHg, Heart rate of 160 beats per minute with a third heart sound. The liver was enlarged 4cm below the costal margin and tender, ...

  3. Relationship between upper and lower limb conduit artery vasodilator function in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Rowley, N.; Padilla, J.; Simmons, G.H.; Laughlin, M.H.; Whyte, G.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a strong predictor of future cardiovascular disease and is believed to represent a "barometer" of systemic endothelial health. Although a recent study [Padilla et al. Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 235: 1287-1291, 2010] in pigs confirmed a strong correlation

  4. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasin...

  5. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  6. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  7. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  8. The contribution of arterial calcification to peripheral arterial disease in pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Leftheriotis

    Full Text Available The contribution of arterial calcification (AC in peripheral arterial disease (PAD and arterial wall compressibility is a matter of debate. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, an inherited metabolic disease due to ABCC6 gene mutations, combines elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft tissues including the arterial wall. Since AC is associated with PAD, a frequent complication of PXE, we sought to determine the role of AC in PAD and arterial wall compressibility in this group of patients.Arterial compressibility and patency were determined by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI in a cohort of 71 PXE patients (mean age 48 ± SD 14 yrs, 45 women and compared to 30 controls without PAD. Lower limb arterial calcification (LLAC was determined by non-contrast enhanced helicoidal CT-scan. A calcification score (Ca-score was computed for the femoral, popliteal and sub-popliteal artery segments of both legs. Forty patients with PXE had an ABI1.40. LLAC increased with age, significantly more in PXE subjects than controls. A negative association was found between LLAC and ABI (r = -0.363, p = 0.002. The LLAC was independently associated with PXE and age, and ABI was not linked to cardiovascular risk factors.The presence of AC was associated with PAD and PXE without affecting arterial compressibility. PAD in PXE patients is probably due to proximal obstructive lesions developing independently from cardiovascular risk factors.

  9. The contribution of arterial calcification to peripheral arterial disease in pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftheriotis, Georges; Kauffenstein, Gilles; Hamel, Jean François; Abraham, Pierre; Le Saux, Olivier; Willoteaux, Serge; Henrion, Daniel; Martin, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of arterial calcification (AC) in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and arterial wall compressibility is a matter of debate. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an inherited metabolic disease due to ABCC6 gene mutations, combines elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft tissues including the arterial wall. Since AC is associated with PAD, a frequent complication of PXE, we sought to determine the role of AC in PAD and arterial wall compressibility in this group of patients. Arterial compressibility and patency were determined by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) in a cohort of 71 PXE patients (mean age 48 ± SD 14 yrs, 45 women) and compared to 30 controls without PAD. Lower limb arterial calcification (LLAC) was determined by non-contrast enhanced helicoidal CT-scan. A calcification score (Ca-score) was computed for the femoral, popliteal and sub-popliteal artery segments of both legs. Forty patients with PXE had an ABI1.40. LLAC increased with age, significantly more in PXE subjects than controls. A negative association was found between LLAC and ABI (r = -0.363, p = 0.002). The LLAC was independently associated with PXE and age, and ABI was not linked to cardiovascular risk factors. The presence of AC was associated with PAD and PXE without affecting arterial compressibility. PAD in PXE patients is probably due to proximal obstructive lesions developing independently from cardiovascular risk factors.

  10. Pediatric nonaortic arterial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Frank M; Eliason, Jonathan L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Blatt, Neal B; Stanley, James C; Coleman, Dawn M

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric arterial aneurysms are extremely uncommon. Indications for intervention remain poorly defined and treatments vary. The impetus for this study was to better define the contemporary surgical management of pediatric nonaortic arterial aneurysms. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 41 children with 61 aneurysms who underwent surgical treatment from 1983 to 2015 at the University of Michigan. Arteries affected included: renal (n = 26), femoral (n = 7), iliac (n = 7), superior mesenteric (n = 4), brachial (n = 3), carotid (n = 3), popliteal (n = 3), axillary (n = 2), celiac (n = 2), ulnar (n = 2), common hepatic (n = 1), and temporal (n = 1). Intracranial aneurysms and aortic aneurysms treated during the same time period were not included in this study. Primary outcomes analyzed were postoperative complications, mortality, and freedom from reintervention. The study included 27 boys and 14 girls, with a median age of 9.8 years (range, 2 months-18 years) and a weight of 31.0 kg (range, 3.8-71 kg). Multiple aneurysms existed in 14 children. Obvious factors that contributed to aneurysmal formation included: proximal juxta-aneurysmal stenoses (n = 14), trauma (n = 12), Kawasaki disease (n = 4), Ehlers-Danlos type IV syndrome (n = 1), and infection (n = 1). Preoperative diagnoses were established using arteriography (n = 23), magnetic resonance angiography (n = 6), computed tomographic arteriography (n = 5), or ultrasonography (n = 7), and confirmed during surgery. Indications for surgery included risk of expansion and rupture, potential thrombosis or embolization of aneurysmal thrombus, local soft tissue and nerve compression, and secondary hypertension in the case of renal artery aneurysms. Primary surgical techniques included: aneurysm resection with reanastomsis, reimplantation, or angioplastic closure (n = 16), interposition (n = 10) or bypass grafts (n = 2), ligation (n = 9), plication (n = 8), endovascular occlusion (n = 3), and nephrectomy (n = 4) in

  11. Effect of dietary intervention and lipid-lowering treatment on brachial vasoreactivity in patients with ischemic heart disease and hypercholesterolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Eva; Møller, Jacob E; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2003-01-01

    advice (n = 68) or no specific dietary advice (n = 63). Endothelial function was assessed at baseline and after 12 months with noninvasive ultrasound scanning vessel-wall tracking of brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD). All patients started statin treatment with Fluvastatin (40 mg once...... daily) at baseline. RESULTS: A total of 115 patients completed the study. At baseline, FMD was 4.30% +/- 4.89% in the control group versus 4.32% +/- 6.15% in the intervention group (P = not significant). After 12 months of follow-up, FMD was significantly higher in the intervention group (control group...... 5.72% +/- 4.87% vs intervention group 8.62% +/- 6.60%, P FMD after adjustment for classic cardiovascular risk...

  12. Arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxuan; Lyu, Peiyuan; Ren, Yanyan; An, Jin; Dong, Yanhong

    2017-09-15

    Arterial stiffness is one of the earliest indicators of changes in vascular wall structure and function and may be assessed using various indicators, such as pulse-wave velocity (PWV), the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI), the ankle-brachial index (ABI), pulse pressure (PP), the augmentation index (AI), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), carotid intima media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness index-β. Arterial stiffness is generally considered an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. To date, a significant number of studies have focused on the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. To investigate the relationships between specific arterial stiffness parameters and cognitive impairment, elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment and determine how to interfere with arterial stiffness to prevent cognitive impairment, we searched PUBMED for studies regarding the relationship between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment that were published from 2000 to 2017. We used the following key words in our search: "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment" and "arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment mechanism". Studies involving human subjects older than 30years were included in the review, while irrelevant studies (i.e., studies involving subjects with comorbid kidney disease, diabetes and cardiac disease) were excluded from the review. We determined that arterial stiffness severity was positively correlated with cognitive impairment. Of the markers used to assess arterial stiffness, a higher PWV, CAVI, AI, IMT and index-β and a lower ABI and FMD were related to cognitive impairment. However, the relationship between PP and cognitive impairment remained controversial. The potential mechanisms linking arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment may be associated with arterial pulsatility, as greater arterial pulsatility

  13. Uric Acid Level Has a J-Shaped Association with Arterial Stiffness in Korean Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyungbin; Jung, Young-Hyo; Kwon, Yu-Jin; Park, Byoungjin

    2017-11-01

    Uric acid has been reported to function both as an oxidant or antioxidant depending on the context. A previous study in the Korean population reported a positive linear association between serum uric acid level and arterial stiffness in men, but little is known about how serum uric acid level is related to the risk of increased arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women. We performed a cross-sectional study of 293 subjects who participated in a health examination program run by the health promotion center of Gangnam Severance Hospital between October 2007 and July 2010. High brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was defined as a brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity of more than 1,450 cm/s. The odds ratios (ORs) for high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analysis across uric acid quartiles after adjusting for other indicators of cardiovascular risk. The 293 postmenopausal women were divided into quartiles according to uric acid level. The mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity values of each quartile were as follows: Q1, 1,474 cm/s; Q2, 1,375 cm/s; Q3, 1,422 cm/s; Q4, 1,528 cm/s. The second quartile was designated as the control group based on mean brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value. Multivariate adjusted ORs (95% confidence intervals) for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity across the uric acid quartiles were 2.642 (Q1, 1.095-6.3373), 1.00, 4.305 (Q3, 1.798-10.307), and 4.375 (Q4, 1.923-9.949), after adjusting for confounding variables. Serum uric acid level has a J-shaped association with arterial stiffness in Korean postmenopausal women.

  14. Training to Perform Ankle-Brachial Index: Systematic Review and Perspectives to Improve Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudru, S; de Müllenheim, P-Y; Le Faucheur, A; Kaladji, A; Jaquinandi, V; Mahé, G

    2016-02-01

    To conduct a systematic review focusing on the impact of training programs on ankle-brachial index (ABI) performance by medical students, doctors and primary care providers. Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a highly prevalent disease affecting ∼202 million people worldwide. ABI is an essential component of medical education because of its ability to diagnose PAD, and as it is a powerful prognostic marker for overall and cardiovascular related mortality. A systematic search was conducted (up to May 2015) using Medline, Embase, and Web of Science databases. Five studies have addressed the impact of a training program on ABI performance by either medical students, doctors or primary care providers. All were assigned a low GRADE system quality. The components of the training vary greatly either in substance (what was taught) or in form (duration of the training, and type of support which was used). No consistency was found in the outcome measures. According to this systematic review, only few studies, with a low quality rating, have addressed which training program should be performed to provide the best way of teaching how to perform ABI. Future high quality researches are required to define objectively the best training program to facilitate ABI teaching and learning. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ankle-Brachial Index and Long-Term (10 Years) Survival of Nondiabetic Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevc, Sebastjan; Purg, Darinka; Knehtl, Maša; Hren, Martin; Turnšek, Nina; Hojs, Nina; Zorman, Tadej; Dvoršak, Benjamin; Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2016-06-01

    Low (1.4) ankle brachial index (ABI) is associated with a higher cardiovascular (CV) mortality in the general and hemodialysis (HD) population. The aim of our study was to determine the impact of ABI on long-term survival of 52 non-diabetic HD patients. The ABI was determined using an automated, non-invasive waveform analysis device. Patients were divided into three groups: low (1.4) ABI. Patients were observed from the date of ABI measurement until their death or ten years. Survival analysis showed higher risk for CV death in HD patients with high ABI compared to normal ABI (log rank test P < 0.027). In Cox regression model adjusted for arterial hypertension, smoking, serum cholesterol and triglycerides, high ABI (P < 0.049) remained a predictor of mortality. The results indicate an association between ABI and long-term survival of non-diabetic HD patients and only high ABI was associated with higher CV mortality. © 2016 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  16. Factors associated with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, H; Takase, H; Dohi, Y; Kimura, G

    2012-12-01

    The present study investigated factors that modify or affect arterial stiffness as assessed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in the general population. Subjects had previously participated in a physical checkup program (n=911), and baPWV and urinary albumin and sodium excretion were also measured. Urine albumin was expressed as the ratio of urine albumin to urine creatinine. Individual salt intake was assessed by estimating 24-h urinary salt excretion and expressed as the ratio of estimated salt intake to body weight. The mean blood pressure and baPWV were 127.1±15.2/77.0±9.5 mm Hg and 15.9±3.3 m s(-1), respectively. Univariate analysis demonstrated that baPWV correlated with various factors including age, blood pressure, electrocardiogram voltage (SV(1)+RV(5)), urine albumin and salt intake. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that electrocardiogram voltage (Pblood pressure (P<0.0001), urine albumin (P<0.001) and salt intake (P<0.001), independently correlated with baPWV after adjustment for other possible factors. Similar results were obtained for participants not taking any medication. These results suggest that the baPWV value is independently associated with individual salt intake and cardiac and renal damage, and could be a useful procedure for identifying individuals with concealed risk of cardiovascular disease.

  17. Serum Phosphorus Levels and the Spectrum of Ankle-Brachial Index in Older Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jerry; Wassel, Christina L.; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Collins, Tracie C.; Criqui, Michael H.; Lewis, Cora E.; Cummings, Steve R.; Ix, Joachim H.

    2010-01-01

    A higher serum phosphorus level is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among community-living populations. Mechanisms are unknown. The ankle-brachial index (ABI) provides information on both atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness. In this cross-sectional study (2000–2002), the authors evaluated the association of serum phosphorus levels with low (phosphorus level was 3.2 mg/dL (standard deviation, 0.4), 6% had a low ABI, and 5% had a high ABI. Each 1-mg/dL increase in serum phosphorus level was associated with a 1.6-fold greater prevalence of low ABI (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2, 2.1; P phosphorus with high ABI differed by chronic kidney disease (CKD) status (in persons with CKD, prevalence ratio = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.61, 5.45; in persons without CKD, prevalence ratio = 1.14, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.61; interaction P = 0.04). In conclusion, among community-living older men, higher phosphorus levels are associated with low ABI and are also associated with high ABI in persons with CKD. These associations may explain the link between serum phosphorus levels and CVD events. PMID:20237150

  18. [Ankle-brachial index measurement: Methods of teaching in French medical schools and review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, G

    2015-05-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be measured to diagnose peripheral artery disease (PAD) and used as an independent marker of cardiovascular risk. What are the teaching methods for ABI in French medical schools? What are the data in the literature showing the link between and educational interventions and ABI competency? A questionnaire to assess how ABI is taught in the second and third cycles of French medical schools was sent to vascular medicine chairs of each faculty. A systematic review of the literature in PubMed was performed including articles that studied the effect of an educational intervention on this competency. Sixty-five percent of vascular medicine chairs (teachers) responded. ABI was taught in the second cycle in all medical schools. In 75% of schools, ABI was taught as part of lectures on PAD. Practical training was implemented in the second cycle in 20% of medical schools and in the third cycle in 60%. Teachers are statistically less satisfied with their way of teaching in the second cycle compared with the third cycle. Four articles have studied the effect of an educational intervention. Practical training improves student performance. Most of vascular medicine teachers used lectures to teach ABI. This type of teaching does not favor the development of this medical competency. The best way of teaching this competency should be addressed. Homogenization in the way ABI is taught would be necessary at national and international levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W-M; Zhang, H-F; Zhu, Z-Y; Zhou, Y-L; Liang, N-X; Xu, D-J; Zhou, F; Sheng, Y-H; Yang, R; Gong, L; Yin, Z-J; Chen, F-K; Cao, K-J; Li, X-L

    2013-04-01

    Elevated levels of circulating triglycerides and increased arterial stiffness are associated with cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have reported an association between levels of circulating triglycerides and arterial stiffness. We used Mendelian randomization to test whether this association is causal. We investigated the association between circulating triglyceride levels, the apolipoprotein A-V (ApoA5) -1131T>C single nucleotide polymorphism and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) by examining data from 4421 subjects aged 18-74 years who were recruited from the Chinese population. baPWV was significantly associated with the levels of circulating triglycerides after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, waist-to-hip ratio, antihypertensive treatment and diabetes mellitus status. The -1131C allele was associated with a 5% (95% confidence interval 3-8%) increase in circulating triglycerides (adjusted for age, sex, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, diabetes mellitus and antihypertensive treatment). Instrumental variable analysis showed that genetically elevated levels of circulating triglycerides were not associated with increased baPWV. These results do not support the hypothesis that levels of circulating triglycerides have a causal role in the development of arterial stiffness.

  20. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Moayeri, N.; Bruhn, J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Chan, V.W.; Groen, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  1. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  2. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  3. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  4. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  5. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  6. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, J.A.; Beckerman, H.; de Groot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Method: Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the

  7. Association of polymorphisms in NOS3 with the ankle-brachial index in hypertensive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullo, Iftikhar J; Greene, M Todd; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chu, Jian; Turner, Stephen T; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the association of 14 polymorphisms in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) with ankle brachial index (ABI) in non-Hispanic white hypertensives belonging to hypertensive sibships. Subjects (n=659, mean age 61+/-9 years, 54% women) underwent measurement of ABI using a standard protocol, and the lowest of 4 ABI values was used in the analyses. Non-synonymous SNPs with a minor allele frequency >0.02 and tag SNPs selected based on a measure of linkage disequilibrium (r(2)) were genotyped. We reduced the chance of false positives by testing for replication, randomly selecting 1 hypertensive sib from each sibship to create Subset 1 (n=330) and Subset 2 (n=329). Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the associations of single NOS3 polymorphisms and haplotypes with ABI after adjustment for covariates (age, sex, body mass index, smoking, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and diabetes). Two specific SNPs in significant LD with each other (rs891512 and rs1808593) were significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. Based on a sliding window approach with a window size of 2, estimated haplotypes from 2 SNP pairs (rs2070744-rs3918226 and rs1808593-rs7830) were also significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. In conclusion, specific NOS3 SNPs and haplotypes were associated with inter-individual variation in ABI, a non-invasive marker of peripheral arterial disease, in replicate subsets of hypertensive subjects. These findings motivate further investigation of the role of NOS3 variants in determining susceptibility to peripheral arterial disease.

  8. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood Flow Velocity in Brachial and Subclavian Vessels Immediately After Compressive Procedures for Treatment of Postcancer Therapy Lymphedema in Breast Cancer: A Randomized Blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Monique Silva; Marsengo, Ana Luiza; de Jesus Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira

    2017-03-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effect of elastic compression, functional compressive bandaging, and kinesiotherapy on blood flow of the upper limb with lymphedema secondary to the treatment of breast cancer. This was a randomized blind crossover clinical trial with a washout period of 7 days between treatments. We evaluated 20 women with a mean age of 66.85 years (standard deviation = 11.76), undergoing three types of therapeutic procedures randomly applied by lot: kinesiotherapy, functional compressive bandaging + kinesiotherapy (FCB), and elastic compression + kinesiotherapy (EC). Blood flow, including mean and maximum velocity, was assessed by Doppler ultrasound before and after the therapeutic procedure (immediately after, 15 minutes, and 30 minutes). We used two-way analysis of variance for repeated measures followed by Bonferroni's test, considering a significance level of 5%. The EC and FCB groups showed a significant increase in the mean velocity of blood flow in the axillary and brachial arteries and veins compared to the group that received only kinesiotherapy (p  0.05). Moreover, the EC and FCB groups showed greater increase in maximum velocity of blood flow in the brachial artery (p  0.05). Elastic compression and functional compressive bandaging combined with kinesiotherapy increased blood flow of upper limb lymphedema.

  10. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity predicts all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes: the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yasutaka; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Etoh, Erina; Kodama, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Shuji; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Nawata, Hajime; Shimabukuro, Michio; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Whether brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), a noninvasive marker for arterial stiffness, is a useful predictive maker for cardiovascular events in subjects with diabetes is not established. In the present cohort study, we evaluated the benefit of baPWV for the prediction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in subjects with diabetes. A total of 4,272 outpatients with diabetes were enrolled in the Kyushu Prevention Study of Atherosclerosis. Of these, 3,628 subjects, excluding those with an ankle-brachial index of mortality. RP revealed baPWVs of 14 and 24 m/s as statistically adequate cutoff points for cardiovascular events and mortality, respectively. High-baPWV classes showed significantly low event-free ratios in Kaplan-Meier curves for all end points and remained independent risks for all-cause mortality and cerebrovascular events, but not for coronary artery events after adjustments for age, sex, BMI, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, and hemoglobin A1c by Cox proportional hazards models. This large-scale cohort study provided evidence that high baPWV is a useful independent predictor of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in subjects with diabetes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  11. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  12. Clinical evaluation of the trans brachial selective digital subtraction angiography (TB-SDSA). Its role for the diagnosis and therapy of hepatoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Yuichi; Okazaki, Toru

    1989-01-01

    To assess the role of trans brachial selective digital subtraction angiography (TB-SDSA) in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatoma, 80 TB-SDSAs obtained in 29 patients with hepatoma were retrospectively analyzed. Using a guidewire in TB-SDSA, a catheter could be inserted into the target artery in 97.5%. None of the patients complained of previously reported serious complications, including severe pain. In 27 patients, hepatomas were depicted as dark stains, including solitary or multiple tumors less than one cm in diameter that were missed on conventional CT and US (n=ll). In conclusion, TB-SDSA would contribute to repeat radiographic examinations, TAE-treatment, and infusion of drugs into the target artery. (Namekawa, K).

  13. Risk factors of accelerated progression of peripheral artery disease in hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang-Reu; Su, Ho-Ming; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Su, Shin-Li; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2013-02-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) are markers for peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and arterial stiffness, respectively. The aims of this study were to assess whether PAOD and arterial stiffness progressed and to determine the risk factors for ABI and baPWV progression in patients on hemodialysis. This study enrolled 173 routine patients on hemodialysis. Both ABI and baPWV were measured by an ABI-form device at baseline and at 1 year of follow-up. Progression in ABI was defined as reduction in ABI exceeding 0.3, while baPWV measured at 1 year of follow-up exceeding that at baseline indicated baPWV progression. Comparison with baseline data showed increase in both prevalence of ABI hemodialysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Determinants of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hsin Chen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available High prevalences of peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD and increased arterial stiffness have been reported in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, these have not been assessed in Taiwan where the prevalence of CKD is high. The aim of this study was to investigate the determinants of PAOD and arterial stiffness in patients with CKD in southern Taiwan. We enrolled 169 patients with stage 3–5 CKD in one regional hospital. Ankle-brachial index (ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity were measured using an ABI-form device (Colin VP1000. In multivariate analysis, ABI < 0.9 was positively correlated with the presence of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.014 and negatively correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (p = 0.049, and increased brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was correlated with increased age, diabetes mellitus, increased systolic blood pressure, decreased pulse pressure and decreased eGFR. This study identified determinants of PAOD and arterial stiffness in patients with CKD in one hospital in southern Taiwan. In addition to the traditional atherosclerotic risk factors, decreased eGFR was also correlated with PAOD and increased arterial stiffness in these patients.

  15. Endothelial dysfunction, carotid artery plaque burden, and conventional exercise-induced myocardial ischemia as predictors of coronary artery disease prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihara Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While both flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD in the brachial artery (BA, which measures endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and intima-media thickness (IMT in the carotid artery are correlated with the prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD, it is not clear which modality is a better predictor of CAD. Furthermore, it has not been fully determined whether either of these modalities is superior to conventional ST-segment depression on exercise stress electrocardiogram (ECG as a predictor. Thus, the goal of the present study was to compare the predictive value of FMD, IMT, and stress ECG for CAD prognosis. Methods and Results A total of 103 consecutive patients (62 ± 9 years old, 79 men with clinically suspected CAD had FMD and nitroglycerin-induced dilation (NTG-D in the BA, carotid artery IMT measurement using high-resolution ultrasound, and exercise treadmill testing. The 73 CAD patients and 30 normal coronary patients were followed for 50 ± 15 months. Fifteen patients had coronary events during this period (1 cardiac death, 2 non-fatal myocardial infarctions, 3 acute heart failures, and 9 unstable anginas. On Kaplan-Meier analysis, only FMD and stress ECG were significant predictors for cardiac events. Conclusion Brachial endothelial function as reflected by FMD and conventional exercise stress testing has comparable prognostic value, whereas carotid artery plaque burden appears to be less powerful for predicting future cardiac events.

  16. Impact of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial blood pressure index on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Tokuyuki; Ono, Kumeo; Tsuchida, Akiyasu; Kawai, Hironobu; Shinohara, Masahiko; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Koyanagi, Hikaru; Noguchi, Toshiharu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Sekihara, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Yukiyasu; Kanai, Hideo; Ishida, Hideki; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2005-10-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABPI) are markers for atherosclerosis, and each predicts mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. However, there have been no studies in the past that compared head-to-head the clinical validity of these 2 parameters. Compared with conventional aortic PWV, brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is considered simple and thereby easily applicable to clinical use. To clarify the relationship between baPWV and ABPI and assess their prognostic values, we analyzed 785 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 60.2 +/- 12.5 (SD) years for whom ABPI and baPWV at baseline had been measured simultaneously and who were followed up for 33.8 +/- 10.8 months. Of 785 patients, 131 deaths were recorded. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, all-cause mortality was progressively and significantly greater from the lowest quartile of baPWV onward (log-rank test, 41.8; P hemodialysis patients. However, baPWV was useful to pick a high-risk population in patients with ABPI greater than 0.9. Thus, screening hemodialysis patients by means of baPWV and ABPI provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population.

  17. Perineural spread of melanoma to the brachial plexus: identifying the anatomic pathway(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Tomas; Laughlin, Ruple S; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-08

    Perineural spread of melanoma is a well-known mechanism of metastasis in cases involving cranial nerves. Brachial plexus involvement is rare and the pathway is unknown. A retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic database was performed to identify patients with a history of melanoma and brachial plexus compromise between 1994 and 2017. Inclusion criteria were a history of melanoma, a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, radiological features consistent with perineural spread and biopsy of melanoma within nerve. We identified 42 cases, 24 men and 18 women with a median age of 61 years (37 - 84 years) with a history of melanoma and a brachial plexopathy. After review of their clinical information, 2 cases fulfilled inclusion criteria. Both patients presented with progressive brachial plexopathy and imaging studies revealed features consistent with perineural spread. In 40 excluded cases, brachial plexopathy was caused by: metastasis to axillary lymph nodes (n = 11); trauma (n = 8); post-surgical sequelae (n = 7); tumors other than melanoma (n = 5); inflammation (n = 5); radiation (n = 2); a combination of radiation and post-surgical changes (n = 1); and radiculopathy (n = 1). The 2 identified cases both showed similar clinical and radiological features. We believe that there is a pattern of perineural spread to the brachial plexus through the cervical plexus. Literature review shows several recently published cases demonstrating an analogous mechanism of melanoma spread involving upper cervical nerves which supports our proposed pathway. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Lipomas of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; Yang, Kai; King, David; Dzwierzynski, William; Sanger, James; Hettinger, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Lipomas are common benign tumors. When they develop in proximity to peripheral nerves, they can cause neurologic symptoms secondary to mass effect. Previous reports have shown symptom resolution after removal of lipomas compressing various upper extremity peripheral nerves. However, brachial plexus lipomas are relatively rare. Our multidisciplinary experience with brachial plexus lipoma resection is reviewed in the largest case series to date. A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection of brachial plexus lipomatous tumors between 2006 and 2016 was performed. Patient demographic data, diagnostic imaging, clinical presentation, operative details, surgical pathology, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Twelve brachial plexus lipomatous tumors were resected in 11 patients: 10 lipomas, 1 hibernoma, and 1 atypical lipomatous tumor. The most common tumor location was supraclavicular (50%), followed by axillary (42%), and proximal medial arm (8%). The most common brachial plexus segment involved was the upper trunk (50%), followed by posterior cord (25%), lateral pectoral nerve (8%), lower trunk (8%), and proximal median nerve (8%). Most patients presented with an enlarging painless mass (58%). Of the patients who presented with neurologic symptoms, symptoms resolved in the majority (80%). Brachial plexus lipomas are rare causes of compression neuropathy in the upper extremity. Careful resection and knowledge of brachial plexus anatomy, which may be distorted by the tumor, are critical to achieving a successful surgical outcome with predictable symptom resolution. Finally, surveillance magnetic resonance imaging may be warranted for atypical lesions.

  19. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  20. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Professor Birch argues for early exploration of the brachial plexus as the optimum both to delineate the pathology and undertake reconstructive surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients.

  2. Effects of Handgrip Training With Venous Restriction on Brachial Artery Vasodilation

    OpenAIRE

    Credeur, Daniel P.; Hollis, Brandon C.; Welsch, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance training with restricted venous blood flow (Kaatsu) results in significant strength gains and muscle hypertrophy. However, few studies have examined the concurrent vascular responses following restrictive venous blood flow training protocols.

  3. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CVD, and diabetes. Consider scientific recommendations, like this one from the Task Force. Use this information to become fully informed and to decide whether screening for PAD is right for you. At the same time, take action to reduce your risk for heart ...

  4. Associations of Depressive Symptoms and Brachial Artery Reactivity among Police Officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Violanti

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Depressive symptoms were inversely associated with BAR among police officers who were current smokers and together may be considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease among police officers. Further prospective research is warranted.

  5. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  6. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  7. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  8. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  9. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Babhulkar, Sonali; Hiremath, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial. PMID:23661959

  10. Psychometric evaluation of the Brachial Assessment Tool Part 1: Reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Bridget Hill; Williams, Gavin; Olver, John; Ferris, Scott; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2017-11-06

    To evaluate reproducibility (reliability and agreement) of the Brachial Assessment Tool (BrAT) a new patient-reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury (BPI) DESIGN: Prospective repeated measure design SETTING: Outpatient clinics PARTICIPANTS: Adults with confirmed traumatic BPI INTERVENTION: 43 people (age range 19-82) with BPI completed the 31-item 4-response BrAT twice, 2 weeks apart. Results for the 3 subscales and summed score were compared at time 1 and time 2 to determine reliability including systematic differences using paired t tests; test retest using Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC 1,1) and internal consistency using Cronbach alpha. Agreement parameters included standard error of measurement, minimal detectable change and limits of agreement. The BrAT RESULTS: Test retest reliability was excellent (ICC [1,1] = 0.90 - 0.97). Internal consistency was high (Cronbach alpha 0.90 - 0.98). Measurement error was relatively low (SEM range 3.1 - 8.8). A change of >4 for subscale 1, >6 for subscale 2, >4 for subscale 3 and >10 for the summed score is indicative of change over and above measurement error. Limits of agreement ranged from ± 4.4 (subscale 3) to 11.61 (summed score). These findings support the use of the BrAT as a reproducible patient reported outcome measure for adults with traumatic BPI with evidence of appropriate reliability and agreement for both individual and group comparisons. Further psychometric testing is required to establish the construct validity and responsiveness of the BrAT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further guideline development and multicentre research. A structured

  12. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  13. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  14. Comparison between absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures in arterial anastomoses in growing dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersak, B

    1991-01-01

    Five dogs, 10 weeks old, underwent operation using ketamin-HCl anesthesia and end-to-end anastomoses of the femoral and brachial arteries were made using polyfilament nonabsorbable material (Ethibond), monofilament nonabsorbable material (Prolene), polyfilament absorbable material (Vicryl) and monofilament absorbable material (PDS). The arterial diameter using a micrometer and blood flow using an electromagnetic flow meter were determined. After six months another operation was performed and diameter and blood flow were measured again. No statistically significant differences were found between the different materials used with respect to growth related increases either in arterial diameter or blood flow.

  15. Salvage of bilateral renal artery occlusion after endovascular aneurysm repair with open splenorenal bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Jessula, MDCM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report renal salvage maneuvers after accidental bilateral renal artery coverage during endovascular aneurysm repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 79-year-old man with an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated coverage of the renal arteries. Several revascularization techniques were attempted, including endograft repositioning and endovascular stenting through the femoral and brachial approach. The patient eventually underwent open splenorenal bypass with a Y Gore-Tex graft (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz. After 3 months, computed tomography showed no evidence of endoleak and patent renal arteries. Renal function was well maintained, and the patient did not require dialysis.

  16. Evaluation of endothelial function by peripheral arterial tonometry and relation with the nitric oxide pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedetoft, Morten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2014-01-01

    by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery, but the two methods are not interchangeable. We have reviewed the recent literature in an effort to evaluate peripheral arterial tonometry as a method to assess the function of the endothelium and additionally suggest directions for future research......Endothelial dysfunction is an important component in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial function may be evaluated by peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) which measures the vasodilator function in the microvasculature of the fingertip during reactive hyperaemia. The reactive...

  17. Assessment of central haemomodynamics from a brachial cuff in a community setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunan David

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large artery stiffening and wave reflections are independent predictors of adverse events. To date, their assessment has been limited to specialised techniques and settings. A new, more practical method allowing assessment of central blood pressure from waveforms recorded using a conventional automated oscillometric monitor has recently been validated in laboratory settings. However, the feasibility of this method in a community based setting has not been assessed. Methods One-off peripheral and central haemodynamic (systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP and pulse pressure and wave reflection parameters (augmentation pressure (AP and index, AIx were obtained from 1,903 volunteers in an Austrian community setting using a transfer-function like method (ARCSolver algorithm and from waveforms recorded with a regular oscillometric cuff. We assessed these parameters for known differences and associations according to gender and age deciles from 80 years in the whole population and a subset with a systolic BP  Results We obtained 1,793 measures of peripheral and central BP, PP and augmentation parameters. Age and gender associations with central haemodynamic and augmentation parameters reflected those previously established from reference standard non-invasive techniques under specialised settings. Findings were the same for patients with a systolic BP below 140 mmHg (i.e. normotensive. Lower values for AIx in the current study are possibly due to differences in sampling rates, detection frequency and/or averaging procedures and to lower numbers of volunteers in younger age groups. Conclusion A novel transfer-function like algorithm, using brachial cuff-based waveform recordings, provides robust and feasible estimates of central systolic pressure and augmentation in community-based settings.

  18. Determinants of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, and its associated risk factors in Chinese patients with RA. Methods. 138 Chinese RA patients and 150 healthy subjects were included. baPWV of all the participants was measured. RA related factors were determined, as well as traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Results. baPWV was significant higher in RA group (1705.44 ± 429.20 cm/s compared to the healthy control group (1386.23 ± 411.09 cm/s (P<0.001. Compared with low baPWV group, high baPWV group patients were significantly older (P = 0.008 and taller (P = 0.033. Serum cholesterol (P = 0.035, triglycerides (P = 0.004, and LDL level (P = 0.006 were significantly higher in high baPWV group patients compared with low baPWV group patients. The baPWV of RA patients was positively correlated with age (r = 0.439, P<0.001, and serum cholesterol level (r = 0.231, P = 0.035, serum triglycerides level (r = 0.293, P<0.001, serum LDL level (r = 0.323, P = 0.003. Meanwhile, baPWV negatively correlated with the height of RA patients (r = −0.253, P = 0.043. Multivariate regression analysis showed that baPWV of RA group was independently associated with age and serum triglycerides level. Conclusions. The old age and high level of serum triglycerides may be the major determinants of arterial stiffness in Chinese RA patients.

  19. Automated oscillometric determination of the ankle-brachial index: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Willem J; Kollias, Anastasios; Stergiou, George S

    2012-09-01

    Measurement of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) using a Doppler device is widely used to identify subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD), and those who are at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This paper presents a systematic review (Medline/PubMed, Embase and Cochrane) and meta-analysis of studies assessing the usefulness of automated oscillometric devices for ABI estimation and PAD detection compared with the conventional Doppler method. A total of 25 studies including 4186 subjects were analyzed. A random-effects model analysis showed that the average oscillometric ABI was similar to the Doppler ABI (mean difference ± s.e. 0.020 ± 0.018, P=0.3) but that the absolute differences were significant (0.048 ± 0.009, Poscillometric and Doppler ABI was 0.71 ± 0.05. Simultaneous arm-leg measurements resulted in a smaller difference between the average oscillometric ABI value and the average Doppler ABI value than did sequential measurements (-0.012 ± 0.022 vs. 0.040 ± 0.026, respectively, Poscillometric ABI estimation in PAD diagnosis was 69 ± 6% and 96 ± 1%, respectively (with Doppler ABI taken as the reference). These data suggest that an automated ABI measurement obtained by oscillometric blood pressure monitors is a reliable and practical alternative to the conventional Doppler measurement for the detection of PAD. To increase the sensitivity of the PAD diagnosis based on an oscillometric ABI, a higher threshold of 1.0 might be preferable.

  20. Ankle-brachial index and incident diabetes mellitus: the atherosclerosis risk in communities (ARIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Simin; Loehr, Laura R; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Heiss, Gerardo; Coresh, Josef; Selvin, Elizabeth; Matsushita, Kunihiro

    2016-12-07

    Individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) often have reduced physical activity, which may increase the future risk of diabetes mellitus. Although diabetes is a risk factor for PAD, whether low ankle-brachial index (ABI) predates diabetes has not been studied. We examined the association of ABI with incident diabetes using Cox proportional hazards models in the ARIC Study. ABI was measured in 12,247 black and white participants without prevalent diabetes at baseline (1987-1989). Incident diabetes cases were identified by blood glucose levels at three subsequent visits (1990-92, 1993-95, and 1996-98) or self-reported physician diagnosis or medication use at those visits or during annual phone interview afterward through 2011. A total of 3305 participants developed diabetes during a median of 21 years of follow-up. Participants with low (≤0.90) and borderline low (0.91-1.00) ABI had 30-40% higher risk of future diabetes as compared to those with ABI of 1.10-1.20 in the demographically adjusted model. The associations were attenuated after further adjustment for other potential confounders but remained significant for ABI 0.91-1.00 (HR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.04-1.31) and marginally significant for ABI ≤ 0.90 (HR = 1.19, 0.99-1.43). Although the association was largely consistent across subgroups, a stronger association was seen in participants without hypertension, those with normal fasting glucose, and those with a history of stroke compared to their counterparts. Low ABI was modestly but independently associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in the general population. Clinical attention should be paid to the glucose trajectory among people with low ABI but without diabetes.

  1. ANNUAL FORECAST IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE: ROLE OF PATHOLOGICAL ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Sumin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the factors associated with a poor annual prognosis in patients with acute stroke and prognostic role of pathological ankle-brachial index (ABI.Material and methods. The study included 345 patients (age 63.6±7.8 years, 181 males and 164 females with ischemic stroke that were observed for 1 year. All patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 included patients with favorable annual outcome of stroke; Group 2 included patients that during a year had any clinical events including death. All patients underwent a standard neurological and instrumental examination including assessment of peripheral arteries status by sphygmomanometry.Results. Both groups did not differ by age and sex. The frequency of unfavorable outcomes (death, re-stroke, cardiovascular events 1 year after ischemic stroke was 29.5%. Chronic heart failure, atrial fibrillation, previous cardiovascular events, presence of peripheral atherosclerosis, overweight were identified most commonly in Group 2. Patients of Group 2 initially had a rough neurological deficit. The pathological ABI was detected in 70.7% of patients in Group 2 vs 33.8% of patients in Group 1 (p=0.000001. A strong relationship of pathological ABI with a poor outcome of stroke was found by regression analysis.Conclusions. Detection of pathological ABI in patients with ischemic stroke makes it possible to reveal peripheral atherosclerosis and to carry out the targeted preventive measures in these patients. Risk stratification can contribute to more individual and effective secondary prevention in patients with cerebrovascular disease. 

  2. Cardiovascular morbidity-mortality associated to ankle-brachial index in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, C; Barrionuevo, M; García-Fernández, T; Vicente, I; García-Iglesias, M F; Mostaza, J M

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with a high risk of cardiovascular disease. This study has aimed to investigate the association between low ABI and risk of cardiovascular death in a general population attended in a primary care center. A total of 1,361 volunteers aged between 60 and 79 years without any evidence of peripheral artery disease who attended a primary care center participated in the study. They underwent a complete physical examination, together with standard blood tests and ABI was determined. The participants were contacted by telephone 4 years later and asked about any cardiovascular problems for that period. Causes of death and hospitalization were confirmed in the medical records in the primary care center and/or hospital. Information was obtained about the clinical evolution of 1,300 participants (mean age 69.9 years, 38.2% men). Mean follow-up was 49.8 months. There were 13 cardiovascular death and 49 major cardiovascular events. Low ABI (<0.9) was associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death (adjusted relative risk 6.83; 95% confidence interval 1.36-34.30, P=.020), and with a higher risk of major cardiovascular events (adjusted relative risk 2.42; 95% confidence interval 0.99-5.91, P=.051). High or uncompressible ABI was not associated with higher cardiovascular risk. A low ABI was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular death in the general population followed-up in a primary care center. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostic value of an increase in post-exercise ankle-brachial index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Tarek A; Hiatt, William R; Gornik, Heather L; Shishehbor, Mehdi H

    2017-06-01

    Prior studies have assessed the prognostic value of a decrease, not an increase, of the post-exercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) among patients with normal resting results. Thus, we sought to evaluate the prognostic significance of an increase in post-exercise ABI among these patients. From a single center vascular laboratory database between September 2005 and January 2010, we retrospectively identified 1437 consecutive patients with a normal resting ABI (1.00-1.40) and available post-exercise results. We classified them into group 1 (normal subjects; post-exercise ABI drop ⩽ 20%, 58%) and group 2 (post-exercise ABI increase, 42%) after excluding those with an ABI drop > 20% (peripheral artery disease) as they had known disease ( n=192). The primary outcome was to assess the risk of ischemic events, defined as a composite of unadjudicated death, stroke, or myocardial infraction (MACE). Associations between groups and outcomes were examined using multivariable Cox proportional hazard and propensity analyses. Both groups had similar prevalence of cardiovascular comorbidities. In unadjusted analysis, group 2 was more likely to have MACE ( p = 0.001). After adjusting for all baseline characteristics, an increase in post-exercise ABI compared to normal subjects was associated with a higher MACE (adjusted HR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.14-2.53; p=0.009). This association stayed statistically significant after propensity matching (adjusted HR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.17-2.76; p=0.007). This hypothesis-generating analysis showed that an increase in post-exercise ABI appears to identify a population with a higher risk for MACE. A prospective study of this association and mechanisms of risk should be conducted.

  4. Prevalencia de calcificación arterial y factores de riesgo cardiovascular asociados: Estudio multicéntrico poblacional ARTPER Prevalence of arterial calcification and related risk factors: The multicenter population-based ARTPER study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Alzamora

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Estudiar la prevalencia de calcificación arterial (índice tobillo-brazo >1,4 y de factores de riesgo cardiovascular asociados en población general >49 años de edad. Métodos: Estudio transversal, 3786 sujetos seleccionados aleatoriamente en 28 centros. Para el cálculo de la prevalencia se usó toda la muestra, excluyendo los sujetos con arteriopatía periférica (índice tobillo-brazo Objective: To determine the prevalence of arterial calcification (ankle-brachial index >1.4 and its related factors among the general population aged >49 years. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 3,786 people randomly selected from 28 centers. To assess the factors associated with arterial calcification using a multivariate logistic model, the whole sample was used to compute prevalence, excluding persons with peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index <0.9. Results: Arterial calcification was found in 235 persons (prevalen 6.2%; 95% CI: 5.6-7.0, and was twice as frequent in men as in women. Patients with arterial calcification were older, had more previous cardiovascular events, diabetes and obesity, and were less able to perform physical activity than persons with a healthy ankle-brachial index. Conclusions: We recommend measurement of the ankle-brachial index in primary care centers to detect arterial calcification among men, persons with diabetes, overweight, obesity or difficulty in performing physical activity, and in those with left ventricular hypertrophy.

  5. Ankle-Brachial Index as a Predictor of Mortality in Hemodialysis: A 5-Year Cohort Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jair Baptista Miguel; Jorge Paulo Strogoff de Matos; Jocemir Ronaldo Lugon

    Abstract Background: Abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI) has been found to be a strong predictor of mortality in some hemodialysis populations in studies with relatively short periods of follow-up, lower than 2 years. Objective...

  6. Morphometric analyses of normal pediatric brachial biceps and quadriceps muscle tissue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sallum, Adriana M E; Varsani, Hemlata; Holton, Janice L; Marie, Suely K N; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric normal brachial biceps (14 specimens) and quadriceps muscles (14 specimens) were studied by immunohistochemistry to quantify fiber-type, diameter and distribution, capillary density, presence of inflammatory cells...

  7. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  8. Nerve reconstruction: A cohort study of 93 cases of global brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acceptable function (restoration of biceps power ≥3 can be obtained in more than two thirds (73% of these global brachial plexus injuries by using the principles of early exploration and nerve transfer with rehabilitation.

  9. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  10. La prise en charge de la paralysie obstétricale du plexus brachial du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Averagely, evaluations of the results were uncertain due to a high drop out rate. And finally the authors suggest that prevention should be refrained in our African context. Keywords: Physiotherapy – Obstetrical paralysis- Brachial plexus – Infancy ...

  11. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  12. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  13. Heritability and intrafamilial aggregation of arterial characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidlerová, Jitka; Bochud, Murielle; Staessen, Jan A.; Cwynar, Marcin; Dolejšová, Milena; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Nawrot, Tim; Olszanecka, Agnieszka; Stolarz, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Struijker-Boudier, Harry A.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Elston, Robert C.; Fagard, Robert; Filipovský, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the heritability and familial aggregation of various indexes of arterial stiffness and wave reflection and we partitioned the phenotypic correlation between these traits into shared genetic and environmental components. Methods Using a family-based population sample, we recruited 204 parents (mean age, 51.7 years) and 290 offspring (29.4 years) from the population in Cracow, Poland (62 families), Hechtel-Eksel, Belgium (36), and Pilsen, the Czech Republic (50). We measured peripheral pulse pressure (PPp) sphygmomanometrically at the brachial artery; central pulse pressure (PPc), the peripheral augmentation indexes (PAIxs) and central augmentation indexes (CAIxs) by applanation tonometry at the radial artery; and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) by tonometry or ultrasound. In multivariate-adjusted analyses, we used the ASSOC and PROC GENMOD procedures as implemented in SAGE and SAS, respectively. Results We found significant heritability for PAIx, CAIx, PPc and mean arterial pressure ranging from 0.37 to 0.41; P ≤ 0.0001. The method of intrafamilial concordance confirmed these results; intrafamilial correlation coefficients were significant for all arterial indexes (r > ≥ 0.12; P < ≤ 0.02) with the exception of PPc (r = −0.007; P = 0.90) in parent–offspring pairs. The sib–sib correlations were also significant for CAIx (r = 0.22; P = 0.001). The genetic correlation between PWV and the other arterial indexes were significant (ρG ≥ 0.29; P < 0.0001). The corresponding environmental correlations were only significantly positive for PPp (ρE = 0.10, P = 0.03). Conclusion The observation of significant intrafamilial concordance and heritability of various indexes of arterial stiffness as well as the genetic correlations among arterial phenotypes strongly support the search for shared genetic determinants underlying these traits. PMID:18327082

  14. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the...

  15. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Radiographic assessment of vascular calcification, aortic pulse wave velocity, ankle-brachial index and fibroblast growth factor-23 in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breznik, Silva; Ekart, Robert; Hren, Martin; Rupreht, Mitja; Balon, Breda Pečovnik

    2013-08-01

    Vascular calcification is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. In both the general population and patients with end stage renal disease, vascular calcification is related to arterial stiffness and is a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Various diagnostic methods are currently used to assess vascular calcification. There is a preference for simple, reliable methods that can be used in daily practice. Therefore, several imaging and laboratory methods are investigated. Twenty-eight patients with mean age of 62 years on chronic hemodialysis were enrolled in the study. The mean duration of hemodialysis treatment was 70 months (range 3 to 350 months). Vascular calcification was assessed with coronary computed tomography and lateral lumbar, pelvic and hand radiographs. Vascular stiffness was evaluated using aortic pulse wave velocity and ankle-brachial index measurements, and finally serum levels of fibroblast growth factor-23 were followed. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between all the following parameters: coronary artery calcification score, aortic pulse wave velocity, abdominal aortic calcification score, simple vascular calcification scores in pelvis and hand. A statistically significant correlation of ankle-brachial index >1.3 to coronary artery calcification score was found. There was no correlation between the previous parameters and fibroblast growth factor-23. The results of our study indicate that simple imaging methods could provide confident vascular damage assessment and therefore potentially guide therapy adjustments. An association between fibroblast growth factor-23 and the other diagnostic modalities in our study was not found. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  17. The reliability of the ankle-brachial index in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study (FHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catellier Diane J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A low ankle-brachial index (ABI is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and death. Regression model parameter estimates may be biased due to measurement error when the ABI is included as a predictor in regression models, but may be corrected if the reliability coefficient, R, is known. The R for the ABI computed from DINAMAP™ readings of the ankle and brachial SBP is not known. Methods A total of 119 participants in both the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study and the NHLBI Family Heart Study (FHS had repeat ABIs taken within 1 year, using a common protocol, automated oscillometric blood pressure measurement devices, and technician pool. Results The estimated reliability coefficient for the ankle systolic blood pressure (SBP was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.77 and for the brachial SBP was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.62, 0.83. The reliability for the ABI based on single ankle and arm SBPs was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.50, 0.70 and the reliability of the ABI computed as the ratio of the average of two ankle SBPs to two arm SBPs was estimated from simulated data as 0.70. Conclusion These reliability estimates may be used to obtain unbiased parameter estimates if the ABI is included in regression models. Our results suggest the need for repeated measures of the ABI in clinical practice, preferably within visits and also over time, before diagnosing peripheral artery disease and before making therapeutic decisions.

  18. Arterial damages in acute elbow dislocations: which diagnostic tests are required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Christoph; Pfefferkorn, Ronny; Schoeffl, Volker

    2016-07-19

    Blunt vessel injuries of peripheral arteries caused by a direct trauma are rare. Studies have described the frequency of arterial ruptures following closed elbow dislocations in 0.3-1.7% of all cases. However, arterial damage does not always necessarily appear as a complete rupture of the vessel with a loss of peripheral circulation and ischaemic symptoms; a relatively strong periarticular system of collaterals can maintain circulation. Furthermore, the traumatic dislocation can also cause intimal tears, arterial dissections and aneurysms or thrombosis. In all cases of vessel injury, including total disruption, a peripheral pulse might still be palpable. 3 weeks after an acute elbow dislocation, we have diagnosed a patient with a long-segment stenosis of the brachial artery and a thrombosis of the radial artery. Therefore, the close anatomic proximity to the neurovascular structures should always be considered in cases of elbow dislocations, even if peripheral pulses are traceable. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. INSTRUMENTAL AND DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA OF HEMODYNAMIC DISORDERS AND ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION CORRECTION IN PREGNANTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Heryak

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions. It was found that the brachial artery ultrasound measuring and occlusive plethysmography procedure by Dietz is an early and safe method of endothelial dysfunction diagnostic in pregnants with hypertension. Doppler ultrasound of blood flow in uterine, umbilical arteries, and middle cerebral arteries of the fetus allows timely diagnosis of the side effect of antihypertensive drugs on the fetus. The therapy of choice for pregnants with Stage II Arterial Hypertension should be based on methyldopa and calcium channel antagonists or selective beta-blockers combination. Highly selective beta-blockers with vasodilative effect (nebivolol hydrochloride and L-arginine (Tivortin allow to prevent perinatal adverse effects of antihypertensive therapy, to correct hemodynamic disorders and endothelial dysfunction in pregnants with arterial hypertension. KEY WORDS: arterial hypertension, uterine-placental hemodynamics, endothelial dysfunction

  20. Increased arterial wall stiffness limits flow volume in the lower extremities in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, E; Kashiwagi, A; Nishio, Y; Egawa, K; Shimizu, S; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Yasuda, H; Morikawa, S; Inubushi, T; Kikkawa, R

    2001-12-01

    To document an association between arterial wall stiffness and reduced flow volume in the lower-extremity arteries of diabetic patients. We recruited 60 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients who had no history or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the lower extremities and normal ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure index at the time of the study (non-PAD group) and 20 age-matched nondiabetic subjects (control group). We used an automatic device to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the lower extremities as an index of arterial wall stiffness. At the popliteal artery, we evaluated flow volume and the resistive index as an index of arterial resistance to blood flow using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with previous reports, we confirmed that the non-PAD group had an abnormally higher PWV compared with that of the control group (P lower extremities of diabetic patients.

  1. Utility of ultrasound in noninvasive preoperative workup of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Di Pietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound has been utilized in the evaluation of compressive and traumatic peripheral nerve pathology. To determine whether US can provide comprehensive evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in the setting of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and whether this information can be used to guide preoperative nerve reconstruction strategies. In this retrospective cohort study, preoperative brachial plexus ultrasonography was performed in 52 children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who were being considered for surgery. The 33 children who had surgery compose the patient cohort. The presence and location of post-ganglionic neuromas were evaluated by US and compared to the surgical findings. US evaluation of shoulder muscle atrophy was conducted as an indirect way to assess the integrity of nerves. Finally, we correlated glenohumeral joint laxity to surgical and clinical management. Ultrasound correctly identified 21 of 25 cases of upper trunk and middle trunk neuroma involvement (84% sensitivity for each). It was 68% sensitive and 40% specific in detection of lower trunk involvement. US identified shoulder muscle atrophy in 11 of 21 children evaluated; 8 of these 11 went on to nerve transfer procedures based upon the imaging findings. US identified 3 cases of shoulder joint laxity of the 13 children evaluated. All 3 cases were referred for orthopedic evaluation, with 1 child undergoing shoulder surgery and another requiring casting. Ultrasound can provide useful preoperative evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  2. Retinal vascular caliber and brachial flow-mediated dilation: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh T; Islam, F M Amirul; Farouque, H M Omar; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Cotch, Mary Frances; Herrington, David M; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-07-01

    Retinal vascular caliber changes have been shown to predict stroke, but the underlying mechanism of this association is unknown. We examined the relationship between retinal vascular caliber with brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of systemic endothelial function. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a population-based study of persons 45 to 84 years of age residing in 6 US communities free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline. Brachial FMD data were collected at baseline (July 2000 to June 2002), and retinal vascular caliber was measured from digital retinal photographs at the second examination, immediately after the first (August 2002 to January 2004). Data were available for 2851 participants for analysis. The mean brachial FMD was 4.39+/-2.79%. After adjusting for age and gender, brachial FMD was reduced in persons with wider retinal venular caliber (changes in FMD -0.25, 95% CI, -0.36, - 0.13; PhemoglobinA(1C) (-0.18; 95% CI -0.30, - 0.06; P=0.004, per SD increase in venular caliber). Brachial FMD was not associated with retinal arteriolar caliber. Persons with wider retinal venules have reduced brachial FMD, independent of other vascular risk factors. This suggests that retinal venular caliber, previously shown to predict stroke, may be a marker of underlying systemic endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Accidental Coverage of Both Renal Arteries during Infrarenal Aortic Stent-Graft Implantation: Cause and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Marcello Bracale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to report a salvage maneuver for accidental coverage of both renal arteries during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. A 72-year-old female with a 6 cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm was treated by endovascular means with a standard bifurcated graft. Upon completing an angiogram, both renal arteries were found to be accidentally occluded. Through a left percutaneous brachial approach, the right renal artery was catheterized and a chimney stent was deployed; however this was not possible for the left renal artery. A retroperitoneal surgical approach was therefore carried out with a retrograde chimney stent implanted to restore blood flow. After three months, both renal arteries were patent and renal function was not different from the baseline. Both endovascular with percutaneous access via the brachial artery and open retroperitoneal approaches with retrograde catheterization are feasible rescue techniques to recanalize the accidentally occluded renal arteries during EVAR.

  4. SIMULATION ANALYSIS OF BLOOD FLOW IN ARTERIES OF THE HUMAN ARM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanyu, Wu; Xiaojie, Liu; Lingjiao, Pan; Weige, Tao; Chunqi, Qian

    2017-08-01

    Arteries in the upper limb play important roles in the circulation system of the human body. In particular, the radial artery has received considerable attention in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Here, a 3D model for the arm arteries has been created uncomplicated, in a Chinese adult's left hand, from the magnetic resonance imaging data, using professional modeling software to restore the basic structure of the arm artery in human body, before being imported to Ansys software for simulation. Blood model has been only simulated, and using the blood density of constant parameter and viscosity using the Carreau fluid model, and using viscous-laminar model of Fluent to obtain the velocity profile, static pressure and shear stress in the brachial, interosseous, ulnar, radial and palmar arch arteries. In particular, the brachial and bifurcations have the high pressure and velocity profiles. The simulation results obtained here are also validated by those published in the literature and proved the ulnar artery prevails over the radial artery as a blood supplier to the vessels in the wrist and hand.

  5. Ankle-brachial index and cardiovascular mortality in nondiabetic hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevc, Sebastjan; Purg, Darinka; Turnšek, Nina; Hren, Martin; Hojs, Nina; Zorman, Tadej; Pečovnik-Balon, Breda; Dvoršak, Benjamin; Ekart, Robert; Hojs, Radovan

    2013-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Low (1.40) ankle-brachial index (ABI) is known as a non-invasive diagnostic marker for generalized atherosclerosis associated with higher cardiovascular (CV) mortality in the general population. Less is known about associations between ABI and CV mortality in HD patients. The aim of our study was to determine the impact of the ABI on CV mortality in nondiabetic HD patients. Fifty-two nondiabetic HD patients (mean age 59 years, range 22 - 76 years) were enrolled in our study. Twenty-three (44%) were women and 29 (56%) men. The ABI was determined using an automated, non-invasive, waveform analysis device. All patients were divided according to the ABI into three groups: low ABI (1.4). The presence of arterial hypertension and smoking was established. Serum cholesterol (HDL and LDL) and triglycerides were measured by routine laboratory methods. Survival rates were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. The Cox regression model was used to assess the influence of the ABI on CV outcomes. The model was adjusted for age, arterial hypertension, smoking, cholesterol and triglycerides. Mean ABI value was 1.2 ± 0.3 (range 0.2-2.2). Patients were observed from the date of the ABI measurement until their death or maximally up to 1620 days. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that the risk for CV death was higher for HD patients with low and high ABI compared to normal ABI (log rank test: P < 0.006; P < 0.0001). In the adjusted Cox multivariable regression model low and high ABI (P < 0.011; P < 0.003) remained predictors of mortality in our patients. The results indicate a U-shaped association between the ABI and CV mortality in nondiabetic HD patients and showed that low and high ABI were directly associated with higher mortality of our patients. © 2013 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2013 International Society for Apheresis.

  6. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyström, Thomas; Gutniak, Mark K; Zhang, Qimin

    2004-01-01

    (I)) in two groups: 1) 12 type 2 diabetes patients with stable coronary artery disease and 2) 10 healthy subjects with normal endothelial function and S(I). Subjects underwent infusion of recombinant GLP-1 or saline in a random crossover study. Endothelial function was measured by postischemic FMD of brachial...... artery, using ultrasonography. S(I) [in (10(-4) dl.kg(-1).min(-1))/(muU/ml)] was measured by hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp technique. In type 2 diabetic subjects, GLP-1 infusion significantly increased relative changes in brachial artery diameter from baseline FMD(%) (3.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.0%, P...... FMD(%) (11.9 +/- 0.9 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.0%, P = NS) nor S(I) (14.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.6 +/- 2.0, P = NS). We conclude that GLP-1 improves endothelial dysfunction...

  7. Brachial and Cerebrovascular Functions Are Enhanced in Postmenopausal Women after Ingestion of Chocolate with a High Concentration of Cocoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Channa E; Carter, Howard H; Guelfi, Kym J; Smith, Kurt J; Pike, Kerryn E; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    Background: Cocoa contains polyphenols that are thought to be beneficial for vascular health. Objective: We assessed the impact of chocolate containing distinct concentrations of cocoa on cerebrovascular function and cognition. Methods: Using a counterbalanced within-subject design, we compared the acute impact of consumption of energy-matched chocolate containing 80%, 35%, and 0% single-origin cacao on vascular endothelial function, cognition, and cerebrovascular function in 12 healthy postmenopausal women (mean ± SD age: 57.3 ± 5.3 y). Participants attended a familiarization session, followed by 3 experimental trials, each separated by 1 wk. Outcome measures included cerebral blood flow velocity (CBF v ) responses, recorded before and during completion of a computerized cognitive assessment battery (CogState); brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD); and hemodynamic responses (heart rate and blood pressure). Results: When CBF v data before and after chocolate intake were compared between conditions through the use of 2-factor ANOVA, an interaction effect ( P = 0.003) and main effects for chocolate ( P = 0.043) and time ( P = 0.001) were evident. Post hoc analysis revealed that both milk chocolate (MC; 35% cocoa; P = 0.02) and dark chocolate (DC; 80% cocoa; P = 0.003) induced significantly lower cerebral blood flow responses during the cognitive tasks, after normalizing for changes in arterial pressure. DC consumption also increased brachial FMD compared with the baseline value before chocolate consumption ( P = 0.002), whereas MC and white chocolate (0% cocoa) caused no change ( P- interaction between conditions = 0.034). Conclusions: Consumption of chocolate containing high concentrations of cocoa enhanced vascular endothelial function, which was reflected by improvements in FMD. Cognitive function outcomes did not differ between conditions; however, cerebral blood flow responses during these cognitive tasks were lower in those consuming MC and DC. These

  8. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  9. Axillary artery aneurysm in tuberous sclerosis: cross-sectional imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hite, S.H.; Kuo, J.S. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Box 292, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, 420 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Cheng, E.Y. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    1998-07-01

    A 10-month-old boy with a known diagnosis of tuberous sclerosis presented with axillary and brachial masses. Cross-sectional imaging with computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound demonstrated unsuspected aneurysms of the axillary and brachial arteries. The results of these studies significantly changed the preoperative planning for this patient, who was scheduled for a biopsy of a presumed soft-tissue tumor. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the cross-sectional imaging findings in the extremity peripheral vascular manifestation of tuberous sclerosis; it has only been previously described on angiography in one case. The rare association of peripheral arterial aneurysms with tuberous sclerosis is important to recognize not only for clinical diagnosis but also for appropriate surgical treatment and genetic counseling. (orig.) With 5 figs., 7 refs.

  10. Infrared thermography as option for evaluating the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty by patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffa, Erik; Bernard, Vladan; Kubicek, Lubos; Vlachovsky, Robert; Vlk, Daniel; Mornstein, Vojtech; Bourek, Ales; Staffa, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the possible use of infrared thermography as a supplementary method to the ankle-brachial index used in assessing the treatment effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The study included 21 patients, mean age was 60.22 years. Healthy control group included 20 persons, mean age was 55.60 years. Patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease (Fontaine stages I-III) were admitted for endovascular treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Thermal images and ankle-brachial index values were obtained before and after treatment by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Median temperature change in the treated limb was 0.4℃, for non-treated limb was -0.5℃. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the treated limb increased by 0.17 from 0.81 after the procedure. The median value of ankle-brachial index in the non-treated limb decreased by 0.03 from the value of 1.01. Significant difference between treated limb and non-treated limb in change of ankle-brachial index was found with p value = .0035. The surface temperature obtained by the infrared thermography correlates with ankle-brachial index. We present data showing that the increase of ankle-brachial index is associated with increase of skin temperature in the case of limbs treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Our results also suggest potential of the use of infrared thermography for monitoring foot temperature as a means of early detection of onset of foot ischemic disorders.

  11. Does conduit artery diameter vary according to the anthropometric characteristics of children or men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, N D; Green, D J; Tinken, T M; Sutton, L; McWhannell, N; Thijssen, D H J; Cable, N T; Stratton, G; George, K

    2009-12-01

    Arterial measurements are commonly undertaken to assess acute and chronic adaptations to exercise. Despite the widespread adoption of scaling practices in cardiac research, the relevance of scaling for body size and/or composition has not been addressed for arterial measures. We therefore investigated the relationships between brachial artery diameter and body composition in 129 children aged 9 to 10 yr (75 girls and 54 boys), and 50 men aged 16-49 yr. Body composition variables (total, lean, and fat mass in the whole body, arm, and forearm) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and brachial artery diameter was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Bivariate correlations were performed, and arterial diameter was then scaled using simple ratios (y/x) and allometric approaches after log-log least squares linear regression and production of allometric exponents (b) and construction of power function ratios (y/xb). Size independence was checked via bivariate correlations (x:y/x; x:y/xb). As a result, significant correlations existed between brachial artery diameter and measures of body mass and lean mass in both cohorts (r=0.21-0.48, P0.05). In conclusion, when between- or within-group comparisons are performed under circumstances where it is important to control for differences in body size or composition, allometric scaling of artery diameter should be adopted rather than ratio scaling. Our data also suggest that scaling for lean or total mass may be more appropriate than scaling for indexes of fat mass.

  12. MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos; Mailley, Kathleen; del Carpio O’Donovan, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. The imaging assessment of the brachial plexus, in particular, has been traditionally challenging due to the complexity of its anatomy, its distribution in space and due to technical factors. Herein, we describe a modified technique used in our institution for the evaluation of the brachial plexus which led to a substantial decrease in scanning time and to better visualization of all the segments of the brachial plexus from the roots to the branches, in only one or two images, facilitating therefore the understanding of the anatomy and the interpretation of the study. To our knowledge, we are the first group to describe this technique of imaging the brachial plexus. We illustrate the benefit of this modified technique with an example of a patient with a lesion in the proximal branches of the left brachial plexus that was clinically suspected but missed on conventional brachial plexus imaging for six consecutive years. In addition, we review the common and infrequent benign and malignant pathology that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:24355190

  13. Brachial plexus injury in Thailand: a report of 520 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    Between October 1984 and October 1993, 520 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injuries were treated at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok. There were 486 male and 34 female patients. Eighty-two percent of the injuries were caused by motorcycle accidents, 9% by other traffic accidents, and 9% by gunshot, stabbing, and other means. The initial physical examination revealed 332 (63.8%) complete paralyses and 88 (36.2%) incomplete paralyses. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated conservatively, 43 patients were observed before definitive treatment was given, and 350 patients were treated by operative means. Four hundred and twenty-one surgical procedures were performed, consisting of 314 neurotisations (250 spinal accessory, 14 plexo-plexal, 21 intercostal, 21 phrenic, 4 cervical plexus, 1 long thoracic, and 3 neuromuscular), 38 neurolyses, 23 nerve grafting, 16 free muscle transfers combined with neurotisations, and 30 musculotendinous transfers. Motor functional recovery of patients followed up for more than 2 years was evaluated. Nerve grafting gave 82% good (more than MRC grade 3) and 18% fair and poor recovery. Neurolysis gave 69% good and 31% fair and poor recovery. In patients with neurotisation, the spinal accessory (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculotaneous) intercostal (to musculotaneous), phrenic (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculocutaneous), and plexo- plexal methods gave a significant number of good results.

  14. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakerley, Benjamin R; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-01

    The pharyngeal-cervical-brachial (PCB) variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome is defined by rapidly progressive oropharyngeal and cervicobrachial weakness associated with areflexia in the upper limbs. Serial nerve conduction studies suggest that PCB represents a localised subtype of Guillain-Barré syndrome characterised by axonal rather than demyelinating neuropathy. Many neurologists are unfamiliar with PCB, which is often misdiagnosed as brainstem stroke, myasthenia gravis or botulism. The presence of additional ophthalmoplegia and ataxia indicates overlap with Fisher syndrome. Half of patients with PCB carry IgG anti-GT1a antibodies which often cross-react with GQ1b, whereas most patients with Fisher syndrome carry IgG anti-GQ1b antibodies which always cross-react with GT1a. Significant overlap between the clinical and serological profiles of these patients supports the view that PCB and Fisher syndrome form a continuous spectrum. In this review, we highlight the clinical features of PCB and outline new diagnostic criteria.

  15. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  16. Postfixed brachial plexus radiculopathy due to thoracic disc herniation in a collegiate wrestler: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Scott A; Doberstein, Scott T; Rushlow, David R

    2013-01-01

    To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1-T2 disc herniation. A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1-T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1-T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for patients with suspected brachial plexus radiculopathies.

  17. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topics / Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting What Is Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) ... multiple coronary arteries during one surgery. Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Figure A shows the location of the ...

  18. Impact of age and sex on carotid and peripheral arterial wall thickness in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Munckhof, I; Scholten, R; Cable, N T; Hopman, M T E; Green, D J; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-12-01

    Although previous studies have reported age-related wall thickening in carotid arteries, it is not clear whether this is a systemic phenomenon which is also apparent in peripheral conduit arteries or whether conduit wall thickness (WT) changes occur to a similar degree in men and women. To determine whether sex modifies the impact of ageing on WT or wall-to-lumen ratio (W:L) in atherosclerosis-prone (i.e. carotid artery, femoral, superficial femoral, popliteal artery) and atherosclerosis-resistant (i.e. brachial artery) conduit arteries. We included 30 young (23 ± 2 year; 15M : 15F) and 31 older (70 ± 5 year; 18M : 13F) healthy subjects. High-resolution ultrasound was used to measure diameter, WT and wall-to-lumen ratio (W/L) in all arteries. Older subjects had increased WT and W/L in the carotid, femoral, superficial femoral, popliteal and brachial arteries (all P < 0.05). Compared with women, men demonstrated larger diameter and WT (both P < 0.01) across all arteries. Sex did not impact upon age-related changes in WT or W/L (P = 0.39 and 0.43 respectively). Our data suggest that age-related wall thickening, evident in the carotid artery, is also apparent in the arteries of the upper and lower limbs. The impact of age on wall thickening did not differ between men and women. These data support the presence of systemic increases in WT and W/L with age in apparently healthy humans, independent of sex. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  19. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic subjects in south-west Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji O. Oyelade

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is rarely sought for and generally underdiagnosed even in diabetics in developing countries like Nigeria. PAD is easily detected and diagnosed by the ankle-brachial index, a simple and reliable test. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of PAD in diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years and the value of ankle-brachial index measurement in the detection of PAD.Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study of 219 diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years was carried out. The participants were administered a pre-tested questionnaire and measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI was done. The ankle-brachial index < 0.90 was considered equivalent to peripheral arterial disease.Results: The overall prevalence of PAD was 52.5%. The prevalence of symptomatic PAD was 28.7% whilst that of asymptomatic PAD was 71.3%. There were a number of associations with PAD which included, age (p < 0.05, sex (p < 0.05, and marital status (p < 0.05. The use of the ankle-brachial index in the detection of PAD was clearly more reliable than the clinical methods like history of intermittent claudication and absence or presence of pedal pulses.Conclusion: The prevalence of PAD is relatively high in diabetic subjects in the southwestern region of Nigeria. Notable is the fact that a higher proportion was asymptomatic. Also the use of ABI is of great value in the detection of PAD as evidenced by a clearly more objective assessment of PAD compared to both intermittent claudication and absent pedal pulses.

  20. Serum leptin levels positively correlate with peripheral arterial stiffness in kidney transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M-C; Chen, Y-C; Ho, G-J; Shih, M-H; Chou, K-C; Hsu, B-G

    2014-01-01

    Leptin is a protein predominantly produced by adipocytes that plays a pathophysiologic role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between fasting serum leptin levels and peripheral arterial stiffness among kidney transplant (KT) patients. Fasting blood samples were obtained from 74 KT patients. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured in the right or left brachial artery to the ankle segments using an automatic pulse wave analyzer (VaSera VS-1000). Plasma leptin levels were measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. In this study, left or right baPWV values of less than 14.0 m/s were used to define the high arterial stiffness group. Forty KT patients (54.1%) were defined in high arterial stiffness group. Hypertension (P leptin level (P leptin (odds ratio, 1.033; 95% CI, 1.004-1.062; P = .023), KT duration (odds ratio, 1.023; 95% CI, 1.004-1.044; P = .020), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (odds ratio, 0.925; 95% CI, 0.872-0.982; P = .010) were the independent predictors of peripheral arterial stiffness in KT patients. Serum fasting leptin level was positively associated with peripheral arterial stiffness among KT patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A rare variant of the ulnar artery with important clinical implications: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casal Diogo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the major arteries of the upper limb are estimated to be present in up to one fifth of people, and may have significant clinical implications. Case presentation During routine cadaveric dissection of a 69-year-old fresh female cadaver, a superficial brachioulnar artery with an aberrant path was found bilaterally. The superficial brachioulnar artery originated at midarm level from the brachial artery, pierced the brachial fascia immediately proximal to the elbow, crossed superficial to the muscles that originated from the medial epicondyle, and ran over the pronator teres muscle in a doubling of the antebrachial fascia. It then dipped into the forearm fascia, in the gap between the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus. Subsequently, it ran deep to the palmaris longus muscle belly, and superficially to the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle, reaching the gap between the latter and the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle, where it assumed is usual position lateral to the ulnar nerve. Conclusion As far as the authors could determine, this variant of the superficial brachioulnar artery has only been described twice before in the literature. The existence of such a variant is of particular clinical significance, as these arteries are more susceptible to trauma, and can be easily confused with superficial veins during medical and surgical procedures, potentially leading to iatrogenic distal limb ischemia.

  2. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  3. Coronary Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... animations for grades K-6. The Coronary Arteries Coronary Circulation The heart muscle, like every other organ or ... the heart by its own vascular system, called coronary circulation. The aorta (the main blood supplier to the ...

  4. Characteristics and Fate of Systemic Artery Aneurysm after Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shinsuke; Tsuda, Etsuko; Yamada, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    To determine the long-term outcome of systemic artery aneurysms (SAAs) after Kawasaki disease (KD). We investigated the characteristics and the fate of SAAs in 20 patients using medical records and angiograms. The age of onset of KD ranged from 1 month to 20 months. The interval from the onset of KD to the latest angiogram ranged from 16 months to 24 years. The regression rate of peripheral artery aneurysm and the frequency of stenotic lesions were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method in 11 patients who had undergone initial angiography within 4 months. The mean duration of fever was 24 ± 12 days. All 20 patients had at least 1 symmetric pair of aneurysms in bilateral peripheral arteries, and 16 patients had multiple SAAs. The distributions of SAAs was as follows: brachial artery, 30; common iliac artery, 20; internal iliac artery, 21; abdominal aortic aneurysm, 7; and others, 29. The frequencies of regression of SAA and of the occurrence of stenotic lesions at 20 years after the onset of KD were 51% and 25%, respectively (n = 42). The diameter of all SAAs in the acute phase leading to stenotic lesions in the late period was >10 mm. SAAs occurred symmetrically and were multiple in younger infants and those with severe acute vasculitis. The fate of SAAs resembles that of coronary artery aneurysms, and depends on the diameter during the acute phase. Larger SAAs can lead to stenotic lesions in the late period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberbuhler, Paz; León Cejas, Luciana V; Binaghi, Daniela; Reisin, Ricardo C

    2013-11-15

    Acute brachial plexus neuropathy is characterized by acute onset of shoulder girdle and arm pain, followed by weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. It affects primarily nerves of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus and the long thoracic nerve. Cranial nerve involvement is an infrequent association and implies a diagnostic challenge. We report a unique case of acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of the cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII. Fifty six year-old woman who developed acute dysphonia, dysphagia and left shoulder pain, followed, six days later, by left arm weakness. Needle examination showed only fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in the left deltoid muscle. MRI of the brachial plexus shows enlargement of the trunks, cords and terminal branches, with mild gadolinium enhancement. This case illustrates the unique presentation of neuralgic amyotrophy with involvement of nerves outside the brachial plexus, and the importance of MRI for diagnosis, in the absence of electrophysiologic involvement. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  7. Hourglass-Like Constriction of the Brachial Plexus in the Posterior Cord: A Case Report.

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    Nakagawa, Yasunobu; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Hourglass-like constrictions are fascicular conditions confirmed definitively by interfascicular neurolysis. Certain peripheral nerves have vulnerable areas such as around the elbow in the posterior interosseous nerve. We report the first hourglass-like constriction in the brachial plexus supplying the radial innervated forearm musculature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brachial plexus were consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA). A 9-yr-old boy experienced worsening left arm pain and difficulty in elevating the shoulder. Sequentially, severe palsy emerged when extending the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Based on the clinical picture, we diagnosed him with NA. The oblique coronal T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery images showed mildly diffuse enlargement and hyperintensity of the brachial plexus. He showed few signs of improvement and interfascicular neurolysis was performed 11 mo after the onset. One of the fascicles in the posterior cord had developed an hourglass-like constriction. Electrical stimulation confirmed that the fascicle supplied forearm muscles. His wrist and finger extension had almost recovered at the 12-mo postoperative visit. Hourglass-like constrictions can occur in the brachial plexus. Although surgical approaches for the constrictions are still controversial, several reports demonstrated their effectiveness. Meanwhile, concerning NA treatment, evidence on the surgical intervention is lacking. Brachial plexus MRI might help in discerning the lesion and planning treatment options including surgical interventions. Hourglass-like constrictions are a possible etiology for certain NA patients with residual symptoms or paresis.

  8. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

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    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  9. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  10. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and the cardio-ankle vascular index as a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes in patients on regular hemodialysis.

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    Kato, Akihiko; Takita, Takako; Furuhashi, Mitsuyoshi; Maruyama, Yukitaka; Miyajima, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2012-06-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) are both used to evaluate arterial stiffness. The aim of the present study is to determine whether baPWV or CAVI is superior as a marker of arterial stiffness in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Of 194 patients, 59 patients had been excluded from the study due to advanced age over 76 years old (n = 29), or abnormal ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) (<0.90 or ≥1.30) (n = 30). We then followed the 135 patients (age: 60 ± 11 years, time on HD: 110 ± 93 months) for the 63 ± 4 (55-70) months. Thirty-two (23.7%) patients had expired, 22 of them of cardiovascular (CV) causes. There were 37 fatal and non-fatal CV events. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the patients with the highest tertile of baPWV (≥16.6 m/s) had a significantly lower survival rate (P < 0.01) when compared with the second (13.4 ≤ baPWV < 16.6 m/s) and the lowest tertiles (<13.4 m/s). Cox hazards analysis after adjustment for comorbid risk factors revealed that the top tertile of baPWV was a determinant of CV death (hazards ratio [HR]: 16.9 [1.1-251.8], P < 0.05) In contrast, CAVI did not associate with CV mortality or events. These findings suggest that baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in patients on regular HD. © 2012 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2012 International Society for Apheresis.

  12. Ankle-brachial index: a simple way to predict mortality among patients on hemodialysis--a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Zaida Noemy Cabrera; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Romão, João Egidio; Makida, Sonia Cristina da Silva; Abensur, Hugo; Moyses, Rosa Maria Affonso; Elias, Rosilene Motta

    2012-01-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) can access peripheral artery disease and predict mortality in prevalent patients on hemodialysis. However, ABI has not yet been tested in incident patients, who present significant mortality. Typically, ABI is measured by Doppler, which is not always available, limiting its use in most patients. We therefore hypothesized that ABI, evaluated by a simplified method, can predict mortality in an incident hemodialysis population. We studied 119 patients with ESRD who had started hemodialysis three times weekly. ABI was calculated by using two oscillometric blood pressure devices simultaneously. Patients were followed until death or the end of the study. ABI was categorized in two groups normal (0.9-1.3) or abnormal (1.3). There were 33 deaths during a median follow-up of 12 months (from 3 to 24 months). Age (1 year) (hazard of ratio, 1.026; p = 0.014) and ABI abnormal (hazard ratio, 3.664; p = 0.001) were independently related to mortality in a multiple regression analysis. An easy and inexpensive technique to measure ABI was tested and showed to be significant in predicting mortality. Both low and high ABI were associated to mortality in incident patients on hemodialysis. This technique allows nephrologists to identify high-risk patients and gives the opportunity of early intervention that could alter the natural progression of this population.

  13. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-09-09

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI 4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI  4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD.

  14. Effects of the ankle-brachial blood pressure index and skin perfusion pressure on mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Yumi; Otsubo, Shigeru; Kimata, Naoki; Takano, Mari; Abe, Takayuki; Okajima, Tomoki; Miwa, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku; Akiba, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Clinically, the ankle-brachial blood pressure index (ABI) and skin perfusion pressure (SPP) are used to screen for subclinical peripheral artery disease. However, the association between the SPP and mortality in hemodialysis patients has not been previously reported. We investigated these factors and compared the ABI and SPP in patients receiving hemodialysis. A total of 102 patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled in this study. The ABI was determined using an ABI-form (Colin, Japan). The SPP was measured using a SensiLase(TM) PAD3000 (Kaneka, Osaka, Japan). The mean follow-up period was 3.2 ± 1.4 years. A multivariate Cox analysis identified a low ABI (p=0.019) and a low SPP (p=0.047) as being independent predictors of mortality. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of the ABI revealed a cutoff point of 1.1 and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.79, with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 62%. A ROC analysis of the SPP revealed a cutoff point of 54.0 mmHg and an AUC of 0.71, with a sensitivity of 55% and a specificity of 84%. Both low ABI and SPP values were found to be independent risk factors for mortality among hemodialysis patients. The cutoff point for ABI as a predictor of mortality was 1.1, while that for SPP was 54.0 mmHg.

  15. Ankle-Brachial Index: A Simple Way to Predict Mortality among Patients on Hemodialysis - A Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Zaida Noemy Cabrera; Pereira, Benedito Jorge; Romão, João Egidio; Makida, Sonia Cristina da Silva; Abensur, Hugo; Moyses, Rosa Maria Affonso; Elias, Rosilene Motta

    2012-01-01

    Background Ankle-brachial index (ABI) can access peripheral artery disease and predict mortality in prevalent patients on hemodialysis. However, ABI has not yet been tested in incident patients, who present significant mortality. Typically, ABI is measured by Doppler, which is not always available, limiting its use in most patients. We therefore hypothesized that ABI, evaluated by a simplified method, can predict mortality in an incident hemodialysis population. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied 119 patients with ESRD who had started hemodialysis three times weekly. ABI was calculated by using two oscillometric blood pressure devices simultaneously. Patients were followed until death or the end of the study. ABI was categorized in two groups normal (0.9–1.3) or abnormal (1.3). There were 33 deaths during a median follow-up of 12 months (from 3 to 24 months). Age (1 year) (hazard of ratio, 1.026; p = 0.014) and ABI abnormal (hazard ratio, 3.664; p = 0.001) were independently related to mortality in a multiple regression analysis. Conclusions An easy and inexpensive technique to measure ABI was tested and showed to be significant in predicting mortality. Both low and high ABI were associated to mortality in incident patients on hemodialysis. This technique allows nephrologists to identify high-risk patients and gives the opportunity of early intervention that could alter the natural progression of this population. PMID:22860108

  16. Ankle-brachial index: a simple way to predict mortality among patients on hemodialysis--a prospective study.

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    Zaida Noemy Cabrera Jimenez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ankle-brachial index (ABI can access peripheral artery disease and predict mortality in prevalent patients on hemodialysis. However, ABI has not yet been tested in incident patients, who present significant mortality. Typically, ABI is measured by Doppler, which is not always available, limiting its use in most patients. We therefore hypothesized that ABI, evaluated by a simplified method, can predict mortality in an incident hemodialysis population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 119 patients with ESRD who had started hemodialysis three times weekly. ABI was calculated by using two oscillometric blood pressure devices simultaneously. Patients were followed until death or the end of the study. ABI was categorized in two groups normal (0.9-1.3 or abnormal (1.3. There were 33 deaths during a median follow-up of 12 months (from 3 to 24 months. Age (1 year (hazard of ratio, 1.026; p = 0.014 and ABI abnormal (hazard ratio, 3.664; p = 0.001 were independently related to mortality in a multiple regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: An easy and inexpensive technique to measure ABI was tested and showed to be significant in predicting mortality. Both low and high ABI were associated to mortality in incident patients on hemodialysis. This technique allows nephrologists to identify high-risk patients and gives the opportunity of early intervention that could alter the natural progression of this population.

  17. Ankle-Brachial Index Is a Powerful Predictor of Renal Outcome and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Fu-An Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle-brachial index (ABI is an accurate tool to diagnose peripheral arterial disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ABI is also a good predictor of renal outcome and cardiovascular events in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We enrolled 436 patients with stage 3–5 CKD who had not been undergoing dialysis. Patients were stratified into two groups according to the ABI value with a cut point of 0.9. The composite renal outcome, including doubling of serum creatinine level and commencement of dialysis, and the incidence of cardiovascular events were compared between the two groups. After a median follow-up period of 13 months, the lower ABI group had a poorer composite renal outcome (OR=2.719, P=0.015 and a higher incidence of cardiovascular events (OR=3.260, P=0.001. Our findings illustrated that ABI is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular events and renal outcome in patients with CKD.

  18. Treatment of a brachial plexus injury using kinesiotape and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon Fleming

    2010-10-01

    This describes a child whose neonatal brachial plexus injury was treated with kinesiotape and exercise. The subject was a two-year-old female whose X-rays demonstrated severe inferior subluxation of the humeral head and winging of the scapula on the left. She was fitted with a shoulder brace with surgery scheduled in six months. The initial PT exam noted 80 degrees of shoulder abduction (trumpet sign), significant asymmetry, and nonuse. Mallet score was 15/25. Treatment consisted of d/c of the brace and E-stimulation, parent education on exercise and taping, and kinesiotape to facilitate rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. Typical wear time was 2-3 days on, 1-2 days off. After 2 weeks, there was prominent deltoid definition. The shoulder was in 20 degrees of abduction, shoulders level with less scapular winging. Scapular stabilizers were then taped. At 4 weeks, her arm was held to her side displaying a stable symmetrical scapula. The arm displayed increased fine motor use and initiation of activities. At 10 weeks there was a forced d/c, and a decline toward baseline levels. After 2 weeks of reinstatement, function returned to prior level. At 20 weeks (12 total visits) she displayed full ROM, symmetrical shoulders, Mallet score of 20/25, rare trumpet sign, and was hanging by arms during play. X-rays displayed significant improvement in humeral head position, rib cage rotation, angle of scapula and clavicle, and size and mineralization of humerus. Reconstructive surgery was cancelled. Kinesiotape and parent education made a significant difference in this child's function.

  19. Rehabilitation of patients following traction lesions of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn Parry, C B

    1984-01-01

    The management of patients with brachial plexus lesions requires a multidisciplinary approach. We insist on admission to our rehabilitation ward for a full assessment by the physiotherapist, occupational therapist, rehabilitation officer, and social worker when necessary. We confirm the diagnosis by clinical, electrophysiologic, and radiologic techniques and set out a plan of action, either involving definitive surgery or a conservative program involving functional splintage, relief of pain when possible, and return to work. We insist on regular follow-ups to check that the pain is still being relieved. At subsequent reviews it may become clear that spontaneous recovery is not going to occur, and a program of reconstructive surgery can be instituted. In general terms, three years or more should have elapsed before accepting that elbow flexion is not going to return. In patients with C5-C6 lesions, where elbow flexion is permanently paralyzed, the simple elbow lock splint may be perfectly satisfactory, but in some patients it may be wise to advise reconstructive procedure. In our experience the most satisfactory means of restoring elbow flexion is the Steindler flexor plasty, advancing the origins of the extensors and flexors of the forearm up the humerus. If present, latissimus dorsi can be transferred to replace the biceps. The pectoralis major transfer is useful but almost always requires an external rotation osteotomy, as there is too much adduction when the patient flexes the elbow. Finally, triceps can be transferred to biceps, but this is an operation that we do not like, as elbow extension is so useful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. [Treatment of residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with tendon transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Mehmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Uysal, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the results of the correction of adduction and internal rotation deformities of the shoulder associated with residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) by the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff. In order to correct adduction and internal rotation deformities associated with residual OBPP, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; mean age 8.1 years; range 4 to 19 years) underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff and lengthening of the pectoralis major tendon with Z-plasty. The right and left extremities were affected in seven and three patients, respectively. Involvement of the C5-C6 nerve roots was detected in four, and C5-C6-C7 nerve roots in six patients. In two patients with a positive Putti sign, axillary roentgenograms showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans revealed type III glenohumeral deformity. Functional evaluations were made using a 5-point scoring system proposed by Mallet. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months (range 5 to 42 months). Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation were 134.5 degrees (range 95 degrees to 170 degrees ) and 70 degrees (range 45 degrees to 90 degrees ), respectively. The mean global abduction score was 4, external rotation score was 4.2, and the scores assigned to the ability to move hand to the neck and mouth were 3.5. Of two patients with type III glenohumeral deformity, whose ages were four and 19 years, abduction and external rotation were 150 degrees and 45 degrees in the former, 135 degrees and 70 degrees in the latter, respectively. The transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons is a necessary procedure to restore external rotation and abduction functions of paralysed shoulders. Compared to other techniques employed, it offers obvious advantages in terms of ease and cost, as well.

  1. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  2. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  3. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  4. [A survey of ankle-brachial index among natural population in Shanghai and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region].

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    Xie, Xiao-liang; Xing, Yan; Li, Jue; Hu, Da-yi

    2012-10-01

    To investigate epidemiological characteristics and differences in ankle-brachial index (ABI) among the natural population in Shanghai and Inner Mongolia, and to observe the prevalence of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A total of 2604 volunteers from Shanghai and Inner Mongolia were selected by stratified cluster random sample. ABI was measured and related data were collected. The ABI value in Shanghai was 1.074 ± 0.095, while it was 1.062 ± 0.075 in Inner Mongolia (P Mongolia (P Mongolia (P > 0.05). For females, the ABI value in Shanghai was 1.073 ± 0.089, while it was 1.052 ± 0.070 in Inner Mongolia (P Mongolia (P Mongolia (P Mongolia were 1.037 ± 0.082 and 1.055 ± 0.068, respectively (P Mongolia were 7.6% and 1.2%, respectively (P Mongolia in both age group of 50 - 69 years and ≥ 70 years (all P values > 0.05). The ABI value in Shanghai is higher than that in Inner Mongolia and the prevalence of lower extremity PAD in both males and females in Shanghai is significantly higher than that in Inner Mongolia. But they are lower than the level of western countries. In different age groups, the difference of the prevalence of lower extremity PAD between Shanghai and Inner Mongolia is only displayed in the age group of < 50 years, which may be related to the limited sample size. The natural population in Shanghai exposed artery atherosclerotic disease risk factors may increase and we need to pay more attention to the lower extremity PAD.

  5. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

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    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  6. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

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    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  7. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Quinn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of biomechanical properties of arteries have become an important surrogate outcome used in epidemiological and interventional cardiovascular research. Structural and functional differences of vessels in the arterial tree result in a dampening of pulsatility and smoothing of blood flow as it progresses to capillary level. A loss of arterial elastic properties results a range of linked pathophysiological changes within the circulation including increased pulse pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy, subendocardial ischaemia, vessel endothelial dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. With increased arterial stiffness, the microvasculature of brain and kidneys are exposed to wider pressure fluctuations and may lead to increased risk of stroke and renal failure. Stiffening of the aorta, as measured by the gold-standard technique of aortic Pulse Wave Velocity (aPWV, is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes across many different patient groups and in the general population. Therefore, use of aPWV has been proposed for early detection of vascular damage and individual cardiovascular risk evaluation and it seems certain that measurement of arterial stiffness will become increasingly important in future clinical care. In this review we will consider some of the pathophysiological processes that result from arterial stiffening, how it is measured and factors that may drive it as well as potential avenues for therapy. In the face of an ageing population where mortality from atheromatous cardiovascular disease is falling, pathology associated with arterial stiffening will assume ever greater importance. Therefore, understanding these concepts for all clinicians involved in care of patients with cardiovascular disease will become vital.

  9. Close correlation between the ankle-brachial index and symptoms of depression in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Ing-Chin; Tsai, Hung-Bin; Lin, Chien-Hung; Ma, Tsung-Liang; Guo, How-Ran; Hung, Peir-Haur; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2017-08-01

    As both of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and depression carried a poor prognosis in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD), we investigated the correlation between the ankle-brachial index (ABI), an indicator of subclinical PAD, and symptoms of depression in patients on MHD. One hundred and twenty-nine patients on MHD (75 males and 54 females, mean age 64.8 ± 12 years) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, which aimed at evaluating the relationship between symptoms of depression and ABI. Demographic as well as clinical and laboratory variables including status of diabetes, chronic hepatitis C infection, dialysis duration, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), plasma levels of albumin, C-peptide, insulin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adiponectin, and lipid profile were obtained. The self-administered beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to determine the presence or absence of symptoms of depression, and depression was defined as a BDI score ≧14. Multivariable-adjusted linear regression models were constructed to confirm the independent association of biologic parameters of symptoms of depression. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS/Windows software (SPSS Science, v. 15.0, Chicago, IL). The mode of multivariate analysis showed that diabetes (β = 3.594; P = 0.040), hepatitis C infection (β = 4.057; P = 0.008), levels of serum albumin (β = -5.656; P = 0.024), C-peptide (β = -0.292; P = 0.002), ABI (β = -9.041; P = 0.031), and Ln-transformed hsCRP were significantly associated with BDI. Hepatitis C infection, serum levels of albumin, C-peptide, and ABI levels were found to be correlated with BDI (P < 0.05).

  10. Perceptions of the ankle brachial index amongst podiatrists registered in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pamela Y

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ankle brachial index (ABI is an objective diagnostic tool that is widely used for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease. Despite its usefulness, it is evident within the literature that many practitioners forgo using this screening tool due to limiting factors such as time. There is also no recommended technique for ABI measurement. The purpose of this study is to investigate the perceptions of the use of ABI clinically among Western Australian podiatrists. Methods This study was a cross sectional survey which evaluated the perceptions of the ABI amongst registered podiatrists in Western Australia. The study sample was obtained from the register of podiatrists listed with the Podiatrists Registration Board of Western Australia. Podiatrists were contacted by telephone and invited to participate in a telephone questionnaire. Chi-square tests were performed to determine if there was a statistically significant relationship between use of the ABI and podiatrists’ profile which included: sector of employment; geographical location; and length of time in practice. Results There is a statistically significant relationship (p=0.004 between podiatrists’ profile and the use of ABI, with higher usage in the tertiary hospital setting than in private practice. Length of time spent in practice had no significant impact on ABI usage (p=0.098. Time constraints and lack of equipment were key limiting factors to performing the ABI, and no preferred technique was indicated. Conclusion Western Australian podiatrists agree that the ABI is a useful tool for lower limb vascular assessment, however, various factors influence uptake in the clinical setting. This study suggests that a podiatrists’ profile has a significant influence on the use of the ABI, which may be attributed to different patient types across the various settings. The influence of time spent in practice on ABI usage may be attributed to differences in clinical

  11. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  12. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  13. Exercise and arterial adaptation in humans: uncoupling localized and systemic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Nicola J; Dawson, Ellen A; Birk, Gurpreet K; Cable, N Timothy; George, Keith; Whyte, Greg; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2011-05-01

    Previous studies have established effects of exercise training on arterial wall thickness, remodeling, and function in humans, but the extent to which these changes are locally or systemically mediated is unclear. We examined the brachial arteries of the dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) upper limbs of elite racquet sportsmen and compared them to those of matched healthy inactive controls. Carotid and superficial femoral artery responses were also assessed in both groups. High-resolution duplex ultrasound was used to examine resting diameter, wall thickness, peak diameter, and blood flow. We found larger resting arterial diameter in the preferred arm of the athletes (4.9 ± 0.5 mm) relative to their nonpreferred arm (4.3 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05) and both arms of control subjects (D: 4.1 ± 0.4 mm; ND: 4.0 ± 0.4, P < 0.05). Similar limb-specific differences were also evident in brachial artery dilator capacity (5.5 ± 0.5 vs. 4.8 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.6, and 4.8 ± 0.6 mm, respectively; P < 0.05) following glyceryl trinitrate administration and peak blood flow (1,118 ± 326 vs. 732 ± 320, 737 ± 219, and 698 ± 174 ml/min, respectively; P < 0.05) following ischemic handgrip exercise. In contrast, athletes demonstrated consistently lower wall thickness in carotid (509 ± 55 μm), brachial (D: 239 ± 100 μm; ND: 234 ± 133 μm), and femoral (D: 479 ± 38 μm; ND: 479 ± 42 μm) arteries compared with control subjects (carotid: 618 ± 74 μm; brachial D: 516 ± 100 μm; ND: 539 ± 129 μm; femoral D: 634 ± 155 μm; ND: 589 ± 112 μm; all P < 0.05 vs. athletes), with no differences between the limbs of either group. These data suggest that localized effects of exercise are evident in the remodeling of arterial size, whereas arterial wall thickness appears to be affected by systemic factors.

  14. Preoperative estimation of run off in patients with multiple level arterial obstructions as a guide to partial reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Ivan; Tønnesen, K H; Sager, P

    1978-01-01

    Preoperative measurements of direct femoral artery systolic pressure, indirect ankle systolic pressure and direct brachial artery systolic pressure were carried out in nine patients with severe ischemia and arterial occlusions both proximal and distal to the ingvinal ligament. The pressure......-rise at the ankle was estimated preoperatively by assuming that the ankle pressure would rise in proportion to the rise in femoral artery pressure. Thus it was predicted that reconstruction of the iliac obstruction with aorta-femoral pressure gradients from 44 to 96 mm Hg would result in a rise in ankle pressure...... of 16--54 mm Hg. The actual rise in ankle pressure one month after reconstruction of the iliac arteries ranged from 10 to 46 mm Hg and was well correlated to the preoperative estimations. In conclusion, by proper pressure measurements the run-off problem of multiple level arterial occlusions can...

  15. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  16. The current role of diagnostic imaging in the preoperative workup for refractory neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Wilson, Thomas J; DiPietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in perinatal care, the incidence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains relatively common. CT myelography is currently considered to be the optimal imaging modality for evaluating nerve root integrity. Recent improvements in MRI techniques have made it an attractive alternative to evaluate nerve root avulsions (preganglionic injuries). We demonstrate the utility of MRI for the evaluation of normal and avulsed spinal nerve roots. We also show the utility of ultrasound in providing useful preoperative evaluation of the postganglionic brachial plexus in patients with NBPP.

  17. Radiologic manifestation of the malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumor involving the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Aran, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old African American female with history of bilateral breast cancer status after lumpectomy and radiation therapy presented with right hand, wrist, and arm pain. She was found to have a right axillary mass and a large lesion in the right brachial plexus. A biopsy of the brachial plexus mass came back as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. This case report illustrates the critical value of multiple imaging modalities in definitive diagnosis of this rare pathologic entity.

  18. Lower-extremity arterial stiffness vs. aortic stiffness in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfahrt, Peter; Krajčoviechová, Alena; Seidlerová, Jitka; Galovcová, Markéta; Bruthans, Jan; Filipovský, Jan; Laurent, Stéphane; Cífková, Renata

    2013-08-01

    While determinants of aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) are well known, much less is known about factors affecting lower-extremity pulse wave velocity (lePWV). Unlike aPWV, increased lePWV does not predict cardiovascular risk, but limits lower-extremity blood flow and is associated with increased left ventricular mass. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of cardiovascular risk factors on aPWV and lePWV. A total of 911 individuals from the Czech post-MONICA study (a randomly selected 1% representative population sample, mean age 54±13.5 years, 47% men) were examined. Pulse wave velocity was measured using the SphygmoCor device. Aging had a large effect on aPWV, but only a small effect on lePWV. After adjustment for covariates, we observed that hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and dyslipidemia were positively and significantly associated with aPWV. However, only hypertension had a significant effect on lePWV. Increased ankle systolic blood pressure was associated with increased aPWV independently of brachial blood pressure. Ankle systolic blood pressure was more closely related to aPWV than lePWV. Subjects with an ankle-brachial index lower lePWV compared with individuals with a normal ankle-brachial index. Lower-extremity arterial stiffness is affected by age and cardiovascular risk factors to a lesser extent than aortic stiffness. Increased ankle systolic blood pressure is linked not only to increased lower-extremity arterial stiffness, but also increased aortic stiffness. In subjects with a low ankle-brachial index, lower-extremity arterial stiffness is spuriously decreased.

  19. Effect of brachial plexus block-driven vascular access planning on primary distal arteriovenous fistula recruitment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Claude J; Leong, Chuo Ren; Bin, Hsien Wern; Wong, Julian Chi Leung

    2015-11-01

    Hemodialysis vascular accesses (VAs) are traditionally planned based on the nondominant upper extremity preoperative physical and sonographic vascular findings. Clinical guidelines advocate the use of the most suitably distended vein in the most distal location. Brachial plexus block (BPB), through its sympathectomy-like effect, promotes vasodilation and can thus further optimize vein recruitment and operative strategy. However, studies on its role in driving primary distal autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) placement are limited. We therefore evaluated a traditional approach of clinic-based VA planning against an on-table sonography-guided strategy under BPB. This was a prospective observational study involving 110 consecutive end-stage renal disease multiethnic Asian patients referred for primary VA creation under BPB after preoperative venous mapping. Cases were grouped according to whether there was a preset operative plan for radial cephalic (RC) or brachial cephalic (BC) AVF creation based on artery and vein >2 mm and >2.5 mm size criteria respectively (group A) or vein size or length were suboptimal (2-2.5 mm and  .05). Satisfactory post-BPB forearm vasodilation resulted in 44% of 36 plans for BC being changed to RC AVFs. RC AVF 6-week hemodynamic maturation and 3-month functional maturation in group A vs B were 48% vs 60% and 69% vs 57%, respectively (P > .05). One-year primary and secondary patency rates were 57% vs 50% and 73% vs 87%, respectively (log rank >.05). Outcomes of RC AVFs in group B were not inferior to those of BC AVFs. On-table BPB-driven VA planning and plan modification strategy contribute to considerable AVF recruitment but do not lead to significantly better distal AVF prevalence or outcomes over the traditional approach. An adequately powered randomized controlled study is, however, warranted to better assess the long-term clinical and cost benefits of such a strategy. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  20. Prognostic significance of ankle-brachial index, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, flow-mediated dilation, and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Satoshi; Yurugi, Takatomi; Aota, Yasuko; Sakuma, Takao; Jo, Fusakazu; Nishikawa, Mitsushige; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Maki, Kei

    2009-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease is important in managing patients undergoing hemodialysis. We evaluated a series of prognostic values: flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrogen-mediated dilation (NMD), an index of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent function, respectively, ankle-brachial index (ABI), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. A cohort of 199 patients was studied. At entry, these values were examined and the prognostic significances were investigated. In estimating the significance of baPWV, patients with ABI hemodialysis patients by means of ABI and baPWV but not FMD or NMD provides complementary information in identifying a high-risk population in these patients.

  1. Transbrachial artery approach for selective cerebral angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Morisako, Toshitaka; Numazawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Keisuke; Nagai, Shigeki; Shibamoto, Kenji (Osaka Neurological Inst., Toyonaka (Japan))

    1990-02-01

    Transaxillary or transbrachial approaches to the cerebral vessels have been reported, but selective angiography of all four vessels has not been possible through one route. In this report, a new technique for selective cerebral angiography with transbrachial approach is described. One hundred and twenty three patients with cerebral infarction, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, intracerebral hemorrhage, epilepsy, or cerebral tumor were examined. Those patients consisted of 85 outpatients and 38 inpatients whose age ranged from 15 years old to 82 years old. The patients were examined via the transbrachial approach (97 cases via the right brachial, 29 cases via the left). Materials included a DSA system (Digital Fluorikon 5000, General Electric Co.), a 4 French tight J-curved Simmons 80-cm catheter, a 19-gauge extra-thin-wall Seldinger needle, and a J/Straight floppy 125-cm guide-wire. Generally, the volume of the contrast agent (300 mgI/ml iopamidol) used in the common carotid artery angiogram was 6 ml, while that used in the vertebral artery angiogram was 4 ml. If catheterization of the vertebral artery or right common carotid artery was unsuccessful, about 8 ml of the contrast agent was injected into the subclavian or branchiocephalic artery. Definitive diagnosis and a decision on proper treatment of the patients can be easily obtained, and the results were clinically satisfactory. Moreover, no complications were encountered in this study. This new technique making a transbrachial approach to the cerebral vessels using the DSA system is introduced here. Neurosurgeons can use this technique easily, and they will find that it provides them with all the information they need about the patient. (author).

  2. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but also to the worsening of the disease. Obstructive peripheral arterial disease most commonly develops in the arteries of the legs, including the two branches of the aorta (iliac arteries), main arteries of the thighs (femoral arteries), of ... arterial disease may also develop in the part ...

  3. Neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injuries: an historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2004-01-01

    An historical cohort study was conducted to investigate the rate and extent of neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) and to identify possible prognostic factors in a cohort of children with OBPI from birth to 7 years. All children (n=56; 31 females, 25 males) with OBPI

  4. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to brachial plexus block and its comparison with tramadol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kelika

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Clonidine in a dose of 1.5 μg/kg body weight provided the fastest onset of sensory as well as motor block and the longest duration of postoperative analgesia and thus is a good additive to local anesthetic solutions for brachial plexus blocks.

  5. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  6. A comparison of the lateral and posterior approach for brachial plexus block.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, H.C.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Jack, N.T.; Boersma, E.; Klein, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus block by the posterior approach described by Pippa is not widely used in contrast to the lateral approach of Winnie. We compared the clinical efficacy of both approaches in a randomized prospective study. METHODS: Eighty patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists

  7. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, McB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  8. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  9. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  10. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  11. A Case of Scapulothoracic Dissociation with Brachial Plexus Injury: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, G.K.; Suh, K.J.; Choi, J.A.; Oh, O.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-11-15

    Scapulothoracic dissociation is defined as violent lateral or rotational displacement of the shoulder girdle from its thoracic attachments with severe neurovascular injury. We describe the radiographic and associated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a case of scapulothoracic dissociation with brachial plexus injury in a 17-year-old man, and include a review of the relevant literature.

  12. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Patients on Hemodialysis With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Ryota; Aoyama, Naoyoshi; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD; n = 210) were examined for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) using ankle-brachial index (ABI) and toe-brachial index (TBI). The prevalence of PAD was 38.1%. Among patients with PAD, 87.5% were newly diagnosed with PAD, 42.5% were diagnosed with TBI <0.6 despite ABI ≥ 0.9, and 68.7% had no lower limb symptoms. In patients with PAD, the prevalence rate of cerebrovascular disease was 36.3%, coronary artery disease was 42.5%, spinal stenosis was 33.2%, and vertebral fracture 15.0% and was significantly higher than those of the non-PAD patients. Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was the most important biomarker among patients with PAD. PAD has been underdiagnosed and untreated in patients on HD because most patients do not have symptoms that could be due to diabetic neuropathy or have insufficient daily activity to experience exertional leg symptoms. Screening for PAD using the ABI and TBI increased diagnostic efficiency in patients on HD and may lead to effective early treatments, including pharmacotherapy, revascularization therapy, and exercise rehabilitation to avoid the worst possible scenario such as lower limb amputation, cardiovascular event, and death. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  15. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  16. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  17. Screening for coronary artery disease in asymptomatic individuals: Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrell, Philippe; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Feldman, Laurent J; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Ducrocq, Gregory

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the main cause of death in the world, and coronary artery disease is the largest contributor. Screening asymptomatic individuals for coronary artery disease in view of preventive treatment is therefore of crucial interest. Apart from established risk scores based on traditional risk factors such as the Framingham or SCORE risk scores, new biomarkers and imaging methods have emerged (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 and secretory phospholipase A2, coronary artery calcium score, carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-brachial index). Their added value on top of the classic risk scores varies considerably and the most convincing evidence exists for coronary artery calcium score in intermediate-risk asymptomatic individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. El índice tobillo-brazo como predictor de mortalidad vascular Ankle brachial index as indicator for vascular mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Arévalo Manso

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available El índice tobillo-brazo (ITB es un parámetro que muestra la relación entre la tensión arterial sistólica de la extremidad superior y la extremidad inferior. Este indicador, ampliamente estudiado y presente en la bibliografía, se ha mostrado como excelente predictor de mortalidad tanto vascular como por causas generales cuando presenta valores fuera del rango establecido como normal (0,90-1,30. En dichas situaciones la utilidad del ITB reside en detectar precozmente la existencia de enfermedad arterial periférica (EAP durante su fase asintomática y servir como parámetro de corte para el establecimiento de medidas preventivas más contundentes antes de que el daño vascular existente se haga sintomático. Para el profesional de enfermería este parámetro constituye una potente herramienta de valoración, objetiva y cuantitativa, que permite seleccionar aquellos pacientes en los que es preciso potenciar al máximo los cuidados preventivos.The ankle-brachial index (ABI is a simple test showing the relationship between systolic blood pressure in the upper and the lower limbs. This parameter widely studied in literature has been reported as an excellent vascular and all-cause death predictor when exceeds the normal values (0.90-1.30. In such situation the ABI can early detect periferic arterial disease (PAD in asymptomatic phase and be a cutoff parameter to consider more aggressive preventive interventions before the existing vascular damage becomes symptomatic. This test is a powerful assessment tool for nurses to select those patients needing to maximize preventive cares. The nursing staff training for ABI measurement, the provision of suitable equipment by the Health Institutions and the development of reliable and more simple measurement methods are key issues that would facilitate its routinely and systematically use to improve the preventive strategy in vascular diseases.

  19. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation: Randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-10-01

    Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke.

  20. Intelligence in Childhood and Atherosclerosis of the Carotid and Peripheral Arteries in Later Life: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Catharine R.; Eadie, Elizabeth; Thomas, Avril; Bastin, Mark E.; Starr, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is some evidence that people who score higher on tests of intelligence in childhood have lower carotid intima-media thickness and higher ankle brachial index in middle age. These findings need replicating in other, older populations. We investigated the prospective relationship between intelligence in childhood and atherosclerosis in the carotid and peripheral arteries at age 73 years. Methods Participants were 713 members of the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 whose intelligence was assessed at age 11 years. At age 73 years, carotid intima-media thickness and degree of stenosis were measured using ultrasound imaging; ankle-brachial index was measured using Doppler ultrasound. Results There were no significant associations between intelligence at age 11 and measures of atherosclerosis at age 73. In age- and sex-adjusted analyses, for a standard deviation higher score in intelligence, intima-media thickness (x 10) was lower by 0.07 (-0.20, 0.06) mm and ankle brachial index (x 10) was lower by 0.09 (-0.24, 0.07); odds ratios for having carotid stenosis >25% or peripheral arterial disease were 0.98 (0.82, 1.16) and 1.05 (0.81, 1.36) respectively. Conclusion In this study of people aged 73 years, higher childhood intelligence was not associated with reduced risk of atherosclerosis in the carotid or peripheral arteries. PMID:25915652

  1. PLASMA NITRITE FLUX PREDICTS EXERCISE PERFORMANCE IN PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL DISEASE FOLLOWING 3 MONTHS OF EXERCISE TRAINING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jason D; Stabler, Thomas; Kenjale, Aarti; Ham, Katherine L.; Robbins, Jennifer.L.; Duscha, Brian D; Dobrosielski, Devon A; Annex, Brian H

    2010-01-01

    Plasma nitrite is a major oxidation product of nitric oxide. It has also recently been suggested to perform an endocrine-like function as a nitric oxide donor in hypoxic tissues, allowing vasodilation. Exercise performance is limited in peripheral arterial disease due to an inadequate blood supply to working tissues. We hypothesized that exercise training in peripheral arterial disease subjects will demonstrate improved “plasma nitrite flux” and endothelial function, to accompany increased exercise performance. Peripheral arterial disease subjects were tested at baseline and following 3 months supervised or home exercise training. Venous blood (arm) was drawn at rest and 10min following a maximal graded treadmill test. Samples were added to heparin, centrifuged and plasma snap frozen for analysis by reductive chemiluminescence. Brachial artery endothelial function was measured in response to a hyperemic stimulus (flow-mediated dilation). At 3 months the peripheral arterial disease-supervised exercise group showed increases in claudication onset pain time (+138sec, p≤0.05) peak walking time (+260sec, p≤0.01), VO2peak (1.3ml/kg/min, p≤0.05), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (+2%, p≤0.05) and plasma nitrite flux (+33% p≤0.05). There were no changes in the peripheral arterial disease-home exercise group. The change in plasma nitrite flux predicted the change in claudication onset pain (r2=0.59, p≤0.01). These findings suggest changes in plasma nitrite are related to endothelial function and predict exercise performance in peripheral arterial disease. PMID:20620208

  2. Obesity, arterial function and arterial structure – a systematic review and meta‐analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ne, J. Y. A.; Cai, T. Y.; Celermajer, D. S.; Caterson, I. D.; Gill, T.; Lee, C. M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective Obesity is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which obesity affects cardiovascular risk have not been fully elucidated. This paper reports a comprehensive systematic review and meta‐analysis on obesity and two key aspects of vascular health using gold‐standard non‐invasive measures – arterial endothelial function (brachial flow‐mediated dilatation) and subclinical atherosclerosis (carotid intima‐media thickness). Methods Electronic searches for ‘Obesity and flow‐mediated dilatation’ and ‘Obesity and intima‐media thickness’ were performed using Ovid Medline and Embase databases. A meta‐analysis was undertaken for brachial flow‐mediated dilatation and carotid intima‐media thickness to obtain pooled estimates for adults with obesity and those with healthy weight. Results Of the 5,810 articles retrieved, 19 studies on flow‐mediated dilatation and 19 studies on intima‐media thickness were included. Meta‐analysis demonstrated that obesity was associated with lower flow‐mediated dilatation (−1.92 % [95% CI −2.92, −0.92], P = 0.0002) and greater carotid intima‐media thickness (0.07 mm [95% CI 0.05, 0.08], P Obesity is associated with poorer arterial endothelial function and increased subclinical atherosclerosis, consistent with these aspects of vascular health at least partially contributing to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in adults with obesity. These estimated effect sizes will enable vascular health benefits in response to weight loss treatment to be put in greater perspective, both in the research setting and potentially also clinical practice. PMID:28702212

  3. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komine Hidehiko

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial stiffness is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Because current methods of measuring arterial stiffness are technically demanding, the purpose of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement. Methods Blood pressure was conventionally measured in the left upper arm of 173 individuals using an inflatable cuff. Using the time series of occlusive cuff pressure and the amplitudes of pulse oscillations, we calculated local slopes of the curve between the decreasing cuff pressure and corresponding arterial volume. Whole pressure-volume curve was derived from numerical integration of the local slopes. The curve was fitted using an equation and we identified a numerical coefficient of the equation as an index of arterial stiffness (Arterial Pressure-volume Index, API. We also measured brachial-ankle (baPWV PWV and carotid-femoral (cfPWV PWV using a vascular testing device and compared the values with API. Furthermore, we assessed carotid arterial compliance using ultrasound images to compare with API. Results The slope of the calculated pressure-volume curve was steeper for compliant (low baPWV or cfPWV than stiff (high baPWV or cfPWV arteries. API was related to baPWV (r = -0.53, P r = -0.49, P r = 0.32, P Conclusions These results suggest that our method can simply and simultaneously evaluate arterial stiffness and blood pressure based on oscillometric measurements of blood pressure.

  4. Risk factors of accelerated progression of peripheral artery disease in hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Reu Hsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ankle-brachial index (ABI and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV are markers for peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD and arterial stiffness, respectively. The aims of this study were to assess whether PAOD and arterial stiffness progressed and to determine the risk factors for ABI and baPWV progression in patients on hemodialysis. This study enrolled 173 routine patients on hemodialysis. Both ABI and baPWV were measured by an ABI-form device at baseline and at 1 year of follow-up. Progression in ABI was defined as reduction in ABI exceeding 0.3, while baPWV measured at 1 year of follow-up exceeding that at baseline indicated baPWV progression. Comparison with baseline data showed increase in both prevalence of ABI < 0.9 (p = 0.045 and baPWV (p = 0.028 at 1 year of follow-up. Multiple linear regression analyses identified high fasting glucose and old age as independent factors of annual change in ABI and baPWV, respectively. Good control of blood sugar may contribute to delay the progression of peripheral artery disease in patients on hemodialysis.

  5. How to become proficient in performance of the resting ankle-brachial index: Results of the first randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnou, Céline; Chaudru, Ségolène; Stivalet, Olivier; Paul, Eunice; Charasson, Marie; Selli, Jean-Marc; Mauger, Chadi; Chapron, Anthony; Le Faucheur, Alexis; Jaquinandi, Vincent; Mahé, Guillaume

    2017-11-01

    The resting ankle-brachial index (ABI) is a first-line test to diagnose peripheral artery disease (PAD). No randomized controlled trial (RCT) has yet been conducted to determine the best teaching method to become proficient in the ABI procedure. We conducted a monocentric RCT to determine whether didactic learning alone or didactic learning combined with experiential learning improved proficiency in the ABI procedure. Medical students ( n = 30) received didactic learning, including (i) a presentation of the ABI guidelines and (ii) a video demonstration. Each student was then randomized into two groups ('no experiential learning group' and 'experiential learning group'). An initial evaluation was performed after the didactic learning and a final evaluation at the end of the intervention. A student was considered to be proficient when he or she performed a correct ABI procedure on a healthy individual and a patient. The correct procedure corresponds to (i) following guidelines and (ii) a difference in ABI measurement between a vascular specialist and a student of ≤ 0.15. No student was proficient at the initial evaluation. At the final evaluation, in the didactic learning group, the number of proficient students was not improved compared with the initial evaluation (0/10 vs 1/10). In the experiential learning group, the number of proficient students was significantly improved (0/20 vs 11/20; p < 0.05). At the final evaluation, there was a significant difference between the number of proficient students depending on their learning group. In conclusion, didactic learning alone is insufficient to gain proficiency in the ABI procedure. Combining didactic learning with experiential learning significantly improved the students' proficiency.

  6. Factors influencing pathological ankle-brachial index values along the chronic kidney disease spectrum: the NEFRONA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, David; Betriu, Angels; Valls, Joan; Gorriz, Jose L; Pallares, Vicente; Abajo, Maria; Gracia, Marta; Valdivielso, Jose Manuel; Fernandez, Elvira

    2017-03-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) is widely used to diagnose subclinical peripheral artery disease (PAD) in the general population, but data assessing its prevalence and related factors in different chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages are scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and associated factors of pathological ABI values in CKD patients. NEFRONA is a multicentre prospective project that included 2445 CKD patients from 81 centres and 559 non-CKD subjects from 9 primary care centres across Spain. A trained team collected clinical and laboratory data, performed vascular ultrasounds and measured the ABI. PAD prevalence was higher in CKD than in controls (28.0 versus 12.3%, P < 0.001). Prevalence increased in more advanced CKD stages, due to more patients with an ABI ≥1.4, rather than ≤0.9. Diabetes was the only factor predicting both pathological values in all CKD stages. Age, female sex, carotid plaques, higher carotid intima-media thickness, higher high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and triglycerides, and lower 25-hydroxi-vitamin D were independently associated with an ABI ≤0.9. Higher phosphate and hsCRP, lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and dialysis were associated with an ABI ≥1.4. A stratified analysis showed different associated factors in each CKD stage, with phosphate being especially important in earlier CKD, and LDL-cholesterol being an independent predictor only in Sage 5D CKD. Asymptomatic PAD is very prevalent in all CKD stages, but factors related to a low or high pathological ABI differ, revealing different pathogenic pathways. Diabetes, dyslipidaemia, inflammation and mineral-bone disorders play a role in the appearance of PAD in CKD.

  7. The Optimal Cut-off Value of Ankle Brachial Index for Screening Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Hemodialysis Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HARADA, Makoto; TSUKADA, Wataru; TSUKADA, Osamu; HASHIMOTO, Koji; KAMIJO, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    ...), are frequently detected in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Ankle brachial index (ABI) is a useful marker for detecting PAD, as well as being predictive of the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD...

  8. High prevalence of neuropathic pain in the hand of patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. B. Santana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe the pain profile of patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. Methods We enrolled 65 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire was used to classify pain and the SF-36 was used to evaluate quality of life. Results The patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury were predominantly young male victims of motorcycle accidents. Pain was present in 75.4% of the individuals and 79% presented with neuropathic pain, mostly located in the hands (30.41%. The use of auxiliary devices (p = 0.05 and marital status (p = 0.03 were both independent predictors of pain. Pain also impacted negatively on the quality of life (p = 0.001. Conclusions Pain is frequent in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. Despite the peripheral nervous system injury, nociceptive pain is not unusual. Pain evaluation, including validated instruments, is essential to guide optimal clinical management of patients with the condition.

  9. Participation restrictions among adolescents and adults with neonatal brachial plexus palsy: the patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, Menno; Groot, Jeroen; Steenbeek, Duco; Pondaag, Willem; Nelissen, Rob Ghh; Vliet Vlieland, Thea Pm

    2017-09-24

    To examine the impact of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) on societal participation of adolescents and adults. This cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with NBPP, aged ≥16 years, who had visited our NBPP clinic. Patients completed questions on the influence of NBPP on their choices regarding education/work and their work-performance, the Impact on Participation/Autonomy questionnaire and the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation (USER-P). In addition, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed. Seventy-five patients participated (median age 20, inter quartile range 17-27). Twenty were full-time students, 28 students with a job, 21 employed, two unemployed, and four work-disabled. Sixty-six patients had had a job at some stage. Patients' overall HRQoL was comparable to the general population. 27/75 patients reported that NBPP had affected their choices regarding education and 26/75 those regarding work. 33/66 reported impact on their work performance. On the Impact on Participation/Autonomy questionnaire, 80% (49/61) reported restrictions in the work-and-education domain, 74% in social-relations and 67% in autonomy-outdoors. 37/61 reported participation restrictions on the USER-P. Although their overall HRQoL was not impaired, a substantial proportion of adolescent/adult patients reported that NBPP had an impact on choices regarding education and profession, as well as on work-performance. Restrictions in participation, especially in work and education were also reported. Guiding patients in making choices on education and work at an early stage and providing tailored physical as well as psychosocial care may prevent or address restrictions, which may improve participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Adolescent and adult patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy perceive restrictions in societal participation, especially regarding the work-and-education domain. All patients with neonatal brachial plexus

  10. Types and severity of operated supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries caused by traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Radek; Waldauf, Petr; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injuries occur in up to 5% of polytrauma cases involving motorcycle accidents and in approximately 4% of severe winter sports injuries. One of the criteria for a successful operative therapy is the type of lesion. Upper plexus palsy has the best prognosis, whereas lower plexus palsy is surgically untreatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate a group of patients with brachial plexus injury caused by traffic accidents, categorize the injuries according to type of accident, and look for correlations between type of palsy (injury) and specific accidents. A total of 441 brachial plexus reconstruction patients from our department were evaluated retrospectively(1993 to 2011). Sex, age, neurological status, and the type and cause of injury were recorded for each case. Patients with BPI caused by a traffic accident were assessed in detail. Traffic accidents were the cause of brachial plexus injury in most cases (80.7%). The most common type of injury was avulsion of upper root(s) (45.7%) followed by rupture (28.2%), complete avulsion (16.9%) and avulsion of lower root(s) (9.2%). Of the patients, 73.9% had an upper,22.7% had a complete and only 3.4% had a lower brachial plexus palsy. The main cause was motorcycle accidents(63.2%) followed by car accidents (23.5%), bicycle accidents(10.7%) and pedestrian collisions (3.1%) (pcar accidents had a higher percentage of lower avulsion (22.7%) and a lower percentage of upper avulsion (29.3%), whereas cyclists had a higher percentage of upper avulsion (68.6%) based on the data from the entire group of patients (pcar accidents (9.3%,pcar and motorcycle accidents),significantly more upper and fewer lower palsies were present. In the bicycle accident group, upper palsy was the most common (89%). Study results indicate that the most common injury was an upper plexus palsy. It was characteristic of bicycle accidents, and significantly more common in car and motorcycle accidents. The results also indicate that it is

  11. A new systolic parameter defined as the ratio of brachial pre-ejection period to brachial ejection time predicts overall and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Hsu, Po-Chao; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Su, Ho-Ming; Voon, Wen-Chol; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2010-05-01

    Impaired left ventricular systolic function is an important cause of mortality in hemodialysis patients. An increase in the ratio of pre-ejection period (PEP) to ejection time (ET) is associated with a decrease in left ventricular systolic function. Brachial PEP (bPEP) and brachial ET (bET) can be automatically determined from an ankle-brachial index (ABI)-form device. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bPEP/bET was a useful predictor for overall and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. We enrolled 212 hemodialysis patients in one regional hospital. The bPEP and bET were measured using an ABI-form device. The mean follow-up period was 28.3+/-5.7 months. The relative mortality risk was analyzed by Cox-regression methods. Twenty-two deaths were recorded in 212 patients (10.4%). In a multivariate analysis, the bPEP/bET (hazard ratio [HR], 1.055; P=0.047) and serum creatinine level (P=0.029) were positively and negatively associated with overall mortality, respectively. In addition, increased bPEP/bET (HR, 1.080; P=0.017), increased fasting glucose (P=0.046) and decreased serum creatinine level (P=0.004) were independent predictors for cardiovascular mortality. Our findings show that bPEP/bET, a surrogate of left ventricular systolic function, is a useful predictor for overall and cardiovascular mortality in hemodialysis patients. Screening hemodialysis patients by means of bPEP/bET may help to identify a high-risk group for increased mortality.

  12. Underrecognized Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus in Thailand: We Must Consider Neuroischemic Foot Ulcers From This Fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerkasem, Kittipan; Kosachunhanun, Natapong; Sony, Kiran; Inpankaew, Nimit; Mani, Raj

    2015-06-01

    A range of prevalence of peripheral artery disease in diabetic patients has been estimated using the measurement of ankle brachial pressure index and clinical features in Asian countries. These data may be underestimates and hence underrecognized, raising questions about the numbers of patients with neuroischemic feet who are also at risk of diabetic foot ulcers. Underrecognition of these lesions may well increase the high levels of chronic wound burden resulting from peripheral artery disease as well as neuroischemic foot lesions. Improved education and training of clinical staff (nurses and family physicians) is required to combat these serious issues. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  14. Successful Outcome of Modified Quad Surgical Procedure in Preteen and Teen Patients with Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of modified Quad procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Background: We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in shoulder abduction, resulting from the modified Quad procedure in children (mean age 2.5 years; range, 0.5?9 years) with obstetric brachial plexus injury. Methods: We describe in this report the outcome of 16 patients (6 girls and 10 boys; 7 preteen and 9 teen) who have undergone the modified Quad ...

  15. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  16. Hemoglobin A1c and arterial and ventricular stiffness in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Zieman

    Full Text Available Arterial and ventricular stiffening are characteristics of diabetes and aging which confer significant morbidity and mortality; advanced glycation endproducts (AGE are implicated in this stiffening pathophysiology. We examined the association between HbA(1c, an AGE, with arterial and ventricular stiffness measures in older individuals without diabetes.Baseline HbA(1c was measured in 830 participants free of diabetes defined by fasting glucose or medication use in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a population-based cohort study of adults aged ≥ 65 years. We performed cross-sectional analyses using baseline exam data including echocardiography, ankle and brachial blood pressure measurement, and carotid ultrasonography. We examined the adjusted associations between HbA(1c and multiple arterial and ventricular stiffness measures by linear regression models and compared these results to the association of fasting glucose (FG with like measures.HbA(1c was correlated with fasting and 2-hour postload glucose levels (r = 0.21; p<0.001 for both and positively associated with greater body-mass index and black race. In adjusted models, HbA(1c was not associated with any measure of arterial or ventricular stiffness, including pulse pressure (PP, carotid intima-media thickness, ankle-brachial index, end-arterial elastance, or left ventricular mass (LVM. FG levels were positively associated with systolic, diastolic and PP and LVM.In this sample of older adults without diabetes, HbA(1c was not associated with arterial or ventricular stiffness measures, whereas FG levels were. The role of AGE in arterial and ventricular stiffness in older adults may be better assessed using alternate AGE markers.

  17. X-ray diagnosis of the abruption of brachial plexal roots from the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogleznev, K.Ya.; Lebedev, A.N.; Akhmetov, K.K. (Tsentral' nyj Inst. Usovershenstvovaniya Vrachej, Moscow (USSR))

    An oily radiographic agent was introduced suboccipitally to 38 patients 4 to 18 months after the trauma for diagnosis of the damage site in the brachial plexus both within the range of the vertebral canal (intradurally, preganglionarly), and beyond it (extradurally, postganglionarly). The abruption of the brachial plexal roots from the spinal cord was characterized on the cervical myeloradiculograms by the contrasting of traumatic meningocele (23 observations), deformation and compression of the subdural space by the cicatricialcystic process. Symptoms of concurrent arachnoidith were often revealed (peripachymeningitis, epiduritis). Ruptures of the radicular saccular walls are accompanied by a change of their shape, manifested by its elongation, bicontour outlines, the obliteration or the formation of the ''false traumatic meningocele''.

  18. Extended long-term (5 years) outcomes of triangle tilt surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, ptriangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients.

  19. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  20. The usefulness of a single arm cuff oscillometric method (Arteriograph) to assess changes in central aortic blood pressure and arterial stiffness by antihypertensive treatment: results from the Doxazosin-Ramipril Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekell, Andreas; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-10-26

    Inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system may have effects on vascular structure and function beyond the effects on blood pressure (BP) reduction. We studied the ability of a single arm cuff oscillometric method (Arteriograph, TensioMed, Hungary) to assess effects of antihypertensive treatment on BP and arterial stiffness. Furthermore, this technique was compared to pulse wave analysis and applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical, Australia). Brachial and aortic BP, augmentation index (AIx), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was simultaneously assessed by both techniques in 71 untreated hypertensive patients. Thereafter, 58 completed double-blind randomized treatment for 12 weeks with ramipril or doxazosin. Treatment (assessed by the Arteriograph) reduced aortic more than brachial systolic BP (-13.2 vs. -11.2 mm Hg; p = .002) and improved all indices of arterial stiffness. This greater reduction in aortic to brachial systolic BP was more marked by ramipril than by doxazosin (-20.9 and -17.1 vs. -4.3 and -4.2 mm Hg; p = .006), with a similar trend for AIx (-6.2 vs. -2.2%; p = .058). Both devices showed correlations for aortic and brachial systolic and diastolic BP and AIx (r = 0.75-0.86, all p < .001), while agreement for PWV was weaker (r = 0.28; p = .043). The Arteriograph generally recorded higher values for aortic BP and AIx than the SphygmoCor. Antihypertensive treatment reduced aortic systolic BP more than brachial BP and improved arterial stiffness. Blocking the renin-angiotensin system may have additional effects beyond BP reduction. We demonstrate the feasibility of the Arteriograph to monitor changes in BP and arterial stiffness by treatment.

  1. Lower Mitochondrial Energy Production of the Thigh Muscles in Patients With Low-Normal Ankle-Brachial Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Zane, Ariel; Oberdier, Matt; Canepa, Marco; Studenski, Stephanie; Simonsick, Eleanor; Spencer, Richard G; Fishbein, Kenneth; Reiter, David; Lakatta, Edward G; McDermott, Mary M; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2017-08-30

    Lower muscle mitochondrial energy production may contribute to impaired walking endurance in patients with peripheral arterial disease. A borderline ankle-brachial index (ABI) of 0.91 to 1.10 is associated with poorer walking endurance compared with higher ABI. We hypothesized that in the absence of peripheral arterial disease, lower ABI is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production. We examined 363 men and women participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40. Muscle mitochondrial energy production was assessed by post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (kPCr) measured by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the left thigh. A lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant reflects decreased mitochondria energy production.The mean age of the participants was 71±12 years. A total of 18.4% had diabetes mellitus and 4% were current and 40% were former smokers. Compared with participants with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40, those with an ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 had significantly lower post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant (19.3 versus 20.8 ms-1, P=0.015). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, and cholesterol levels (P=0.028). Similarly, post-exercise phosphocreatine recovery rate constant was linearly associated with ABI as a continuous variable, both in the ABI ranges of 0.90 to 1.40 (standardized coefficient=0.15, P=0.003) and 1.1 to 1.4 (standardized coefficient=0.12, P=0.0405). An ABI of 0.90 to 1.10 is associated with lower mitochondrial energy production compared with an ABI of 1.11 to 1.40. These data demonstrate adverse associations of lower ABI values with impaired mitochondrial activity even within the range of a clinically accepted definition of a normal ABI. Further study is needed to determine whether interventions in persons with ABIs of 0.90 to 1.10 can prevent subsequent

  2. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Because current methods of measuring arterial stiffness are technically demanding, the purpose of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement. Methods Blood pressure was conventionally measured in the left upper arm of 173 individuals using an inflatable cuff. Using the time series of occlusive cuff pressure and the amplitudes of pulse oscillations, we calculated local slopes of the curve between the decreasing cuff pressure and corresponding arterial volume. Whole pressure-volume curve was derived from numerical integration of the local slopes. The curve was fitted using an equation and we identified a numerical coefficient of the equation as an index of arterial stiffness (Arterial Pressure-volume Index, API). We also measured brachial-ankle (baPWV) PWV and carotid-femoral (cfPWV) PWV using a vascular testing device and compared the values with API. Furthermore, we assessed carotid arterial compliance using ultrasound images to compare with API. Results The slope of the calculated pressure-volume curve was steeper for compliant (low baPWV or cfPWV) than stiff (high baPWV or cfPWV) arteries. API was related to baPWV (r = -0.53, P blood pressure based on oscillometric measurements of blood pressure. PMID:22325084

  3. Non-invasive assessment of arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Hidehiko; Asai, Yoshiyuki; Yokoi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Mutsuko

    2012-02-10

    Arterial stiffness is a major contributor to cardiovascular diseases. Because current methods of measuring arterial stiffness are technically demanding, the purpose of this study was to develop a simple method of evaluating arterial stiffness using oscillometric blood pressure measurement. Blood pressure was conventionally measured in the left upper arm of 173 individuals using an inflatable cuff. Using the time series of occlusive cuff pressure and the amplitudes of pulse oscillations, we calculated local slopes of the curve between the decreasing cuff pressure and corresponding arterial volume. Whole pressure-volume curve was derived from numerical integration of the local slopes. The curve was fitted using an equation and we identified a numerical coefficient of the equation as an index of arterial stiffness (Arterial Pressure-volume Index, API). We also measured brachial-ankle (baPWV) PWV and carotid-femoral (cfPWV) PWV using a vascular testing device and compared the values with API. Furthermore, we assessed carotid arterial compliance using ultrasound images to compare with API. The slope of the calculated pressure-volume curve was steeper for compliant (low baPWV or cfPWV) than stiff (high baPWV or cfPWV) arteries. API was related to baPWV (r = -0.53, P blood pressure based on oscillometric measurements of blood pressure.

  4. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... results of stenting versus endarterectomy for carotid-artery stenosis. N Engl J Med . 2016;374(11):1021- ...

  5. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because ... other substances found in the blood. Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood ...

  6. Coronary artery disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the ...

  7. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of blood pressure ...

  8. Significant Correlation between Ankle-Brachial Index and Vascular Access Failure in Hemodialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Lin, Feng-Hsien; Su, Ho-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Vascular access failure (VAF) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The most common cause of VAF is stenosis at the arteriovenous anastomosis because of abnormal neointimal proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition. These two changes are also observed in the classic atheroma, which means atherosclerotic lesions and venous stenosis in VAF may share some similar pathogenic mechanisms. The ankle–brachial index (ABI) is a...

  9. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  10. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  11. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mizuma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic l