WorldWideScience

Sample records for boundary-layer cloud study

  1. A Lagrangian Study of Southeast Pacific Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Gallia

    concentration which extend far offshore into regions of normally very clean cloud. We use Lagrangian trajectories to investigate the source of the high droplet concentrations of the mesoscale "hooks", and evaluate whether boundary layer transport of coastal pollutants alone can account for their extent. We find that boundary layer trajectories past 85 W do not pass sufficiently close to the coastline to explain high aerosol concentrations offshore.

  2. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  3. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 1. Case Study Development and Ensemble Large-Scale Forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; hide

    2015-01-01

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60 h case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in situ measurements from the Routine AAF (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility) CLOWD (Clouds with Low Optical Water Depth) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign and remote sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, are derived from observations to be approximately 0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing data sets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and a multiscale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in "trial" large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary

  4. Turbulent dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijlbergh, R.A.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Heus, T.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to dry boundary layers, dispersion in cloud-topped boundary layers has received less attention. In this LES based numerical study we investigate the dispersion of a passive tracer in the form of Lagrangian particles for four kinds of atmospheric boundary layers: 1) a dry convective boundary

  5. Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Property Retrievals from High-Resolution ASTER Observations: Case Studies and Comparison with Terra MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Frank; Wind, Galina; Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Di Girolamo, Larry; Zhao, Guangyu; Amarasinghe, Nandana; Meyer, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    A research-level retrieval algorithm for cloud optical and microphysical properties is developed for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard the Terra satellite. It is based on the operational MODIS algorithm. This paper documents the technical details of this algorithm and evaluates the retrievals for selected marine boundary layer cloud scenes through comparisons with the operational MODIS Data Collection 6 (C6) cloud product. The newly developed, ASTERspecific cloud masking algorithm is evaluated through comparison with an independent algorithm reported in Zhao and Di Girolamo (2006). To validate and evaluate the cloud optical thickness (tau) and cloud effective radius (r(sub eff)) from ASTER, the high-spatial-resolution ASTER observations are first aggregated to the same 1000m resolution as MODIS. Subsequently, tau(sub aA) and r(sub eff, aA) retrieved from the aggregated ASTER radiances are compared with the collocated MODIS retrievals. For overcast pixels, the two data sets agree very well with Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients of R greater than 0.970. However, for partially cloudy pixels there are significant differences between r(sub eff, aA) and the MODIS results which can exceed 10 micrometers. Moreover, it is shown that the numerous delicate cloud structures in the example marine boundary layer scenes, resolved by the high-resolution ASTER retrievals, are smoothed by the MODIS observations. The overall good agreement between the research-level ASTER results and the operational MODIS C6 products proves the feasibility of MODIS-like retrievals from ASTER reflectance measurements and provides the basis for future studies concerning the scale dependency of satellite observations and three-dimensional radiative effects.

  6. MPLNET V3 Cloud and Planetary Boundary Layer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Campbell, James R.; Haftings, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Micropulse Lidar Network Version 3 algorithms for planetary boundary layer and cloud detection are described and differences relative to the previous Version 2 algorithms are highlighted. A year of data from the Goddard Space Flight Center site in Greenbelt, MD consisting of diurnal and seasonal trends is used to demonstrate the results. Both the planetary boundary layer and cloud algorithms show significant improvement of the previous version.

  7. Size distributions of boundary-layer clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stull, R.; Berg, L.; Modzelewski, H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Scattered fair-weather clouds are triggered by thermals rising from the surface layer. Not all surface layer air is buoyant enough to rise. Also, each thermal has different humidities and temperatures, resulting in interthermal variability of their lifting condensation levels (LCL). For each air parcel in the surface layer, it`s virtual potential temperature and it`s LCL height can be computed.

  8. Lidar characterization of the Arctic atmosphere during ASTAR 2007: four cases studies of boundary layer, mixed-phase and multi-layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lampert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosol, Clouds and Radiation (ASTAR, which was conducted in Svalbard in March and April 2007, tropospheric Arctic clouds were observed with two ground-based backscatter lidar systems (micro pulse lidar and Raman lidar and with an airborne elastic lidar. In the time period of the ASTAR 2007 campaign, an increase in low-level cloud cover (cloud tops below 2.5 km from 51% to 65% was observed above Ny-Ålesund. Four different case studies of lidar cloud observations are analyzed: With the ground-based Raman lidar, a layer of spherical particles was observed at an altitude of 2 km after the dissolution of a cloud. The layer probably consisted of small hydrated aerosol (radius of 280 nm with a high number concentration (around 300 cm−3 at low temperatures (−30 °C. Observations of a boundary layer mixed-phase cloud by airborne lidar and concurrent airborne in situ and spectral solar radiation sensors revealed the localized process of total glaciation at the boundary of different air masses. In the free troposphere, a cloud composed of various ice layers with very different optical properties was detected by the Raman lidar, suggesting large differences of ice crystal size, shape and habit. Further, a mixed-phase double layer cloud was observed by airborne lidar in the free troposphere. Local orography influenced the evolution of this cloud. The four case studies revealed relations of cloud properties and specific atmospheric conditions, which we plan to use as the base for numerical simulations of these clouds.

  9. The GOES I-M Imagers: New Tools for Studying Microphysical Properties of Boundary Layer Stratiform Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Thomas J.; Christopher, Sundar A.

    2000-11-01

    This study reviews the capability of the advanced imagers on Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) I-M to provide quantitative information about bulk microphysical properties of low-level stratiform clouds, namely, cloud liquid water path (LWP) and droplet effective radius (re). Previous studies show that accurate estimates of cloud LWP from GOES imagers are possible, as evaluated from both ground-based and spaceborne passive microwave measurements, provided care is taken in vicarious calibration of the visible channel. GOES estimates of re have yet to be validated. However, the re versus LWP relationship derived from GOES and Special Sensor Microwave/Imager data shows good agreement with theory. The unique high-temporal sampling of the imager allows for detailed study of daytime characteristics of cloud microphysical properties and, possibly, indirect aerosol effect. Microphysical information for drizzling marine stratocumuli was also obtained, which was confirmed by direct comparison to ship-based C-band radar during the 1997 Tropical Eastern Pacific Process Study. From the promising results obtained thus far, GOES I-M imager data should be of great value in future field experiments involving low-level stratiform clouds.

  10. Experimental studies on transitional separated boundary layers

    OpenAIRE

    Serna Serrano, José

    2013-01-01

    Separated transitional boundary layers appear on key aeronautical processes such as the flow around wings or turbomachinery blades. The aim of this thesis is the study of these flows in representative scenarios of technological applications, gaining knowledge about phenomenology and physical processes that occur there and, developing a simple model for scaling them. To achieve this goal, experimental measurements have been carried out in a low speed facility, ensuring the flow homogeneity and...

  11. Clidar Mountain Boundary Layer Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nimmi C. P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A CCD Camera Lidar system called the CLidar system images a vertically pointing laser from the side with a spatially separated CCD camera and wide angle optics. The system has been used to investigate case studies of aerosols in mountain boundary layers in in the times following sunset. The aerosols detected by the system demonstrate the wide variation of near ground aerosol structure and capabilities of the CLidar system.

  12. Observational and Numerical Studies of the Boundary Layer, Cloud, and Aerosol Variability in the Southeast Pacific Coastal Marine Stratocumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    of 20 km of aircraft observations. Blue symbols are average Terra MODIS retrievals for a 0.5° region centered on Point Alpha taken at between 14:20...85 Figure 4.2: Snapshots of the albedo estimated with cloud water and cloud droplet number concentration a...resulting from changes in the Sc global coverage and albedo can be comparable to that from the greenhouse effect (Slingo 1990). However, the Sc and

  13. Spectral Dependence of MODIS Cloud Droplet Effective Radius Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven E.; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Cho, Hyoun-Myoung

    2014-01-01

    Low-level warm marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds cover large regions of Earth's surface. They have a significant role in Earth's radiative energy balance and hydrological cycle. Despite the fundamental role of low-level warm water clouds in climate, our understanding of these clouds is still limited. In particular, connections between their properties (e.g. cloud fraction, cloud water path, and cloud droplet size) and environmental factors such as aerosol loading and meteorological conditions continue to be uncertain or unknown. Modeling these clouds in climate models remains a challenging problem. As a result, the influence of aerosols on these clouds in the past and future, and the potential impacts of these clouds on global warming remain open questions leading to substantial uncertainty in climate projections. To improve our understanding of these clouds, we need continuous observations of cloud properties on both a global scale and over a long enough timescale for climate studies. At present, satellite-based remote sensing is the only means of providing such observations.

  14. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c) 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  15. Shallow marine cloud topped boundary layer in atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-04-01

    A common problem in many atmospheric models is excessive expansion over cold water of shallow marine planetary boundary layer (PBL) topped by a thin cloud layer. This phenomenon is often accompanied by spurious light precipitation. The "Cloud Top Entrainment Instability" (CTEI) was proposed as an explanation of the mechanism controlling this process in reality thereby preventing spurious enlargement of the cloudy area and widely spread light precipitation observed in the models. A key element of this hypothesis is evaporative cooling at the PBL top. However, the CTEI hypothesis remains controversial. For example, a recent direct simulation experiment indicated that the evaporative cooling couldn't explain the break-up of the cloudiness as hypothesized by the CTEI. Here, it is shown that the cloud break-up can be achieved in numerical models by a further modification of the nonsingular implementation of the Mellor-Yamada Level 2.5 turbulence closure model (MYJ) developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Washington. Namely, the impact of moist convective instability is included into the turbulent energy production/dissipation equation if (a) the stratification is stable, (b) the lifting condensation level (LCL) for a particle starting at a model level is below the next upper model level, and (c) there is enough turbulent kinetic energy so that, due to random vertical turbulent motions, a particle starting from a model level can reach its LCL. The criterion (c) should be sufficiently restrictive because otherwise the cloud cover can be completely removed. A real data example will be shown demonstrating the ability of the method to break the spurious cloud cover during the day, but also to allow its recovery over night.

  16. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L; O’Connor, Ewan J; Hogan, Robin J; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-01-01

    .... The need for improved long-term but comprehensive measurements at a marine low-cloud site motivated the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL; www.arm .gov/sites/amf/grw...

  17. Retrieval of Boundary Layer 3D Cloud Properties Using Scanning Cloud Radar and 3D Radiative Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, Roger [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Retrievals of cloud optical and microphysical properties for boundary layer clouds, including those widely used by ASR investigators, frequently assume that clouds are sufficiently horizontally homogeneous that scattering and absorption (at all wavelengths) can be treated using one dimensional (1D) radiative transfer, and that differences in the field-of-view of different sensors are unimportant. Unfortunately, most boundary layer clouds are far from horizontally homogeneous, and numerous theoretical and observational studies show that the assumption of horizontal homogeneity leads to significant errors. The introduction of scanning cloud and precipitation radars at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sites presents opportunities to move beyond the horizontally homogeneous assumption. The primary objective of this project was to develop a 3D retrieval for warm-phase (liquid only) boundary layer cloud microphysical properties, and to assess errors in current 1D (non-scanning) approaches. Specific research activities also involved examination of the diurnal cycle of hydrometeors as viewed by ARM cloud radar, and continued assessment of precipitation impacts on retrievals of cloud liquid water path using passive microwaves.

  18. Precipitating clouds observed by 1.3-GHz boundary layer radars in equatorial Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Renggono

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variations of precipitating clouds in equatorial Indonesia have been studied based on observations with 1357.5 MHz boundary layer radars at Serpong (6.4° S, 106.7° E near Jakarta and Bukittinggi (0.2° S, 100.3° E in West Sumatera. We have classified precipitating clouds into four types: stratiform, mixed stratiform-convective, deep convective, and shallow convective clouds, using the Williams et al. (1995 method. Diurnal variations of the occurrence of precipitating clouds at Serpong and Bukittinggi have showed the same characteristics, namely, that the precipitating clouds primarily occur in the afternoon and the peak of the stratiform cloud comes after the peak of the deep convective cloud. The time delay between the peaks of stratiform and deep convective clouds corresponds to the life cycle of the mesoscale convective system. The precipitating clouds which occur in the early morning at Serpong are dominated by stratiform cloud. Concerning seasonal variations of the precipitating clouds, we have found that the occurrence of the stratiform cloud is most frequent in the rainy season, while the occurrence of the deep convective cloud is predominant in the dry season.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (convective processes; precipitation; tropical meteorology

  19. 2007 Program of Study: Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    zero. The stream function multiplied by the boundary layer thickness is negligible close to the right hand side. This gives, for we = we(y), 0 = xewe ...δsψx(0)− δ3mψ (0). (2) The first derivative of ψ is zero at the left boundary due to the no slip condition. This gives 0 = xewe + δ3mψ (0), (3...which means that the vorticity inserted by the Ekman pumping must be dissipated by the sublayer. We verify that (1.20) is a solution to Eq. 3 xewe

  20. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Alex [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while

  1. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neggers, R. A. J.; Ackerman, A. S.; Angevine, W. M.; Bazile, E.; Beau, I.; Blossey, P. N.; Boutle, I. A.; de Bruijn, C.; Cheng, A.; van der Dussen, J.; Fletcher, J.; Dal Gesso, S.; Jam, A.; Kawai, H.; Cheedela, S. K.; Larson, V. E.; Lefebvre, M.-P.; Lock, A. P.; Meyer, N. R.; de Roode, S. R.; de Rooy, W.; Sandu, I.; Xiao, H.; Xu, K.-M.

    2017-10-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model intercomparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate models for this cloud regime, using large-eddy simulations of the same scenes as a reference. A novelty is that the comparison covers four different cases instead of one, in order to broaden the covered parameter space. Three cases are situated in the North-Eastern Pacific, while one reflects conditions in the North-Eastern Atlantic. A set of variables is considered that reflects key aspects of the transition process, making use of simple metrics to establish the model performance. Using this method, some longstanding problems in low-level cloud representation are identified. Considerable spread exists among models concerning the cloud amount, its vertical structure, and the associated impact on radiative transfer. The sign and amplitude of these biases differ somewhat per case, depending on how far the transition has progressed. After cloud breakup the ensemble median exhibits the well-known "too few too bright" problem. The boundary-layer deepening rate and its state of decoupling are both underestimated, while the representation of the thin capping cloud layer appears complicated by a lack of vertical resolution. Encouragingly, some models are successful in representing the full set of variables, in particular, the vertical structure and diurnal cycle of the cloud layer in transition. An intriguing result is that the median of the model ensemble performs best, inspiring a new approach in subgrid parameterization.

  2. Response Timescales and Multiple Equilibria in Boundary-Layer Cloud-Aerosol Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretherton, C. S.; Berner, A.; Wood, R.

    2012-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of subtropical stratocumulus-topped boundary layers coupled to an interactive aerosol model are run for multiday periods to examine their coupled equilibria and adjustment timescales. The LES includes two-moment Morrison microphysics, interactive radiation, and Razzak-Ghan cloud droplet activation from a single log-normal size distribution of hygroscopic aerosol with prognosed total aerosol mass and number. The aerosol evolves due to surface and entrainment sources, dry coalescence, precipitation sinks coupled to the Morrison microphysics due to autoconversion and accretion of cloud droplets (and a source due to raindrop evaporation), and cloud and rain scavenging of interstitial aerosol. Simulations are initialized with an idealized southeast Pacific stratocumulus sounding based on observations during VOCALS REx and forced with specified SST, mean subsidence, geostrophic wind, and free-tropospheric aerosol concentration. The surface aerosol source is based on the Clarke parameterization for the dependence of sea-salt number concentration on wind speed. Both surface and free-tropospheric aerosol are assumed to quickly grow to a specified size due to a surface DMS source. The goal is to explore the adjustment timescales and long-term equilibria produced by this model, to compare with studies such as Wood et al. (2012) that postulate that remote marine boundary layer aerosol concentrations are controlled as much by the precipitation sink as the surface and entrainment sources. We show that the coupled cloud-aerosol model supports rapid transitions from a solid, high aerosol, stratocumulus-capped state to a cumulus-like state reminisniscent of pockets of open cells as the liquid water path rises above a threshold supporting sufficient precipitation. The system can support multiple long-term equilibria for the same boundary forcing, or slow oscillations between a collapsed POC-like state and a deepening, thickening stratocumulus

  3. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The extensive coverage of low clouds over the subtropical eastern oceans greatly impacts the current climate. In addition, the response of low clouds to changes in atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols is a major source of uncertainty, which thwarts accurate prediction of future climate change. Low clouds are poorly simulated in climate models, partly due to inadequate long-term simultaneous observations of their macrophysical and microphysical structure, radiative effects, and associated aerosol distribution in regions where their impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling, boundary layer turbulence, and precipitation (much of which evaporates before reaching the ocean surface and is closely connected to the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei). These couplings have been documented as a result of past field programs and model studies. However, extensive research is still required to achieve a quantitative understanding sufficient for developing parameterizations, which adequately predict aerosol indirect effects and low cloud response to climate perturbations. This is especially true of the interactions between clouds, aerosol, and precipitation. These processes take place in an ever-changing synoptic environment that can confound interpretation of short time period observations.

  4. Exploring the boundary-layer cloud-climate feedback through Single-Column Model in Radiative-Advective Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Gesso, Sara; Neggers, Roel

    2017-04-01

    Boundary-layer clouds remain the major contributor to the inter-model spread in future climate predictions. Although light has been shed on the low-level cloud feedback, much remains to be understood about the physical mechanisms at the basis of the response of these clouds to climate warming. In the present study, EC-EARTH Single Column Model (SCM) is used to explore the boundary-layer cloud-climate feedback by imposing a Radiative-Advective Equilibrium, namely a balance between the radiative cooling and the advection of warm air. 30-year simulations are performed with the SCM forced by high-frequency cfSites outputs of the CMIP5 simulations of the host General Circulation Model (GCM) for both the AMIP and AMIP4K experiments. As this study exclusively focuses on marine low-level cloud regimes, the simulations are performed at the Barbados Cloud Observatory in the so-called "dry period", when the large-scale forcing are representative of subtropical marine trade-wind conditions. A first step is to assess how representative long-term SCM simulations are of their host GCM. Subsequently, the SCM is forced by different GCMs within the same framework. In this way, the contribution of the physical parameterization to the boundary-layer cloud feedback is isolated from the dynamics, and systematically evaluated. Finally, a procedure to integrate Large-Eddy Simulations and observations into this framework is discussed.

  5. Cloud and boundary layer interactions over the Arctic sea ice in late summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, in the central Arctic sea-ice pack in late summer 2008, provide a detailed view of cloud–atmosphere–surface interactions and vertical mixing processes over the sea-ice environment. Measurements from a suite of ground-based remote sensors, near-surface meteorological and aerosol instruments, and profiles from radiosondes and a helicopter are combined to characterize a week-long period dominated by low-level, mixed-phase, stratocumulus clouds. Detailed case studies and statistical analyses are used to develop a conceptual model for the cloud and atmosphere structure and their interactions in this environment. Clouds were persistent during the period of study, having qualities that suggest they were sustained through a combination of advective influences and in-cloud processes, with little contribution from the surface. Radiative cooling near cloud top produced buoyancy-driven, turbulent eddies that contributed to cloud formation and created a cloud-driven mixed layer. The depth of this mixed layer was related to the amount of turbulence and condensed cloud water. Coupling of this cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface boundary layer was primarily determined by proximity. For 75% of the period of study, the primary stratocumulus cloud-driven mixed layer was decoupled from the surface and typically at a warmer potential temperature. Since the near-surface temperature was constrained by the ocean–ice mixture, warm temperatures aloft suggest that these air masses had not significantly interacted with the sea-ice surface. Instead, back-trajectory analyses suggest that these warm air masses advected into the central Arctic Basin from lower latitudes. Moisture and aerosol particles likely accompanied these air masses, providing necessary support for cloud formation. On the occasions when cloud–surface coupling did occur, back trajectories indicated that these air masses advected at

  6. Observations of high droplet number concentrations in Southern Ocean boundary layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chubb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud physics data collected during the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO campaigns provide a snapshot of unusual wintertime microphysical conditions in the boundary layer over the Southern Ocean. On 29 June 2011, the HIAPER sampled the boundary layer in a region of pre-frontal warm air advection between 58 and 48° S to the south of Tasmania. Cloud droplet number concentrations were consistent with climatological values in the northernmost profiles but were exceptionally high for wintertime in the Southern Ocean at 100–200 cm−3 in the southernmost profiles. Sub-micron (0.06  < D <  1 µm aerosol concentrations for the southern profiles were up to 400 cm−3. Analysis of back trajectories and atmospheric chemistry observations revealed that while conditions in the troposphere were more typical of a clean remote ocean airmass, there was some evidence of continental or anthropogenic influence. However, the hypothesis of long-range transport of continental aerosol fails to explain the magnitude of the aerosol and cloud droplet concentration in the boundary layer. Instead, the gale force surface winds in this case (wind speed at 167 m above sea level was  > 25 m s−1 were most likely responsible for production of sea spray aerosol which influenced the microphysical properties of the boundary layer clouds. The smaller size and higher number concentration of cloud droplets is inferred to increase the albedo of these clouds, and these conditions occur regularly, and are expected to increase in frequency, over windy parts of the Southern Ocean.

  7. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  8. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  9. Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An ARM Mobile Facility Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Remillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; hide

    2015-01-01

    Capsule: A 21-month deployment to Graciosa Island in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean is providing an unprecedented record of the clouds, aerosols and meteorology in a poorly-sampled remote marine environment The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009- December 2010) comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the marine boundary layer. Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1- 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to be a

  10. Turbulence structure of the boundary layer below marine clouds in the SOFIA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Réchou

    Full Text Available The SOFIA (Surface of the Ocean: Flux and Interaction with the Atmosphere experiment, included in the ASTEX (Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment field program, was conducted in June 1992 in the Azores region in order to investigate air-sea exchanges, as well as the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and its capping low-level cloud cover. We present an analysis of the vertical structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL, and especially of its turbulence characteristics, deduced from the aircraft missions performed during SOFIA. The meteorological situations were characteristic of a temperate latitude under anticyclonic conditions, i.e., with weak to moderate winds, weak surface sensible heat flux, and broken capping low-altitude cloud cover topped by a strong trade inversion. We show that the mixed layer, driven by the surface fluxes, is decoupled from the above cloud layer. Although weak, the surface buoyancy flux, and the convective velocity scale deduced from it, are relevant for scaling the turbulence moments. The mixed layer then follows the behaviour of a continental convective boundary layer, with the exception of the entrainment process, which is weak in the SOFIA data. These results are confirmed by conditional sampling analysis, which shows that the major turbulence source lies in the buoyant moist updrafts at the surface.

  11. Turbulence structure of the boundary layer below marine clouds in the SOFIA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Réchou

    1995-10-01

    Full Text Available The SOFIA (Surface of the Ocean: Flux and Interaction with the Atmosphere experiment, included in the ASTEX (Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment field program, was conducted in June 1992 in the Azores region in order to investigate air-sea exchanges, as well as the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and its capping low-level cloud cover. We present an analysis of the vertical structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL, and especially of its turbulence characteristics, deduced from the aircraft missions performed during SOFIA. The meteorological situations were characteristic of a temperate latitude under anticyclonic conditions, i.e., with weak to moderate winds, weak surface sensible heat flux, and broken capping low-altitude cloud cover topped by a strong trade inversion. We show that the mixed layer, driven by the surface fluxes, is decoupled from the above cloud layer. Although weak, the surface buoyancy flux, and the convective velocity scale deduced from it, are relevant for scaling the turbulence moments. The mixed layer then follows the behaviour of a continental convective boundary layer, with the exception of the entrainment process, which is weak in the SOFIA data. These results are confirmed by conditional sampling analysis, which shows that the major turbulence source lies in the buoyant moist updrafts at the surface.

  12. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer: An Arm Mobile Facility Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert; Wyant, Matthew; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Rémillard, Jasmine; Kollias, Pavlos; Fletcher, Jennifer; Stemmler, Jayson; de Szoeke, Simone; Yuter, Sandra; Miller, Matthew; Mechem, David; Tselioudis, George; Chiu, J. Christine; Mann, Julian A. L.; O’Connor, Ewan J.; Hogan, Robin J.; Dong, Xiquan; Miller, Mark; Ghate, Virendra; Jefferson, Anne; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Palikonda, Rabindra; Albrecht, Bruce; Luke, Ed; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Yanluan

    2015-03-01

    The Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) 38 deployment at Graciosa Island in the Azores generated a 21 month (April 2009-December 2010) 39 comprehensive dataset documenting clouds, aerosols and precipitation using the Atmospheric 40 Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). The scientific aim of the deployment is 41 to gain improved understanding of the interactions of clouds, aerosols and precipitation in the 42 marine boundary layer. 43 Graciosa Island straddles the boundary between the subtropics and midlatitudes in the 44 Northeast Atlantic Ocean, and consequently experiences a great diversity of meteorological and 45 cloudiness conditions. Low clouds are the dominant cloud type, with stratocumulus and cumulus 46 occurring regularly. Approximately half of all clouds contained precipitation detectable as radar 47 echoes below the cloud base. Radar and satellite observations show that clouds with tops from 1-48 11 km contribute more or less equally to surface-measured precipitation at Graciosa. A wide 49 range of aerosol conditions was sampled during the deployment consistent with the diversity of 50 sources as indicated by back trajectory analysis. Preliminary findings suggest important two-way 51 interactions between aerosols and clouds at Graciosa, with aerosols affecting light precipitation 52 and cloud radiative properties while being controlled in part by precipitation scavenging. 53 The data from at Graciosa are being compared with short-range forecasts made a variety 54 of models. A pilot analysis with two climate and two weather forecast models shows that they 55 reproduce the observed time-varying vertical structure of lower-tropospheric cloud fairly well, 56 but the cloud-nucleating aerosol concentrations less well. The Graciosa site has been chosen to 57 be a long-term ARM site that became operational in October 2013.

  13. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 3. Separation of Parameterization Biases in Single-Column Model CAM5 Simulations of Shallow Cumulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-01-01

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) Project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only a relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.

  14. Low cloud investigations for project FIRE: Island studies of cloud properties, surface radiation, and boundary layer dynamics. A simulation of the reflectivity over a stratocumulus cloud deck by the Monte Carlo method. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    1993-01-01

    The radiation field over a broken stratocumulus cloud deck is simulated by the Monte Carlo method. We conducted four experiments to investigate the main factor for the observed shortwave reflectively over the FIRE flight 2 leg 5, in which reflectivity decreases almost linearly from the cloud center to cloud edge while the cloud top height and the brightness temperature remain almost constant through out the clouds. From our results, the geometry effect, however, did not contribute significantly to what has been observed. We found that the variation of the volume extinction coefficient as a function of its relative position in the cloud affects the reflectivity efficiently. Additional check of the brightness temperature of each experiment also confirms this conclusion. The cloud microphysical data showed some interesting features. We found that the cloud droplet spectrum is nearly log-normal distributed when the clouds were solid. However, whether the shift of cloud droplet spectrum toward the larger end is not certain. The decrease of number density from cloud center to cloud edges seems to have more significant effects on the optical properties.

  15. Variability of Vertical Velocity Statistics in the Cloud-Free Convective Boundary Layer as Revealed by Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, L. K.; Newsom, R. K.; Turner, D. D.

    2016-12-01

    The majority of our understanding of the behavior of vertical velocity in the convective boundary layer is based on a small number of short-term observations made using either in situ or with remote sensing techniques over a limited number of sites. Analysis of long-term statistics have been lacking due to the scarcity of appropriate measurements. The US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is addressing this shortcoming through the deployment of a suite of scanning Doppler Lidars at a number of locations, associated with reconfiguration of the ARM Southern Great Plains site and the recent Holistic Interaction of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) field campaign. In this study, we utilize data collected by a Doppler Lidar system that has operated continuously from 2011 to the present at a location in north-central Oklahoma to examine the long-term behavior of the vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis. The application of standard normalization techniques, such as the mixed-layer depth and Deardorff convective velocity scale, do a good job in collapsing the data onto a single curve during periods in which the boundary layer is well developed, albeit with considerable amounts of scatter. During non-steady conditions, such as those found in the morning, scaling using the Deardorff convective velocity scale is found to work poorly. This behavior is likely due to the eddy turnover time and the growth rate of the boundary-layer depth. Systematic differences in the turbulence statistics are found by season, for non-stationary conditions, or periods with relatively small and large values of the surface friction velocity measured at the surface, amount of static instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top.

  16. Synoptic/Mesoscale Modulation of Cloud, Boundary-Layer, and Aerosol Processes During ASCOS/AMISA: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, O. P.; Shupe, M.; Sukovich, E.; Tjernström, M.; Gasiewski, A.; Brooks, B. J.; Leuski, V.; Brooks, I. M.

    2009-05-01

    Arctic clouds and boundary-layer processes are believed to have an important impact on the surface energy budget of the Arctic pack ice, and hence on the fate of the Arctic sea ice. The clouds and boundary-layer structure in turn are modulated by synoptic and mesoscale processes and by aerosols. Unfortunately, many of the complex interactive processes affecting key properties of the clouds and their effect on the sea ice are unknown. The overall objective of the Arctic Summer Cloud-Ocean Study (ASCOS) and Arctic Mechanisms of Interaction between the Surface and Atmosphere (AMISA) field program was to provide the data to improve our understanding of these processes during the fall freeze-up period. ASCOS/AMISA was conducted in August and September 2008 near the North Pole using coordinated measurements from the Swedish icebreaker Oden and the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. Both are IPY-approved projects. ASCOS measurements include an extensive array of ship-based and on-ice remote sensors, 4X daily rawinsondes, tethersonde measurements, helicopter-based measurements, and near-surface measurements. The measurements focused on the macro- and microphysical structure of the Arctic clouds, the associated high-temporal resolution thermal and kinematic structure of the lower troposphere, aerosol sizes and types, and the structure of the ice surface conditions. They utilize remote sensing technology combined with retrieval techniques and in-situ measurements. The remote sensing instruments include a Ka- band cloud radar, an enhanced S-band vertically-pointing cloud and precipitation radar, a ceilometer, a microwave radiometer, a 449 MHz wind profiler, a Doppler sodar, and a scanning 55-GHz radiometer. The DC- 8 measurements by AMISA provided in-situ and remote sensing observations of the microphysical structure of the clouds, the atmospheric thermodynamic structure, aerosol sizes and composition, and high resolution microwave and radiometric imagery of the sea ice. The

  17. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe, E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro; Gurlui, Silviu Octavian, E-mail: dimitriu@uaic.ro [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi (Romania); Cazacu, Marius Mihai [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania and Department of Physics, Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi, 59A Mangeron Blvd., 700 (Romania); Timofte, Adrian [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, Faculty of Physics, Atmosphere Optics, Spectroscopy and Lasers Laboratory, 11 Carol I Blvd., 700506 Iasi, Romania and National Meteorological Administration, Regional Forecast Center Bacau, 1 Cuza Voda Str., 60 (Romania)

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  18. Intercomparisons of marine boundary layer cloud properties from the ARM CAP-MBL campaign and two MODIS cloud products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Song, Hua; Ma, Po-Lun; Ghan, Steven J.; Platnick, Steven; Minnis, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    From April 2009 to December 2010, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program carried out an observational field campaign on Graciosa Island, targeting the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds over the Azores region. In this paper, we present an intercomparison of the MBL cloud properties, namely, cloud liquid water path (LWP), cloud optical thickness (COT), and cloud-droplet effective radius (CER), among retrievals from the ARM mobile facility and two Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud products (Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)-MODIS and Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System-MODIS). A total of 63 daytime single-layer MBL cloud cases are selected for intercomparison. Comparison of collocated retrievals indicates that the two MODIS cloud products agree well on both COT and CER retrievals, with the correlation coefficient R > 0.95, despite their significant difference in spatial sampling. In both MODIS products, the CER retrievals based on the 2.1 µm band (CER2.1) are significantly larger than those based on the 3.7 µm band (CER3.7). The GSFC-MODIS cloud product is collocated and compared with ground-based ARM observations at several temporal-spatial scales. In general, the correlation increases with more precise collocation. For the 63 selected MBL cloud cases, the GSFC-MODIS LWP and COT retrievals agree reasonably well with the ground-based observations with no apparent bias and correlation coefficient R around 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. However, GSFC-MODIS CER3.7 and CER2.1 retrievals have a lower correlation (R 0.5) with the ground-based retrievals. For the 63 selected cases, they are on average larger than ground observations by about 1.5 µm and 3.0 µm, respectively. Taking into account that the MODIS CER retrievals are only sensitive to cloud top reduces the bias only by 0.5 µm.

  19. CLOUD-MAP Field Campaign Measurements of the Earth's Lower Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Nicholas; Avery, Alyssa; Jacob, Jamey

    2016-11-01

    CLOUD-MAP (Collaboration Leading Operational UAS Development for Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics) is a 4 year, 4 university collaboration to develop capabilities that will allow meteorologists and atmospheric scientists to use unmanned aircraft as a common, useful everyday tool. Currently, we know that systems can be used for meteorological measurements, but they are far from being practical or robust for everyday field diagnostics by the average meteorologist or scientist. In particular, UAS are well suited for the lower atmosphere, namely the lower boundary layer that has a large impact on the atmosphere and where much of the weather phenomena begin. A sensor set called MDASS (Meteorological Data Acquisition Sonde System) was developed and used to collect and transmit live data necessary for developing such forecasts as well as be usable on multiple platforms ranging from fixed-wing and multi-rotor UAVs to rockets. The data transmitted from MDASS is viewed and stored on a ground control station via LabVIEW in a program developed for real-time data analysis. Results from the first CLOUD-MAP are presented. The campaign resulted in nearly 250 unmanned aircraft flights of 12 separate platforms over a 3 day period, collecting meteorological data at 3 different sites.

  20. Boundary Layer Study. Experimental Validation Test Plan. Phase 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    profile aceros the boundary layer. Also included are the measurement of surface properties including pressure, temperature, heat transfer rate, and...the sninplos charged either by fric~tion or byy exposure to passes. The. voimelor owWj is displayed As the turntabie rotates. the sample a corona . N...When the Corona -charginig arm inso.e arm. After about 150 seconlds aale ur rors introducec! by variationis among tost levied, 11 Is exiendead to the

  1. Early Warning Signals for Regime Transition in the Stable Boundary Layer : A Model Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooijdonk, I.G.S.; Moene, A. F.; Scheffer, M.; Clercx, H. J H; van de Wiel, B.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    The evening transition is investigated in an idealized model for the nocturnal boundary layer. From earlier studies it is known that the nocturnal boundary layer may manifest itself in two distinct regimes, depending on the ambient synoptic conditions: strong-wind or overcast conditions typically

  2. Numerical experiments in the stability of leading edge boundary layer flow. A two-dimensional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theofilis, Vassilios; Theofilis, V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study is performed in order to gain insight to the stability of the infinite swept attachment line boundary layer. The basic flow is taken to be of the Hiemenz class with an added cross-flow giving rise to a constant thickness boundary layer along the attachment line. The full

  3. Single-Column Model Simulations of Subtropical Marine Boundary-Layer Cloud Transitions Under Weakening Inversions: SCM SIMULATIONS OF CLOUD TRANSITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neggers, R. A. J. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Ackerman, A. S. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York NY USA; Angevine, W. M. [CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder CO USA; NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder CO USA; Bazile, E. [Météo France/CNRM, Toulouse France; Beau, I. [Météo France/ENM, Toulouse France; Blossey, P. N. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Boutle, I. A. [Met Office, Exeter UK; de Bruijn, C. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Cheng, A. [NOAA Center for Weather and Climate Prediction, Environmental Modeling Center, College Park MD USA; van der Dussen, J. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; Fletcher, J. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; University of Leeds, Leeds UK; Dal Gesso, S. [Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, Department of Geosciences, University of Cologne, Cologne Germany; Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Jam, A. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Kawai, H. [Meteorological Research Institute, Climate Research Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tsukuba Japan; Cheedela, S. K. [Department of Atmosphere in the Earth System, Max-Planck Institut für Meteorologie, Hamburg Germany; Larson, V. E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; Lefebvre, M. -P. [Météo-France/CNRM & CNRS/IPSL/LMD, Toulouse France; Lock, A. P. [Met Office, Exeter UK; Meyer, N. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee WI USA; de Roode, S. R. [Department of Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, Delft The Netherlands; de Rooy, W. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt The Netherlands; Sandu, I. [Section of Physical Aspects, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading UK; Xiao, H. [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles CA USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Xu, K. -M. [NASA Langley Research Centre, Hampton VI USA

    2017-10-01

    Results are presented of the GASS/EUCLIPSE single-column model inter-comparison study on the subtropical marine low-level cloud transition. A central goal is to establish the performance of state-of-the-art boundary-layer schemes for weather and climate mod- els for this cloud regime, using large-eddy simulations of the same scenes as a reference. A novelty is that the comparison covers four different cases instead of one, in order to broaden the covered parameter space. Three cases are situated in the North-Eastern Pa- cific, while one reflects conditions in the North-Eastern Atlantic. A set of variables is considered that reflects key aspects of the transition process, making use of simple met- rics to establish the model performance. Using this method some longstanding problems in low level cloud representation are identified. Considerable spread exists among models concerning the cloud amount, its vertical structure and the associated impact on radia- tive transfer. The sign and amplitude of these biases differ somewhat per case, depending on how far the transition has progressed. After cloud breakup the ensemble median ex- hibits the well-known “too few too bright” problem. The boundary layer deepening rate and its state of decoupling are both underestimated, while the representation of the thin capping cloud layer appears complicated by a lack of vertical resolution. Encouragingly, some models are successful in representing the full set of variables, in particular the verti- cal structure and diurnal cycle of the cloud layer in transition. An intriguing result is that the median of the model ensemble performs best, inspiring a new approach in subgrid pa- rameterization.

  4. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jähn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Large eddy simulations (LESs are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to “gray zone modeling” when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with PM2.5within boundary layer: Cloud/fog and regional transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minmin; Wang, Yan; Li, Hongli; Li, Tao; Nie, Xiaoling; Cao, Fangfang; Yang, Fengchun; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Tao; Qie, Guanghao; Jin, Tong; Du, Lili; Wang, Wenxing

    2018-01-31

    A study of PM 2.5 -associated PAHs analysis at Mount Lushan (1165m) was conducted to investigate the distributions of PAHs in PM 2.5 and influences of cloud/fog. The main purpose was to quantify the main emission sources of PAHs and estimate regional transport effects within the boundary layer. Mount Lushan is located between the boundary layer and troposphere, which is an ideal site for atmosphere transport investigation. The concentrations of PAHs in PM 2.5 were analyzed with GC-MS. The results showed that the volume concentration was 6.98ng/m 3 with a range from 1.47 to 25.17ng/m 3 and PAHs mass were 160.24μg/g (from 63.86 to 427.97μg/g) during the sampling time at Mount Lushan. The dominant compounds are BbF, Pyr and BP. In terms of aromatic-ring PAHs distributions, 4-6-ring PAHs are predominant, indicating that the high-ring PAHs tend to contribute more than low-ring PAHs in particulates. Due to frequent cloud/fog days at Mount Lushan, PAHs concentrations in the PM 2.5 were determined before and after cloud/fog weather. The results demonstrated that the cloud/fog and rain conditions cause lower PAHs levels. Regression analysis was used for studying the relationship of PAHs distributions with meteorological conditions like temperature, humidity and wind. The results showed that the temperature and wind speed were inversely related with PAHs concentration but humidity had no significant relationship. Furthermore, backward trajectories and PCA combined with DR (diagnostic ratio analysis) were employed to identify the influences of regional transport and main emission sources. The results revealed that PAHs in PM 2.5 were mainly affected by regional transport with the main emissions by mobile vehicle and steel industry, which contributed about 56.0% to the total PAHs in the area of Mount Lushan. In addition, backward trajectories revealed that the dominant air masses were from the northwest accounting for about one third of total PAHs. Copyright © 2018

  6. Coastal Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layers and the Role of Cloud-Top Entrainment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eleuterio, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    ...) to accurately forecast the height and structure of the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) in the coastal zone is analyzed and compared to surface and aircraft observations from the Dynamics and Evolution of Coastal Stratus (DECS...

  7. Application of a commercial lidar-ceilometer to studies of aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ramkilowan, A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available has therefore become of great interest. CSIR/DPSS has acquired and deployed a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer chiefly for the purpose of investigating the vertical distribution of aerosols in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and cloud base height...

  8. Study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer using Thermal Large Eddy Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillant, G. [CEA/Grenoble DEN/DER/SSTH/LMDL, 17 rue des Martyrs 38054, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Husson, S. [INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bataille, F. [INSA/Centre de Thermique de Lyon (UMR CNRS 5008), Bat. Sadi Carnot 69621, Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francoise.Daumas-Bataille@univ-perp.fr; Ducros, F. [CEA/Grenoble DEN/DER/SSTH/LMDL, 17 rue des Martyrs 38054, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-12-15

    We investigate Thermal Large Eddy Simulation in a complex case using Trio U. We develop a thermal turbulent inflow condition based on parallel flows in order to simulate a turbulent thermal boundary layer. This inflow condition is tested with a turbulent channel flow. We show that it produces fine profiles for velocity and temperature. Later, this inlet condition is used in the case of blowing through a porous plate. Two different blowing regimes are studied: the classical turbulent boundary layer and the blown off boundary layer. Comparisons show that we obtain similar experimental and numerical profiles (Brillant, G., Husson, S., Bataille, F., 2008. Experimental study of the blowing impact on a hot turbulent boundary layer. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 51 (7-8), 1996-2005.). We finish with additional results obtained only through numerical simulations.

  9. Study of turbulent boundary layer structures using Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Longmire, Ellen; Ortiz-Duenas, Cecilia

    2009-11-01

    Tomographic-PIV was applied to investigate vortical structures in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers. Measurements were performed in a water channel facility with δ 110 mm for Reτ 2400 and 2900. Laser sheets with thickness up to 7mm were aligned parallel to the bounding surface. Four cameras with 2k x 2k pixels were placed in a rectangular array facing the measurement volume with tilt angle ˜30 to the wall normal direction. Magnification was ˜0.05 mm/pixel. The resulting measurement volumes were 0.8δ x 0.8δ in the streamwise and spanwise directions and 0.065δ or 120 viscous units in the wall-normal direction. Correlations were performed on 64^3 voxel volumes with 75% overlap yielding a vector spacing of 25^3 viscous units. The data were probed using swirl strength and direction as well as convection velocity to identify and characterize relatively large scale eddies and structures within the volumes. The results will be discussed and compared with results at similar wall-normal locations in lower Reynolds number DNS channel (Reτ=590, 934 of Moser et al., 1999 and del 'Alamo et al., 2004) and wind tunnel (Reτ=1160) flows.

  10. Study of stable atmospheric boundary layer characterization over highveld region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luhunga, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERIZATION OVER HIGHVELD REGION OF SOUTH AFRICA Philbert Luhunga1, 2, 3, George Djolov1, Venkataraman Sivakumar1,4,5 1 University of Pretoria, Department of Geography Geoinformatics and Meterology, Lynnwood road, 0001.... INTRODUCTION The stable atmospheric boundary layer (SBL) study over the Highveld South Africa has a special relevance, since it has the majority of the electric power generating plants located in this region. SBL is characterized by a steady wind near...

  11. Wind tunnel study of a vertical axis wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Vincent; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are in a relatively infant state of development when compared to their cousins the horizontal axis wind turbines. Very few studies have been carried out to characterize the wake flow behind VAWTs, and virtually none to observe the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer. Here we present results from an experiment carried out at the EPFL-WIRE boundary-layer wind tunnel and designed to study the interaction between a turbulent boundary layer flow and a VAWT. Specifically we use stereoscopic particle image velocimetry to observe and quantify the influence of the boundary layer flow on the wake generated by a VAWT, as well as the effect the VAWT has on the boundary layer flow profile downstream. We find that the wake behind the VAWT is strongly asymmetric, due to the varying aerodynamic forces on the blades as they change their position around the rotor. We also find that the wake adds strong turbulence levels to the flow, particularly on the periphery of the wake where vortices and strong velocity gradients are present. The boundary layer is also shown to cause greater momentum to be entrained downwards rather than upwards into the wake.

  12. Early Warning Signals for Regime Transition in the Stable Boundary Layer: A Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooijdonk, I. G. S.; Moene, A. F.; Scheffer, M.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.

    2017-02-01

    The evening transition is investigated in an idealized model for the nocturnal boundary layer. From earlier studies it is known that the nocturnal boundary layer may manifest itself in two distinct regimes, depending on the ambient synoptic conditions: strong-wind or overcast conditions typically lead to weakly stable, turbulent nights; clear-sky and weak-wind conditions, on the other hand, lead to very stable, weakly turbulent conditions. Previously, the dynamical behaviour near the transition between these regimes was investigated in an idealized setting, relying on Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity to describe turbulent transport. Here, we investigate a similar set-up, using direct numerical simulation; in contrast to MO-based models, this type of simulation does not need to rely on turbulence closure assumptions. We show that previous predictions are verified, but now independent of turbulence parametrizations. Also, it appears that a regime shift to the very stable state is signaled in advance by specific changes in the dynamics of the turbulent boundary layer. Here, we show how these changes may be used to infer a quantitative estimate of the transition point from the weakly stable boundary layer to the very stable boundary layer. In addition, it is shown that the idealized, nocturnal boundary-layer system shares important similarities with generic non-linear dynamical systems that exhibit critical transitions. Therefore, the presence of other, generic early warning signals is tested as well. Indeed, indications are found that such signals are present in stably stratified turbulent flows.

  13. Properties of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the trade wind marine boundary layer of the western North Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Kristensen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cloud optical properties in the trade winds over the eastern Caribbean Sea have been shown to be sensitive to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. The objective of the current study was to investigate the CCN properties in the marine boundary layer (MBL in the tropical western North Atlantic, in order to assess the respective roles of inorganic sulfate, organic species, long-range transported mineral dust and sea-salt particles. Measurements were carried out in June–July 2013, on the east coast of Barbados, and included CCN number concentrations, particle number size distributions and offline analysis of sampled particulate matter (PM and sampled accumulation mode particles for an investigation of composition and mixing state with transmission electron microscopy (TEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. During most of the campaign, significant mass concentrations of long-range transported mineral dust was present in the PM, and influence from local island sources can be ruled out. The CCN and particle number concentrations were similar to what can be expected in pristine marine environments. The hygroscopicity parameter κ was inferred, and values in the range 0.2–0.5 were found during most of the campaign, with similar values for the Aitken and the accumulation mode. The accumulation mode particles studied with TEM were dominated by non-refractory material, and concentrations of mineral dust, sea salt and soot were too small to influence the CCN properties. It is highly likely that the CCN were dominated by a mixture of sulfate species and organic compounds.

  14. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, T.C. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, W.P.; Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes the phenomena of wake-induced transition of the boundary layers on a NACA0012 airfoil using measured phase-averaged data. Especially, the phase-averaged wall shear stresses are reasonably evaluated using the principle of Computational Preston Tube Method. Due to the passing wake, the turbulent patch is generated in the laminar boundary layer on the airfoil and the boundary layer becomes temporarily transitional. The patches propagate downstream with less speed than free-stream velocity and merge with each other at further downstream station, and the boundary layer becomes more transitional. The generation of turbulent patch at the leading edge of the airfoil mainly depends on velocity defects and turbulent intensity profiles of passing wakes. However, the growth and merging of turbulent patches depend on local streamwise pressure gradients as well as characteristics of turbulent patches. In this transition process, the present experimental data show very similar features to the previous numerical and experimental studies. It is confirmed that the two phase-averaged mean velocity dips appear in the outer region of transitional boundary layer for each passing cycle. Relatively high values of the phase-averaged turbulent fluctuations in the outer region indicate the possibility that breakdown occurs in the outer layer not near the wall. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs.

  15. The Impact of Land-Surface Parameter Properties and Resolution on the Simulated Cloud-Topped Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Leonhard; Maurer, Vera; Kalthoff, Norbert; Kiseleva, Olga

    2017-12-01

    Sensitivity tests using the `Consortium for Small Scale Modeling' model in large-eddy simulation mode with a grid spacing of 100 m are performed to investigate the impact of the resolution of soil- and vegetation-related parameters on a cloud-topped boundary layer in a real-data environment. The reference simulation uses the highest land-surface parameter resolution available for operational purposes (300 m). The sensitivity experiments were conducted using spatial averaging of about 2.5 km× 2.5 km and 10 km × 10 km for the land-surface parameters and a completely homogeneous distribution for the whole model domain of about 70 km × 70 km. Additionally, one experiment with a higher mean soil moisture and another with six mesoscale patches of enhanced or reduced soil moisture are performed. Boundary-layer clouds developed in all simulations. To assess the deviations of cloud cover on different scales within the model domain, we calculated the root-mean-square deviation ( RMSD) between the sensitivity experiments and the reference simulation. The RMSD depends strongly on the spatial resolution at which cloud fields are compared. Different spatial resolutions of the cloud fields were generated by applying a low-pass filter. For all sensitivity experiments, large RMSD values occur for cut-off wavelengths {}5 km, the RMSD is still pronounced for the simulation with higher mean soil moisture. Additionally, for cut-off wavelengths between 5 and 30 km, considerable differences can be found for the experiment with mesoscale patches and for that with homogeneous land-surface parameters. Spatial averaging of land-surface parameters for areas of 2.5 km × 2.5 km and 10 km × 10 km results in larger patch sizes but simultaneously in reduced amplitudes of land-surface parameter anomalies and shows the lowest RMSD for all cut-off wavelengths.

  16. Infrared imaging and tufts studies of boundary layer flow regimes on a NACA 0012 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartenberg, Ehud; Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.; Mcree, Griffith J.

    1989-01-01

    A study of boundary-layer flow regimes on a NACA 0012 airfoil from zero angle of attack up to separation is presented. The boundary-layer transition from the laminar to the turbulent regime and the onset of the separation were detected by surface thermography of the airfoil performed with an infrared imaging system. The findings were compared with observations of aluminum-foil tufts visible with the infrared imaging system. This arrangement allows the infrared imaging system to assume the dual role of flow regime detection through surface thermography and flow visualization through the observation of the aluminum-foil tufts. Ultimately the temperature history on an uncontaminated surface could provide an interpretation of the state of boundary-layer flow. Separation studies performed on the NACA 0012 airfoil showed that aluminum foil tufts can be observed with infrared imaging systems.

  17. Experimental study on the effect of unsteadiness on boundary layer development on a linear turbine cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States). Turbomachinery Performance Lab.; Pappu, K. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (United States). Turbomachinery Performance Lab.

    1997-08-01

    The results from an experimental investigation of unsteady boundary layer behavior on a linear turbine cascade are presented in this paper. To perform a detailed study on unsteady cascade aerodynamics and heat transfer, a new large-scale, high-subsonic research facility for simulating the periodic unsteady flow has been developed. It is capable of sequentially generating up to four different unsteady inlet flow conditions that lead to four different passing frequencies, wake structures, and freestream turbulence intensities. For a given Reynolds number, two different unsteady wake formations are utilized. Detailed unsteady boundary layer velocity. turbulence intensity, and pressure measurements are performed along the suction and pressure surfaces of one blade. The results display the transition and development of the boundary layer, ensemble-averaged velocity, and turbulence intensity. (orig.). With 11 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Progress in Understanding the Impacts of 3-D Cloud Structure on MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Werner, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Andrew; DiGirolamo, Larry; Meyer, Kerry; Marshak, Alexander; Wind, Galina; Zhao, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Theory: A novel framework based on 2-D Tayler expansion for quantifying the uncertainty in MODIS retrievals caused by sub-pixel reflectance inhomogeneity. (Zhang et al. 2016). How cloud vertical structure influences MODIS LWP retrievals. (Miller et al. 2016). Observation: Analysis of failed MODIS cloud property retrievals. (Cho et al. 2015). Cloud property retrievals from 15m resolution ASTER observations. (Werner et al. 2016). Modeling: LES-Satellite observation simulator (Zhang et al. 2012, Miller et al. 2016).

  19. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhunga, P; Djolov, G [University of Pretoria (South Africa); Esau, I, E-mail: george.djolov@up.ac.z

    2010-08-15

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II 'Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes'. The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  20. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhunga, P.; Esau, I.; Djolov, G.

    2010-08-01

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II "Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes". The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  1. Study of Varying Boundary Layer Height on Turret Flow Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    the cylinder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 3.4. Spanwise-averaged Reynolds stress profiles in wake of cylinder, ReD = 3900...and fine mesh for grid con- vergence study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 4.48. L2 residuals for Cases 1, 5, 9, and 17...the ensemble version of the governing equations is solved. In this case the modelling introduces new apparent stresses referred to as Reynolds stresses

  2. Aerosol and cloud microphysics covariability in the northeast Pacific boundary layer estimated with ship-based and satellite remote sensing observations: NE Pacific Aerosol-Cloud Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painemal, David [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Chiu, J. -Y. Christine [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading UK; Minnis, Patrick [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Yost, Christopher [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton Virginia USA; Zhou, Xiaoli [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal Quebec Canada; Cadeddu, Maria [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont Illinois USA; Eloranta, Edwin [Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison Wisconsin USA; Lewis, Ernie R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton New York USA; Ferrare, Richard [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton Virginia USA; Kollias, Pavlos [School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA

    2017-02-27

    Ship measurements collected over the northeast Pacific along transects between the port of Los Angeles (33.7°N, 118.2°W) and Honolulu (21.3°N, 157.8°W) during May to August 2013 were utilized to investigate the covariability between marine low cloud microphysical and aerosol properties. Ship-based retrievals of cloud optical depth (τ) from a Sun photometer and liquid water path (LWP) from a microwave radiometer were combined to derive cloud droplet number concentration Nd and compute a cloud-aerosol interaction (ACI) metric defined as ACICCN = ∂ ln(Nd)/∂ ln(CCN), with CCN denoting the cloud condensation nuclei concentration measured at 0.4% (CCN0.4) and 0.3% (CCN0.3) supersaturation. Analysis of CCN0.4, accumulation mode aerosol concentration (Na), and extinction coefficient (σext) indicates that Na and σext can be used as CCN0.4 proxies for estimating ACI. ACICCN derived from 10 min averaged Nd and CCN0.4 and CCN0.3, and CCN0.4 regressions using Na and σext, produce high ACICCN: near 1.0, that is, a fractional change in aerosols is associated with an equivalent fractional change in Nd. ACICCN computed in deep boundary layers was small (ACICCN = 0.60), indicating that surface aerosol measurements inadequately represent the aerosol variability below clouds. Satellite cloud retrievals from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and GOES-15 data were compared against ship-based retrievals and further analyzed to compute a satellite-based ACICCN. Satellite data correlated well with their ship-based counterparts with linear correlation coefficients equal to or greater than 0.78. Combined satellite Nd and ship-based CCN0.4 and Na yielded a maximum ACICCN = 0.88–0.92, a value slightly less than the ship-based ACICCN, but still consistent with aircraft-based studies in the eastern Pacific.

  3. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  4. Characterization of particle cloud droplet activity and composition in the free troposphere and the boundary layer during INTEX-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Roberts

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, aerosol size distributions, and submicron aerosol composition were made as part of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment Phase B (INTEX-B campaign during spring 2006. Measurements were conducted from an aircraft platform over the northeastern Pacific and western North America with a focus on how the transport and evolution of Asian pollution across the Pacific Ocean affected CCN properties. A broad range of air masses were sampled and here we focus on three distinct air mass types defined geographically: the Pacific free troposphere (FT, the marine boundary layer (MBL, and the polluted continental boundary layer in the California Central Valley (CCV. These observations add to the few observations of CCN in the FT. CCN concentrations showed a large range of concentrations between air masses, however CCN activity was similar for the MBL and CCV (κ~0.2–0.25. FT air masses showed evidence of long-range transport from Asia and CCN activity was consistently higher than for the boundary layer air masses. Bulk chemical measurements predicted CCN activity reasonably well for the CCV and FT air masses. Decreasing trends in κ with organic mass fraction were observed for the combination of the FT and CCV air masses and can be explained by the measured soluble inorganic chemical components. Changes in hygroscopicity associated with differences in the non-refractory organic composition were too small to be distinguished from the simultaneous changes in inorganic ion composition in the FT and MBL, although measurements for the large organic fractions (0.6–0.8 found in the CCV showed values of the organic fraction hygroscopicity consistent with other polluted regions (κorg~0.1–0.2. A comparison of CCN-derived κ (for particles at the critical diameter to H-TDMA-derived κ (for particles at 100 nm diameter showed similar trends, however the CCN-derived κ values were significantly

  5. Statistical-mechanical approach to study the hydrodynamic stability of the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, G.; Vercauteren, N.; Kaiser, A.; Dubrulle, B.; Faranda, D.

    2017-08-01

    We study the hydrodynamic equilibrium properties of the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer from measurements obtained in the Snow-Horizontal Array Turbulence Study campaign at the Plaine Morte Glacier in the Swiss Alps. Our approach is based on a combination of dynamical systems techniques and statistical analysis. The main idea is to measure the deviations from the behavior expected by a turbulent observable when it is close to a transition between different metastable states. We first assess the performance of our method on the Lorenz attractor, then on a turbulent flow. The results show that the method recognizes subtle differences among different stable boundary layer turbulence regimes and may be used to help characterize their transitions.

  6. An Experimental Study of Roughness-Induced Instabilities in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Norris, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Progress on an experimental study of laminar-to-turbulent transition induced by an isolated roughness element in a supersonic laminar boundary layer is reported in this paper. Here, the primary focus is on the effects of roughness planform shape on the instability and transition characteristics. Four different roughness planform shapes were considered (a diamond, a circle, a right triangle, and a 45 degree fence) and the height and width of each one was held fixed so that a consistent frontal area was presented to the oncoming boundary layer. The nominal roughness Reynolds number was 462 and the ratio of the roughness height to the boundary layer thickness was 0.48. Detailed flow- field surveys in the wake of each geometry were performed via hot-wire anemometry. High- and low-speed streaks were observed in the wake of each roughness geometry, and the modified mean flow associated with these streak structures was found to support a single dominant convective instability mode. For the symmetric planform shapes - the diamond and circular planforms - the instability characteristics (mode shapes, growth rates, and frequencies) were found to be similar. For the asymmetric planform shapes - the right-triangle and 45 degree fence planforms - the mode shapes were asymmetrically distributed about the roughness-wake centerline. The instability growth rates for the asymmetric planforms were lower than those for the symmetric planforms and therefore, transition onset was delayed relative to the symmetric planforms.

  7. Experimental study of wind turbine wakes in a convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Markfort, C. D.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the interaction of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flows with wind turbines is important for optimizing the design of wind farms (maximizing energy output and mitigating fatigue loads) and improving the parameterization of wind farms in weather and climate models. Field observations have suggested that atmospheric stability affects ABL flow and its interaction with wind turbines, which in turn affects wind farm performance. However, the fluid mechanics involved has not been fully understood, highlighting the need of acquiring high quality data in clearly defined conditions. Well-controlled wind tunnel experiments of the wake of wind turbines immersed in thermally stratified or convective boundary layers are very limited. In this study, we investigate the wake structure of a miniature three-blade wind turbine model placed in a convective boundary layer (CBL) in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory wind tunnel. The objectives of this study are: 1) to understand how the CBL flow affects the wake behind a wind turbine in terms of tip vortices distribution, mean velocity deficit, turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress and heat flux modification; 2) to provide reliable data sets for validating and developing new parameterizations of turbulent fluxes and turbine-induced forces in numerical models, such as large-eddy simulation (LES). The CBL was generated by cooling the free stream air flow to 13 οC and heating up the test section floor to 80 οC. The free stream speed was set at 2.5 m/s, resulting in the Obukhov stability of δ/L=-3.15 and the bulk Richardson number about -0.16. The wake of a wind turbine model, whose height is about 1/3 the boundary layer thickness, was systematically studied using Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) and a hot-wire/cold-wire anemometer. Results revealed the top tip vortices (in Fig.1), noticeably degraded velocity deficit and significantly enhanced turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were also

  8. An A-train and MERRA view of cloud, thermodynamic, and dynamic variability within the subtropical marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Kahn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The global-scale patterns and covariances of subtropical marine boundary layer (MBL cloud fraction and spatial variability with atmospheric thermodynamic and dynamic fields remain poorly understood. We describe an approach that leverages coincident NASA A-train and the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA data to quantify the relationships in the subtropical MBL derived at the native pixel and grid resolution. A new method for observing four subtropical oceanic regions that capture transitions from stratocumulus to trade cumulus is demonstrated, where stratocumulus and cumulus regimes are determined from infrared-based thermodynamic phase. Visible radiances are normally distributed within stratocumulus and are increasingly skewed away from the coast, where trade cumulus dominates. Increases in MBL depth, wind speed, and effective radius (re, and reductions in 700–1000 hPa moist static energy differences and 700 and 850 hPa vertical velocity correspond with increases in visible radiance skewness. We posit that a more robust representation of the cloudy MBL is obtained using visible radiance rather than retrievals of optical thickness that are limited to a smaller subset of cumulus. The method using the combined A-train and MERRA data set has demonstrated that an increase in re within shallow cumulus is strongly related to higher MBL wind speeds that further correspond to increased precipitation occurrence according to CloudSat, previously demonstrated with surface observations. Hence, the combined data sets have the potential of adding global context to process-level understanding of the MBL.

  9. A model study of mixing and entrainment in the horizontally evolving atmospheric convective boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorovich, E.; Kaiser, R. [Univ. Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Hydrologie und Wasserwirtschaft (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    We present results from a parallel wind-tunnel/large-eddy simulation (LES) model study of mixing and entrainment in the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL) longitudinally developing over a heated surface. The advection-type entrainment of warmer air from upper turbulence-free layers into the growing CBL has been investigated. Most of numerical and laboratory model studies of the CBL carried out so far dealt with another type of entrainment, namely the non-steady one, regarding the CBL growth as a non-stationary process. In the atmosphere, both types of the CBL development can take place, often being superimposed. (au)

  10. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  11. Modelling study of boundary-layer ozone over northern China - Part I: Ozone budget in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guiqian; Zhu, Xiaowan; Xin, Jinyuan; Hu, Bo; Song, Tao; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Jinqiang; Wang, Lili; Cheng, Mengtian; Chao, Na; Kong, Lingbin; Li, Xin; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-05-01

    Regional photochemical pollution caused by ozone (O3) is serious in northern China during summer. In this study, we combined network observation data with the Fifth-Generation Pennsylvania State/National Centre for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model -Community Multiscale Air Quality (MM5-CMAQ) model system to simulate O3 and its precursors'concentrations over northern China in June 2008. Comparisons of the simulations and observations indicate that the model can accurately reproduce the temporal and spatial distributions of temperature, humidity, and wind as well as the evolution of O3 and its precursors over northern China. The monthly mean of the total oxidants (nitrogen dioxide + O3) at 15:00 LT exceeded 90 ppbv across the North China Plain, thereby indicating significant photochemical pollution in this area. Vertical diffusion is the main source of the near-ground O3, with contributions of more than 20 ppbv h- 1 in the urban areas. Dry deposition and chemical reactions are the main sinks for O3, with contributions of more than 20 ppbv h- 1 and 7 ppbv h- 1 in the forest and urban areas, respectively. Although vertical diffusion is the main source of near-ground O3, photochemical reactions dominate the O3 concentrations in the boundary layer because of the circulation between the lower and upper boundary layers. Considering that O3 is mainly produced in the upper boundary layer, both nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compounds should be controlled on the North China Plain. The results presented here are intended to provide guidance for redefining strategies to control photochemical pollution over northern China.

  12. Recent Findings Related to Giant Cloud Condensation Nuclei in the Marine Boundary Layer and Impacts on Clouds and Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorooshian, Armin; Dadashazar, Hossein; Wang, Zhen; Crosbie, Ewan; Brunke, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Jonsson, Haflidi; Woods, Roy; Flagan, Richard; Seinfeld, John

    2017-04-01

    This presentation reports on findings from multiple airborne field campaigns off the California coast to understand the sources, nature, and impacts of giant cloud condensation nuclei (GCCN). Aside from sea spray emissions, measurements have revealed that ocean-going ships can be a source of GCCN due to wake and stack emissions off the California coast. Observed particle number concentrations behind 10 ships exceeded those in "control" areas, exhibiting number concentration enhancement ratios (ERs) for minimum threshold diameters of 2, 10, and 20 μm as high as 2.7, 5.5, and 7.5, respectively. The data provide insights into how ER is related to a variety of factors (downwind distance, altitude, ship characteristics such as gross tonnage, length, and beam). The data also provide insight into the extent to which a size distribution parameter and a cloud water chemical measurement can capture the effect of sea salt on marine stratocumulus cloud properties. The two GCCN proxy variables, near-surface particle number concentration for diameter > 5 µm and cloud water chloride concentration, are significantly correlated with each other, and both exhibit expected relationships with other parameters that typically coincide with sea salt emissions. Factors influencing the relationship between these two GCCN proxy measurements will be discussed. When comparing twelve pairs of high and low chloride cloud cases (at fixed liquid water path and cloud drop number concentration), the average drop spectra for high chloride cases exhibit enhanced drop number at diameters exceeding 20 µm, especially above 30 µm. In addition, high chloride cases coincide with enhanced mean columnar R and negative values of precipitation susceptibility. The difference in drop effective radius (re) between high and low chloride conditions decreases with height in cloud, suggesting that some GCCN-produced rain drops precipitate before reaching cloud tops. The sign of cloud responses (i.e., re, R) to

  13. Impact of Neutral Boundary-Layer Turbulence on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Numerical Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The wake characteristics of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer under neutral stratification are investigated systematically by means of large-eddy simulations. A methodology to maintain the turbulence of the background flow for simulations with open horizontal boundaries, without the necessity of the permanent import of turbulence data from a precursor simulation, was implemented in the geophysical flow solver EULAG. These requirements are fulfilled by applying the spectral energy distribution of a neutral boundary layer in the wind-turbine simulations. A detailed analysis of the wake response towards different turbulence levels of the background flow results in a more rapid recovery of the wake for a higher level of turbulence. A modified version of the Rankine-Froude actuator disc model and the blade element momentum method are tested as wind-turbine parametrizations resulting in a strong dependence of the near-wake wind field on the parametrization, whereas the far-wake flow is fairly insensitive to it. The wake characteristics are influenced by the two considered airfoils in the blade element momentum method up to a streamwise distance of 14 D ( D = rotor diameter). In addition, the swirl induced by the rotation has an impact on the velocity field of the wind turbine even in the far wake. Further, a wake response study reveals a considerable effect of different subgrid-scale closure models on the streamwise turbulent intensity.

  14. Sensitivity analysis of the boundary layer height on idealised cities (model study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schayes, G. [Univ. of Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Grossi, P. [Joint Research Center, Ispra (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The behaviour of the typical diurnal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over cities is a complex function of very numerous environmental parameters. Two types of geographical situations have been retained: (i) inland city only surrounded by uniform fields, (ii) coastal city, thus influenced by the sea/land breeze effect. We have used the three-dimensional Thermal Vorticity-mode Mesoscale (TVM) model developed jointly by the UCL (Belgium) and JRC (Italy). In this study it has been used in 2-D mode allowing to perform many sensitivity runs. This implies that a kind of infinitely wide city has been effectively stimulated, but this does not affect the conclusions for the ABL height. The sensibility study has been performed for two turbulence closure schemes, for various assumptions for the ABL height definition in the model, and for a selected parameter, the soil water content. (LN)

  15. Impact of the Diurnal Cycle of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Numerical Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The wake characteristics of a wind turbine for different regimes occurring throughout the diurnal cycle are investigated systematically by means of large-eddy simulation. Idealized diurnal cycle simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer are performed with the geophysical flow solver EULAG over both homogeneous and heterogeneous terrain. Under homogeneous conditions, the diurnal cycle significantly affects the low-level wind shear and atmospheric turbulence. A strong vertical wind shear and veering with height occur in the nocturnal stable boundary layer and in the morning boundary layer, whereas atmospheric turbulence is much larger in the convective boundary layer and in the evening boundary layer. The increased shear under heterogeneous conditions changes these wind characteristics, counteracting the formation of the night-time Ekman spiral. The convective, stable, evening, and morning regimes of the atmospheric boundary layer over a homogeneous surface as well as the convective and stable regimes over a heterogeneous surface are used to study the flow in a wind-turbine wake. Synchronized turbulent inflow data from the idealized atmospheric boundary-layer simulations with periodic horizontal boundary conditions are applied to the wind-turbine simulations with open streamwise boundary conditions. The resulting wake is strongly influenced by the stability of the atmosphere. In both cases, the flow in the wake recovers more rapidly under convective conditions during the day than under stable conditions at night. The simulated wakes produced for the night-time situation completely differ between heterogeneous and homogeneous surface conditions. The wake characteristics of the transitional periods are influenced by the flow regime prior to the transition. Furthermore, there are different wake deflections over the height of the rotor, which reflect the incoming wind direction.

  16. Experimental Study of Boundary Layer Flow Control Using an Array of Ramp-Shaped Vortex Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Zaman, Khairul B.M.Q.; Bencic, Tomothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a database on the flowfield past an array of vortex generators (VGs) in a turbulent boundary layer. All testing was carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a flow velocity of 29 ft/sec, giving a Reynolds number of 17,500 based on the width of the VG. The flowfield generated by an array of five ramp-shaped vortex generators was examined with hot wire anemometry and smoke flow visualization. The magnitude and extent of the velocity increase near the wall, the penetration of the velocity deficit into the core flow, and the peak streamwise vorticity are examined. Influence of various parameters on the effectiveness of the array is considered on the basis of the ability to pull high momentum fluid into the near wall region.

  17. Numerical Study of a Boundary Layer Bleedfor a Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Inlet in Ejector Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; He, Guoqiang; Qin, Fei; Wei, Xianggeng

    2014-12-01

    Fully integrated numerical simulations were performed for a ready-made central strut-based rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine operating in ejector mode, and the applicability of using a boundary layer bleed in the RBCC inlet designed for supersonic speeds was investigated in detail. The operational mechanism of the boundary layer bleed and its effects on the RBCC inlet and the engine under different off-design conditions in ejector mode were determined. The boundary layer bleed played different roles in the RBCC inlet for different flight regimes. When the RBCC engine took off, some air was entrained into the inlet through the bleed block, thereby inducing significant flow separation and a low-speed vortex, which deteriorated the inner flow and reduced the entraining air mass flow rate: thus, the total pressure loss increased and extra drag was exerted on the inlet. In the low subsonic regime, the bleed block had almost no impact on the RBCC engine and its inlet. However, as the RBCC engine accelerated into a high subsonic flight regime, the boundary layer bleed had a clearly positive effect, comprehensively improving the performance of the RBCC inlet. A boundary layer bleed operation strategy for the RBCC inlet in ejector mode was also developed in this study.

  18. Seasonal Variability of Warm Boundary Layer Cloud and Precipitation Properties in the Southern Ocean as Diagnosed from A-Train and Ship-based Remote Sensing Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    The extensive cloudiness and resulting high albedo of the Southern Oceans (SO) are predominantly due to the occurrence of widespread marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. Recent work finds correlations between biogenically enhanced cloud condensation nuclei concentrations and cloud droplet number concentrations derived from passive satellite data. The active remote sensors in the A-Train have created a unique and long-term record of these clouds that include vertical profiles of radar reflectivity and microwave brightness temperature from CloudSat that can be combined with solar reflectances from MODIS. We examine this data record to infer warm-topped cloud and precipitation properties. We find seasonal variations in cloud properties where summer season clouds demonstrate higher cloud droplet number concentrations on average and require higher liquid water contents to produce similar precipitation rates. We compare the properties and processes implied by the A-Train data with a unique cloud and precipitation remote sensing data set collected on board the Australian RV Investigator during March and April, 2016 during a 5-week voyage into the Southern Ocean.

  19. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on an airfoil induced by periodically passing wake (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, T.C. [Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul (Korea); Jeon, W.P.; Kang, S.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    Hot-wire measurements are performed in boundary layers developing on a NACA0012 airfoil over which wakes pass periodically. The Reynolds number based on chord length of the airfoil is 2X10{sup 5} and the wakes are generated by circular cylinders rotating clockwise and counterclockwise around the airfoil. This paper and its companion Part II describe the phenomena of wake-induced transition of the boundary layers on the airfoil using measured data; phase- and time-averaged streamwise mean velocities, turbulent fluctuations, integral parameters and wall skin frictions. This paper describes the background and facility together with results of time-averaged quantities. Due to the passing wake with mean velocity defects and high turbulence intensities, the laminar boundary layer is periodically disturbed at the upstream station and becomes steady-state transitional boundary layer at the downstream station. The velocity defect in the passing wake changes the local pressure at the leading of the airfoil, significantly affects the time-mean pressure distribution on the airfoil and eventually, has influence on the transition process of the boundary layer. (author). 22 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Coupling between marine boundary layer clouds and summer-to-summer sea surface temperature variability over the North Atlantic and Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy A.; Mechoso, Carlos R.; DeFlorio, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Climate modes of variability over the Atlantic and Pacific may be amplified by a positive feedback between sea-surface temperature (SST) and marine boundary layer clouds. However, it is well known that climate models poorly simulate this feedback. Does this deficiency contribute to model-to-model differences in the representation of climate modes of variability? Over both the North Atlantic and Pacific, typical summertime interannual to interdecadal SST variability exhibits horseshoe-like patterns of co-located anomalies of shortwave cloud radiative effect (CRE), low-level cloud fraction, SST, and estimated inversion strength over the subtropics and midlatitudes that are consistent with a positive cloud feedback. During winter over the midlatitudes, this feedback appears to be diminished. Models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 that simulate a weak feedback between subtropical SST and shortwave CRE produce smaller and less realistic amplitudes of summertime SST and CRE variability over the northern oceans compared to models with a stronger feedback. The change in SST amplitude per unit change in CRE amplitude among the models and observations may be understood as the temperature response of the ocean mixed layer to a unit change in radiative flux over the course of a season. These results highlight the importance of boundary layer clouds in interannual to interdecadal atmosphere-ocean variability over the northern oceans during summer. The results also suggest that deficiencies in the simulation of these clouds in coupled climate models contribute to underestimation in their simulation of summer-to-summer SST variability.

  1. The Unmanned Aerial System SUMO: an alternative measurement tool for polar boundary layer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.; Jonassen, M. O.; Reuder, J.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical weather prediction and climate models face special challenges in particular in the commonly stable conditions in the high-latitude environment. For process studies as well as for model validation purposes in-situ observations in the atmospheric boundary layer are highly required, but difficult to retrieve. We introduce a new measurement system for corresponding observations. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO consists of a small and light-weight auto-piloted model aircraft, equipped with a meteorological sensor package. SUMO has been operated in polar environments, among others during IPY on Spitsbergen in the year 2009 and has proven its capabilities for atmospheric measurements with high spatial and temporal resolution even at temperatures of -30 deg C. A comparison of the SUMO data with radiosondes and tethered balloons shows that SUMO can provide atmospheric profiles with comparable quality to those well-established systems. Its high data quality allowed its utilization for evaluation purposes of high-resolution model runs performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting model WRF and for the detailed investigation of an orographically modified flow during a case study.

  2. DNS study on bursting and intermittency in late boundary layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YiQian; Liu, ChaoQun

    2017-11-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations have suggested the existence of a strong correlation between the passage of coherent structures and events of bursting and intermittency. However, a detailed cause-and-effect study on the subject is rarely found in the literature due to the complexity and the nonlinear multiscale nature of turbulent flows. The primary goal of this research is to explore the motion and evolution of coherent structures during late transition, whose structure is much more ordered than that of fully developed turbulence, and their relationship with events of bursting and intermittency based on a verified high-order direct numerical simulation (DNS). The computation was carried out on a flat plate at Reynolds number 1000 (based on the inflow displacement thickness) with an inflow Mach number 0.5. It is concluded that bursting and intermittency detected by stationary sensors in a transitional boundary layer actually result from the passage and development of vortical structures, and it would be more rational to design transitional turbulence models based on modelling the moving vortical structures rather than the statistical features and experimental experiences.

  3. Aerodynamic wake study: oscillating model wind turbine within a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Christopher J.

    An experimental investigation on the aerodynamic wake behind a pitching and/or heaving model wind turbine was performed. The study was split into two quasi-coupled phases; the first phase characterized the motion of an offshore floating wind turbine subjected to linear wave forcing, the second phase replicated specific motion cases, which were driven by results from phase I, on a model wind turbine within a turbulent boundary layer. Wake measurements were made in an effort to quantify fluctuations in the flow associated with the motion of the turbine. Weak differences were observed in the mean, streamwise velocity and turbulent fluctuations between the static and oscillating turbine cases. These weak differences were a result of opposing trends in the velocity quantities based on turbine motion phases. The wake oscillations created by the turbine motion was characteristic of a 2D wave (with convection in the x plane and amplitude in the z plane) with a relatively small amplitude as compared to urms..

  4. The study of aerosol and ozone measurements in lower boundary layer with UAV helicopter platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-hsiung; Chen, Wen-nai

    2013-04-01

    This study describes the aerosol and ozone measurement in the lower atmospheric boundary layer of highly polluted region at Kao-hsiung, Taiwan with a small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) helicopter platform. This UAV helicopter, modified from Gaui-X7 electronic-power model helicopter with autopilot AHRS (Altitude-Head-Reference System) kit, has fast climb speed up to 700 m height and keeps stable status for atmospheric measurements in five-minute fly leg. Several quick-replaced battery packages are ready on ground for field intensive observation. The payload rack under this UAV helicopter carries a micro-Aethalometer (black carbon concentration), ozone meter, temperature-humidity sensor, barometer and a time-lapse digital camera. The field measurement site closes to Linyuan Petrochemical Industrial Park, where is one of the heavy polluted regions in Taiwan. Balloon-borne Vaisala RS-92 radiosonde and CL31 Lidar Ceilometer are used to provide the background of the atmosphere at the same time. More data analysis measured by UAV helicopter and its potential application will be discussed.

  5. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Boundary-Layer and Air Quality Study at “Station Nord” in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Skov, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on the forcing mechanisms (meteorological and chemical) that come into play in the Arctic environment is highly uncertain. We analyse data from measurements and mesoscale meteorological modelling for periods in summer 2011 and winter 2011/2012 to elucidate the boundary-layer features...

  7. Boundary-layer and air quality study at “Station Nord” in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Skov, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge on the forcing mechanisms (meteorological and chemical) that come into play in the Arctic environment is highly uncertain. We analyse data from measurements and mesoscale meteorological modelling for periods in summer 2011 and winter 2011/2012 to elucidate the boundary-layer features...

  8. Introduction to the Third GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS3)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a dominant role in the exchange of energy, water vapour, trace gases and momentum between the earth’s surface and the overlying atmosphere. Consequently, the ABL is an important part of any numerical model in use for atmospheric and climate research, for

  9. Micro Ramps in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers : An experimental and numerical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The micro vortex generator (MVG) is used extensively in low speed aerodynamic problems and is now extended into the supersonic flow regime to solve undesired flow features that are associated with shock wave boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) such as flow separation and associated unsteadiness of

  10. Numerical study of wingtip shed vorticity reduction by wing Boundary Layer Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, Jose Alejandro

    Wingtip vortex reductions have been obtained by Boundary Layer Control application to an AR=1.5 rectangular wing using a NACA 0012 airfoil. If wingtip shed vorticity could be reduced significantly, then so would induced drag resulting in improved cruise fuel economy. Power savings would be even more impressive at low flight speed or in climb. A two dimensional wing produces lift without wingtip vorticity. Its bound vorticity, Gamma, equals the contour integral of the boundary layer vorticity gamma or Gamma = ∮gamma · dl. Where the upper and lower boundary layers meet at the cusped TE, their local static pressure pu=pl then the boundary layer outer edge inviscid velocity Vupper=Vlower and gammalower=-gamma upper. This explains the 2-D wing self cancellation of the upper and lower surface boundary layer vorticity when they meet upon shedding at the trailing edge. In finite wings, the presence of spanwise pressure gradients near the wing tips misaligns gammalower and gammaupper at the wingtip TE preventing the upper and lower surface boundary layers from completely canceling each other. To prevent them from generating wing tip vortices, the local boundary layers need to be captured in suction slots. Once vorticity is captured, it can be eliminated by viscous mixing prior to venting over board. The objective of this dissertation was to use a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics code (Fluent) to search for the best configuration to locate BLC suction slots to capture non-parallel boundary layer vorticity prior to shedding near the wingtips. The configuration selected for running the simulations was tested by trying to duplicate a 3D wing for which sufficient experimental and computational models by others are available. The practical case selected was done by Chow et al in the 32 x 48 in. low speed wind tunnel at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory of NASA Ames Research Center, and computationally analyzed by Dacles-Mariani et al, and Khim and Rhee. The present

  11. Evolution of trace elements in the planetary boundary layer in southern China: Effects of dust storms and aerosol-cloud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Tao; Ding, Aijun; Nie, Wei; Xue, Likun; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing

    2017-03-01

    Aerosols and cloud water were analyzed at a mountaintop in the planetary boundary layer in southern China during March-May 2009, when two Asian dust storms occurred, to investigate the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACIs) on chemical evolution of atmospheric trace elements. Fe, Al, and Zn predominated in both coarse and fine aerosols, followed by high concentrations of toxic Pb, As, and Cd. Most of these aerosol trace elements, which were affected by dust storms, exhibited various increases in concentrations but consistent decreases in solubility. Zn, Fe, Al, and Pb were the most abundant trace elements in cloud water. The trace element concentrations exhibited logarithmic inverse relationships with the cloud liquid water content and were found highly pH dependent with minimum concentrations at the threshold of pH 5.0. The calculation of Visual MINTEQ model showed that 80.7-96.3% of Fe(II), Zn(II), Pb(II), and Cu(II) existed in divalent free ions, while 71.7% of Fe(III) and 71.5% of Al(III) were complexed by oxalate and fluoride, respectively. ACIs could markedly change the speciation distributions of trace elements in cloud water by pH modification. The in-cloud scavenging of aerosol trace elements likely reached a peak after the first 2-3 h of cloud processing, with scavenging ratios between 0.12 for Cr and 0.57 for Pb. The increases of the trace element solubility (4-33%) were determined in both in-cloud aerosols and postcloud aerosols. These results indicated the significant importance of aerosol-cloud interactions to the evolution of trace elements during the first several cloud condensation/evaporation cycles.

  12. A numerical study of wind turbine-boundary layer interactions in a large offshore wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tanvi; Baidya Roy, Somnath

    2017-04-01

    Large offshore wind farm installations are rapidly increasing all over the world driven by the availability of strong, consistent winds and the unavailability of appropriate land sites. This study quantitatively explores the interaction between wind turbines and the marine atmospheric boundary layer and its impacts on power generation in a hypothetical large offshore wind farm off the western coast of India in the Arabian Sea. The simulations are conducted using the mesoscale model WRF equipped with a wind turbine parameterization, which approximates a wind turbine as a sink of resolved kinetic energy and a source of turbulent kinetic energy. In this study, the WRF parameterization is modified to include the effects of density variations. The simulations are conducted over a 300 km x 300 km domain discretised with an 1 km grid with 10000 turbines placed in the centre. Wind turbines extract atmospheric kinetic energy and convert it into electricity. The extraction of kinetic energy from the atmospheric flow leads to two major phenomena: (1) momentum deficit in the wakes that reduce energy availability for downwind turbines and (2) enhanced vertical convergence to partly replenish the momentum deficit. Results show a 200% increase in vertical momentum convergence, with 95% of that coming from sub-grid turbulent eddies. However, the enhanced momentum convergence offsets only a small part of the momentum deficit. Consequently, there is a net reduction of almost 60% in power production for turbines in the interior of the farm compared to the turbines at the leading edge. These results suggest that a numerical model like WRF that accounts for both the momentum deficit and enhanced momentum convergence effects may provide better estimates of wind power generation than traditional wind speed density or wake model approaches.

  13. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  14. A One-Dimensional Model Study of the Occurrence and the Termination of Polar Boundary-Layer Ozone Depletion Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Le; Gutheil, Eva

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) in polar spring have attracted increased attention in the last thirty years. A dramatic decline of the surface ozone mixing ratio from tens of parts per billion (ppb) to less than one ppb within a few days is observed in various observation sites in polar regions. Previous studies suggest that the halogen species, especially bromine, acts as a catalyst in a chemical reaction cycle, which causes the destruction of ozone in the polar boundary layer. Moreover, a group of heterogeneous reactions with the involvement of HOBr occur on the surface of different substrates such as suspended aerosols and sea ice, leading to the activation of bromide from these substrates, and a following enhancement of the total bromine amount in the boundary layer occurs. This phenomenon is widely known as the 'bromine explosion' mechanism. However, the initiation and the termination steps of the ODEs are still not well understood. In the present study, a one-dimensional model, KINAL-T, is developed with the aim of investigating the role of the boundary layer in the occurrence and the termination of the ODEs. The 1-D model is an extension of the previous box model study1, explicitly including the vertical convection of gas. The parameterization of the vertical profile of the turbulent diffusivity from Pielke and Mahrer (1975)2 is adopted. Moreover, in the 1-D model, a bromine-related reaction scheme taken from Cao et al. (2014)1 is used, in which not only the gas phase but also the heterogeneous reactions are implemented. The simulation results show that the tropospheric ozone depletion event in a 200 m boundary layer starts after 12 days under the condition of a potential temperature gradient of 0.7 K km-1 and a wind speed of 5 m s-1. The whole depletion process of ozone takes approximately 2.5 days. The vertical profiles of ozone and bromine-containing compounds at different days are also captured. Instead of preventing the ozone from the

  15. Development and evaluation of airborne microwave refractometer for studies on atmospheric tropical boundary layer radiorefractive index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. S. S. Sarma

    Full Text Available Observations of high-resolution data on radio refractivity were obtained by the airborne microwave refractometer over the Indian sub-continent (a tropical country from 1971 to 1988. Detailed vertical and horizontal distributions of radio refractivity on a near-real-time basis in the atmospheric boundary layer were determined . Radiosonde observations cannot detect the thin refractivity gradients which characterize the propagation environment in this low-altitude region. This knowledge is required to design reliable and efficient communication systems for strategic, tactical and operational needs. However, the results demonstrate the layer structures and the variability of the boundary layer in time and space. The radio refractive effects on electromagnetic propagation and the future direction of radio refractivity fine-structure measurements are discussed.

  16. Turbine blade boundary layer separation suppression via synthetic jet: An experimental and numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, C.; Carnevale, M.; Manna, M.; Martelli, F.; Simoni, D.; Zunino, P.

    2012-10-01

    The present paper focuses on the analysis of a synthetic jet device (with a zero net massflow rate) on a separated boundary layer. Separation has been obtained on a flat plate installed within a converging-diverging test section specifically designed to attain a local velocity distribution typical of a high-lift LPT blade. Both experimental and numerical investigations have been carried out. Unsteady RANS results have been compared with experiments in terms of time-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity distributions. Two different Reynolds number cases have been investigated, namely Re = 200, 000 and Re = 70, 000, which characterize low-pressure turbine operating conditions during take-off/landing and cruise. A range of synthetic jet aerodynamic parameters (Strouhal number and blowing ratio) has been tested in order to analyze the features of control — separated boundary layer interaction for the aforementioned Reynolds numbers.

  17. Lidar observations of marine boundary-layer winds and heights: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a nearly 1-yr meteorological campaign, which was carried out at the FINO3 marine research platform on the German North Sea, where a pulsed wind lidar and a ceilometer were installed besides the platform's 105-m tower and measured winds and the aerosol backscatter in the entire...... marine atmospheric boundary layer. The campaign was the last phase of a research project, in which the vertical wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer was firstly investigated on a coastal and a semi-urban site. At FINO3 the wind lidar, which measures the wind speed up to 2000 m, shows...... the highest data availability (among the three sites) and a very good agreement with the observations of wind speed and direction from cup anemometers and vanes from the platform's tower. The wind lidar was also able to perform measurements under a winter storm where 10-s gusts were observed above 60 m s 1...

  18. Studi Numerik Karakteristik Boundary Layer Turbulen pada Pelat Datar dengan Alur Melintang Tipe-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiansyah Arya Mahendra Whindracaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Boundary layer akan terbentuk apabila aliran viscous melewati suatu kontur permukaan. Hal ini menyebabkan terjadinya gaya drag di kontur permukaan, oleh karena itu boundary layer yang terbentuk perlu dikontrol. Salah satu cara untuk mengkontrol boundary layer yang terbentuk adalah dengan memberi alur permukaan yang dilalui aliran. Pada penelitian ini, aliran yang dikaji adalah aliran boundary layer turbulen yang melintasi suatu pelat datar dengan alur melintang tipe-D. Alur tipe-D adalah tipe alur berbentuk persegi dengan kedalaman dan jarak antar alur yang sama, diletakan normal terhadap arah aliran. Penelitian ini dilakukan secara simulasi numerik. Terdapat 4 model yang disimulasikan yaitu pelat datar (smooth-wall, pelat beralur tipe-D ukuran 4mm, 10mm, dan 30mm . Bilangan Reynolds berdasarkan panjang pelat yaitu Rel = 2.16 x 106 dan kecepatan freestream pada inlet sebesar 10 m/s. Pemodelan numerik dilakukan  menggunakan software Gambit 2.4.6 dan Fluent 6.3.26 dengan model 2ddp unsteady, viscous model standart k-epsilon. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, penambahan alur tipe-D berbagai ukuran meningkatkan koefisien drag total dibanding pelat datar (smooth-wall. Pressure-gradient yang terbentuk didalam alur berkontribusi pada peningkatan ini walaupun nilai koefisien skin-friction mengalami penurunan. Tidak hanya koefisien drag total, tapi nilai intensitas turbulensi juga mengalami peningkatan dibanding pelat datar (smooth-wall. Didalam alur juga terbentuk vortex yang berkontribusi dalam penurunan koefisien skin-friction. Dari ketiga ukuran alur yang berbeda, ditemukan ukuran alur tipe-D ukuran 4mm memiliki nilai koefisien drag total yang lebih rendah daripada lainya.

  19. Coupled vs. decoupled boundary layers in VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the extent of subtropical stratocumulus-capped boundary layer decoupling and its relation to other boundary-layer characteristics and forcings using aircraft observations from VOCALS-REx along a swath of the subtropical southeast Pacific Ocean running west 1600 km from the coast of Northern Chile. We develop two complementary and consistent measures of decoupling. The first is based on boundary layer moisture and temperature stratification in flight profiles from near the surface to above the capping inversion, and the second is based the difference between the lifted condensation level (LCL and a mean lidar-derived cloud base measured on flight legs at 150 m altitude. Most flights took place during early-mid morning, well before the peak in insolation-induced decoupling.

    We find that the boundary layer is typically shallower, drier, and well mixed near the shore, and tends to deepen, decouple, and produce more drizzle further offshore to the west. Decoupling is strongly correlated to the "mixed layer cloud thickness", defined as the difference between the capping inversion height and the LCL; other factors such as wind speed, cloud droplet concentration, and inversion thermodynamic jumps have little additional explanatory power. The results are broadly consistent with the deepening-warming theory of decoupling.

    In the deeper boundary layers observed well offshore, there was frequently nearly 100 % boundary-layer cloud cover despite pronounced decoupling. The cloud cover was more strongly correlated to a κ parameter related to the inversion jumps of humidity and temperature, though the exact functional relation is slightly different than found in prior large-eddy simulation studies.

  20. Towards the fourth GEWEX atmospheric boundary layer model intercomparison study (GABLS4): exploration of very stable conditions over an Antarctic ice shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vihma, T.; Kilpeläinen, T.; Rontu, L.; Anderson, P.S.; Orr, A.; Phillips, T.; Finkele, K.; Rodrigo, I.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Svensson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical weather prediction and climate models continue to have large errors for stable boundary layers (SBL). To understand and to improve on this, so far three atmospheric boundary layer model inter-comparison studies have been organised within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX)

  1. Aerodynamic optimization of the flat-plate leading edge for experimental studies of laminar and transitional boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald E.; Buckley, Howard P.; Lavoie, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    This work is concerned with the design of a leading edge for a flat-plate model used to study laminar and transitional boundary layers. For this study, the flow over the complete boundary-layer model, including leading edge, flat section, and trailing-edge flap, is modeled. The effect of important geometrical features of the leading edge on the resulting pressure distribution, starting from the well-known symmetric modified super ellipse, is investigated. A minimal pressure gradient on the measurement side of the plate is achieved using an asymmetrical configuration of modified super ellipses, with a thickness ratio of 7/24. An aerodynamic shape optimization is performed to obtain a novel leading edge shape that greatly reduces the length of the non-zero pressure gradient region and the adverse pressure gradient region compared to geometries defined by ellipses. Wind tunnel testing is used to validate the numerical solutions.

  2. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  3. Comparison of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Properties from CERES-MODIS Edition 4 and DOE ARM AMF Measurements at the Azores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan; Minnis, Patrick; Sun-Mack, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    Marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud properties derived from the NASA Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project using Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are compared with observations taken at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility at the Azores (AMF-Azores) site from June 2009 through December 2010. Cloud properties derived from ARM ground-based observations were averaged over a 1 h interval centered at the satellite overpass time, while the CERES-MODIS (CM) results were averaged within a 30 km×30 km grid box centered over the Azores site. A total of 63 daytime and 92 nighttime single-layered overcast MBL cloud cases were selected from 19 months of ARM radar-lidar and satellite observations. The CM cloud top/base heights (Htop/Hbase) were determined from cloud top/base temperatures (Ttop/Tbase) using a regional boundary layer lapse rate method. For daytime comparisons, the CM-derived Htop (Hbase), on average, is 0.063 km (0.068 km) higher (lower) than its ARM radar-lidar-observed counterpart, and the CM-derived Ttop and Tbase are 0.9 K less and 2.5 K greater than the surface values with high correlations (R(sup 2) = 0.82 and 0.84, respectively). In general, the cloud top comparisons agree better than the cloud base comparisons, because the CM cloud base temperatures and heights are secondary products determined from cloud top temperatures and heights. No significant day-night difference was found in the analyses. The comparisons of MBL cloud microphysical properties reveal that when averaged over a 30 km× 30 km area, the CM-retrieved cloud droplet effective radius (re) at 3.7 micrometers is 1.3 micrometers larger than that from the ARM retrievals (12.8 micrometers), while the CM-retrieved cloud liquid water path (LWP) is 13.5 gm( exp -2) less than its ARM counterpart (114.2 gm( exp-2) due to its small optical depth (9.6 versus 13.7). The differences are reduced by 50

  4. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the heat transfer behavior with adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, B. F.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat transfer behavior of the near equilibrium transpired turbulent boundary layer with adverse pressure gradient has been carried out. Stanton numbers were measured by an energy balance on electrically heated plates that form the bottom wall of the wind tunnel. Two adverse pressure gradients were studied. Two types of transpiration boundary conditions were investigated. The concept of an equilibrium thermal boundary layer was introduced. It was found that Stanton number as a function of enthalpy thickness Reynolds number is essentially unaffected by adverse pressure gradient with no transpiration. Shear stress, heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number profiles were computed from mean temperature and velocity profiles. It was concluded that the turbulent Prandtl number is greater than unity in near the wall and decreases continuously to approximately 0.5 at the free stream.

  5. Statistical study of hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Williamson fluid regarding a radiative surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Anum; Sindhu, T. N.

    In this article, the unsteady boundary layer flow of an incompressible Williamson fluid over a permeable radiative stretched surface. Both electric and magnetic fields are taken into account. The nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations are obtained through suitable transformations and then solved statistically and analytically. Influence of physical on the velocity and temperature are graphically analyzed. The expressions of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are presented and examined numerically. Correlation coefficient and probable error are calculated to check the significance and insignificant relation of parameters with skin friction and Nusselt number.

  6. An Experimental Study of Turbulence Production Mechanisms in Boundary Layer Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    dimiaies betebm Vell mad sewlos Mlid soid be MDs. lb" end is Weeeu .16. ais 81"moes~ #0 o dilo ~ mafs nws 0bt. Sobgges sllrned .tsma diemID&AMISO so...defect-law profile varies with Reynolds number. 1. Introduction The usual analysis for the velocity defect in a turbulent boundary layer in zero... analysis assumes that the apparent effect of the parameter uT/Ue a ((cf/2), or equivalently diw/dx, is negligible. It is possible that the effect of

  7. A model for the estimation of the surface fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture of the cloud topped marine atmospheric boundary layer from satellite measurable parameters. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A model is developed for the estimation of the surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture of the cloud topped marine atmospheric boundary layer by use of satellite remotely sensed parameters. The parameters chosen for the problem are the integrated liquid water content, q sub li, the integrated water vapor content, q sub vi, the cloud top temperature, and either a measure of the 10 meter neutral wind speed or the friction velocity at the surface. Under the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous, well-mixed boundary layer, the model calculates the equivalent potential temperature and total water profiles of the boundary layer along with the boundary layer height from inputs of q sub li, q sub vi, and cloud top temperature. These values, along with the 10m neutral wind speed or friction velocity and the sea surface temperature are then used to estimate the surface fluxes. The development of a scheme to parameterize the integrated water vapor outside of the boundary layer for the cases of cold air outbreak and California coastal stratus is presented.

  8. Numerical Study of Broadband Disturbance Development in APG Boundary Layer Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijia; Chen, Jim; Lo, Edmond

    2014-03-01

    A numerical model is developed with combined compact difference methods to simulation boundary layer transition problems. The model is used to investigate the formation and development of coherent structures in late stage of a laminar-turbulent transition initiated by a two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave and initially weak broadband disturbances. The numerical simulation closely follows the conditions in the experiments by Borodulin (2006). The boundary layer base flow has an Adverse Pressure Gradient (APG) with Hartree parameter βH = - 0.115. The instantaneous flow structures are visualized, which demonstrate results comparable with experiments. Interaction between the TS wave and broadband disturbances leads to the formation of Λ-vortices, Ω-vortices, and ring-like vortices. In comparison with those in classical transition paths, i.e., fundamental and subharmonic resonances, these structures are distributed in a random order and have distorted shapes. However, their local evolution properties are qualitatively similar with those in classical transition paths. The authors thank Nanyang Techonological Univerisity for funding support.

  9. Numerical study on dynamic characteristics for sharp opening procedure of boundary-layer suction slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yubao; Yin, Hang; Huang, Hongyan; Yu, Daren

    2017-08-01

    Based on the sharp forward of shock train and taking the forthcoming unstart for a background, the dynamic characteristics for sharp opening procedure of boundary-layer suction slot are investigated numerically using the dynamic mesh technique. Results indicate that the climbing path of shock train with the complex background waves exhibits a sharp and slow forward state at different time. The compression waves in the primary shock sweep the trailing edge of the separation bubble, and the recirculation within the shock train is communicated with the separation bubble, which reveals that the flow is in a critical state and is about to be unstart at the subsequent time. Furthermore, the dynamic pattern for sharp opening procedure of boundary-layer suction slot can be classified into four distinct stages, namely, the formation of the jet plume without suction mass loss, the formation of the barrier shock with suction mass loss characterized by gradient increase and subsequent two oscillations, the evolution of the barrier shock and jet plume with suction mass loss that ramps up via a series of discrete step increases, and the formation of the stable structure accompanied by the linear suction mass loss.

  10. Modeling the feedback between aerosol and boundary layer processes: a case study in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu

    2016-02-01

    Rapid development has led to frequent haze in Beijing. With mountains and sea surrounding Beijing, the pollution is found to be influenced by the mountain-plain breeze and sea-land breeze in complex ways. Meanwhile, the presence of aerosols may affect the surface energy balance and impact these boundary layer (BL) processes. The effects of BL processes on aerosol pollution and the feedback between aerosol and BL processes are not yet clearly understood. Thus, the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate the possible effects and feedbacks during a haze episode on 23 September 2011. Influenced by the onshore prevailing wind, sea-breeze, and upslope breeze, about 45% of surface particulate matter (PM)2.5 in Beijing are found to be contributed by its neighbor cities through regional transport. In the afternoon, the development of upslope breeze suppresses the growth of BL in Beijing by imposing a relatively low thermal stable layer above the BL, which exacerbates the pollution. Two kinds of feedback during the daytime are revealed as follows: (1) as the aerosols absorb and scatter the solar radiation, the surface net radiation and sensible heat flux are decreased, while BL temperature is increased, resulting in a more stable and shallower BL, which leads to a higher surface PM2.5 concentration in the morning and (2) in the afternoon, as the presence of aerosols increases the BL temperature over plains, the upslope breeze is weakened, and the boundary layer height (BLH) over Beijing is heightened, resulting in the decrease of the surface PM2.5 concentration there.

  11. Connecting Tropical Marine Cloud Structures to Boundary Layer Properties and the Effect of Sea State on Whitecap Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    on whitecap coverage Steven Howell Department of Oceanography University of Hawaii 1000 Pope Rd, Honolulu, HI 96822 phone: (808)956-5185 email...efforts to lead to improved modeling and predictability of marine aerosol concentrations and optical properties. 2 Objectives During the PASE project in...Approach It is often difficult to determine whether clouds are organized when one is among them. We used satellite imagery to classify regions we flew

  12. Simulation of Boundary-Layer Cumulus and Stratocumulus Clouds using a Cloud-Resolving Model With Low- and Third-Order Turbulence Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cheng, Anning

    2007-01-01

    The effects of subgrid-scale condensation and transport become more important as the grid spacings increase from those typically used in large-eddy simulation (LES) to those typically used in cloud-resolving models (CRMs). Incorporation of these effects can be achieved by a joint probability density function approach that utilizes higher-order moments of thermodynamic and dynamic variables. This study examines how well shallow cumulus and stratocumulus clouds are simulated by two versions of a CRM that is implemented with low-order and third-order turbulence closures (LOC and TOC) when a typical CRM horizontal resolution is used and what roles the subgrid-scale and resolved-scale processes play as the horizontal grid spacing of the CRM becomes finer. Cumulus clouds were mostly produced through subgrid-scale transport processes while stratocumulus clouds were produced through both subgrid-scale and resolved-scale processes in the TOC version of the CRM when a typical CRM grid spacing is used. The LOC version of the CRM relied upon resolved-scale circulations to produce both cumulus and stratocumulus clouds, due to small subgrid-scale transports. The mean profiles of thermodynamic variables, cloud fraction and liquid water content exhibit significant differences between the two versions of the CRM, with the TOC results agreeing better with the LES than the LOC results. The characteristics, temporal evolution and mean profiles of shallow cumulus and stratocumulus clouds are weakly dependent upon the horizontal grid spacing used in the TOC CRM. However, the ratio of the subgrid-scale to resolved-scale fluxes becomes smaller as the horizontal grid spacing decreases. The subcloud-layer fluxes are mostly due to the resolved scales when a grid spacing less than or equal to 1 km is used. The overall results of the TOC simulations suggest that a 1-km grid spacing is a good choice for CRM simulation of shallow cumulus and stratocumulus.

  13. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  14. An observational study of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer over Cabo Frio, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Franchito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of coastal upwelling on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in Cabo Frio (Brazil is investigated. For this purpose, radiosounding data collected in two experiments made during the austral summer (upwelling case and austral winter (no upwelling case are analysed. The results show that during the austral summer, cold waters that crop up near the Cabo Frio coast favour the formation of an atmospheric stable layer, which persists during the upwelling episode. Due to the low SSTs, the descending branch of the sea-breeze circulation is located close to the coast, inhibiting the development of a mixed layer mainly during the day. At night, with the reduction of the land-sea thermal contrast the descending motion is weaker, allowing a vertical mixing. The stable ABL favours the formation of a low level jet, which may also contribute to the development of a nocturnal atmospheric mixed layer. During the austral winter, due to the higher SSTs observed near the coast, the ABL is less stable compared with that in the austral summer. Due to warming, a mixed layer is observed during the day. The observed vertical profiles of the zonal winds show that the easterlies at low levels are stronger in the austral summer, indicating that the upwelling modulates the sea-breeze signal, thus confirming model simulations.

  15. Numerical and Experimental Study of Wake Redirection Techniques in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Foley, S.; Nanos, E. M.; Yu, T.; Campagnolo, F.; Bottasso, C. L.; Zanotti, A.; Croce, A.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present paper is to validate a wind farm LES framework in the context of two distinct wake redirection techniques: yaw misalignment and individual cyclic pitch control. A test campaign was conducted using scaled wind turbine models in a boundary layer wind tunnel, where both particle image velocimetry and hot-wire thermo anemometers were used to obtain high quality measurements of the downstream flow. A LiDAR system was also employed to determine the non-uniformity of the inflow velocity field. A high-fidelity large-eddy simulation lifting-line model was used to simulate the aerodynamic behavior of the system, including the geometry of the wind turbine nacelle and tower. A tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic approach was adopted to improve the sub-grid scale modeling. Comparisons with experimental measurements are used to systematically validate the simulations. The LES results are in good agreement with the PIV and hot-wire data in terms of time-averaged wake profiles, turbulence intensity and Reynolds shear stresses. Discrepancies are also highlighted, to guide future improvements.

  16. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  17. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  18. Study on drag reduction of turbulent boundary layer over semi-circular riblets using PIV measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.J.; Lee, S.H. [Pohang Institute of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    The near-wall flow structures of turbulent boundary layer over riblets having semi-circular grooves were investigated experimentally for the drag reduction (s{sup +}=25.2) and drag increasing (s{sup +}=40.6) cases. The field of view used for the velocity field measurement was 6.75 x 6.75 mm{sup 2} in physical dimension, containing two grooves. One thousand instantaneous velocity fields over the riblets were extracted for the both cases of drag increase and decrease. For comparison, five hundreds instantaneous velocity fields over a smooth flat plate were also extracted under the same flow conditions. For the drag decreasing case (s{sup +}=25.2), most of the streamwise vortices stay above the riblets, interacting with the riblet tips. The high-speed in-rush flow toward the riblet surface rarely influences the flow inside the riblet valleys submerged in the viscous sublayer. The riblet tips seem to impede the spanwise movement of the longitudinal vortices, causing the secondary vortices to restrict the growth of the streamwise vortices. The turbulent kinetic energy in the riblet valley is sufficiently small to compensate the increased wetted surface area of the riblets. In addition, in the log region, the turbulent energy are small or almost equal to that of a smooth flat plate. For the drag increasing case (s{sup +}=40.6), however, the streamwise vortices move into the riblet valley freely, interacting directly with the riblet inner surface. The penetration of the high-speed in-rush flow on the riblets increases the skin-friction. The turbulent kinetic energy is increased in the riblet valleys and in the outer region compared to that over a flat plate. (author). 7 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Study on flow structure of turbulent boundary layer over semi-circular riblets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Lee, S.J. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    The near-wall flow structures of turbulent boundary layer over riblets having semi-circular grooves were investigated experimentally for the drag decreasing (s{sup +}=25.2) and drag increasing (s{sup +}=40.6) cases. The field of view used for the velocity field measurement was 6.75 X 6.75mm{sup 2} in physical dimension, containing two grooves. One thousand instantaneous velocity fields over the riblets were extracted for each case of drag increase and decrease. For comparison, five hundreds instantaneous velocity fields over a smooth flat plate were also obtained under the same flow conditions. To see the global flow structure qualitatively, the flow visualization was also performed using the synchronized smoke-wire technique. For the drag decreasing case (s{sup +}=25.2), most of the streamwise vortices stay above the riblets, interacting with the riblet tips. The high-speed in-rush flow toward the riblet surface rarely influences the flow inside the riblet valleys submerged in the viscous sublayer. The riblet tips seem to impede the spanwise movement of the longitudinal vortices and induce secondary vortices. The turbulent kinetic energy in the riblet valley is sufficiently small to compensate the increased wetted area of the riblets. In addition, in the logarithmic region, the turbulent kinetic energy are small or almost equal to that of a smooth flat plate. For the drag increasing case (S + = 40.6), however, the streamwise vortices more into the riblet valley freely, interacting directly with the riblet inner surface. The penetration of the high-speed in-rush flow on the riblets increases the skin-friction. The turbulent kinetic energy is increased in the riblet valleys and even in the outer region compared to that over a flat plate. (author). 10 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  20. An experimental study on laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers with pressure gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernoray Valery

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here the results of a study on measurements and prediction of laminar-turbulent transition at high free-stream turbulence in boundary layers of the airfoil-like geometries with presence of the external pressure gradient changeover. The experiments are performed for a number of flow cases with different flow Reynolds number, turbulence intensity and pressure gradient distributions. The results were then compared to numerical calculations for same geometries and flow conditions. The experiments and computations are performed for the flow parameters which are typical for turbomachinery applications and the major idea of the current study is the validation of the turbulence model which can be used for such engineering applications.

  1. Boundary-layer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  2. On the complexity of the boundary layer structure and aerosol vertical distribution in the coastal Mediterranean regions: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giandomenico Pace

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer structure in the coastal areas, and particularly in complex orography regions such as the Mediterranean, is extremely intricate. In this study, we show the evolution of the planetary boundary layer based on in situ airborne measurements and ground-based remote sensing observations carried out during the MORE (Marine Ozone and Radiation Experiment campaign in June 2010. The campaign was held in a rural coastal Mediterranean region in Southern Italy. The study focuses on the observations made on 17 June. Vertical profiles of meteorological parameters and aerosol size distribution were measured during two flights: in the morning and in the afternoon. Airborne observations were combined with ground-based LIDAR, SODAR, microwave and visible radiometer measurements, allowing a detailed description of the atmospheric vertical structure. The analysis was complemented with data from a regional atmospheric model run with horizontal resolutions of 12, 4 and 1 km, respectively; back-trajectories were calculated at these spatial resolutions. The observations show the simultaneous occurrence of dust transport, descent of mid-tropospheric air and sea breeze circulation on 17 June. Local pollution effects on the aerosol distribution, and a possible event of new particles formation were also observed. A large variability in the thermodynamical structure and aerosol distribution in the flight region, extending by approximately 30 km along the coast, was found. Within this complex, environment-relevant differences in the back-trajectories calculated at different spatial resolutions are found, suggesting that the description of several dynamical processes, and in particular the sea breeze circulation, requires high-resolution meteorological analyses. The study also shows that the integration of different observational techniques is needed to describe these complex conditions; in particular, the availability of flights and their timing

  3. Interferometric and numerical study of the temperature field in the boundary layer and heat transfer in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucic, Anita; Emans, Maximilian; Mayinger, Franz; Zenger, Christoph

    2004-04-01

    An interferometric study and a numerical simulation are presented of the combined process of the bulk turbulent convection and the dynamic of a vapor bubble which is formed in the superheated boundary layer of a subcooled flowing liquid, in order to determine the heat transfer to the flowing subcooled liquid. In this investigation focus has been given on a single vapor bubble at a defined cavity site to provide reproducible conditions. In the experimental study single bubbles were generated at a single artificial cavity by means of a CO{sub 2}-laser as a spot heater at a uniformly heated wall of a vertical rectangular channel with water as the test fluid. The experiments were performed at various degrees of subcooling and mass flow rates. The bubble growth and the temporal decrease of the bubble volume were captured by means of the high-speed cinematography. The thermal boundary layer and the temperature field at the phase-interface between fluid and bubble were visualized by means of the optical measurement method holographic interferometry with a high temporal and spatial resolution, and thus the local and temporal heat transfer could be quantified. The experimental results form a significant data basis for the description of the mean as well as the local heat transfer as a function of the flow conditions. According to the experimental configuration and the obtained data the numerical simulations were performed. A numerical method has been developed to simulate the influence of single bubbles on the surrounding fluid which is based on a Lagrangian approach to describe the motion of the bubbles. The method is coupled to a large-eddy simulations by the body force term which is locally evaluated based on the density field. The obtained experimental data correspond well with the numerical predictions, both of which demonstrate the thermo- and fluiddynamic characteristics of the interaction between the vapor bubble and the subcooled liquid.

  4. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  5. Modelling study of boundary-layer ozone over northern China - Part II: Responses to emission reductions during the Beijing Olympics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guiqian; Zhu, Xiaowan; Xin, Jinyuan; Hu, Bo; Song, Tao; Sun, Yang; Wang, Lili; Wu, Fangkun; Sun, Jie; Cheng, Mengtian; Chao, Na; Li, Xin; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of emission reduction measures during the Olympics provided a valuable opportunity to study regional photochemical pollution over northern China. In this study, the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/National Centre for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model and Community Multiscale Air Quality model system was applied to conduct two sets of modelling analyses of the period from July 20 to September 20, 2008, to illustrate the influences of emission reduction measures on regional photochemical pollution over northern China during the Beijing Olympics. The results indicated that the implementation of emission control measures decreased the concentrations of ozone (O3) precursors, namely nitrogen oxide (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), throughout the boundary layer. The concentrations of these compounds were reduced by 45% in the central urban area of Beijing at the ground level. Although the average O3 concentration in the central urban area increased by more than 8 ppbv, the total oxidant concentration decreased significantly by more than 5 ppbv. Greater O3 concentrations mainly occurred during periods with weak photochemical reactions. During periods of strong photochemical production, the O3 concentration decreased significantly due to a weakening vertical circulation between the lower and upper boundary layer. Consequently, the number of days when the O3 concentration exceeded 100 ppbv decreased by 25% in Beijing. The emission control measures altered the sensitivity of the regional O3 production. The coordinated control region of NOx and VOCs expanded, and the control region of VOCs decreased in size. The reduction of non-point-source emissions, such as fugitive VOCs and vehicles, was more useful for controlling regional photochemical pollution over northern China.

  6. Integrating surface, entrainment and mesoscale in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer dynamics: a 10-year study in Cabauw (The Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ander Arrillaga, Jon; Bosveld, Fred; Jiménez, Pedro A.; Baltink, Henk K.; Yagüe, Carlos; Hensen, Arjan; van Dinther, Danielle; Frumau, Arnoud; Dudhia, Jimy; Zhao, Wanjun; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi

    2017-04-01

    The diurnal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in Cabauw (Netherlands) is investigated by considering the role of local and non-local forcings. By local, we understand, the surface fluxes that drive the growing of the ABL in addition to the non-local entrained fluxes. We study potential disruptions occurring in spring and particularly in summer driven by the formation of sea-breeze flows in the form of density currents, due to the proximity of both The North Sea and the Ijsselmeer closed sea. Moreover, this interactive system of surface, boundary layer and mesoscale may play a role in the transport of carbon dioxide and its diurnal variability. Our method is based on the analysis of a comprehensive 10-yr observational database (2001-2010), which gives the opportunity to understand the ABL dynamics from a robust perspective. To support the analysis, modelling results obtained from the WRF mesoscale model are available during the entire 10-year period. The model is run every 48 h to maintain it close to the synoptic conditions calculated by the ERA-Interim state. A fine horizontal resolution of 2 km is used, and the vertical levels are set to match the observational ones (2, 10, 20, 40, 80, 140 and 200 m). In order to identify the sea-breeze arrival, we apply a sea-breeze criteria selection algorithm. It is developed and adapted after a sea-breeze observational study in the Cantabrian Coast (Spain) to filter the sea-breeze events occurring in Cabauw, and consequently analyse their impact in the ABL and the surface fluxes. Preliminary results show that this criteria is able to distinguish between the two main wind directions related to the sea breeze in Cabauw. Our finding shows that the sea-breeze days are characterized by a sharp increment of the wind speed and a noticeable increase of the specific humidity at around 16-17 UTC.

  7. An experimental study on the characteristics of transient deployment of hinged wing actuators within a boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierides, Alexis

    Herein we investigate the flapping wing phenomenon in great detail. A 10cm x 10cm square winglet and a 10cm high, 10cm base isosceles triangular winglet are tested as they transiently deploy from a 0 degree position embedded in the wind tunnel floor, to 90 degrees with respect to the wind tunnel floor and the free stream flow. The two winglets were tested in two flow conditions. The first flow condition was a delta1 = 14cm thick boundary layer, with a free stream velocity of U01=11.03m/s, and a Re1 = 70300. The second flow condition was a delta 2 = 5cm thick boundary layer with a free stream velocity of U02 =10.69m/s, and a Re2 = 68133. Through these experiments we are trying to understand, both qualitatively and quantitatively, how drag is generated, increased beyond the steady state value under dynamic conditions, and then how drag falls back to its normal steady state values, after the transient phenomenon has ended. Our experiments used a novel aerodynamic balance design, developed for the exact purpose of acquiring very accurate low magnitude force measurements with high frequency response. Through this direct measurement method we acquired time-resolved and decoupled measurements of drag and lift that indicated the accurate timing and magnitude of these transient events. The controlling parameters in this transient drag generation phenomenon are the deployment speed and shape of the winglet, the range of deployment and the viscous effect of the boundary layer. The effect of these controlling parameters was then quantified. Load-cell measurements of drag and lift, along with accelerometer measurements of the tangential and radial acceleration, and encoder measurements of angle were taken for every experiment. These dynamic measurements helped us quantify the aerodynamic effects on the moving winglets within the two boundary layers. The following overall conclusions were derived as a result of this study. (1) Faster deployment speed produces higher maximum

  8. Using Remotely Piloted Aircraft System to Study the Evolution of the Boundary Layer Related to Fog Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G. C.; Cayez, G.; Ronflé-Nadaud, C.; Albrand, M.; Dralet, J. P.; Momboisse, G.; Nicoll, K.; Seity, Y.; Bronz, M.; Hattenberger, G.; Gorraz, M.; Bustico, A.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past decade, the scientific community has embraced the use of RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft system) as a tool to improve observations of the Earth's surface and atmospheric phenomena. The use of small RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) in atmospheric research has increased because of their relative low-cost, compact size and ease of operation. Small RPAS are especially adapted for observing the atmospheric boundary layer processes at high vertical and temporal resolution. To this end, CNRM, ENAC, and ENM have developed the VOLTIGE (Vecteurs d'Observation de La Troposphere pour l'Investigation et la Gestion de l'Environnement) program to study the life cycle of fog with multiple, small RPAS. The instrumented RPAS flights have successfully observed the evolution of the boundary layer and dissipation of fog events. In addition, vertical profiles from the RPAS have been compared with Météo France forecast models, and the results suggest that forecast models may be improved using high resolution and frequent in-situ measurements. Within the VOLTIGE project, a flying-wing RPAS with four control surfaces was developed to separate elevator and aileron controls in order to reduce the pitch angle envelope and improve turbulence and albedo measurements. The result leads to a small RPAS with the capability of flying up to two hours with 150 grams of payload, while keeping the hand-launch capability as a constraint for regular atmospheric research missions. High frequency data logging has been integrated into the main autopilot in order to synchronize navigation and payload measurements, as well as allowing an efficient sensor-based navigation. The VOLTIGE program also encourages direct participation of students on the advancement of novel observing systems for atmospheric sciences, and provides a step towards deploying small RPAS in an operational network. VOLTIGE is funded by the Agence Nationale de Recherche (ANR-Blanc 2012) and supported by Aerospace

  9. Experimental Study of Fillets to Reduce Corner Effects in an Oblique Shock-Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted in the 15 cm x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center that focused on corner effects of an oblique shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. In an attempt to control the interaction in the corner region, eight corner fillet configurations were tested. Three parameters were considered for the fillet configurations: the radius, the fillet length, and the taper length from the square corner to the fillet radius. Fillets effectively reduced the boundary-layer thickness in the corner; however, there was an associated penalty in the form of increased boundary-layer thickness at the tunnel centerline. Larger fillet radii caused greater reductions in boundary-layer thickness along the corner bisector. To a lesser, but measureable, extent, shorter fillet lengths resulted in thinner corner boundary layers. Overall, of the configurations tested, the largest radius resulted in the best combination of control in the corner, evidenced by a reduction in boundary-layer thickness, coupled with minimal impacts at the tunnel centerline.

  10. The effect of unsteady and baroclinic forcing on predicted wind profiles in Large Eddy Simulations: Two case studies of the daytime atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Kelly, Mark C.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    . The applied domain-scale pressure gradient and its height- and time-dependence are estimated from LIDAR measurements of the wind speed above the atmospheric boundary layer in the Høvsøre case, and from radio soundings and a network of ground-based pressure sensors in the Hamburg case. In the two case studies......Due to its fine-resolution requirement and subsequent computational demand, Large Eddy Simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer is limited in most cases to computational domains extending only a few kilometers in both the vertical and horizontal directions. Variations in the flow...... and in relevant atmospheric fields (e.g. temperature) that occur at larger scales must be imposed through boundary conditions or as external forcing. In this work we study the influence of such variations on the wind profile in Large Eddy Simulations of daytime atmospheric boundary layers, by comparing...

  11. Experimental studies on particle emissions from cruising ship, their characteristic properties, transformation and atmospheric lifetime in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petzold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle emissions from ship engines and their atmospheric transformation in the marine boundary layer (MBL were investigated in engine test bed studies and in airborne measurements of expanding ship plumes. During the test rig studies, detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical properties were measured in the exhaust gas of a serial MAN B&W seven-cylinder four-stroke marine diesel engine under various load conditions. The emission studies were complemented by airborne aerosol transformation studies in the plume of a large container ship in the English Channel using the DLR aircraft Falcon 20 E-5. Observations from emission studies and plume studies combined with a Gaussian plume dispersion model yield a consistent picture of particle transformation processes from emission to atmospheric processing during plume expansion. Particulate matter emission indices obtained from plume measurements are 8.8±1.0×1015(kg fuel−1 by number for non-volatile particles and 174±43 mg (kg fuel−1 by mass for Black Carbon (BC. Values determined for test rig conditions between 85 and 110% engine load are of similar magnitude. For the total particle number including volatile compounds no emission index can be derived since the volatile aerosol fraction is subject to rapid transformation processes in the plume. Ship exhaust particles occur in the size range Dp<0.3 μm, showing a bi-modal structure. The combustion particle mode is centred at modal diameters of 0.05 μm for raw emissions to 0.10 μm at a plume age of 1 h. The smaller-sized volatile particle mode is centred at Dp≤0.02 μm. From the decay of ship exhaust particle number concentrations in an expanding plume, a maximum plume life time of approx. 24 h is estimated for a well-mixed marine boundary layer.

  12. Iodine-mediated coastal particle formation: an overview of the Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe Roscoff coastal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the measurements made during the heavily-instrumented Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe coastal study in Roscoff on the North West coast of France throughout September 2006. It was clearly demonstrated that iodine-mediated coastal particle formation occurs, driven by daytime low tide emission of molecular iodine, I2, by macroalgal species fully or partially exposed by the receding waterline. Ultrafine particle concentrations strongly correlate with the rapidly recycled reactive iodine species, IO, produced at high concentrations following photolysis of I2. The heterogeneous macroalgal I2 sources lead to variable relative concentrations of iodine species observed by path-integrated and in situ measurement techniques.

    Apparent particle emission fluxes were associated with an enhanced apparent depositional flux of ozone, consistent with both a direct O3 deposition to macroalgae and involvement of O3 in iodine photochemistry and subsequent particle formation below the measurement height. The magnitude of the particle formation events was observed to be greatest at the lowest tides with the highest concentrations of ultrafine particles growing to the largest sizes, probably by the condensation of anthropogenically-formed condensable material. At such sizes the particles should be able to act as cloud condensation nuclei at reasonable atmospheric supersaturations.

  13. Study of Diurnal Cycle Variability of Planetary Boundary Layer Characteristics over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Weigang

    2012-07-01

    This work is aimed at investigating diurnal cycle variability of the planetary boundary layer characteristics over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea region. To fulfill this goal the downscaling simulations are performed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We analyze planetary boundary layer height, latent and sensible heat fluxes, and surface air temperature. The model results are compared with observations in different areas, for different seasons, and for different model resolutions. The model results are analyzed in order to better quantify the diurnal cycle variability over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea. The specific features of this region are investigated and discussed.

  14. Numerical Study on the Effect of Air–Sea–Land Interaction on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Coastal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixuan Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We have performed large-eddy simulations (LES to study the effect of complex land topography on the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in coastal areas. The areas under investigation are located at three beaches in Monterey Bay, CA, USA. The sharp-interface immersed boundary method is employed to resolve the land topography down to grid scale. We have considered real-time and what-if cases. In the real-time cases, measurement data and realistic land topographies are directly incorporated. In the what-if cases, the effects of different scenarios of wind speed, wind direction, and terrain pattern on the momentum flux at the beach are studied. The LES results are compared with simulations using the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS and field measurement data. We find that the land topography imposes a critical influence on the ABL in the coastal area. The momentum fluxes obtained from our LES agree with measurement data. Our results indicate the importance of capturing the effects of land topographies in simulations.

  15. Numerical Study of Dual-Plume Interference in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouie, Shahin N.; Wang, Bing-Chen; Yee, Eugene

    2017-09-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the interference arising from the dispersion of passive scalar plumes released from a pair of point sources in a fully-developed wall-bounded shear flow. Four different lateral separations of the two sources for both near ground-level and elevated releases are considered. The downwind evolution of the correlation between the plume concentrations along the centreline between the two sources and the behaviour of the lateral profiles of the correlation at various locations downwind of the two sources are examined in detail. Differences in the exceedance probability over a high concentration level for a single plume and the total plume are highlighted and studied, and the effects of destructive and constructive interferences on the exceedance probabilities for the total plume are used to explain these differences. One significant result is that all higher-order (third-order and above) moments of the total concentration can be inferred from the application of a clipped-gamma distribution using the information embodied in only the first- and second-order concentration moments of each single plume, and in the cross-correlation coefficient of the instantaneous concentration of the two plumes.

  16. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  17. A verification study and trend analysis of simulated boundary layer wind fields over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenberg, Janna

    2011-07-01

    Simulated wind fields from regional climate models (RCMs) are increasingly used as a surrogate for observations which are costly and prone to homogeneity deficiencies. Compounding the problem, a lack of reliable observations makes the validation of the simulated wind fields a non trivial exercise. Whilst the literature shows that RCMs tend to underestimate strong winds over land these investigations mainly relied on comparisons with near surface measurements and extrapolated model wind fields. In this study a new approach is proposed using measurements from high towers and a robust validation process. Tower height wind data are smoother and thus more representative of regional winds. As benefit this approach circumvents the need to extrapolate simulated wind fields. The performance of two models using different downscaling techniques is evaluated. The influence of the boundary conditions on the simulation of wind statistics is investigated. Both models demonstrate a reasonable performance over flat homogeneous terrain and deficiencies over complex terrain, such as the Upper Rhine Valley, due to a too coarse spatial resolution ({proportional_to}50 km). When the spatial resolution is increased to 10 and 20 km respectively a benefit is found for the simulation of the wind direction only. A sensitivity analysis shows major deviations of international land cover data. A time series analysis of dynamically downscaled simulations is conducted. While the annual cycle and the interannual variability are well simulated, the models are less effective at simulating small scale fluctuations and the diurnal cycle. The hypothesis that strong winds are underestimated by RCMs is supported by means of a storm analysis. Only two-thirds of the observed storms are simulated by the model using a spectral nudging approach. In addition ''False Alarms'' are simulated, which are not detected in the observations. A trend analysis over the period 1961 - 2000 is conducted

  18. Effect of geometry on the downstream flow topology of a micro ramp in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambe, S.S.; Schrijer, F.F.J.; van Oudheusden, B.W.

    2017-01-01

    The physical relation between the geometry and the flow topology of the wake of a micro ramp is investigated by means of a parametric study. Various micro ramp geometries are placed in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer at a free-stream Mach number of 2. The flow field is measured with schlieren

  19. Experimental and theoretical study of the atmospheric boundary layer over the paris area; Etude experimentale et theorique de la couche limite atmospherique en agglomeration parisienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menut, L

    1997-12-15

    This thesis studied the urban boundary layer dynamic behaviour over the Paris area by comparing urban (Paris) and suburban (Palaiseau) dynamic data such as lidars, sodars, sonic anemometers. All the data were obtained during the ECLAP experiment, specifically performed to characterize the differences between a city and its near environment. (author)

  20. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  1. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  2. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlak, H.; Sørensen, J. N.; Mikkelsen, R.

    2012-09-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer (See [1]). A prescribed initial boundary layer profile is enforced through the computational domain using body forces to maintain a desired flow field. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than typically required for such problems.

  3. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM......) and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer (See [1]). A prescribed initial boundary layer profile is enforced through the computational domain using body forces to maintain a desired flow field. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation...... and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than typically...

  4. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphas...

  5. Year-Long Vertical Velocity Statistics Derived from Doppler Lidar Data for the Continental Convective Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Larry K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Newsom, Rob K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Turner, David D. [Global Systems Division, NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado

    2017-09-01

    One year of Coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Oklahoma is analyzed to provide profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis for cases of cloud-free convective boundary layers. The variance was scaled by the Deardorff convective velocity scale, which was successful when the boundary layer depth was stationary but failed in situations when the layer was changing rapidly. In this study the data are sorted according to time of day, season, wind direction, surface shear stress, degree of instability, and wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The normalized variance was found to have its peak value near a normalized height of 0.25. The magnitude of the variance changes with season, shear stress, and degree of instability, but was not impacted by wind shear across the boundary-layer top. The skewness was largest in the top half of the boundary layer (with the exception of wintertime conditions). The skewness was found to be a function of the season, shear stress, wind shear across the boundary-layer top, with larger amounts of shear leading to smaller values. Like skewness, the vertical profile of kurtosis followed a consistent pattern, with peak values near the boundary-layer top (also with the exception of wintertime data). The altitude of the peak values of kurtosis was found to be lower when there was a large amount of wind shear at the boundary-layer top.

  6. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  7. An Experimental Study of Polymer Drag Reduction and Boundary Layer Diffusion Characteristics for Incompressible Flow Over a Flat Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-15

    Macromolecular Solutions," Hendon College of Technology, London, 1966. ___, "Turbulence and Drag Reduction With Polymer Additives," Research Bulletin...no. 4, Hendon College of Technology, London, January 1967. White, F. N., "An Analysis of Flat-Plate Drag With Polymer Additives," Journal of... Christoph , G. H., "A Simple Theory for the Two-Diensional Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layer," Transactions of the ASHE, September 1972. White, F. M

  8. A Study of the Drag Characteristics and Polymer Diffusion in the Boundary Layer of an Axisymmetric Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-03-12

    February 1970. White, A., "Some Observations on the Flow Characteristics of Certain Dilute Macromolecular Solutions," Hendon College of Technology...External Bodies by Polymer Additives," AIAA Paper No. 68-127, AIAA 6th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, 1968. White, F. M. and G. H. Christoph , "A...and G. H. Christoph , "Analysis of Tur- bulent Skin Friction in Thick Axisymmetric Boundary Layers," University of Rhode Island, Kingston, R. I

  9. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combe, M.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Jacobs, C. M. J.; Peters, W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere is key to modelling boundary-layer meteorology and cloud formation, as well as carbon cycling and crop yield. In this study we explore these interactions in the exchange of water, heat and CO2 in a cropland-atmosphere system

  10. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water, and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combe, M.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Peters, W.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere is key to model boundary-layer meteorology and cloud formation, as well as carbon cycling and crop yield. In this study we explore these interactions in the exchange of water, heat, and CO2 in a cropland–atmosphere system at

  11. Two perspectives on the coupled carbon, water and energy exchange in the planetary boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combe, M.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Peters, W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere is key to modelling boundary-layer meteorology and cloud formation, as well as carbon cycling and crop yield. In this study we explore these interactions in the exchange of water, heat and CO2 in a cropland–atmosphere system

  12. Numerical Study of the Wintertime Planetary Boundary Layer Development in the Urban Area of Sao Paulo - Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, F. N. D.; Soares, J.; Oliveira, A. P.; Miranda, R. M.; Chen, F.

    2015-12-01

    The gradual replacement of natural by built surfaces and the ongoing emission of particulate matter and other pollutants that happens in urban environments, besides degrading the environment, influence the local weather and climate patterns. Urban areas have different albedo, heat and hydraulic capacity and conductivity, roughness, emissivity, and transmissivity, when compared to naturally vegetated areas. This set of characteristics may change the surface energy budget, air temperature, humidity, atmospheric chemical composition, wind direction and velocity, and therefore the planetary boundary layer (PBL) development. The effects of urbanization on the PBL have been studied in many mid-latitude areas, however in the tropical or subtropical areas they are scarce. The MCITY Brazil project developed in 2 cities of Brazil, Sao Paulo (23°32' S) and Rio de Janeiro (latitude 22° 55' S), has provided the necessary data to properly investigate the effects of urbanization in these two cities. The project included a campaign of soundings launched every 3 hours for 10 consecutive days in August (Austral winter) from an airport at the north part of the city of Sao Paulo, that allowed the study of the PBL development, and also the measurements of the components of the energy budget equation by micrometeorological towers. Therefore, the goal of this work is to simulate the development of the PBL in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo during winter, comparing its characteristics in urbanized and non urbanized sites, in order to assess the impact of urbanization on the development of the PBL in this area. The model used is the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) with a single layer urban canopy parameterization (SLUCM) and realistic anthropogenic heat diurnal evolution. Preliminary results showed that the model is able to reproduce the PBL development during the campaign, including the passage of a cold-frontal system. The urban PBL reaches greater heights during the day than

  13. The LENS Facilities and Experimental Studies to Evaluate the Modeling of Boundary Layer Transition, Shock/Boundary Layer Interaction, Real Gas, Radiation and Plasma Phenomena in Contemporary CFD Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Cavity to Rupture Diaphragms Mylar Diaphragm Vaporizes , Flow Initiated Past Model Steady Flow Through Tunnel Center Body Closes as Airflow Ends...transition process. Figure 22 shows a Schlieren photograph of a transitioning boundary layer along the forebody of the HIFiRE vehicle. The heat transfer...4. Figure 21: HIFiRE-1 Heat Transfer and Pressure Instrumentation 1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. Laminar Figure 22: HIFiRE-1 Schlieren showing

  14. A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsoddin, Sina; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    In a future sustainable energy vision, in which diversified conversion of renewable energies is essential, vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) exhibit some potential as a reliable means of wind energy extraction alongside conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Nevertheless, there is currently a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs as compared to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to, for the first time, study the wake of a single VAWT placed in the atmospheric boundary layer using large-eddy simulation (LES). To do this, we use a previously-validated LES framework in which an actuator line model (ALM) is incorporated. First, for a typical three- and straight-bladed 1-MW VAWT design, the variation of the power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed by performing 117 simulations using LES-ALM. The optimum combination of solidity (defined as Nc/R, where N is the number of blades, c is the chord length and R is the rotor radius) and tip-speed ratio is found to be 0.18 and 4.5, respectively. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulence wake flow statistics. It is found that for this case, the maximum velocity deficit at the equator height of the turbine occurs 2.7 rotor diameters downstream of the center of the turbine, and only after that point, the wake starts to recover. Moreover, it is observed that the maximum turbulence intensity (TI) at the equator height of the turbine occurs at a distance of about 3.8 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine. As we move towards the upper and lower edges of the turbine, the maximum TI (at a certain height) increases, and its location moves relatively closer to the turbine. Furthermore, whereas both TI and turbulent momentum flux fields show clear vertical asymmetries (with larger magnitudes at the upper wake edge

  15. A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Shamsoddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In a future sustainable energy vision, in which diversified conversion of renewable energies is essential, vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs exhibit some potential as a reliable means of wind energy extraction alongside conventional horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs. Nevertheless, there is currently a relative shortage of scientific, academic and technical investigations of VAWTs as compared to HAWTs. Having this in mind, in this work, we aim to, for the first time, study the wake of a single VAWT placed in the atmospheric boundary layer using large-eddy simulation (LES. To do this, we use a previously-validated LES framework in which an actuator line model (ALM is incorporated. First, for a typical three- and straight-bladed 1-MW VAWT design, the variation of the power coefficient with both the chord length of the blades and the tip-speed ratio is analyzed by performing 117 simulations using LES-ALM. The optimum combination of solidity (defined as N c / R , where N is the number of blades, c is the chord length and R is the rotor radius and tip-speed ratio is found to be 0.18 and 4.5, respectively. Subsequently, the wake of a VAWT with these optimum specifications is thoroughly examined by showing different relevant mean and turbulence wake flow statistics. It is found that for this case, the maximum velocity deficit at the equator height of the turbine occurs 2.7 rotor diameters downstream of the center of the turbine, and only after that point, the wake starts to recover. Moreover, it is observed that the maximum turbulence intensity (TI at the equator height of the turbine occurs at a distance of about 3.8 rotor diameters downstream of the turbine. As we move towards the upper and lower edges of the turbine, the maximum TI (at a certain height increases, and its location moves relatively closer to the turbine. Furthermore, whereas both TI and turbulent momentum flux fields show clear vertical asymmetries (with larger magnitudes at the

  16. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  17. The laminar boundary layer equations

    CERN Document Server

    Curle, N

    2017-01-01

    Thorough introduction to boundary layer problems offers an ordered, logical presentation accessible to undergraduates. The text's careful expositions of the limitations and accuracy of various methods will also benefit professionals. 1962 edition.

  18. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  19. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Caryn L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  20. Wind and boundary layers in Rayleigh-Bénard convection. II. Boundary layer character and scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Reeuwijk, Maarten; Jonker, Harm J J; Hanjalić, Kemo

    2008-03-01

    The scaling of the kinematic boundary layer thickness lambda(u) and the friction factor C(f) at the top and bottom walls of Rayleigh-Bénard convection is studied by direct numerical simulation (DNS). By a detailed analysis of the friction factor, a new parameterisation for C(f) and lambda(u) is proposed. The simulations were made of an L/H=4 aspect-ratio domain with periodic lateral boundary conditions at Ra=(10(5), 10(6), 10(7), 10(8)) and Pr=1. The continuous spectrum, as well as significant forcing due to Reynolds stresses, clearly indicates a turbulent character of the boundary layer, while viscous effects cannot be neglected, judging from the scaling of classical integral boundary layer parameters with Reynolds number. Using a conceptual wind model, we find that the friction factor C(f) should scale proportionally to the thermal boundary layer thickness as C(f) proportional variant lambda(Theta)/H, while the kinetic boundary layer thickness lambda(u) scales inversely proportionally to the thermal boundary layer thickness and wind Reynolds number lambda(u)/H proportional variant (lambda(Theta)/H)(-1)Re(-1). The predicted trends for C(f) and lambda(u) are in agreement with DNS results.

  1. Intercomparison of planetary boundary layer parameterizations in the WRF Model for a case study in Houston/Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, G. C.; Rappenglück, B.

    2013-05-01

    A realistic simulation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) structure and its evolution is critical for regional modeling of meteorology and air quality. Conversely, poor accuracy in the simulated physical properties often leads to degraded meteorological and air quality prognostic skills. With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest metropolitan area in the United States. Located in southeast Texas this region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. Our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by three widely used PBL schemes and compared the results to observational data. Two non-local PBL schemes were evaluated, the Yonsei University (YSU) and Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2), and one local PBL scheme, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) scheme. The WRF model is configured with two domains: the coarse domain has a 98 x 70 mesh with horizontal resolution of 30 km covering the south of United States, the nested domain has a 118 x 103 mesh of 10 km horizontal grid spacing covering the Houston-Galveston area in Texas. All model domains have 28 vertical levels, 10 of those in the lowermost 2 km above the surface. The National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Eta 40km is used for the initial and boundary conditions. Three 36h forecasts, one for each PBL scheme, were run. The first 12h of each simulation are treated as spinup, and the remaining 24h are used for the evaluation. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. The vertical sounding experiment site was located on the University of Houston campus (UH), approximately 4 km southwest of

  2. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  3. A method for the parameterization of cloud optical properties in bulk and bin microphysical models. Implications for arctic cloudy boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jerry Y.; Olsson, Peter Q.

    Computationally efficient and numerically accurate methods for computing band-averaged cloud optical properties for radiative transfer interactions with various microphysical parameterizations are described. Parameterizations for bulk microphysical models employing generalized gamma distribution representations of the size spectra and binned representations, in which the size spectra fluctuate with time, are discussed. It is shown that simple exponential fits and look-up tables may be used with minimal computational cost and high accuracy for bulk microphysical models. Binned microphysical representations may be parameterized using mean properties for each bin, if averaged appropriately. The implications for the radiative scheme are discussed in comparison with the computed radiative budget of fall/spring season mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds (ASC). Compared to liquid clouds of the same water path, mixed-phase ASC absorb and reflect less radiation, and transmit more radiation to the surface. This results in greater cooling (warming) of the surface, by up to 60 W m -2, in the infrared (solar) by mixed-phase clouds. The radiative properties of mixed-phase clouds show a significant sensitivity to crystal habit for clouds with ice water paths ≳25 g m -2. Surface net fluxes and cloud absorption may vary by up to 15 W m -2, depending on the ice habit. It is also shown that mixed-phase clouds are more sensitive to the choice of ice effective radius ( re,i) than liquid clouds are to re. Using values of from the literature, it is shown that the surface net fluxes can vary by as much as 50 W m -2 depending on the value of re,i. Furthermore, it is shown that the sign of the surface net flux (i.e. warming or cooling) may be dependent on the value of re,i selected.

  4. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, ZhiQiang; Lin, Weili; Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin; Fuentes, Jose D; Xue, Ming

    2014-11-15

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (~1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O3 pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  6. Diagnosis of boundary-layer circulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Robert J; Cullen, Michael J P

    2013-05-28

    Diagnoses of circulations in the vertical plane provide valuable insights into aspects of the dynamics of the climate system. Dynamical theories based on geostrophic balance have proved useful in deriving diagnostic equations for these circulations. For example, semi-geostrophic theory gives rise to the Sawyer-Eliassen equation (SEE) that predicts, among other things, circulations around mid-latitude fronts. A limitation of the SEE is the absence of a realistic boundary layer. However, the coupling provided by the boundary layer between the atmosphere and the surface is fundamental to the climate system. Here, we use a theory based on Ekman momentum balance to derive an SEE that includes a boundary layer (SEEBL). We consider a case study of a baroclinic low-level jet. The SEEBL solution shows significant benefits over Ekman pumping, including accommodating a boundary-layer depth that varies in space and structure, which accounts for buoyancy and momentum advection. The diagnosed low-level jet is stronger than that determined by Ekman balance. This is due to the inclusion of momentum advection. Momentum advection provides an additional mechanism for enhancement of the low-level jet that is distinct from inertial oscillations.

  7. Asymptotic analysis and boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cousteix, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This book presents a new method of asymptotic analysis of boundary-layer problems, the Successive Complementary Expansion Method (SCEM). The first part is devoted to a general comprehensive presentation of the tools of asymptotic analysis. It gives the keys to understand a boundary-layer problem and explains the methods to construct an approximation. The second part is devoted to SCEM and its applications in fluid mechanics, including external and internal flows. The advantages of SCEM are discussed in comparison with the standard Method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions. In particular, for the first time, the theory of Interactive Boundary Layer is fully justified. With its chapter summaries, detailed derivations of results, discussed examples and fully worked out problems and solutions, the book is self-contained. It is written on a mathematical level accessible to graduate and post-graduate students of engineering and physics with a good knowledge in fluid mechanics. Researchers and practitioners will estee...

  8. Tropical cyclone boundary layer shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Slocum, Christopher J.; Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; Wayne H. Schubert

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents numerical solutions and idealized analytical solutions of axisymmetric, $f$-plane models of the tropical cyclone boundary layer. In the numerical model, the boundary layer radial and tangential flow is forced by a specified pressure field, which can also be interpreted as a specified gradient balanced tangential wind field $v_{\\rm gr}(r)$ or vorticity field $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$. When the specified $\\zeta_{\\rm gr}(r)$ field is changed from one that is radially concentrated i...

  9. A barotropic planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, D.; Syrakov, D.; Djolov, G.

    1983-04-01

    The temperature and wind profiles in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are investigated. Assuming stationary and homogeneous conditions, the turbulent state in the PBL is uniquely determined by the external Rossby number and the stratification parameters. In this study, a simple two-layer barotropic model is proposed. It consists of a surface (SL) and overlying Ekman-type layer. The system of dynamic and heat transfer equations is closed using K theory. In the SL, the turbulent exchange coefficient is consistent with the results of similarity theory while in the Ekman layer, it is constant. Analytical solutions for the wind and temperature profiles in the PBL are obtained. The SL and thermal PBL heights are properly chosen functions of the stratification so that from the solutions for wind and temperature, the PBL resistance laws can be easily deduced. The internal PBL characteristics necessary for the calculation (friction velocity, angle between surface and geostrophic winds and internal stratification parameter) are presented in terms of the external parameters. Favorable agreement with experimental data and model results is demonstrated. The simplicity of the model allows it to be incorporated in large-scale weather prediction models as well as in the solution of various other meteorological problems.

  10. Marine boundary layer simulation and verification during BOBMEX ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A global spectral model (T80L18) that is operational at NCMRWF is utilized to study the structure of the marine boundary layer over the Bay of Bengal during the BOBMEX-Pilot period. The vertical profiles of various meteorological parameters within the boundary layer are studied and verified against the available ...

  11. Numerical simulation of the marine boundary layer characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A one-dimensional multi- level atmospheric boundary layer with TKE- closure scheme is employed to study the marine boundary layer characteristics. In this study two synoptic situations are chosen: one represents an active convection case and the other a suppressed convection. In the present article the marine ...

  12. The Importance and Current Limitations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Retrieval from Space for Land-Atmosphere Coupling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Schaefer, A.

    2016-12-01

    There is an established need for improved PBL remote sounding over land for hydrology, land-atmosphere (L-A), PBL, cloud/convection, pollution/chemistry studies and associated model evaluation and development. Most notably, the connection of surface hydrology (through soil moisture) to clouds and precipitation relies on proper quantification of water's transport through the coupled system, which is modulated strongly by PBL structure, growth, and feedback processes such as entrainment. In-situ (ground-based or radiosonde) measurements will be spatially limited to small field campaigns for the foreseeable future, so satellite data is a must in order to understand these processes globally. The scales of these applications require diurnal resolution (e.g. 3-hourly or finer) at attention or planning (short or long-term) in place for improving lower tropospheric sounding over land, and as a result PBL and L-A interactions have been identified as `gaps' in current programmatic focal areas. It is therefore timely to assess how these technologies can be leveraged, combined, or evolved in order to form a dedicated mission or sub-mission to routinely monitor the PBL on diurnal timescales. In addition, improved PBL monitoring from space needs to be addressed in the next Decadal Survey. In this talk, the importance of PBL information (structure, evolution) for L-A coupling diagnostics and model development will be summarized. The current array of PBL retrieval methods and products from space will then be assessed in terms of meeting the needs of these models, diagnostics, and scales, with a look forward as to how this can and must be improved through future mission and sensor design.

  13. the Martian atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, Søren Ejling

    2011-01-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime...

  14. Motion of particles in a thermal boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schefer, R.W.; Agrawal, Y.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1978-06-15

    In the course of using laser Doppler velocimetry to study combustion in a thermal boundary layer, the particle count rate was found to decrease abruptly to zero inside the boundary layer. Experimental and theoretical investigation of this phenomenon was carried out. The motion of the particles may be due to the combined effects of thermophoresis and radiative heating.

  15. Numerical Simulation of tsunami-scale wave boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Isaac A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the boundary layer flow and properties induced by tsunami-scale waves. For this purpose, an existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) boundary layer model, based on the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations,

  16. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 2. Solitary motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Jensen, Palle Martin; Sørensen, Lone B.

    2010-01-01

    This study continues the investigation of wave boundary layers reported by Carstensen, Sumer & Fredsøe (J. Fluid Mech., 2010, part 1 of this paper). The present paper summarizes the results of an experimental investigation of turbulent solitary wave boundary layers, simulated by solitary motion...

  17. The study of the effects of sea-spray drops on the marine atmospheric boundary layer by direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druzhinin, Oleg A.; Troitskaya, Yuliya I.; Zilitinkevich, Sergej S.

    2017-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the interaction of wind with surface water waves is necessary for correct parameterization of turbulent exchange at the air-sea interface in prognostic models. At sufficiently strong winds, sea-spray-generated droplets interfere with the wind-waves interaction. The results of field experiments and laboratory measurements (Andreas et al., JGR 2010) show that mass fraction of air-borne spume water droplets increases with the wind speed and their impact on the carrier air-flow may become significant. Phenomenological models of droplet-laden marine atmospheric boundary layer (Kudryavtsev & Makin, Bound.-Layer Met. 2011) predict that droplets significantly increase the wind velocity and suppress the turbulent air stress. The results of direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent particle-laden Couette flow over a flat surface show that inertial particles may significantly reduce the carrier flow vertical momentum flux (Richter & Sullivan, GRL 2013). The results also show that in the range of droplet sizes typically found near the air-sea interface, particle inertial effects are significant and dominate any particle-induced stratification effects. However, so far there has been no attempt to perform DNS of a droplet-laden air-flow over waved water surface. The objective of the present paper is to elucidate possible effects of sea spray on the momentum transfer in marine boundary layer under strong wind-forcing conditions by performing direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent, droplet-laden air-flow over a waved water surface. Three-dimensional, turbulent Couette air-flow is considered in DNS as a model of a constant-flux layer in the atmospheric surface layer. Two-dimensional stationary waves at the water surface are prescribed and assumed to be unaffected by the air-flow and/or droplets. Droplets are considered as non-deformable spheres and tracked in a Lagrangian framework, and their impact on the carrier flow is modeled with the use of

  18. Numerical study of the effects of Planetary Boundary Layer structure on the pollutant dispersion within built-up areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu; Liu, Zhenxin; Zhang, Bihui

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) structures on pollutant dispersion processes within two idealized street canyon configurations and a realistic urban area were numerically examined by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. The boundary conditions of different PBL structures/conditions were provided by simulations of the Weather Researching and Forecasting model. The simulated results of the idealized 2D and 3D street canyon experiments showed that the increment of PBL instability favored the downward transport of momentum from the upper flow above the roof to the pedestrian level within the street canyon. As a result, the flow and turbulent fields within the street canyon under the more unstable PBL condition are stronger. Therefore, more pollutants within the street canyon would be removed by the stronger advection and turbulent diffusion processes under the unstable PBL condition. On the contrary, more pollutants would be concentrated in the street canyon under the stable PBL condition. In addition, the simulations of the realistic building cluster experiments showed that the density of buildings was a crucial factor determining the dynamic effects of the PBL structure on the flow patterns. The momentum field within a denser building configuration was mostly transported from the upper flow, and was more sensitive to the PBL structures than that of the sparser building configuration. Finally, it was recommended to use the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which can explicitly output the needed turbulent variables, to provide the boundary conditions to the CFD simulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...... layer. In the current study, another approach has been implemented to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on Immersed Boundary Method and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer. An initial boundary layer is enforced...... through the whole domain, without wind turbines included, while the body forces that are required to maintain that flow field is calculated. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation of wind turbine and the boundary layer shape will be modified based on the turbine...

  20. Statistical study of the location and size of the electron edge of the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer as observed by Cluster at mid-altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Bogdanova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of particle precipitations at dayside mid-altitudes can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of reconnected field lines. Due to the difference between electron and ion parallel velocities, two distinct boundary layers should be observed at mid-altitudes between the boundary between open and closed field lines and the injections in the cusp proper. At lowest latitudes, the electron-dominated boundary layer, named the "electron edge" of the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL, contains soft-magnetosheath electrons but only high-energy ions of plasma sheet origin. A second layer, the LLBL proper, is a mixture of both ions and electrons with characteristic magnetosheath energies. The Cluster spacecraft frequently observe these two boundary layers. We present an illustrative example of a Cluster mid-altitude cusp crossing with an extended electron edge of the LLBL. This electron edge contains 10–200 eV, low-density, isotropic electrons, presumably originating from the solar wind halo population. These are occasionally observed with bursts of parallel and/or anti-parallel-directed electron beams with higher fluxes, which are possibly accelerated near the magnetopause X-line. We then use 3 years of data from mid-altitude cusp crossings (327 events to carry out a statistical study of the location and size of the electron edge of the LLBL. We find that the equatorward boundary of the LLBL electron edge is observed at 10:00–17:00 magnetic local time (MLT and is located typically between 68° and 80° invariant latitude (ILAT. The location of the electron edge shows a weak, but significant, dependence on some of the external parameters (solar wind pressure, and IMF BZ- component, in agreement with expectations from previous studies of the cusp location. The latitudinal extent of the electron edge has been estimated using new multi-spacecraft techniques. The Cluster tetrahedron crosses the electron and ion boundaries of the LLBL/cusp with

  1. Statistical study of the location and size of the electron edge of the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer as observed by Cluster at mid-altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Bogdanova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The nature of particle precipitations at dayside mid-altitudes can be interpreted in terms of the evolution of reconnected field lines. Due to the difference between electron and ion parallel velocities, two distinct boundary layers should be observed at mid-altitudes between the boundary between open and closed field lines and the injections in the cusp proper. At lowest latitudes, the electron-dominated boundary layer, named the "electron edge" of the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL, contains soft-magnetosheath electrons but only high-energy ions of plasma sheet origin. A second layer, the LLBL proper, is a mixture of both ions and electrons with characteristic magnetosheath energies. The Cluster spacecraft frequently observe these two boundary layers. We present an illustrative example of a Cluster mid-altitude cusp crossing with an extended electron edge of the LLBL. This electron edge contains 10–200 eV, low-density, isotropic electrons, presumably originating from the solar wind halo population. These are occasionally observed with bursts of parallel and/or anti-parallel-directed electron beams with higher fluxes, which are possibly accelerated near the magnetopause X-line. We then use 3 years of data from mid-altitude cusp crossings (327 events to carry out a statistical study of the location and size of the electron edge of the LLBL. We find that the equatorward boundary of the LLBL electron edge is observed at 10:00–17:00 magnetic local time (MLT and is located typically between 68° and 80° invariant latitude (ILAT. The location of the electron edge shows a weak, but significant, dependence on some of the external parameters (solar wind pressure, and IMF BZ- component, in agreement with expectations from previous studies of the cusp location. The latitudinal extent of the electron edge has been estimated using new multi-spacecraft techniques. The Cluster tetrahedron crosses the electron and ion boundaries of

  2. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  3. A box model study on photochemical interactions between VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new chemical scheme is developed for the multiphase photochemical box model SEAMAC (size-SEgregated Aerosol model for Marine Air Chemistry to investigate photochemical interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs and reactive halogen species in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Based primarily on critically evaluated kinetic and photochemical rate parameters as well as a protocol for chemical mechanism development, the new scheme has achieved a near-explicit description of oxidative degradation of up to C3-hydrocarbons (CH4, C2H6, C3H8, C2H4, C3H6, and C2H2 initiated by reactions with OH radicals, Cl- and Br-atoms, and O3. Rate constants and product yields for reactions involving halogen species are taken from the literature where available, but the majority of them need to be estimated. In particular, addition reactions of halogen atoms with alkenes will result in forming halogenated organic intermediates, whose photochemical loss rates are carefully evaluated in the present work. Model calculations with the new chemical scheme reveal that the oceanic emissions of acetaldehyde (CH3CHO and alkenes (especially C3H6 are important factors for regulating reactive halogen chemistry in the MBL by promoting the conversion of Br atoms into HBr or more stable brominated intermediates in the organic form. The latter include brominated hydroperoxides, bromoacetaldehyde, and bromoacetone, which sequester bromine from a reactive inorganic pool. The total mixing ratio of brominated organic species thus produced is likely to reach 10-20% or more of that of inorganic gaseous bromine species over wide regions over the ocean. The reaction between Br atoms and C2H2 is shown to be unimportant for determining the degree of bromine activation in the remote MBL. These results imply that reactive halogen chemistry can mediate a link between the oceanic emissions of VOCs and the behaviors of compounds that are sensitive to halogen chemistry such as dimethyl

  4. Improving Boundary-layer Turbulence and Cloud Processes in CAM with a Higher-order Turbulence Closure Scheme and ASR Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kuan-Man [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Cheng, Anning [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Hampton, VA (United States)

    2015-11-24

    The intermediately-prognostic higher-order turbulence closure (IPHOC) introduces a joint double-Gaussian distribution of liquid water potential temperature (θl ), total water mixing ratio (qt), and vertical velocity (w) to represent any skewed turbulence circulation. The distribution is inferred from the first-, second-, and third-order moments of the variables given above, and is used to diagnose cloud fraction and gridmean liquid water mixing ratio, as well as the buoyancy term and fourth-order terms in the equations describing the evolution of the second- and third-order moments. Only three third-order moments, i.e., the triple moments of θl, qt, and w, are predicted in IPHOC.

  5. A global boundary-layer height climatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dop, H. van; Krol, M.; Holtslag, B. [Inst. for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, IMAU, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    In principle the ABL (atmospheric boundary layer) height can be retrieved from atmospheric global circulation models since they contain algorithms which determine the intensity of the turbulence as a function of height. However, these data are not routinely available, or on a (vertical) resolution which is too crude in view of the application. This justifies the development of a separate algorithm in order to define the ABL. The algorithm should include the generation of turbulence by both shear and buoyancy and should be based on readily available atmospheric parameters. There is obviously a wide application for boundary heights in off-line global and regional chemistry and transport modelling. It is also a much used parameter in air pollution meteorology. In this article we shall present a theory which is based on current insights in ABL dynamics. The theory is applicable over land and sea surfaces in all seasons. The theory is (for various reasons) not valid in mountainous areas. In areas where boundary-layer clouds or deep cumulus convection are present the theory does not apply. However, the same global atmospheric circulation models contain parameterizations for shallow and deep convection from which separate estimates can be obtained for the extent of vertical mixing. (au)

  6. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  7. Diffusive boundary layers over varying topography

    KAUST Repository

    Dell, R. W.

    2015-03-25

    Diffusive bottom boundary layers can produce upslope flows in a stratified fluid. Accumulating observations suggest that these boundary layers may drive upwelling and mixing in mid-ocean ridge flank canyons. However, most studies of diffusive bottom boundary layers to date have concentrated on constant bottom slopes. We present a study of how diffusive boundary layers interact with various idealized topography, such as changes in bottom slope, slopes with corrugations and isolated sills. We use linear theory and numerical simulations in the regional ocean modeling system (ROMS) model to show changes in bottom slope can cause convergences and divergences within the boundary layer, in turn causing fluid exchanges that reach far into the overlying fluid and alter stratification far from the bottom. We also identify several different regimes of boundary-layer behaviour for topography with oceanographically relevant size and shape, including reversing flows and overflows, and we develop a simple theory that predicts the regime boundaries, including what topographies will generate overflows. As observations also suggest there may be overflows in deep canyons where the flow passes over isolated bumps and sills, this parameter range may be particularly significant for understanding the role of boundary layers in the deep ocean.

  8. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M J; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A F; Springston, Stephen R; Tomlinson, Jason M; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A T; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T

    2016-11-17

    The nucleation of atmospheric vapours is an important source of new aerosol particles that can subsequently grow to form cloud condensation nuclei in the atmosphere. Most field studies of atmospheric aerosols over continents are influenced by atmospheric vapours of anthropogenic origin (for example, ref. 2) and, in consequence, aerosol processes in pristine, terrestrial environments remain poorly understood. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions, but the origin of small aerosol particles that grow into cloud condensation nuclei in the Amazon boundary layer remains unclear. Here we present aircraft- and ground-based measurements under clean conditions during the wet season in the central Amazon basin. We find that high concentrations of small aerosol particles (with diameters of less than 50 nanometres) in the lower free troposphere are transported from the free troposphere into the boundary layer during precipitation events by strong convective downdrafts and weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This rapid vertical transport can help to maintain the population of particles in the pristine Amazon boundary layer, and may therefore influence cloud properties and climate under natural conditions.

  9. Effect of externally generated turbulence on wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Kozakiewicz, A.

    2003-01-01

    This experimental study deals with the effect of externally generated turbulence on the oscillatory boundary layer to simulate the turbulence in the wave boundary layer under broken waves in the swash zone. The subject has been investigated experimentally in a U-shaped, oscillating water tunnel...... results. The mean and turbulence quantities in the outer flow region are increased substantially with the introduction of the grids. It is shown that the externally generated turbulence is able to penetrate the bed boundary layer, resulting in an increase in the bed shear stress, and therefore...

  10. The thermodynamic evolution of the hurricane boundary layer during eyewall replacement cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2017-12-01

    Eyewall replacement cycles (ERCs) are frequently observed during the lifecycle of mature tropical cyclones. Although the kinematic structure and intensity changes during an ERC have been well-documented, comparatively little research has been done to examine the evolution of the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL) during an ERC. This study will examine how the inner core thermal structure of the TCBL is affected by the presence of multiple concentric eyewalls using a high-resolution moist, hydrostatic, multilayer diagnostic boundary layer model. Within the concentric eyewalls above the cloud base, latent heat release and vertical advection (due to the eyewall updrafts) dominate the heat and moisture budgets, whereas vertical advection (due to subsidence) and vertical diffusion dominate the heat and moisture budgets for the moat region. Furthermore, it is shown that the development of a moat region within the TCBL depends sensitively on the moat width in the overlying atmosphere and the relative strength of the gradient wind field in the overlying atmosphere. These results further indicate that the TCBL contributes to outer eyewall formation through a positive feedback process between the vorticity in the nascent outer eyewall, boundary layer convergence, and boundary layer moist convection.

  11. Multiple Regimes of Flow, Stratification, and Turbulence in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, A. H.; Rees, T.

    2014-12-01

    It is well established that the atmospheric Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) can display distinct regimes of flow. In the weakly stable boundary layer, turbulence is weak but continuous and the surface flow is coupled to that aloft. In the very stable boundary layer, turbulence collapses and the surface flow becomes decoupled from the flow above.This study demonstrates the clear presence of two distinct SBL regimes in a long record of observations from the 213m tower in Cabauw, Netherlands. These regimes are found in the joint distribution of near-surface stratification, shear, and vertically-averaged wind speed. Hidden Markov model (HMM) analysis is used to distinguish these regimes and objectively classify states as being in one regime or the other. This classification allows for a detailed diagnosis of the flow, stratification, and turbulence structures within each of the two regimes, as well as their relation to large-scale forcing through the geostrophic wind and cloud cover. Observational evidence is presented that the very stable boundary layer is produced by a previously-discussed positive feedback associated with a maximum sustainable turbulent heat flux.

  12. The turbulent boundary layer on a porous plate: An experimental study of the fluid mechanics for adverse free stream pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P. S.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of transpired turbulent boundary layers in zero and adverse pressure gradients has been carried out. Profiles of: (1) the mean velocity, (2) the three intensities of the turbulent fluctuations, and (3) the Reynolds stress were obtained by hot-wire anemometry. The friction coefficients were measured by using an integrated form of the boundary layer equation to extrapolate the measured shear stress profiles to the wall.

  13. Boundary-layer height detection with a ceilometer at a coastal site in western Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannesdóttir, Ásta; Hansen, Aksel Walle

    with those from turbulence measurements of a wind lidar and the two methods are in good agreement. It is found that detecting the boundary-layer height from turbulence kinetic energy considerations with the wind lidar is not recommendable for detecting the boundary layer height during the presence of clouds......One year of data from ceilometer measurements is used to estimate the atmospheric boundary-layer height at the coastal site Høvsøre in western Denmark. The atmospheric boundary-layer height is a fundamental parameter for the evaluation of the wind speed profile, and an essential parameter...... in atmospheric transport- and dispersion models. A new method of filtering clouds from the ceilometer data is presented. This allows for the inclusion of more than half of the data in the subsequent analysis, as the presence of clouds would otherwise complicate the boundary-layer height estimations. The boundary...

  14. Experimental study of gas propagation in turbulent plate boundary layers with neutral and stable stratification for different surface roughness patterns. Experimentelle Untersuchung des Ausbreitungsverhaltens eines gasfoermigen Stoffes in neutral- und stabil-geschichteten turbulenten Plattengrenzschichten bei unterschiedlicher Bodenrauhigkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerruth, M.

    1988-07-15

    The study investigates into the influence of stability and soil roughness on the dispersion of a gaseous substance in thermally stratified, turbulent balanced-pressure boundary layers. The simulation of atmospheric boundary layers in wind tunnels is tested and assessed critically with the help of a comparison of data on wind tunnels with atmospheric data. The transfer of impulses, heat and material in an atmospheric boundary layer flow is adequately reproduced in its structures in a wind tunnel. The wind tunnel experiment thus simulates turbulent transfer reliably. With this simulation system it is also possible to reproduce dispersion in the proximity of complicated geometrical structures. Specifically, material dispersion near buildings or building complexes which cannot be represented accurately by means of computer simulation can be studied reliably in the wind tunnel experiment, depending on soil roughness, stability and building geometry. (orig./KW).

  15. The atmospheric boundary layer response to the dynamic new Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing ice-free area in the Arctic Ocean has transformed its climate system to one with more dynamic boundary layer clouds and seasonal sea ice. During the fall freeze season, the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) is a crucial mechanism for the loss of excessive ocean heat to the atmosphere, and it has been speculated to play an important role in the recent cloud cover increase and boundary layer (BL) instability observed in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Based on multi-year Japanese cruise ship observations from the ice-strengthened R/V Mirai, we are able to characterize the late summer and early fall ocean-BL interactions in this region. Although the BL is found to be well-mixed more than 90% of the time, the SSHF can explain only 10% of the mixed layer height variability. It is the cloud-generated convective turbulence that apparently dominates BL mixing in this ice-free region, which is similar to previous in-situ observations (SHEBA, ASCOS) over sea ice. The SSHF, however, may contribute to BL instability during conditions of uplift (low-pressure), and the presence of the highly stable stratus cloud regime. The efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus cloud regime) despite an enhanced ocean-atmosphere temperature difference (ΔT). In general, surface-generated mixing is favored during episodes of high surface wind speeds as opposed to pronounced ΔT. Our analysis suggests a weak local response of the boundary layer stability to the loss of sea ice cover during late summer, which is masked by the strong influence of the large-scale circulation (and clouds). Apart from the fall season, we also studied the Arctic Ocean BL properties during the cold months (Nov-Apr) using multi-year satellite measurements (COSMIC RO). As the boundary layer is typically stable at this time, one might expect major differences in the nature of surface-atmosphere coupling compared to that observed during late

  16. Modelling the Arctic Stable boundary layer and its coupling to the surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of coupling the atmosphere to the surface energy balance is examined for the stable boundary layer, as an extension of the first GABLS (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study) one-dimensional model intercomparison. This coupling is of major importance for the stable boundary-layer

  17. Wind tunnel study of the wind turbine interaction with a boundary-layer flow: Upwind region, turbine performance, and wake region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastankhah, M.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2017-06-01

    Comprehensive wind tunnel experiments were carried out to study the interaction of a turbulent boundary layer with a wind turbine operating under different tip-speed ratios and yaw angles. Force and power measurements were performed to characterize the variation of thrust force (both magnitude and direction) and generated power of the wind turbine under different operating conditions. Moreover, flow measurements, collected using high-resolution particle-image velocimetry as well as hot-wire anemometry, were employed to systematically study the flow in the upwind, near-wake, and far-wake regions. These measurements provide new insights into the effect of turbine operating conditions on flow characteristics in these regions. For the upwind region, the results show a strong lateral asymmetry under yawed conditions. For the near-wake region, the evolution of tip and root vortices was studied with the use of both instantaneous and phase-averaged vorticity fields. The results suggest that the vortex breakdown position cannot be determined based on phase-averaged statistics, particularly for tip vortices under turbulent inflow conditions. Moreover, the measurements in the near-wake region indicate a complex velocity distribution with a speed-up region in the wake center, especially for higher tip-speed ratios. In order to elucidate the meandering tendency of far wakes, particular focus was placed on studying the characteristics of large turbulent structures in the boundary layer and their interaction with wind turbines. Although these structures are elongated in the streamwise direction, their cross sections are found to have a size comparable to the rotor area, so that they can be affected by the presence of the turbine. In addition, the study of spatial coherence in turbine wakes reveals that any statistics based on streamwise velocity fluctuations cannot provide reliable information about the size of large turbulent structures in turbine wakes due to the effect of wake

  18. Thermodynamic structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL over the Indian monsoon region during CAIPEEX campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mehta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability in the convective boundary layer (CBL height for the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX study period are examined using the data collected from high-resolution radiosondes during May–September 2009 over the Indian monsoon region. In total, 57 radiosonde launchings were carried out at ∼ 11:00–17:00 IST over six different stations covering a large geographical region, ranging from latitude ∼ 13 to 32° N and longitude 73 to 92° E. Of the total 57 launchings, 17 were made during cloudy conditions during which relative humidity (RH was found to be greater than 83 % for an ∼ 1.0 km layer at various altitudes below 6 km. Within the layer the difference between saturated equivalent potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature is small, and it satisfies the condition that RH > 83 % for about 1 km is considered as the cloudy layer. There are eight cases when the cloud-topped boundary layer (CTBL and 19 cases when fair-weather boundary layer (FWBL is observed. The CBL heights are obtained using thermodynamic profiles, which vary from ∼ 0.4 to 2.5 km a. g. l.  The formation of the cloud layers above the boundary layer generally lowers the CBL height and is responsible for its day-to-day variability. The development of the cloud beneath the boundary layer generally elevates the CBL, which is also responsible for the large day-to-day variability in the CBL. The FWBL identified using relative invariance of the thermodynamic profiles varies from ∼ 2.0 to 5.5 km, which is clearly marked by a local minimum in the refractivity gradient. During cloudy days, the CBL is found to be shallow and the surface temperature lower when compared to clear-sky days. The CBL and the lifting condensation level (LCL heights are randomly related and are found to be at a lower height during cloudy days when compared to clear-sky days

  19. Analytical study of MHD free convective, dissipative boundary layer flow past a porous vertical surface in the presence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and constant suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Raju

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution of MHD free convective, dissipative boundary layer flow past a vertical porous surface in the presence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and constant suction, under the influence of uniform magnetic field which is applied normal to the surface is studied. The governing equations are solved analytically using a regular perturbation technique. The expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. With the aid of these, the expressions for the coefficient of skin friction, the rate of heat transfer in the form of Nusselt number and the rate of mass transfer in the form of Sherwood number are derived. Finally the effects of various physical parameters of the flow quantities are studied with the help of graphs and tables. It is observed that the velocity and concentration increase during a generative reaction and decrease in a destructive reaction. The same observed to be true for the behavior of the fluid temperature. The presence of magnetic field and radiation diminishes the velocity and also the temperature.

  20. Cumulative ozone effect on canopy stomatal resistance and the impact on boundary layer dynamics and CO2 assimilation at the diurnal scale: A case study for grassland in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Super, I.; Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Biological, chemical, and dynamical processes occurring at the surface strongly interact at diurnal scales. Therefore, this study examines the seasonal ozone impact on stomatal resistance, surface energy balance, boundary layer dynamics, and CO2 assimilation at this (sub)diurnal scale under changing

  1. Boundary layer thickness effect on boattail drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, B. J.; Chamberlain, R.; Bober, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program was conducted to investigate the effects of boundary layer changes on the flow over high angle boattail nozzles. The tests were run on an isolated axisymmetric sting mounted model. Various boattail geometries were investigated at high subsonic speeds over a range of boundary layer thicknesses. In general, boundary layer effects were small at speeds up to Mach 0.8. However, at higher speeds significant regions of separated flow were present on the boattail. When separation was present large reductions in boattail drag resulted with increasing boundary layer thickness. The analysis predicts both of these trends.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of the load of an object due to the effects of a flow field in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, V.; Kuznetsov, Sergeii; Pospíšil, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2014), s. 135-140 ISSN 1998-0159 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0060 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : atmospheric boundary layer ABL * bluff body * CFD * ELES * SAS * wind tunnel Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://www.naun.org/cms.action?id=7632

  3. dFirst simultaneous space measurements of atmospheric pollutants in the boundary layer from IASI: A case study in the North China Plain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boynard, A.; Clerbaux, C.; Clarisse, L.; Safieddine, S.; Pommier, M.; van Damme, M.; Bauduin, S.; Oudot, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Hurtmans, D.; Coheur, P.F.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a severe pollution episode that occurred in Beijing, Tianjin, and the Hebei province in January 2013. The episode was caused by the combination of anthropogenic emissions and a high-pressure system that trapped pollutants in the boundary layer. Using IASI (Infrared

  4. COED Transactions, Vol. X, No. 9, September 1978. Use of the Analog/Hybrid Computer in Boundary Layer and Convection Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    In certain boundary layer or natural convection work, where a similarity transformation is valid, the equations can be reduced to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. They are therefore well-suited to a fast solution on an analog/hybrid computer. This paper illustrates such usage of the analog/hybrid computer by a set of…

  5. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  6. Amazon boundary layer aerosol concentration sustained by vertical transport during rainfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Krejci, Radovan; Giangrande, Scott; Kuang, Chongai; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Chi, Xuguang; Comstock, Jennifer; Ditas, Florian; Lavric, Jost; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mei, Fan; Moran-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Saturno, Jorge; Schmid, Beat; Souza, Rodrigo A. F.; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Toto, Tami; Walter, David; Wimmer, Daniela; Smith, James N.; Kulmala, Markku; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    A necessary prerequisite of cloud formation, aerosol particles represent one of the largest uncertainties in computer simulations of climate change1,2, in part because of a poor understanding of processes under natural conditions3,4. The Amazon rainforest is one of the few continental regions where aerosol particles and their precursors can be studied under near-natural conditions5-7. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in clean Amazonia are mostly produced by the growth of smaller particles in the boundary layer8-10, whereas these smaller particles themselves 31 appear to be produced elsewhere5,11. Key questions are in what part of the atmosphere they might 32 be produced and what could be the transport processes that deliver them to the boundary layer, where they grow into CCN. Here, using recent aircraft measurements above central Amazonia, we show high concentrations of small particles in the lower free troposphere. The particle size spectrum shifts towards larger sizes with decreasing altitude, implying particle growth as air descends from the free troposphere towards Earth's surface. Complementary measurements at ground sites show that free tropospheric air having high concentrations of small particles (diameters of less than 50 nm) is transported into the boundary layer during precipitation events, both by strong convective downdrafts and by weaker downward motions in the trailing stratiform region. This vertical transport helps maintain the population of small particles and ultimately CCN in the boundary layer, thereby playing an important role in controlling the climate state under natural conditions. In contrast, this mechanism becomes masked under polluted conditions, which sometimes prevail at times in Amazonia as well as over other tropical continental regions5,12.

  7. Flow Visualization in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael Wayne

    This thesis is a collection of novel flow visualizations of two different flat-plate, zero pressure gradient, supersonic, turbulent boundary layers (M = 2.8, Re _theta ~ 82,000, and M = 2.5, Re_ theta ~ 25,000, respectively). The physics of supersonic shear flows has recently drawn increasing attention with the renewed interest in flight at super and hypersonic speeds. This work was driven by the belief that the study of organized, Reynolds -stress producing turbulence structures will lead to improved techniques for the modelling and control of high-speed boundary layers. Although flow-visualization is often thought of as a tool for providing qualitative information about complex flow fields, in this thesis an emphasis is placed on deriving quantitative results from image data whenever possible. Three visualization techniques were applied--'selective cut-off' schlieren, droplet seeding, and Rayleigh scattering. Two experiments employed 'selective cut-off' schlieren. In the first, high-speed movies (40,000 fps) were made of strong density gradient fronts leaning downstream at between 30^circ and 60^ circ and travelling at about 0.9U _infty. In the second experiment, the same fronts were detected with hot-wires and imaged in real time, thus allowing the examination of the density gradient fronts and their associated single-point mass -flux signals. Two experiments employed droplet seeding. In both experiments, the boundary layer was seeded by injecting a stream of acetone through a single point in the wall. The acetone is atomized by the high shear at the wall into a 'fog' of tiny (~3.5mu m) droplets. In the first droplet experiment, the fog was illuminated with copper-vapor laser sheets of various orientations. The copper vapor laser pulses 'froze' the fog motion, revealing a variety of organized turbulence structures, some with characteristic downstream inclinations, others with large-scale roll-up on the scale of delta. In the second droplet experiment, high

  8. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  9. BUBBLE - an urban boundary layer meteorology project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotach, M.W.; Vogt, R.; Bernhofer, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Basel urban Boundary Layer Experiment (BUBBLE) was a year-long experimental effort to investigate in detail the boundary layer structure in the City of Basel, Switzerland. At several sites over different surface types (urban, sub-urban and rural reference) towers up to at least twice the main...

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic cross-field boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Ingham

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available The Blasius boundary layer on a flat plate in the presence of a constant ambient magnetic field is examined. A numerical integration of the MHD boundary layer equations from the leading edge is presented showing how the asymptotic solution described by Sears is approached.

  11. Experimental investigation of wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A review is presented of experimental investigation of wave boundary layer. The review is organized in six main sections. The first section describes the wave boundary layer in a real-life environment and its simulation in the laboratory in an oscillating water tunnel and in a water tank...... with an oscillating seabed. A brief account is given of measured quantities, measurement techniques (LDA, PIV, flow visualization) and limitations/constraints in the experimental investigation of the wave boundary layer in the laboratory. The second section concentrates on uniform oscillating boundary layers...... with a smooth bed. The boundary layer process is described over the entire range of the Reynolds number (Re from practically nil to Re = O(107)), from the laminar regime to the transitional regime and to the fully developed turbulent regime. The third section focuses on the effect of the boundary roughness...

  12. Study of the effect of wind speed on evaporation from soil through integrated modeling of atmospheric boundary layer and shallow subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarzani, Hossein; Smits, Kathleen; Tolene, Ryan; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2013-04-01

    The study of the interaction between the land and atmosphere is paramount to our understanding of many emerging problems to include climate change, the movement of green house gases such as possible leaking of sequestered CO2 and the accurate detection of buried objects such as landmines. Soil moisture distribution in the shallow subsurface becomes a critical factor in all these problems. The heat and mass flux in the form of soil evaporation across the land surface couples the atmospheric boundary layer to the shallow subsurface. The coupling between land and the atmosphere leads to highly dynamic interactions between the porous media properties, transport processes and boundary conditions, resulting in dynamic evaporative behavior. However, the coupling at the land-atmospheric interface is rarely considered in most current models and their validation for practical applications. This is due to the complexity of the problem in field scenarios and the scarcity of field or laboratory data capable of testing and refining coupled energy and mass transfer theories. In most efforts to compute evaporation from soil, only indirect coupling is provided to characterize the interaction between non-isothermal multiphase flows under realistic atmospheric conditions even though heat and mass flux are controlled by the coupled dynamics of the land and the atmospheric boundary layer. In earlier drying modeling concepts, imposing evaporation flux (kinetic of relative humidity) and temperature as surface boundary condition is often needed. With the goal of improving our understanding of the land/atmospheric coupling, we developed a model based on the coupling of Navier-Stokes free flow and Darcy flow in porous medium. The model consists of the coupled equations of mass conservation for the liquid phase (water) and gas phase (water vapor and air) in porous medium with gas phase (water vapor and air) in free flow domain under non-isothermal, non-equilibrium conditions. The boundary

  13. Nonlinear radiation heat transfer effects in the natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate: a numerical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meraj Mustafa

    Full Text Available The problem of natural convective boundary layer flow of nanofluid past a vertical plate is discussed in the presence of nonlinear radiative heat flux. The effects of magnetic field, Joule heating and viscous dissipation are also taken into consideration. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The results reveal an existence of point of inflection for the temperature distribution for sufficiently large wall to ambient temperature ratio. Temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as Brownian motion and thermophoretic effects intensify. Moreover temperature increases and heat transfer from the plate decreases with an increase in the radiation parameter.

  14. Two case studies on the interaction of large-scale transport, mesoscale photochemistry, and boundary-layer processes on the lower tropospheric ozone dynamics in early spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brönnimann

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of ozone in the lower troposphere over the Swiss Plateau is investigated in detail for two episodes in early spring (February 1998 and March 1999. Profile measurements of boundary-layer ozone performed during two field campaigns with a tethered balloon sounding system and a kite are investigated using regular aerological and ozone soundings from a nearby site, measurements from monitoring stations at various altitudes, backward trajectories, and synoptic analyses of meteorological fields. Additionally, the effect of in situ photochemistry was estimated for one of the episodes employing the Metphomod Eulerian photochemical model. Although the meteorological situations were completely different, both cases had elevated layers with high ozone concentrations, which is not untypical for late winter and early spring. In the February episode, the highest ozone concentrations of 55 to 60 ppb, which were found at around 1100 m asl, were partly advected from Southern France, but a considerable contribution of in situ photochemistry is also predicted by the model. Below that elevation, the local chemical sinks and surface deposition probably overcompensated chemical production, and the vertical ozone distribution was governed by boundary-layer dynamics. In the March episode, the results suggest that ozone-rich air parcels, probably of stratospheric or upper tropospheric origin, were advected aloft the boundary layer on the Swiss Plateau.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pollution – urban and regional; troposphere – composition and  chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology

  15. Importance of the surface reaction OH + Cl− on sea salt aerosol for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of the hydroxyl radical with chloride on the surface of sea salt aerosol producing gas phase Cl2 and particulate OH− and its implications for the chemistry of the marine boundary layer under coastal, remote, and very remote conditions have been investigated with a numerical model. This reaction had been suggested by Laskin et al. (2003 to play a major role in the sulfur cycle in the marine boundary layer by increasing the sulfate production in sea salt by O3 oxidation due to the additional production of alkalinity in the particle. Based on literature data a new "best estimate" for the rate coefficient of the reaction was deduced and applied, showing that the additional initial sulfate production by this reaction is less than 1%, therefore having only a minor impact on sulfate production. Even though the gas phase concentration of Cl2 increased strongly in the model, the concentration of Cl radicals increased by less than 5% for the "best guess" case. Additional feedbacks between the cycles of chlorine and sulfur in the marine boundary layer are discussed as well as a two-stage acidification of large fresh sea salt aerosol.

  16. Temporal Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Community Composition in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, J. B.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Fierer, N.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for significant microbial influences on atmospheric chemistry, cloud condensation, and ice nuclei concentrations, with known health impacts, yet we have a limited understanding of the types, abundances, and spatiotemporal dynamics of bacteria and fungi in the atmosphere. Here we use culture-independent molecular approaches, including targeted gene sequencing and quantitative PCR, to characterize bacterial and fungal community composition and abundance in the atmospheric boundary layer. We present results from 32 air samples, collected via vacuum filtration at 10 m and 250 m on the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower (Erie, CO) between November 2013 and April 2014. Samples were collected at night, and each sample was integrated over consecutive nights for approximately two weeks. Significant temporal shifts in bacterial and fungal community composition were observed over the course of the study, corresponding to changing bacterial and fungal concentrations. Within the same sampling time periods, bacterial and fungal communities from the near-surface atmosphere (10 m) were generally similar to those aloft (250 m), although coupled temporal and altitudinal effects were observed in some cases, particularly for fungi. Overall, our results indicate that bacterial and fungal communities exhibit minimal vertical stratification throughout the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer but show a high degree of variability on two-week timescales. This study paves the way for further research into the connections between boundary layer microbiology, atmospheric dynamics, emissions, and local meteorology.

  17. A global climatology of boundary layer ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David; Plant, Robert; Belcher, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    The general circulation pattern of the Earth's atmosphere is well known, however there has been relatively little effort to quantify the climatological effects of the buffer zone known as the atmospheric boundary layer. Turbulent motions in the atmospheric boundary layer act to mix the layer along with its constituent pollutants, below a temperature inversion which separates it from the free troposphere. Exchanges between the boundary layer and free troposphere can occur through the mechanisms of convection, isentropic uplift, and coastal and orographic venting. In particular the rate at which pollutants are removed from the atmosphere can be different depending on whether or not they are resident within the boundary layer or the free troposphere. Thus the limiting factor on the concentrations of, for example, certain eg NOx, pollutants in the free troposphere will be the rate at which they are vented from the boundary layer. A global climatology (spanning 10 years between 1995 and 2005) of boundary layer venting is presented here using the ERA-interim dataset which has a grid scale resolution of 0.7 degrees x 0.7 degrees. The boundary layer height is first calculated using a bulk Richardson number method and then an associated vertical velocity is found by linearly interpolating between the two model levels either side of the boundary layer height. This value along with the change in height of the boundary layer over a 3 hour period is used to give an estimate of the rate of venting. The climatology of this rate allows us to describe and quantify the areas of the globe that are responsible for boundary layer entrainment and boundary layer venting, which could be used as a basis for further comparisons with other suitable datasets. We will also present results for the climatology of the boundary layer height itself. [possibly? That could be attractive for a BL audience anyway] Furthermore we will present and discuss results from a method designed to isolate the

  18. Application of LES (Large Eddy Simulation) to Understanding and Parameterizing the Arctic Cloudy Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Judith

    2002-01-01

    The GEWEX (Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment) Cloud Systems Studies Working Group 5 Polar Clouds was formed largely to exploit the enormous potential of the FIRE.ACE (FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment) and SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) data sets to improve parameterizations of clouds, radiation, and atmospheric boundary layer processes in the polar regions. The web page for this project is a clearinghouse of information for polar clouds in general and specifically for FIRE.ACE and SHEBA modelling activities. Note that the GCSS Working Group and Polar Clouds leverages heavily the FIRE.ACE investment, since it involves a large group of international scientists and has adopted the modelling goals and other issues related to cloud and radiation processes that are articulated by the FIRE.ACE Science Plan. The supplemental funds in this proposal are targeted at providing the continued coordination for the GCSS Working Group on Polar Clouds, which will insure that final FIRE.ACE project objectives regarding modelling and cloud and radiative processes are achieved.

  19. A numerical simulation of longitudinal vortex in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Lee, K.B. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2000-06-01

    This paper represents numerical computations of the interaction between the longitudinal vortex and a flat plate 3-D turbulent boundary layer. In the present study, the main interest is in the behavior of longitudinal vortices introduced in turbulent boundary layers. The flow field behind vortex generator is modeled by the information that is available from studies on the delta winglet. Also, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stoke equations for three-dimensional turbulent flows, together with a two-layer turbulence model to resolve the near-wall flow, is solved by the method of pseudo compressibility. The present results show that the boundary layer is thinned in the regions where the secondary flow is directed toward the wall and thickened where it is directed away from the wall, and have a good agreement with the experimental data. (author). 12 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Numerical simulation of tsunami-scale wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Isaac A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the boundary layer flow and properties induced by tsunami-scalewaves. For this purpose, an existing one-dimensional vertical (1DV) boundary layer model, based on the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations...... demonstrating the ability to reproduce accurate velocity profiles, turbulence, and bed shear stresses on both smooth and rough beds.The validated model is then employed for the study of transient wave boundary layers at full tsunami scales,covering a wide and realistic geophysical range in terms of the flow...... duration, bottom roughness, and associated Reynolds numbers. For this purpose, three different “synthetic” (idealised) tsunami wave descriptions are considered i.e., invoking: (1) single wave (solitary-like, but with independent period and wave height),(2) sinusoidal, and (3) N-wave descriptions. The flow...

  1. DNS of Turbulent Boundary Layers under Highenthalpy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Martín, Pino

    2010-11-01

    To study real-gas effects and turbulence-chemistry interaction, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of hypersonic boundary layers are conducted under typical hypersonic conditions. We consider the boundary layer on a lifting-body consisting of a flat plate at an angle of attack, which flies at altitude 30km with a Mach number 21. Two different inclined angles, 35^o and 8^o, are considered,representing blunt and slender bodies. Both noncatalytic and supercatalytic wall conditions are considered. The DNS data are studied to assess the validity of Morkovin's hypothesis, the strong Reynolds analogy, as well as the behaviors of turbulence structures under high-enthalpy conditions.Relative to low-enthalpy conditions [1], significant differences in typical scalings are observed. [4pt] [1] L. Duan and I. Beekman and M. P. Mart'in, Direct numerical simulation of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. Part 2: Effect of temperature, J. Fluid Mech. 655 (2010), 419-445.

  2. Analysis of diabatic flow modification in the internal boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Measurements at two meteorological masts in Denmark, Horns Rev in the sea and Høvsøre near the coastline on land, are used to analyze the behaviour of the flow after a smooth-to-rough change in surface conditions. The study shows that the wind profile within the internal boundary layer...... is controlled by a combination of both downstream and upstream stability and surface roughness conditions. A model based on a diffusion analogy is able to predict the internal boundary layer height well. Modeling the neutral and long-term wind profile with a 3 layer linear interpolation scheme gives good...... results at Høvsøre. Based on a comparison with a numerical model and the measurements, the constants in the interpolation scheme are slightly adjusted, which yields an improvement for the description of the wind profile in the internal boundary layer....

  3. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  4. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers in swimming rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2015-05-01

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, swimming at 1.02±0.09 L s(-1) (mean±s.d., N=4), were measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique at a Reynolds number of 4×10(5). The boundary layer profile showed unsteadiness, oscillating above and beneath the classical logarithmic law of the wall with body motion. Across the entire surface regions that were measured, local Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, which is the distance that is perpendicular to the fish surface through which the boundary layer momentum flows at free-stream velocity, were greater than the critical value of 320 for the laminar-to-turbulent transition. The skin friction was dampened on the convex surface while the surface was moving towards a free-stream flow and increased on the concave surface while retreating. These observations contradict the result of a previous study using different species swimming by different methods. Boundary layer compression accompanied by an increase in local skin friction was not observed. Thus, the overall results may not support absolutely the Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning hypothesis that the undulatory motions of swimming fish cause a large increase in their friction drag because of the compression of the boundary layer. In some cases, marginal flow separation occurred on the convex surface in the relatively anterior surface region, but the separated flow reattached to the fish surface immediately downstream. Therefore, we believe that a severe impact due to induced drag components (i.e. pressure drag) on the swimming performance, an inevitable consequence of flow separation, was avoided. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Two case studies on the interaction of large-scale transport, mesoscale photochemistry, and boundary-layer processes on the lower tropospheric ozone dynamics in early spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brönnimann

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of ozone in the lower troposphere over the Swiss Plateau is investigated in detail for two episodes in early spring (February 1998 and March 1999. Profile measurements of boundary-layer ozone performed during two field campaigns with a tethered balloon sounding system and a kite are investigated using regular aerological and ozone soundings from a nearby site, measurements from monitoring stations at various altitudes, backward trajectories, and synoptic analyses of meteorological fields. Additionally, the effect of in situ photochemistry was estimated for one of the episodes employing the Metphomod Eulerian photochemical model. Although the meteorological situations were completely different, both cases had elevated layers with high ozone concentrations, which is not untypical for late winter and early spring. In the February episode, the highest ozone concentrations of 55 to 60 ppb, which were found at around 1100 m asl, were partly advected from Southern France, but a considerable contribution of in situ photochemistry is also predicted by the model. Below that elevation, the local chemical sinks and surface deposition probably overcompensated chemical production, and the vertical ozone distribution was governed by boundary-layer dynamics. In the March episode, the results suggest that ozone-rich air parcels, probably of stratospheric or upper tropospheric origin, were advected aloft the boundary layer on the Swiss Plateau.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pollution – urban and regional; troposphere – composition and  chemistry – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology

  6. Experimental Study on the Wake Meandering Within a Scale Model Wind Farm Subject to a Wind-Tunnel Flow Simulating an Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudou, Nicolas; Buckingham, Sophia; Bricteux, Laurent; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2017-12-01

    The phenomenon of meandering of the wind-turbine wake comprises the motion of the wake as a whole in both horizontal and vertical directions as it is advected downstream. The oscillatory motion of the wake is a crucial factor in wind farms, because it increases the fatigue loads, and, in particular, the yaw loads on downstream turbines. To address this phenomenon, experimental investigations are carried out in a wind-tunnel flow simulating an atmospheric boundary layer with the Coriolis effect neglected. A 3 × 3 scaled wind farm composed of three-bladed rotating wind-turbine models is subject to a neutral boundary layer over a slightly-rough surface, i.e. corresponding to offshore conditions. Particle-image-velocimetry measurements are performed in a horizontal plane at hub height in the wakes of the three wind turbines occupying the wind-farm centreline. These measurements allow determination of the wake centrelines, with spectral analysis indicating the characteristic wavelength of the wake-meandering phenomenon. In addition, measurements with hot-wire anemometry are performed along a vertical line in the wakes of the same wind turbines, with both techniques revealing the presence of wake meandering behind all three turbines. The spectral analysis performed with the spatial and temporal signals obtained from these two measurement techniques indicates a Strouhal number of ≈ 0.20 - 0.22 based on the characteristic wake-meandering frequency, the rotor diameter and the flow speed at hub height.

  7. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  8. Analytical solution of the transpiration on the boundary layer flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analysis is carried out to study the effects that blowing/injection and suction on the steady mixed convection or combined forced and free convection boundary layer flows over a vertical slender cylinder with a mainstream velocity and a wall surface temperature proportional to the axial distance along the surface of the ...

  9. Thermal Internal Boundary Layer characteristics at a tropical coastal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    examined with the help of measurements carried out with a mini-SODAR (SOund Detection And ..... moisture upwards and periodic intrusion of mar- ..... Ocean System 2. 351–362. Kunhikrishnan P K, Gupta K S, Ramachandran R, Prakash. J W, Nair K N 1993 Study on thermal internal boundary layer structure over Thumba, ...

  10. Global instabilities and transient growth in Blasius boundary-layer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We develop a hybrid of computational and theoretical approaches suited to study the fluid–structure interaction (FSI) of a compliant panel, flush between rigid upstream and downstream wall sections, with a Blasius boundary-layer flow. The ensuing linear-stability analysis is focused upon global instability and transient ...

  11. Conserved variable analysis of the marine boundary layer and air ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study is based on the observed features of the MBL (Marine Boundary Layer) during the Bay of Bengal and Monsoon Experiment (BOBMEX) - Pilot phase. Conserved Variable Analysis (CVA) of the conserved variables such as potential temperature, virtual potential temperature, equivalent potential temperature ...

  12. The collapse of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Wiel, B J H; Clercx, H J H [Department of Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Moene, A F [Department of Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre (Netherlands); Jonker, H J J, E-mail: b.j.h.v.d.wiel@tue.nl [Department of Multi-scale Pysics, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    A well-known phenomenon in the atmospheric boundary layer is the fact that winds may become very weak in the evening after a clear sunny day. In these quiet conditions usually hardly any turbulence is present. Consequently this type of boundary layer is referred to as the quasi-laminar boundary layer. In spite of its relevance, the appearance of laminar boundary layers is poorly understood and forms a long standing problem in meteorological research. Here we investigate an analogue problem in the form of a stably stratified channel flow. The flow is studied with a simplified atmospheric model as well as with Direct Numerical Simulations. Both models show remarkably similar behaviour with respect to the mean variables such as temperature and wind speed. The similarity between both models opens new way for understanding and predicting the laminarization process. Mathematical analysis on the simplified model shows that relaminarization can be understood from the existence of a definite limit in the maximum sustainable heat flux under stably stratified conditions. This fascinating aspect will be elaborated in future work.

  13. Experimental study on the wind-turbine wake meandering inside a scale model wind farm placed in an atmospheric-boundary-layer wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudou, N.; Buckingham, S.; van Beeck, J.

    2017-05-01

    Increasing use of wind energy over the years results in more and larger clustered wind farms. It is therefore fundamental to have an in-depth knowledge of wind-turbine wakes, and especially a better understanding of the well-known but less understood wake-meandering phenomenon which causes the wake to move as a whole in both horizontal and vertical directions as it is convected downstream. This oscillatory motion of the wake is crucial for loading on downstream turbines because it increases fatigue loads and in particular yaw loads. In order to address this phenomenon, experimental investigations were carried out in an atmospheric-boundary-layer wind tunnel using a 3 × 3 scaled wind farm composed of three-bladed rotating wind-turbine models subject to a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) corresponding to a slightly rough terrain, i.e. to offshore conditions. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in a horizontal plane, at hub height, in the wake of the three wind turbines in the wind-farm centreline. From the PIV velocity fields obtained, the wake-centrelines were determined and a spectral analysis was performed to obtain the characteristics of the wake-meandering phenomenon. In addition, Hot-Wire Anemometry (HWA) measurements were performed in the wakes of the same wind turbines to validate the PIV results. The spectral analysis performed with the spatial and temporal signals obtained from PIV and HWA measurements respectively, led to Strouhal numbers St = fD/Uhub ≃ 0.20 - 0.22.

  14. Dynamics, thermodynamics, radiation, and cloudiness associated with cumulus-topped marine boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghate, Virendra P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Miller, Mark [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The overall goal of this project was to improve the understanding of marine boundary clouds by using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites, so that they can be better represented in global climate models (GCMs). Marine boundary clouds are observed regularly over the tropical and subtropical oceans. They are an important element of the Earth’s climate system because they have substantial impact on the radiation budget together with the boundary layer moisture, and energy transports. These clouds also have an impact on large-scale precipitation features like the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Because these clouds occur at temporal and spatial scales much smaller than those relevant to GCMs, their effects and the associated processes need to be parameterized in GCM simulations aimed at predicting future climate and energy needs. Specifically, this project’s objectives were to (1) characterize the surface turbulent fluxes, boundary layer thermodynamics, radiation field, and cloudiness associated with cumulus-topped marine boundary layers; (2) explore the similarities and differences in cloudiness and boundary layer conditions observed in the tropical and trade-wind regions; and (3) understand similarities and differences by using a simple bulk boundary layer model. In addition to working toward achieving the project’s three objectives, we also worked on understanding the role played by different forcing mechanisms in maintaining turbulence within cloud-topped boundary layers We focused our research on stratocumulus clouds during the first phase of the project, and cumulus clouds during the rest of the project. Below is a brief description of manuscripts published in peer-reviewed journals that describe results from our analyses.

  15. The Ocean Boundary Layer beneath Hurricane Frances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasaro, E. A.; Sanford, T. B.; Terrill, E.; Price, J.

    2006-12-01

    The upper ocean beneath the peak winds of Hurricane Frances (57 m/s) was measured using several varieties of air-deployed floats as part of CBLAST. A multilayer structure was observed as the boundary layer deepened from 20m to 120m in about 12 hours. Bubbles generated by breaking waves create a 10m thick surface layer with a density anomaly, due to the bubbles, of about 1 kg/m3. This acts to lubricate the near surface layer. A turbulent boundary layer extends beneath this to about 40 m depth. This is characterized by large turbulent eddies spanning the boundary layer. A stratified boundary layer grows beneath this reaching 120m depth. This is characterized by a gradient Richardson number of 1/4, which is maintained by strong inertial currents generated by the hurricane, and smaller turbulent eddies driven by the shear instead of the wind and waves. There is little evidence of mixing beneath this layer. Heat budgets reveal the boundary layer to be nearly one dimensional through much of the deepening, with horizontal and vertical heat advection becoming important only after the storm had passed. Turbulent kinetic energy measurements support the idea of reduced surface drag at high wind speeds. The PWP model correctly predicts the degree of mixed layer deepening if the surface drag is reduced at high wind speed. Overall, the greatest uncertainty in understanding the ocean boundary layer at these extreme wind speeds is a characterization of the near- surface processes which govern the air-sea fluxes and surface wave properties.

  16. Summertime observations of elevated levels of ultrafine particles in the high Arctic marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Bozem, Heiko; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Kathy; Hoor, Peter; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Herber, Andreas; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by increasing levels of open ocean in the Arctic summer and the lack of prior altitude-resolved studies, extensive aerosol measurements were made during 11 flights of the NETCARE July 2014 airborne campaign from Resolute Bay, Nunavut. Flights included vertical profiles (60 to 3000 m above ground level) over open ocean, fast ice, and boundary layer clouds and fogs. A general conclusion, from observations of particle numbers between 5 and 20 nm in diameter (N5 - 20), is that ultrafine particle formation occurs readily in the Canadian high Arctic marine boundary layer, especially just above ocean and clouds, reaching values of a few thousand particles cm-3. By contrast, ultrafine particle concentrations are much lower in the free troposphere. Elevated levels of larger particles (for example, from 20 to 40 nm in size, N20 - 40) are sometimes associated with high N5 - 20, especially over low clouds, suggestive of aerosol growth. The number densities of particles greater than 40 nm in diameter (N > 40) are relatively depleted at the lowest altitudes, indicative of depositional processes that will lower the condensation sink and promote new particle formation. The number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN; measured at 0.6 % supersaturation) are positively correlated with the numbers of small particles (down to roughly 30 nm), indicating that some fraction of these newly formed particles are capable of being involved in cloud activation. Given that the summertime marine Arctic is a biologically active region, it is important to better establish the links between emissions from the ocean and the formation and growth of ultrafine particles within this rapidly changing environment.

  17. Model Simulations of the Arctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer from the SHEBA Year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjernstroem, Michael; Zagar, Mark; Svensson, Gunilla [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    2004-06-01

    We present Arctic atmospheric boundary-layer modeling with a regional model COAMPSTM, for the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment. Model results are compared to soundings, near-surface measurements and forecasts from the ECMWF model. The near-surface temperature is often too high in winter, except in shorter periods when the boundary layer was cloud-capped and well-mixed due to cloud-top cooling. Temperatures are slightly too high also during the summer melt season. Effects are too high boundary-layer moisture and formation of too dense stratocumulus, generating a too deep well-mixed boundary layer with a cold bias at the simulated boundary-layer top. Errors in temperature and therefore moisture are responsible for large errors in heat flux, in particular in solar radiation, by forming these clouds. We conclude that the main problems lie in the surface energy balance and the treatment of the heat conduction through the ice and snow and in how low-level clouds are treated.

  18. Sulfur processing in the marine atmospheric boundary layer: A review and critical assessment of modeling uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faloona, Ian

    Sulfur is an extremely motile and vital element in the Earth's biogeochemical environment, one whose active redox chemistry maintains small reservoirs in the atmosphere and biosphere yet large fluxes through both. Essential for life, intimately linked to the climate state, and an important component of air quality, sulfur and its transport and processing in the atmosphere have been the subject of active research for several decades. This review article describes the current state of our understanding of the atmospheric sulfur cycle, focusing on the marine atmospheric boundary layer, with the aim of identifying the largest roots of uncertainty that most inhibit accurate simulation of sulfur cycling in the atmosphere. An overview of the emissions by phytoplankton and shipping, dispersion and entrainment in the marine boundary layer, and chemical processing by aerosols, clouds, and dry deposition is presented. Analysis of 20 contemporary modeling studies suggests that the greatest ambiguity in global sulfur cycling derives from (in descending order) wet deposition of aerosol sulfate, dry deposition of sulfur dioxide to the Earth's surface, and the heterogeneous oxidation of SO 2 in aerosols and clouds.

  19. Vortex properties in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Ortiz-Duenas, Cecilia; Longmire, Ellen

    2008-11-01

    Swirl strength was used to identify vortices in turbulent boundary layers. Dual-plane PIV data at Reτ 1100 with coarser (Ganapathisubramani et al., 2006) and finer resolution (Saikrishnan et al., 2007) as well as DNS data at Reτ=590 (Moser et al., 1999) and Reτ=934 (del álamo et al., 2004) were analyzed. A new core-combination algorithm was developed to improve identification of in- and out-of-plane vortices. Core orientation was determined by the eigenvector of the velocity gradient tensor, and core radii were characterized. The effects of wall normal location, Reynolds number, and spatial resolution were studied. In general, the PDF of swirl magnitude is affected by both in- and out-of-plane spatial resolution as well as the wall normal location. Scaling of swirl will be discussed in the presentation. The results show that, in the logarithmic region, the mean angle between the eigenvector and the vorticity vector decreases and the mean core radius increases with wall normal distance. Joint PDFs show linear increases in circulation with core radius, as well as correlations between core inclination angle and circulation. Convection velocities of strong cores are typically smaller than the local mean velocity.

  20. Effects of coastal forcing on turbulence and boundary- layer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Linda Maria Viktoria

    Coastal mountains of significant elevation impose constraints for the surrounding flow. The aim of this study is to describe the modifications of the marine atmospheric boundary layer that occur offshore of the west coast of the United States. Aircraft measurements, up to 1000 km off the coast from two experiments, are used. This boundary layer is capped by a subsidence inversion, which slopes down toward the coast and produces large thermal winds. Low-level wind maxima (i.e. jets) are typical for these conditions, commonly a 40-50% increase relative to the 30 m wind speed. The effects of coastal forcing on low-level winds cancel in average when no regard is taken for position relative a cape or point. The variability of the low-level wind speed increases nevertheless significantly toward the coast, the standard deviation is +/-40% of the offshore value. The scale of the adjustment downstream of a cape or point is specifically addressed. Some measurements support a formulation of the coastal extent based on an inviscid shallow-water concept; mean variables (i.e. 30 m wind speed and boundary-layer depth) and turbulent parameters (i.e. dissipation and shear production of turbulent kinetic energy) vary in a uniform, predicted manner. The effects of coastal forcing on winds result in cold sea surface temperatures at the coast, due to upwelling. Stability becomes a function of offshore distance. Surface-layer turbulence statistics and spectra (and cospectra) of turbulence variables are presented. Across- and along-wind sampled spectra (and cospectra) show that large wind shear and shallow boundary layer affect the scales of the turbulence eddies. The relation between the standard deviations of wind components are affected. The turbulence appears to be non-local in some aspects, entrainment fluxes are proposed to be important due to a shallow boundary layer with a sharp, sloping inversion and a low-level jet.

  1. Cloud and Radiation Studies during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; King, M. D.; Hobbs, P. V.; Osborne, S.; Piketh, S.; Bruintjes, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Though the emphasis of the Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative 2000 (SAFARI-2000) dry season campaign was largely on emission sources and transport, the assemblage of aircraft (including the high altitude NASA ER-2 remote sensing platform and the University of Washington CV-580, UK MRF C130, and South African Weather Bureau JRA in situ aircrafts) provided a unique opportunity for cloud studies. Therefore, as part of the SAFARI initiative, investigations were undertaken to assess regional aerosol-cloud interactions and cloud remote sensing algorithms. In particular, the latter part of the experiment concentrated on marine boundary layer stratocumulus clouds off the southwest coast of Africa. Associated with cold water upwelling along the Benguela current, the Namibian stratocumulus regime has received limited attention but appears to be unique for several reasons. During the dry season, outflow of continental fires and industrial pollution over this area can be extreme. From below, upwelling provides a rich nutrient source for phytoplankton (a source of atmospheric sulphur through DMS production as well as from decay processes). The impact of these natural and anthropogenic sources on the microphysical and optical properties of the stratocumulus is unknown. Continental and Indian Ocean cloud systems of opportunity were also studied during the campaign. Aircraft flights were coordinated with NASA Terra Satellite overpasses for synergy with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and other Terra instruments. An operational MODIS algorithm for the retrieval of cloud optical and physical properties (including optical thickness, effective particle radius, and water path) has been developed. Pixel-level MODIS retrievals (11 km spatial resolution at nadir) and gridded statistics of clouds in th SAFARI region will be presented. In addition, the MODIS Airborne Simulator flown on the ER-2 provided high spatial resolution retrievals (50 m at nadir

  2. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  3. Measurements of a Separating Turbulent Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    the uncertainties of most of the dominant terms are less than 30% 40% at many points. In general, the terms involving derivatives with re spect to y...34 DISA Information, no. 13, pp. 29-33. Perry, A.E. and Schofield, W.H. 1973 "Mean Velocity and Shear Stress Distribu- tions in Turbulent Boundary Layers

  4. Instabilities and transition in boundary layers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Some recent developments in boundary layer instabilities and transition are reviewed. Background disturbance levels determine the instability mechanism that ulti- mately leads to turbulence. At low noise levels, the traditional Tollmien–Schlichting route is followed, while at high levels, a 'by-pass' route is more ...

  5. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shankar Ghosh

    2006-11-12

    Introduction. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based study. Shankar Ghosh. November 12, 2006. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research. Co-workers : S. Bhattacharya and Prerna Sharma. Shankar Ghosh. Motion of a sphere in an oscillatory boundary layer: an optical tweezer based ...

  6. Marine boundary layer investigations in the False Bay, supported by optical refraction and scintillation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van; Benoist, K.W.; Gunter, W.H.; Vrahimis, G.; October, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge on the marine boundary layer is of importance for the prediction of the optical image quality obtained from long range targets. One property of the boundary layer, that can be studied rather easily by means of optical refraction measurements, is the vertical temperature profile. This

  7. PathfinderTURB: an automatic boundary layer algorithm. Development, validation and application to study the impact on in situ measurements at the Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltera, Yann; Martucci, Giovanni; Collaud Coen, Martine; Hervo, Maxime; Emmenegger, Lukas; Henne, Stephan; Brunner, Dominik; Haefele, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    We present the development of the PathfinderTURB algorithm for the analysis of ceilometer backscatter data and the real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. Two aerosol layer heights are retrieved by PathfinderTURB: the convective boundary layer (CBL) and the continuous aerosol layer (CAL). PathfinderTURB combines the strengths of gradient- and variance-based methods and addresses the layer attribution problem by adopting a geodesic approach. The algorithm has been applied to 1 year of data measured by two ceilometers of type CHM15k, one operated at the Aerological Observatory of Payerne (491 m a.s.l.) on the Swiss plateau and one at the Kleine Scheidegg (2061 m a.s.l.) in the Swiss Alps. The retrieval of the CBL has been validated at Payerne using two reference methods: (1) manual detections of the CBL height performed by human experts using the ceilometer backscatter data; (2) values of CBL heights calculated using the Richardson's method from co-located radio sounding data. We found average biases as small as 27 m (53 m) with respect to reference method 1 (method 2). Based on the excellent agreement between the two reference methods, PathfinderTURB has been applied to the ceilometer data at the mountainous site of the Kleine Scheidegg for the period September 2014 to November 2015. At this site, the CHM15k is operated in a tilted configuration at 71° zenith angle to probe the atmosphere next to the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m a.s.l.) on the Jungfraujoch (JFJ). The analysis of the retrieved layers led to the following results: the CAL reaches the JFJ 41 % of the time in summer and 21 % of the time in winter for a total of 97 days during the two seasons. The season-averaged daily cycles show that the CBL height reaches the JFJ only during short periods (4 % of the time), but on 20 individual days in summer and never during winter. During summer in particular, the CBL and the CAL modify the air sampled in situ at JFJ, resulting

  8. PathfinderTURB: an automatic boundary layer algorithm. Development, validation and application to study the impact on in situ measurements at the Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Poltera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the development of the PathfinderTURB algorithm for the analysis of ceilometer backscatter data and the real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. Two aerosol layer heights are retrieved by PathfinderTURB: the convective boundary layer (CBL and the continuous aerosol layer (CAL. PathfinderTURB combines the strengths of gradient- and variance-based methods and addresses the layer attribution problem by adopting a geodesic approach. The algorithm has been applied to 1 year of data measured by two ceilometers of type CHM15k, one operated at the Aerological Observatory of Payerne (491 m a.s.l. on the Swiss plateau and one at the Kleine Scheidegg (2061 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps. The retrieval of the CBL has been validated at Payerne using two reference methods: (1 manual detections of the CBL height performed by human experts using the ceilometer backscatter data; (2 values of CBL heights calculated using the Richardson's method from co-located radio sounding data. We found average biases as small as 27 m (53 m with respect to reference method 1 (method 2. Based on the excellent agreement between the two reference methods, PathfinderTURB has been applied to the ceilometer data at the mountainous site of the Kleine Scheidegg for the period September 2014 to November 2015. At this site, the CHM15k is operated in a tilted configuration at 71° zenith angle to probe the atmosphere next to the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m a.s.l. on the Jungfraujoch (JFJ. The analysis of the retrieved layers led to the following results: the CAL reaches the JFJ 41 % of the time in summer and 21 % of the time in winter for a total of 97 days during the two seasons. The season-averaged daily cycles show that the CBL height reaches the JFJ only during short periods (4 % of the time, but on 20 individual days in summer and never during winter. During summer in particular, the CBL and the CAL modify the

  9. Experimental Study of Boundary Layer Behavior in a Simulated Low Pressure Turbine. Degree awarded by the University of Toledo, May 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyne, Rickey J.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the flow physics occurring on the suction side of a simulated Low Pressure Turbine (LPT) blade was performed. A contoured upper wall was designed to simulate the pressure distribution of an actual LPT blade onto a flat plate. The experiments were carried out at Reynolds numbers of 100,000 and 250,000 with three levels of freestream turbulence. Freestream turbulence levels ranging from 0.8% to 3% was used in this experiment. Smoke-wire flow visualization data was used to confirm that the boundary layer was separated and formed a bubble. Hot-wires (single and x-wire) and surface mounted hot-film gases and static pressure taps were used to map the flowfield. The transition process over the separated flow region is observed to be similar to a laminar free shear layer flow with the formation of a large coherent eddy structure. For each condition, the locations defining the separation bubble were determined by careful examination of pressure and mean velocity profile data. Transition onset location and length determined from intermittency profiles decrease as freestream turbulence levels increase. Additionally, the length and height of the laminar separation bubbles were observed to be inversely proportional to the levels of freestream turbulence.

  10. Advances in Unsteady Boundary Layer Transition Research, Part II: Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-part article presents recent advances in boundary layer research into the unsteady boundary layer transition modeling and its validation. This, Part II, deals with the results of an inductive approach based on comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies of unsteady wake flow and unsteady boundary layer flow. The experiments were performed on a curved plate at a zero streamwise pressure gradient under periodic unsteady wake flow, in which the frequency of the periodic unsteady flow was varied. To validate the model, systematic experimental investigations were performed on the suction and pressure surfaces of turbine blades integrated into a high-subsonic cascade test facility, which was designed for unsteady boundary layer investigations. The analysis of the experiment's results and comparison with the model's prediction confirm the validity of the model and its ability to predict accurately the unsteady boundary layer transition.

  11. Boundary layer receptivity phenomena in three-dimensional and high-speed boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Streett, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The process by which the boundary layer internalizes the environmental disturbances in the form of instability waves is known as the boundary-layer receptivity. The paper discusses the importance of receptivity in transition research. The receptivity scenario for three-dimensional and high-speed boundary layers is examined. It is found that, while receptivity mechanisms present in the low-speed case are also operative in these complex flows, certain uniquely 'compressible' receptivity mechanisms may come into play as well. Both numerical, and where convenient, asymptotic procedures are utilized to develop quantitative predictions of the localized generation of a variety of instability types (Tollmien-Schlichting, inflectional, higher modes, crossflow vortices) in boundary layer flows relevant to the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP).

  12. Towards fully predictive large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheou, G.; Chung, D.; Teixeira, J.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer is host to a plethora of physical processes that strongly affect the energy balance of Earth, and consequently weather and climate. Large-eddy Simulation (LES) is an invaluable technique in the study and prediction of the boundary layer mainly because it can capture detailed flow structure including clouds. In spite of the widespread use of LES, predictions of atmospheric flows lack fidelity. We discuss the development of a novel state-of-the-art LES framework suitable for the simulation of atmospheric flows and focus on the effects of turbulent transport, including stable stratification and multi-phase/latent heat exchange physics. The main components of the LES framework are a high-order fully conservative finite difference discretization and the buoyancy-adjusted stretched-vortex subgrid-scale (SGS) model. The new stability correction of the SGS model accounts of the increasing anisotropy of turbulence motions as stratification increases in a way that is consistent with the physics of stratified turbulence. Moreover, the SGS model employs no flow adjustable parameters. Our aim is twofold: (i) using identical LES setup (e.g. advection scheme and SGS-model parameters), perform simulations of diverse boundary layers, including stable, convectively unstable, cumulus and stratocumulus convection; and (ii) investigate grid convergence of flow statistics. We show that the new LES framework accurately predicts a diverse set of atmospheric conditions and in all cases the statistics exhibit good grid resolution independence, even for resolutions that are typically considered coarse. Grid convergence criteria are also discussed.

  13. Active control of ionized boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, R V

    1997-01-01

    The challenging problems, in the field of control of chaos or of transition to chaos, lie in the domain of infinite-dimensional systems. Access to all variables being impossible in this case and the controlling action being limited to a few collective variables, it will not in general be possible to drive the whole system to the desired behaviour. A paradigmatic problem of this type is the control of the transition to turbulence in the boundary layer of fluid motion. By analysing a boundary layer flow for an ionized fluid near an airfoil, one concludes that active control of the transition amounts to the resolution of an generalized integro-differential eigenvalue problem. To cope with the required response times and phase accuracy, electromagnetic control, whenever possible, seems more appropriate than mechanical control by microactuators.

  14. Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Dennis M. (Editor); Hefner, Jerry N. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

  15. Optimal control of wind turbines in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, optimal control theory was combined with large-eddy simulations to study the optimal control of wind farms and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer. The individual turbine's induction factors were dynamically controlled in time with the aim of increasing overall power extraction. In these studies, wind turbines were represented using an actuator disk method. In the current work, we focus on optimal control on a much finer mesh (and a smaller computational domain), representing turbines with an actuator line method. Similar to Refs., optimization is performed using a gradient-based method, and gradients are obtained employing an adjoint formulation. Different cases are investigated, that include a single and a double turbine case both with uniform inflow, and with turbulent-boundary-layer inflow. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  16. Boundary Layer Transition Results From STS-114

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Cassady, Amy M.; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Wang, K. C.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The tool for predicting the onset of boundary layer transition from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight is compared to the STS-114 flight results. The Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment of the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time of transition onset is predicted to help determine the proper aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions provided the means to correlate the experimental results and then to extrapolate to flight. During STS-114, the BLT Tool was utilized and was part of the decision making process to perform an extravehicular activity to remove the large gap fillers. The role of the BLT Tool during this mission, along with the supporting information that was acquired for the on-orbit analysis, is reviewed. Once the large gap fillers were removed, all remaining damage sites were cleared for reentry as is. Post-flight analysis of the transition onset time revealed excellent agreement with BLT Tool predictions.

  17. Boundary-layer theory. 9. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlichting, Hermann [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik; Gersten, Klaus [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik und Stroemungsmechanik

    2017-03-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  18. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  19. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    OpenAIRE

    Teleman, Elena-Carmen; Silion, Radu; Axinte, Elena; Pescaru, Radu

    2008-01-01

    The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence sca...

  20. Numerical Simulation of Roughness Induced Boundary Layer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-30

    901-918. 18. ZHENG Yun, LI Hongyang, LIU Daxiang. “Application and Analysis of γ-Reθ Transition Model in Hypersonic Flow”, Journal of Propulsion ...making the simulated result more accurate. Xiao [25] used a three-equation k-ω- γ transition model to study hypersonic flow around single roughness...point RANS Approach”, Journal of Turbomachinery, 2004, 126(1):193-202. 14. FU Song, WANG Liang. “Simulation of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition

  1. Numerical simulation of tsunami-scale wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Isaac A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2016-01-01

    duration, bottom roughness, and associated Reynolds numbers. For this purpose, three different “synthetic” (idealised) tsunami wave descriptions are considered i.e., invoking: (1) single wave (solitary-like, but with independent period and wave height),(2) sinusoidal, and (3) N-wave descriptions. The flow......, is newly extended to incorporate a transitional variant of the standard two-equation k–ω turbulence closure. The developed numerical model is successfully validated against recent experimental measurements involving transient solitary wave boundary layers as well as for oscillatory flows, collectively...... demonstrating the ability to reproduce accurate velocity profiles, turbulence, and bed shear stresses on both smooth and rough beds.The validated model is then employed for the study of transient wave boundary layers at full tsunami scales,covering a wide and realistic geophysical range in terms of the flow...

  2. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a

  3. Using ground-based solar and lunar infrared spectroscopy to study the diurnal trend of carbon monoxide in the Mexico City boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stremme

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an important pollutant in urban agglomerations. Quantifying the total burden of this pollutant in a megacity is challenging because not only its surface concentration but also its vertical dispersion present different behaviours and high variability. The diurnal trend of columnar CO in the boundary layer of Mexico City has been measured during various days with ground-based infrared absorption spectroscopy. Daytime CO total columns are retrieved from solar spectra and for the first time, nocturnal CO total columns using moonlight have been retrieved within a megacity. The measurements were taken at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM campus located in Mexico City (19.33° N, 99.18° W, 2260 m a.s.l. from October 2007 until February 2008 with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer at 0.5 cm−1 resolution. The atmospheric CO background column was measured from the high altitude site Altzomoni (19.12° N, 98.65° W, 4010 m a.s.l. located 60 km southeast of Mexico City. The total CO column within the city presents large variations. Fresh CO emissions at the surface, the transport of cleaner or more polluted air masses within the field-of-view of the instrument and other processes contribute to this variability. The mean background value above the boundary mixing layer was found to be (8.4±0.5×1017 molecules/cm2, while inside the city, the late morning mean on weekdays and Sundays was found to be (2.73±0.41×1018 molecules/cm2 and (2.04±0.57×1018 molecules/cm2, respectively. Continuous CO column retrieval during the day and night (when available, in conjunction with surface CO measurements, allow for a reconstruction of the effective mixing layer height. The limitations from this simplified approach, as well as the potential of using continuous column measurements in order to derive top-down CO emissions from a large urban area

  4. The curved kinetic boundary layer of active matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John F

    2018-01-03

    A body submerged in active matter feels the swim pressure through a kinetic accumulation boundary layer on its surface. The boundary layer results from a balance between translational diffusion and advective swimming and occurs on the microscopic length scale . Here , D T is the Brownian translational diffusivity, τ R is the reorientation time and l = U 0 τ R is the swimmer's run length, with U 0 the swim speed [Yan and Brady, J. Fluid. Mech., 2015, 785, R1]. In this work we analyze the swim pressure on arbitrary shaped bodies by including the effect of local shape curvature in the kinetic boundary layer. When δ ≪ L and l ≪ L, where L is the body size, the leading order effects of curvature on the swim pressure are found analytically to scale as J S λδ 2 /L, where J S is twice the (non-dimensional) mean curvature. Particle-tracking simulations and direct solutions to the Smoluchowski equation governing the probability distribution of the active particles show that λδ 2 /L is a universal scaling parameter not limited to the regime δ, l ≪ L. The net force exerted on the body by the swimmers is found to scale as F net /(n ∞ k s T s L 2 ) = f(λδ 2 /L), where f(x) is a dimensionless function that is quadratic when x ≪ 1 and linear when x ∼ 1. Here, k s T s = ζU 0 2 τ R /6 defines the 'activity' of the swimmers, with ζ the drag coefficient, and n ∞ is the uniform number density of swimmers far from the body. We discuss the connection of this boundary layer to continuum mechanical descriptions of active matter and briefly present how to include hydrodynamics into this purely kinetic study.

  5. Acoustic Radiation From a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the turbulence statistics and the radiation field generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0:18 times the recovery temperature. The flow conditions fall within the range of nozzle exit conditions of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Tunnel No. 9 facility. The streamwise domain size is approximately 200 times the boundary-layer thickness at the inlet, with a useful range of Reynolds number corresponding to Re 450 ?? 650. Consistent with previous studies of turbulent boundary layer at high Mach numbers, the weak compressibility hypothesis for turbulent boundary layers remains applicable under this flow condition and the computational results confirm the validity of both the van Driest transformation and Morkovin's scaling. The Reynolds analogy is valid at the surface; the RMS of fluctuations in the surface pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux is 24%, 53%, and 67% of the surface mean, respectively. The magnitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuations are found to vary dramatically within the inner layer (z/delta 0.< or approx. 0.08 or z+ < or approx. 50). The peak of the pre-multiplied frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuation is f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 2.1 at the surface and shifts to a lower frequency of f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 0.7 in the free stream where the pressure signal is predominantly acoustic. The dominant frequency of the pressure spectrum shows a significant dependence on the freestream Mach number both at the wall and in the free stream.

  6. Boundary-layer turbulent processes and mesoscale variability represented by numerical weather prediction models during the BLLAST campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreux, Fleur; Bazile, Eric; Canut, Guylaine; Seity, Yann; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Guichard, Françoise; Nilsson, Erik

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluates the ability of three operational models, with resolution varying from 2.5 to 16 km, to predict the boundary-layer turbulent processes and mesoscale variability observed during the Boundary Layer Late-Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign. We analyse the representation of the vertical profiles of temperature and humidity and the time evolution of near-surface atmospheric variables and the radiative and turbulent fluxes over a total of 12 intensive observing periods (IOPs), each lasting 24 h. Special attention is paid to the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), which was sampled by a combination of independent instruments. For the first time, this variable, a central one in the turbulence scheme used in AROME and ARPEGE, is evaluated with observations.In general, the 24 h forecasts succeed in reproducing the variability from one day to another in terms of cloud cover, temperature and boundary-layer depth. However, they exhibit some systematic biases, in particular a cold bias within the daytime boundary layer for all models. An overestimation of the sensible heat flux is noted for two points in ARPEGE and is found to be partly related to an inaccurate simplification of surface characteristics. AROME shows a moist bias within the daytime boundary layer, which is consistent with overestimated latent heat fluxes. ECMWF presents a dry bias at 2 m above the surface and also overestimates the sensible heat flux. The high-resolution model AROME resolves the vertical structures better, in particular the strong daytime inversion and the thin evening stable boundary layer. This model is also able to capture some specific observed features, such as the orographically driven subsidence and a well-defined maximum that arises during the evening of the water vapour mixing ratio in the upper part of the residual layer due to fine-scale advection. The model reproduces the order of magnitude of spatial variability observed at

  7. Exploring a Plume-Based Mass-Flux Scheme in the Boundary-Layer Gray Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismüller, M.; Heus, T.; Neggers, R.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the behavior of plume-based mass flux parameterizations in the gray zone of boundary layer convection, to inform the development of scale-aware and scale-adaptive parameterizations. To this end, the Eddy Diffusivity Mass Flux scheme with multiple plumes, named ED(MF)n, is implemented in a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) model. This way, the LES is used as a non-hydrostatic larger-scale model, providing a convenient platform for investigating the behavior of parameterizations across the boundary-layer gray zone. First, as a feasibility study, a single plume is launched in every column of the LES in an offline, diagnostic way, without affecting the simulation. We find that the plumes are sensitive to the LES columns in which they rise, feeling the presence of LES clouds. A plume budget analysis shows that the plume termination height is mostly determined by the mixing term, and not so much by the buoyancy term. Then, the ED(MF)n is made interactive with the resolved flow, replacing the LES-subgrid scheme. The work performed by the scheme reduces with increasing LES resolution, due to the size-filtering applied in the ED(MF)n framework. An encouraging result is that the total specific humidity flux is conserved across the investigated range of LES resolutions, covering the gray zone between 10m (large-eddy resolving) and 10km (regional-scale). The sensitivity of the results to various model parameters is assessed.

  8. Dry intrusions: Lagrangian climatology and impact on the boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh-Rubin, Shira; Wernli, Heini

    2017-04-01

    Dry air intrusions (DIs) are large-scale descending airstreams. A DI is typically referred to as a coherent airstream in the cold sector of an extratropical cyclone. Emerging evidence suggests that DIs are linked to severe surface wind gusts. However, there is yet no strict Lagrangian definition of DIs, and so their climatological frequency, dynamical characteristics as well as their seasonal and spatial distributions are unknown. Furthermore, the dynamical interaction between DIs and the planetary boundary layer is not fully understood. Here, we suggest a Lagrangian definition for DI air parcels, namely a minimum pressure increase along a trajectory of 400 hPa in 48 hours. Based on this criterion, the open questions are addressed by: (i) a novel global Lagrangian climatology for the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset for the years 1979-2014; (ii) a case study illustrating the interaction between DIs and the boundary layer. We find that DIs occur predominantly in winter. DIs coherently descend from the upper troposphere (their stratospheric origin is small), to the mid- and low levels, where they mix with their environment and diverge. Different physical characteristics typify DIs in the different regions and seasons. Finally, we demonstrate the different mechanisms by which DIs can destabilize the boundary layer and facilitate the formation of strong surface winds.

  9. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-06-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  10. A Coordinate Transformation for Unsteady Boundary Layer Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul G. A. CIZMAS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new coordinate transformation for unsteady, incompressible boundary layer equations that applies to both laminar and turbulent flows. A generalization of this coordinate transformation is also proposed. The unsteady boundary layer equations are subsequently derived. In addition, the boundary layer equations are derived using a time linearization approach and assuming harmonically varying small disturbances.

  11. Advances in Unsteady Boundary Layer Transition Research, Part I: Theory and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-part article presents recent advances in boundary layer research that deal with the unsteady boundary layer transition modeling and its validation. A new unsteady boundary layer transition model was developed based on a universal unsteady intermittency function. It accounts for the effects of periodic unsteady wake flow on the boundary layer transition. To establish the transition model, an inductive approach was implemented; the approach was based on the results of comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies of unsteady wake flow and unsteady boundary layer flow. The experiments were performed on a curved plate at a zero streamwise pressure gradient under a periodic unsteady wake flow, where the frequency of the periodic unsteady flow was varied. To validate the model, systematic experimental investigations were performed on the suction and pressure surfaces of turbine blades integrated into a high-subsonic cascade test facility, which was designed for unsteady boundary layer investigations. The analysis of the experiment's results and comparison with the model's prediction confirm the validity of the model and its ability to predict accurately the unsteady boundary layer transition.

  12. Massive-scale aircraft observations of giant sea-salt aerosol particle size distributions in atmospheric marine boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    iant sea-salt aerosol particles (dry radius, rd > 0.5 μm) occur nearly everywhere in the marine boundary layer and frequently above. This study presents observations of atmospheric sea-salt size distributions in the range 0.7 Chile and the 2011 ICE-T in the Caribbean. In each deployment, size distributions using hundreds of slides are used to relate fitted log-normal size distributions parameters to wind speed, altitude and other atmospheric conditions. The size distributions provide a unique observational set for initializing cloud models with coarse-mode aerosol particle observations for marine atmospheres.

  13. Decomposition Methods For a Piv Data Analysis with Application to a Boundary Layer Separation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav URUBA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Separation of the turbulent boundary layer (BL on a flat plate under adverse pressure gradient was studied experimentally using Time-Resolved PIV technique. The results of spatio-temporal analysis of flow-field in the separation zone are presented. For this purpose, the POD (Proper Orthogonal Decomposition and its extension BOD (Bi-Orthogonal Decomposition techniques are applied as well as dynamical approach based on POPs (Principal Oscillation Patterns method. The study contributes to understanding physical mechanisms of a boundary layer separation process. The acquired information could be used to improve strategies of a boundary layer separation control.

  14. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  15. Numerical methods for hypersonic boundary layer stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Four different schemes for solving compressible boundary layer stability equations are developed and compared, considering both the temporal and spatial stability for a global eigenvalue spectrum and a local eigenvalue search. The discretizations considered encompass: (1) a second-order-staggered finite-difference scheme; (2) a fourth-order accurate, two-point compact scheme; (3) a single-domain Chebychev spectral collocation scheme; and (4) a multidomain spectral collocation scheme. As Mach number increases, the performance of the single-domain collocation scheme deteriorates due to the outward movement of the critical layer; a multidomain spectral method is accordingly designed to furnish superior resolution of the critical layer.

  16. Modeling and computation of boundary-layer flows laminar, turbulent and transitional boundary layers in incompressible and compressible flows

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of our book extends the modeling and calculation of boundary-layer flows to include compressible flows. The subjects cover laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers for two- and three-dimensional incompressible and compressible flows. The viscous-inviscid coupling between the boundary layer and the inviscid flow is also addressed. The book has a large number of homework problems.

  17. HIFiRE-5 Boundary Layer Transition and HIFiRE-1 Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    ballistic trajectory , with no active attitude control. The elliptic cone test article remained attached to the second stage booster at all times...Page Figure 1 Rollup of Boundary-layer into Streamwise Vortex on 2:1 Sharp Elliptic Cone, Similar to HIFiRE-5 (from Ref...Bulge of 2:1 Elliptic Cone13 ..............6 Figure 4 Photograph of Model

  18. Control Parameters for Boundary-Layer Instabilities in Unsteady Shock Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaVar King Isaacson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the computation of a set of control parameters for the deterministic prediction of laminar boundary-layer instabilities induced by an imposed unsteady shock interaction. The objective of the study is exploratory in nature by computing a supersonic flight environment for flow over a blunt body and the deterministic prediction of the spectral entropy rates for the boundary layer subjected to an unsteady pressure disturbance. The deterministic values for the spectral entropy rate within the instabilities are determined for each control parameter. Computational results imply that the instabilities are of a span-wise vortex form, that the maximum vertical velocity wave vector components are produced in the region nearest the wall and that extended transient coherent structures are produced in the boundary layer at a vertical location slightly below the mid-point of the boundary layer.

  19. Effect of riblets on the streaky structures excited by free stream tip vortices in boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiko, Andrey V. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jung, Kwang Hyo; Chun, Ho Hwan; Lee, Inwon [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    In this study, experimental investigations were made regarding the effect of riblets on the streak instability in boundary layer. The streak instability is now regarded as a major source of the self-regeneration mechanism for the hairpin type coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer flow. Thus, it is important to control the instability to suppress the drag-inducing vortical structure in terms of drag reduction. Toward enhancing the measurement accuracy and spatial resolution, an enlarged version of riblets was applied to a streak which was artificially induced by a microwing in a laminar boundary layer. It is found that the riblets have attenuation effect on the streak instability, i.e., to reduce the spanwise velocity gradient of the quasi-streamwise streak in boundary layer.

  20. Effect of riblets on the streaky structures excited by free stream tip vortices in boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boiko, Andrey V. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Jung, Kwang Hyo; Chun, Ho Hwan; Lee, In Won [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    In this study, experimental investigations were made regarding the effect of riblets on the streak instability in boundary layer. The streak instability is now regarded as a major source of the self-regeneration mechanism for the hairpin type coherent structures in turbulent boundary layer flow. Thus, it is important to control the instability to suppress the drag-inducing vortical structure in terms of drag reduction. Toward enhancing the measurement accuracy and spatial resolution, an enlarged version of riblets was applied to a streak which was artificially induced by a microwing in a laminar boundary layer. It is found that the riblets have attenuation effect on the streak instability, i.e., to reduce the spanwise velocity gradient of the quasi-streamwise streak in boundary layer

  1. Boundary layer photochemistry during a total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fabian

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous measurements of radiation, photolysis frequencies, O3, CO, OH, PAN and NOx species were carried out in the boundary layer, along with pertinent meteorological parameters, under total solar eclipse conditions. This experiment performed at about 34 solar zenith angle and noontime conditions thus provided a case study about the interactions between radiation and photochemistry under fast ''day-night'' and ''night-day'' transitions, at high solar elevation. The results reveal a close correlation of photolysis frequencies jO(1D and jNO2with the UV radiation flux. All three parameters show, due to the decreasing fraction of direct radiation at shorter wavelengths, much weaker cloud shading effects than global solar radiation. NO and OH concentrations decrease to essentially zero during totality. Subsequently, NO and OH concentrations increased almost symmetrically to their decrease preceding totality. The NO/NO2 ratio was proportional to jNO2over 30 min before and after totality indicating that the partitioning of NOx species is determined by jNO2. Simple box model simulations show the effect of reduced solar radiation on the photochemical production of O3 and PAN. WÄhrend der totalen Sonnenfinsternis am 11. August 1999 wurden simultane und kontinuierliche Messungen von O3, CO, OH, PAN and NOx, Strahlung, Photolysefrequenzen und relevanten meteorologischen Parametern durchgefÜhrt. Dieses Experiment, durchgefÜhrt etwa am Mittag, bei 34 Zenithwinkel der Sonne, ermöglichte die Untersuchung der Interaktion von Strahlung und Photochemie fÜr schnelle Tag-Nacht und Nacht-Tag-ÜbergÄnge bei hohem Sonnenstand. Die Ergebnisse zeigen eine enge Korrelation der Photolysefrequenzen jO(1D und jNO2 mit dem UV-Strahlungsfluss. Alle drei Parameter zeigen, wegen des abnehmenden Anteils direkter Sonnenstrahlung bei kurzen WellenlÄngen, erheblich geringere AbschwÄchung durch Wolken als die Globalstrahlung. NO und OH gehen wÄhrend der

  2. Helicity in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, Michael; Koprov, Boris; Koprov, Victor; Chkhetiani, Otto

    2017-04-01

    An overview is presented of recent direct field measurements at the Tsimlyansk Scientific Station of A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Moscow of turbulent helicity (and potential vorticity) using four acoustic anemometers positioned, within the atmospheric surface-adjacent boundary layer, in the vertices of a rectangular tetrahedron, with an approximate 5 m distance between the anemometers and a 5.5 m elevation of the tetrahedron base above the ground surface (Koprov, Koprov, Kurgansky and Chkhetiani. Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol.51, 565-575). The same ideology was applied in a later field experiment in Tsimlyansk with the tetrahedron's size of 0.7 m and variable elevation over the ground from 3.5 to 25 m. It is illustrated with examples of the statistical distribution of instantaneous (both positive and negative) turbulent helicity values. A theory is proposed that explains the measured mean turbulent helicity sign, including the sign of contribution to helicity from the horizontal and vertical velocity & vorticity components, respectively, and the sign of helicity buoyant production term. By considering a superposition of the classic Ekman spiral solution and a jet-like wind profile that mimics a shallow breeze circulation over a non-uniformly heated Earth surface, a possible explanation is provided, why the measured mean turbulent helicity sign is negative. The pronounced breeze circulation over the Tsimlyansk polygon which is located nearby the Tsimlyansk Reservoir was, indeed, observed during the measurements period. Whereas, essentially positive helicity is injected into the boundary layer from the free atmosphere in the Northern Hemisphere.

  3. Boundary layer polarization and voltage in the 14 MLT region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, R.; Yamauchi, M.; Woch, J.; Marklund, G.

    1995-05-01

    Viking midlatitude observations of ions and electrons in the postnoon auroral region show that field-aligned acceleration of electrons and ions with energies up to a few kiloelectron volts takes place. The characteristics of the upgoing ion beams and the local transverse electric field observed by Viking indicate that parallel ion acceleration is primarily due to a quasi-electrostatic field-aligned acceleration process below Viking altitudes, i.e., below 10,000-13,500 km. A good correlation is found between the maximum upgoing ion beam energy and the depth of the local potential well determined by the Viking electric field experiment within dayside 'ion inverted Vs.' The total transverse potential throughout the entire region near the ion inverted Vs. is generally much higher than the field-aligned potential and may reach well above 10 kV. However, the detailed mapping of the transverse potential out to the boundary layer, a fundamental issue which remains controversial, was not attempted here. An important finding in this study is the strong correlation between the maximum up going ion beam energy of dayside ion inverted Vs and the solar wind velocity. This suggests a direct coupling of the solar wind plasma dynamo/voltage generator to the region of field-aligned particle acceleration. The fact that the center of dayside ion inverted Vs coincide with convection reversals/flow stagnation and upward Birkeland currents on what appears to be closed field lines (Woch et al., 1993), suggests that field-aligned potential structures connect to the inner part of an MHD dyanmo in the low-latitude boundary layer. Thus the Viking observations substantiate the idea of a solar wind induced boundary layer polarization where negatively charged perturbations in the postnoon sector persistently develops along the magnetic field lines, establishing accelerating potential drops along the geomagnetic field lines in the 0.5-10 kV range.

  4. Numerical simulation of convective boundary layer above polynyas and leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debolskiy, Andrey; Stepanenko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    Arctic region is very important as one of drivers for global atmosphere circulation. Meanwhile, results of modern global atmospheric models, both climatic and weather forecasting differs significantly from each other and observations in this region. One of the reasons for these uncertainties can be inaccurate simulation of ice and snow cover distribution, which accuracy depends in turn on variety of factors. Among others, appropriate parameterizations of atmospheric boundary layer over inhomogeneous surface, not explicitly resolved at the atmospheric model grid, can decrease these inaccuracies. The main objective of these parameterizations is to calculate surface heat and water vapor fluxes, averaged over the whole model cell. However, due to great differences in structure of boundary layers formed over cold ice and relatively warm open water, which cause nonlinear dependencies,the parameterizations suggested to the moment can hardly be regarded as applicable for "complete" set of synoptic scenarios . The present paper attempts to improve standard mosaic method of flux aggregation, which is still common in climate models [1]. The main idea is to derive heat fluxes using data from numerical experiments, explicitly reproducing most of sub grid (for global models) turbulence motions spectra, and compare with fluxes calculated using mosaic method implying the part of model domain to be a global model cell. The study is based on idealized high resolution (~10 m) experiments with typically observed surface parameters (temperature and roughness), ice-open water distribution, initial temperature and wind profiles distribution included in Large Eddy Simulation model of Insitute of Numerical Mathematics RAS [2],[3]. Analysis of other boundary layer characteristics such as its height, eddy diffusivity profiles, kinetic energy is presented. The modeling results are compared with field experiments' data gathered at White Sea. References: 1. V.M. Stepanenko, P.M. Miranda, V

  5. Anthropogenic pollution elevates the peak height of new particle formation from planetary boundary layer to lower free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Yangang; Liu, Quan; Jia, Xingcan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Ding, Deping; Li, Jie; Wang, Zifa

    2017-07-01

    New particle formation (NPF) and subsequent growth are primary sources of atmospheric aerosol particles and cloud condensation nuclei. Previous studies have been conducted in relatively clean environments; investigation of NPF events over highly polluted megacities is still lacking. Here we show, based on a recent yearlong aircraft campaign conducted over Beijing, China, from April 2011 to June 2012, that NPF occurrence peaks in the lower free troposphere (LT), instead of planetary boundary layer (PBL), as most previous studies have found and that the distance of NPF peak to PBL top increases with increasing aerosol loading. Further analysis reveals that increased aerosols suppress NPF in PBL, but enhance NPF in LT due to a complex chain of aerosol-radiation-photochemistry interactions that affect both NPF sources and sinks. These findings shed new light on our understanding of NPF occurrence, NPF vertical distribution, and thus their effects on atmospheric photochemistry, clouds, and climate.

  6. Boundary-Layer Bypass Transition Over Large-Scale Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-16

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0007 Boundary - layer bypass transition over large-scale bodies Pierre Ricco UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD, DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Sep 2013 to 31 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Boundary - layer bypass transition over large-scale...shape of the streamwise velocity profile compared to the flat-plate boundary layer . The research showed that the streamwise wavenumber plays a key role

  7. Methods and results of boundary layer measurements on a glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nes, W. V.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary layer measurements were carried out on a glider under natural conditions. Two effects are investigated: the effect of inconstancy of the development of static pressure within the boundary layer and the effect of the negative pressure difference in a sublaminar boundary layer. The results obtained by means of an ion probe in parallel connection confirm those results obtained by means of a pressure probe. Additional effects which have occurred during these measurements are briefly dealt with.

  8. On the application of mixed-layer theory to the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunyan

    In this dissertation, we explore the applicability of mixed-layer theory to represent stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL). Mixed-layer theory is used to study the STBL diurnal cycle. Our results show that the diurnal evolution of cloud thickness is sensitive to the entrainment efficiency. Specifically with low entrainment efficiencies, the cloud thickness evolution is in a better agreement with observations. We explain these effects through a consideration of the equilibrium state of cloud boundaries and their adjustment timescales. The susceptibility of cloud albedo to droplet number density dominates the entrainment effects. This suggests that estimates of aerosol indirect effects from stratocumulus clouds will not be particularly sensitive to the way entrainment is represented in large-scale models. The low-cloud amount (LCA) is diagnosed based on the equilibrium solutions of the mixed-layer model (MLM). ECMWF Reanalysis (ERA-40) data serve as large-scale boundary conditions. Results are compared to the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project D2 data, especially in light of the relationship between the LCA and the lower-troposphere stability (LTS). Our results show that the synoptic variability in divergence contributes to LCA climatology. This climatology reproduced from MLM is more sensitive to processes that redistribute the mass field as compared to heat and moisture. Other large-scale conditions contribute to LCA depending on their correlation with the LTS and the strength of the LTS signal in individual regions. An autoregressive noise model is proposed to represent the synoptic variability in divergence based on analysis of ERA-40 data. Using this model, the equilibrium cloud fraction is shown as a function of the mean divergence value, the noise level, and the noise autocorrelation time scale. Mixed-layer model with such noise produces a reasonable comparison to observations in LCA climatology. An interaction rule is specified based on

  9. AMSR-MODIS Boundary Layer Water Vapor L3 Daily 1 degree x 1 degree V1 (AMDBLWV) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides an estimate the marine boundary layer water vapor beneath uniform cloud fields. Microwave radiometry from AMSR-E and AMSR-2 provides the total...

  10. AMSR-MODIS Boundary Layer Water Vapor L3 Monthly 1 degree x 1 degree V1 (AMMBLWV) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides an estimate the marine boundary layer water vapor beneath uniform cloud fields. Microwave radiometry from AMSR-E and AMSR-2 provides the total...

  11. A conceptual framework to quantify the influence of convective boundary layer development on carbon dioxide mixing ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Peters, W.; Schröter, J.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Krol, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Interpretation of observed diurnal carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios near the surface requires knowledge of the local dynamics of the planetary boundary layer. In this paper, we study the relationship between the boundary layer dynamics and the CO2 budget in convective conditions through a newly

  12. Boundary-layer effects in droplet splashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2017-07-01

    A drop falling onto a solid substrate will disintegrate into smaller parts when its impact velocity V exceeds the so-called critical velocity for splashing, i.e., when V>V^{*}. Under these circumstances, the very thin liquid sheet, which is ejected tangentially to the solid after the drop touches the substrate, lifts off as a consequence of the aerodynamic forces exerted on it. Subsequently, the growth of capillary instabilities breaks the toroidal rim bordering the ejecta into smaller droplets, violently ejected radially outward, provoking the splash [G. Riboux and J. M. Gordillo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507. In this contribution, the effect of the growth of the boundary layer is included in the splash model presented in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507, obtaining very good agreement between the measured and the predicted values of V^{*} for wide ranges of liquid and gas material properties, atmospheric pressures, and substrate wettabilities. Our description also modifies the way at when the liquid sheet is first ejected, which can now be determined in a much more straightforward manner than that proposed in Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 024507 (2014)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.113.024507.

  13. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Eliáš

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson’s ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis.

  14. Thermographic analysis of turbulent non-isothermal water boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the investigation of the turbulent water boundary layer in the jet mixing flows using high-speed infrared (IR) thermography. Two turbulent mixing processes were studied: a submerged water jet impinging on a flat surface and two intersecting jets in a round disc-shaped vessel. An infrared camera (FLIR Systems SC7700) was focused on the window transparent for IR radiation; it provided high-speed recordings of heat fluxes from a thin water layer close to the window. Temperature versus time curves at different points of water boundary layer near the wall surface were acquired using the IR camera with the recording frequency of 100 Hz. The time of recording varied from 3 till 20 min. The power spectra for the temperature fluctuations at different points on the hot-cold water mixing zone were calculated using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. The obtained spectral behavior was compared to the Kolmogorov "-5/3 spectrum" (a direct energy cascade) and the dual-cascade scenario predicted for...

  15. Boundary Layer Effect on Behavior of Discrete Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliáš, Jan

    2017-02-10

    The paper studies systems of rigid bodies with randomly generated geometry interconnected by normal and tangential bonds. The stiffness of these bonds determines the macroscopic elastic modulus while the macroscopic Poisson's ratio of the system is determined solely by the normal/tangential stiffness ratio. Discrete models with no directional bias have the same probability of element orientation for any direction and therefore the same mechanical properties in a statistical sense at any point and direction. However, the layers of elements in the vicinity of the boundary exhibit biased orientation, preferring elements parallel with the boundary. As a consequence, when strain occurs in this direction, the boundary layer becomes stiffer than the interior for the normal/tangential stiffness ratio larger than one, and vice versa. Nonlinear constitutive laws are typically such that the straining of an element in shear results in higher strength and ductility than straining in tension. Since the boundary layer tends, due to the bias in the elemental orientation, to involve more tension than shear at the contacts, it also becomes weaker and less ductile. The paper documents these observations and compares them to the results of theoretical analysis.

  16. Dynamics of Under Ice Boundary Layers Below Floating Ice Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, W. J.; Stanton, T. P.

    2016-02-01

    Pine Island Glacier (PIG), a major outlet stream of the Western Antarctic Ice Sheet, has dramatically thinned and accelerated in recent decades. It is believed that a weakening of the floating portion of the glacier, known as the ice shelf, due to increased ocean thermal forcing is a primary cause of the observed increasing discharge of PIG. In order to better understand the controls on the exchange of heat between the PIG shelf and the underlying ocean cavity, a numerical model, MITgcm, has been configured to study the dynamics of the sloping, meltwater-forced, buoyant boundary layer below the ice shelf A 2-D approximation allows for high vertical resolution that resolves well the under shelf ocean boundary layer. We are particularly interested in the dynamical balance between buoyancy along the sloping ice shelf base, drag, and entrainment/detrainment and the associated feedback of basal melting of the ice shelf. Numerical results will be compared to in-situ observations obtained through a field campaign in 2013.

  17. Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer Observations from GPS Occultation and CALIPSO over Subtropical Eastern Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, F.; Wu, D. L.; Wood, R.; Ao, C. O.; Mannucci, A.

    2012-12-01

    The highly reflective low clouds that are generally trapped below the shallow marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) inversion produce profound radiative cooling effects in the climate system. The low cloud feedback remains a primary cause of uncertainty in global climate model projections. Understanding how climate sensitivity is controlled by these low clouds remains one of the key challenges partly due to the lack of global observation of the low cloud morphology and MABL thermodynamic structures, such as the cloud height, thickness, cloud fraction and cloud top inversion strength, which are difficult to model and integrate into global climate/forecast simulations. High-resolution, self-calibrated Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) soundings provide a unique capability for MABL sensing in all-weather conditions. The thermal inversion along with a large moisture decrease across the MABL top leads to a large bending angle and a sharp refractivity gradient that can be precisely detected by the GPS RO measurements. On the other hand, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) lidar offers cloud-top-height (CTH) measurements with superior resolution (60 m). In this study, we derive the MABL height climatology from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS RO observations over five selected regions in subtropical eastern oceans, which include the northeast and southeast Pacific and Atlantic as well as the southeast Indian Ocean off the coast of west Australia. The CTH climatology is also derived from CALIPSO lidar measurements. The CALIPSO CTH shows consistent features with the GPS thermal inversion height over stratocumulus region. However, a large discrepancy is found over the trade-cumulus region. A further comparison of the MABL height observations from GPS/CALIPSO with state-of-the-art global reanalyses, such as the ECMWF-ERA-interim, the NOAA Climate Forecast

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic and thermal radiation effects on the boundary-layer flow due to a moving extensible surface with the velocity slip model: A comparative study of four nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, Emad H., E-mail: efarag@uj.edu.sa [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, University of Jeddah, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Sayed, Hamed M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams University, Roxy, Cairo 11757 (Egypt); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Sciences, Taibah University, Yanbu (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-01-15

    In the current work, we investigated effects of the velocity slip for the flow and heat transfer of four nanofluids over a non-linear stretching sheet taking into account the thermal radiation and magnetic field in presence of the effective electrical conductivity. The governing partial differential equations were transformed into a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equation using similarity transformations before being solved numerically by the Chebyshev pseudospectral differentiation matrix (ChPDM). It was found that the investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluid stream function for the whole investigated nanoparticles. In addition, velocity and skin friction profiles of the four investigated nanofluids decreases and increases, respectively, with the increase of the magnetic parameter, first-order and second-order velocity slips. Further, the flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced on applying the velocity slip model, where lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer. - Highlights: • A comparative study for four nanoparticles with MHD and thermal radiation effects was studied. • The effective electrical conductivity is mandatory; otherwise a spurious physical sight will be gained. • The investigated parameters affect remarkably on the nanofluids' flow. • The flow velocity, surface shear stress and temperature are strongly influenced by the slip model. • Lower values of the second-order imply higher surface heat flux and thereby making the fluid warmer.

  19. Measurements of the sum of NO3 and N2O5 in the urban, nocturnal boundary layer and studies of urban nighttime chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, A. K.; Langridge, J. M.; Dessens, O.; Ball, S.; Jones, R.

    2009-12-01

    Broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) enables the unambiguous determination of gas concentrations at trace levels in laboratory and field atmospheric studies. The versatility of this method has here been applied to the measurement of the nitrate radical (NO3). A heated inlet was used to shift the equilibrium between nitrate and dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) to convert all ambient (N2O5) to NO3 to allow the sum of these species to be measured. The nitrate radical is rapidly photolysed during the day and generally only builds to appreciable concentrations at night, except for under extremely high O3 concentrations. A BBCEAS instrument using a LED light-source was deployed in an urban area at an altitude of 189m on balcony of the 35th Floor of the British Telecommunications Tower, London, during October and November 2007 as part the Regent’s Park and Tower Campaign (REPARTEE-II). Mirror reflectivity, R(λ), was derived from the phase-shift between the cavity output and the modulated LED source on a daily basis. Beer-Lambert retrieval over a range of wavelengths was used to retrieve absorber concentrations in every 10s sample from an absorption spectrum as shown in figure 2. Ancillary measurements of NO2, pressure and temperature were used to infer the NO3:N2O5 ratio. The data collated shows large variation in nighttime concentrations of the sum of NO3 and N2O5, (the vast majority of this being N2O5) with some very high concentrations measured, often peaking at around 700ppt. Box-model studies were used to investigate the chemical scenarios developing such high N2O5 concentrations and chemical lifetimes were calculated. An example absorbance spectrum from REPARTEE II depicting 4n+d polyad bands of H2O and the NO3 absorption band (boxed).

  20. Intercomparison of Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization and its Impacts on Surface Ozone Concentration in the WRF/Chem Model for a Case Study in Houston/Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, Gustavo C.; Li, Xiangshang; Carvalho, Jonas; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    With over 6 million inhabitants the Houston metropolitan area is the fourth-largest in the United States. Ozone concentration in this southeast Texas region frequently exceeds the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). For this reason our study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) to quantify meteorological prediction differences produced by four widely used PBL schemes and analyzed its impact on ozone predictions. The model results were compared to observational data in order to identify one superior PBL scheme better suited for the area. The four PBL schemes include two first-order closure schemes, the Yonsei University (YSU) and the Asymmetric Convective Model version 2 (ACM2); as well as two turbulent kinetic energy closure schemes, the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) and Quasi-Normal Scale Elimination (QNSE). Four 24 h forecasts were performed, one for each PBL scheme. Simulated vertical profiles for temperature, potential temperature, relative humidity, water vapor mixing ratio, and the u-v components of the wind were compared to measurements collected during the Second Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS-II) Radical and Aerosol Measurements Project (TRAMP) experiment in summer 2006. Simulated ozone was compared against TRAMP data, and air quality stations from Continuous Monitoring Station (CAMS). Also, the evolutions of the PBL height and vertical mixing properties within the PBL for the four simulations were explored. Although the results yielded high correlation coefficients and small biases in almost all meteorological variables, the overall results did not indicate any preferred PBL scheme for the Houston case. However, for ozone prediction the YSU scheme showed greatest agreements with observed values.

  1. Interaction Between Aerothermally Compliant Structures and Boundary-Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Zachary Bryce

    The use of thin-gauge, light-weight structures in combination with the severe aero-thermodynamic loading makes reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles prone to fluid-thermal-structural interactions. These interactions result in surface perturbations in the form of temperature changes and deformations that alter the stability and eventual transition of the boundary layer. The state of the boundary layer has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamic loads acting on a hypersonic vehicle. The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerothermodynamic loading, and surface conditions make the interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important area of study in high-speed flows. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the interaction between boundary layer transition and the response of aerothermally compliant structures. This is carried out by first examining the uncoupled problems of: (1) structural deformation and temperature changes altering boundary-layer stability and (2) the boundary layer state affecting structural response. For the former, the stability of boundary layers developing over geometries that typify the response of surface panels subject to combined aerodynamic and thermal loading is numerically assessed using linear stability theory and the linear parabolized stability equations. Numerous parameters are examined including: deformation direction, deformation location, multiple deformations in series, structural boundary condition, surface temperature, the combined effect of Mach number and altitude, and deformation mode shape. The deformation-induced pressure gradient alters the boundary-layer thickness, which changes the frequency of the most-unstable disturbance. In regions of small boundary-layer growth, the disturbance frequency modulation resulting from a single or multiple panels deformed into the flowfield is found to improve boundary-layer stability and potentially delay transition. For the

  2. Hundred years of the boundary layer – Some aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-08-02

    Aug 2, 2005 ... at the Third International Congress of Mathematics held in Heidelberg and published in the. Proceedings of the Congress ..... Work on boundary layers is going on in many organizations in India. The above ... Rao G N V 1967 The law of the wall in thick axisymmetric turbulent boundary layers. J. Appl. Mech.

  3. Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer from radiosonde ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    moisture) or substances originating from the sur- face. It is usually flatter than the boundary layer, but fills the whole ABL in the deep convective boundary layers ..... Wea. Rev. 92 235–242. Holzworth G C 1967 Mixing depths, wind speeds and air pollution potential for selected locations in the United. States; J. Appl. Meteorol.

  4. Coupled wake boundary layer model of wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Gayme, Dennice F.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We present and test a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a wind-farm. This model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake model approach with a “top-down” model for the overall wind-farm boundary layer structure. The wake model

  5. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed...... winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general....

  6. Analytical solution for the convectively-mixed atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2013-01-01

    Based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer theory assuming a zeroth order jump at the entrainment zone, analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height evolution are derived with different degrees of accuracy. First, an exact implicit expression for the boundary-layer height for a situation

  7. Virtual effect, boundary layer dynamics, and the size of convective self-aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.

    2016-12-01

    Convective self-aggregation refers to a phenomenon that atmospheres spontaneously develop into a moist convecting patch and a dry non-convecting patch. This phenomenon is simulated in cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and is considered as an essential element for tropical cyclones and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Here we present a boundary-layer theory for the horizontal scale L of 2D (x, z) convective self-aggregation by considering both the momentum and energy constraints for steady circulations. This theory interprets L as the distance over which the radiation-driven vertical mass flux balances the pressure-induced horizontal mass flux within the boundary layer. The length scale L is therefore determined by the ratio between the horizontal pressure difference within the boundary layer and the radiative cooling rate at the top of the boundary layer. The horizontal pressure difference arises mainly due to the virtual effect—water vapor is lighter than the dry air. This theory explains the CRM results across a wide range of sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Our results may help explain the size of tropical mesoscale convective systems.

  8. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao, E-mail: zhangchao@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Liao, Qiang, E-mail: lqzx@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chen, Rong, E-mail: rchen@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhu, Xun, E-mail: zhuxun@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-grade Energy Utilization Technologies and Systems (Chongqing University), Ministry of Education, Chongqing 400030 (China); Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  9. Knuckleball and Flying Disk: Boundary Layer Transitions, Separations and Vortex Wakes in Sports Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kiura, Toshiro; Goto, Yuichiro; Hiramoto, Riho

    2001-11-01

    In spite of their popularity, flow structures over common baseball and flying disks have not been studied in detail. A slowly rotating baseball is subject to erratic flight paths, and is known as a knuckleball. In the present experiment, the characteristic of force acting on a baseball was obtained and the velocity vector field near the surface of the ball and the wake were measured with the DPIV technique. The seam triggered the boundary layer transition or caused the boundary layer separation itself. The laminar/turbulent boundary layer separations were identified with specific ball orientations. Corresponding three-dimensional wake pattern and the side force result in unpredictable trajectories. In the second part of the talk, flow physics regarding a spin-stabilized flying disk is addressed. The roll-up of trailing vortices was visualized in detail and their vorticity field was measured with the DPIV. The vortical flow over the disk produced flow reattachment at a very high angle of attack. The boundary layer at low angles of attack was affected by the surface motion with asymmetric boundary layer transitions as evidenced by the flow visualization and the hot wire survey. The flow separation and attachment on the underside cavity were also affected by the rotation.

  10. Spatially Developing Secondary Instabilities in Compressible Swept Airfoil Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional eigenvalue analysis is used on a massive scale to study spatial instabilities of compressible shear flows with two inhomogeneous directions. The main focus of the study is crossflow dominated swept-wing boundary layers although the methodology can also be applied to study other type of flows, such as the attachment-line flow. Certain unique aspects of formulating a spatial, two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for the secondary instability of finite amplitude crossflow vortices are discussed, namely, fixing the spatial growth direction unambiguously through a non-orthogonal formulation of the linearized disturbance equations. A primary test case used for parameter study corresponds to the low-speed, NLF-0415(b) airfoil configuration as tested in the ASU Unsteady Wind Tunnel, wherein a spanwise periodic array of roughness elements was placed near the leading edge in order to excite stationary crossflow modes with a specified fundamental wavelength. The two classes of flow conditions selected for this analysis include those for which the roughness array spacing corresponds to either the naturally dominant crossflow wavelength, or a subcritical wavelength that serves to reduce the growth of the naturally excited dominant crossflow modes. Numerical predictions are compared with the measured database, both as indirect validation for the spatial instability analysis and to provide a basis for comparison with a higher Reynolds number, supersonic swept-wing configuration. Application of the eigenvalue analysis to the supersonic configuration reveals that a broad spectrum of stationary crossflow modes can sustain sufficiently strong secondary instabilities as to potentially cause transition over this configuration. Implications of this finding for transition control in swept wing boundary layers are examined.

  11. A study of the combined impact of boundary layer height and near-surface meteorology on the CO diurnal cycle at a low mountaintop site using simultaneous lidar and in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; Lee, T. R.; De Wekker, S. F. J.

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of air pollutants and trace gas measurements over mountaintop sites and their application in inverse transport models to estimate regional scale fluxes are oftentimes challenging due to the influences associated with atmospheric transport at both local and regional scales. The objective of this study is to investigate the diurnal cycle pattern of CO mixing ratio over a low mountaintop influenced by: (1) two different convective boundary layer (CBL) regimes (shallow and deep) and associated growth rates over the mountaintop, (2) the combined effect of a deep CBL with and without diurnal wind shift, and (3) slope flows and associated air mass transport. For this purpose, we used simultaneous measurements of lidar-derived CBL heights, standard meteorological variables, and CO2 and CO mixing ratio from Pinnacles, a mountaintop monitoring site in the Appalachian Mountains. We used both water vapor and CO2 mixing ratio as tracers for upslope flow air masses. We used case studies to focus on two different scenarios of daytime CO mixing ratio variability: (1) a gradual increase in the morning with a maximum in the afternoon, and (2) a gradual decrease in the morning with a minimum in the late afternoon. The second scenario is similar to the CO variability observed atop tall towers in flat terrain. Using the lidar-derived CBL height evolution and in situ CO, CO2 and meteorological measurements over the mountaintop, we found that the CBL height dynamics, regional scale wind shift, and upslope flow air masses arriving at the mountaintop in the morning affect the CO mixing ratio variability during the remaining part of the diurnal cycle. These findings help introduce a conceptual framework that can explain and differentiate the opposite patterns (i.e. daytime increase versus daytime decrease) in the CO diurnal cycles over a mountaintop site affected by upslope flows and provide new roadmaps for monitoring and assimilating trace gas mixing ratios into applications

  12. Radiative transfer in a polluted urban planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a polluted urban atmosphere is studied using a dynamic model. The diurnal nature of radiative transfer for summer conditions is simulated for an urban area 40 km in extent and the effects of various parameters arising in the problem are investigated. The results of numerical computations show that air pollution has the potential of playing a major role in the radiative regime of the urban area. Absorption of solar energy by aerosols in realistic models of urban atmosphere are of the same order of magnitude as that due to water vapor. The predicted effect of the air pollution aerosol in the city is to warm the earth-atmosphere system, and the net effect of gaseous pollutant is to warm the surface and cool the planetary boundary layer, particularly near the top.

  13. Turbulence Scales Simulations in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena-Carmen Teleman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of the air flow over models in atmospheric boundary layer tunnels is a research domain based on advanced scientific technologies imposed by the necessity of studying the turbulent fluid movements in the proximity of the Earth’s surface. The experiment presented herein is developed in the wind tunnel from the Laboratory of Structural Aerodynamics of the Faculty of Civil Engineering and Building Services in Iassy. Measurements necessary for the determination of the turbulence scales of the wind action in urban environment were conducted. The data obtained were processed and analyzed and interpreted with specific software. The results are used for a synthesis regarding the scales of turbulence of the model of flow and the actual accuracy of measurements. The paper presents some of the important elements of this synthesis.

  14. Hydromagnetic free convection currents effects on boundary layer thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwanza, J.K., E-mail: kwanzakioko@yahoo.co [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya); Marigi, E.M.; Kinyanjui, M. [Department of Pure and Applied Mathematics, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology, P.O. Box 62000-00200, Nairobi (Kenya)

    2010-06-15

    In this study we discuss an unsteady free convection MHD flow past semi-infinite vertical porous plate. We have considered the flow in the presence of a strong magnetic field and therefore the electromagnetic force is very large. This brings in the phenomenon of Hall and Ion-slip currents. The effects of these two parameters together with that of viscous dissipation and radiation absorption among others on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are presented. The profiles are presented graphically. As the partial differential equations governing this problem are highly non-linear they are solved numerically by a finite difference method. It is found that in presence of heating of the plate by free convection current the velocity boundary layer thickness decreases.

  15. Change of Surface Roughness and Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1978-01-01

    The ratio between upstream and far downstream surface friction velocities relative to a change in surface roughness is given on the basis of results from surface Rossby number similarity theory. By simple theories for the internal boundary layer, which are found to compare quite well with recent...... numerical results from higher-order closure models, it is found that, even at a downwind distance such that the internal boundary layer has grown to the full height of the planetary boundary layers, the surface stress still considerably exceeds the equilibrium value...

  16. Large Eddy Simulation of the ventilated wave boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmann, Iris P.; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2006-01-01

    A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of (1) a fully developed turbulent wave boundary layer and (2) case 1 subject to ventilation (i.e., suction and injection varying alternately in phase) has been performed, using the Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model to express the subgrid viscosity. The model was found...... slows down the flow in the full vertical extent of the boundary layer, destabilizes the flow and decreases the mean bed shear stress significantly; whereas suction generally speeds up the flow in the full vertical extent of the boundary layer, stabilizes the flow and increases the mean bed shear stress...

  17. Rapid cycling of reactive nitrogen in the marine boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chunxiang; Zhou, Xianliang; Pu, Dennis; Stutz, Jochen; Festa, James; Spolaor, Max; Tsai, Catalina; Cantrell, Christopher; Mauldin, Roy L; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew; Hornbrook, Rebecca S; Apel, Eric C; Guenther, Alex; Kaser, Lisa; Yuan, Bin; Karl, Thomas; Haggerty, Julie; Hall, Samuel; Ullmann, Kirk; Smith, James N; Ortega, John; Knote, Christoph

    2016-04-28

    Nitrogen oxides are essential for the formation of secondary atmospheric aerosols and of atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and the hydroxyl radical, which controls the self-cleansing capacity of the atmosphere. Nitric acid, a major oxidation product of nitrogen oxides, has traditionally been considered to be a permanent sink of nitrogen oxides. However, model studies predict higher ratios of nitric acid to nitrogen oxides in the troposphere than are observed. A 'renoxification' process that recycles nitric acid into nitrogen oxides has been proposed to reconcile observations with model studies, but the mechanisms responsible for this process remain uncertain. Here we present data from an aircraft measurement campaign over the North Atlantic Ocean and find evidence for rapid recycling of nitric acid to nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides in the clean marine boundary layer via particulate nitrate photolysis. Laboratory experiments further demonstrate the photolysis of particulate nitrate collected on filters at a rate more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of gaseous nitric acid, with nitrous acid as the main product. Box model calculations based on the Master Chemical Mechanism suggest that particulate nitrate photolysis mainly sustains the observed levels of nitrous acid and nitrogen oxides at midday under typical marine boundary layer conditions. Given that oceans account for more than 70 per cent of Earth's surface, we propose that particulate nitrate photolysis could be a substantial tropospheric nitrogen oxide source. Recycling of nitrogen oxides in remote oceanic regions with minimal direct nitrogen oxide emissions could increase the formation of tropospheric oxidants and secondary atmospheric aerosols on a global scale.

  18. Influences on the Height of the Stable Boundary Layer as seen in LES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosovic, B; Lundquist, J

    2004-06-15

    Climate models, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and atmospheric dispersion models often rely on parameterizations of planetary boundary layer height. In the case of a stable boundary layer, errors in boundary layer height estimation can result in gross errors in boundary-layer evolution and in prediction of turbulent mixing within the boundary layer.

  19. Fuselage Boundary Layer Ingestion Propulsion Applied to a Thin Haul Commuter Aircraft for Optimal Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikic, Gregor Veble; Stoll, Alex; Bevirt, JoeBen; Grah, Rok; Moore, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical aspects of aerodynamic efficiency of propulsion systems are studied. Focus is on types of propulsion that closely couples to the aerodynamics of the complete vehicle. We discuss the effects of local flow fields, which are affected both by conservative flow acceleration as well as total pressure losses, on the efficiency of boundary layer immersed propulsion devices. We introduce the concept of a boundary layer retardation turbine that helps reduce skin friction over the fuselage. We numerically investigate efficiency gains offered by boundary layer and wake interacting devices. We discuss the results in terms of a total energy consumption framework and show that efficiency gains offered depend on all the elements of the propulsion system.

  20. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing for the determination of the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Keller

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A new method for measuring air temperature profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer at high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The measurements are based on Raman scattering distributed temperature sensing (DTS with a fiber optic cable attached to a tethered balloon. These data were used to estimate the height of the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The experiment was successfully deployed during a two-day campaign in September 2009, providing evidence that DTS is well suited for this atmospheric application. Observed stable temperature profiles exhibit an exponential shape confirming similarity concepts of the temperature inversion close to the surface. The atmospheric mixing height (MH was estimated to vary between 5 m and 50 m as a result of the nocturnal boundary layer evolution. This value is in good agreement with the MH derived from concurrent Radon-222 (222Rn measurements and in previous studies.

  1. Subtropical Low Cloud Response to a Warmer Climate in an Superparameterized Climate Model: Part I. Regime Sorting and Physical Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter N Blossey

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The subtropical low cloud response to a climate with SST uniformly warmed by 2 K is analyzed in the SP- CAM superparameterized climate model, in which each grid column is replaced by a two-dimensional cloud-resolving model (CRM. Intriguingly, SP-CAM shows substantial low cloud increases over the subtropical oceans in the warmer climate. The paper aims to understand the mechanism for these increases. The subtropical low cloud increase is analyzed by sorting grid-column months of the climate model into composite cloud regimes using percentile ranges of lower tropospheric stability (LTS. LTS is observed to be well correlated to subtropical low cloud amount and boundary layer vertical structure. The low cloud increase in SP-CAM is attributed to boundary-layer destabilization due to increased clear-sky radiative cooling in the warmer climate. This drives more shallow cumulus convection and a moister boundary layer, inducing cloud increases and further increasing the radiative cooling. The boundary layer depth does not change substantially, due to compensation between increased radiative cooling (which promotes more turbulent mixing and boundary-layer deepening and slight strengthening of the boundary-layer top inversion (which inhibits turbulent entrainment and promotes a shallower boundary layer. The widespread changes in low clouds do not appear to be driven by changes in mean subsidence.
    In a companion paper we use column-mode CRM simulations based on LTS-composite profiles to further study the low cloud response mechanisms and to explore the sensitivity of low cloud response to grid resolution in SP-CAM.

  2. FOREWORD: International Conference on Planetary Boundary Layer and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djolov, G.; Esau, I.

    2010-05-01

    structural uncertainties is hard to reduce and this could be one of the reasons determining slow progress in narrowing the climate model uncertainty range over the last 30 years (Knutti and Hagerl, Nature Geoscience, 2008). One of the most prominent structural uncertainties in the ongoing transient climate change is related to poor understanding and hence incorrect modelling of the turbulent physics and dynamics processes in the planetary boundary layer. Nevertheless, the climate models continue to rely on physically incorrect boundary layer parameterizations (Cuxart et al., BLM, 2006), whose erroneous dynamical response in the climate models may lead to significant abnormalities in simulated climate. At present, international efforts in theoretical understanding of the turbulent mixing have resulted in significant progress in turbulence simulation, measurements and parameterizations. However, this understanding has not yet found its way to the climate research community. Vice versa, climate research is not usually addressed by the boundary layer research community. The gap needs to be closed in order to crucially complete the scientific basis of climate change studies. The focus of the proposed forum could be formulated as follows: The planetary boundary layer determines several key parameters controlling the Earth's climate system but being a dynamic sub-system, just a layer of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere/ocean, it is also controlled by the climate system and its changes. Such a dynamic relationship causes a planetary boundary layer feedback (PBL-feedback) which could be defined as the response of the surface air temperature on changes in the vertical turbulent mixing. The forum participants have discussed both climatological and fluid dynamic aspects of this response, in order to quantify their role in the Earth's transient heat uptake and its representation in climate models. The choice of the forum location and dates are motivated by the role of tropical oceans

  3. Longitudinal dispersion of heavy particles in an oscillating tunnel and application to wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V. S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Steffensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    is studied numerically, using a random-walk particle model with the input data for the mean and turbulence characteristics of the wave boundary layer picked up from a transitional two-equation k–ω Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes model and plugged in the random-walk model. First, the flowmodel is validated...... are found to be in general agreement both qualitatively and quantitatively. In the last part of the study, an example application of the present model for fine sand dispersing in a wave boundary layer under storm conditions is given....

  4. Boundary-layer transition on a plate subjected to simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldman, D. R.; Brinich, P. F.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary-layer transition on a short plate was studied by means of the china-clay visual technique. The plate model was mounted in a wind tunnel so that it was subjected to small simultaneous spanwise and chordwise pressure gradients. Results of the experimental study, which was performed at three subsonic velocities, indicated that the transition pattern was appreciably curved in the spanwise direction but quite smooth and well behaved. Reasonable comparisons between predictions of transition and experiment were obtained from two finite-difference two-dimensional boundary-layer calculation methods which incorporated transition models based on the concept of a transition intermittency factor.

  5. Viscous boundary layers in rotating fluids driven by periodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Cogley, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    The paper analyzes the boundary layers formed in a rotating fluid by an oscillating flow over an infinite half plate, with particular attention paid to the effects of unsteadiness, the critical latitude effect and the structure of the solution to the boundary layer equations at resonance. The Navier-Stokes boundary layer equations are obtained through an asymptotic expansion with the incorporation of the Rossby and Ekman numbers and are analyzed as the sum of a nonlinear steady solution and a linearized unsteady solution. The solution is predominantly composed of two inertial wave vector components, one circularly polarized to the left and the other circularly polarized to the right. The problem considered here has relevance in oceanography and meteorology, with special reference to the unsteady atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 1. Oscillatory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This work concerns oscillatory boundary layers over smooth beds. It comprises combined visual and quantitative techniques including bed shear stress measurements. The experiments were carried out in an oscillating water tunnel. The experiments reveal two significant coherent flow structures: (i) ...

  7. Bristled shark skin: a microgeometry for boundary layer control?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, A W; Hidalgo, P; Westcott, M [Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics Department, University of Alabama, Box 870280, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Motta, P [Biology Department, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)], E-mail: alang@eng.ua.edu

    2008-12-01

    There exists evidence that some fast-swimming shark species may have the ability to bristle their scales during fast swimming. Experimental work using a water tunnel facility has been performed to investigate the flow field over and within a bristled shark skin model submerged within a boundary layer to deduce the possible boundary layer control mechanisms being used by these fast-swimming sharks. Fluorescent dye flow visualization provides evidence of the formation of embedded cavity vortices within the scales. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) data, used to evaluate the cavity vortex formation and boundary layer characteristics close to the surface, indicate increased momentum in the slip layer forming above the scales. This increase in flow velocity close to the shark's skin is indicative of boundary layer control mechanisms leading to separation control and possibly transition delay for the bristled shark skin microgeometry.

  8. Pre-LBA Rondonia Boundary Layer Experiment (RBLE) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the layer of air closest to the ground which is directly influenced on a daily basis by the heating and cooling of the...

  9. Pre-LBA Rondonia Boundary Layer Experiment (RBLE) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is the layer of air closest to the ground which is directly influenced on a daily basis by the heating and cooling of...

  10. Studies on reduction of fluid drag for athlete swimming suit by boundary layer control; Kyoeiyo mizugi ni kansuru kenkyu (kyokaiso seigyo ni yoru mizugi teiko no sakugen ni tsuite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Y. [Mie University, Mie (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Suzuki, T. [Mie University, Mie (Japan); Mori, K. [Mizuno Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-09-25

    Sport science progresses step by step in the world. The paper describes, the first, the relationships between fluid drag for a model of woman swimmer and the flow around it. The flow around the model swimmer is very complicated, and includes, for example, wave, some kinds of vortices, hydraulic jumping and so on. The complicated flows are visualized by the surface tufts method and so on. Second, the possibility of the reduction of fluid drag for a woman athlete swimming suit is challenged. The boundary layer control is applied to reduce the fluid drag. The separation occurs around the breast of a woman swimmer. The separation can be suppressed by the boundary layer control. Many beads are distributed on the breast area of a woman swimming suit. As the result, it is found that the fluid drag for the model swimmer can be reduced in a range of 1.5%--2% by the suit with the boundary layer control, which is carried out by many beads. 2 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Resistance Laws For Stable Baroclinic Boundary Layers Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, S.; Baklanov, A.; Djolov, G.; Esau, I.

    An advanced theoretical model is proposed including the effects of the free-flow sta- bility and baroclinicity in the resistance law for stable boundary layers. Theoretical predictions are verified against LES and experimental data. This new development ex- plains low accuracy of all earlier resistance law formulation and opens up fresh oppor- tunities for improved parameterisation of stable boundary layers in general circulation models.

  12. Linear stability of three-dimensional boundary layers - Effects of curvature and non-parallelism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, M. R.; Balakumar, P.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of in-plane (wavefront) curvature on the stability of three-dimensional boundary layers. It is found that this effect is stabilizing or destabilizing depending upon the sign of the crossflow velocity profile. We also investigate the effects of surface curvature and nonparallelism on crossflow instability. Computations performed for an infinite-swept cylinder show that while convex curvature stabilizes the three-dimensional boundary layer, nonparallelism is, in general, destabilizing and the net effect of the two depends upon meanflow and disturbance parameters. It is also found that concave surface curvature further destabilizes the crossflow instability.

  13. Diffusive boundary layers and photosynthesis of the epilithic algal community of coral reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larkum, Anthony W.D.; Koch, Eva-Maria W.; Kühl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    : the Gulf of Aqaba, Eilat (Israel), and One Tree Reef on the Great Barrier Reef (Australia). Microsensors were used to measure O2 and pH at the EAC surface and above. Oxygen profiles in the light and dark indicated a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) thickness of 180–590 µm under moderate flow (~0.08 m s-1......The effects of mass transfer resistance due to the presence of a diffusive boundary layer on the photosynthesis of the epilithic algal community (EAC) of a coral reef were studied. Photosynthesis and respiration of the EAC of dead coral surfaces were investigated for samples from two locations...

  14. Angular momentum transport in accretion disk boundary layers around weakly magnetized stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, M.E.; Chan, C.-K.

    2013-01-01

    , in the boundary layer where the accretion disk meets the surface of a weakly magnetized star. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI......) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. Motivated by the need of a deeper understanding of the behavior of an MHD fluid in a differentially rotating background that deviates from a Keplerian profile, we study the dynamics of MHD waves...

  15. Research of the boundary layer with an adverse pressure gradient by the Smoke Image Velocimetry method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Saushin, I. I.; Goltsman, A. E.

    2017-09-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of velocity profiles, turbulent pulsations, generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in a nonequilibrium boundary layer under the adverse pressure gradient are presented. The profiles of characteristics are estimated by means of the field dynamics of the two-component instantaneous velocity vectors measured by the optical method Smoke Image Velocimetry. The opportunities of using the field measurement method SIV to study the spatial evolution of small-scale characteristics in a boundary layer with a pressure gradient have been showed.

  16. Turbulent boundary layer in high Rayleigh number convection in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-28

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra=1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  17. Reactive boundary layers in metallic rolling contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbank, John

    2016-05-01

    more thorough investigation into the effects of residual austenite on the properties of this material. The high-performance alternative steels, 36NiCrMoV1-5-7 (hot working steel) and 45SiCrMo6 (spring steel), were heat treated as recommended by their respective manufacturers, and were not case-hardened. The selection of materials with and materials without case-hardening allows for an investigation into whether or not case-hardening is even necessary to deliver acceptable friction behaviour and wear performance. Elemental analyses were conducted by multiple methods to ensure accurate results. Residual austenite contents of the steels and the depth profiles of residual stresses were determined by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), for 20MnCr5 ranging from approximately 6 - 14 vol.%, and under 2 vol.% for the alternative alloys. Hardness profiles were taken from the testing surfaces into the material core. The carburization of 20MnCr5 led to higher hardness and the greater concentration of carbon in the carburization zone more representative of a hardened SAE E52100, or 100Cr6/102Cr6, than of a non-case-hardened 20MnCr5. Residual stresses from machining and case-hardening were measured directly at the sample surface. The high-performance steels fulfilled manufacturer expectations in terms of elemental content, with hardness values between 50 - 55 HRC and strongly martensitic microstructure character. With characterization of the chosen materials complete, the materials could then be subjected to pre-conditioning. The first pre-conditioning method involved targeted generation of cold work hardening as induced boundary layers to protect the contact zone against wear. Work hardening was identified both by variations in residual stress profiles, i.e. the introduction of beneficial compressive residual stresses, and hardness increases in the contact zone, providing enhanced wear resistance. Parameters for work hardening were further optimized to reduce damage to the surface substrates

  18. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part IV: A compilation of previous observations for valuation of simulation results from a columnar modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preceding Papers I, II and III a revised columnar high-order modelling approach to model gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed, and simulation results of two synthetic nucleation scenarios (binary vs. ternary on new particle formation (NPF in the anthropogenically influenced CBL were presented and discussed. The purpose of the present finishing Paper IV is twofold: Firstly, an attempt is made to compile previous observational findings on NPF bursts in the CBL, obtained from a number of field experiments. Secondly, the scenario simulations discussed in Paper III will be evaluated with respect to the role of CBL turbulence in NPF burst evolution. It was demonstrated, that completely different nucleation mechanisms can lead to the occurrence of NPF bursts in the surface layer, but the corresponding evolution patterns strongly differ with respect to the origin, amplitude and phase of the NPF burst as well as with respect to the time-height evolution of turbulent vertical fluxes and double correlation terms of physicochemical and aerosoldynamical variables. The large differences between the binary and ternary case scenario indicate, that ammonia (NH3 can not be considered as a time-independent tuning parameter in nucleation modelling. Its contribution to the evolution of the NPF burst pattern is much more complicated and reflects the influence of CBL turbulence as well as the strong non-linearity of the ternary nucleation rate. The impact of water (H2O vapour on the nucleation rate is quite varying depending on the considered nucleation mechanism. According to the classical theory of binary nucleation involving H2O and sulphuric acid (H2SO4, H2O vapour favours NPF, according to the classical theory of ternary nuncleation involving H2O, H2SO4 and NH3 and according to organic nucleation via chemical reactions involving stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs, H2O vapour disfavours nucleation, and

  19. The movement of small insects in the convective boundary layer: linking patterns to processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Charlotte E; Stepanian, Phillip M; Reynolds, Don R; Reynolds, Andy M

    2017-07-14

    In fine warm weather, the daytime convective atmosphere over land areas is full of small migrant insects, among them serious pests (e.g. some species of aphid), but also many beneficial species (e.g. natural enemies of pests). For many years intensive aerial trapping studies were the only way of determining the density profiles of these small insects, and for taxon-specific studies trapping is still necessary. However, if we wish to determine generic behavioural responses to air movements shown by small day-migrating insects as a whole, the combination of millimetre-wavelength 'cloud radars' and Doppler lidar now provides virtually ideal instrumentation. Here we examine the net vertical velocities of > 1 million insect targets, relative to the vertical motion of the air in which they are flying, as a succession of fair-weather convective cells pass over the recording site in Oklahoma, USA. The resulting velocity measurements are interpreted in terms of the flight behaviours of small insects. These behaviours are accounted for by a newly-developed Lagrangian stochastic model of weakly-flying insect movements in the convective boundary layer; a model which is consistent with classic characterisations of small insect aerial density profiles. We thereby link patterns to processes.

  20. In vitro porcine blood-brain barrier model for permeability studies: pCEL-X software pKa(FLUX) method for aqueous boundary layer correction and detailed data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Siti R; Avdeef, Alex; Abbott, N Joan

    2014-12-18

    In vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) models from primary brain endothelial cells can closely resemble the in vivo BBB, offering valuable models to assay BBB functions and to screen potential central nervous system drugs. We have recently developed an in vitro BBB model using primary porcine brain endothelial cells. The model shows expression of tight junction proteins and high transendothelial electrical resistance, evidence for a restrictive paracellular pathway. Validation studies using small drug-like compounds demonstrated functional uptake and efflux transporters, showing the suitability of the model to assay drug permeability. However, one limitation of in vitro model permeability measurement is the presence of the aqueous boundary layer (ABL) resulting from inefficient stirring during the permeability assay. The ABL can be a rate-limiting step in permeation, particularly for lipophilic compounds, causing underestimation of the permeability. If the ABL effect is ignored, the permeability measured in vitro will not reflect the permeability in vivo. To address the issue, we explored the combination of in vitro permeability measurement using our porcine model with the pKa(FLUX) method in pCEL-X software to correct for the ABL effect and allow a detailed analysis of in vitro (transendothelial) permeability data, Papp. Published Papp using porcine models generated by our group and other groups are also analyzed. From the Papp, intrinsic transcellular permeability (P0) is derived by simultaneous refinement using a weighted nonlinear regression, taking into account permeability through the ABL, paracellular permeability and filter restrictions on permeation. The in vitro P0 derived for 22 compounds (35 measurements) showed good correlation with P0 derived from in situ brain perfusion data (r(2)=0.61). The analysis also gave evidence for carrier-mediated uptake of naloxone, propranolol and vinblastine. The combination of the in vitro porcine model and the software

  1. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer: a system dynamics approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Ronda, R.J.; DeBruin, H.A.R.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) is often characterised by turbulence which is not continuous in space and time. This socalled intermittent turbulence may affect the whole depth of the SBL. In this study intermittent turbulence is studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. The

  2. Partitioning aerosol optical depth between the boundary layer and the free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Quentin; Ekman, Annica; Krejci, Radovan; Devasthale, Abhay; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    Aerosols are short-lived (about a week) compounds in the atmosphere due to the efficient removal by dry and wet deposition in the boundary layer (BL) where a majority of the emission sources are located. As a consequence, most of the aerosol mass should be found in the BL and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) integrated over the atmospheric column should be dominated by the BL contribution. As a consequence, BL aerosols would most likely have the largest climate effect. However, aerosols advected to the free troposphere (FT) have a much longer residence time (typically a few weeks) than those in the BL, potentially inducing a more long-term effect on climate. Light-absorbing aerosols may in addition have an enhanced absorption, and thereby climate warming effect, if they are located above low-level reflective clouds. Light-absorbing aerosols above clouds may also modify below cloud formation and transformation. In this study, the global AOD has been retrieved using satellite observations from CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) over a nine-year period (2007-2015) and partitioned between the BL and FT using BL heights obtained from the ERA-Interim re-analysis data. The results show that the vertical distribution of AOD does not follow the diurnal cycle of the BL but remains similar between day and night highlighting the role of a residual layer during night. The BL and FT contribute 71% and 29%, respectively, to the global AOD during daytime. The FT AOD contribution is larger in the tropics than at mid-latitudes which indicates that convective transport largely controls the vertical profile of aerosols, and the FT AOD contribution over oceans is governed by neighboring continents. According to the CALIOP aerosol classification, dust and smoke particles are the main aerosol types transported into the FT. Overall, the study shows that the fraction of AOD in the FT - and thus potentially located above low-level clouds - is substantial and should

  3. Aerosols in the Convective Boundary Layer: Radiation Effects on the Coupled Land-Atmosphere System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, E.; Vila-Guerau Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H. G.; Schroter, J.; Donovan, D. P.; Krol, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols using a combination of observations and numerical simulations. A detailed observational dataset containing (thermo)dynamic variables observed at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research) and aerosol information from the European Integrated Project on Aerosol, Cloud, Climate, and Air Quality Interactions (IMPACT/EUCAARI) campaign is employed to design numerical experiments reproducing two prototype clear-sky days characterized by: (i) a well-mixed residual layer above a ground inversion and (ii) a continuously growing CBL. A large-eddy simulation (LES) model and a mixed-layer (MXL) model, both coupled to a broadband radiative transfer code and a land-surface model, are used to study the impacts of aerosol scattering and absorption of shortwave radiation on the land-atmosphere system. We successfully validate our model results using the measurements of (thermo)dynamic variables and aerosol properties for the two different CBL prototypes studied here. Our findings indicate that in order to reproduce the observed surface energy budget and CBL dynamics, information of the vertical structure and temporal evolution of the aerosols is necessary. Given the good agreement between the LES and the MXL model results, we use the MXL model to explore the aerosol effect on the land-atmosphere system for a wide range of optical depths and single scattering albedos. Our results show that higher loads of aerosols decrease irradiance, imposing an energy restriction at the surface. Over the studied well-watered grassland, aerosols reduce the sensible heat flux more than the latent heat flux. As a result, aerosols increase the evaporative fraction. Moreover, aerosols also delay the CBL morning onset and anticipate its afternoon collapse. If also present above the CBL during the morning transition, aerosols maintain a persistent near

  4. Surface Temperature and Surface-Layer Turbulence in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garai, A.; Pardyjak, E.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous laboratory and atmospheric experiments have shown that turbulence influences the surface temperature in a convective boundary layer. The main objective of this study is to examine land-atmosphere coupled heat transport mechanism for different stability conditions. High frequency infrared

  5. Effects of Shock-Tube Cleanliness on Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition at High Enthalpy

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Parziale, Nicholaus J.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of a high-speed boundary-layer transition (BLT) location is critical to hypersonic vehicle design; this is because the increased skin friction and surface heating rate after transition result in increased weight of the thermal protection system. Experimental studies using hypervelocity wind tunnels are one component of BLT research.

  6. Turbulent exchange of energy, momentum, and reactive gases between high vegetation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with the representation of the exchange of energy, momentum and chemically reactive compounds between the land, covered by high vegetation, and the lowest part of the atmosphere, named as atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The study presented in this thesis introduces the roughness

  7. Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration of the colony-forming plankton algae, Phaeocystis sp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Stolte, W.; Epping, EHG

    1999-01-01

    Diffusive boundary layers, photosynthesis, and respiration in Phaeocystis colonies were studied by the use of microelectrodes for oxygen and pH during a bloom in the Barents Sea, 1993, and in the Marsdiep, Dutch North Sea, 1994. The oxygen microenvironment of a Phaeocystis colony with a mean...

  8. Interactions between dry-air entrainment, surface evaporation and convective boundary-layer development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Moene, A.F.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of dry-air entrainment on surface heat fluxes and the convective boundary-layer (CBL) properties is studied for vegetated land surfaces, using a mixed-layer CBL model coupled to the Penman¿Monteith equation under a wide range of conditions. In order to address the complex behaviour of

  9. Effects of turbulence and heterogeneous emissions on photochemically active species in the convective boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, M.C.; Molemaker, M.J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.

    2000-01-01

    Photochemistry is studied in a convective atmospheric boundary layer. The essential reactions that account for the ozone formation and depletion are included in the chemical mechanism which, as a consequence, contains a wide range of timescales. The turbulent reacting flow is modeled with a

  10. Single Column Modeling of Atmospheric Boundary Layers and the Complex Interactions with the Land Surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a summary is given of the basic approaches for the modeling and parameterization of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. The treated approaches are in current use in regional and global-scale models for the forecasting and study of weather, climate and air quality. Here we

  11. Impact of aerosol heat radiation absorption on the dynamics of an atmospheric boundary layer in equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbaro, E.W.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the influence of the shortwave radiation (SW) absorption by aerosols on the dynamics and heat budget of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This study is relevant for areas characterized by large concentrations of light-absorbing aerosol, which are

  12. Impacts of Aerosol Shortwave Radiation Absorption on the Dynamics of an Idealized Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Krol, M.C.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the impact of aerosol heat absorption on convective atmospheric boundary-layer (CBL) dynamics. Numerical experiments using a large-eddy simulation model enabled us to study the changes in the structure of a dry and shearless CBL in depthequilibrium for different vertical profiles of

  13. Variability of the oceanic boundary layer characteristics in the Northern Bay of Bengal during MONTBLEX-90

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Rao, D.P.

    Variability of the ocean surface boundary layer characteristics on daily time-scale is studied utilizing the 3-hourly hydrographic data collected at a stationary location (20 degrees N, 89 degrees E) in the Bay of Bengal during August (18th-31st...

  14. Dispersion of a passive tracer in buoyancy- and shear-driven boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosio, A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Builtjes, P.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various atmospheric turbulent flows, from pure convective to

  15. Effects of shear in the convective boundary layer: analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of convective and mechanical turbulence at the entrainment zone are studied through the use of systematic Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) experiments. Five LES experiments with different shear characteristics in the quasi-steady barotropic boundary layer were conducted by increasing the value of

  16. Coherent structures generated by a circular jet issuing into a cross laminar boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, L. E.; Bousgarbiès, J. L.; Foucault, E.

    1997-06-01

    Visualisations by LASER topographies and velocity measurements by LDV have allowed the study of the flow resulting from the interaction between a circular jet and a cross boundary layer. This type of flow is dominated by the presence of many complex vortices that come from the recombining of the vorticity created in the injection tube and that created along the chamber floor.

  17. Vertical structure of the boundary layer. a comparison between land and sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sadhuram, Y.

    The structure and the energetics of the boundary layer have been studied simultaneously over land and sea off Goa Coast just before the onset of south west monsoon. The Radiosonde data obtained at 00 GMT (0530 IST) are used in the present...

  18. Effects on the Benthic Diffusive Boundary-Layer Imposed by Microelectrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GLUD, RN; GUNDERSEN, JK; REVSBECH, NP

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen microgradients and fluxes were studied in a 0.3-0.6-mm-thick diffusive boundary layer (DBL) of aquatic sediments by the use of O2 microelectrodes with sensing tips of 5 mum. One microelectrode was introduced vertically from above while another was introduced along the same vertical axis fr...

  19. Numerical model simulations of boundary-layer dynamics during winter conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melas, D.; Persson, T.; Bruin, H. de

    2001-01-01

    A mesoscale numerical model, incorporating a land-surface scheme based on Deardorffs' approach, is used to study the diurnal variation of the boundary layer structure and surface fluxes during four consecutive days with air temperatures well below zero, snow covered ground and changing synoptic f...

  20. Evaluation of WRF Boundary Layer Profiles against Radiosoundings in Northern Greenland in winter conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirova, Hristina; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The boundary-layer processes in High Arctic area are studied based on consecutive radiosoundings and numerical simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model version 3.3.1 during a late winter period. The measurements consist of about 30 radiosondings performed every 12 hours...

  1. The Wind Profile in the Coastal Boundary Layer: Wind Lidar Measurements and Numerical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Vincent, Claire Louise; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally it has been difficult to verify mesoscale model wind predictions against observations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here we used measurements from a wind lidar to study the PBL up to 800 m above the surface at a flat coastal site in Denmark during a one month period in autu...

  2. Variability in boundary layer structure during HAPEX-Sahel wet-dry season transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wai, M.M.K.; Smith, E.A.; Bessemoulin, P.; Culf, A.D.; Dolman, A.J.; Lebel, T.

    1997-01-01

    The variability of the Sahelian boundary layer has been studied with streamline analyses, rainfall measurements, and upper air soundings during its transition from wet to dry season. The 1992 rainy season ended prematurely because of the early arrival of westerly troughs over West Africa. The change

  3. Design, construction and calibration of a portable boundary layer wind tunnel for field use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind tunnels have been used for several decades to study wind erosion processes. Portable wind tunnels offer the advantage of testing natural surfaces in the field, but they must be carefully designed to insure that a logarithmic boundary layer is formed and that wind erosion processes may develop ...

  4. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  5. Boundary Layer Fluid Flow in a Channel with Heat Source, Soret ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The boundary layer fluid flow in a channel with heat source, soret effects and slip condition was studied. The governing equations were solved using perturbation technique. The effects of different parameters such Prandtl number Pr , Hartmann number M, Schmidt number Sc, suction parameter ƒÜ , soret number Sr and the ...

  6. Characteristics of the Venus Boundary Layer, as modeled by the IPSL Venus GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebonnois, S.; Schubert, G.

    2017-09-01

    For the first time, a model of Venus's deep atmosphere allows to study the behavior of the convective boundary layer above the surface. This region is still largely unknown and modeling is an efficient way to understand its characteristics, and to prepare for future missions.

  7. Analysis and Modeling of Boundary Layer Separation Method (BLSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethő, Dóra; Horváth, Géza; Liszi, János; Tóth, Imre; Paor, Dávid

    2010-09-01

    Nowadays rules of environmental protection strictly regulate pollution material emission into environment. To keep the environmental protection laws recycling is one of the useful methods of waste material treatment. We have developed a new method for the treatment of industrial waste water and named it boundary layer separation method (BLSM). We apply the phenomena that ions can be enriched in the boundary layer of the electrically charged electrode surface compared to the bulk liquid phase. The main point of the method is that the boundary layer at correctly chosen movement velocity can be taken out of the waste water without being damaged, and the ion-enriched boundary layer can be recycled. Electrosorption is a surface phenomenon. It can be used with high efficiency in case of large electrochemically active surface of electrodes. During our research work two high surface area nickel electrodes have been prepared. The value of electrochemically active surface area of electrodes has been estimated. The existence of diffusion part of the double layer has been experimentally approved. The electrical double layer capacity has been determined. Ion transport by boundary layer separation has been introduced. Finally we have tried to estimate the relative significance of physical adsorption and electrosorption.

  8. Experimental investigation of a supercritical airfoil boundary layer in pitching motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masdari, Mehran; Tabrizian, Arshia [Faculty of New Science and Technology, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanmiri, Mohsen; Gorji, Mohamamd [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltani, Mohammad Reza [Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, the boundary layer velocity profile on the upper surface of a supercritical airfoil in a forced sinusoidal pitching motion was measured and experimentally investigated. Measurements were performed using a boundary layer rake, including total pressure tubes positioned at 25 % of the chord far from the leading edge on the upper surface. For static measurements, the effects of the angle of attack between −3° and 14° and free-stream velocity between 40 m/s and 70 m/s were investigated; for dynamic measurements, the effects of oscillation amplitude variation between ±3° and ±10°, reduced frequency from 0.007 to 0.0313, and mean angle of attack between −3° and 6° were studied during one oscillation cycle. Results indicated that the boundary layer thickness decreased in upstroke motion. Increasing the oscillation frequency led to the extension of hysteresis loops. Fast Fourier transform was used on pressure signals to study the amplitude of the dominant frequency in the velocity profile. Spectral analysis showed that the dominant forced frequency of oscillation in the boundary layer and the amplitude of this frequency were varied by increasing the reduced frequency and other parameters.

  9. Plasma-based actuators for turbulent boundary layer control in transonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budovsky, A. D.; Polivanov, P. A.; Vishnyakov, O. I.; Sidorenko, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    The study is devoted to development of methods for active control of flow structure typical for the aircraft wings in transonic flow with turbulent boundary layer. The control strategy accepted in the study was based on using of the effects of plasma discharges interaction with miniature geometrical obstacles of various shapes. The conceptions were studied computationally using 3D RANS, URANS approaches. The results of the computations have shown that energy deposition can significantly change the flow pattern over the obstacles increasing their influence on the flow in boundary layer region. Namely, one of the most interesting and promising data were obtained for actuators basing on combination of vertical wedge with asymmetrical plasma discharge. The wedge considered is aligned with the local streamlines and protruding in the flow by 0.4-0.8 of local boundary layer thickness. The actuator produces negligible distortion of the flow at the absence of energy deposition. Energy deposition along the one side of the wedge results in longitudinal vortex formation in the wake of the actuator providing momentum exchange in the boundary layer. The actuator was manufactured and tested in wind tunnel experiments at Mach number 1.5 using the model of flat plate. The experimental data obtained by PIV proved the availability of the actuator.

  10. Estimation of stable boundary-layer height using variance processing of backscatter lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Stable boundary layer (SBL) is one of the most complex and less understood topics in atmospheric science. The type and height of the SBL is an important parameter for several applications such as understanding the formation of haze fog, and accuracy of chemical and pollutant dispersion models, etc. [1]. This work addresses nocturnal Stable Boundary-Layer Height (SBLH) estimation by using variance processing and attenuated backscatter lidar measurements, its principles and limitations. It is shown that temporal and spatial variance profiles of the attenuated backscatter signal are related to the stratification of aerosols in the SBL. A minimum variance SBLH estimator using local minima in the variance profiles of backscatter lidar signals is introduced. The method is validated using data from HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany [2], under different atmospheric conditions. This work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, FP7 People, ITN Marie Curie Actions Programme (2012-2016) in the frame of ITaRS project (GA 289923), H2020 programme under ACTRIS-2 project (GA 654109), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness - European Regional Development Funds under TEC2015-63832-P project, and from the Generalitat de Catalunya (Grup de Recerca Consolidat) 2014-SGR-583. [1] R. B. Stull, An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology, chapter 12, Stable Boundary Layer, pp. 499-543, Springer, Netherlands, 1988. [2] U. Löhnert, J. H. Schween, C. Acquistapace, K. Ebell, M. Maahn, M. Barrera-Verdejo, A. Hirsikko, B. Bohn, A. Knaps, E. O'Connor, C. Simmer, A. Wahner, and S. Crewell, "JOYCE: Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution," Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., vol. 96, no. 7, pp. 1157-1174, 2015.

  11. Productivity of a coral reef using boundary layer and enclosure methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillis, W.R.; Langdon, C.; Loose, B.; Yates, K.K.; Corredor, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The metabolism of Cayo Enrique Reef, Puerto Rico, was studied using in situ methods during March 2009. Benthic O2 fluxes were used to calculate net community production using both the boundary layer gradient and enclosure techniques. The boundary layer O2 gradient and the drag coefficients were used to calculate productivity ranging from -12.3 to 13.7 mmol O2 m-2 h-1. Productivity measurements from the enclosure method ranged from -11.0 to 12.9 mmol O2 m-2 h-1. During the study, the mean hourly difference between the methods was 0.65 mmol O2 m-2 h-1 (r2 = 0.92), resulting in well-reconciled estimates of net community production between the boundary layer (-33.1 mmol m-2 d-1) and enclosure (-46.3 mmol m-2 d-1) techniques. The results of these independent approaches corroborate quantified rates of metabolism at Cayo Enrique Reef. Close agreement between methods demonstrates that boundary layer measurements can provide near real-time assessments of coral reef health.

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer inside an Axisymmetric Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junji; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step toward a study of acoustic disturbance field within a conventional, hypersonic wind tunnel, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer on the inner wall of a straight axisymmetric nozzle are conducted and the results are compared with those for a flat plate. The DNS results for a nozzle radius to boundary-layer thickness ratio of 5:5 show that the turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer are nearly unaffected by the transverse curvature of the nozzle wall. Before the acoustic waves emanating from different parts of the nozzle surface can interfere with each other and undergo reflections from adjacent portions of the nozzle surface, the rms pressure fluctuation beyond the boundary layer edge increases toward the nozzle axis, apparently due to a focusing effect inside the axisymmetric configuration. Spectral analysis of pressure fluctuations at both the wall and the freestream indicates a similar distribution of energy content for both the nozzle and the flat plate, with the peak of the premultiplied frequency spectrum at a frequency of [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 6.0 inside the free stream and at [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 2.0 along the wall. The present results provide the basis for follow-on simulations involving reverberation effects inside the nozzle.

  13. The origin and structure of streak-like instabilities in laminar boundary layer flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollner, Michael; Miller, Colin; Tang, Wei; Finney, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Streamwise streaks are consistently observed in wildland fires, at the base of pool fires, and in other heated flows within a boundary layer. This study examines both the origin of these structures and their role in influencing some of the macroscopic properties of the flow. Streaks were reproduced and characterized via experiments on stationary heated strips and liquid and gas-fueled burners in laminar boundary layer flows, providing a framework to develop theory based on both observed and measured physical phenomena. The incoming boundary layer was established as the controlling mechanism in forming streaks, which are generated by pre-existing coherent structures, while the amplification of streaks was determined to be compatible with quadratic growth of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities, providing credence to the idea that the downstream growth of streaks is strongly tied to buoyancy. These local instabilities were also found to affect macroscopic properties of the flow, including heat transfer to the surface, indicating that a two-dimensional assumption may fail to adequately describe heat and mass transfer during flame spread and other reacting boundary layer flows. This work was supported by NSF (CBET-1554026) and the USDA-FS (13-CS-11221637-124).

  14. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Liao, Qiang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of Bay-Breeze Circulations on Surface Air Quality and Boundary Layer Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughner, Christopher P.; Tzortziou, Maria; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Goldberg, Daniel; Satam, Chinmay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Crawford, James H.; Knapp, David J.; Montzka, Denise D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological and air-quality model simulations are analyzed alongside observations to investigate the role of the Chesapeake Bay breeze on surface air quality, pollutant transport, and boundary layer venting. A case study was conducted to understand why a particular day was the only one during an 11-day ship-based field campaign on which surface ozone was not elevated in concentration over the Chesapeake Bay relative to the closest upwind site and why high ozone concentrations were observed aloft by in situ aircraft observations. Results show that southerly winds during the overnight and early-morning hours prevented the advection of air pollutants from the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, metropolitan areas over the surface waters of the bay. A strong and prolonged bay breeze developed during the late morning and early afternoon along the western coastline of the bay. The strength and duration of the bay breeze allowed pollutants to converge, resulting in high concentrations locally near the bay-breeze front within the Baltimore metropolitan area, where they were then lofted to the top of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Near the top of the PBL, these pollutants were horizontally advected to a region with lower PBL heights, resulting in pollution transport out of the boundary layer and into the free troposphere. This elevated layer of air pollution aloft was transported downwind into New England by early the following morning where it likely mixed down to the surface, affecting air quality as the boundary layer grew.

  16. Boundary layer effects on particle impaction and capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inertial impaction and deposition of small particles on larger bodies with viscous boundary layers are considered theoretically, in a detailed comment on a paper by Menguturk et al. (1983). Topics addressed include cushion effects, the dimensionless groups corresponding to the diameter range (3-6 microns) examined by Menguturk et al. in a numerical example, analogous effects of particle-gas energy and mass exchange in boundary layers, and the combined effects of particle inertia and diffusion. It is argued that the inertial effects can be characterized in terms of a body, boundary-layer, or sublayer Stokes number. In a reply by Menguturk et al., the focus is on the application of the theoretical model to the erosion of blade surfaces in large gas turbines; the Stokes number is found to be of limited practical value in these cases, because the particle motion is not primarily normal to the blade surfaces.

  17. Definition of Turbulent Boundary-Layer with Entropy Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Rui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the entropy increment and the viscosity dissipation in turbulent boundary-layer is systematically investigated. Through theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulation (DNS, an entropy function fs is proposed to distinguish the turbulent boundary-layer from the external flow. This approach is proved to be reliable after comparing its performance in the following complex flows, namely, low-speed airfoil flows with different wall temperature, supersonic cavity-ramp flow dominated by the combination of free-shear layer, larger recirculation and shocks, and the hypersonic flow past an aeroplane configuration. Moreover, fs is deduced from the point of energy, independent of any particular turbulent quantities. That is, this entropy concept could be utilized by other engineering applications related with turbulent boundary-layer, such as turbulence modelling transition prediction and engineering thermal protection.

  18. Vortex Generator Induced Flow in a High Re Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Braud, C.; Coudert, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry measurements have been conducted in cross-planes behind three different geometries of Vortex Generators (VGs) in a high Reynolds number boundary layer. The VGs have been mounted in a cascade producing counter-rotating vortices and the downstream flow...... development was examined. Three VG geometries were investigated: rectangular, triangular and cambered. The various VG geometries tested are seen to produce different impacts on the boundary layer flow. Helical symmetry of the generated vortices is confirmed for all investigated VG geometries in this high...... Reynolds number boundary layer. From the parameters resulting from this analysis, it is observed at the most upstream measurement position that the rectangular and triangular VGs produce vortices of similar size, strength and velocity induction whilst the cambered VGs produce smaller and weaker vortices...

  19. Boundary-layer temperatures in high accretion rate cataclysmic variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoare, M.G.; Drew, J.E. (Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics)

    1991-04-01

    We use the Zanstra method to derive limits on boundary-layer temperatures in eclipsing dwarf novae during outburst and nova-like variables, using the observed He II {lambda}1640 and {lambda}4686 recombination lines. It is assumed that all the emission is produced in the wind rather than the accretion disc. This method constrains the boundary-layer temperatures to between 50 000 and 100 000 K depending on the degree of wind bipolarity. These estimates are lower than the T>or approx200 000 K predicted theoretically. Possible explanations include rapid rotation of the white dwarf and spreading of the boundary layer over the entire white-dwarf surface. (author).

  20. Entropy Generation in Steady Laminar Boundary Layers with Pressure Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. McEligot

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier paper in Entropy [1] we hypothesized that the entropy generation rate is the driving force for boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow. Subsequently, with our colleagues we have examined the prediction of entropy generation during such transitions [2,3]. We found that reasonable predictions for engineering purposes could be obtained for flows with negligible streamwise pressure gradients by adapting the linear combination model of Emmons [4]. A question then arises—will the Emmons approach be useful for boundary layer transition with significant streamwise pressure gradients as by Nolan and Zaki [5]. In our implementation the intermittency is calculated by comparison to skin friction correlations for laminar and turbulent boundary layers and is then applied with comparable correlations for the energy dissipation coefficient (i.e., non-dimensional integral entropy generation rate. In the case of negligible pressure gradients the Blasius theory provides the necessary laminar correlations.

  1. Laminar boundary layers with uniform shear cross flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Laminar boundary layers with fully developed uniform shear cross flows are considered. The first streamwise laminar flow is a Blasius boundary layer flow, the second is uniform shear flow over a semi-infinite plate, and the third is the flow induced by a power-law stretching surface. In the first two cases, the effect of streamwise plate motion is taken into account by the parameter λ. In each case, the similarity solutions reduce the governing boundary layer equations to a primary ordinary differential equation for the streamwise flow and a secondary linear equation coupled to the primary solution for the cross flow. It is found that an infinity of solutions exist in each problem and the unique solution in each case is found by applying the Glauert criterion. In some instances, a simple exact solution for the cross flow is presented. Results for the wall shear stresses and velocity profiles are given in graphical form.

  2. Integral analysis of boundary layer flows with pressure gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Maciel, Yvan; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-09-01

    This Rapid Communication investigates boundary layer flows with a pressure gradient using a similarity/integral analysis of the continuity equation and momentum equation in the streamwise direction. The analysis yields useful analytical relations for Ve, the mean wall-normal velocity at the edge of the boundary layer, and for the skin friction coefficient Cf in terms of the boundary layer parameters and in particular βRC, the Rotta-Clauser pressure gradient parameter. The analytical results are compared with experimental and numerical data and are found to be valid. One of the main findings is that for large positive βRC (an important effect of an adverse pressure gradient), the friction coefficient is closely related to βRC as Cf∝1 /βRC , because δ /δ1,δ1/δ2=H , and d δ /d x become approximately constant. Here, δ is the boundary layer thickness, δ1 is the displacement thickness, δ2 is the momentum thickness, and H is the shape factor. Another finding is that the mean wall-normal velocity at the edge of the boundary layer is related to other flow variables as UeVe/uτ2=H +(1 +δ /δ1+H ) βRC , where Ue is the streamwise velocity at the edge of the boundary layer. At zero pressure gradient, this relation reduces to U∞V∞/uτ2=H , as recently derived by Wei and Klewicki [Phys. Rev. Fluids 1, 082401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.1.082401].

  3. Marine boundary-layer height estimated from the HIRLAM model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, E.

    2002-01-01

    -number estimates based on output from the operational numerical weather prediction model HIRLAM (a version of SMHI with a grid resolution of 22.5 km x 22.5 km). For southwesterly winds it was found that a relatively large island (Bornholm) lying 20 km upwind of the measuring site influences the boundary...... to the measuring site is about 100 km and the Richardson methods reproduce the height of the marine boundary layer. This suggests that the HIRLAM model adequately resolves a water fetch of 100 km with respect to predictions of the height of the marine boundary layer....

  4. Oscillations of the Boundary Layer and High-frequency QPOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed persistent high-frequency oscillations of the boundary layer near an accreting, weakly-magnetized star in global 3D MHD simulations. The tilted dipole magnetic field is not strong enough to open a gap between the star and the disk. Instead, it forms a highly-wrapped azimuthal field near the surface of the star which slows down rotation of the disk matter, while a small tilt of the field excites oscillations of the boundary layer with a frequency below the Keplerian frequency. This mechanism may be responsible for the high-frequency oscillations in accreting neutron stars, white dwarfs and classical T Tauri stars.

  5. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, P [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Turner, DD [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Chilson, P [University of Oklahoma; Blumberg, WG [University of Oklahoma; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M [University of Oklahoma - School of Meteorology; Jacobsen, EP [University of Oklahoma; Wharton, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  6. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers with constant skin friction

    KAUST Repository

    Sridhar, A.

    2017-03-28

    A semi-empirical model is presented that describes the development of a fully developed turbulent boundary layer in the presence of surface roughness with length scale ks that varies with streamwise distance x . Interest is centred on flows for which all terms of the von Kármán integral relation, including the ratio of outer velocity to friction velocity U+∞≡U∞/uτ , are streamwise constant. For Rex assumed large, use is made of a simple log-wake model of the local turbulent mean-velocity profile that contains a standard mean-velocity correction for the asymptotic fully rough regime and with assumed constant parameter values. It is then shown that, for a general power-law external velocity variation U∞∼xm , all measures of the boundary-layer thickness must be proportional to x and that the surface sand-grain roughness scale variation must be the linear form ks(x)=αx , where x is the distance from the boundary layer of zero thickness and α is a dimensionless constant. This is shown to give a two-parameter (m,α) family of solutions, for which U+∞ (or equivalently Cf ) and boundary-layer thicknesses can be simply calculated. These correspond to perfectly self-similar boundary-layer growth in the streamwise direction with similarity variable z/(αx) , where z is the wall-normal coordinate. Results from this model over a range of α are discussed for several cases, including the zero-pressure-gradient ( m=0 ) and sink-flow ( m=−1 ) boundary layers. Trends observed in the model are supported by wall-modelled large-eddy simulation of the zero-pressure-gradient case for Rex in the range 108−1010 and for four values of α . Linear streamwise growth of the displacement, momentum and nominal boundary-layer thicknesses is confirmed, while, for each α , the mean-velocity profiles and streamwise turbulent variances are found to collapse reasonably well onto z/(αx) . For given α , calculations of U+∞ obtained from large-eddy simulations are streamwise

  7. Vertical pressure gradient and particle motions in wave boundary layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Lindegård

    and its role in the fully turbulent boundary layer. The pressure in the flow is obtained from the flow fields of the oscillatory boundary layer. What differs, the vertical pressure gradient, from other turbulent quantities, like e.g. velocity fluctuations is that it can detect newly generated turbulence....... The experiment is conducted in a oscillating water tunnel, for both smooth bed and rough bed. The particle motion is determined by utilizing particle tracking base on a video recording of the particle motion in the flow. In the oscillatory flow, in contrast to steady current, the particle motion is a function...

  8. An interactive boundary layer modelling methodology for aerodynamic flows

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available is used. The artificial compressibility formulation allows for a finite value of c2 to be used for incompressible flows, calculated as per Malan et al. (2002). 3.2. Boundary layer solution 7 To ensure numerical stability, the Crank... � Similarity coordinate � Momentum thickness m � * Kinetic energy thickness � Dynamic viscosity kg.m-1.s-1 � Density kg.m-3 � Shear stress N.m-2 Kinematic viscosity m2.s-1 Coordinate parallel to the boundary layer m...

  9. Investigation of turbulent boundary layer structures using Tomographic PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Longmire, Ellen; Wieneke, Bernd

    2008-11-01

    Tomographic particle image velocimetry (TPIV) data were acquired in the logarithmic region of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer flow at friction Reynolds number Reτ = 1160. Experiments were conducted in a suction type wind tunnel seeded with olive oil particles of diameter ˜ 1μm. The volume of interest was illuminated by two Nd:YAG laser beams expanded with appropriate optics into sheets of 8mm thickness in the wall-normal direction (z). Images were acquired by four 2k x 2k pixel cameras, and correlation of reconstructed fields provided the full velocity gradient tensor in a volume of 0.7δ x 0.7δ x 0.07δ, which resolved the region z^+ = 70-150 in the log layer. Various vortex identification techniques, such as Galilean decomposition and iso-surfaces of two- and three-dimensional swirl, were utilized to visualize and analyze the eddy structures present in instantaneous fields. The results of the present study will be compared to results from earlier experimental studies that relied on planar PIV data only to identify vortices and vortex packets as well as from a direct numerical simulation of fully developed channel flow at comparable Reτ.

  10. Meteodrones - Meteorological Planetary Boundary Layer Measurements by Vertical Drone Soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jonas; Fengler, Martin

    2017-04-01

    As of today, there is a gap in the operational data collection of meteorological observations in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). This lack of spatially and temporally reliable knowledge of PBL conditions and energy fluxes with the surface causes shortcomings in the prediction of micro- and mesoscale phenomena such as convection, temperature inversions, local wind systems or fog. The currently used remote sensing instruments share the drawback of only partially covering necessary variables. To fill this data gap, since 2012, Meteomatics has been developing a drone measurement system, the Meteodrone, to measure the parameters wind speed, wind direction, dewpoint, temperature and air pressure of the PBL up to 1.5 km above ground. Both the data quality and the assimilation into a regional numerical weather model could be determined in several pilot studies. Besides, a project in cooperation with the NSSL (National Severe Storms Laboratory) was launched in October 2016 with the goal of capturing pre-convective conditions for improved severe storm forecasts in Oklahoma. Also, related measurements, such as air pollution measurements in the Misox valley to determine LDSP values, were successfully conducted. The main goal of the project is the operational data collection of PBL measurements and the assimilation of this data into regional numerical weather forecast models. Considering the high data quality indicated in all conducted studies as well as the trouble-free execution, this goal is both worthwhile and realistic.

  11. Investigation of Materials for Boundary Layer Control in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braafladt, Alexander; Lucero, John M.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    During operation of the NASA Glenn Research Center 15- by 15-Centimeter Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT), a significant, undesirable corner flow separation is created by the three-dimensional interaction of the wall and floor boundary layers in the tunnel corners following an oblique-shock/ boundary-layer interaction. A method to minimize this effect was conceived by connecting the wall and floor boundary layers with a radius of curvature in the corners. The results and observations of a trade study to determine the effectiveness of candidate materials for creating the radius of curvature in the SWT are presented. The experiments in the study focus on the formation of corner fillets of four different radii of curvature, 6.35 mm (0.25 in.), 9.525 mm (0.375 in.), 12.7 mm (0.5 in.), and 15.875 mm (0.625 in.), based on the observed boundary layer thickness of 11.43 mm (0.45 in.). Tests were performed on ten candidate materials to determine shrinkage, surface roughness, cure time, ease of application and removal, adhesion, eccentricity, formability, and repeatability. Of the ten materials, the four materials which exhibited characteristics most promising for effective use were the heavy body and regular type dental impression materials, the basic sculpting epoxy, and the polyurethane sealant. Of these, the particular material which was most effective, the heavy body dental impression material, was tested in the SWT in Mach 2 flow, and was observed to satisfy all requirements for use in creating the corner fillets in the upcoming experiments on shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction.

  12. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF, whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4 vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3. Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated

  13. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer - first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmuth, O.

    2006-09-01

    In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL) was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs) and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF), whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT) is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3). Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated, that

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Forced Mixing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer in an Annular Diffuser. Ph.D. Thesis - Ohio State Univ.; [for boundary layer control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The forced mixing process of a turbulent boundary layer in an axisymmetric annular diffuser using conventional wing-like vortex generators was studied. Flow field measurements were made at four axial locations downstream of the vortex generators. At each axial location, a total of 25 equally spaced profiles were measured behind three consecutive vortex generators which formed two pairs of vortex generators. Hot film anemometry probes measured the boundary layer turbulence structure at the same locations where pressure measurements were made. Both single and cross film probes were used. The diffuser turbulence data was teken only for a nominal inlet Mach number of 0.3. Three vortex generator configurations were tested. The differences between configurations involved changes in size and relative vortex generator positions. All three vortex generator configurations tested provided increases in diffuser performance. Distinct differences in the boundary layer integral properties and skin friction levels were noted between configurations. The axial turbulence intensity and Reynolds stress profiles measured displayed similarities in trends but differences in levels for the three configurations.

  15. Interaction of Atmospheric Turbulence with Blade Boundary Layer Dynamics on a 5MW Wind Turbine using Blade-Boundary-Layer-Resolved CFD with hybrid URANS-LES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, Ganesh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Brasseur, James [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lavely, Adam; Jayaraman, Balaji; Craven, Brent

    2016-01-04

    We describe the response of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine blade boundary layer to the passage of atmospheric turbulence using blade-boundary-layer-resolved computational fluid dynamics with hybrid URANS-LES modeling.

  16. Investigation of Boundary Layer Structure by Dual-Plane PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, E. K.; Ganapathisubramani, B.; Marusic, I.

    2004-11-01

    Dual-plane PIV was employed in a turbulent boundary layer at Re_τ ˜ 1100 to study the nature of the vortical structures there. Laser sheets separated by 1 mm were aligned in streamwise-spanwise (x,y) planes, and the scattered light was captured by three cameras: two in a stereo configuration and one in a normal configuration. All velocity gradient components were determined for fields in the log (z^+ = 125) and outer (z/δ = 0.5) regions. Three-dimensional swirl strength was used to isolate vortex cores, and the vorticity direction of individual swirl centers was determined. Instantaneous fields in the log region reveal signatures of hairpin vortex packets consistent with previous results. The packets contain evidence of smaller hairpin heads embedded within the long low-speed regions surrounded by larger hairpins. The data set at z^+ = 125 yielded a most probable hairpin inclination angle of 32^rc and an average inclination angle of 57^rc. In the presentation, these results will be contrasted with those at z/δ = 0.5.

  17. Coherence of simulated atmospheric boundary-layer turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiadong, Zeng; Zhiguo, Li; Mingshui, Li

    2017-12-01

    The coherences in a plane perpendicular to incoming flow are measured in wind tunnel simulations of atmospheric turbulent flow. The measured coherences are compared with analytical expressions tailored to field measurements and with theoretical coherence models which assume homogeneous turbulence and the von Kármán’s spectrum. The comparison indicates that the simulated atmospheric boundary layer flow is approximately horizontally homogeneous turbulence. Based on the above assumption and the systematic analysis of lateral coherence, it can be concluded that the lateral coherences of simulated atmospheric boundary turbulence can be determined accurately using the von Kármán spectrum and the turbulence parameters measured by a few measurement points. The measured results also show that the spatial characteristics of vertical coherences are closely related to the dimensionless parameter {{Δ }}z/({\\bar{z}}0.3{L}ux 0.7). The vertical coherence at two heights can be roughly estimated by the ratio to {{Δ }}z/({\\bar{z}}0.3{L}ux 0.7). The relationship between the phase angles of u-, v- and w-components and the vertical separation distance and the height from the ground is further analyzed. Finally, the roles of the type of land surface roughness, the height from the ground, the turbulence intensity and the integral length scale in lateral and vertical coherences are also discussed in this study.

  18. Full-Scale Spectrum of Boundary-Layer Winds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Extensive mean meteorological data and high frequency sonic anemometer data from two sites in Denmark, one coastal onshore and one offshore, have been used to study the full-scale spectrum of boundary-layer winds, over frequencies f from about 1 yr−1 to10 Hz. 10-min cup anemometer data are used...... to estimate the spectrum from about 1 yr−1 to 0.05 min−1; in addition, using 20-Hz sonic anemometer data, an ensemble of 1-day spectra covering the range 1 day−1 to 10 Hz has been calculated. The overlapping region in these two measured spectra is in good agreement. Classical topics regarding the various...... spectral ranges,including the spectral gap, are revisited. Following the seasonal peak at 1 yr−1, the frequency spectrum f S( f ) increases with f +1 and gradually reaches a peak at about 0.2 day−1. From this peak to about 1 hr−1, the spectrum f S( f ) decreases with frequency with a −2 slope...

  19. Computational modeling of unsteady loads in tidal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Spencer R.

    As ocean current turbines move from the design stage into production and installation, a better understanding of oceanic turbulent flows and localized loading is required to more accurately predict turbine performance and durability. In the present study, large eddy simulations (LES) are used to measure the unsteady loads and bending moments that would be experienced by an ocean current turbine placed in a tidal channel. The LES model captures currents due to winds, waves, thermal convection, and tides, thereby providing a high degree of physical realism. Probability density functions, means, and variances of unsteady loads are calculated, and further statistical measures of the turbulent environment are also examined, including vertical profiles of Reynolds stresses, two-point correlations, and velocity structure functions. The simulations show that waves and tidal velocity had the largest impact on the strength of off-axis turbine loads. By contrast, boundary layer stability and wind speeds were shown to have minimal impact on the strength of off- axis turbine loads. It is shown both analytically and using simulation results that either transverse velocity structure functions or two-point transverse velocity spatial correlations are good predictors of unsteady loading in tidal channels.

  20. Geostrophic convective turbulence: The effect of boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilla-Mónico, Rodolfo; Kunnen, Rudie P J; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents results of the first direct numerical simulations of rotating Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection in the so-called geostrophic regime, (hence very small Ekman numbers $\\mathcal{O}(10^{-7})$ and high Rayleigh numbers~$Ra=10^{10}$ and~$5\\cdot 10^{10}$), employing the \\emph{full} Navier--Stokes equations. In the geostrophic regime the criteria of very strong rotation and large supercriticality are met simultaneously, which is true for many geophysical and astrophysical flows. Until now, numerical approaches of this regime have been based on \\emph{reduced} versions of the Navier--Stokes equations (cf. Sprague \\emph{et al.} J. Fluid Mech., \\textbf{551}, 141 (2006)), omitting the effect of the viscous (Ekman) boundary layers. By using different velocity boundary conditions at the plates, we study the effect of these Ekman layers. We find that the formation of large-scale structures (Rubio \\emph{et al.} (Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{112} (2014)), which indicates the presence of an inverse energy cascade, ...

  1. Transient Growth Analysis of Compressible Boundary Layers with Parabolized Stability Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of parabolized linear stability equations (PSE) is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in boundary layer flows. This methodology includes the non-parallel effects associated with the spatial development of boundary layer flows. As noted in literature, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating stream-wise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of stream-wise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The parameter space for optimal growth is extended to the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high enthalpy effects, and the effect of wall cooling is studied with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the span-wise wavenumber that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous-inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and also for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. These differences in the base flow lead to an increasing reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on self-similar mean-flow approximation. Finally, the maximum optimal energy gain for the favorable pressure gradient boundary layer near a planar stagnation point is found to be substantially weaker than that in a zero pressure gradient Blasius boundary layer.

  2. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  3. LAMINAR STABILITY ANALYSIS IN BOUNDARY LAYER FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela CALUDESCU

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a numerical study concerning the flow control by suction and injection. The case study is over a symmetrical airfoil with suction and injection slots. The angle of attack is 3 degree with the Mach number 0.12.

  4. Understanding and prediction of stable atmospheric boundary layers over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to contribute to further understanding of the stable boundary layer (SBL) over land, and its representation in atmospheric models. A SBL develops during night due to radiative surface cooling. Observations in the SBL are difficult since many different physical

  5. On the marine atmospheric boundary layer characteristics over Bay ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed measurements were carried out in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB) which covered both Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal during March to May 2006. In this paper, we present the meteorological observations made ...

  6. Sun–Earth connection: Boundary layer waves and auroras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G S Lakhina et al. Figure 1. Schematics of the Earth's magnetosphere with various boundary layers. The plasma mantle, the exterior cusp, the entry layer, the .... The univer- sal time (UT), radial distance from the center of the earth (R ), magnetic latitude (λЕ), magnetic local time (MLT), and approximate L-shell value, are ...

  7. Boundary Layer Flows in Porous Media with Lateral Mass Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nemati, H; H, Bararnia; Noori, F

    2015-01-01

    Solutions for free convection boundary layers on a heated vertical plate with lateral mass flux embedded in a saturated porous medium are presented using the Homotopy Analysis Method and Shooting Numerical Method. Homotopy Analysis Method yields an analytic solution in the form of a rapidly...

  8. Influences of the boundary layer evolution on surface ozone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 4. Influences of the boundary layer evolution on surface ozone variations at a tropical rural site in India. K K Reddy M Naja N Ojha P Mahesh S Lal. Volume 121 Issue 4 August 2012 pp 911-922 ...

  9. Body surface adaptations to boundary-layer dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    Evolutionary processes have adapted nektonic animals to interact efficiently with the water that surrounds them. Not all these adaptations serve the same purpose. This paper concentrates on reduction of drag due to friction in the boundary layer close to the body surface. Mucus, compliant skins,

  10. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cylinder in Axial Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-29

    wall- norma 6caling or Rao’s wall-normal scaling. Other measurements of the mean velocity in a cylindrical boundary layer should be mentioned for...located near the wall at three azimuthal locations that w𔃽re 900 apa ,-t and at several streamwise spacings for flow conditions resulting in 8/a=8

  11. Workshop on Coherent Structure of Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    trying to investigate what you can visually determine within the boundary layer. In regard to the first of your questions, I am familiae with your work at...experiment like a nuclear physicist would do or you can do it in a more general fluid mechanical way. I just think I’ll leave it at that, interacting spots

  12. Response of neutral boundary-layers to changes of roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Mortensen, Niels Gylling

    1990-01-01

    When air blows across a change in surface roughness, an internal boundary layer (IBL) develops within which the wind adapts to the new surface. This process is well described for short fetches, > 1 km. However, few data exist for large fetches on how the IBL grows to become a new equilibrium boun...

  13. Thermal Internal Boundary Layer characteristics at a tropical coastal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Prabha1 R Venkatesan2 Erich Mursch-Radlgruber3 G Rengarajan3 N Jayanthi4. Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, GA, USA. Health and Safety Division, SHINE Group, IGCAR, Kalpakkam, India 603 102. Boundary Layer Meteorology Division, Institut fuer Meteorologie und Physik (IMP-BOKU), Wien, Austria.

  14. Flow visualization of swept wing boundary layer transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpieri, J.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work the flow visualization of the transition pattern occurring on a swept wing in a subsonic flow is presented. This is done by means of fluorescent oil flow technique and boundary layer hot-wire scans. The experiment was performed at Reynolds number of 2:15 . 106 and at angle of attack of

  15. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  16. Effects of mussel filtering activity on boundary layer structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.; Sandee, A.J.J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the benthic boundary layer over a bed of mussels (Mytilus edulis) was investigated in a large racetrack flume. Flow was observed to be modified both by the physical roughness of the mussel bed and by the momentum input of the exhalent jets of the mussels. Particularly when the

  17. Radio wave propagation in the marine boundary layer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kukushkin, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    ... boundary layer. Two basic mathematical methods have been used, depending on the ease of obtaining a closed analytical solution: 1. 2. Expansion of the quantum-mechanical amplitude of the transition into a complete and orthogonal set of eigen functions of the continuous spectrum. The Feynman path integral. It is not intended to provide a full ste...

  18. The use of a wave boundary layer model in SWAN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Bolaños, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo

    2017-01-01

    A Wave Boundary Layer Model (WBLM) is implemented in the third-generation ocean wave model SWAN to improve the wind-input source function under idealized, fetch-limited condition. Accordingly, the white capping dissipation parameters are re-calibrated to fit the new wind-input source function...

  19. The role of boundary layer momentum advection in the mean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple three-way balance between the pressure gradients, Coriolis force and effective Rayleigh friction has been classically used to diagnose the location of maximum boundary layer convergence in the near equatorial ITCZ. If such a balance can capture the dynamics of off-equatorial convergence was not known.

  20. Influence of micrometeorological features on coastal boundary layer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Characteristics of aerosols in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) obtained from a bistatic CW lidar at Trivandrum for the last one decade are used to investigate the role of ABL micro- meteorological processes in controlling the altitude distribution and size spectrum. The altitude structure of number density shows three ...

  1. Characterization of the atmospheric boundary layer from radiosonde ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, a comparison of two methods for the calculation of the height of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), using balloon-borne GPS radiosonde data is presented. ABL has been characterized using vertical profiles of meteorological parameter. The gradient of virtual potential temperature (v) profile for the ...

  2. On the modeling of electrical boundary layer (electrode layer) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 1. On the modeling of electrical boundary layer (electrode layer) and derivation of atmospheric electrical profiles, eddy diffusion coeffcient and scales of electrode layer. Madhuri N Kulkarni. Volume 119 Issue 1 February 2010 pp 75-86 ...

  3. Analysis of differential infrared thermography for boundary layer transition detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, A. D.; Eder, C.; Wolf, C. C.; Raffel, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the differential infrared thermography (DIT) technique, a contactless method of measuring the unsteady movement of the boundary layer transition position on an unprepared surface. DIT has been shown to measure boundary layer transition positions which correlate well with those from other measurement methods. In this paper unsteady aerodynamics from a 2D URANS solution are used and the resulting wall temperatures computed. It is shown that the peak of the temperature difference signal correlates well with the boundary layer transition position, but that the start and end of boundary layer transition cannot be extracted. A small systematic time-lag cannot be reduced by using different surface materials, but the signal strength can be improved by reducing the heat capacity and heat transfer of the surface layer, for example by using a thin plastic coating. Reducing the image time separation used to produce the difference images reduces the time-lag and also the signal level, thus the optimum is when the signal to noise ratio is at the minimum which can be evaluated.

  4. Temperature boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Emran, Mohammad S.; Horn, Susanne; Shishkina, Olga

    2017-11-01

    Classical boundary-layer theory for steady flows cannot adequately describe the boundary layer profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection. We have developed a thermal boundary layer equation which takes into account fluctuations in terms of an eddy thermal diffusivity. Based on Prandtl's mixing length ideas, we relate the eddy thermal diffusivity to the stream function. With this proposed relation, we can solve the thermal boundary layer equation and obtain a closed-form expression for the dimensionless mean temperature profile in terms of two independent parameters: θ(ξ) =1/b∫0b ξ [ 1 +3a3/b3(η - arctan(η)) ] - c dη , where ξ is the similarity variable and the parameters a, b, and c are related by the condition θ(∞) = 1 . With a proper choice of the parameters, our predictions of the temperature profile are in excellent agreement with the results of our direct numerical simulations for a wide range of Prandtl numbers (Pr), from Pr=0.01 to Pr=2547.9. OS, ME and SH acknowledge the financial support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grants Sh405/4-2 (Heisenberg fellowship), Sh405/3-2 and Ho 5890/1-1, respectively.

  5. Mechanisms of boundary layer transition induced by isolated roughnes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Q.

    2017-01-01

    Boundary layer transition is a relevant phenomenon in many aerodynamic and aero-thermodynamic problems and has been extensively investigated from the past century till recent times. Among the factors affecting the transition process, surface roughness plays a key role. When a roughness element with

  6. Observations of regional and local variability in the optical properties of maritime clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B. [Univ. of Colorado at Boulder/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    White and Fairall (1995) calculated the optical properties of the marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds observed during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) and compared their results with the results obtained by Fairall et al. for the MBL clouds observed during the First International Satellite Climatology Program (ISSCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE). They found a factor of two difference in the optical depth versus liquid water relationship that applies to the clouds observed in each case. In the present study, we present evidence to support this difference. We also investigate the local variability exhibited in the ASTEX optical properties using measurements of the boundary layer aerosol concentration.

  7. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  8. Chemistry in a dry cloud: the effects of radiation and turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vil...-Guerau, de J.; Cuijpers, J.W.M.

    2000-01-01

    The combined effect of ultraviolet radiation and turbulent mixing on chemistry in a cloud-topped boundary layer is investigated. The authors study a flow driven by longwave radiative cooling at cloud top. They consider a chemical cycle that is composed of a first-order reaction whose

  9. Preface: GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-layer Study (GABLS) on Stable Boundary Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is a program initiated by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to observe, understand and model the hydrological cycle and the related energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at the land surface and in the upper oceans. Consequently the

  10. One Year of Doppler Lidar Observations Characterizing Boundary Layer Wind, Turbulence, and Aerosol Structure During the Indianapolis Flux Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, R. M.; Brewer, A.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Salmon, O. E.; Heimburger, A. M. F.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; McGowan, L. E.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Sarmiento, D. P.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Podolske, J. R.; Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Song, Y.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.; Possolo, A.; Prasad, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) is aimed at improving methods for estimation of greenhouse gas emissions at urban scales. INFLUX observational components include several-times-per-month aircraft measurements of gas concentrations and meteorological parameters, as well as a number of towers observing CO2, CH4, and CO and a single continuously operating Doppler lidar to estimate wind, turbulence and aerosol structure in the boundary layer. The observations are used to develop top-down emissions estimates from the aircraft measurements and as input to inversion models. The Doppler lidar provides information on boundary layer structure for both the aircraft and inversion studies. A commercial Doppler lidar characterized by low pulse energy and high pulse repetition rate has operated for well over a year at a site NE of downtown Indianapolis. The lidar produces profiles of horizontal wind speed, vertical velocity variance, and aerosol structure two to three times per hour. These data are then used to investigate boundary layer mixing and thickness and horizontal transport as inputs for the flux calculations. During its one year deployment the lidar generally operated reliably with few outages. Comparisons with aircraft spirals over the site and with the NOAA High Resolution research Doppler lidar deployed to Indianapolis for one month during May, 2014, were used to assess the performance of the INFLUX lidar. Measurements agreed quite well when aerosol loading was sufficient for lidar observations throughout the boundary layer. However, low aerosol loading during some periods limited the range of the lidar and precluded characterization of the full boundary layer. We present an overall assessment of the commercial Doppler lidar for providing the needed information on boundary layer structure for emission estimations, and show variability of the boundary layer observations over diurnal, seasonal, and annual cycles. Recommendations on system design changes to

  11. The open-ocean sensible heat flux and its significance for Arctic boundary layer mixing during early fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ganeshan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multi-year Japanese cruise-ship observations from R/V Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean–atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime, yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure followed by the highly stable (stratus regime. Overall, it can explain  ∼  10 % of the open-ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the R/V Mirai for

  12. The Open-Ocean Sensible Heat Flux and Its Significance for Arctic Boundary Layer Mixing During Early Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshan, Manisha; Wu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    The increasing ice-free area during late summer has transformed the Arctic to a climate system with more dynamic boundary layer (BL) clouds and seasonal sea ice growth. The open-ocean sensible heat flux, a crucial mechanism of excessive ocean heat loss to the atmosphere during the fall freeze season, is speculated to play an important role in the recently observed cloud cover increase and BL instability. However, lack of observations and understanding of the resilience of the proposed mechanisms, especially in relation to meteorological and interannual variability, has left a poorly constrained BL parameterization scheme in Arctic climate models. In this study, we use multiyear Japanese cruise-ship observations from RV Mirai over the open Arctic Ocean to characterize the surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) during early fall and investigate its contribution to BL turbulence. It is found that mixing by SSHF is favored during episodes of high surface wind speed and is also influenced by the prevailing cloud regime. The deepest BLs and maximum ocean-atmosphere temperature difference are observed during cold air advection (associated with the stratocumulus regime), yet, contrary to previous speculation, the efficiency of sensible heat exchange is low. On the other hand, the SSHF contributes significantly to BL mixing during the uplift (low pressure) followed by the highly stable (stratus) regime. Overall, it can explain 10 of the open ocean BL height variability, whereas cloud-driven (moisture and radiative) mechanisms appear to be the other dominant source of convective turbulence. Nevertheless, there is strong interannual variability in the relationship between the SSHF and the BL height which can be intensified by the changing occurrence of Arctic climate patterns, such as positive surface wind speed anomalies and more frequent conditions of uplift. This study highlights the need for comprehensive BL observations like the RV Mirai for better understanding and

  13. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2018-01-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  15. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2017-08-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  16. Excitation of localized wave packet in swept-wing supersonic boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatskikh Aleksey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the artificial wave packet in swept-wing supersonic boundary layer was experimentally studied at M = 2. The localized disturbances were generated by a pulse glow discharge. Measurements were provided by a hot-wire anemometer. The spatial structure of the wave packet was studied. It was found that the wave packet has an asymmetric shape. In addition, the velocity of the propagation downstream of the wave packet was estimated.

  17. Observations of the marine boundary layer under a cutoff low over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Stratocumulus is often present offshore of Peru and northern Chile and exists at the top of a cool, moist and well-mixed marine boundary layer (MBL) under a marked temperature inversion maintained by large-scale subsidence. The subtropical MBL and stratocumulus has been the focus of many recent studies, but mid-latitude systems can exert a strong influence. However, this connection is not well established due to debatable model results and few in situ measurements south of 20°S. During a 2-week field campaign in August 2011 at Robinson Crusoe Island (~700 km offshore at 33.6°S), radiosondes were launched to observe the response of the MBL to mid-latitude synoptic forcing. During the observation period a broad, slow-moving cutoff low (COL) passed over the region. Other observations include COSMIC GPS, infrared satellite imagery, TRMM radar reflectivity, and operational radiosondes from the Chilean weather service. A numerical simulation is included to diagnose the synoptic features. The inversion prior to the COL was maintained and lifted above 5 km as the COL passed over the island. Soon after the COL center passed the island, the MBL top did not descend or reform near the surface and then deepen, but rather an inversion reformed at ~2.7 km. Using a variety of datasets, the height of the reformation of the inversion is related to the cloud top height of the scattered shallow cumulus convection under the COL, which coincides with the level of maximum convergence of the vertical velocity.

  18. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  19. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Z. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  20. Turbulence structures in a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional intense Reynolds shear stress structures (Qs) are presented from a direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer at Reθ = 1500 -2175. The intense Q2 (ejections) and Q4 (sweeps) structures separate into two groups: wall-attached and wall-detached structures. In the region where turbulent activity is maximal, between 0 . 2 δ and 0 . 6 δ , 94 % of the structures are detached structures. In comparison to canonical wall flows, the large velocity defect turbulent boundary layers are less efficient in extracting turbulent energy from the mean flow. There is, furthermore, much less turbulence activity and less velocity coherence near the wall. Additionally, the wall-detached structures are more frequent and carry a much larger amount of Reynolds shear stress. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  1. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is satisfied by an analytical sampling rate model. A nonlinear scaling relation maps the path space onto the semi-infinite boundary layer. The underlying near-wall behavior of fluctuating velocities perfectly agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The resulting integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities represents fully developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type of stochastic process. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ (with ɛ-->∞ in the diffusion limit). For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ~=0.58.

  2. On Hydromagnetic Stresses in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the physical structure of accretion disk boundary layers, and thus their inferred observational properties, rely on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear...... viscosity satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where......, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. In order to shed light on physically viable mechanisms for angular momentum transport in this inner disk region, we examine the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in differentially rotating backgrounds...

  3. Turbulent boundary layer under the control of different schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Z X; Zhou, Y; Wu, Z

    2017-06-01

    This work explores experimentally the control of a turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate based on wall perturbation generated by piezo-ceramic actuators. Different schemes are investigated, including the feed-forward, the feedback, and the combined feed-forward and feedback strategies, with a view to suppressing the near-wall high-speed events and hence reducing skin friction drag. While the strategies may achieve a local maximum drag reduction slightly less than their counterpart of the open-loop control, the corresponding duty cycles are substantially reduced when compared with that of the open-loop control. The results suggest a good potential to cut down the input energy under these control strategies. The fluctuating velocity, spectra, Taylor microscale and mean energy dissipation are measured across the boundary layer with and without control and, based on the measurements, the flow mechanism behind the control is proposed.

  4. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  5. Transport of gaseous pollutants by convective boundary layer around a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licina, Dusan; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Sekhar, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the ability of the human convective boundary layer to transport pollution in a quiescent indoor environment. The impact of the source location in the vicinity of a human body is examined in relation to pollution distribution in the breathing zone and the thickness...... of the pollution boundary layer. The study, in addition, evaluates the effects of the room air temperature, table positioning, and seated body inclination. The human body is represented by a thermal manikin that has a body shape, size, and surface temperature that resemble those of a real person. The results show...... at the upper back or behind the chair. The results also indicate that a decrease in personal exposure to pollutants released from or around the human body increases the extent to which the pollution spreads to the surroundings. Reducing the room air temperature or backward body inclination intensifies...

  6. Measurement Science of the Intermittent Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    investigate intermittency fluxes of clear-air radar reflectivity inthe atmospheric boundary layer, 2013 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and...meridionally by 40 m), eight ultrasonic anemometers, two low-response thermometers, two low-response hygrometers, three quartz-crystal barometers, and...vertically spaced sonics can be used for post-facto calibration (Muschinski and Ayvazian, 2014) of relative biases in a pair of ultrasonic

  7. Scaling laws and turbulence closures for stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, S.; Esau, I.; Baklanov, A.; Djolov, G.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents a recently developed theory of non-local turbulence in the stably stratified planetary boundary layers (PBLs): basic theoretical results, new LES code specifically designed for LES of stably stratified flows, and comparison of theoretical predictions with LES and experimental data. The paper includes improved formulations for the PBL depth and resistance laws and outlines an advanced turbulence closure accounting for the transport properties of internal gravity waves.

  8. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  9. Ozone in the Atlantic Ocean marine boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Boylan; Detlev Helmig; Samuel Oltmans

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In situ atmospheric ozone measurements aboard the R/V Ronald H. Brown during the 2008 Gas-Ex and AMMA research cruises were compared with data from four island and coastal Global Atmospheric Watch stations in the Atlantic Ocean to examine ozone transport in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Ozone measurements made at Tudor Hill, Bermuda, were subjected to continental outflow from the east coast of the United States, which resulted in elevated ozone levels above 50 ppbv. Ozone measurem...

  10. Combined Wave and Current Bottom Boundary Layers: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    wave mechanics for engineers and scientists. New Jersey: World Scientific . Dingler, J. R., and D. L. Inman. 1976. Wave-formed ripples in nearshore...sediment transport. New York: World Scientific . Papanicolaou, A. N., M. Elhakeem, G. Krallis, S. Prakash, and J. Edinger. 2008. Sediment transport...Boundary layers, Models, Near-shore processes, Review article , Sediment transport, Wave and current interaction 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. Pressure Fluctuations Induced by a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a spatially-developed Mach 5.86 turbulent boundary layer. The unsteady pressure field is analyzed at multiple wall-normal locations, including those at the wall, within the boundary layer (including inner layer, the log layer, and the outer layer), and in the free stream. The statistical and structural variations of pressure fluctuations as a function of wall-normal distance are highlighted. Computational predictions for mean velocity pro les and surface pressure spectrum are in good agreement with experimental measurements, providing a first ever comparison of this type at hypersonic Mach numbers. The simulation shows that the dominant frequency of boundary-layer-induced pressure fluctuations shifts to lower frequencies as the location of interest moves away from the wall. The pressure wave propagates with a speed nearly equal to the local mean velocity within the boundary layer (except in the immediate vicinity of the wall) while the propagation speed deviates from the Taylor's hypothesis in the free stream. Compared with the surface pressure fluctuations, which are primarily vortical, the acoustic pressure fluctuations in the free stream exhibit a significantly lower dominant frequency, a greater spatial extent, and a smaller bulk propagation speed. The freestream pressure structures are found to have similar Lagrangian time and spatial scales as the acoustic sources near the wall. As the Mach number increases, the freestream acoustic fluctuations exhibit increased radiation intensity, enhanced energy content at high frequencies, shallower orientation of wave fronts with respect to the flow direction, and larger propagation velocity.

  12. Review of Orbiter Flight Boundary Layer Transition Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Berry, Scott A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Barnell, maria; Wang, Kuo C.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the Shuttle Return to Flight program, a tool was developed to predict when boundary layer transition would occur on the lower surface of the orbiter during reentry due to the presence of protuberances and cavities in the thermal protection system. This predictive tool was developed based on extensive wind tunnel tests conducted after the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Recognizing that wind tunnels cannot simulate the exact conditions an orbiter encounters as it re-enters the atmosphere, a preliminary attempt was made to use the documented flight related damage and the orbiter transition times, as deduced from flight instrumentation, to calibrate the predictive tool. After flight STS-114, the Boundary Layer Transition Team decided that a more in-depth analysis of the historical flight data was needed to better determine the root causes of the occasional early transition times of some of the past shuttle flights. In this paper we discuss our methodology for the analysis, the various sources of shuttle damage information, the analysis of the flight thermocouple data, and how the results compare to the Boundary Layer Transition prediction tool designed for Return to Flight.

  13. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  14. Evidence for renoxification in the tropical marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Chris; Evans, Mathew J.; Crilley, Leigh R.; Bloss, William J.; Sherwen, Tomás; Read, Katie A.; Lee, James D.; Carpenter, Lucy J.

    2017-03-01

    We present 2 years of NOx observations from the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory located in the tropical Atlantic boundary layer. We find that NOx mixing ratios peak around solar noon (at 20-30 pptV depending on season), which is counter to box model simulations that show a midday minimum due to OH conversion of NO2 to HNO3. Production of NOx via decomposition of organic nitrogen species and the photolysis of HNO3 appear insufficient to provide the observed noontime maximum. A rapid photolysis of nitrate aerosol to produce HONO and NO2, however, is able to simulate the observed diurnal cycle. This would make it the dominant source of NOx at this remote marine boundary layer site, overturning the previous paradigm according to which the transport of organic nitrogen species, such as PAN, is the dominant source. We show that observed mixing ratios (November-December 2015) of HONO at Cape Verde (˜ 3.5 pptV peak at solar noon) are consistent with this route for NOx production. Reactions between the nitrate radical and halogen hydroxides which have been postulated in the literature appear to improve the box model simulation of NOx. This rapid conversion of aerosol phase nitrate to NOx changes our perspective of the NOx cycling chemistry in the tropical marine boundary layer, suggesting a more chemically complex environment than previously thought.

  15. Wave boundary layer over a stone-covered bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixen, Martin; Hatipoglu, Figen; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental investigation on wave boundary layers over a bed with large roughness, simulating stone/rock/armour block cover on the sea bottom. The roughness elements used in the experiments were stones the size of 1.4cm and 3.85cm in one group of experiments...... and regular ping-pong balls the size 3.6cm in the other. The orbital-motion-amplitude-to-roughness ratio at the bed was rather small, in the range a/ks=0.6-3. The mean and turbulence properties of the boundary-layer flow were measured. Various configurations of the roughness elements were used in the ping...... for small values of a/ks. The results further show that the phase lead of the bed friction velocity over the surface elevation does not seem to change radically with a/ks, and found to be in the range 12°-23°. Furthermore the results show that the boundary-layer turbulence also is not extremely sensitive...

  16. Unsteady Boundary-Layer Flow over Jerked Plate Moving in a Free Stream of Viscoelastic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian Munawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the unsteady boundary-layer flow of a viscoelastic non-Newtonian fluid over a flat surface. The plate is suddenly jerked to move with uniform velocity in a uniform stream of non-Newtonian fluid. Purely analytic solution to governing nonlinear equation is obtained. The solution is highly accurate and valid for all values of the dimensionless time 0≤τ<∞. Flow properties of the viscoelastic fluid are discussed through graphs.

  17. Transition Delay in Hypervelocity Boundary Layers by Means of Vibrational Relaxation and Acoustic Instability Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-04

    9   Through an EOARD grant with Prof. Alexander Fedorov , from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, he was able to study the growth of...acoustically absortive surface. PhD Thesis, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 2001. See also Rasheed, A., Hornung, H.G., Fedorov , A.V., and...boundary layer; see Fedorov et al.7 and Rasheed8 for work focused on absorbing acoustic energy using porous walls. Another approach to suppression of the

  18. Laser beam propagation through an atmospheric transitional and turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard A.; Manzur, Tariq

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates laser beam propagation through an atmospheric boundary layer near the ocean surface. Objectives of this research are to ascertain feasibility limits for achieving maximum energy efficiency at extended ranges in the face of atmospheric and other distortions as the laser beam penetrates through transitional (anisotropic) and turbulent (isotropic) boundary layer regimes. Various aspects of turbulence modeling of laser beam propagation near the ocean surface are discussed including: Kolmogorov's model of atmospheric turbulence, parameterized structure functions (e.g., velocity and temperature gradients, gradients in refractive index) and other important factors affecting near surface propagation such as humidity, aerosols, and wave slap. Various preliminary modeled propagation results are shown, and a new methodology is proposed for improving existing model estimates with new time domain measurement procedures.

  19. Oscillating viscous boundary layer at high Reynolds number: Experiments and numerical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, I.; Bailliet, H.; Foucault, E.; Valière, J.-Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Transition to turbulence for an acoustically oscillating flow (without any mean motion) in a resonant wave guide is considered. Departure from the laminar behaviour of the Stokes boundary layer formed in the near wall region is studied both experimentally and numerically for increasing acoustic levels. Laser Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure velocity profiles at different phases along the acoustic period and the experimental profile distortion is interpreted as the consequence of the development of a turbulent boundary layer. On the other hand, the oscillating flow is investigated numerically with a high order resolution one dimensional scheme for comparison with experimental results. The effective viscosity that models transition to turbulence is included and the velocity profile is integrated along the radial coordinate. Results from experiments and from numerical calculation are in very good agreement.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary Layer Flow of Nanofluid over an Exponentially Stretching Permeable Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Bhattacharyya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of the steady boundary layer flow of nanofluid due to an exponentially permeable stretching sheet with external magnetic field is presented. In the model, the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis on heat transfer and nanoparticle volume friction are considered. Using shooting technique with fourth-order Runge-Kutta method the transformed equations are solved. The study reveals that the governing parameters, namely, the magnetic parameter, the wall mass transfer parameter, the Prandtl number, the Lewis number, Brownian motion parameter, and thermophoresis parameter, have major effects on the flow field, the heat transfer, and the nanoparticle volume fraction. The magnetic field makes enhancement in temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction, whereas the wall mass transfer through the porous sheet causes reduction of both. For the Brownian motion, the temperature increases and the nanoparticle volume fraction decreases. Heat transfer rate becomes low with increase of Lewis number. For thermophoresis effect, the thermal boundary layer thickness becomes larger.

  1. Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer of FMWCNT/Water Nanofluids over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Safaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the heat transfer and flow of water/FMWCNT (functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids over a flat plate was investigated using a finite volume method. Simulations were performed for velocity ranging from 0.17 mm/s to 1.7 mm/s under laminar regime and nanotube concentrations up to 0.2%. The 2-D governing equations were solved using an in-house FORTRAN code. For a specific free stream velocity, the presented results showed that increasing the weight percentage of nanotubes increased the Nusselt number. However, an increase in the solid weight percentage had a negligible effect on the wall shear stress. The results also indicated that increasing the free stream velocity for all cases leads to thinner boundary layer thickness, while increasing the FMWCNT concentration causes an increase in the boundary layer thickness.

  2. Boundary-layer behavior of the flow at the inner edge of black hole accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeger, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The flow of accreting material into black holes from Keplerian disks surrounding them is studied. Solving the system of radial structure equations in Schwarzschild geometry for the case where the kinematic viscosity is constant, the paper discovers a boundary layer at the disk's inner edge, where the flow becomes non-Keplerian. It is also shown that, despite the operation of viscous stresses across this inner edge and the presence of the boundary layer there, very little extra energy or angular momentum is radiated or transported outward from inside that radius - a result many have often assumed but no one has carefully demonstrated. These results constitute a solution to the problem of adequately describing the flow across the inner edge and properly setting the boundary conditions there and at the event horizon.

  3. Effect of boundary layer trip on reduction of jet noise in over-expanded nozzle flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyoji, Masayuki; Tabaru, Issei

    2017-10-01

    A flow resonance accompanied by the emission of acoustic tones occurs in an over-expanded convergent-divergent (C-D) nozzle when operated at comparatively low pressure ratios. This phenomenon is distinguished from conventional screech tones and is referred to as "transonic tones". In contrast to screech tones, the peak resonant frequency for transonic tones increases with pressure ratio; the peak sound pressure level exceeds 110 dB. In this study, we investigated the basic characteristics of transonic resonance and tones using a circular C-D nozzle in an anechoic room. The effects of the boundary layer trip were also evaluated using a tripping wire for the suppressing transonic resonance and tones. The results of acoustic measurements show that several predominant peaks correspond to transonic tones. However, the boundary layer trip inside the nozzle effectively eliminated these tones and suppressed the unsteadiness of the flow inside the nozzle.

  4. Effects of boundary layer and liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fang Zou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, numerical investigations for tank sloshing, based on commercial CFD package FLUENT, are performed to study effects of boundary layer grid, liquid viscosity and compressible air on sloshing pressure, wave height and rising time of impact pressure. Also, sloshing experiments for liquids of different viscosity are carried out to validate the numerical results. Through comparison of numerical and experimental results, a computational model in-cluding boundary layer grid can predict the sloshing pressure more accurately. Energy dissipation due to viscous friction leads to reduction of sloshing pressure and wave elevation. Sloshing pressure is also reduced because of cushion effect of compressible air. Due to high viscosity damping effect and compressible air effect, the rising time of impact pressure becomes longer. It is also found that liquid viscosity and compressible air influence distribution of dynamic pressure along the vertical tank wall.

  5. Measurement of corner separation zone response on a compression ramp to plasma actuation within the hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Brock E.; Houpt, Alec W.; Gordeyev, Stanislav V.; Leonov, Sergey B.

    2017-10-01

    This study was performed to characterize the dominant frequencies present in the boundary layer uptsream of and in the corner separation zone of a compression surface in Mach 4.5 flow and to determine a control effect of transient plasma actuation on the boundary layer. Schlieren imaging was used to distinguish the corner separation zone for 20°, 25°, and 30° compression ramps mounted on flat plates. Spectra of the natural disturbances present in the boundary layer and separation zone were gathered using a high-speed Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and surface mounted PCBTM pressure sensors while varying flow parameters by adjusting total pressure, temperature, and ramp angle. Shallow cavity discharge plasma actuators were used as a high-frequency localized thermal forcing mechanism of the boundary layer. The plasma effect was negligible for forcing frequencies (50 kHz) below the natural dominant frequency (~55-80 kHz). High frequency perturbations that can promote the transition to turbulence were amplified when the plasma forcing frequency (100 kHz) was higher than the natural dominant frequency (~55-80 kHz). This technique can potentially be used for active control of hypersonic boundary layer transition and the supersonic flow structure on the compression surface.

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation of Shock-Wave Boundary Layer Interaction and its Control Using Sparkjet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Yao, Yufeng; Fang, Jian; Gan, Tian; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-06-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of an oblique shock-wave generated by an 8° sharp wedge impinging onto a spatially-developing Mach 2.3 turbulent boundary layer and their interactions has been carried out in this study. The Reynolds number based on the incoming flow property and the boundary layer displacement thickness at the impinging point without shock-wave is 20,000. The detailed numerical approaches are described and the inflow turbulence is generated using the digital filter method to avoid artificial temporal or streamwise periodicity. Numerical results are compared with the available wind tunnel PIV measurements of the same flow conditions. Further LES study on the control of flow separation due to the strong shock-viscous interaction is also conducted by using an active control actuator “SparkJet” concept. The single-pulsed characteristics of the control device are obtained and compared with the experiments. Instantaneous flowfield shows that the “SparkJet” promotes the flow mixing in the boundary layer and enhances its ability to resist the flow separation. The time and spanwise averaged skin friction coefficient distribution demonstrates that the separation bubble length is reduced by maximum 35% with the control exerted.

  7. A mass-spring-damper model for unsteady Ekman boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Mostafa; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2014-11-01

    The Ekman boundary layer is a central problem in geophysical fluid dynamics that emerges in atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers when pressure gradient forces, Coriolis forces, and molecular or turbulent friction forces interact in a flow. These boundary layers are dynamical systems; however, due to their inherent complexity most studies of these wall-bounded flows have focused on steady state conditions. The transient version of the problem, which occurs when these forces are not in equilibrium such as when the pressure gradients are changing in time, is solvable analytically only for a limited set of forcing variability modes, and the resulting solutions are intricate and difficult to interpret. In this study, we derive a simple physical model that reduces Navier-Stokes equations into a second-order ordinary differential equation that is very similar to the dynamical equation of a mass-spring-damper system. The validation of the proposed model is performed by comparing it to results from a suite of large-eddy simulations. The reduced model can be solved for a wider range of variable forcing conditions and serves to elucidate the physical origin of the inertia (mass), energy storage (spring), and energy dissipation (damper) attributes of the Ekman layer. The authors acknowledge support from the CICS of Princeton University and the NOAA's under Grant Number 344-6127, and the Physical and Dynamic Meteorology Program of the National Science Foundation under AGS-1026636.

  8. Modelling the internal boundary layer over the lower fraser valley, British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchvarova, E. [National Inst. of Meteorology and Hydrology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Steyn, D. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Geography, Vancouver (Canada); Cai, X. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Geography, Edgbaston (United Kingdom); Gryning, S.E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Baldi, M. [Inst. for Atmospheric Physics, IFA-CNR, Rome (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    In this study we use the very extensive data-set on temporal and spatial structure of the internal boundary layer on the Lower Faser Valley, Canada, collected during the so-called Pacific `93 field campaign, to study the ability of the simple applied model by Gryning and Batchvarova (1996) and the CSU-RAMS meso-scale model summarised in Pielke et al. (1992) to describe the development and variability of the internal boundary layer depth during the course of a day. Given the complexity of topography, coastline and land-use in the Lower Fraser Valley region, both models perform remarkably well. The simple applied model performs extremely well, given its simplicity. It is clear that correct specification of spatially resolved surface sensible heat flux and wind field are crucial to the success of this model which can be operated at very fine spatial resolution. The 3D model performs extremely well, though it too must capture the local wind field correctly for complete success. Its limited horizontal resolution results in strongly smoothed internal boundary layer height fields. (LN)

  9. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  10. Velocity Data in a Fully Developed Wind Turbine Array Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Results are reported from an experimental study of an array of porous disks simulating offshore wind turbines. The disks mimic power extraction of similarly scaled wind turbines via drag matching, and the array consists of 19x5 disks of 0.25 m diameter. The study was conducted in the UNH Flow Physics Facility (FPF), which has test section dimensions of 6.0 m wide, 2.7 m high and 72.0 m long. The FPF can achieve a boundary layer height on the order of 1 m at the entrance of the wind turbine array which puts the model turbines in the bottom third of the boundary layer, which is typical of field application. Careful consideration was given to an expanded uncertainty analysis, to determine possible measurements in this type of flow. For a given configuration (spacing, initial conditions, etc.), the velocity levels out and the wind farm approaches fully developed behavior, even within the maintained growth of the simulated atmospheric boundary layer. Benchmark pitot tube data was acquired in vertical profiles progressing streamwise behind the centered column at every row in the array.

  11. Experimental and modeling study of the impact of vertical transport processes from the boundary-layer on the variability and the budget of tropospheric ozone; Etude experimentale et numerique de l'influence des processus de transport depuis la couche-limite sur la variabilite et le bilan d'ozone tropospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colette, A

    2005-12-15

    Closing the tropospheric ozone budget requires a better understanding of the role of transport processes from the major reservoirs: the planetary boundary layer and the stratosphere. Case studies lead to the identification of mechanisms involved as well as their efficiency. However, their global impact on the budget must be addressed on a climatological basis. This manuscript is thus divided in two parts. First, we present case studies based on ozone LIDAR measurements performed during the ESCOMPTE campaign. This work consists in a data analysis investigation by means of a hybrid - Lagrangian study involving: global meteorological analyses, Lagrangian particle dispersion computation, and mesoscale, chemistry - transport, and Lagrangian photochemistry modeling. Our aim is to document the amount of observed ozone variability related to transport processes and, when appropriate, to infer the role of tropospheric photochemical production. Second, we propose a climatological analysis of the respective impact of transport from the boundary-layer and from the tropopause region on the tropospheric ozone budget. A multivariate analysis is presented and compared to a trajectography approach. Once validated, this algorithm is applied to the whole database of ozone profiles collected above Europe during the past 30 years in order to discuss the seasonal, geographical and temporal variability of transport processes as well as their impact on the tropospheric ozone budget. The variability of turbulent mixing and its impact on the persistence of tropospheric layers will also be discussed. (author)

  12. Boundary layers at a dynamic interface: Air-sea exchange of heat and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeri, Andrew J.

    2017-04-01

    Exchange of mass or heat across a turbulent liquid-gas interface is a problem of critical interest, especially in air-sea transfer of natural and anthropogenic gases involved in the study of climate. The goal in this research area is to determine the gas flux from air to sea or vice versa. For sparingly soluble nonreactive gases, this is controlled by liquid phase turbulent velocity fluctuations that act on the thin species concentration boundary layer on the liquid side of the interface. If the fluctuations in surface-normal velocity w' and gas concentration c' are known, then it is possible to determine the turbulent contribution to the gas flux. However, there is no suitable fundamental direct approach in the general case where neither w' nor c' can be easily measured. A new approach is presented to deduce key aspects about the near-surface turbulent motions from measurements that can be taken by an infrared (IR) camera. An equation is derived with inputs being the surface temperature and heat flux, and a solution method developed for the surface-normal strain experienced over time by boundary layers at the interface. Because the thermal and concentration boundary layers experience the same near-surface fluid motions, the solution for the surface-normal strain determines the gas flux or gas transfer velocity. Examples illustrate the approach in the cases of complete surface renewal, partial surface renewal, and insolation. The prospects for use of the approach in flows characterized by sheared interfaces or rapid boundary layer straining are explored.

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layer with fully resolved particles at low volume fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Hu, Chenshu; Wu, Fan; Fan, Jianren

    2017-05-01

    In the present work, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of dilute particulate flow in a turbulent boundary layer has been conducted, containing thousands of finite-sized solid rigid particles. The particle surfaces are resolved with the multi-direct forcing immersed-boundary method. This is, to the best of the authors' knowledge, the first DNS study of a turbulent boundary layer laden with finite-sized particles. The particles have a diameter of approximately 11.3 wall units, a density of 3.3 times that of the fluid, and a solid volume fraction of 1/1000. The simulation shows that the onset and the completion of the transition processes are shifted earlier with the inclusion of the solid phase and that the resulting streamwise mean velocity of the boundary layer in the particle-laden case is almost consistent with the results of the single-phase case. At the same time, relatively stronger particle movements are observed in the near-wall regions, due to the driving of the counterrotating streamwise vortexes. As a result, increased levels of dissipation occur on the particle surfaces, and the root mean square of the fluctuating velocities of the fluid in the near-wall regions is decreased. Under the present parameters, including the particle Stokes number St + = 24 and the particle Reynolds number Re p = 33 based on the maximum instantaneous fluid-solid velocity lag, no vortex shedding behind the particle is observed. Lastly, a trajectory analysis of the particles shows the influence of turbophoresis on particle wall-normal concentration, and the particles that originated between y + = 60 and 2/3 of the boundary-layer thickness are the most influenced.

  14. Predicting transition ranges to fully turbulent viscous boundary layers in low Prandtl number convection flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Janet D.; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-12-01

    We discuss two aspects of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations in a unique setting: a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio of one. First, we present a comprehensive comparison of statistical quantities such as energy dissipation rates and boundary layer thickness scales. Data are used from three simulation run series at Prandtl numbers Pr that cover two orders of magnitude. In contrast to most previous studies in RBC the focus of the present work is on convective turbulence at very low Prandtl numbers including Pr=0.021 for liquid mercury or gallium and Pr=0.005 for liquid sodium. In this parameter range of RBC, inertial effects cause a dominating turbulent momentum transport that is in line with highly intermittent fluid turbulence both in the bulk and in the boundary layers and thus should be able to trigger a transition to the fully turbulent boundary layers of the ultimate regime of convection for higher Rayleigh number. Second, we predict the ranges of Rayleigh numbers for which the viscous boundary layer will transition to turbulence and the flow as a whole will cross over into the ultimate regime. These transition ranges are obtained by extrapolation from our simulation data. The extrapolation methods are based on the large-scale properties of the velocity profile. Two of the three methods predict similar ranges for the transition to ultimate convection when their uncertainties are taken into account. All three extrapolation methods indicate that the range of critical Rayleigh numbers Rac is shifted to smaller magnitudes as the Prandtl number becomes smaller.

  15. Inviscid/Boundary-Layer Aeroheating Approach for Integrated Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Esther; Wurster, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    A typical entry vehicle design depends on the synthesis of many essential subsystems, including thermal protection system (TPS), structures, payload, avionics, and propulsion, among others. The ability to incorporate aerothermodynamic considerations and TPS design into the early design phase is crucial, as both are closely coupled to the vehicle's aerodynamics, shape and mass. In the preliminary design stage, reasonably accurate results with rapid turn-representative entry envelope was explored. Initial results suggest that for Mach numbers ranging from 9-20, a few inviscid solutions could reasonably sup- port surface heating predictions at Mach numbers variation of +/-2, altitudes variation of +/-10 to 20 kft, and angle-of-attack variation of +/- 5. Agreement with Navier-Stokes solutions was generally found to be within 10-15% for Mach number and altitude, and 20% for angle of attack. A smaller angle-of-attack increment than the 5 deg around times for parametric studies and quickly evolving configurations are necessary to steer design decisions. This investigation considers the use of an unstructured 3D inviscid code in conjunction with an integral boundary-layer method; the former providing the flow field solution and the latter the surface heating. Sensitivity studies for Mach number, angle of attack, and altitude, examine the feasibility of using this approach to populate a representative entry flight envelope based on a limited set of inviscid solutions. Each inviscid solution is used to generate surface heating over the nearby trajectory space. A subset of a considered in this study is recommended. Results of the angle-of-attack sensitivity studies show that smaller increments may be needed for better heating predictions. The approach is well suited for application to conceptual multidisciplinary design and analysis studies where transient aeroheating environments are critical for vehicle TPS and thermal design. Concurrent prediction of aeroheating

  16. Development of efficient GPU parallelization of WRF Yonsei University planetary boundary layer scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer (PBL is the lowest part of the atmosphere and where its character is directly affected by its contact with the underlying planetary surface. The PBL is responsible for vertical sub-grid-scale fluxes due to eddy transport in the whole atmospheric column. It determines the flux profiles within the well-mixed boundary layer and the more stable layer above. It thus provides an evolutionary model of atmospheric temperature, moisture (including clouds, and horizontal momentum in the entire atmospheric column. For such purposes, several PBL models have been proposed and employed in the weather research and forecasting (WRF model of which the Yonsei University (YSU scheme is one. To expedite weather research and prediction, we have put tremendous effort into developing an accelerated implementation of the entire WRF model using graphics processing unit (GPU massive parallel computing architecture whilst maintaining its accuracy as compared to its central processing unit (CPU-based implementation. This paper presents our efficient GPU-based design on a WRF YSU PBL scheme. Using one NVIDIA Tesla K40 GPU, the GPU-based YSU PBL scheme achieves a speedup of 193× with respect to its CPU counterpart running on one CPU core, whereas the speedup for one CPU socket (4 cores with respect to 1 CPU core is only 3.5×. We can even boost the speedup to 360× with respect to 1 CPU core as two K40 GPUs are applied.

  17. Modelling atmospheric structure, cloud and their response to CCN in the central Arctic: ASCOS case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Birch

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations made during late summer in the central Arctic Ocean, as part of the Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS, are used to evaluate cloud and vertical temperature structure in the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM. The observation period can be split into 5 regimes; the first two regimes had a large number of frontal systems, which were associated with deep cloud. During the remainder of the campaign a layer of low-level cloud occurred, typical of central Arctic summer conditions, along with two periods of greatly reduced cloud cover. The short-range operational NWP forecasts could not accurately reproduce the observed variations in near-surface temperature. A major source of this error was found to be the temperature-dependant surface albedo parameterisation scheme. The model reproduced the low-level cloud layer, though it was too thin, too shallow, and in a boundary-layer that was too frequently well-mixed. The model was also unable to reproduce the observed periods of reduced cloud cover, which were associated with very low cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations (<1 cm−3. As with most global NWP models, the MetUM does not have a prognostic aerosol/cloud scheme but uses a constant CCN concentration of 100 cm−3 over all marine environments. It is therefore unable to represent the low CCN number concentrations and the rapid variations in concentration frequently observed in the central Arctic during late summer. Experiments with a single-column model configuration of the MetUM show that reducing model CCN number concentrations to observed values reduces the amount of cloud, increases the near-surface stability, and improves the representation of both the surface radiation fluxes and the surface temperature. The model is shown to be sensitive to CCN only when number concentrations are less than 10–20 cm−3.

  18. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Yanase

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L (mean±s.d.; N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s−1 (N=6 in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×105 with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, lx=71±8 mm, N=3, and lx=110±13 mm, N=4, respectively were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner−Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (lx=163±22 mm, N=3. The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment.

  19. Boundary layer control by a fish: Unsteady laminar boundary layers of rainbow trout swimming in turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2016-12-15

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss [0.231±0.016 m total body length (L) (mean±s.d.); N=6], swimming at 1.6±0.09 L s -1 (N=6) in an experimental flow channel (Reynolds number, Re=4×10 5 ) with medium turbulence (5.6% intensity) were examined using the particle image velocimetry technique. The tangential flow velocity distributions in the pectoral and pelvic surface regions (arc length from the rostrum, l x =71±8 mm, N=3, and l x =110±13 mm, N=4, respectively) were approximated by a laminar boundary layer model, the Falkner-Skan equation. The flow regime over the pectoral and pelvic surfaces was regarded as a laminar flow, which could create less skin-friction drag than would be the case with turbulent flow. Flow separation was postponed until vortex shedding occurred over the posterior surface (l x =163±22 mm, N=3). The ratio of the body-wave velocity to the swimming speed was in the order of 1.2. This was consistent with the condition of the boundary layer laminarization that had been confirmed earlier using a mechanical model. These findings suggest an energy-efficient swimming strategy for rainbow trout in a turbulent environment. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and its feedback on the haze formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chao; Su, Hang; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-04-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) plays a key role in air pollution dispersion and influences day-to-day air quality. Some studies suggest that high aerosol loadings during severe haze events may modify PBL dynamics by radiative effects and hence enhance the development of haze. This study mainly investigates the radiative effects of tropospheric aerosols on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer by conducting simulations with Weather Research and Forecasting single-column model (WRF-SCM). We find that high aerosol loading in PBL depressed boundary layer height (PBLH). But the magnitude of the changes of PBLH after adding aerosol loadings in our simulations are small and can't explain extreme high aerosol concentrations observed. We also investigate the impacts of the initial temperature and moisture profiles on the evolution of PBL. Our studies show that the impact of the vertical profile of moisture is comparable with aerosol effects.

  1. Wing aeroelasticity analysis based on an integral boundary-layer method coupled with Euler solver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An interactive boundary-layer method, which solves the unsteady flow, is developed for aeroelastic computation in the time domain. The coupled method combines the Euler solver with the integral boundary-layer solver (Euler/BL in a “semi-inverse” manner to compute flows with the inviscid and viscous interaction. Unsteady boundary conditions on moving surfaces are taken into account by utilizing the approximate small-perturbation method without moving the computational grids. The steady and unsteady flow calculations for the LANN wing are presented. The wing tip displacement of high Reynolds number aero-structural dynamics (HIRENASD Project is simulated under different angles of attack. The flutter-boundary predictions for the AGARD 445.6 wing are provided. The results of the interactive boundary-layer method are compared with those of the Euler method and experimental data. The study shows that viscous effects are significant for these cases and the further data analysis confirms the validity and practicability of the coupled method.

  2. RANS Modeling of Stably Stratified Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows in OpenFOAM®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jordan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying mixing processes relating to the transport of heat, momentum, and scalar quantities of stably stratified turbulent geophysical flows remains a substantial task. In a stably stratified flow, such as the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, buoyancy forces have a significant impact on the flow characteristics. This study investigates constant and stability-dependent turbulent Prandtl number (Prt formulations linking the turbulent viscosity (νt and diffusivity (κt for modeling applications of boundary layer flows. Numerical simulations of plane Couette flow and pressure-driven channel flow are performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results are compared with DNS data to evaluate model efficacy for predicting mean velocity and density fields. In channel flow simulations, a Prandtl number formulation for wall-bounded flows is introduced to alleviate overmixing of the mean density field. This research reveals that appropriate specification of Prt can improve predictions of stably stratified turbulent boundary layer flows.

  3. Unsteady incompressible MHD boundary layer on porous aerofoil in high accelerating fluid flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Dečan J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The fluid, flowing past the surface, is incompressible and its electro-conductivity is constant. The present magnetic field is homogenous and perpendicular to the surface and through the porous contour the fluid has been injected or ejected. In order to study this problem, a polyparametric method known as generalized similarity method has been established. The corresponding equations of unsteady boundary layer, by introducing the appropriate variable transformations, momentum and energy equations and three similarity parameters sets, being transformed into generalized form. The numerical integration of the generalized equation with boundary conditions has been performed by means of the difference schemes and by using Tridiagonal Algorithm Method with iterations in the four parametric and twice localized approximation. So obtained generalized solutions are used to calculate the shear stress distribution in laminar-turbulent transition of unsteady boundary layer on porous high accelerating aerofoil. It's shown that for both in confuser and in diffuser regions the ejection of fluid postpones the boundary layer separation, and vice versa the fluid injection favors the separation. For both injection and ejection of fluid, the magnetic field increases the friction and postpones the laminar-turbulent transition.

  4. Air Entrainment and Surface Ripples in a Turbulent Ship Hull Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Erinin, Martin; Duncan, James H.

    2017-11-01

    The air entrainment and free-surface fluctuations caused by the interaction of a free surface and the turbulent boundary layer of a vertical surface-piercing plate is studied experimentally. In this experiment, a meter-wide stainless steel belt travels horizontally in a loop around two rollers with vertically oriented axes. This belt device is mounted inside a large water tank with the water level set just below the top edge of the belt. The belt, rollers, and supporting frame are contained within a sheet metal box to keep the device dry except for one 6-meter-long straight test section. The belt is accelerated suddenly from rest until reaching constant speed in order to create a temporally evolving boundary layer analogous to the spatially evolving boundary layer that would exist along a surface-piercing towed flat plate. Surface ripples are measured using a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique with the laser sheet oriented parallel or normal to the belt surface. Air entrainment events and bubble motions are recorded from underneath the water surface using a stereo imaging system. Measurements of small bubbles, that tend to stay submerged for a longer time, are planned via a high-speed digital in-line holographic system. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Boundary layer flow and heat transfer to Carreau fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Khan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the Carreau viscosity model (which is a generalized Newtonian model and then use it to obtain a formulation for the boundary layer equations of the Carreau fluid. The boundary layer flow and heat transfer to a Carreau model over a nonlinear stretching surface is discussed. The Carreau model, adequate for many non-Newtonian fluids, is used to characterize the behavior of the fluids having shear thinning properties and fluids with shear thickening properties for numerical values of the power law exponent n. The modeled boundary layer conservation equations are converted to non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. Numerical solution of the resulting equations are obtained by using the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method along with shooting technique. This analysis reveals many important physical aspects of flow and heat transfer. Computations are performed for different values of the stretching parameter (m, the Weissenberg number (We and the Prandtl number (Pr. The obtained results show that for shear thinning fluid the fluid velocity is depressed by the Weissenberg number while opposite behavior for the shear thickening fluid is observed. A comparison with previously published data in limiting cases is performed and they are in excellent agreement.

  6. Forced Response Analysis of a Fan with Boundary Layer Inlet Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhle, Milind A.; Reddy, T. S. R.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2014-01-01

    Boundary layer ingesting propulsion systems have the potential to significantly reduce fuel burn for future generations of commercial aircraft, but these systems must be designed to overcome the challenge of high dynamic stresses in fan blades due to forced response. High dynamic stresses can lead to high cycle fatigue failures. High-fidelity computational analysis of the fan aeromechanics is integral to an ongoing effort to design a boundary layer ingesting inlet and fan for a wind-tunnel test. An unsteady flow solution from a Reynoldsaveraged Navier Stokes analysis of a coupled inlet-fan system is used to calculate blade unsteady loading and assess forced response of the fan to distorted inflow. Conducted prior to the mechanical design of a fan, the initial forced response analyses performed in this study provide an early look at the levels of dynamic stresses that are likely to be encountered. For the boundary layer ingesting inlet, the distortion contains strong engine order excitations that act simultaneously. The combined effect of these harmonics was considered in the calculation of the forced response stresses. Together, static and dynamic stresses can provide the information necessary to evaluate whether the blades are likely to fail due to high cycle fatigue. Based on the analyses done, the overspeed condition is likely to result in the smallest stress margin in terms of the mean and alternating stresses. Additional work is ongoing to expand the analyses to off-design conditions, on-resonance conditions, and to include more detailed modeling of the blade structure.

  7. Convection and reaction in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium: nonlinear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jeanne Therese H; Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2012-09-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear interactions between chemical reaction and convective fingering in a diffusive boundary layer in a porous medium. The reaction enhances stability by consuming a solute that is unstably distributed in a gravitational field. We show that chemical reaction profoundly changes the dynamics of the system, by introducing a steady state, shortening the evolution time, and altering the spatial patterns of velocity and concentration of solute. In the presence of weak reaction, finger growth and merger occur effectively, driving strong convective currents in a thick layer of solute. However, as the reaction becomes stronger, finger growth is inhibited, tip-splitting is enhanced and the layer of solute becomes much thinner. Convection enhances the mass flux of solute consumed by reaction in the boundary layer but has a diminishing effect as reaction strength increases. This nonlinear behavior has striking differences to the density fingering of traveling reaction fronts, for which stronger chemical kinetics result in more effective finger merger owing to an increase in the speed of the front. In a boundary layer, a strong stabilizing effect of reaction can maintain a long-term state of convection in isolated fingers of wavelength comparable to that at onset of instability.

  8. Airborne Measurement of Insolation Impact on the Atmospheric Surface Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jamey; Chilson, Phil; Houston, Adam; Detweiler, Carrick; Bailey, Sean; Cloud-Map Team

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric surface boundary layer measurements of wind and thermodynamic parameters are conducted during variable insolation conditions, including the 2017 eclipse, using an unmanned aircraft system. It is well known that the air temperatures can drop significantly during a total solar eclipse as has been previously observed. In past eclipses, these observations have primarily been made on the ground. We present results from airborne measurements of the near surface boundary layer using a small unmanned aircraft with high temporal resolution wind and thermodynamic observations. Questions that motivate the study include: How does the temperature within the lower atmospheric boundary vary during an eclipse? What impact does the immediate removal of radiative heating on the ground have on the lower ABL? Do local wind patterns change during an eclipse event and if so why? Will there be a manifestation of the nocturnal boundary layer wind maximum? Comparisons are made with the DOE ARM SGP site that experiences a lower but still significant insolation. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Award Number 1539070.

  9. Towards grid-converged wall-modeled LES of atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellapantula, Shashank; Vijayakumar, Ganesh; Henry de Frahan, Marc; Churchfield, Matthew; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Accurate characterization of incoming atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) turbulence is a critical factor in improving accuracy and predictive nature of simulation of wind farm flows. Modern commercial wind turbines operate in the log layer of the ABL that are typically simulated using wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (WMLES). One of the long-standing issues associated with wall modeling for LES and hybrid RANS-LES for atmospheric boundary layers is the over-prediction of the mean-velocity gradient, commonly referred to as log-layer mismatch. Kawai and Larsson in 2012, identified under-resolution of the near-wall region and the incorrect information received by the wall model as potential causes for the log-layer mismatch in WMLES of smooth-wall boundary-layer flows. To solve the log layer mismatch issue, they proposed linking the wall model to the LES solution at a physical of height of ym, instead of the first grid point. In this study, we extend their wall modeling approach to LES of the rough-wall ABL to investigate issues of log-layer mismatch and grid convergence. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Technologies Office, under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  10. The decay of forced rescaling modes in a Mach 3 turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Yin-Chiu; Beekman, Izaak; Priebe, Stephan; Martin, Pino

    2010-11-01

    We introduce a new, Mach 3, compressible, turbulent boundary layer (TBL) spatial direct numerical simulation (SDNS), with a streamwise length of 50δinlet. The simulation has an inlet Reθ of 2500, increasing to 4000 at the outlet, with the boundary layer thickness, δ, nearly doubling from the inlet to the outlet. The inflow is computed using an auxiliary DNS with a rescaling length of 8δ. We examine the evolution of turbulence statistics as the boundary layer grows. In particular, we scrutinize the effects of rescaling and the non-stationarity of the flow. We wish to determine how far downstream the flow must travel to sufficiently "forget" the effects of rescaling. The effect of rescaling is of particular interest when investigating low frequency and large scale phenomena, such as coherent flow structures. These large coherent structures are on the order of 10δ in streamwise extent, and have been found at similar conditions to the present study.ootnotetextRinguette, Wu & Mart'in J. Fluid Mech., 594:59-69, 2008. With this data set we will address and quantify the role of rescaling and the rate at which the flow will forget this artificial forcing.

  11. Proceedings of the 17th and 18th NAL Workshops on Investigation and Control of Boundary-Layer Transition

    OpenAIRE

    National Aerospace Laboratory; 航空宇宙技術研究所

    1996-01-01

    The following topics were discussed: vortex shedding, laminar boundary layer measurement, vortex ring, turbulent flow measurement, high Reynolds number turbulence, pulsed flow, boundary layer instability, Ekman boundary layer, sound receptivity, Tollmien-Schlichting wave in supersonic boundary layer, flow field instability, turbulent flow pattern, vorticity distribution in shear flow, turbulence wedge, streamwise vortex mixing, thermal convection, oblique wave generation in boundary layer, in...

  12. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  13. Correlation and prediction of thermophoretic and inertial effects on particle deposition from non-isothermal turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of small particle deposition which can cause hot stage corrosion and/or fouling in combustion turbines operating on fuels containing ash or inorganic salts is investigated. Two boundary layer transport phenomena are shown to assume importance in these cases: particle thermophoresis (migration down a temperature gradient) and particle inertia. Thermophoretic and eddy transport across turbulent boundary layers without and with particle inertia effects are quantitatively analyzed. The effects of streamwise blade curvature on particle transport across turbulent boundary layers are determined. It is shown that these phenomena destroy the analogy between mass and heat transfer or mass and momentum transfer. Also studied are the effects on particle deposition of distributed or localized wall blowing, surface roughness, and mainstream turbulence.

  14. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  15. Sensitivity analysis of WRF model PBL schemes in simulating boundary-layer variables in southern Italy: An experimental campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avolio, E.; Federico, S.; Miglietta, M.

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity of boundary layer variables to five (two non-local and three local) planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parameterization schemes, available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteorological model, is evaluated in an experimental site in Calabria region (southern...... is investigated. On a single-case basis, significantly better results are obtained when the atmospheric conditions near the measurement site are dominated by synoptic forcing rather than by local circulations. From this study, it follows that the two first order non-local schemes, ACM2 and YSU, are the schemes...... with the best performance in representing parameters near the surface and in the boundary layer during the analyzed campaign....

  16. Role of residual layer and large-scale phenomena on the evolution of the boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Faloona, I.; Garrouste, O.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-layer theory and large-eddy simulations are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer on two intensive operational periods during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) campaign: 1st and 2nd of July 2011, when convective boundary layers (CBLs) were observed.

  17. Amendment to "Analytical Solution for the Convectively-Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer": Inclusion of Subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.; Arellano, de J.V.G.

    2013-01-01

    In Ouwersloot and Vila-Guerau de Arellano (Boundary-Layer Meteorol. doi: 10. 1007/s10546-013-9816-z, 2013, this issue), the analytical solutions for the boundary-layer height and scalar evolutions are derived for the convective boundary layer, based on the prognostic equations of mixed-layer slab

  18. The atmospheric boundary layer during wintertime persistent inversions in the Grenoble valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Largeron

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the atmospheric boundary layer dynamics in the Grenoble valleys during persistent inversions, for 5 months during the 2006-2007 winter. During a persistent inversion, the boundary layer contains a layer with a positive vertical temperature gradient over a few days. Temperature data recorded on the valley sidewalls are first used. A bulk measure of the boundary layer stability, based upon the temperature difference between the valley top and the valley bottom, is introduced and a criterion is proposed to detect persistent inversions. We show that this criterion is equivalently expressed in terms of the heat deficit inside the boundary layer. Nine episodes are detected and coincide with the PM10-polluted periods of the 2006-2007 winter.Secondly, the five strongest and longest persistent inversions are simulated using the MesoNH model. Focus is made on the stagnation stage of the episode, during which the inversion exhibits a diurnal cycle that does not significantly evolve from day to day. Whatever the episode, the inversion develops from the ground over a height of about 1200 m, with a nighttime temperature strength of about 20 K.The boundary-layer dynamics within the inversion layer are fully decoupled from the (anticyclonic, weak synoptic flow, independent from the synoptic-wind direction and similar whatever the episode. This implies that these dynamics are controlled by thermal winds and solely depends upon the geometry of the topography and upon the radiative cooling of the ground.Finally, a two-day high-resolution simulation is made for the strongest case, representative of any persistent inversion. The flow pattern displays a well-defined spatial structure, with a vertical layering resulting from the superposition of the down-valley winds flowing from the different valleys surrounding Grenoble. This pattern persists all day long over a shallow convective layer of about 50 m forming above the ground during the reduced

  19. Dry and moist convection in the boundary layer over the Black Forest - a combined analysis of in situ and remote sensing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Kalthoff

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the COPS experiment performed in south-western Germany and eastern France in 2007, several insitu and remote sensing systems were operated at Hornisgrinde - the highest summit of the northern Black Forest mountains. For this case study, data from a surface flux station, radiosondes, cloud camera, cloud radar, wind lidar, water vapour differential absorption lidar, and microwave profiler were used to investigate turbulence characteristics in cloud-free and cloud-topped convective boundary layers (CBLs. Short time intervals were analysed, during which dry and moist convective cells occurred, in order to obtain insight of the processes that determine the turbulent characteristic in the CBL. The frequently-used aerosol concentration was used to calculate the CBL height, zi . It was found that active CBL clouds penetrated deeper into the free troposphere than dry convective cells. In the cloud-free CBL the normalised variance of the vertical velocity, ?w 2, decreased to zero approximately at zi , while ?w 2 was nearly constant between 0.5 and 1 z/zi in the cloud-topped CBL. The higher normalised ?w 2 values in the cloud layer could be attributed to the additional elevated heat source due to condensation. In the cloud-free CBL the latent heat flux showed a strong decrease between 0.7 and 1.1 z/zi , i.e., it considerably moistened the upper part of the CBL and entrainment zone. In the cloud-topped CBL the latent heat flux decreased significantly above the CBL top only and became zero at about 1.4 z/zi . CBL height calculations, which took measures of the turbulence into account, resulted in normalised ?w 2 and E profiles, which became zero at the CBL top and appeared more appropriate for CBL height scaling over complex terrain. The case studies demonstrated that only the combined use of different monitoring systems allowed for the recording of the entire structure of the convective cells and that synergetic measurements in cloud-topped CBLs were

  20. Modelling wave-boundary layer interaction for wind power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, A. D.; Barstad, I.; Gupta, A.; Adakudlu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Marine wind power production facilities are subjected to direct and indirect effects of ocean waves. Direct effects include forces due to wave orbital motions and slamming of the water surface under breaking wave conditions, corrosion and icing due to sea spray, and the effects of wave-generated air bubbles. Indirect effects include include the influence of waves on the aerodynamic sea-surface roughness, air turbulence, the wind velocity profile, and air velocity oscillations, wave-induced currents and sediment transport. Field observations within the boundary layers from floating measurement may have to be corrected to account for biases induced as a result of wave-induced platform motions. To estimate the effect of waves on the atmospheric boundary layer we employ the WRF non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmosphere model, using the default YSU planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme and the WAM spectral wave model, running simultaneously and coupled using the open-source coupler MCEL which can interpolate between different model grids and timesteps. The model is driven by the WRF wind velocity at 10 m above the surface. The WRF model receives from WAM updated air-sea stress fields computed from the wind input source term, and computes new fields for the Charnock parameter and marine surface aerodynamic roughness. Results from a North Atlantic and Nordic Seas simulation indicate that the two-way coupling scheme alters the 10 metre wind predicted by WRF by up to 10 per cent in comparison with a simulation using a constant Charnock parameter. The changes are greatest in developing situations with passages of fronts, moving depressions and squalls. This may be directly due to roughness length changes, or may be due to changes in the timing of front/depression/squall passages. Ongoing work includes investigating the effect of grid refinement/nesting, employing different PBL schemes, and allowing the wave field to change the direction of the total air-sea stress.