WorldWideScience

Sample records for boundary upwelling systems

  1. A comparative study of biological production in eastern boundary upwelling systems using an artificial neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Lachkar; Gruber, N.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are highly productive ocean regions. Yet, substantial differences in net primary production (NPP) exist within and between these systems for reasons that are still not fully understood. Here, we explore the leading physical processes and environmental factors controlling NPP in EBUS through a comparative study of the California, Canary, Benguela, and Humboldt Current systems. The NPP drivers are identified with the aid of an artifici...

  2. A comparative study of biological production in eastern boundary upwelling systems using an artificial neural network

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Lachkar; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are highly productive ocean regions. Yet, substantial differences in net primary production (NPP) exist within and between these systems for reasons that are still not fully understood. Here, we explore the leading physical processes and environmental factors controlling NPP in EBUS through a comparative study of the California, Canary, Benguela, and Humboldt Current systems. The identification of NPP drivers is done with the aid of an artificial neur...

  3. A comparative study of biological production in eastern boundary upwelling systems using an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Z.; Gruber, N.

    2012-01-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are highly productive ocean regions. Yet, substantial differences in net primary production (NPP) exist within and between these systems for reasons that are still not fully understood. Here, we explore the leading physical processes and environmental factors controlling NPP in EBUS through a comparative study of the California, Canary, Benguela, and Humboldt Current systems. The NPP drivers are identified with the aid of an artificial neural network analysis based on self-organizing-maps (SOM). Our results suggest that in addition to the expected NPP enhancing effect of stronger equatorward alongshore wind, three factors have an inhibiting effect: (1) strong eddy activity, (2) narrow continental shelf, and (3) deep mixed layer. The co-variability of these 4 drivers defines in the context of the SOM a continuum of 100 patterns of NPP regimes in EBUS. These are grouped into 4 distinct classes using a Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering (HAC) method. Our objective classification of EBUS reveals important variations of NPP regimes within each of the four EBUS, particularly in the Canary and Benguela Current systems. Our results show that the Atlantic EBUS are generally more productive and more sensitive to upwelling favorable winds because of weaker factors inhibiting NPP. Perturbations of alongshore winds associated with climate change may therefore lead to contrasting biological responses in the Atlantic and the Pacific EBUS.

  4. A comparative study of biological production in eastern boundary upwelling systems using an artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS are highly productive ocean regions. Yet, substantial differences in net primary production (NPP exist within and between these systems for reasons that are still not fully understood. Here, we explore the leading physical processes and environmental factors controlling NPP in EBUS through a comparative study of the California, Canary, Benguela, and Humboldt Current systems. The identification of NPP drivers is done with the aid of an artificial neural network analysis based on self-organizing-maps (SOMs. We show that in addition to the expected NPP enhancing effect of stronger alongshore wind, three factors have an inhibiting effect: (1 strong eddy activity, (2 narrow continental shelf, and (3 deep mixed layer. The co-variability of these 4 drivers defines in the context of the SOM a continuum of 100 patterns of NPP regimes in EBUS. These are grouped into 4 distinct classes using a Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering (HAC method. Our objective classification of EBUS reveals important variations of NPP regimes within each of the four EBUS, particularly in the Canary and Benguela Current systems. Our results show that the Atlantic EBUS are generally more productive and more sensitive to upwelling favorable winds because of a weaker factors inhibiting NPP. Perturbations of alongshore winds associated with climate change may therefore lead to contrasting biological responses in the Atlantic and the Pacific EBUS.

  5. Surface mixing and biological activity in the four Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rossi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS are characterized by a high productivity of plankton associated with large commercial fisheries, thus playing key biological and socio-economical roles. Since they are populated by several physical oceanic structures such as filaments and eddies, which interact with the biological processes, it is a major challenge to study this sub- and mesoscale activity in connection with the chlorophyll distribution. The aim of this work is to make a comparative study of these four upwelling systems focussing on their surface stirring, using the Finite Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLEs, and their biological activity, based on satellite data. First, the spatial distribution of horizontal mixing is analysed from time averages and from probability density functions of FSLEs, which allow us to divide each areas in two different subsystems. Then we studied the temporal variability of surface stirring focussing on the annual and seasonal cycle. We also proposed a ranking of the four EBUS based on the averaged mixing intensity. When investigating the links with chlorophyll concentration, the previous subsystems reveal distinct biological signatures. There is a global negative correlation between surface horizontal mixing and chlorophyll standing stocks over the four areas. To try to better understand this inverse relationship, we consider the vertical dimension by looking at the Ekman-transport and vertical velocities. We suggest the possibility of a changing response of the phytoplankton to sub/mesoscale turbulence, from a negative effect in the very productive coastal areas to a positive one in the open ocean. This study provides new insights for the understanding of the variable biological productivity in the ocean, which results from both dynamics of the marine ecosystem and of the 3-D turbulent medium.

  6. Ocean-Atmosphere-Land interactions and their consequences on the biogeochemical variability in Eastern Boundary Upwelling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, L.; McWilliams, J. C.; Deutsch, C.; Molemaker, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep water along Eastern Boundary Upwelling System (EBUS) yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems, but the effect of coastal wind shape and ocean-atmosphere interactions on regional Net Primary Production (NPP) is not well known. Here, we first show how the spatial and temporal variability of nearshore winds in EBUS is affected by orography, coastline shape, and air-sea interaction. Using regional atmospheric simulations over the US West Coast, we determine monthly characteristics of the wind drop-off, and show that when the mountain orography is combined with the coastline shape of a cape, it has the biggest influence on wind drop-off. Then, using a realistic ocean model of the California Current System, we show that the slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity, despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On a regional scale, the wind drop-off leads to a substantially higher NPP, especially when it occurs over a broad swath, even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of NPP from upwelling is effected by alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. When peak winds extend all the way to the coast, alongshore current shear is stronger, and a more energetic eddy field subducts nutrients offshore and out of the photic zone, reducing overall productivity. This causal sequence is supported by satellite remote sensing. Finally, using a interanual coupled simulation over the US West Coast, we show the ocean-atmosphere interactions can also reduce the eddy activity by pumping energy out from the eddies, reducing their amplitude and rotation speed, and leading to more realistic eddies characteristics. This may also reduce the eddy quenching and therefore increase the NPP. This complex ocean-atmosphere-land interactions imply that simple wind indices are incomplete predictors of productivity in EBUS.

  7. Surface-to-subsurface temperature variations during the last century in a western boundary upwelling system (Southeastern, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venancio, Igor M.; Gomes, Vitor P.; Belem, Andre L.; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S.

    2016-08-01

    The upper thermal gradient of a western boundary upwelling system was reconstructed for the last 100 years. The reconstruction was based on oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) of four planktonic foraminifera species derived from two boxcores (BCCF10-01 and BCCF10-04) located in the southeastern Brazilian shelf. Calcification depths of the four planktonic foraminifera species were estimated in order to understand which layer of the water column was assessed. Changes in the upper thermal gradient were evaluated by using the δ18O difference from the surface-dwelling species Globigerinoides ruber (pink) and the deep-dwelling Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. The relative abundance of cold-water species and the δ13C of G. ruber (pink) were also used to evaluate changes on the surface layer. Our results demonstrate a trend to reduction on the temperature difference (∆T) between the surface and the thermocline layer towards the present for both cores, together with an increase on the relative abundance of cold-water species for the mid-shelf core (BCCF10-04) and a decrease in δ13C values of G. ruber (pink) for both cores. Despite the observable trend on the proxies, only the relative abundance of Turborotalita quinqueloba and the δ13C of G. ruber (pink) for the mid-shelf core presented statistically significant trends. These results were related to an increase in South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) intrusions in the sub-surface layer, especially on the middle shelf region. The SACW intrusions would lower the sea surface temperature and would bring a depleted δ13C of the dissolved inorganic carbon signature to the surface, which would be in agreement with our findings. Moreover, these mid-shelf SACW intrusions in the region were attributed to the Ekman pumping (wind stress curl-driven), which was previously reported to be an important mechanism in this upwelling system. The major outcomes to this western boundary current ecosystem from an intensification of the mid

  8. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gutknecht

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (northern Benguela using the high-resolution hydrodynamic ROMS model. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate, and chlorophyll a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g, NH4+ and NO2− oxidation, NO3− reduction, and anammox as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking, and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss, and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the explicit parameterization of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is necessary to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with the OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen

  9. Coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling including O2-dependent processes in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems: application in the Benguela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS contribute to one fifth of the global catches in the ocean. Often associated with Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Important bioavailable N loss due to denitrification and anammox processes as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g, N2O occur also in these EBUS. However, their dynamics are currently crudely represented in global models. In the climate change context, improving our capability to properly represent these areas is crucial, due to anticipated changes in the winds, productivity, and oxygen content. We developed a biogeochemical model (BioEBUS taking into account the main processes linked with EBUS and associated OMZs. We implemented this model in a 3-D realistic coupled physical/biogeochemical configuration in the Namibian upwelling system (Northern Benguela using the high-resolution hydrodynamical model ROMS. We present here a validation using in situ and satellite data as well as diagnostic metrics, and sensitivity analyses of key parameters and N2O parameterizations. The impact of parameter values on the OMZ off Namibia, on N loss, and on N2O concentrations and emissions is detailed. The model realistically reproduces the vertical distribution and seasonal cycle of observed oxygen, nitrate and Chl a concentrations, and the rates of microbial processes (e.g. NH4+ and NO2− oxidation, NO3− reduction and anammox as well. Based on our sensitivity analyses, biogeochemical parameter values associated with organic matter decomposition, vertical sinking and nitrification play a key role for the low-oxygen water content, N loss and N2O concentrations in the OMZ. Moreover, the importance of both steps of nitrification, ammonium oxidation to nitrate with nitrite as an explicit intermediate, is highlighted to improve the representation of microbial activity linked with OMZ. The simulated minimum oxygen concentrations are driven by the

  10. Nitrogen fixation in sediments along a depth transect through the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems off Peru and Mauritania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gier, J.; Sommer, S.; Löscher, C. R.; Dale, A.; Schmitz, R. A.; Treude, T.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of benthic nitrogen (N2) fixation and its relevance for N cycling in the Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) are still unknown. Recent studies confirm that benthic N2 fixation can be coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) and that several species of sulfate reducing bacteria have the genetic ability to fix N due to the presence of the gene encoding for the nitrogenase enzyme. We investigated benthic N2 fixation and SR in the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone at 12°S and in the Mauritanian upwelling system at 18°N along a depth transect. Sediments were retrieved by a multicorer and a benthic lander at six stations in both regions. Benthic N2 fixation occurred throughout the sediment in both EBUS. Off Peru the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.4 mmol N/m2/d was measured inside the core of the OMZ at 253 m water depth. Off Mauritania the highest integrated (0-20 cm) N2 fixation rate of 0.15 mmol N/m2/d was measured at 90 m, coinciding with a low bottom water oxygen concentration (30 μM). N2 fixation depth profiles often overlapped with SR activity. Moreover, sequencing data yielded insights into the composition and diversity of the nifH gene pool in EBUS sediments. Interestingly, detected sequences in both EBUS clustered with SR bacteria, such as Desulfovibrio vulgaris and several of the novel detected clades belonged to uncultured diazotrophs. Our results suggest that N2 fixation and SR were coupled to a large extent in both regions. However, potential environmental factors controlling benthic diazotrophs in the EBUS appear to be the availability of sulfide and organic matter. Additionally, no inhibition of N2 fixation at high ammonium concentrations was found, which highlights gaps in our knowledge regards the interaction between ammonium availability and diazotrophy. Our results contribute to a better understanding of N cycling in EBUS sediments and sources of fixed N.

  11. Eastern Boundary Upwelling Ecosystems: Review and Observing Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, F.; Garçon, V. C.; Dewitte, B.; Montes, I.

    2015-12-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) cover less than 3% of the world ocean surface but play a significant role in the climate system, and contribute disproportionately to ocean biological productivity with up to 40% of the reported global fish catch. Coupled with the vast coastal human populations, these regions play key socio-economic roles. Human pressure on these productive ecosystems and their services is increasing, requiring new and evolving scientific approaches to collect information and use it in management. Here we review and compare the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the four major EBUS: Benguela, California, Northwest Africa and Peru/Chile. Long-term trends and climate variability are emphasized. Technologies and systems for observing and understanding the changing marine ecosystems of EBUS are discussed.

  12. An annually-resolved palaeoenvironmental archive for the Eastern Boundary North Atlantic upwelling system: Sclerochronology of Glycymeris glycymeris (Bivalvia) shells from the Iberian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Pedro; Monteiro, Carlos; Butler, Paul; Reynolds, David; Richardson, Christopher; Gaspar, Miguel; Scourse, James

    2015-04-01

    The seasonally variable western Iberia upwelling system, albeit placed at a crucial climatic boundary position to record high frequency climate events, lacks well-dated high-resolution records of environmental variability. Bivalve shells provide robust high-resolution archives of oceanographic and climatic variability on timescales of decades to millennia. In particular, the North Atlantic Ocean region has recently seen several noteworthy sclerochronological and geochemical reconstructions based on bivalve shells (mainly Arctica islandica) of high frequency oceanographic and climatic conditions during the last millennium. However, due to the absence of Arctica islandica and similarly long-lived bivalves, sclerochronological palaeoenvironmental studies of southern European coastal shelf seas are scarce. In particular, none of these studies focus on reconstructing the variability of an eastern boundary upwelling system. The relatively long-lived bivalve (>100 years) Glycymeris glycymeris occurs in European and North West African coastal shelf seas and provides a valid annually resolved archive of environmental conditions during growth. Annual growth increment width series from living G. glycymeris shells, collected in 2014 on the western Iberian continental shelf (ca. 35 m water depth), were used to construct a statistically robust, ca. 70-year long absolutely-dated chronology. Sub-annually resolved (11 to 22 samples per year) oxygen stable isotope (δ18Oshell) data covering three years of shell growth, together with the direct evaluation of the time of growth mark deposition in shells collected during the autumn and winter months, were used to constrain the season of growth and to evaluate the seasonal bias of the sea-surface temperature signal preserved in the δ18Oshelldata. The growth increment width and δ18Oshell series, once robustly calibrated against modelled and instrumental oceanographic and climatic series, potentially provide novel insights into the

  13. Retention controls on-shelf hypoxia in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. S.; Long, M. C.; Hales, B. R.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Samelson, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    A maximally simple, coupled physical-biogeochemical box model is used to examine interactions controlling seasonal hypoxia over the continental shelf in an idealized Eastern Boundary upwelling system (EBUS). On-shelf bottom oxygen drawdown is controlled by the balance between flushing with offshore source waters and the degree to which surface particulate organic carbon (POC) production and its subsequent sinking and respiration are retained over the shelf and focused on the bottom. In the model, POC production is controlled by wind-driven upwelling of a generic nutrient to the surface, balanced by respiration and sinking. The degree to which this production occurs over shelf is a balance between the net POC growth rate η, and the upwelling driven shelf flushing rate λ, equivalent to the Ekman upwelling index scaled by the shelf width and surface layer depth. Initial oxygen drawdown follows this exponential rate of surface POC accumulation over shelf (α=η-λ), and so is slower for rapid upwelling (large λ) or nutrient limited conditions (small η). Retention efficiency indicates that up to 40% or more of upwelled nutrients can be retained over the shelf and contribute to oxygen drawdown. Fluctuations in the amplitude of the upwelling forcing can systematically reduce the potential for oxygen depletion below these estimates, especially when surface sinking export is rapid or forcing is strong.

  14. What controls biological production in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Lachkar; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of net primary production (NPP) in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the wind-driven upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of NPP to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003). Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS), we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light,...

  15. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Lachkar; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003). Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS), we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and c...

  16. Upwelling processes along a western boundary current in the Abrolhos-Campos region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, A. L.; Cirano, M.; Pereira, J.; Marta-Almeida, M.

    2014-08-01

    Upwelling events observed from the years 2003 to 2011 were analyzed. Our focus was on the Abrolhos-Campos region (ACR, 15°S-23°S), which is located along the Brazilian Margin and influenced by a western boundary current, the Brazil Current (BC). Satellite sea surface temperature, National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) and Global Forecast System (GFS) wind data were used to complement the results of a high-resolution regional oceanic model to investigate the occurrence of and the mechanisms responsible for intense upwelling events in this region. These events were more frequent from 20°S to 23°S. Over 90% of the identified upwelling events were influenced by favorable wind stress. Surface Ekman transport was found to be more important for the region from Prado (17°S) to Marataízes (21°S), whereas upward Ekman pumping played a more important role from 22°S to 23°S. Current-driven upwelling processes associated with the location of the BC as well as its velocity and meso-scale activity were also analyzed. The results showed that these mechanisms are highly influenced by the local topography. Topographic effects exerted via the acceleration of the BC are more obvious in the southern ACR, while in the Prado region, BC cyclonic meanders tend to be more relevant. Moreover, eddy-driven upwelling increases in the southward direction after the passage of the Vitória-Trindade Ridge (20°S), an important submarine chain, which acts to constrain and modulate the southward flow of the BC.

  17. Behaviorally Mediated Larval Transport in Upwelling Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly advective upwelling systems along the western margins of continents are widely believed to transport larvae far offshore in surface currents resulting in larval wastage, limited recruitment, and increased population connectivity. However, suites of larval behaviors effectively mediate interspecific differences in the extent of cross-shelf migrations between nearshore adult habitats and offshore larval habitats. Interspecific differences in behavior determining whether larvae complete d...

  18. Controls on Primary Productivity and its Measurement in Coastal Upwelling Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jacox, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Eastern Boundary Current systems, running along the west coasts of Africa and the Americas, are among the most biologically productive oceanic ecosystems. Their disproportionately large contributions to global marine primary productivity (photosynthesis) and fish catch are supported by upwelling of deep, nutrient rich water, a process driven by the interaction of surface winds and Earth's rotation. Upwelling in these systems may be forced by two mechanisms: equatorward winds at the coastal bo...

  19. Modelling the impact of Baltic Sea upwelling on the atmospheric boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Sproson, David; Sahlée, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Coastal upwelling, with a strong sea-surface temperature (SST) signal, is extremely common in the Baltic Sea during the summer months. Although the spatial scale of upwelling is small, its high frequency of occurrence in the semi-enclosed basin may allow the SST signature to have significant feedback onto the lower atmosphere. In this paper, we develop a method to remove the signature of upwelling from SST fields, and use these modified SST fields as the lower boundary condition of an atmosph...

  20. Modelling shelf-ocean exchange and its biogeochemical consequences in coastal upwelling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar

    The biogeochemical cycles of organic carbon, nutrients, oxygen, and sulfur in the oceans have been suggested to dominantly occur across the shelf–ocean transition over the continental margin, although this zone represents only a small percentage of the global ocean area. Coastal upwelling zones...... in eastern boundary upwelling systems is an example of the most productive ocean waters over continental margins where intense supply of nutrients occur from deeper ocean waters. Interesting questions arise related to the biogeochemical cycles in such upwelling systems; such as 1) how the recently observed...... these questions centering on shelf–ocean exchange and biogeochemical cycle in the coastal upwelling systems under oxic and anoxic conditions. Firstly, I developed a new biogeochemical model which resolves coupling between cycles of the elements nitrogen, oxygen, phosphate, and sulfur by considering several key...

  1. A Model Analysis for the Design and Deployment of an Eulerian Sediment Trap Mooring Array in a Western Boundary Upwelling System from Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    URSULA MENDOZA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design and configuration of a Eulerian sediment trap mooring array, which was deployed at the shelf edge (zm ≈ 140 m 80 km off Cabo Frio, SE- Brazil (23° S. The site was subject to interplay between the Tropical Waters (TW of the Brazil Current (BC, intrusions from the South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW, which are the source of upwelling in the region, and other oceanographic processes. Detailed computations were used to optimize the total weight, buoyancy balance, and maximum acceptable tilt to avoid hydrodynamic bias in the trapping efficiency and array adaptation to the local oceanographic conditions with the assistance of Matlab and Muringa programs and Modular Ocean Model 4.0 (MOM; i.e., to assert the vertical distribution of the meridional current component. The velocity range of the current component was determined by short term measurements to be between 0.1 and 0.5 m/s. Projections led to a resulting minimum anchor weight of 456 kg. The necessary line tension was ascertained by using the appropriate distribution of a series of buoys along the array, which finally attained a high vertical load of 350 kg because of the attached oceanographic equipment. Additional flotation devices resulted in a stable mooring array as reflected by their low calculated tilt (2.6° ± 0.6°. A low drag of 16 N was computed for the maximum surface current velocity of 0.5 m/s. The Reynolds number values ranged from 4 × 104 to 2 × 105 and a cone-trap aspect ratio of 1.75 was used to assess the trap sampling efficiency upon exposure to different current velocities.

  2. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  3. Relation between Upwelling Intensity and the Variability of Physical and Chemical Parameters in the Southern Benguela Upwelling System

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Ebrahiem Ismail; Johannes Jacobus Agenbag; Stephanie de Villiers; Bhekumusa Jabulani Ximba

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which wind-driven seasonal upwelling cycles manifest in surface ocean temperature and nutrient variability along a monitoring line in the Southern Benguela upwelling system was investigated. Monitoring conducted monthly over a six-year period shows that surface temperature and nutrient concentrations exhibit very poor seasonality and weak correlation with the upwelling index. This is, despite clear evidence for spatial inshore-offshore gradients in temperature, nutrients, and ch...

  4. Partial decoupling of primary productivity from upwelling in the California Current system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Deutsch, Curtis; McWilliams, James C.; Frenzel, Hartmut; Liang, Jun-Hong; Colas, François

    2016-07-01

    Coastal winds and upwelling of deep nutrient-rich water along subtropical eastern boundaries yield some of the ocean's most productive ecosystems. Simple indices of coastal wind strength have been extensively used to estimate the timing and magnitude of biological productivity on seasonal and interannual timescales and underlie the prediction that anthropogenic climate warming will increase the productivity by making coastal winds stronger. The effect of wind patterns on regional net primary productivity is not captured by such indices and is poorly understood. Here we present evidence, using a realistic model of the California Current system and satellite measurements, that the observed slackening of the winds near the coast has little effect on near-shore phytoplankton productivity despite a large reduction in upwelling velocity. On the regional scale the wind drop-off leads to substantially higher production even when the total upwelling rate remains the same. This partial decoupling of productivity from upwelling results from the impact of wind patterns on alongshore currents and the eddies they generate. Our results imply that productivity in eastern boundary upwelling systems will be better predicted from indices of the coastal wind that account for its offshore structure.

  5. What controls biological productivity in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the biological productivity in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of productivity to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of biological productivity to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the California CS and Canary CS using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. We find the nutrient content of the euphotic zone to be 20 % smaller in the Canary CS relative to the California CS. Yet, the biological productivity is 50 % smaller in the latter. This is due to: (1 a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS, related to a more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS which lead to larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing the productivity. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be associated with the wider continental shelves and the lower eddy activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and enhancing the coupling between new and export production in the Northwest African system. Our results suggest that climate change induced perturbations such as upwelling favorable wind intensification might lead to contrasting biological responses in the California CS and the Canary CS, with major implications for the biogeochemical cycles

  6. Shelf/Offshore interactions in the Benguela upwelling system using a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical model

    OpenAIRE

    Gutknecht, E.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this PhD thesis is the study of the shelf/offshore interactions in the Benguela upwelling system, off South African and Namibian coasts, using a numerical model as well as satellite and in-situ data. A Biogeochemical model adapted for the Benguela Upwelling System (BioBUS), taking into account the main processes linked with eastern boundary upwelling systems and associated oxygen minimum zones, has been developed and coupled with the ROMS hydrodynamical model, in order t...

  7. Does mesoscale matters in decadal changes observed in the northern Canary upwelling system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relvas, P.; Luís, J.; Santos, A. M. P.

    2009-04-01

    The Western Iberia constitutes the northern limb of the Canary Current Upwelling System, one of the four Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems of the world ocean. The strong dynamic link between the atmosphere and the ocean makes these systems highly sensitive to global change, ideal to monitor and investigate its effects. In order to investigate decadal changes of the mesoscale patterns in the Northern Canary upwelling system (off Western Iberia), the field of the satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) trends was built at the pixel scale (4x4 km) for the period 1985-2007, based on the monthly mean data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on board NOAA series satellites, provided by the NASA Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The time series were limited to the nighttime passes to avoid the solar heating effect and a suite of procedures were followed to guarantee that the temperature trends were not biased towards the seasonally more abundant summer data, when the sky is considerably clear. A robust linear fit was applied to each individual pixel, crossing along the time the same pixel in all the processed monthly mean AVHRR SST images from 1985 until 2007. The field of the SST trends was created upon the slopes of the linear fits applied to each pixel. Monthly mean SST time series from the one degree enhanced International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) and from near-shore measurements collected on a daily basis by the Portuguese Meteorological Office (IM) are also used to compare the results and extend the analysis back until 1960. A generalized warming trend is detected in the coastal waters off Western Iberia during the last decades, no matter which data set we analyse. However, significant spatial differences in the warming rates are observed in the satellite-derived SST trends. Remarkably, off the southern part of the Western Iberia the known

  8. Influence of external climate forcing on coastal upwelling systems analysed in ensemble of past millennium climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim, Nele; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit; Yi, Xin; Emeis, Kay

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are highly productive coastal ocean areas where nutrient rich, cold water upwells by the action of favorable winds. Observations over the 20th century and ocean sediment records, which may be indicative of upwelling, display an intensification due to stronger external climate forcing, such as increasing greenhouse gas concentrations or changes in solar irradiance. This intensification is compatible with the hypothesis put forward by Bakun (1990) that a stronger external radiative forcing should lead to a more intense coastal upwelling. Here, we analyze ensemble of simulations covering the past millennium with the aim of identifying and quantifying the role of external climate forcing on upwelling in the major Eastern Boundary Upwelling System. We analyse the decadal variability and centennial trends of upwelling in ensemble of simulations with the global climate model MPI-ESM covering the past millennium, the last 150 years and the next 100 years. The future simulations were driven by three IPCC scenarios of concentrations of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, RCP2.5, RCP4.5 and RCP 8.5. For the past millennium and the last 150 years, coastal upwelling does not show any imprint of external forcing. This result indicates that chaotic internal variability has dominated upwelling intensity in major upwelling regions over the last thousand years and even since industrialisation up to present. For the 21st century, all ensemble members show a consistent and significant intensification of upwelling in the strongest scenario RCP8.5 for the Benguela upwelling region, consistent and significant weakening for Morocco and California, and no significant change for the Peruvian upwelling. Weaker scenarios do not produce consistent long-term trends that are replicated in all ensemble members. The results are confirmed by analysing another ensemble of past millennium simulations with the model CESM-CAM5 (Community Earth System Model

  9. Winter conditioning of the Cascadian margin upwelling system: Remote forcing and coastal river influences (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, B. R.; Goni, M. A.; Evans, W.; Harris, K. E.; Siedlecki, S. A.; Skyllingstad, E. D.; Wall, C.; Wetz, M.; White, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascadian margin stretches along the North American Pacific coast from Cape Mendocino to Vancouver Island, and across the land-ocean margin from the crest of the coastal mountains to the California Current. Carbonate system chemistry in these coastal waters is among the most dynamic in the world, with high net community productivity driving the system to a regionally important CO2 sink, while upwelled, respiration-influenced waters carry such elevated CO2 that they are often corrosive to biogenic carbonates. Most of the focus on this ecosystem has been on the influence of the seasonal upwelling and interaction with the upper thermocline of the ocean interior; recently, however, the downwelling-season has been recognized as critical in shaping the carbon cycling of the ecosystem. We present a combination of in-water survey and mooring data from river, estuary, and shelf waters; remote-sensing of coastal surface waters and watershed precipitation; and modeling results describing the physics of coastal circulation and storm-event precipitation and river discharge that shows how the winter conditions control carbon cycling. Coastally-trapped internal waves propagating northward from remote upwelling regions to the south lead to shoaling of the pycnocline such that upwelled source waters are present far inshore of the shelfbreak months before the onset of upwelling favorable winds. The close proximity of upwelled source waters to inner shelf upwelling locations leads to rapid transition in response to late winter and early spring upwelling favorable wind events. Winter storms and closely coupled flooding events deliver regionally significant amounts of nutrient-rich, low-CO2 fresh waters to the coastal ocean during downwelling conditions that retain these inputs on the shelf, and this fuels phytoplankton blooms that are a significant contribution to the annual net community production. These blooms and river influences maintain low coastal surface water pCO2 during

  10. What controls biological production in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of net primary production (NPP in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the wind-driven upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of NPP to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of NPP to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the two upwelling systems using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen-based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. Using identical ecological/biogeochemical parameters, our coupled model simulates a level of NPP in the California CS that is 50 % smaller than that in the Canary CS, in agreement with observationally based estimates. We find this much lower NPP in the California CS despite phytoplankton in this system having nearly 20 % higher nutrient concentrations available to fuel their growth. This conundrum can be explained by: (1 phytoplankton having a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS; a consequence of more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS, which permit a larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing NPP. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be a result of the wider continental shelves and the lower mesoscale activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and reducing the spatial decoupling between new and export production in the Canary CS. Our results suggest that climate change

  11. Estimates of potential new production in the Java-Sumatra upwelling system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xing; LIAO Xiaomei; ZHAN Haigang; LIU Hailong

    2012-01-01

    The Java-Sumatra upwelling is one of the most important upwelling systems in the Indian Ocean,with maximum upwelling intensity in July through August.To estimate the nitrate supplied by upwelling,we developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model to calculate the mean vertical speed and determine the depth of upwelling.We used in-situ vertical nitrate profiles to assess nitrate concentration in the upwelled waters,and calculated the nitrate supply as the product of nitrate concentration and vertical transport obtained from the numerical model.The calculated result represents potential new production generated in the upwelling region.We found that on the event time scale (monthly) of Java-Sumatra upwelling,water brought to the surface originated from locations 100-m deep,giving a nitrate supply of 93.77× 103 mol/s and potential new production of 1.02× 1014 gC/a.

  12. Pliocene-Pleistocene variability of upwelling activity, productivity and nutrient cycle in the Benguela Upwelling System and the Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Etourneau, Johan

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study is to explore the long term Plio-Pleistocene variability of coastal and open ocean upwelling systems by reconstructing for the last ~3.5 Ma, sea surface temperature (SST), primary productivity and nutrient cycling in the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) and the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP), two areas particularly sensible and influential to climate change.

  13. The influence of summer upwelling at the western boundary of the Cantabrian coast

    OpenAIRE

    Prego, R; Varela, Manuel; De Castro, M.; Ospina-Álvarez, Natalia; García-Soto, Carlos; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent characterizations of atmospheric conditions favorable to upwelling events in the Western Cantabrian Sea have stressed the need to analyze the significance of the orientation of the coast on the phenomenon of upwelling. Surface-wind fields for the northwestern Galician marine area were provided by the QuikSCAT satellite and an SST map was elaborated using the NASA GHRSST satellite data. A cruise was conducted aboard the RV Lura in June 2009 during northern prevailing winds. Data of ther...

  14. Biophysical interactions in the Cabo Frio upwelling system, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Augusto Coelho-Souza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The rising of cold water from deeper levels characterizes coastal upwelling systems. This flow makes nutrients available in the euphotic layer, which enhances phytoplankton production and growth. On the Brazilian coast, upwelling is most intense in the Cabo Frio region (RJ. The basic knowledge of this system was reviewed in accordance with concepts of biophysical interactions. The high frequency and amplitude of the prevailing winds are the main factor promoting the rise of South Atlantic Central Water, but meanders and eddies in the Brazil Current as well as local topography and coast line are also important. Upwelling events are common during spring/summer seasons. Primary biomass is exported by virtue of the water circulation and is also controlled by rapid zooplankton predation. Small pelagic fish regulate plankton growth and in their turn are preyed on by predatory fish. Sardine furnishes an important regional fish stock. Shoreline irregularities define the embayment formation of the Marine Extractive Reserve of Arraial do Cabo making it an area with evident different intensities of upwelled water that harbors high species diversity. Consequently, on a small spatial scale there are environments with tropical and subtropical features, a point to be explored as a particularity of this ecosystem.Os sistemas costeiros de ressurgência são caracterizados pela ascensão de águas frias que tornam os nutrientes disponíveis na camada eufótica para o crescimento e aumento da produção fitoplanctônica. No Brasil, a região do Cabo Frio (RJ é o principal sistema de ressurgência costeira. O objetivo desse artigo foi revisar o atual conhecimento desse sistema através dos conceitos sobre interações biofísicas. A ascensão da Água Central do Atlântico Sul ocorre devido à alta frequência e amplitude dos ventos, à presença de meandros e vórtices na Corrente do Brasil, além da topografia local e da linha de costa. Os eventos de ressurg

  15. Defining seascapes for marine unconsolidated shelf sediments in an eastern boundary upwelling region: The southern Benguela as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karenyi, Natasha; Sink, Kerry; Nel, Ronel

    2016-02-01

    Marine unconsolidated sediment habitats, the largest benthic ecosystem, are considered physically controlled ecosystems driven by a number of local physical processes. Depth and sediment type are recognised key drivers of these ecosystems. Seascape (i.e., marine landscape) habitat classifications are based solely on consistent geophysical features and provide an opportunity to define unconsolidated sediment habitats based on processes which may vary in distribution through space and time. This paper aimed to classify unconsolidated sediment seascapes and explore their diversity in an eastern boundary upwelling region at the macro-scale, using the South African west coast as a case study. Physical variables such as sediment grain size, depth and upwelling-related variables (i.e., maximum chlorophyll concentration, austral summer bottom oxygen concentration and sediment organic carbon content) were included in the analyses. These variables were directly measured through sampling, or collated from existing databases and the literature. These data were analysed using multivariate Cluster, Principal Components Ordination and SIMPER analyses (in PRIMER 6 + with PERMANOVA add-in package). There were four main findings; (i) eight seascapes were identified for the South African west coast based on depth, slope, sediment grain size and upwelling-related variables, (ii) three depth zones were distinguished (inner, middle and outer shelf), (iii) seascape diversity in the inner and middle shelves was greater than the outer shelf, and (iv) upwelling-related variables were responsible for the habitat diversity in both inner and middle shelves. This research demonstrates that the inclusion of productivity and its related variables, such as hypoxia and sedimentary organic carbon, in seascape classifications will enhance the ability to distinguish seascapes on continental shelves, where productivity is most variable.

  16. How will Somali coastal upwelling evolve under future warming scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decastro, M.; Sousa, M. C.; Santos, F.; Dias, J. M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2016-07-01

    Somali upwelling system, the fifth in the world, presents some unique features compared with the other major upwelling systems: 1) it is a Western Boundary Upwelling System located near the Equator and 2) upwelling affects the moisture responsible for monsoon rainfall. The intensity of Somali coastal upwelling during summer was projected for the twenty first century by means of an ensemble of Global Climate Models and Regional Climate Models within the framework of CMIP5 and CORDEX projects, respectively. Regardless global or regional circulation models and the chosen greenhouse warming scenario, the strengthening of Somali coastal upwelling, which increases with latitude, is even higher than observed for the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System. In addition, coastal upwelling strengthening is mainly due to Ekman transport since Ekman pumping shows no clear trend for most of the latitudes. Projected land-sea air temperature and pressure show a clear intensification of land-sea thermal and pressure gradient as a consequence of the global warming, which is likely to affect the strengthening of Somali upwelling verifying the hypothesis of Bakun. As a consequence, projected sea surface temperature warming is less intense nearshore than at oceanic locations, especially at latitudes where upwelling strengthening is more intense.

  17. How will Somali coastal upwelling evolve under future warming scenarios?

    Science.gov (United States)

    deCastro, M; Sousa, M C; Santos, F; Dias, J M; Gómez-Gesteira, M

    2016-01-01

    Somali upwelling system, the fifth in the world, presents some unique features compared with the other major upwelling systems: 1) it is a Western Boundary Upwelling System located near the Equator and 2) upwelling affects the moisture responsible for monsoon rainfall. The intensity of Somali coastal upwelling during summer was projected for the twenty first century by means of an ensemble of Global Climate Models and Regional Climate Models within the framework of CMIP5 and CORDEX projects, respectively. Regardless global or regional circulation models and the chosen greenhouse warming scenario, the strengthening of Somali coastal upwelling, which increases with latitude, is even higher than observed for the Eastern Boundary Upwelling System. In addition, coastal upwelling strengthening is mainly due to Ekman transport since Ekman pumping shows no clear trend for most of the latitudes. Projected land-sea air temperature and pressure show a clear intensification of land-sea thermal and pressure gradient as a consequence of the global warming, which is likely to affect the strengthening of Somali upwelling verifying the hypothesis of Bakun. As a consequence, projected sea surface temperature warming is less intense nearshore than at oceanic locations, especially at latitudes where upwelling strengthening is more intense. PMID:27440455

  18. Trends in the number of extreme hot SST days along the Canary Upwelling System due to the influence of upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xurxo Costoya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Trends in the number of extreme hot days (days with SST anomalies higher than the 95% percentile were analyzed along the Canary Upwelling Ecosystem (CUE over the period 1982- 2012 by means of SST data retrieved from NOAA OI1/4 Degree. The analysis will focus on the Atlantic Iberian sector and the Moroccan sub- region where upwelling is seasonal (spring and summer are permanent, respectively. Trends were analyzed both near coast and at the adjacent ocean where the increase in the number of extreme hot days is higher. Changes are clear at annual scale with an increment of 9.8±0.3 (9.7±0.1 days dec-1 near coast and 11.6±0.2 (13.5±0.1 days dec-1 at the ocean in the Atlantic Iberian sector (Moroccan sub-region. The differences between near shore and ocean trends are especially patent for the months under intense upwelling conditions. During that upwelling season the highest differences in the excess of extreme hot days between coastal and ocean locations (Δn(#days dec-1 occur at those regions where coastal upwelling increase is high. Actually, Δn and upwelling trends have shown to be significantly correlated in both areas, R=0.88 (p<0.01 at the Atlantic Iberian sector and R=0.67 (p<0.01 at the Moroccan sub-region.

  19. Implications of Upwells as Hydrodynamic Jets in a Pulse Jet Mixed System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bamberger, Judith A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report evaluates the physics of the upwell flow in pulse jet mixed systems in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Although the initial downward flow and radial flow from pulse jet mixers (PJMs) has been analyzed in some detail, the upwells have received considerably less attention despite having significant implications for vessel mixing. Do the upwells behave like jets? How do the upwells scale? When will the central upwell breakthrough? What proportion of the vessel is blended by the upwells themselves? Indeed, how the physics of the central upwell is affected by multiple PJMs (e.g., six in the proposed mixing vessels), non-Newtonian rheology, and significant multicomponent solids loadings remain unexplored. The central upwell must satisfy several criteria to be considered a free jet. First, it must travel for several diameters in a nearly constant direction. Second, its velocity must decay with the inverse of elevation. Third, it should have an approximately Gaussian profile. Fourth, the influence of surface or body forces must be negligible. A combination of historical data in a 12.75 ft test vessel, newly analyzed data from the 8 ft test vessel, and conservation of momentum arguments derived specifically for PJM operating conditions demonstrate that the central upwell satisfies these criteria where vigorous breakthrough is achieved. An essential feature of scaling from one vessel to the next is the requirement that the underlying physics does not change adversely. One may have confidence in scaling if (1) correlations and formulas capture the relevant physics; (2) the underlying physics does not change from the conditions under which it was developed to the conditions of interest; (3) all factors relevant to scaling have been incorporated, including flow, material, and geometric considerations; and (4) the uncertainty in the relationships is sufficiently narrow to meet required specifications. Although the central upwell

  20. Decadal variability and trends of the Benguela upwelling system as simulated in a high-resolution ocean simulation

    OpenAIRE

    N. Tim; E. Zorita; B. Hünicke

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the atmospheric drivers of the Benguela upwelling systems is essential to understand its present variability and its past and future changes. We present a statistical analysis of a high-resolution (0.1°) ocean-only simulation driven by observed atmospheric fields over the last 60 years with the aim of identifying the large-scale atmospheric drivers of upwelling variability and trends. The simulation is found to reproduce well the seasonal cycle of upwelling intens...

  1. Decadal variability and trends of the Benguela Upwelling System as simulated in a high-resolution ocean simulation

    OpenAIRE

    N. Tim; E. Zorita; B. Hünicke

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the atmospheric drivers of the Benguela Upwelling Systems is essential to understand its present variability and its past and future changes. We present a statistical analysis of an ocean-only simulation driven by observed atmospheric fields over the last decades with the aim of identifying the large-scale atmospheric drivers of upwelling variability and trends. The simulation is found to reproduce well the seasonal cycle of upwelling intensity, with a maximum in t...

  2. Diatoms Si uptake capacity drives carbon export in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Fatima; Cermeno, Pedro; Lopes, Cristina; Romero, Oscar; Matos, Lélia; Van Iperen, Jolanda; Rufino, Marta; Magalhães, Vitor

    2016-07-01

    Coastal upwelling systems account for approximately half of global ocean primary production and contribute disproportionately to biologically driven carbon sequestration. Diatoms, silica-precipitating microalgae, constitute the dominant phytoplankton in these productive regions, and their abundance and assemblage composition in the sedimentary record is considered one of the best proxies for primary production. The study of the sedimentary diatom abundance (SDA) and total organic carbon content (TOC) in the five most important coastal upwelling systems of the modern ocean (Iberia-Canary, Benguela, Peru-Humboldt, California, and Somalia-Oman) reveals a global-scale positive relationship between diatom production and organic carbon burial. The analysis of SDA in conjunction with environmental variables of coastal upwelling systems such as upwelling strength, satellite-derived net primary production, and surface water nutrient concentrations shows different relations between SDA and primary production on the regional scale. On the global scale, SDA appears modulated by the capacity of diatoms to take up silicic acid, which ultimately sets an upper limit to global export production in these ocean regions.

  3. Diagnosing CO2 fluxes in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Cao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that the interplay between the carbon and nutrients supplied from subsurface waters via biological metabolism would determine the CO2 fluxes in upwelling systems. However, quantificational assessment of such interplay is difficult because of the dynamic nature of both upwelling circulation and the associated biogeochemistry. In this study, the diagnosis approach based upon the carbon/nutrient mass balance in the Ocean-dominated Margin (OceMar framework was applied to resolve the CO2 fluxes in the well-known upwelling system in the US west coast off Oregon, using the data collected along two cross-shelf transects from the inner shelf to the open basin in spring/early summer 2007. Through examining the biological consumption on top of the water mass mixing built upon the total alkalinity–salinity relationship, we successfully predicted and semi-analytically resolved the CO2 fluxes showing strong uptakes from the atmosphere beyond the nearshore regions, primarily resulting from the higher utilization of nutrients relative to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC based on their concurrent inputs from the depth. On the other hand, we showed significant CO2 outgassing in the nearshore regions associated with intensified upwelling and minor biological consumption, where CO2 fluxes could be simplified without considering DIC/nutrient consumption. We reasoned that our approach in conceptualizing OceMar would be in a steady state with balanced DIC and nutrients via both physical transport and biological alterations in comparable timescales.

  4. Microbial diversity of a Brazilian coastal region influenced by an upwelling system and anthropogenic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano C Cury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Upwelling systems are characterised by an intense primary biomass production in the surface (warmest water after the outcrop of the bottom (coldest water, which is rich in nutrients. Although it is known that the microbial assemblage plays an important role in the food chain of marine systems and that the upwelling systems that occur in southwest Brazil drive the complex dynamics of the food chain, little is known about the microbial composition present in this region. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a molecular survey based on SSU rRNA gene from the three domains of the phylogenetic tree of life present in a tropical upwelling region (Arraial do Cabo, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The aim was to analyse the horizontal and vertical variations of the microbial composition in two geographically close areas influenced by anthropogenic activity (sewage disposal/port activity and upwelling phenomena, respectively. A lower estimated diversity of microorganisms of the three domains of the phylogenetic tree of life was found in the water of the area influenced by anthropogenic activity compared to the area influenced by upwelling phenomena. We observed a heterogenic distribution of the relative abundance of taxonomic groups, especially in the Archaea and Eukarya domains. The bacterial community was dominated by Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes phyla, whereas the microeukaryotic community was dominated by Metazoa, Fungi, Alveolata and Stramenopile. The estimated archaeal diversity was the lowest of the three domains and was dominated by uncharacterised marine Crenarchaeota that were most closely related to Marine Group I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The variety of conditions and the presence of different microbial assemblages indicated that the area of Arraial do Cabo can be used as a model for detailed studies that contemplate the correlation between pollution-indicating parameters and the depletion of microbial

  5. Exploring system boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Autopoiesis is normally considered to be the systems theory in law. In this paper complexity theory is presented as an alternative systems approach. In order to position complexity theory as a plausible alternative to autopoiesis I discuss the differing understanding of boundary within each theory, and use this as a vehicle to critique autopoiesis. My critique is situated within systems theory thinking but is external to both autopoiesis and complexity theory (although I must oscillate betwee...

  6. Climate change in the Iberian Upwelling System: a numerical study using GCM downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro Pires, Ana; Nolasco, Rita; Rocha, Alfredo; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Dubert, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    The present work aims at evaluating the impacts of a climate change scenario on the hydrography and dynamics of the Iberian Upwelling System. Using regional ocean model configurations, the study domain is forced with three different sets of surface fields: a climatological dataset to provide the control run; a dataset obtained from averaging several global climate models (GCM) that integrate the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) models used in climate scenarios, for the same period as the climatological dataset; and this same dataset but for a future period, retrieved from the IPCC A2 climate scenario. After ascertaining that the ocean run forced with the GCM dataset for the present compared reasonably well with the climatologically forced run, the results for the future run (relative to the respective present run) show a general temperature increase (from +0.5 to +3 °C) and salinity decrease (from -0.1 to -0.3), particularly in the upper 100-200 m, although these differences depend strongly on season and distance to the coast. There is also strengthening of the SST cross-shore gradient associated to upwelling, which causes narrowing and shallowing of the upwelling jet. This effect is contrary to the meridional wind stress intensification that is also observed, which would tend to strengthen the upwelling jet.

  7. The significance of nitrogen regeneration for new production within a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darren R.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2016-05-01

    The Lagrangian progression of a biological community was followed in a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system, north-west Africa, during offshore advection. The inert dual tracers sulfur hexafluoride and helium-3 labelled a freshly upwelled patch of water that was mapped for 8 days. Changes in biological, physical, and chemical characteristics were measured, including phytoplankton productivity, nitrogen assimilation, and regeneration. Freshly upwelled water contained high nutrient concentrations but was depleted in N compared to Redfield stoichiometry. The highest rate of primary productivity was measured on the continental shelf, associated with high rates of nitrogen assimilation and a phytoplankton community dominated by diatoms and flagellates. Indicators of phytoplankton abundance and activity decreased as the labelled water mass transited the continental shelf slope into deeper water, possibly linked to the mixed layer depth exceeding the light penetration depth. By the end of the study, the primary productivity rate decreased and was associated with lower rates of nitrogen assimilation and lower nutrient concentrations. Nitrogen regeneration and assimilation took place simultaneously. Results highlighted the importance of regenerated NH4+ in sustaining phytoplankton productivity and indicate that the upwelled NO3- pool contained an increasing fraction of regenerated NO3- as it advected offshore. By calculating this fraction and incorporating it into an f ratio formulation, we estimated that of the 12.38 Tg C of annual regional production, 4.73 Tg C was exportable.

  8. Nitrogen transfers off Walvis Bay: a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical modeling approach in the Namibian upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gutknecht

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS are regions of high primary production often associated with oxygen minimum zones (OMZs. They represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. By exporting organic matter (OM and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. However, losses of fixed inorganic N through denitrification and anammox processes take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and can potentially mitigate the role of these regions as a source of N to the open ocean. EBUS can also represent a considerable source of nitrous oxide (N2O to the atmosphere, affecting the atmospheric budget of N2O. In this paper a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical model (ROMS/BioEBUS is used to investigate the N budget in the Namibian upwelling system. The main processes linked to EBUS and associated OMZs are taken into account. The study focuses on the northern part of the Benguela upwelling system (BUS, especially the Walvis Bay area (between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed. Fluxes of N off the Walvis Bay area are estimated in order to understand and quantify (1 the total N offshore export from the upwelling area, representing a possible N source that sustains primary production in the South Atlantic subtropical gyre; (2 export production and subsequent losses of fixed N via denitrification and anammox under suboxic conditions (O2 2 m−3; and (3 the N2O emission to the atmosphere in the upwelling area. In the mixed layer, the total N offshore export is estimated as 8.5 ± 3.9 × 1010 mol N yr−1 at 10° E off the Walvis Bay area, with a mesoscale contribution of 20%. Extrapolated to the whole BUS, the coastal N source for the subtropical gyre corresponds to 0.1 ± 0.04 mol N m−2 yr−1. This N flux represents a major source of N for the gyre compared with other N sources, and contributes 28% of the new primary

  9. Particle fluxes in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system: Hydrodynamical and biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, D.; Villacieros-Robineau, N.; Salgueiro, E.; Alonso-Pérez, F.; Rosón, G.; Abrantes, F.; Castro, C. G.

    2016-07-01

    To better understand sources and transport of particulate material in the NW Iberian coastal upwelling system, a mooring line dotted with an automated PPS 4/3 sediment trap was deployed off Cape Silleiro at the base of the photic zone. The samples were collected from November 2008 through June 2012 over sampling periods of 4-12 days. Our study represents the first automated sediment trap database for the NW Iberian margin. The magnitude and composition of the settling material showed strong seasonal variability with the highest fluxes during the poleward and winter mixing periods (averages of 12.9±9.6 g m-2 d-1 and 5.6±5.6 g m-2 d-1 respectively), and comparatively lower fluxes (3.6±4.1 g m-2 d-1) for the upwelling season. Intensive deposition events registered during poleward and winter mixing periods were dominated by the lithogenic fraction (80±3%). They were associated to high energy wave-driven resuspension processes, due to the occurrence of south-westerly storms, and intense riverine inputs of terrestrial material from Minho and Douro rivers. On the other hand, during the spring - summer upwelling season, the share of biogenic compounds (organic matter, calcium carbonate (CaCO3), biogenic silica (bSiO2)) to downward fluxes was higher, reflecting an increase in pelagic sedimentation due to the seasonal intensification of primary production and negligible river inputs and wave-driven resuspended material. Otherwise, the large variations of biogenic settling particles were mainly modulated by upwelling intensity, which by means of upwelling filaments ultimately controlled the offshore transport of the organic carbon fixed by primary producers towards the adjacent ocean. Based on the average downward flux of organic carbon (212 mg C m-2 d-1) and considering an average primary production of 1013 mg C m-2 d-1 from literature, we estimated that about 21% of the fixed carbon is vertically exported during the upwelling season.

  10. Ionospheric heating, upwelling, and depletions in auroral current systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    This research investigates aspects of ionospheric dynamics relevant to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in auroral arc current systems. Auroral electric fields and particle precipitation deposit energy in the ionosphere, often resulting in enhanced ion or electron temperatures. This heating has a wide variety of consequences for the ionosphere. High ion temperatures alter chemical balance in the lower F-region, resulting in conversion to a molecular ion plasma, faster recombination, and plasma depletions. Pressure enhancements resulting from both ion and electron heating are capable of generating intense ion upflows. Ion upflow and depletion processes redistribute and structure the auroral plasma in ways that are likely of consequence to wave coupling of the magnetosphere and ionosphere. These implications are examined through the use of a fluid-kinetic model of the auroral ionosphere and new incoherent scatter radar data analysis techniques. Results indicate that enhanced recombination of molecular ions in auroral downward current regions may work in concert with well-known electrodynamic depletion processes, in the F-region ionosphere. Furthermore, ionospheric upflows in auroral upward and downward current regions may be quite different in terms of intensity and types of upflowing ions.

  11. A physical view of La Guajira Upwelling System, Colombian Basin, Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, G.; Beier, E.; Barton, E. D.; Ruiz-Ochoa, M.; Correa, J. G.

    2013-05-01

    La Guajira Peninsula lies within a large upwelling system along the South Caribbean Coast, created by the NE trade winds. In this location, sea surface temperature (SST) exhibits the lowest mean value and the highest variability in the whole Colombian Basin. The seasonal variation of SST explains up to 75 % of the total variability. La Guajira coastal zone also experiences the highest values of wind stress and wind stress curl, with the greatest annual and semiannual variability in the Colombian Basin. It has been shown that wind stress curl enhances the upwelling over the region. Near 90% of the variability of SST in La Guajira can be explained by the seasonality plus the first three EOFs interannual modes: the first, synchronous throughout the Basin, is dominant, and consists of a uniform interannual variation in phase with the North Tropical Atlantic Index; the second co-varies strongly with the second mode of wind stress curl; and the third reflects the role of the vertical atmospheric circulation cell associated with the Caribbean Low Level Jet off Central America. The inclusion of wind stress curl with its maximum offshore of La Guajira explains in part the extension of cool coastal water into the Colombian Basin, with advection in filaments, eddies and meanders. In order to complement the physical knowledge of La Guajira upwelling system, an analysis of water masses, sea surface height, Ekman suction, Ekman transport and coastal upwelling index (CUI) was performed. Hydrographic data was obtained from gridded climatologies from the National Oceanographic Data Center (WOD01); sea surface height anomalies from the Archiving, Validation, and Interpretation of Satellite Oceanography (AVISO) data; and wind data from the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform Ocean Surface Wind Velocity Product for Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications (CCMP). The upwelling forms a local water mass, La Guajira surface water (LGSW), with the mixing of subtropical underwater and

  12. Observations of Upwelling Filaments in the Southern North-West African Upwelling System : a Joint Effect of the Bottom Topography and the Offshore Eddy Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, T.; Barton, E. D.; Torres, R.; Barreiro, B.

    2010-12-01

    The nature and dynamics of the long filaments forming in the southern edge of the West-African upwelling system are investigated using data from the SOLAS-ICON cruise, that took place in April-May 2009 offshore of Cap Blanc, between 19.5 and 22.5 °N and 17 and 19 °W. Two synoptic hydrographic surveys using a Moving Vessel Profiler were performed at a 15 days interval on two distinct upwelling filaments at different stages of development. The first survey showed the presence of a large anticyconic eddy North of the filament, also evident in the satellite imagery. Two transects were performed across the tip of the filament, showing a steep rising of the isohalines and the isotherms, with horizontal gradients of 3.10-2 psu km-1 and 10 -1 °C km-1. The density compensation of temperature and salinity in this part of the North West African upwelling system resulted in a weaker doming of the isopycnals across the filament. The second filament developed during a strong wind episode directly following a 2 days wind relaxation period. 8 cross sections were performed, all showing a steeper doming of the isohalines and isotherms than during the first survey, resulting in horizontal gradients of 8.10-2 psu km-1 and 5.10-1 °C km-1 near the surface. The hydrographic signature of the filament was evident as deep as 300 m. Satellite imagery showed the persistence between the two surveys of a shorter and colder filament West of Cap Blanc , rolling around a small anticyclonic eddy, in spite of the relaxation of the wind. The surveyed filaments both appeared to emerge from this struc ture. A process study using a simple two layer shallow water isopycnic numerical model (MICOM) and an idealized topography was carried out to elucidate the development and stationarity of the anticyclone and cold filament at the root of the longer structures. Potential vorticity anomalies generated by topographic effects were shown to play a major role in the filament formation, when interacting with

  13. The significance of nitrogen regeneration for new production within a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. R.; Widdicombe, C. E.; Rees, A. P.; Woodward, E. M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The lagrangian progression of biogeochemical processes was followed in a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system, North West Africa, during offshore advection. Inert duel tracers sulphur hexafluoride and helium-3 labelled a freshly upwelled patch of water that was mapped for 8 days. Changes in biological, physical and chemical characteristics were measured including phytoplankton productivity, nitrogen assimilation and regeneration. Freshly upwelled water contained high nutrient concentrations (NO3- = 9.0 ± 0.1 μmol L-1; PO43- = 0.7 ± 0.1 μmol L-1; Si = 2.7 ± 0.1 μmol L-1) but was depleted in N compared to Redfield stoichiometry (N:P = 13.9:1). A maximum primary productivity rate of 0.7 mol C m-2 d-1 was measured on the continental shelf, associated with N-assimilation rates of 43.8 nmol L-1 h-1 for NO3-, 32.8 nmol L-1 h-1 for NH4+ and a phytoplankton community dominated by diatoms and flagellates. Indicators of phytoplankton abundance and activity decreased as the labelled water mass transited the continental shelf slope into deeper water, possibly linked to the mixed layer depth exceeding the light penetration depth. By the end of the study, primary productivity rates of 0.1 mol C m-2 d-1 were measured, associated with N-assimilation rates of 3.9 nmol L-1 h-1 for NO3-, 6.1 nmol L-1 h-1 for NH4+ and lower nutrient concentrations (NO3- = 4.6 ± 0.3 μmol L-1; PO43- = 0.4 ± 0.1 μmol L-1; Si = 0.9 ± 0.1 μmol L-1). Nitrogen regeneration and assimilation took place simultaneously; NH4+ was regenerated at 9.4-85.0 nmol L-1 h-1; NH4+ was oxidised at 0.30-8.75 nmol L-1 h-1; NO2- was oxidised at 25.55-81.11 nmol L-1 h-1. Results highlight the importance of regenerated NH4+ in sustaining phytoplankton productivity and indicate that the upwelled NO3- pool contained an increasing fraction of regenerated NO3- as it advected offshore. By calculating this fraction and incorporating it into an f ratio formulation we estimated that of the 12.38 Tg C of annual

  14. The significance of nitrogen regeneration for new production within a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Clark

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lagrangian progression of biogeochemical processes was followed in a filament of the Mauritanian upwelling system, North West Africa, during offshore advection. Inert duel tracers sulphur hexafluoride and helium-3 labelled a freshly upwelled patch of water that was mapped for 8 days. Changes in biological, physical and chemical characteristics were measured including phytoplankton productivity, nitrogen assimilation and regeneration. Freshly upwelled water contained high nutrient concentrations (NO3− = 9.0 ± 0.1 μmol L−1; PO43− = 0.7 ± 0.1 μmol L−1; Si = 2.7 ± 0.1 μmol L−1 but was depleted in N compared to Redfield stoichiometry (N:P = 13.9:1. A maximum primary productivity rate of 0.7 mol C m−2 d−1 was measured on the continental shelf, associated with N-assimilation rates of 43.8 nmol L−1 h−1 for NO3−, 32.8 nmol L−1 h−1 for NH4+ and a phytoplankton community dominated by diatoms and flagellates. Indicators of phytoplankton abundance and activity decreased as the labelled water mass transited the continental shelf slope into deeper water, possibly linked to the mixed layer depth exceeding the light penetration depth. By the end of the study, primary productivity rates of 0.1 mol C m−2 d−1 were measured, associated with N-assimilation rates of 3.9 nmol L−1 h−1 for NO3−, 6.1 nmol L−1 h−1 for NH4+ and lower nutrient concentrations (NO3− = 4.6 ± 0.3 μmol L−1; PO43− = 0.4 ± 0.1 μmol L−1; Si = 0.9 ± 0.1 μmol L−1. Nitrogen regeneration and assimilation took place simultaneously; NH4+ was regenerated at 9.4–85.0 nmol L−1 h−1; NH4+ was oxidised at 0.30–8.75 nmol L−1 h−1; NO2− was oxidised at 25.55–81.11 nmol L−1 h−1. Results highlight the importance of regenerated NH4+ in sustaining phytoplankton productivity and indicate that the upwelled NO3− pool contained an increasing fraction of regenerated NO3− as it advected offshore. By calculating this fraction and

  15. Imprint of external climate forcing on coastal upwelling in past and future climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are the major coastal upwelling regions. The trade winds are driving these upwelling regimes located in the subtropics at the eastern boundary of the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Here we analyse the impact of the external climate forcing, e.g. the greenhouse gas concentration, solar activity and volcano eruptions, on these upwelling systems in simulations of ensembles of two Earth System Models. The ensembles contain three simulations for each time period which cover the past millennium (900–1850, the 20th century (1850–2005 and the near future (2006–2100. Using a set of simulations, differing only in their initial conditions, enables us to detect whether the variability is driven internally or externally. Our analysis shows that the variability of the simulated upwelling is to the most driven internally and that there are no significant trends except for the scenario with the most dramatic increase of greenhouse gas concentrations.

  16. Microzooplankton feeding impact in a coastal upwelling system on the NW Iberian margin: The Ría de Vigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Isabel G.; Figueiras, Francisco G.; Crespo, Bibiana G.; Piedracoba, Sílvia

    2011-01-01

    The dilution technique, combined with identification and enumeration of pico-, nano- and micro-plankton by microscopy, was used to estimate microzooplankton impact on the microbial community in surface waters of a coastal embayment on the NW Iberian upwelling system. Microzooplankton were important consumers of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton in this system, feeding up to 93% of standing stock and more than 100% of production of several groups. Heterotrophic bacteria and heterotrophic picoflagellates experienced the highest and constant impact, with 75-84% of their standing stocks and 85-102% of their production being channelled through the microbial food web. Pico- and nano-phytoplankton were also consumed, although maximum grazing occurred on diatoms during upwelling events, coinciding with highest primary production. Predation on pico-nano-heterotrophs was especially relevant under downwelling conditions, when consumption of total carbon and particularly autotrophic carbon was considerably lower than during upwelling. The results suggest that the existence of a multivorous food web, extending from the microbial loop to the herbivorous food web, could be a major feature in this coastal upwelling system. The microbial loop, which occurs as a permanent background in the system, would contribute to sustain the microbial food web during downwelling, whereas the herbivorous food web could coexist with a microbial food web based on large diatoms during upwelling. The multivorous food web would partially divert diatoms from sinking and hence favour the retention of organic matter in the water column. This could enhance the energy transfer to higher pelagic trophic levels in coastal upwelling systems.

  17. Reactive Halogen Species in the Marine Boundary Layer: A Comparision of the Mauretanian and the Peruvian upwelling regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Johannes; Tschritter, Jens; Pöhler, Denis; Großmann, Katja; Horbanski, Martin; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS) such as bromine oxide (BrO) or iodine oxide (IO) play a major role in the chemistry of ozone in both, the troposphere, and the stratosphere and possibly influence the ozone budget on a global scale. In order to estimate the amount of RHS release from marine sources DOAS measurements in three different upwelling regions (Mauritanian, African equatorial and Peruvian) as well as long-term-observations at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (CVAO) were performed within the SOPRAN Project (BMBF Förderkennzeichen 03F0611F). In 2010 the HaloCaVe campaign with a set of DOAS instruments on the CVAO and RV Poseidon allowed for an intercomparision of Long-Path-DOAS (LP), Multi-Axis-DOAS (MAX) and Cavity-Enhanced-DOAS (CE) measurements on shore as well as for extending these observations to a larger area with the simultaneous ship-borne MAX-DOAS measurements during the DRIVE campaign from Gran Canaria to Cape Verde and back along the mauretanian coast. A re-evaluation of the entire data set is presented. LP- and MAX-DOAS observations show significant BrO concentrations of several ppt with strong variations from day to day and a diurnal cycle with a maximum at sunrise and sunset and a minimum during noon. In opposite to previous measurements, IO was below the detection limit of 0.5 ppt for the LP-DOAS and CE-DOAS instrument. From the ship (DRIVE campaign) locally restricted BrO hotspots with mixing ratios of up to 10ppt were observed in the Mauritanian costal upwelling. These findings allow new conclusions on the relevance of halogens on this marine environment which will be presented. Within the SOPRAN cruise M91 on RV Meteor the upwelling region along the coast of Peru has been investigated in December 2012. First results from MAX-DOAS and CE-DOAS measurements will be presented and compared to those from the Atlantic. Both instruments measured NO2, IO and glyoxal mixing ratios, the MAX-DOAS additionally BrO and formaldehyde. We observed

  18. Coastal Upwelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Features a three-part activity designed to teach students about coastal upwelling, the upward movement of cooler, more nutrient-rich water along a coast. Activity includes a mapping exercise, a graphing exercise, and questions for analyzing the map and graph. (Author/WRM)

  19. Massive nitrogen loss from the Benguela upwelling system through anaerobic ammonium oxidation RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Lavik, G.; Woebken, D.;

    2005-01-01

    of the world ocean, the Benguela upwelling system. Our in situ experiments indicate that nitrate is not directly converted to N-2 by heterotrophic denitrification in the suboxic zone. In the Benguela system, nutrient profiles, anammox rates, abundances of anammox cells, and specific biomarker lipids indicate...

  20. Intensification of upwelling along Oman coast in a warming scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, V.; Ajayamohan, R. S.; Valsala, V.; Sandeep, S.

    2016-07-01

    The oceanic impact of poleward shift in monsoon low-level jet (MLLJ) is examined using a Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Two sets of downscaling experiments were conducted using ROMS with boundary and initial conditions from six CMIP5 models. While outputs from the historical run (1981-2000) acts as forcing for the first, the second uses RCP8.5 (2080-2099). By comparing the outputs, it is found that Oman coast will experience an increase in upwelling in tune with MLLJ shift. Consistent with the changes in upwelling and zonal Ekman transport, temperature, salinity, and productivity show significant changes near the Oman coast. The changes in MLLJ causes the coastal wind to angle against the Oman coast in such a fashion that the net upwelling increases in the next century and so does the marine productivity. This study contrasts the general view of weakening of upwelling along the Arabian coasts due to the weakening of monsoon winds.

  1. Short-term changes in the northwest African Upwelling System induced by Saharan dust deposition events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A G; Coca, J; Redondo, A [SeaSnet Canarias. Dpto. de Biologia (University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria), Canary Islands (Spain); Cuevas, E; Alonso-Perez, S; Bustos, J J [Izana Atmospheric Research Center, Agencia Estatal de Meteorologia, Tenerife (Spain); Perez, C; Baldasano, J M [Earth Sciences Department. Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Barcelona (Spain); Nickovic, S [Atmospheric Research and Environment Branch, World Meteorological Organization, Geneva (Switzerland)], E-mail: aramos@pesca.gi.ulpgc.es

    2009-03-01

    During the last 7-year period (2000-2006) atmosphere circulation changes show strong influences on the dust storm deposition dynamics and, as a result, on the primary production dynamics of the northwest African Upwelling System. From 2000 to 2006, the annual mean sea level pressure became higher ranging from 1014 to 1015 mb. Mean annual zonal wind intensity became higher (from 1.1 to 1.8 m s{sup -1}), while the mean annual meridional was reduced from 6.2 to 5.3 m s{sup -1} at the north of the Canary Islands. Mean annual satellite-derived AVHRR/NOAA SST recorded in the northwest African Upwelling became warmer in both locations, from 18.3 deg. C to 18.8 deg. C in Cape Ghir and from 19.5 deg. C to 20.3 deg. C north Canary Islands waters. CHL records from the SeaWiFS/OV-2 showed a different pattern trend. Mean annual CHL levels increased at Cape Ghir from 0.65 mg m-3 to 0.9 mg m-3 and significantly reduced from 0.59 mg m{sup -3} to 0.31 mg m{sup -3} at the north of the Canary Islands. Changes observed in the role of CHL during the last 7-years period could be associated to intensive dust deposition and exceptional weather warming observed in this area since 2000. However, this study focused on a 7-year period and conclusions on possible links between dust deposition and marine biochemistry activity cannot be generalized.

  2. Inorganic carbon dynamics in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast and implications for commercial shellfish hatcheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, J. M.; Hales, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing absorption of anthropogenic CO2 by the global ocean and concomitant decrease in pH will alter seawater carbonate chemistry in ways that may negatively impact calcifying organisms. In particular, the change in saturation state (Ω) of calcium carbonate minerals calcite and aragonite may be energetically unfavorable for shell formation while favoring shell dissolution. Eastern boundary upwelling systems may provide insights into how ecosystems respond to future conditions of ocean acidification when deep water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low pH and low Ω is forced toward the surface. Mortality in commercial seed stock and reduced wild set of the oyster Crassostrea gigas in the northeast Pacific during 2005-2009 reinforced the need for understanding biological responses to acidified ocean water. In response, a long-term strategy to understand local carbonate chemistry dynamics, seasonal perturbations and the effects on development of calcifying bivalves was developed. At present, a time-series of pCO2 measurements was implemented in April 2010 in Netarts Bay, Oregon at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery (WCH). The intake sits at a depth of 0.5-8ft and water is pumped in at 100gpm. A line taken off the intake is run continuously through a thermosalinograph at approximately 1.5gpm into a showerhead style equilibrator in which the headspace is recirculated by aerating the water for enhanced gas exchange. CO2 in equilibrated air is analyzed by NDIR. Additionally two discrete samples of intake seawater were taken across tidal cycles weekly and analyzed for total CO2 (TCO2) according to the methods of Hales et al. (2004) and pCO2 for quality control. The pCO2 in the bay exhibits a diurnal cycle representative of daytime photosynthesis and nighttime respiration. However, the phasing and profiles of these cycles are dominated by tidal mixing and are affected by the introduction of high pCO2 water during upwelling events. Diurnal pCO2 during

  3. Octopus vulgaris paralarvae vertical distribution in a fluctuating upwelling-downwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Olmos Pérez

    2014-06-01

    - Upwelling situation: superficial waters (0-20m enter through the northern mouth of the Ría and are washed through the southern mouth. This water movement promotes the entrance of cold, bottom upwelled water through the southern mouth of the Ría. Under this scenario, Octopus paralarvae are concentrated at the surface (10-0m, thus leaving the Ría. This difference is bigger after strong upwelling during the previous days. Abundances inside the Ría are the highest, maybe because it acts as a temporal retention area, or because cold upwelled waters might stimulate hatching inside the Ría. Day/night changes under strong upwelling conditions: paralarvae abundance in both mouths was quite similar, except that during the day they were in sub-surficial waters (10-5 m, while at night paralarvae were mainly found close to the surface (0-5 m. This vertical distribution during the day is remarkable because paralarvae may select offward surface waters.

  4. Aragonite saturation state in a monsoonal upwelling system off Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Huiwu; Jiang, Li-Qing; Cai, Wei-Jun; Wei, Qinsheng; Song, Hongjun; Kuswardani, Rita Tisiana Dwi; Pranowo, Widodo S.; Beck, Brian; Liu, Lin; Yu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) and its influence from upwelling along the southern coast of Java, Indonesia were examined using carbonate and hydrographic data collected from 22 September to 2 October 2013. Results showed that sea surface Ωarag was lower in the upwelling area (2.97-3.44) than in the nonupwelling area (3.45-3.57), with the lowest value in the eastern part of the study area. We used a two end-member mixing model to separate contributions on Ωarag from two processes associated with upwelling: physical transport vs. biological production. Results indicated that physical transport induced at least a Ωarag decrease of 0.8, whereas biological production caused Ωarag to increase by up to 0.6. Additionally, the influence on Ωarag of interannual upwelling variability modulated by the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), a unique climate phenomenon in the Indian Ocean, was roughly estimated. We argue that the effect of interannual upwelling variability modulated by IOD events was possibly larger than what was imposed on Ωarag by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels over the past decade.

  5. Complex trophic interactions of calanoid copepods in the Benguela upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schukat, Anna; Auel, Holger; Teuber, Lena; Lahajnar, Niko; Hagen, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Life-cycle adaptations, dietary preferences and trophic levels of calanoid copepods from the northern Benguela Current off Namibia were determined via lipid classes, marker fatty acids and stable isotope analyses, respectively. Trophic levels of copepod species were compared to other zooplankton and top consumers. Lipid class analyses revealed that three of the dominant calanoid copepod species stored wax esters, four accumulated triacylglycerols and another three species were characterised by high phospholipid levels. The two biomarker approaches (via fatty acids and stable isotopes) revealed a complex pattern of trophic positions for the various copepod species, but also highlighted the dietary importance of diatoms and dinoflagellates. Calanoides carinatus and Nannocalanus minor occupied the lowest trophic level (predominantly herbivorous) corresponding to high amounts of fatty acid markers for diatoms (e.g. 16:1(n - 7)) and dinoflagellates (e.g. 18:4(n - 3)). These two copepod species represent the classical link between primary production and higher trophic levels. All other copepods belonged to secondary or even tertiary (some deep-sea copepods) consumers. The calanoid copepod species cover the entire range of δ15N ratios, as compared to δ15N ratios of all non-calanoid taxa investigated, from salps to adult fish. These data emphasise that the trophic roles of calanoid copepods are far more complex than just interlinking primary producers with pelagic fish, which should also be considered in the process of developing realistic food-web models of coastal upwelling systems.

  6. Seasonal and interannual phytoplankton dynamics and forcing mechanisms in the Northern Benguela upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Deon C.; van der Plas, Anja K.; Mohrholz, Volker; Wasmund, Norbert; Junker, Tim; Eggert, Anja

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal phytoplankton blooms are one of the key features of the productive northern Benguela upwelling system (nBUS), however they are not well described thus far. In this study twelve years (2000-2012) of in situ chlorophyll-a data from a monitoring transect off the Namibian coast were analysed to assess the long-term and seasonal variability in chlorophyll-a as a measure of phytoplankton biomass and the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms. On the shelf, low chlorophyll-a concentrations were identified in 2001/2002, 2005/2006, and 2011/2012. The concentrations on the shelf were highest in 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Major phytoplankton blooms defined at chlorophyll-a concentrations > 18 mg m- 3 occurred in five of the 12 years (2002/2003, 2004/2005, 2008/2009, 2009/2010 and 2010/2011) while minor blooms (> 13 mg m- 3) occurred in almost every year. The calculated climatology of the chlorophyll-a time series revealed a clear seasonality. Three chlorophyll-a maxima typically develop inshore over the year: an austral winter peak (August), an early austral summer peak (December) and a late summer/autumn peak (April). The analysis of synoptic hydrographic, nutrient and wind data revealed three different forcing mechanisms that all initiate an influx of nutrients into the surface mixed layer.

  7. Microbial and biogeochemical responses to projected future nitrate enrichment in the California upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Coastal California is a dynamic upwelling region where nitrogen (N and iron (Fe can both limit productivity and influence biogeochemistry over different spatial and temporal scales. With global change, the flux of nitrate from upwelling is expected to increase over the next century, potentially driving additional oceanic regions toward Fe limitation. In this study we explored the effect of changes in Fe/N ratio on native phytoplankton from five currently Fe-replete sites near the major California upwelling centers at Bodega Bay and Monterey Bay using nutrient addition incubation experiments. Despite the high nitrate levels (13-30 M in the upwelled water, phytoplankton at three of the five sites showed increased growth when 10 M nitrate was added. None of the sites showed enhanced growth following addition of 10 nM Fe. Nitrate additions favored slow sinking single-celled diatoms over faster sinking chain-forming diatoms, suggesting that future increases in nitrate flux could affect carbon and silicate export and alter grazer populations. In particular, solitary cells of Cylindrotheca were more abundant than the toxin-producing genus Pseudonitzschia following nitrate addition. These responses suggest the biogeochemistry of coastal California could change in response to future increases in nitrate, and multiple stressors like ocean acidification and hypoxia may further result in ecosystem shifts.

  8. Cadmium in the California Current system: Tracer of past and present upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanGeen, A.; Husby, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    Over 100 samples were collected off the west coast of North America during 1991-1993 to determine the relation between wind-driven upwelling and nearshore concentrations of dissolved silicate (Si), phosphate (P), and cadmium (Cd). Highly enriched in deep water offshore, these constituents are sensitive indicators of upwelling. Coastal water was sampled from the shore in January and June 1992 at 12 sites distributed between 36?? and 48??N latitude. In January the composition of nearshore water along this transect was fairly uniform: 5-15 ??mol/kg for Si, 0.5 to 1.0 ??mol/kg for P, and 0.1-0.3 nmol/kg for Cd. In June, elevated concentrations of Si (30 ??mol/kg), P (2.0 ??mol/kg), and Cd (0.6 nmol/kg) revealed a region of intense upwelling between 38?? and 40??N. The pattern is broadly consistent with meridional gradients in coastal upwelling calculated from the long-term mean of alongshore winds compiled from ship reports. Nearshore water was also collected biweekly to monthly at two sites 3 km apart near San Francisco Bay (37.5??N) during 1991-1993. The variability seen in the time series suggests that the composition of nearshore water integrates the effect of alongshore winds over timescales of several weeks. Seasonal variations in Si (5-50 ??mol/kg), P (0.5-2.5 ??mol/kg), and Cd (0.1-0.8 nmol/kg) concentrations were consistent with upwelling during spring and summer. Maximum Si, P, and Cd concentrations reached in May 1991 were consistent with advection to the very nearshore region from a depth of about 300 m relative to a vertical profile at a distance of 200 km from the coast. Nearshore Si, P, and Cd concentrations were reduced relative to 1991 in 1992 and, to a lesser extent, in 1993 due to weaker upwelling linked to the warm phase of the El Nin???o-Southern Oscillation. During periods of weaker upwelling or downwelling, variations in P, Si, and Cd concentrations became uncoupled. There is a good correlation between the coastal Cd time series near San

  9. An improved coastal upwelling index from sea surface temperature using satellite-based approach : the case of the Canary Current upwelling system

    OpenAIRE

    Benazzouz, A.; Mordane, S.; Orbi, A.; Chagdali, M.; Hilmi, K; A. Atillah; Pelegri, J. L.; Demarcq, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    A new methodology to derive an SST-based upwelling index was based on a rigorous spatial analysis of satellite SST fields and their variability, by referring to previous works, from Wooster et al. (1976) to Santos et al. (2011). The data was precautiously processed by considering data quality aspects (including cloud cover) and the best way to derive accurate coastal SST and its offshore reference. The relevance of the developed index was evaluated by comparing its spatial and seasonal consis...

  10. Fungal parasites infect marine diatoms in the upwelling ecosystem of the Humboldt current system off central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Marcelo H; Jara, Ana M; Pantoja, Silvio

    2016-05-01

    This is the first report of fungal parasitism of diatoms in a highly productive coastal upwelling ecosystem, based on a year-round time series of diatom and parasitic Chytridiomycota abundance in the Humboldt Current System off Chile (36°30.80'S-73°07.70'W). Our results show co-variation in the presence of Skeletonema, Thalassiosira and Chaetoceros diatoms with attached and detached chytrid sporangia. High abundance of attached sporangia was observed during the austral spring, coinciding with a predominance of Thalassiosira and Skeletonema under active upwelling conditions. Towards the end of austral spring, a decreasing proportion of attached sporangia was accompanied by a decline in abundance of Skeletonema and Thalassiosira and the predominance of Chaetoceros, suggesting specificity and host density dependence of chytrid infection. The new findings on fungal parasitism of diatoms provide further support for the inclusion of Fungi in the current model of the role played by the marine microbial community in the coastal ocean. We propose a conceptual model where Fungi contribute to controlling the dynamics of phytoplankton populations, as well as the release of organic matter and the transfer of organic carbon through the pelagic trophic web in coastal upwelling ecosystems. PMID:26914416

  11. Community response of zooplankton to oceanographic changes (2002-2012) in the central/southern upwelling system of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín-Mora, Johanna; Escribano, Ruben; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    A 10-year time series (2002-2012) at Station 18 off central/southern Chile allowed us to study variations in zooplankton along with interannual variability and trends in oceanographic conditions. We used an automated analysis program (ZooImage) to assess changes in the mesozooplankton size structure and the composition of the taxa throughout the entire community. Oceanographic conditions changed over the decade: the water column became less stratified, more saline, and colder; the mixed layer deepened; and the oxygen minimum zone became shallower during the second half of the time series (2008-2012) in comparison with the first period (2002-2007). Both the size structure and composition of the zooplankton were significantly associated with oceanographic changes. Taxonomic and size diversity of the zooplankton community increased to the more recent period. For the second period, small sized copepods (1.5 mm) and medium size copepods (1-1.5 mm), whereas euphausiids, decapod larvae, appendicularian and ostracods increased their abundance during the second period. These findings indicated that the zooplankton community structure in this eastern boundary ecosystem was strongly influenced by variability of the upwelling process. Thus, climate-induced forcing of upwelling trends can alter the zooplankton community in this highly productive region with potential consequences for the ecosystem food web.

  12. Optimal boundary control and boundary stabilization of hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gugat, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This brief considers recent results on optimal control and stabilization of systems governed by hyperbolic partial differential equations, specifically those in which the control action takes place at the boundary.  The wave equation is used as a typical example of a linear system, through which the author explores initial boundary value problems, concepts of exact controllability, optimal exact control, and boundary stabilization.  Nonlinear systems are also covered, with the Korteweg-de Vries and Burgers Equations serving as standard examples.  To keep the presentation as accessible as possible, the author uses the case of a system with a state that is defined on a finite space interval, so that there are only two boundary points where the system can be controlled.  Graduate and post-graduate students as well as researchers in the field will find this to be an accessible introduction to problems of optimal control and stabilization.

  13. (abstract) Seasonal Variability in Coastal Upwelling: A Comparison of Four Coastal Upwelling Sites from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Mary-Elena

    1996-01-01

    Coastal upwelling of subsurface nutrient-rich water occurs along the eastern boundary of the ocean basins and leads to high primary production and fish catches. In this study satellite observations are used to compare the seasonal cycle in wind forcing and in the oceanic and biological response of the major coastal upwelling regions associated with the Canary, Benguela, California, and Humboldt Currents.

  14. Modern sedimentation in the Cabo Frio upwelling system, Southeastern Brazilian shelf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel M. de Mahiques

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The analyses of Uk'37 paleotemperatures and sedimentological parameters in box cores from the Cabo Frio upwelling zone, southeastern Brazil, were used to understand the modern sedimentation as well as to evaluate the role played by the upwelling process in the sedimentary patterns. Three box-cores located closer to the upwelling area show a general trend of cooling waters taking place in the last 700 years. Since the present upwelling is dependent on local and remote wind regime, a phase of dominating NE winds favors a more effective upward transport of the cold thermocline level South Atlantic CentralWater towards the coast. The intensification in the upwelling regime for the last ca. 700 years can be associated with the strengthening of the NE winds off the area and a possible increase of the Brazil Current mesoscale activity. Nevertheless, the lack of significant correlation of the paleotemperatures and most of sedimentological parameters indicate that upwelling is not the only sedimentation mechanism in the area. Also, the comparison of sedimentological parameters reveals that eventual temporal changes are superimposed by the geographical variability. Sedimentation rates vary from 0.26 mm.yr-1 to 0.66 mm.yr-1.As análises de Uk'37 paleotemperaturas e de parâmetros sedimentológicos em amostras de box-core da zona de ressurgência de Cabo Frio, sudeste do Brasil, foram usadas para compreender os processos de sedimentação moderna na área, bem como avaliar o papel desempenhado pela ressurgência no estabelecimento dos padrões sedimentológicos principais. Como observado em três box-cores localizados nas proximidades da área de ressurgência, é possível verificar uma tendência geral de resfriamento das águas nos últimos 700 anos (idade calibrada. Uma vez que o processo de ressurgência é dependente do regime de ventos local e remoto, uma fase de ventos predominantes de NE favorece um deslocamento mais efetivo das águas frias da

  15. Meeting reproductive demands in a dynamic upwelling system: Foraging strategies of a pursuit-diving seabird, the marbled murrelet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, M.Z.; Newman, S.H.; Storlazzi, C.D.; Beissinger, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Seabirds maintain plasticity in their foraging behavior to cope with energy demands and foraging constraints that vary over the reproductive cycle, but behavioral studies comparing breeding and nonbreeding individuals are rare. Here we characterize how Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) adjust their foraging effort in response to changes in reproductive demands in an upwelling system in central California. We radio-marked 32 murrelets of known reproductive status (9 breeders, 12 potential breeders, and 11 nonbreeders) and estimated both foraging ranges and diving rates during the breeding season. Murrelets spent more time diving during upwelling than oceanographic relaxation, increased their foraging ranges as the duration of relaxation grew longer, and reduced their foraging ranges after transitions to upwelling. When not incubating, murrelets moved in a circadian pattern, spending nighttime hours resting near flyways used to reach nesting habitat and foraging during the daytime an average of 5.7 km (SD 6.7 km) from nighttime locations. Breeders foraged close to nesting habitat once they initiated nesting and nest attendance was at a maximum, and then resumed traveling longer distances following the completion of nesting. Nonbreeders had similar nighttime and daytime distributions and tended to be located farther from inland flyways. Breeders increased the amount of time they spent diving by 71-73% when they had an active nest by increasing the number of dives rather than by increasing the frequency of anaerobiosis. Thus, to meet reproductive demands during nesting, murrelets adopted a combined strategy of reducing energy expended commuting to foraging sites and increasing aerobic dive rates. ?? 2009 by The Cooper Ornithological Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory Simulation of an Iron(II)-rich Precambrian Marine Upwelling System to Explore the Growth of Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Wu, Wenfang; Kappler, Andreas; Swanner, Elizabeth D

    2016-01-01

    A conventional concept for the deposition of some Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIF) proceeds on the assumption that ferrous iron [Fe(II)] upwelling from hydrothermal sources in the Precambrian ocean was oxidized by molecular oxygen [O2] produced by cyanobacteria. The oldest BIFs, deposited prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at about 2.4 billion years (Gy) ago, could have formed by direct oxidation of Fe(II) by anoxygenic photoferrotrophs under anoxic conditions. As a method for testing the geochemical and mineralogical patterns that develop under different biological scenarios, we designed a 40 cm long vertical flow-through column to simulate an anoxic Fe(II)-rich marine upwelling system representative of an ancient ocean on a lab scale. The cylinder was packed with a porous glass bead matrix to stabilize the geochemical gradients, and liquid samples for iron quantification could be taken throughout the water column. Dissolved oxygen was detected non-invasively via optodes from the outside. Results from biotic experiments that involved upwelling fluxes of Fe(II) from the bottom, a distinct light gradient from top, and cyanobacteria present in the water column, show clear evidence for the formation of Fe(III) mineral precipitates and development of a chemocline between Fe(II) and O2. This column allows us to test hypotheses for the formation of the BIFs by culturing cyanobacteria (and in the future photoferrotrophs) under simulated marine Precambrian conditions. Furthermore we hypothesize that our column concept allows for the simulation of various chemical and physical environments - including shallow marine or lacustrine sediments. PMID:27500924

  17. Absorbing Boundary Conditions for Hyperbolic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Ehrhardt

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with absorbing boundary conditions for hyperbolic systems in one and two space dimensions. We prove the strict well-posedness of the resulting initial boundary value problem in 1D. Afterwards we establish the GKS-stability of the corresponding Lax-Wendroff-type finite difference scheme. Hereby, we have to extend the classical proofs, since the (discretized) absorbing boundary conditions do not fit the standard form of boundary conditions for hyperbolic systems.

  18. Influences of riverine and upwelling waters on the coastal carbonate system off Central Chile and their ocean acidification implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Contreras, Paulina Y.; Pérez, Claudia A.; Sobarzo, Marcus; Saldías, Gonzalo S.; Salisbury, Joe

    2016-06-01

    A combined data set, combining data from field campaigns and oceanographic cruises, was used to ascertain the influence of both river discharges and upwelling processes, covering spatial and temporal variation in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and aragonite saturation state. This work was conducted in one of the most productive river-influenced upwelling areas in the South Pacific coasts (36°S). Additionally, further work was also conducted to ascertain the contribution of different DIC sources, influencing the dynamics of DIC along the land-ocean range. Six sampling campaigns were conducted across seven stations at the Biobío River basin, covering approximately 200 km. Three research cruises were undertaken simultaneously, covering the adjacent continental shelf, including 12 sampling stations for hydrographic measurements. Additionally, six stations were also sampled for chemical analyses, covering summer, winter, and spring conditions over 2010 and 2011. Our results evidenced that seaward extent of the river plume was more evident during the winter field campaign, when highest riverine DIC fluxes were observed. The carbonate system along the river-ocean continuum was very heterogeneous varying over spatial and temporal scales. High DIC and pCO2 were observed in river areas with larger anthropogenic effects. CO2 supersaturation at the river plume was observed during all campaigns due to the influence of low pH river waters in winter/spring and high-pCO2 upwelling waters in summer. δ13CDIC evidenced that main DIC sources along the river and river plume corresponded to the respiration of terrestrial organic matter. We have linked this natural process to the carbonate saturation on the adjacent river-influenced coastal area, suggesting that Ωaragonite undersaturation in surface/subsurface waters is largely modulated by the influence of both river discharge and coastal upwelling events in this productive coastal area. Conditions of low Ωaragonite might impact

  19. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF REGIONAL BOUNDARY SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Guangle; WANG Huanchen

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the problems of modeling and analyzing the system with change able boundary are researched. First, a kind of expanding system is set up, in which the changeable boundary is dealt with as a regional boundary. Then some relative models are developed to describe the regional boundary system. Next, the transition or the driftage of bifurcation points in the system is discussed. A fascinating case is studied in which two or more than two classes of chaotic attractive points coexist together or exist alternatively in the same system. Lastly, an effective new method of chaos avoidance for the system is put forward.

  20. A model-based insight into the coupling of nitrogen and sulfur cycles in a coastal upwelling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar; Canfield, Donald Eugene; Fennel, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling in oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) is dominated by the interactions of microbial nitrogen transformations and, as recently observed in the Chilean upwelling system, also through the energetically less favorable remineralization of sulfate reduction. The latter process...... detritus, to quantify the nitrogen and sulfur cycles in the Chilean OMZ. A new biogeochemical submodule was developed and coupled to the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). The model results generally agree with the observed distribution of reactive species and the measured process rates. Modeled...... is masked, however, by rapid sulfide oxidation, most likely through nitrate reduction. Thus, the cryptic sulfur cycle links with the nitrogen cycle in OMZ settings. Here, we model the physical-chemical water column structure and the observed process rates as driven by formation and sinking of organic...

  1. The interplay between the surface and bottom water environment within the Benguela Upwelling System over the last 70 ka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKay, C.L.; Filipsson, H.L.; Romero, O.E.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Bjorck, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Benguela Upwelling System (BUS), located between 30 and 20°S, is one of the fundamentalhigh-productivity systems of the world ocean. The BUS has previously been studied in terms of primaryproductivity and ecology over glacial-interglacial timescales; however, the response and coupling with thebe

  2. Mixed basin boundary structures of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by recent numerical observations on a four-dimensional continuous-time dynamical system, we consider different types of basin boundary structures for chaotic systems. These general structures are essentially mixtures of the previously known types of basin boundaries where the character of the boundary assumes features of the previously known boundary types at different points arbitrarily finely interspersed in the boundary. For example, we discuss situations where an everywhere continuous boundary that is otherwise smooth and differentiable at almost every point has an embedded uncountable, zero Lebesgue measure set of points at which the boundary curve is nondifferentiable. Although the nondifferentiable set is only of zero Lebesgue measure, the curve close-quote s fractal dimension may (depending on parameters) still be greater than one. In addition, we discuss bifurcations from such a mixed boundary to a 'pure' boundary that is a fractal nowhere differentiable curve or surface and to a pure nonfractal boundary that is everywhere smooth. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  3. A modeling study of the effects of river runoff, tides, and surface wind-wave mixing on the Eastern and Western Hainan upwelling systems of the South China Sea, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daoru; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jia; Bai, Xuezhi

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the variation of eastern Hainan (or Qiongdong) and western Hainan upwelling systems during the East Asia summer monsoon (EASM) season using a state-of-the-art finite-volume coastal model and reveals the impacts of tidal mixing, surface wind-wave mixing, and river runoff on the Hainan upwellings in terms of the spatial and temporal variations, intensification, and vertical structure. It is found that (1) river runoff, a stabilizer of the water column, suppresses the upwelling beneath it from reaching the surface, although strong upwelling still occurs in the lower layer of the water column; (2) tidal mixing, a mechanism of forming bottom mixed layer, promotes upwelling, leading to strengthening of the upwelling; (3) surface wind-wave mixing, a major mechanism for formation of the upper mixed layer and a sharp thermocline, inhibits the upwelling from crossing the thermocline to reach the surface; and (4) unlike the east coast upwelling, the upwelling on the west coast is tidally induced.

  4. On Mario Bunge's Definition of System and System Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    In this short paper we discuss Mario Bunge's definition of system boundary. It is quickly discovered that Bunge's definition of system and system boundary are both deficient. We thus propose new definitions, which (hopefully) improve the situation. Our definition of system boundary works off the same intuition behind Bunge's.

  5. The importance of external climate forcing for the variability and trends of coastal upwelling in past and future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tim, Nele; Zorita, Eduardo; Hünicke, Birgit; Yi, Xing; Emeis, Kay-Christian

    2016-06-01

    The eastern boundary upwelling systems, located in the subtropics at the eastern boundary of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and mainly driven by the trade winds, are the major coastal upwelling regions. Previous studies have suggested that the intensity of upwelling in these areas in the past centuries may have been influenced by the external radiative forcing, for instance by changes in solar irradiance, and it will also be influenced in the future by the increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases. Here, we analyse the impact of the external climate forcing on these upwelling systems in ensembles of simulations of two Earth system models. The ensembles contain three simulations for each period covering the past millennium (900-1849) and the 20th century (1850-2005). One of these Earth system models additionally includes the near future (2006-2100). Using a set of simulations, differing only in their initial conditions, enables us to test whether the observed variability and trends are driven by the external radiative forcing. Our analysis shows that the variability of the simulated upwelling is largely not affected by the external forcing and that, generally, there are no significant trends in the periods covering the past and future. Only in future simulations with the strongest increase of greenhouse gas concentrations the upwelling trends are significant and appear in all members of the ensemble.

  6. Dynamics of plankton populations in upwelling areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekielda, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Spectral properties of the upwelled waters off the NW coast of Africa were studied with observations derived from aircraft and Skylab. Results indicate that the two-channel, ratio approach is ineffective in determining surface chlorophyll concentrations. Ocean color boundaries and temperature gradients were found to be directly correlated with each other and also with fishing effort in the upwelling region. Photographic and scanner data derived from Skylab were effective in locating ocean boundaries and mapping temperature distributions.

  7. Life in the sea of plenty: Seasonal and regional comparison of physiological performance of Euphausia hanseni in the northern Benguela upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Thorsten; Buchholz, Cornelia; Buchholz, Friedrich

    2015-09-01

    Variability in upwelling events may lead to periods of constrained food availability in the northern Benguela upwelling system (NBUS), thereby affecting the physiological state and metabolic activity of euphausiids. Most attention has so far been paid to seasonal effects but little is known about regional variability. Metabolic activity (expressed by respiration and excretion rates) and physiological state (expressed by reproductive effort and moult activity) in Euphausia hanseni were examined at different stations during austral summer (minimum upwelling) and austral winter (maximum upwelling). Overall, regional differences in physiological state, influencing metabolic activity, were greater than seasonal ones, indicating favourable conditions for growth and reproduction year-round. Higher respiration rates were found for females in more advanced stages of sexual development. Moult stage did not affect oxygen consumption rates, however. The physiological state of E. hanseni at the time of capture may serve as a meaningful indicator of the associated hydrographic conditions in the NBUS, to be further used in eco-system analysis on seasonal or long-term time scales. A latitudinal comparison of species highlights the extraordinary physiological plasticity of euphausiids.

  8. Boundary Controllability of Nonlinear Fractional Integrodifferential Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed HamdyM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions for boundary controllability of nonlinear fractional integrodifferential systems in Banach space are established. The results are obtained by using fixed point theorems. We also give an application for integropartial differential equations of fractional order.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Effects of Upwelling on the Fatty Acid Composition of Benthic Filter Feeders in the Southern Benguela Ecosystem: Not All Upwelling Is Equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinelli, Eleonora; McQuaid, Christopher David; Noyon, Margaux

    2016-01-01

    Variability in mesoscale nearshore oceanographic conditions plays an important role in the distribution of primary production and food availability for intertidal consumers. Advection of nutrient rich waters by upwelling usually allows the proliferation of diatoms, later replaced by dinoflagellates. We examined upwelling effects on the fatty acid (FA) signature of a benthic intertidal filter feeder to identify its response to pulsed variability in food availability. The study took place in two contrasting seasons and at two upwelling and two non-upwelling sites interspersed within the southern Benguela upwelling system of South Africa. We investigated the FA composition of the adductor muscles and gonads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis to assess how FA are apportioned to the different tissues and whether this changes between upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. In situ temperature loggers used to identify upwelling conditions at the four sites indicated that such events occurred only at the upwelling centres and only in summer. Tissues differed strongly, with gonads presenting a higher proportion of essential FAs. This could reflect the faster turnover rate of gonad tissue or preferential retention of specific FA for reproductive purposes. FA composition did not vary as a direct function of upwelling, but there were strong dissimilarities among sites. Upwelling influenced mussel diets at one upwelling site while at the other, the expected signature of upwelling was displaced downstream of the core of upwelling. Condition Index (CI) and Gonad Index (GI) differed among sites and were not influenced by upwelling, with GI being comparable among sites. In addition, FA proportions were consistent among sites, indicating similar food quality and quantity over time and under upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. This suggests that the influence of upwelling on the west coast of South Africa is pervasive and diffuse, rather than discrete; while nearshore

  10. Spatio-Temporal Variation in Effects of Upwelling on the Fatty Acid Composition of Benthic Filter Feeders in the Southern Benguela Ecosystem: Not All Upwelling Is Equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Christopher David; Noyon, Margaux

    2016-01-01

    Variability in mesoscale nearshore oceanographic conditions plays an important role in the distribution of primary production and food availability for intertidal consumers. Advection of nutrient rich waters by upwelling usually allows the proliferation of diatoms, later replaced by dinoflagellates. We examined upwelling effects on the fatty acid (FA) signature of a benthic intertidal filter feeder to identify its response to pulsed variability in food availability. The study took place in two contrasting seasons and at two upwelling and two non-upwelling sites interspersed within the southern Benguela upwelling system of South Africa. We investigated the FA composition of the adductor muscles and gonads of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis to assess how FA are apportioned to the different tissues and whether this changes between upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. In situ temperature loggers used to identify upwelling conditions at the four sites indicated that such events occurred only at the upwelling centres and only in summer. Tissues differed strongly, with gonads presenting a higher proportion of essential FAs. This could reflect the faster turnover rate of gonad tissue or preferential retention of specific FA for reproductive purposes. FA composition did not vary as a direct function of upwelling, but there were strong dissimilarities among sites. Upwelling influenced mussel diets at one upwelling site while at the other, the expected signature of upwelling was displaced downstream of the core of upwelling. Condition Index (CI) and Gonad Index (GI) differed among sites and were not influenced by upwelling, with GI being comparable among sites. In addition, FA proportions were consistent among sites, indicating similar food quality and quantity over time and under upwelling and non-upwelling conditions. This suggests that the influence of upwelling on the west coast of South Africa is pervasive and diffuse, rather than discrete; while nearshore

  11. Role of nutrient recycling in upwelling ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T E

    1979-01-01

    The regeneration of nitrogen is an important process that increases the efficiency of the upwelling ecosystem by enlarging their spatial scales. Ammonium regeneration was considered to contribute 42 to 72 percent of phytoplankton nitrogen requirements in the northwest Africa, Peru, and Baja California upwelling systems. Zooplankton are responsible for the largest portion of regenerated nitrogen; however, fish and benthic sediments may be nearly as large. Comparisons of the importance of ammonium regeneration in upwelling areas with coastal and open ocean regions indicate that the percentage contributions are similar. Future nutrient regeneration studies are needed to assess the recycling of benthic sediments, microzooplankton, gelatinous zooplankton, demersal fish, bacterioplankton, and mollusks.

  12. Wireless boundary monitor system and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs

  13. A model of trophic flows in the northern Benguela upwelling system during the 1980s

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shannon, L.J.; Jarre, Astrid

    1999-01-01

    A model of trophic flows through the northern Benguela between 1980 and 1989 was constructed using the ECOPATH approach. The model serves to close the temporal gap between models of the system for the 1970s and 1990s. The aim is to provide a workable model, with the intention of encouraging scien...

  14. Dehumidification of Iberia by enhanced summer upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P. M.; Costa, V.; Nogueira, M.; Semedo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Dehumidification of Iberia by enhanced summer upwelling Miranda PMA, Costa V, Semedo AIDL, Faculdade de Ciências, University of LisbonA 24-year simulation of the recent Iberian climate, using the WRF model at 9km resolution forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis (1989-2012), is analysed for the decadal evolution of the upwelling forcing coastal wind and for column integrated Precipitable water vapour (PWV). Results indicate that, unlike what was found by Bakun et al. (2009) for the Peruvian region, a statistically significant trend in the upwelling favourable (northerly) wind has been accompanied by a corresponding decrease in PWV, not only inland but also over the coastal waters. Such increase is consistent with a reinforced northerly coastal jet in the maritime boundary layer contributing to atmospheric Ekman pumping of dry continental air into the coastal region. Diagnostics of the prevalence of the Iberian thermal low following Hoinka and Castro (2003) also show a positive trend in its frequency during an extended summer period (April to September). These results are consistent with recent studies indicating an upward trend in the frequency of upwelling in SW Iberia (Alves and Miranda 2013), and may be relevant for climate change applications as an increase in coastal upwelling (Miranda et al 2013) may lead to substantial regional impacts in the subtropics. Aknowledgements: Study supported by FCT Grant RECI/GEO-MET/0380/2012Alves JMR, Miranda PMA (2013) Variability of Iberian upwelling implied by ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses, Tellus A 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/tellusa.v65i0.19245.Bakun et al (2010) Greenhouse gas, upwelling-favorable winds, and the future of coastal ocean upwelling ecosystems, Global Change Biology, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2009.02094.xHoinka KP, Castro M (2003) The Iberian Peninsula thermal low. QJRMS, 129, 1491- 1511, doi: 10.1256/qj.01.189.Miranda et al (2013) Climate change and upwelling: response of Iberian upwelling to atmospheric

  15. Environmental proteomics of microbial plankton in a highly productive coastal upwelling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowell, Sarah [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Smith, Daniel [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Barofsky, Douglas [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Giovannoni, Stephen [Oregon State University, Corvallis

    2011-01-01

    Metaproteomics is one of a suite of new approaches providing insights into the activities of microorganisms in natural environments. Proteins, the final products of gene expression, indicate cellular priorities, taking into account both transcriptional and posttranscriptional control mechanisms that control adaptive responses. Here, we report the proteomic composition of the o 1.2 lm fraction of a microbial community from Oregon coast summer surface waters, detected with two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Spectra corresponding to proteins involved in protein folding and biosynthesis, transport, and viral capsid structure were the most frequently detected. A total of 36% of all the detected proteins were best matches to the SAR11 clade, and other abundant coastal microbial clades were also well represented, including the Roseobacter clade (17%), oligotrophic marine gammaproteobacteria group (6%), OM43 clade (1%). Viral origins were attributed to 2.5% of proteins. In contrast to oligotrophic waters, phosphate transporters were not highly detected in this nutrient-rich system. However, transporters for amino acids, taurine, polyamines and glutamine synthetase were among the most highly detected proteins, supporting predictions that carbon and nitrogen are more limiting than phosphate in this environment. Intriguingly, one of the highly detected proteins was methanol dehydrogenase originating from the OM43 clade, providing further support for recent reports that the metabolism of one-carbon compounds by these streamlined methylotrophs might be an important feature of coastal ocean biogeochemistry.

  16. Pervasive multidecadal variations in productivity within the Peruvian Upwelling System over the last millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, S.; Martinez, P.; Crosta, X.; Charlier, K.; Billy, I.; Hanquiez, V.; Blanz, T.; Schneider, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    There is no agreement on the pluri-decadal expression of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the Pacific over the last millennium. Marine records from the Peruvian margin indicate humid conditions (El Niño-like mean conditions) over the Little Ice Age, while precipitation records from the eastern equatorial Pacific infer arid conditions (La Niña-like mean conditions) for the same period. We here studied diatom assemblages, nitrogen isotopes, and major and minor elements at the lamination level in three laminated trigger cores located between 11°S and 15°S on the Peruvian shelf within the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) to reconstruct precipitation and ocean productivity at the multiannual to multidecadal timescales over the last millennium. We respected the sediment structure, thus providing the first records of the mean climatic conditions at the origin of the lamination deposition, which ones represent several years. Light laminations were deposited under productive and dry conditions, indicative of La Niña-like mean conditions in the system, while dark laminations were deposited under non-productive and humid conditions, representative of El Niño-like mean conditions. La Niña-like mean conditions were predominant during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP; 1000-600 years BP) and Current Warm Period (CWP; 150 years BP to present), while El Niño-like mean conditions prevailed over the Little Ice Age (LIA; 600-150 years BP). We provide evidence for persistent multidecadal variations in productivity over the last millennium, which were disconnected from the mean climate state. Multidecadal variability has been stronger over the last 450 years concomitantly to increased variability in the NAO index. Two intervals of strong multidecadal variability were also observed over the MWP, congruent to decreased solar irradiance and increased volcanic activity.

  17. Sublittoral soft bottom communities and diversity of Mejillones Bay in northern Chile (Humboldt Current upwelling system)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Jürgen; Rojo, Manuel E.; Oliva, Marcelo E.; Arntz, Wolf E.; Thatje, Sven

    2007-06-01

    The macrozoobenthos of Mejillones Bay (23°S; Humboldt Current) was quantitatively investigated over a 7-year period from austral summer 1995/1996 to winter 2002. About 78 van Veen grab samples taken at six stations (5, 10, 20 m depth) provided the basis for the analysis of the distribution of 60 species and 28 families of benthic invertebrates, as well as of their abundance and biomass. Mean abundance (2,119 individuals m-2) was in the same order compared to a previous investigation; mean biomass (966 g formalin wet mass m-2), however, exceeded prior estimations mainly due to the dominance of the bivalve Aulacomya ater. About 43% of the taxa inhabited the complete depth range. Mean taxonomic Shannon diversity (H', Log e) was 1.54 ± 0.58 with a maximum at 20 m (1.95 ± 0.33); evenness increased with depth. The fauna was numerically dominated by carnivorous gastropods, polychaetes and crustaceans (48%). About 15% of the species were suspensivorous, 13% sedimentivorous, 11% detritivorous, 7% omnivorous and 6% herbivorous. Cluster analyses showed a significant difference between the shallow and the deeper stations. Gammarid amphipods and the polychaete family Nephtyidae characterized the 5-m-zone, the molluscs Aulacomya ater, Mitrella unifasciata and gammarids the intermediate zone, while the gastropod Nassarius gayi and the polychaete family Nereidae were most prominent at the deeper stations. The communities of the three depth zones did not appear to be limited by hypoxia during non-El Niño conditions. Therefore, no typical change in community structure occurred during El Niño 1997-1998, in contrast to what was observed for deeper faunal assemblages and hypoxic bays elsewhere in the coastal Humboldt Current system.

  18. The future of coastal upwelling ecosystems: the impact of potential wind changes on ocean acidification and coastal hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachkar, Z.; Gruber, N.

    2012-04-01

    The upwelling of deep, low pH, and low oxygen water to the surface makes eastern boundary upwelling systems (EBUS) naturally prone to global change induced perturbations such as ocean acidification and ocean deoxygentation related to decreased ocean ventilation. The severity of these chemical perturbations may further be exacerbated in EBUS by the potential increase in upwelling favorable winds induced by global warming. Here, we explore the impact of upwelling-favorable wind changes on modern and future ocean acidification and coastal hypoxia through a comparative study of the California Current System (California CS) and the Canary Current System (Canary CS). To this end, we undertook a series of idealized wind perturbation studies for present-day and year 2050 conditions with eddy-resolving setups of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System - ROMS- to which a nitrogen-based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Detritus-Zooplankton (NPDZ) biogeochemical model was coupled. Our results show that the increase of upwelling favorable winds leads to a substantial shoaling of the hypoxic boundary in the California CS, while the same wind perturbation results in a reduction of the hypoxic water volume in the Canary CS. This is because coastal hypoxia is driven by local remineralization of organic matter on the shelf in the Canary CS, while it is essentially driven by large-scale advection of low oxygen water in the California CS. The intensification of upwelling tends to acerbate ocean acidification in the surface ocean, but mediates it below it, leading to complex change pattern reflecting the intricate interplay between biologically and physically -driven changes in calcium carbonate saturation state. Additionally, our results reveal differential biogeochemical responses to upwelling intensification in the water column and on the continental shelf with, therefore, contrasting implications for the benthic and the pelagic communities of these ecosystems.

  19. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian Upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fuhlbrügge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Halogenated very short lived substances (VSLS are naturally produced in the ocean and emitted to the atmosphere. Recently, oceanic upwelling regions in the tropical East Atlantic were identified as strong sources of brominated halocarbons to the atmosphere. During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL were investigated above the Peruvian Upwelling for the first time. This study presents novel observations of the three VSLS bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide together with high resolution meteorological measurements and Lagrangian transport modelling. Although relatively low oceanic emissions were observed, except for methyl iodide, surface atmospheric abundances were elevated. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting both as strong barriers for convection and trace gas transport in this region. Significant correlations between observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height were found. We used a simple source-loss estimate to identify the contribution of oceanic emissions to observed atmospheric concentrations which revealed that the observed marine VSLS abundances were dominated by horizontal advection below the trade inversion. The observed VSLS variations can be explained by the low emissions and their accumulation under different MABL and trade inversion conditions. This study confirms the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on creating effective transport barriers in the lower atmosphere controlling the distribution of VSLS abundances above ocean upwelling regions.

  20. Meteorological constraints on oceanic halocarbons above the Peruvian upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhlbrügge, Steffen; Quack, Birgit; Atlas, Elliot; Fiehn, Alina; Hepach, Helmke; Krüger, Kirstin

    2016-09-01

    During a cruise of R/V METEOR in December 2012 the oceanic sources and emissions of various halogenated trace gases and their mixing ratios in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) were investigated above the Peruvian upwelling. This study presents novel observations of the three very short lived substances (VSLSs) - bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide - together with high-resolution meteorological measurements, Lagrangian transport and source-loss calculations. Oceanic emissions of bromoform and dibromomethane were relatively low compared to other upwelling regions, while those for methyl iodide were very high. Radiosonde launches during the cruise revealed a low, stable MABL and a distinct trade inversion above acting as strong barriers for convection and vertical transport of trace gases in this region. Observed atmospheric VSLS abundances, sea surface temperature, relative humidity and MABL height correlated well during the cruise. We used a simple source-loss estimate to quantify the contribution of oceanic emissions along the cruise track to the observed atmospheric concentrations. This analysis showed that averaged, instantaneous emissions could not support the observed atmospheric mixing ratios of VSLSs and that the marine background abundances below the trade inversion were significantly influenced by advection of regional sources. Adding to this background, the observed maximum emissions of halocarbons in the coastal upwelling could explain the high atmospheric VSLS concentrations in combination with their accumulation under the distinct MABL and trade inversions. Stronger emissions along the nearshore coastline likely added to the elevated abundances under the steady atmospheric conditions. This study underscores the importance of oceanic upwelling and trade wind systems on the atmospheric distribution of marine VSLS emissions.

  1. Has upwelling strengthened along worldwide coasts over 1982-2010?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, R.; Álvarez, I.; Santos, F.; Decastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in coastal upwelling strength have been widely studied since 1990 when Bakun proposed that global warming can induce the intensification of upwelling in coastal areas. Whether present wind trends support this hypothesis remains controversial, as results of previous studies seem to depend on the study area, the length of the time series, the season, and even the database used. In this study, temporal and spatial trends in the coastal upwelling regime worldwide were investigated during upwelling seasons from 1982 to 2010 using a single wind database (Climate Forecast System Reanalysis) with high spatial resolution (0.3°). Of the major upwelling systems, increasing trends were only observed in the coastal areas of Benguela, Peru, Canary, and northern California. A tendency for an increase in upwelling-favourable winds was also identified along several less studied regions, such as the western Australian and southern Caribbean coasts.

  2. Coastal Upwelling Drives Intertidal Assemblage Structure and Trophic Ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Reddin, Carl J.; Felipe Docmac; Nessa E O'Connor; Bothwell, John H; Chris Harrod

    2015-01-01

    Similar environmental driving forces can produce similarity among geographically distant ecosystems. Coastal oceanic upwelling, for example, has been associated with elevated biomass and abundance patterns of certain functional groups, e.g., corticated macroalgae. In the upwelling system of Northern Chile, we examined measures of intertidal macrobenthic composition, structure and trophic ecology across eighteen shores varying in their proximity to two coastal upwelling centres, in a hierarchi...

  3. LOCAL EXACT BOUNDARY CONTROLLABILITY FOR A CLASS OFQUASILINEAR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    For a class of mixed initial-boundary value problem for general quasilinear hyperbolic systems, this paper establishes the local exact boundary controllability with boundary controls only acting on one end. As an application, the authors show the local exact boundary controllability for a kind of nonlinear vibrating string problem.

  4. Holocene Paleoceanographic Conditions of Cabo Frio Upwelling System (Rio de Janeiro / Brazil). As Inferred by Bulk and Molecular Geochemical Approach From Sedimentary Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, M. H.; Sifeddine, A.; Lallier-Vergès, E.; Boussafir, M.; Jacob, J.

    2005-12-01

    The main upwelling areas in Brazil are along its central coast. Among these, the Cabo Frio (23 deg S x 42 deg W) zone has the strongest signal of low sea surface temperature. The Cabo Frio coastal upwelling cell is controlled by three factors: the topography and orientation of the coastline; the position of the Brazilian Current axes, and the wind pattern, the last being the determining factor. Upwelling events in this region are concentrated in the austral spring and summer (September to April). Their occurrence is associated with NE-ENE winds, and they are inhibited when the wind blows from the southern quadrant (atmospheric frontal passages linked to polar advection). This pattern is associated with the seasonal displacements of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) over this region. Better knowledge of the SACZ behaviour over the time is very important to understanding the climatic variability over the South America in the Holocene. A high resolution sampling study is being done on two Kullenberg piston cores collected from the Brazilian continental shelf, 30-35 km southwest from the Cabo Frio island (115 m and 124 m water depth). AMS radiocarbon dating of organic matter from the core bases gives ages of 3,300 BP and 12,600 BP, respectively. We present the results of elemental analysis (TC and TN), Rock-Eval analysis (TOC, HI and OI), sedimentary organic matter petrographic analysis and alkenone sea surface paleo temperatures. Despite coming from an upwelling area, sediments have very low TOC content and show an increase from around 8,000 year with variations modulated by millennial and secular cycles. Sedimentary organic matter is marine type II that, associated with optical analysis, indicates a high-degraded state and a little continental contribution. The range of paleo temperature values are similar to results of other studies carried out in the same system and are coherent with regional Brazilian Current dynamics. These first results identify two

  5. Impact of boundary regions on the interior circulation of the California Current System in a regional modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneziani, M.; Edwards, C.; Moore, A.

    2008-12-01

    We use the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) to model the circulation of the California Current System (CCS) using ECCO-GODAE products to force the model at the open boundaries of the domain. We investigate the impact that lateral boundary forcing (and the boundary region in general) has on particular metrics of the interior circulation by adopting both an adjoint model and a traditional sensitivity approach. Adjoint methods are naturally suited to sensitivity studies as they provide the direct dependencies of circulation metrics on uncertainties of the model initial conditions, surface and lateral external forcing, and model parameters, but their results are only valid within the time scale during which the linearity assumption underlying adjoint models can be considered to hold. More traditional sensitivity studies must be conducted to investigate longer time scales. We describe the adjoint model results for two metrics that represent the upwelling processes of the Central California region and the mean sea level field of the coastal circulation, respectively. The spatial distribution of the adjoint sensitivity fields allows us to quantify the contribution of the boundary regions over a biweekly time scale. We investigate longer time scales by adopting two methods: 1) apply different ECCO products at the open boundaries and evaluate mean stratification changes in the CalCOFI coastal region; 2) release passive tracers at the boundaries and calculate ventilation time scales and pathways from the boundary areas to the CCS interior.

  6. Outside the paradigm of upwelling rias in NW Iberian Peninsula: Biogeochemical and phytoplankton patterns of a non-upwelling ria

    OpenAIRE

    Ospina-Álvarez, Natalia; Varela, Manuel; Doval, M. Dolores; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Cervantes-Duarte, Rafael; Prego, R

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic Galician rias show the effect of natural eutrophication during ENACW upwelling episodes when large amounts of nutrients are injected. However, the Cantabrian Galician rias do not appear to be disturbed by upwelling events and it can be hypothesized that eutrophy is not inherent to the Galician rias. This question was tackled regarding the biogeochemical and phytoplankton characteristic in the Ria of Barqueiro, located on the western boundary of the Cantabrian Sea, from January 20...

  7. New boundary conditions for the c=-2 ghost system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creutzig, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Quella, T. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands). KdV Inst. for Mathematics; Schomerus, V. [Center for Mathematical Physics, Hamburg (Germany)]|[King' s College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics

    2006-12-15

    We investigate a novel boundary condition for the bc system with central charge c=-2. Its boundary state is constructed and tested in detail. It appears to give rise to the first example of a local logarithmic boundary sector within a bulk theory whose Virasoro zero modes are diagonalizable. (orig.)

  8. ON STABILITY BOUNDARY OF LINEAR MULTI-PARAMETER HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Zhaohui(齐朝晖); Alexander P.Seyranian

    2002-01-01

    In this paper an approximate equation is derived to describe smoothparts of the stability boundary for linear Hamiltonian systems, depending on arbitrarynumber of parameters. With this equation, we can obtain parameters correspondingto the stability boundary, as well as to the stability and instability domains, pro-vided that one point on the stability boundary is known. Then differential equationsdescribing the evolution of eigenvalues and eigenvectors along a curve on the sta-bility boundary surface are derived. These equations also allow us to obtain curvesbelonging to the stability boundary. Applications to linear gyroscopic systems areconsidered and studied with examples.

  9. HETERO PHASE BOUNDARIES IN THE SILVER-NICKEL SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, R; Fischmeister, H.

    1988-01-01

    Using Gleiter's sphere rotation technique, the orientation relations of preferred heterophase boundaries have been determined in the system silver/nickel. Comparison with other sphere rotation studies shows great similarities between all systems studied so far, which include metals on oxides and on alkali halides. In all, 33 orientation types have been found : these can be reduced to 10 "elementary" boundary types if facetting and twinning at the boundary are admitted. In almost al1 systems. ...

  10. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1984-08-30

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water. 1 fig.

  11. Salinity driven oceanographic upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The salinity driven oceanographic upwelling is maintained in a mariculture device that includes a long main duct in the general shape of a cylinder having perforated cover plates at each end. The mariculture device is suspended vertically in the ocean such that one end of the main duct is in surface water and the other end in relatively deep water that is cold, nutrient rich and relatively fresh in comparison to the surface water which is relatively warm, relatively nutrient deficient and relatively saline. A plurality of elongated flow segregating tubes are disposed in the main duct and extend from the upper cover plate beyond the lower cover plate into a lower manifold plate. The lower manifold plate is spaced from the lower cover plate to define a deep water fluid flow path to the interior space of the main duct. Spacer tubes extend from the upper cover plate and communicate with the interior space of the main duct. The spacer tubes are received in an upper manifold plate spaced from the upper cover plate to define a surface water fluid flow path into the flow segregating tubes. A surface water-deep water counterflow is thus established with deep water flowing upwardly through the main duct interior for discharge beyond the upper manifold plate while surface water flows downwardly through the flow segregating tubes for discharge below the lower manifold plate. During such counterflow heat is transferred from the downflowing warm water to the upflowing cold water. The flow is maintained by the difference in density between the deep water and the surface water due to their differences in salinity. The upwelling of nutrient rich deep water is used for marifarming by fertilizing the nutrient deficient surface water.

  12. A system boundary identification method for life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Hongchao; Liu, Zhichao;

    2014-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a useful tool for quantifying the overall environmental impacts of a product, process, or service. The scientific scope and boundary definition are important to ensure the accuracy of LCA results. Defining the boundary in LCA is difficult and there are no commonly...... of processes considered, and the gradient of the fitting curve trends to zero gradually. According to the threshold rules, a relatively accurate system boundary could be obtained.It is found from this research that the system boundary curve describes the growth of life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) results...

  13. Electrostatics of solvated systems in periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Continuum solvation methods can provide an accurate and inexpensive embedding of quantum simulations in liquid or complex dielectric environments. Notwithstanding a long history and manifold applications to isolated systems in open boundary conditions, their extension to materials simulations --- typically entailing periodic-boundary conditions --- is very recent, and special care is needed to address correctly the electrostatic terms. We discuss here how periodic-boundary corrections develop...

  14. Boundary Layer to a System of Viscous Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the large-time behavior of solutions to the initial-boundary value problem for nxn hyperbolic system of conservation laws with artificial viscosity in the half line (0, ∞). We first show that a boundary layer exists if the corresponding hyperbolic part contains at least one characteristic field with negative propagation speed. We further show that such boundary layer is nonlinearly stable under small initial perturbation. The proofs are given by an elementary energy method.

  15. A comparison of benthic foraminiferal Mn/Ca and sedimentary Mn/Al as proxies of relative bottom water oxygenation in the low latitude NE Atlantic upwelling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. McKay

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Trace element incorporation into foraminiferal shells (tests is governed by physical and chemical conditions of the surrounding marine environment and therefore foraminiferal geochemistry provides a means of palaeoceanographic reconstructions. With the availability of high spatial resolution instrumentation with high precision, foraminiferal geochemistry has become a major research topic over recent years. However, reconstructions of past bottom water oxygenation using foraminiferal tests remain in their infancy. In this study we explore the potential of using Mn/Ca determined by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS as well as by Flow-Through Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (FT-ICP-OES in the benthic foraminiferal species Eubuliminella exilis as a proxy for recording changes in bottom water oxygen conditions in the low latitude NE Atlantic upwelling system. Furthermore, we compare the SIMS and FT-ICP-OES results with published Mn/Al in the bulk sediment from the same sediment core. This is the first time that benthic foraminiferal Mn/Ca is directly compared with Mn/Al in the bulk sediment, which largely agree on the former oxygen conditions. Samples were selected to include different productivity regimes related to Marine Isotope Stage 3 (35–28 ka, the Last Glacial Maximum (28–19 ka, Heinrich Event 1 (18–15.5 ka, Bølling Allerød (15.5–13.5 ka and the Younger Dryas (13.5–11.5 ka. Foraminiferal Mn/Ca determined by SIMS and FT-ICP-OES are comparable. Mn/Ca was higher during periods with high primary productivity, such as during the Younger Dryas which indicates low oxygen conditions. This is further supported by the benthic foraminiferal faunal composition. Our results highlight the proxy potential of Mn/Ca in benthic foraminifera from upwelling systems for reconstructing past variations in oxygen conditions of the sea floor environment as well as the need to use it in combination with other proxy records such

  16. Zonation of bacterioplankton communities along aging upwelled water in the northern Benguela upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eBergen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling areas are shaped by enhanced primary production in surface waters, accompanied by a well-investigated planktonic succession. Although bacteria play an important role in biogeochemical cycles of upwelling systems, little is known about bacterial community composition and its development during upwelling events. The aim of this study was to investigate the succession of bacterial assemblages in aging upwelled water of the Benguela upwelling from coastal to offshore sites. Water from the upper mixed layer at 12 stations was sampled along two transects from the origin of the upwelling to a distance of 220 km. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was then used in a bacterial diversity analysis and major bacterial taxa were quantified by catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH. Additionally, bacterial cell numbers and bacterial production were assessed . Community statistical analysis revealed a reproducible zonation along the two transects, with four clusters of significantly different microbial assemblages. Clustering was mainly driven by phytoplankton composition and abundance. Similar to the temporal succession that occurs during phytoplankton blooms in temperate coastal waters, operational taxonomic units (OTUs affiliated with Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria were dominant during algal blooming whereas Pelagibacterales were highly abundant in regions with low algal abundance. The most dominant heterotrophic OTU (9% of all reads was affiliated with Pelagibacterales and showed a strong negative correlation with phytoplankton. By contrast, the second most abundant heterotrophic OTU (6% of all reads was affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia and correlated positively with phytoplankton. Together with the close relation of bacterial production and phytoplankton abundance, our results showed that bacterial community dynamics is strongly driven by the development and composition of the phytoplankton

  17. Planetary boundaries and earth system governance. Exploring the links

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, F.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of planetary boundaries that has been advanced by a group of leading experts around Johan Rockström. I place the concept of planetary boundaries in the larger framework of the emerging research paradigm of earth system governance, welcoming it as a crucial contribu

  18. Inverse Boundary Problems for Systems in Two Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Albin, Pierre; Tzou, Leo; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    We prove identification of coefficients up to gauge by Cauchy data at the boundary for elliptic systems on oriented compact surfaces with boundary or domains of $\\mathbb{C}$. In the geometric setting, we fix a Riemann surface with boundary, and consider both a Dirac-type operator plus potential acting on sections of a Clifford bundle and a connection Laplacian plus potential (i.e. Schr\\"odinger Laplacian with external Yang-Mills field) acting on sections of a Hermitian bundle. In either case we show that the Cauchy data determines both the connection and the potential up to a natural gauge transformation: conjugation by an endomorphism of the bundle which is the identity at the boundary. For domains of $\\mathbb{C}$, we recover zeroth order terms up to gauge from Cauchy data at the boundary in first order elliptic systems.

  19. Cross-shelf structure of coastal upwelling : a two - dimensional extension of Ekman's theory and a mechanism for inner shelf upwelling shut down

    OpenAIRE

    Estrade, P.; Marchesiello, Patrick; Verdière de, A. C.; Roy, Claude

    2008-01-01

    Sea-surface temperature images of the coastal upwelling regions off Northwest Africa show that the core of upwelling is sometimes located far from the coast. This has been documented in three regions that share a common feature, namely a wide and shallow continental shelf. This upwelling feature plays a key role in the ecology of the Canary Current System. It creates an innerfront which provides retention for biological material, e.g. fish eggs and larvae, in the highly productive nearshore e...

  20. Boundary Controllability of Integrodifferential Systems in Banach Spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Balachandran; E R Anandhi

    2001-02-01

    Sufficient conditions for boundary controllability of integrodifferential systems in Banach spaces are established. The results are obtained by using the strongly continuous semigroup theory and the Banach contraction principle. Examples are provided to illustrate the theory.

  1. Spatio-temporal variation of microphytoplankton in the upwelling system of the south-eastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon of 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lathika Cicily Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The phytoplankton standing crop was assessed in detail along the South Eastern Arabian Sea (SEAS during the different phases of coastal upwelling in 2009. During phase 1 intense upwelling was observed along the southern transects(8°N and 8.5°N. The maximum chlorophyll a concentration (22.7 mg m-3 was observedin the coastal waters off Thiruvananthapuram (8.5°N. Further north there was no signature of upwelling, with extensive Trichodesmium erythraeum blooms. Diatoms dominated in these upwelling regions with thecentric diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus being the dominant species along the 8°N transect. Along the 8.5°N transect pennate diatoms like Nitzschia seriata and Pseudo-nitzschia sp. dominated. Duringphase 2, upwelling of varying intensity was observed throughout the study area with maximum chlorophyll a concentrations along the 9°N transect (25 mg m-3 with Chaetoceros curvisetus as the dominantphytoplankton. Along the 8.5°N transect pennate diatoms during phase 1 were replaced by centric diatoms like Chaetoceros sp. The presence of solitary pennate diatoms Amphora sp. and Navicula sp.were significant in the waters off Kochi. Upwelling was waning during phase 3 and was confined to the coastal waters of the southern transects with the highest chlorophyll a concentration of 11.2 mg m-3. Along withdiatoms, dinoflagellate cell densities increased in phases 2 and 3. In the northern transects (9°N and 10°N the proportion of dinoflagellates was comparatively higher and was represented mainly by Protoperidinium spp.

  2. A realization theory for autonomous boundary-value linear systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoukhah, Ramine

    1989-01-01

    A frequency-domain realization theory is developed for the class of autonomous- , but not necessarily stationary, boundary-value linear systems. It is shown that this realization problem, which consists of constructing autonomous boundary-value linear systems from prescribed weighting patterns, reduces to the factorization of several rational matrices in two variables having separable denominators. This factorization problem is examined and a method is given for constructing minimal factoriza...

  3. On weak solvability of boundary value problems for elliptic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce, Felipe; Lebedev, Leonid,; Rendón, Leonardo,

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns with existence and uniqueness of a weak solution for elliptic systems of partial differential equations with mixed boundary conditions. The proof is based on establishing the coerciveness of bilinear forms, related with the system of equations, which depend on first-order derivatives of vector functions in Rn. The condition of coerciveness relates to Korn's type inequalities. The result is illustrated by an example of boundary value problems for a class of elliptic equatio...

  4. Pliocene Warm Period Upwelling in the Southern Benguela Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, B. F.; McClymont, E.; Felder, S.; Leng, M. J.; Rosell Mele, A.; Rueda, G.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pliocene has been proposed as a possible analogue for understanding future climate change and testing climate models. Previous work has shown that during the Pliocene the major upwelling systems were relatively warm, and thus either inactive, contracted, or upwelling warmer waters than present. Here we examine evidence from a core site located on the margins of the modern Benguela upwelling system, to test whether the upwelling cells had migrated or contracted relative to present during the Pliocene. We applied several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the Pliocene history of ODP site 1087 (31º28'S, 15º19'E, 1374m water depth), including the UK37' index and TEX86 index (for reconstructing sea surface temperatures), chlorins (for estimating primary productivity) and planktonic foraminifera assemblages (for inferring water mass changes). These proxies show that between 3.5 and 3.0 Ma the southern Benguela region was significantly cooler than the northern Benguela region, the latter where the main upwelling cells are found today. Coupled with higher primary production, a shift in planktonic foraminifera assemblage, and an offset between the UK37' index and TEX86 index, we infer that more extensive upwelling was present in the southern Benguela region during the Pliocene. We infer that the main Benguela upwelling cells had shifted southward relative to today, as a result of changes in the local wind field. We find evidence for pronounced cooling and a shift in the planktonic foraminifera assemblage during the M2 and KM2 glacial stages, showing a sensitivity of Benguela upwelling to these short-lived climate events.

  5. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  6. Holocene variability in the intensity of wind-gap upwelling in the tropical eastern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Lauren T.; Aronson, Richard B.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Wind-driven upwelling in Pacific Panamá is a significant source of oceanographic variability in the tropical eastern Pacific. This upwelling system provides a critical teleconnection between the Atlantic and tropical Pacific that may impact climate variability on a global scale. Despite its importance to oceanographic circulation, ecology, and climate, little is known about the long-term stability of the Panamanian upwelling system or its interaction with climatic forcing on millennial time scales. Using a combination of radiocarbon and U-series dating of fossil corals collected in cores from five sites across Pacific Panamá, we reconstructed the local radiocarbon reservoir correction, ΔR, from ~6750 cal B.P. to present. Because the ΔR of shallow-water environments is elevated by upwelling, our data set represents a millennial-scale record of spatial and temporal variability of the Panamanian upwelling system. The general oceanographic gradient from relatively strong upwelling in the Gulf of Panamá to weak-to-absent upwelling in the Gulf of Chiriquí was present throughout our record; however, the intensity of upwelling in the Gulf of Panamá varied significantly through time. Our reconstructions suggest that upwelling in the Gulf of Panamá is weak at present; however, the middle Holocene was characterized by periods of enhanced upwelling, with the most intense upwelling occurring just after of a regional shutdown in the development of reefs at ~4100 cal B.P. Comparisons with regional climate proxies suggest that, whereas the Intertropical Convergence Zone is the primary control on modern upwelling in Pacific Panamá, the El Niño–Southern Oscillation drove the millennial-scale variability of upwelling during the Holocene.

  7. Emergy analysis of coastal systems influenced by upwelling in northern Chile: Estimation of ecological-economic sustainability at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous studies carried out in a variety of environments have suggested that coastal marine systems generate a variety of goods and services for humanity. However, in recent decades there has been a marked degradation of these ecosystems, as well as over-exploitation of natural ...

  8. Stability and boundary stabilization of 1-D hyperbolic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bastin, Georges

    2016-01-01

    This monograph explores the modeling of conservation and balance laws of one-dimensional hyperbolic systems using partial differential equations. It presents typical examples of hyperbolic systems for a wide range of physical engineering applications, allowing readers to understand the concepts in whichever setting is most familiar to them. With these examples, it also illustrates how control boundary conditions may be defined for the most commonly used control devices. The authors begin with the simple case of systems of two linear conservation laws and then consider the stability of systems under more general boundary conditions that may be differential, nonlinear, or switching. They then extend their discussion to the case of nonlinear conservation laws and demonstrate the use of Lyapunov functions in this type of analysis. Systems of balance laws are considered next, starting with the linear variety before they move on to more general cases of nonlinear ones. They go on to show how the problem of boundary...

  9. Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of ocean conditions for the Northern region of the California Current upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Samantha A.; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Hermann, Albert J.; Nguyen, Thanh Tam; Bond, Nicholas A.; Newton, Jan A.; Williams, Gregory D.; Peterson, William T.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO’s Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA’s Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders. PMID:27273473

  10. Experiments with Seasonal Forecasts of ocean conditions for the Northern region of the California Current upwelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Samantha A.; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Hermann, Albert J.; Nguyen, Thanh Tam; Bond, Nicholas A.; Newton, Jan A.; Williams, Gregory D.; Peterson, William T.; Alin, Simone R.; Feely, Richard A.

    2016-06-01

    Resource managers at the state, federal, and tribal levels make decisions on a weekly to quarterly basis, and fishers operate on a similar timeframe. To determine the potential of a support tool for these efforts, a seasonal forecast system is experimented with here. JISAO’s Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem (J-SCOPE) features dynamical downscaling of regional ocean conditions in Washington and Oregon waters using a combination of a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry and forecasts from NOAA’s Climate Forecast System (CFS). Model performance and predictability were examined for sea surface temperature (SST), bottom temperature, bottom oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation state through model hindcasts, reforecast, and forecast comparisons with observations. Results indicate J-SCOPE forecasts have measurable skill on seasonal timescales. Experiments suggest that seasonal forecasting of ocean conditions important for fisheries is possible with the right combination of components. Those components include regional predictability on seasonal timescales of the physical environment from a large-scale model, a high-resolution regional model with biogeochemistry that simulates seasonal conditions in hindcasts, a relationship with local stakeholders, and a real-time observational network. Multiple efforts and approaches in different regions would advance knowledge to provide additional tools to fishers and other stakeholders.

  11. Nimbus observation of oceanic upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekielda, K.

    1972-01-01

    Observing the development of upwelling on the northeast coast of Africa by measuring ocean surface emission with infrared radiometers on Nimbus satellites is reported. Using the temperature of the ocean as telemetered by the satellite, the biological potential of an area is estimated, and consequently the highest potential for fisheries.

  12. Upwelling in the Gulf of Lions

    OpenAIRE

    Millot, Claude; Wald, Lucien

    1981-01-01

    International audience The hydrological and meteorological characteristics of the Gulf of Lions are such that upwelling occurs with no bias due to tides or strong longshore circulation. The sky is generally cloud-free, an uncommon feature in an upwelling area that allows extensive use of satellite infrared data. The observations are adequate to compute mean maps of the sea-surface temperature during upwelling events. Undoubtedly upwelling is much more intense along straitght coastal segmen...

  13. Upwelling limitation by onshore geostrophic flow

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesiello, Patrick; Estrade, P.

    2010-01-01

    Although coastal upwelling has now been the subject of many studies. the only available dynamical upwelling index is derived from a simple relation between upwelling intensity and alongshore winds stress In this study. we first present a primitive equation model simulation of the New Caledonia island legion to show that upwelling intensity can be limited by onshore geostrophic flow Then, we propose a new analytical model accounting for the effect of onshore geostrophic flow on the structure o...

  14. Classification of boundary equilibrium bifurcations in planar Filippov systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, Paul

    2016-01-01

    If a family of piecewise smooth systems depending on a real parameter is defined on two different regions of the plane separated by a switching surface, then a boundary equilibrium bifurcation occurs if a stationary point of one of the systems intersects the switching surface at a critical value of the parameter. We derive the leading order terms of a normal form for boundary equilibrium bifurcations of planar systems. This makes it straightforward to derive a complete classification of the bifurcations that can occur. We are thus able to confirm classic results of Filippov [Differential Equations with Discontinuous Right Hand Sides (Kluwer, Dordrecht, 1988)] using different and more transparent methods, and explain why the 'missing' cases of Hogan et al. [Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems: The Case of the Missing Boundary Equilibrium Bifurcations (University of Bristol, 2015)] are the only cases omitted in more recent work.

  15. Two degenerate boundary equilibrium bifurcations in planar Filippov systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dercole, F.; Della Rossa, F.; Colombo, A.; Kuznetsov, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    We contribute to the analysis of codimension-two bifurcations in discontinuous systems by studying all equilibrium bifurcations of 2D Filippov systems that involve a sliding limit cycle. There are only two such local bifurcations: (1) a degenerate boundary focus, which we call the homoclinic boundar

  16. Driven nonequilibrium lattice systems with shifted periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, J.L. (New York Univ., NY (USA)); Leung, K.; Zia, R.K.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA))

    1989-07-01

    The authors present the first study of a driven nonequilibrium lattice system in the two-phase region, with shifted periodic boundary conditions, forcing steps into the interface. When the shift corresponds to small angles with respect to the driving field, they find nonanalytic behavior in the (internal) energy of the system, supporting numerical evidence that interface roughness is suppressed by the field. For larger shifts, the competition between the driving field and the boundary induces the breakup of a single strip with tilted interfaces into many narrower strips with aligned interfaces. The size and temperature dependences of the critical angles of such breakup transitions are studied.

  17. Intensive aggregate formation with low vertical flux during an upwelling-induced diatom bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Tiselius, P.; Mitchell-Innes, B.;

    1998-01-01

    The surfaces of most pelagic diatoms are sticky at times and may therefore form rapidly settling aggregates by physical coagulation. Stickiness and aggregate formation may be particularly adaptive in upwelling systems by allowing the retention of diatom populations in the vicinity of the upwelling...... center. We therefore hypothesized that upwelling diatom blooms are terminated by aggregate formation and rapid sedimentation. We monitored the development of a maturing diatom (mainly Chaetoceros spp.) bloom in the Benguela upwelling current during 7 d in February. Chlorophyll concentrations remained...

  18. A Nonlinear Diffusion System with Coupled Nonlinear Boundary Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinhuan; TIAN Miaoqing; HONG Liang

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a nonlinear diffusion system with coupled nonlinear boundary flux and two kinds of inner sources (positive for the first and negative for the second), where the four nonlinear mechanisms are described by eight nonlinear parameters. The critical exponent of the system is determined by a complete classi-fication of the eight nonlinear parameters, which is represented via the characteristic algebraic system introduced to the problem.

  19. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  20. Boundary Spanning in Offshored Information Systems Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Poornima

    2010-01-01

    Recent growth in offshore outsourcing of information systems (IS) services is accompanied by managing the offshore projects successfully. Much of the project failures can be attributed to geographic and organizational boundaries which create differences in culture, language, work patterns, and decision making processes among the offshore project…

  1. Optimal control problems for impulsive systems with integral boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allaberen Ashyralyev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the optimal control problem is considered when the state of the system is described by the impulsive differential equations with integral boundary conditions. Applying the Banach contraction principle the existence and uniqueness of the solution is proved for the corresponding boundary problem by the fixed admissible control. The first and second variation of the functional is calculated. Various necessary conditions of optimality of the first and second order are obtained by the help of the variation of the controls.

  2. Intense submesoscale upwelling in anticyclonic eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannigan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations from around the global ocean show that enhanced biological activity can be found in anticyclonic eddies. This may mean that upwelling of nutrient-rich water occurs within the eddy, but such upwelling is not captured by models that resolve mesoscale processes. High-resolution simulations presented here show intense submesoscale upwelling from the thermocline to the mixed layer in anticyclonic eddies. The properties of the upwelling are consistent with a process known as symmetric instability. A simple limiting nutrient experiment shows that this upwelling can drive much higher biological activity in anticyclonic eddies when there is a high nutrient concentration in the thermocline. An estimate for the magnitude of upwelling associated with symmetric instability in anticyclonic eddies in the Sargasso Sea shows that it may be of comparable magnitude to other processes, though further work is required to understand the full implications for basin-scale nutrient budgets.

  3. System, Subsystem, Hive: Boundary Problems in Computational Theories of Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Tomer; van Leeuwen, Cees; Edelman, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    A computational theory of consciousness should include a quantitative measure of consciousness, or MoC, that (i) would reveal to what extent a given system is conscious, (ii) would make it possible to compare not only different systems, but also the same system at different times, and (iii) would be graded, because so is consciousness. However, unless its design is properly constrained, such an MoC gives rise to what we call the boundary problem: an MoC that labels a system as conscious will do so for some—perhaps most—of its subsystems, as well as for irrelevantly extended systems (e.g., the original system augmented with physical appendages that contribute nothing to the properties supposedly supporting consciousness), and for aggregates of individually conscious systems (e.g., groups of people). This problem suggests that the properties that are being measured are epiphenomenal to consciousness, or else it implies a bizarre proliferation of minds. We propose that a solution to the boundary problem can be found by identifying properties that are intrinsic or systemic: properties that clearly differentiate between systems whose existence is a matter of fact, as opposed to those whose existence is a matter of interpretation (in the eye of the beholder). We argue that if a putative MoC can be shown to be systemic, this ipso facto resolves any associated boundary issues. As test cases, we analyze two recent theories of consciousness in light of our definitions: the Integrated Information Theory and the Geometric Theory of consciousness. PMID:27512377

  4. Free boundary problems in PDEs and particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carinci, Gioia; Giardinà, Cristian; Presutti, Errico

    2016-01-01

    In this volume a theory for models of transport in the presence of a free boundary is developed. Macroscopic laws of transport are described by PDE's. When the system is open, there are several mechanisms to couple the system with the external forces. Here a class of systems where the interaction with the exterior takes place in correspondence of a free boundary is considered. Both continuous and discrete models sharing the same structure are analysed. In Part I a free boundary problem related to the Stefan Problem is worked out in all details. For this model a new notion of relaxed solution is proposed for which global existence and uniqueness is proven. It is also shown that this is the hydrodynamic limit of the empirical mass density of the associated particle system. In Part II several other models are discussed. The expectation is that the results proved for the basic model extend to these other cases. All the models discussed in this volume have an interest in problems arising in several research fields...

  5. Electrostatics of solvated systems in periodic boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    Continuum solvation methods can provide an accurate and inexpensive embedding of quantum simulations in liquid or complex dielectric environments. Notwithstanding a long history and manifold applications to isolated systems in open boundary conditions, their extension to materials simulations, typically entailing periodic boundary conditions, is very recent, and special care is needed to address correctly the electrostatic terms. We discuss here how periodic boundary corrections developed for systems in vacuum should be modified to take into account solvent effects, using as a general framework the self-consistent continuum solvation model developed within plane-wave density-functional theory [O. Andreussi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064102 (2012), 10.1063/1.3676407]. A comprehensive discussion of real- and reciprocal-space corrective approaches is presented, together with an assessment of their ability to remove electrostatic interactions between periodic replicas. Numerical results for zero- and two-dimensional charged systems highlight the effectiveness of the different suggestions, and underline the importance of a proper treatment of electrostatic interactions in first-principles studies of charged systems in solution.

  6. Applying Twisted Boundary Conditions for Few-body Nuclear Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Körber, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite-volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twists angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length $L\\approx8-14$ fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogue of `i-periodic' twist angles that eliminate the leading order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  7. Applying twisted boundary conditions for few-body nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Christopher; Luu, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twist angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length L ≈8 -14 fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogs of "i-periodic" twist angles that eliminate the leading-order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  8. Comparaisons des systèmes productifs de l'Atlantique tropical est : dômes thermiques, upwellings côtiers et upwelling équatorial

    OpenAIRE

    Voituriez, B; Herbland, Alain

    1982-01-01

    All the high-productive systems of the Eastern tropical Atlantic between 20°N and 15°S - coastal upwelling, equatorial upwelling, and thermal domes-are partly controlled by the subsuperficial equatorial countercurrent system, which feeds all of them with Southern Atlantic Central Water. However, the enrichment processes in the systems are quite different, and thus the structures differ from one another. Two types have to be considered : 1) the quasi geostrophic ones which are two-layered syst...

  9. Some Notes on Reaction Diffusion Systems with Nonlinear Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jun Sun

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the existence and nonexistence of global positive solution to a semilinear reaction-diffusion system with nonlinear boundary conditions. For the heat diffusion case, the necessary and sufficient conditions on the global existence of all positive solutions are obtained. For the general fast diffusion case, we get some conditions on the global existence and nonexistence of positive solutions. The results of this paper fill the some gaps which were left in this field.

  10. On Systems of Boundary Value Problems for Differential Inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynn ERBE; Christopher C. TISDELL; Patricia J. Y. WONG

    2007-01-01

    Herein we consider the existence of solutions to second-order,two-point boundary value problems (BVPs) for systems of ordinary differential inclusions.Some new Bernstein –Nagumo condi-tions are presented that ensure a priori on the derivative of solutions to the differential inclusion.These a priori results are then applied,in conjunction with appropriate topological methods,to prove some new existence theorems for solutions to systems of BVPs for differential inclusions.The new conditions allow of the treatment of systems of BVPs without growth restrictions.

  11. Boundary-Value Problems for Weakly Nonlinear Delay Differential Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boichuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions are derived of the existence of solutions of nonlinear boundary-value problems for systems of n ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients and single delay (in the linear part and with a finite number of measurable delays of argument in nonlinearity: ż(t=Az(t-τ+g(t+εZ(z(hi(t,t,ε,  t∈[a,b], assuming that these solutions satisfy the initial and boundary conditions z(s:=ψ(s if s∉[a,b],  lz(⋅=α∈Rm. The use of a delayed matrix exponential and a method of pseudoinverse by Moore-Penrose matrices led to an explicit and analytical form of sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions in a given space and, moreover, to the construction of an iterative process for finding the solutions of such problems in a general case when the number of boundary conditions (defined by a linear vector functional l does not coincide with the number of unknowns in the differential system with a single delay.

  12. Bifurcations and Stability Boundary of a Power System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui Gao

    2004-01-01

    A single-axis ux decay model including an excitation control model proposed in [12,14,16] is studied. As the bifurcation parameter P m (input power to the generator) varies, the system exhibits dynamics emerging from static and dynamic bifurcations which link with system collapse. We show that the equilibrium point of the system undergoes three bifurcations: one saddle-node bifurcation and two Hopf bifurcations. The state variables dominating system collapse are different for different critical points, and the excitative control may play an important role in delaying system from collapsing. Simulations are presented to illustrate the dynamical behavior associated with the power system stability and collapse. Moreover, by computing the local quadratic approximation of the 5-dimensional stable manifold at an order 5 saddle point, an analytical expression for the approximate stability boundary is worked out.

  13. Variability of Iberian upwelling implied by ERA-40 and ERA-Interim reanalyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. R. Alves

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Regional Ocean Modeling System ocean model is used to simulate the decadal evolution of the regional waters in offshore Iberia in response to atmospheric fields given by ECMWF ERA-40 (1961–2001 and ERA-Interim (1989–2008 reanalyses. The simulated sea surface temperature (SST fields are verified against satellite AVHRR SST, and they are analysed to characterise the variability and trends of coastal upwelling in the region. Opposing trends in upwelling frequency are found at the northern limit, where upwelling has been decreasing in recent decades, and at its southern edge, where there is some evidence of increased upwelling. These results confirm previous observational studies and, more importantly, indicate that observed SST trends are not only due to changes in radiative or atmospheric heat fluxes alone but also due to changes in upwelling dynamics, suggesting that such a process may be relevant in climate change scenarios.

  14. Nutrients, Recycling, and Biological Populations in Upwelling Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitledge, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Nutrient recycling has been studied in the upwelling areas of Baja California, Northwest Africa, and Peru. Regeneration by biological populations in these areas contributes significant quantities of recycled nitrogen which is utilized in productivity processes. Each area has a different combination of organisms which leads to differences in the relative contributions of zooplankton, nekton, or benthos to the nutrient cycles. Comparisons of ammonium regeneration rates of zooplankton and nekton-micronekton populations in the three upwelling areas show that zooplankton recycle relatively less nitrogen in the Baja California and Peru systems than nekton. In the Northwest Africa upwelling region, however, zooplankton, fish, and benthic inputs are all substantial. In recent years the Peruvian upwelling system has been altered with the decline of the anchoveta population and an increase in the importance of zooplankton in nutrient recycling. The distribution of recycled nitrogen (ammonium and urea) in transects across the shelf at 10°S and 15°S indicates that regeneration is relatively more important at 10°S in the region of the wide shelf. In both areas the distribution of ammonium and urea are not entirely coincident thereby indicating differences in their production and/or utilization.

  15. Turing Instability in a Boundary-fed System

    CERN Document Server

    Setayeshgar, S

    1998-01-01

    The formation of localized structures in the chlorine dioxide-idodine-malonic acid (CDIMA) reaction-diffusion system is investigated numerically using a realistic model of this system. We analyze the one-dimensional patterns formed along the gradients imposed by boundary feeds, and study their linear stability to symmetry-breaking perturbations (Turing instability) in the plane transverse to these gradients. We establish that an often-invoked simple local linear analysis which neglects longitudinal diffusion is inappropriate for predicting the linear stability of these patterns. Using a fully nonuniform analysis, we investigate the structure of the patterns formed along the gradients and their stability to transverse Turing pattern formation as a function of the values of two control parameters: the malonic acid feed concentration and the size of the reactor in the dimension along the gradients. The results from this investigation are compared with existing experiments.

  16. Solutions to a hyperbolic system of conservation laws on two boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Zhi; YAO Ai-di

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction of elementary waves including delta-shock waves on two boundaries for a hyperbolic system of conservation laws. The solutions of the initial-boundary value problem for the system are constructively obtained. In the problem the initial-boundary data are in piecewise constant states.

  17. Two-Baryon Systems with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Briceno, Raul A; Luu, Thomas C; Savage, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    We explore the use of twisted boundary conditions in extracting the nucleon mass and the binding energy of two-baryon systems, such as the deuteron, from Lattice QCD calculations. Averaging the results of calculations performed with periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions imposed upon the light-quark fields, or other pair-wise averages, improves the volume dependence of the deuteron binding energy from ~exp(-kappa*L)/L to ~exp(-sqrt(2)kappa*L)/L. However, a twist angle of pi/2 in each of the spatial directions improves the volume dependence from ~exp(-kappa*L)/L to ~exp(-2kappa*L)/L. Twist averaging the binding energy with a random sampling of twist angles improves the volume dependence from ~exp^(-kappa*L)/L to ~exp(-2kappa*L)/L, but with a standard deviation of ~exp(-kappa*L)/L, introducing a signal-to-noise issue in modest lattice volumes. Using the experimentally determined phase shifts and mixing angles, we determine the expected energies of the deuteron states over a range of cubic lattice volume...

  18. The Nonlinear Predator-Prey Singularly Perturbed Robin Initial Boundary Value Problems for Reaction Diffusion System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫嘉琪

    2003-01-01

    The nonlinear predator-prey singularly perturbed Robin initial boundary value problems for reaction diffusion systems were considered. Under suitable conditions, using theory of differential inequalities the existence and asymptotic behavior of solution for initial boundary value problems were studied.

  19. Iron Meteorites and Upwelling in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, B. S.; Behr, E.; Mardon, A.; Behr, E.

    2016-09-01

    In Antarctica, a meteorite stranding zone, stone meteorites are more common than iron. Dr. Evatt's team suggests that the heat conductivity of iron may be opposing the upwelling effects so iron meteorites sink under the ice unlike the stone ones.

  20. A survey of upwelling ion event characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, C. J.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Quasi-static electric field data collected by the DE-1 spacecraft were used to study ionospheric ion upwelling events observed in the vicinity of the dayside cleft. Bulk plasma parameters such as ion-species density and field-aligned bulk velocity and flux were derived at points within several upwelling ion events for the H(+), He(+), O(+), and O(2+), and the ion-species bulk parameters near the source altitude were compared. It was found that O(+) ions comprise about 90 percent of the upwelling particle density, followed by H(+) at less than 10 percent; He(+) and O(2+) contribute about 1 percent each. The upwelling O(+) flux is also dominant, followed by upward H(+) flux, which is relatively more significant than the fractional H(+) density, due to its high upward flow velocity.

  1. Mechanisms for tropical upwelling in the stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Semeniuk, Kirill; Shepherd, Theodore G.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of the tropical upwelling branch of the stratospheric Brewer–Dobson circulation are examined, with a particular focus on the role of the middle-atmosphere Hadley circulation. Upwelling is examined in terms of both the diabatic circulation and Lagrangian trajectories using a zonally symmetric balance model. The behavior of the wave-driven circulation in the presence of angular momentum redistribution by the Hadley circulation is also considered. The results of the zonally symmetri...

  2. Possible upwelling phenomenon off the Nigerian coast

    OpenAIRE

    Ibe, A.C.; Ajayi, T.O.

    1985-01-01

    Published information favour the occurrence in certain years of wind related upwelling in Nigeria's inshore waters especially between July and September. This is corroborated by the prevalence of petroleum source beds, glauconite, phosphorite and periodic abundance of some fish including Engraulis encrassicolus, Sardinella maderensis and the bonga Ethalmosa fimbriata which are pelagic and are associated with upwelling phenomena. Examination of temperature and salinity data for 1978 - 81 sug...

  3. Prototyping global Earth System Models at high resolution: Representation of climate, ecosystems, and acidification in Eastern Boundary Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, J. P.; John, J. G.; Stock, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The world's major Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) such as the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) are critically important areas for global fisheries. Computational limitations have divided past EBC modeling into two types: high resolution regional approaches that resolve the strong meso-scale structures involved, and coarse global approaches that represent the large scale context for EBCs, but only crudely resolve only the largest scales of their manifestation. These latter global studies have illustrated the complex mechanisms involved in the climate change and acidification response in these regions, with the CCLME response dominated not by local adjustments but large scale reorganization of ocean circulation through remote forcing of water-mass supply pathways. While qualitatively illustrating the limitations of regional high resolution studies in long term projection, these studies lack the ability to robustly quantify change because of the inability of these models to represent the baseline meso-scale structures of EBCs. In the present work, we compare current generation coarse resolution (one degree) and a prototype next generation high resolution (1/10 degree) Earth System Models (ESMs) from NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in representing the four major EBCs. We review the long-known temperature biases that the coarse models suffer in being unable to represent the timing and intensity of upwelling-favorable winds, along with lack of representation of the observed high chlorophyll and biological productivity resulting from this upwelling. In promising contrast, we show that the high resolution prototype is capable of representing not only the overall meso-scale structure in physical and biogeochemical fields, but also the appropriate offshore extent of temperature anomalies and other EBC characteristics. Results for chlorophyll were mixed; while high resolution chlorophyll in EBCs were strongly enhanced over the coarse resolution

  4. The thermodynamic cost of driving quantum systems by their boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    The laws of thermodynamics put limits to the efficiencies of thermal machines. Analogues of these laws are now established for quantum engines weakly and passively coupled to the environment providing a framework to find improvements to their performance. Systems whose interaction with the environment is actively controlled do not fall in that framework. Here we consider systems actively and locally coupled to the environment, evolving with a so-called boundary-driven Lindblad equation. Starting from a unitary description of the system plus the environment we simultaneously obtain the Lindblad equation and the appropriate expressions for heat, work and entropy-production of the system extending the framework for the analysis of new, and some already proposed, quantum heat engines. We illustrate our findings in spin 1/2 chains and explain why an XX chain coupled in this way to a single heat bath relaxes to thermodynamic-equilibrium while and XY chain does not. Additionally, we show that an XX chain coupled to a left and a right heat baths behaves as a quantum engine, a heater or refrigerator depending on the parameters, with efficiencies bounded by Carnot efficiencies.

  5. The linking number in systems with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, E.

    2015-11-01

    Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBC) are often used for the simulation of complex physical systems. Using the Gauss linking number, we define the periodic linking number as a measure of entanglement for two oriented curves in a system employing PBC. In the case of closed chains in PBC, the periodic linking number is an integer topological invariant that depends on a finite number of components in the periodic system. For open chains, the periodic linking number is an infinite series that accounts for all the topological interactions in the periodic system. In this paper we give a rigorous proof that the periodic linking number is defined for the infinite system, i.e., that it converges for one, two, and three PBC models. It gives a real number that varies continuously with the configuration and gives a global measure of the geometric complexity of the system of chains. Similarly, for a single oriented chain, we define the periodic self-linking number and prove that it also is defined for open chains. In addition, we define the cell periodic linking and self-linking numbers giving localizations of the periodic linking numbers. These can be used to give good estimates of the periodic linking numbers in infinite systems. We also define the local periodic linking number associated to chains in the immediate cell neighborhood of a chain in order to study local linking measures in contrast to the global linking measured by the periodic linking numbers. Finally, we study and compare these measures when applied to a PBC model of polyethylene melts.

  6. Biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. Part 1: Introduction to the effects of upwelling along the west coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.

    1986-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is examined as it relates to the cycling of chemical species in coastal waters along the west coast of North America. The temporal and spatial features of upwelling phenomena in the Eastern boundary regions of the North Pacific Ocean are presented and discussed in terms of upwelling episodes. Climate conditions affecting upwelling include: thermal effects, wind-induced shear stress which moves surface layers, and the curl of the wind stress vector which is thought to affect the extent and nature of upwelling and the formation of offshore convergent downwelling fronts. These effects and the interaction of sunlight and upwelled nutrients which result in a biological bloom in surface waters is modeled analytically. The roles of biological and chemical species, including the effects of predation, are discussed in that context, and relevant remote sensing and in situ observations are presented. Climatological, oceanographic, biological, physical, chemical events, and processes that pertain to biogeochemical cycling are presented and described by a set of partial differential equations. Simple preliminary results are obtained and are compared with data. Thus a fairly general framework has been laid where the many facets of biogeochemical cycling in coastal upwelled waters can be examined in their relationship to one another, and to the whole, to whatever level of detail or approximation is warranted or desired.

  7. Peru-Chile upwelling dynamics under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oerder, Véra; Colas, Francois; Echevin, Vincent; Codron, Francis; Tam, Jorge; Belmadani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The consequences of global warming on the Peru-Chile Current System (PCCS) ocean circulation are examined with a high-resolution, eddy-resolving regional oceanic model. We performed a dynamical downscaling of climate scenarios from the IPSL-CM4 Coupled General Circulation Model (CGCM), corresponding to various levels of CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. High-resolution atmospheric forcing for the regional ocean model are obtained from the IPSL atmospheric model run on a stretched grid with increased horizontal resolution in the PCCS region. When comparing future scenarios to preindustrial (PI) conditions, the circulation along the Peru and Chile coasts is strongly modified by changes in surface winds and increased stratification caused by the regional warming. While the coastal poleward undercurrent is intensified, the surface equatorial coastal jet shoals and the nearshore mesoscale activity are reinforced. Reduction in alongshore wind stress and nearshore wind stress curl drive a year-round reduction in upwelling intensity off Peru. Modifications in geostrophic circulation mitigate this upwelling decrease in late austral summer. The depth of the upwelling source waters becomes shallower in warmer conditions, which may have a major impact on the system's biological productivity.

  8. Reductions in midlatitude upwelling-favorable winds implied by weaker large-scale Pliocene SST gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nathan P.; Tziperman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The early-to-mid Pliocene (3-5.3 Ma) is the most recent geologic period of significant global warmth. Proxy records of Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) indicate significant and still unexplained warm anomalies of 3°C-9°C in midlatitude eastern boundary currents, where present-day cool temperatures are maintained by wind-driven upwelling. Here we quantify the effect of large-scale Pliocene-like SST patterns on the surface wind stress around the California, Humboldt, Canary, and Benguela midlatitude coastal upwelling sites. A high-resolution atmosphere model forced with Pliocene SST simulates changes in surface winds that imply reductions of 10% to 50% in both coastal upwelling, driven by alongshore wind stress, and offshore upwelling driven by wind stress curl. These changes result primarily from a reduced meridional temperature gradient which weakens the subtropical highs, and a reduction in zonal land-sea temperature contrast which weakens geostrophic alongshore winds. These results suggest that Pliocene coastal warm anomalies may result in part from atmospheric circulation changes which reduce upwelling intensity. The coastal wind stress and offshore wind stress curl are shown to respond differently to incremental changes in SST, topography, and land surface anomalies. Significant decreases in simulated cloud fraction within the subtropical highs suggest that a weaker land-sea temperature contrast could be maintained by cloud radiative feedbacks.

  9. COMPLEX SYSTEM SELF-ORGANIZATION AND BOUNDARY OF ITS PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUBROV Ju. I.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Stipulations. The term “complex system” (CS is rather frequently utilized, therefore, we will take an effort to give a detailed explanation of what is understood by this term. In order to do that, we will not cite a variety of interpretations existing for this term, instead, we are intended to give a notion to this term that would provide for a more visual interpretation. Basic problem statement. Using the abovementioned Stipulation and Hypotheses it is necessary to determine a quality criterion of a self-organizing system functioning as well as to give its formal description. Certain SC subclasses. In order to detect qualitative peculiarities of the considered model the following numerical investigations were conducted. In a new equilibrium state we obtain an absolutely new evolvable system that again, with the change of a load parameter, initiates the process of its development similar. Facts confirming presence of information perception boundary (IPB with self-organizing systems. Given analysis shows that any system, capable of perceiving information, possesses its own IPB. This fact comes well enough to an agreement with data that prove the possibilities of self-organization on the basis of the existing principles of physics and biology. According to the abovementioned it can be concluded that the task of a qualitative survey of evolvable system may lie in determination of its IPB, depending on determining parameters, such as quantity and quality of information coming into the system as well as speed rate of its organization. Such survey is aimed at the description of all possible bifurcations, plotting of a range of bifurcation set at a range with various type of phase portraits and to indicate a phase portrait corresponding to every range with IPB domain. Using the words of great I.P. Pavlov “all types of life, from the simplest to the most complex organisms, including human, is a long line of ever complicating to the highest degree

  10. EXCURSIONS AND L(E')VY SYSTEM OF BOUNDARY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE PING; YING JIANGANG

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the joint distribution of end points of excursion awayfrom a closed set straddling on a fixed time and use this result to compute the Levy systemand the Dirichlet form of the boundary process.

  11. Convective upwelling in the mantle beneath the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Savage, Brian

    2009-11-26

    In the past six million years, Baja California has rifted obliquely apart from North America, opening up the Gulf of California. Between transform faults, seafloor spreading and rifting is well established in several basins. Other than hotspot-dominated Iceland, the Gulf of California is the only part of the world's seafloor-spreading system that has been surrounded by enough seismometers to provide horizontal resolution of upper-mantle structure at a scale of 100 kilometres over a distance great enough to include several spreading segments. Such resolution is needed to address the long-standing debate about the relative importance of dynamic and passive upwelling in the shallow mantle beneath spreading centres. Here we use Rayleigh-wave tomography to image the shear velocity in the upper 200 kilometres or so of the mantle. Low shear velocities similar to those beneath the East Pacific Rise oceanic spreading centre underlie the entire length of the Gulf, but there are three concentrated locations of anomalously low velocities spaced about 250 kilometres apart. These anomalies are 40 to 90 kilometres beneath the surface, at which depths petrological studies indicate that extensive melting of passively upwelling mantle should begin. We interpret these seismic velocity anomalies as indicating that partial melting triggers dynamic upwelling driven by either the buoyancy of retained melt or by the reduced density of depleted mantle. PMID:19940924

  12. A local upwelling controls viral and microbial community structure in South Australian continental shelf waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, James S.; Nayar, Sasi; Mitchell, James G.; Seuront, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing awareness of the role of viruses and heterotrophic bacteria in microbial dynamics and biogeochemical cycles, there is still a critical lack of information on their community composition and dynamics, especially in relation to upwellings. We investigated, within surface waters and the Deep Chlorophyll Max, the community composition and dynamics of flow cytometrically defined sub-populations of heterotrophic bacteria and virus-like particles in nearby water masses that were affected and unaffected by a localised wind-driven coastal upwelling. In contrast to previous studies we uniquely identified a 4-fold increase in total viral abundance and a decrease in bacterial abundance, from upwelled to offshore waters. Individual viral sub-populations were seen to correlate significantly to both bacterial populations and chlorophyll a, suggesting the possibility of individual viral populations infecting multiple host species rather than the often assumed single host species. The percentage of HDNA bacteria was high (84.3-93.4%) within upwelled waters, in accordance with the highest recorded values within an upwelling system, and decreased down to 35.5-42.6% away from the upwelling. Additionally, changes in the community composition of individual bacterial sub-populations suggest individual populations might be better adapted to distinct environments. We suggest that each flow cytometrically defined bacterial population may possess its own environmental niche where favourable conditions for that population result in an increase in abundance, cellular activity and productivity.

  13. Surface circulation and upwelling patterns around Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. de Vos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sri Lanka occupies a unique location within the equatorial belt in the northern Indian Ocean with the Arabian Sea on its western side and the Bay of Bengal on its eastern side. The region is characterised by bi-annually reversing monsoon winds resulting from seasonal differential heating and cooling of the continental land mass and the ocean. This study explored elements of the dynamics of the surface circulation and coastal upwelling in the waters around Sri Lanka using satellite imagery and the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS configured to the study region and forced with ECMWF interim data. The model was run for 2 yr to examine the seasonal and shorter term (∼10 days variability. The results confirmed the presence of the reversing current system in response to the changing wind field: the eastward flowing Southwest Monsoon Current (SMC during the Southwest (SW monsoon transporting 11.5 Sv and the westward flowing Northeast Monsoon Current (NMC transporting 9.5 Sv during the Northeast (NE monsoon, respectively. A recirculation feature located to the east of Sri Lanka during the SW monsoon, the Sri Lanka Dome, is shown to result from the interaction between the SMC and the Island of Sri Lanka. Along the eastern and western coasts, during both monsoon periods, flow is southward converging along the south coast. During the SW monsoon the Island deflects the eastward flowing SMC southward whilst along the east coast the southward flow results from the Sri Lanka Dome recirculation. The major upwelling region, during both monsoon periods, is located along the south coast and is shown to be due to flow convergence and divergence associated with offshore transport of water. Higher surface chlorophyll concentrations were observed during the SW monsoon. The location of the flow convergence and hence the upwelling centre was dependent on the relative strengths of wind driven flow along the east and west coasts: during the SW (NE monsoon the flow

  14. Spatio-temporal trends in coastal upwelling across NW Africa, 1981-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, Thomas; Hanna, Edward; Bigg, Grant

    2013-04-01

    In the early 1990's it was hypothesized that coastal upwelling across the eastern boundary currents may increase as a result of global warming. Since then, numerous studies have sought to elucidate the spatial and temporal trends in coastal upwelling intensity. Across the Canary Current (10-36°N), a conflicting signal (i.e. a positive/negative/no trend) in published results has emerged. We surmise this to be the consequence of (1) minor methodological differences, (2) differences in the temporal periods considered (intra- and inter-annual) and (3) the use of different data sets/sources. Here, we present seasonal upwelling estimates across the most recent 30-year climatic 'normal' period (1981-2010) based on the more commonly used wind stress and sea-surface temperature (SST) methodologies, and reinforce this analysis with traditionally 'lesser-used' sources (including sea-surface height, horizontal current velocity and vertical water column motion). For the wind-stress upwelling index we use six data sources (ERA-Interim, NCEP/NCAR, 20CR, PFEL, ICOADS and MERRA) and for the SST index we use three (HadISST, Reynolds OISST and ICOADS). We also utilize the sparse coastal meteorological and tide-gauge stations scattered across the NW African coastline. Additionally, we examine sea-surface height data from four sources (AVISO, GODAS, SODA and GRACE), horizontal current velocity from two sources (GODAS, SODA) and vertical water column motion from the GODAS dataset as further proxies for upwelling estimation. Generally, across summer, the numerous indices correlate reasonably well and display consistent spatial patterns and the same year-to-year oscillations, although the trend directions across the entire period sometimes diverge. Nevertheless, we conclude there is enough corroborating evidence to suggest there is a positive (negative) tendency in upwelling poleward (equatorward) of 20°N, but are cautious that these trends aren't ubiquitously significant. We suggest

  15. A FREE-BOUNDARY PROBLEM TO DYNAMIC SYSTEM FOR PURE FOREST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A free-boundary model of nonlinear dynamic system for pure forest is presented, in which the felling rate is unbounded nearby the free boundary. The effiect of unbounded function on a priori estimate and analysis of regularity is overcome, and the existence and uniqueness of the global classical solution to this system are proved.

  16. Free Boundary Problems for a Lotka-Volterra Competition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxin; Zhao, Jingfu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we investigate two free boundary problems for a Lotka-Volterra type competition model in one space dimension. The main objective is to understand the asymptotic behavior of the two competing species spreading via a free boundary. We prove a spreading-vanishing dichotomy, namely the two species either successfully spread to the entire space as time t goes to infinity and survive in the new environment, or they fail to establish and die out in the long run. The long time behavior of the solutions and criteria for spreading and vanishing are also obtained. This paper is an improvement and extension of J. Guo and C. Wu.

  17. Boundary Layers Associated with a Coupled Navier-Stokes/Allem-Cahn System: The Non-Characteristic Boundary Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Xiaoqiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this article is to study the boundary layer of Navier-Stokes/Allen-Cahn system in a channel at small viscosity.We prove that there exists a boundary layer at the outlet(down-wind)of thickness v,where v,is the kinematic viscosity.The convergence in L2 of the solutions of the Navier-Stokes/Allen-Cahn equations to that of the Euler/Allen-Cahn equations at the vanishing viscosity was established.In two dimensional case we are able to derive the physically relevant uniform in space and time estimates,which is derived by the idea of better control on the tangential derivative and the use of an anisotropic Sobolve imbedding.

  18. A Wind-Derived Upwelling Index for Lake Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Stephen B; Essig, Rebecca; Troy, Cary

    2014-01-01

    Coastal upwelling is a phenomenon that occurs along coastlines throughout the world, and has been shown to be strongly correlated with large fish populations in these areas. Coastal upwelling occurs when strong coastal winds drive water transport away from the coast, causing colder, often nutrient-rich water to upwell in its place. While coastal upwellings can be detected with satellite imagery or in situ temperature measurements, these datasets are neither continuous nor long-term. A wind-...

  19. Synoptic conditions governing upwelling along the Polish Baltic coast

    OpenAIRE

    Bartosz Czernecki; Ewa Bednorz; Marek Półrolniczak

    2013-01-01

    The study analyses atmospheric feedback to the occurrence of upwelling along the Polish Baltic coast. Upwelling events were identified on the basis of daily mean sea surface temperature (SST) maps from the period 1982-2010 derived from the NOAA OI SST V2 High Resolution Dataset. Synoptic conditions favourable to the occurrence of upwelling were determined on the basis of the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data. On average, there are approximately 23 days with upwelling each year along the Polish Baltic...

  20. Molecular Dynamics ofa Coulomb System with Deformable Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Totsuji, Hiroo; Shirokoshi, Hideki; Nara, Shigetoshi

    1991-01-01

    Variable shape molecular dynamics is formulated for the one-component plasma and the structural transition from the fcc lattice to the bcc lattice has been observed. It is emphasized that the condition of constant volume should be imposed when deformations of periodic boundary conditions are taken into account.

  1. Mass spectrometric study of the phase boundaries of the CdS-CdTe system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunoue, S.Y.; Hemmi, T.; Kato, E. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Waseda Univ., Shinjuku-ku Tokyo 160 (JP))

    1990-04-01

    An isothermal evaporation method by means of a Knudsen cell-mass spectrometer combination has been applied to the determination of the phase boundaries in the CdS-CdTe system in the temperature range of 650{degrees}--720{degrees}C. The phase boundaries obtained were compared with published phase boundaries. The advantages of the present method over the x-ray diffraction technique are discussed.

  2. Bayesian Statistics and Uncertainty Quantification for Safety Boundary Analysis in Complex Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuning; Davies, Misty Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of a safety-critical system often requires detailed knowledge of safe regions and their highdimensional non-linear boundaries. We present a statistical approach to iteratively detect and characterize the boundaries, which are provided as parameterized shape candidates. Using methods from uncertainty quantification and active learning, we incrementally construct a statistical model from only few simulation runs and obtain statistically sound estimates of the shape parameters for safety boundaries.

  3. The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN BangLiang

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking is examined by using a mixed-mode model. The results show that the positive feedback process of the effects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the Kelvin wave is the mechanism of the locking of the event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The memory of the Rossby waves for the sign-shifting of the sea surface temperature anomaly from positive to negative 6 months before the cold peak time is the other mechanism of the locking of the La Ni(n)a event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The results here are different from previous ones which suggest that the balance between cold and warm trends of sea surface temperature anomaly is the mechanism involved. The cold trend is caused by the upwelling Kelvin wave from upwelling Rossby wave reflected at the western boundary, excited by the westerly anomaly stress over the central Pacific and amplified by the seasonal variation of the coupled strength in its way propagating westward. The warm trend is caused by the Kelvin wave forced by the western wind stress over the middle and eastern equatorial Pacific. The cause of the differences is due to the opposite phase of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean to that in the observation and an improper parameterization scheme for the effects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the ENSO cycle in previous studies.

  4. The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the effects of the upwelling mean on the ENSO event mature phase locking is ex-amined by using a mixed-mode model. The results show that the positive feedback process of the ef-fects of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean on the Kelvin wave is the mechanism of the locking of the event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The memory of the Rossby waves for the sign-shifting of the sea surface temperature anomaly from positive to negative 6 months before the cold peak time is the other mechanism of the locking of the La Nia event mature phase to the end of the calendar year. The results here are different from previous ones which suggest that the balance between cold and warm trends of sea surface temperature anomaly is the mechanism involved. The cold trend is caused by the upwelling Kelvin wave from upwelling Rossby wave reflected at the western boundary, excited by the westerly anomaly stress over the central Pacific and amplified by the seasonal variation of the coupled strength in its way propagating westward. The warm trend is caused by the Kelvin wave forced by the western wind stress over the middle and eastern equatorial Pacific. The cause of the differences is due to the opposite phase of the seasonal variation of the upwelling mean to that in the observation and an improper parameterization scheme for the effects of the seasonal varia-tion of the upwelling mean on the ENSO cycle in previous studies.

  5. On the boundaries of solvability and unsolvability in tag systems. Theoretical and experimental results.

    OpenAIRE

    Liesbeth De Mol

    2008-01-01

    Several older and more recent results on the boundaries of solvability and unsolvability in tag systems are surveyed. Emphasis will be put on the significance of computer experiments in research on very small tag systems.

  6. On the boundaries of solvability and unsolvability in tag systems. Theoretical and Experimental Results

    CERN Document Server

    De Mol, Liesbeth

    2009-01-01

    Several older and more recent results on the boundaries of solvability and unsolvability in tag systems are surveyed. Emphasis will be put on the significance of computer experiments in research on very small tag systems.

  7. Remote sensing and ichthyoplankton ecology of coastal upwelling fronts off central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkstedt, Eric Peter

    1998-11-01

    Recruitment to many marine populations is determined by processes affecting survival and transport of planktonic larvae. Coastal upwelling poses a trade-off between larval access to high productivity supported by upwelled nutrients and increased risk of offshore transport and failure to return to coastal habitats. I used plankton surveys, remote sensing, and a simple model to investigate the role of coastal upwelling fronts and behavior in pelagic ecology and recruitment success, focussing on rockfish (Sebastes spp.) off central California. Distributions of early stage larvae suggest that coastal upwelling fronts reduce offshore transport of rockfish larvae, in contrast to distributions of taxa with life histories that minimize larval exposure to strong upwelling. Coincident distributions of larval fish, prey (i.e., small copepods and invertebrate eggs) and phytoplankton patches indicate that coastal upwelling fronts provide enhanced foraging conditions for larvae. Thus, coastal upwelling fronts may allow coastal taxa to successfully exploit high productivity during the upwelling season while reducing the risk of offshore transport. I developed a novel method for utilizing a single HF radar to resolve currents and detect fronts that matched sea surface temperature fronts generated by coastal upwelling. Fronts and currents detected with NF radar affect distributions and transport of planktonic larval fish and intertidal barnacle larvae, demonstrating that remote sensing with HF radar can support field and modelling research on ecological dynamics in coastal marine systems. I used an empirically-based model that incorporated the advection-foraging trade-off and long-distance swimming as an active settlement behavior to investigate optimal settlement strategies as a function of pelagic transport and growth. For parameters loosely describing pelagic stages of rockfish, the model predicts optimal settling strategies (ages and sizes) for pelagic juveniles that roughly

  8. Boundary conditions for star matter and other periodic fermionic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gulminelli, F.; Furuta, T.; Juillet, O.; Leclercq, C

    2011-01-01

    International audience Bulk fermionic matter, as it can be notably found in supernova matter and neutrons stars, is subject to correlations of infinite range due to the antisymmetrisation of the N-body wave function, which cannot be explicitly accounted for in a practical simulation. This problem is usually addressed in condensed matter physics by means of the so-called Twist Averaged Boundary Condition method. A different ansatz based on the localized Wannier representation has been propo...

  9. Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions

    OpenAIRE

    Rykaczewski, Ryan R.; Checkley, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Upwelling of nutrient-rich, subsurface water sustains high productivity in the ocean's eastern boundary currents. These ecosystems support a rate of fish harvest nearly 100 times the global mean and account for >20% of the world's marine fish catch. Environmental variability is thought to be the major cause of the decadal-scale biomass fluctuations characteristic of fish populations in these regions, but the mechanisms relating atmospheric physics to fish production remain unexplained. Two at...

  10. Boundary-induced dynamics in one-dimensional topological systems and memory effects of edge modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Chien, Chih-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics induced by a change of boundary conditions reveals rate-dependent signatures associated with topological properties in one-dimensional Kitaev chain and SSH model. While the perturbation from a change of the boundary propagates into the bulk, the density of topological edge modes in the case of transforming to open boundary condition reaches steady states. The steady-state density depends on the transformation rate of the boundary and serves as an illustration of quantum memory effects in topological systems. Moreover, while a link is physically broken as the boundary condition changes, some correlation functions can remain finite across the broken link and keep a record of the initial condition. By testing those phenomena in the nontopological regimes of the two models, none of the interesting signatures of memory effects can be observed. Our results thus contrast the importance of topological properties in boundary-induced dynamics.

  11. REGULARITY THEORY FOR SYSTEMS OF PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH NEUMANN BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to consider the theory of regularity of systems of partial differential equations with Neumann boundary conditions. It complements previous works of the authors for the Dirichlet case. This type of problem is motivated by stochastic differential games. The Neumann case corresponds to stochastic differential equations with reflection on boundary of the domain.

  12. Dislocations, boundaries and slip systems in cube grains of rolled aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Yili; Godfrey, A.; Liu, W.;

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the dislocation content of boundaries and the active slip systems is explored by characterisation of Burgers vectors, dislocation lines and relative densities in 11 boundaries in near-cube grains in 10% rolled aluminium. To provide a good basis for comparison, all...

  13. Laboratory Experiments Concerning Upwellings From the Slab-Graveyard: Implications For Geochemical and Seismic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. C.; Kincaid, C.; Hall, P.

    2005-12-01

    The ongoing plume debate appears to focus on upwellings characterized by large heads and smaller tails, that form from a deep or basal thermal boundary layer (BTBL), which are driven by temperature excesses in the range of 200° C. We use 3-D laboratory experiments to explore how upwellings might differ from this common plume description when BTBLs are influenced by subducted plates. An important aspect of the models is the representation of ridge chemical differentiation processes resulting in slabs with two distinct layers; a lighter, depleted upper mantle component (Harzburgite:H) and a heavier, iron-rich crustal component (Basalt/Eclogite:B/E). Laboratory experiments utilize a working fluid of glucose syrup with temperature dependent density and viscosity. Compositionally distinct mantle reservoirs are represented through isothermal density/viscosity contrasts controlled by water content. The ambient fluid (AF) is contained within a rectangular tank that is heated from below and cooled from above to produce background convection with a Rayleigh number of 10-5-10-6. Highly viscous, tabular slabs are produced by pouring compositionally distinct syrup from two slab reservoirs (B/E and H) into a mold which is chilled to -5° C. The viscous layered slab is emplaced at the fluid surface and subsequently sinks through, stalls and spreads within a BTBL roughly twice the slab thickness (1 cm). Results show that a wide variety in upwelling morphologies form when layered slabs reside within the BTBL and that plume heads/tails are largely dissimilar to those of the standard plume model. The manner in which the slab laminae vs. AF in the BTBL combine (or segregate) within upwellings depends on viscosity/density contrasts, how slabs collapse in the BTBL, and time. End-member regimes include: experiments dominated by a very light H-slab component with early, cold H-plumes and late, hot B/E-AF plumes and experiments where density differences between H, B/E and AF are small and

  14. Chaotic Dynamics of One-Dimensional Systems with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Pankaj; Miller, Bruce N.

    2014-01-01

    We provide appropriate tools for the analysis of dynamics and chaos for one-dimensional systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our approach allows for the investigation of the dependence of the largest Lyapunov exponent on various initial conditions of the system. The method employs an effective approach for defining the phase-space distance appropriate for systems with periodic boundary and allows for an unambiguous test-orbit rescaling in the phase space required to calculate the Lyapun...

  15. Heat kernel for the elliptic system of linear elasticity with boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Justin; Kim, Seick; Brown, Russell

    2013-01-01

    We consider the elliptic system of linear elasticity with bounded measurable coefficients in a domain where the second Korn inequality holds. We construct heat kernel of the system subject to Dirichlet, Neumann, or mixed boundary condition under the assumption that weak solutions of the elliptic system are H\\"older continuous in the interior. Moreover, we show that if weak solutions of the mixed problem are H\\"older continuous up to the boundary, then the corresponding heat kernel has a Gauss...

  16. Temperature and salinity shaping life-history traits and long-term population stability of Mesodesma donacium in the Humboldt Upwelling System

    OpenAIRE

    Riascos, José; Carstensen, Daniel; Laudien, Jürgen; Arntz, Wolf; Oliva, M.; Günter, A.; Heilmayer, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale environmental patterns in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) show major changes during strong El Niño episodes, leading to the mass mortality of dominant species in coastal ecosystems. Here we explore how these changes affect the life-history traits of the surf clam Mesodesma donacium. Growth and mortality rates under normal temperature and salinity were compared to those under anomalous (El Niño) higher temperature and reduced salinity. Moreover, the reproductivespatialtemporal pa...

  17. Miocene–Pliocene stepwise intensification of the Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge off Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hoetzel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of cold waters to the surface and therefore influences ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela Upwelling System (BUS is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081 from the Late Miocene to the Pliocene we reconstruct and discuss the upwelling history on the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola–Benguela Front (ABF. We show that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.4 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Also effects of Cunene River discharge into the South Atlantic are recorded since 4.4 Ma. Our results show a northward migration of the ABF and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  18. Steps in the intensification of Benguela upwelling over the Walvis Ridge during Miocene and Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoetzel, Sebastian; Dupont, Lydie M.; Marret, Fabienne; Jung, Gerlinde; Wefer, Gerold

    2016-03-01

    Upwelling is a significant part of the ocean circulation controlling largely the transport of nutrient-rich cold waters to the surface and therefore influencing ocean productivity and global climate. The Benguela upwelling system (BUS) is one of the major upwelling areas in the world. Previous reconstructions of the BUS mainly focused on the onset and intensification in southern and central parts, but changes of the northern part have been rarely investigated in detail. Using the Late Miocene to Pliocene organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst record of ODP Site 1081, we reconstruct and discuss the early upwelling history over the Walvis Ridge with a special focus on the movement of the Angola-Benguela Front (ABF). We suggest that during the Late Miocene the Angola Current flowed southwards over the Walvis Ridge more frequently than today because the ABF was probably located further south as a result of a weaker meridional temperature gradient. A possible strengthening of the meridional gradient during the latest Miocene to early Pliocene in combination with uplift of south-western Africa intensified the upwelling along the coast and increased the upwelling's filaments over the Walvis Ridge. An intermediate period from 6.2 to 5.5 Ma is shown by the dominance of Habibacysta tectata, cysts of a cool-tolerant dinoflagellate known from the northern Atlantic, indicating changing oceanic conditions contemporaneous with the Messinian Salinity Crisis. From 4.3 Ma on, the upwelling signal got stronger again and waters were well-mixed and nutrient-rich. Our results indicate a northward migration of the ABF as early as 7 Ma and the initial stepwise intensification of the BUS.

  19. Structural Stability of Boundary Equilibria in a class of hybrid systems : Analysis and Use for Control System Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardo, Mario di; Camlibel, Kanat

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the structural stability of boundary equilibria in a class of hybrid systems, that of piecewise linear continuous systems. Specifically, we study the structural stability under parameter variations of equilibria lying on discontinuity boundaries in phase space dividing r

  20. Manganese content records seasonal upwelling in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Langlet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of cold, oxygen-depleted, nutrient-rich deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a three-year-long limnological and geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were compared to LA-ICP-MS profiles of Mn in five aragonitic shells from the same lake location. Three shells present very similar Mn/Ca profiles dominated by a peak that matched the concomitant increase of Mn and chlorophyll a in surface waters during the 2002 upwelling, while a shell collected during 2003 dry season detect both 2002 and 2003 upwelling events. Larger shells showing an extremely reduced growth display more than 8 Mn/Ca peaks suggesting at least an 8-year-record of seasonal changes in water composition. We postulate that Mn/Ca in shells record the conjunction of an increase of biological activity with supplied of dissolved Mn and nutriments in coastal waters, resulting in an enhanced assimilation of biogenic Mn-rich particles. By combining the most recent generation of laser ablation system and the powerful High Resolution ICP-MS, the spatial resolution could be improved down to 5 to 10 µm crater size and end up in a better constrain of the relative variations of the annual Mn peaks. Such an approach on P. spekii from Lake Tanganyika has definitively a great potential to provide recent and past records on primary productivity associated with the monsoon climate system.

  1. Manganese content records seasonal upwelling in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Alleman, L. Y.; Plisnier, P.-D.; Hughes, H.; André, L.

    2007-03-01

    Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of cold, oxygen-depleted, nutrient-rich deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a three-year-long limnological and geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were compared to LA-ICP-MS profiles of Mn in five aragonitic shells from the same lake location. Three shells present very similar Mn/Ca profiles dominated by a peak that matched the concomitant increase of Mn and chlorophyll a in surface waters during the 2002 upwelling, while a shell collected during 2003 dry season detect both 2002 and 2003 upwelling events. Larger shells showing an extremely reduced growth display more than 8 Mn/Ca peaks suggesting at least an 8-year-record of seasonal changes in water composition. We postulate that Mn/Ca in shells record the conjunction of an increase of biological activity with supplied of dissolved Mn and nutriments in coastal waters, resulting in an enhanced assimilation of biogenic Mn-rich particles. By combining the most recent generation of laser ablation system and the powerful High Resolution ICP-MS, the spatial resolution could be improved down to 5 to 10 µm crater size and end up in a better constrain of the relative variations of the annual Mn peaks. Such an approach on P. spekii from Lake Tanganyika has definitively a great potential to provide recent and past records on primary productivity associated with the monsoon climate system.

  2. Boundary-locality and perturbative structure of entanglement spectra in gapped systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Haque, Masudul; Läuchli, Andreas M

    2012-06-01

    The entanglement between two parts of a many-body system can be characterized in detail by the entanglement spectrum. Focusing on gapped phases of several one-dimensional systems, we show how this spectrum is dominated by contributions from the boundary between the parts. This contradicts the view of an "entanglement Hamiltonian" as a bulk entity. The boundary-local nature of the entanglement spectrum is clarified through its hierarchical level structure, through the combination of two single-boundary spectra to form a two-boundary spectrum, and finally through consideration of dominant eigenfunctions of the entanglement Hamiltonian. We show consequences of boundary-locality for perturbative calculations of the entanglement spectrum.

  3. A question of fit: reflections on boundaries, organizations and social-ecological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternlieb, Faith; Bixler, R Patrick; Huber-Stearns, Heidi; Huayhuaca, Ch'aska

    2013-11-30

    Although there is acknowledgment that the complexity of social-ecological systems governance demands representation from diverse perspectives, there is little agreement in the literature on how to cross both fiat (human-demarcated) and bona fide (physical) boundaries to address such complexities. As a cohort of interdisciplinary scholars, we navigate the boundary between science and practice to address the question of fit regarding the role of organizations in transcending boundaries. We found there is a need to rectify discrepancies between theories about boundaries and theories about organizations. To this end, we propose a conceptual framework to analyze transboundary organizations, an umbrella term to group the literature on boundary organizations, intermediaries and bridging organizations; we introduce this term to illustrate they are not mutually exclusive and to facilitate interdisciplinary research. We first examine social-ecological systems (SES), a framework intended to improve understandings of boundaries and governance. We then continue to unpack the complexity of boundaries and organizations, specifically through important transboundary concepts such as scale and organizational learning. This helps frame our examination of the literature on: 1) boundary organizations; 2) bridging organizations (third-party entities); and 3) intermediaries (distinguished by their position between other actors). Our review identifies a number of discrepancies that pertain to the types of boundaries discussed and the roles assigned to organizations governing SES. Important characteristics have emerged from our review of transboundary organizations including legitimacy, saliency, urgency, and credibility. In developing a conceptual framework, we argue that transboundary organizations: 1) expand upon the boundary spectrum, 2) incorporate transboundary concepts, and 3) hybridize characteristics of boundary, bridging, and intermediary organizations. We conclude with a number

  4. Upwelling characteristics in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) as revealed by Ferrybox measurements in 2007-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikas, Villu; Lips, Urmas

    2016-07-01

    Ferrybox measurements have been carried out between Tallinn and Helsinki in the Gulf of Finland (Baltic Sea) on a regular basis since 1997. The system measures autonomously water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a fluorescence and turbidity and takes water samples for further analyses at a predefined time interval. We aimed to show how the Ferrybox technology could be used to study the coastal upwelling events in the Gulf of Finland. Based on the introduced upwelling index and related criteria, 33 coastal upwelling events were identified in May-September 2007-2013. The number of events, as well as the frequency of their occurrence and intensity expressed as a sum of daily average temperature deviations in the 20 km wide coastal area, were almost equal near the northern and southern coasts. Nevertheless, the wind impulse, which was needed to generate upwelling events of similar intensity, differed between the northern and southern coastal areas. It is suggested that the general thermohaline structure adapted to the prevailing forcing and the estuarine character of the basin weaken the upwelling created by the westerly to southwesterly (up-estuary) winds and strengthen the upwelling created by the easterly to northeasterly (down-estuary) winds. Two types of upwelling events were identified - one characterized by a strong temperature front and the other revealing gradual decrease in temperature from the open sea to the coastal area, with maximum temperature deviation close to the shore.

  5. Surface circulation and upwelling patterns around Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, A.; Pattiaratchi, C. B.; Wijeratne, E. M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Sri Lanka occupies a unique location within the equatorial belt in the northern Indian Ocean, with the Arabian Sea on its western side and the Bay of Bengal on its eastern side, and experiences bi-annually reversing monsoon winds. Aggregations of blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) have been observed along the southern coast of Sri Lanka during the northeast (NE) monsoon, when satellite imagery indicates lower productivity in the surface waters. This study explored elements of the dynamics of the surface circulation and coastal upwelling in the waters around Sri Lanka using satellite imagery and numerical simulations using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS). The model was run for 3 years to examine the seasonal and shorter-term (~10 days) variability. The results reproduced correctly the reversing current system, between the Equator and Sri Lanka, in response to the changing wind field: the eastward flowing Southwest Monsoon Current (SMC) during the southwest (SW) monsoon transporting 11.5 Sv (mean over 2010-2012) and the westward flowing Northeast Monsoon Current (NMC) transporting 9.6 Sv during the NE monsoon, respectively. A recirculation feature located to the east of Sri Lanka during the SW monsoon, the Sri Lanka Dome, is shown to result from the interaction between the SMC and the island of Sri Lanka. Along the eastern and western coasts, during both monsoon periods, flow is southward converging along the southern coast. During the SW monsoon, the island deflects the eastward flowing SMC southward, whilst along the eastern coast, the southward flow results from the Sri Lanka Dome recirculation. The major upwelling region, during both monsoon periods, is located along the southern coast, resulting from southward flow converging along the southern coast and subsequent divergence associated with the offshore transport of water. Higher surface chlorophyll concentrations were observed during the SW monsoon. The location of the flow convergence and hence the

  6. VOCALS-CUpEx: the Chilean Upwelling Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garreaud, R. D.; Rutllant, J. A.; Muñoz, R. C.; Rahn, D. A.; Ramos, M.; Figueroa, D.

    2011-03-01

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was a major field experiment conducted in spring of 2008 off southern Peru and northern Chile, aimed at better understanding the coupled climate systems of the southeast Pacific. Because of logistical constrains, the coastal area around 30° S was not sampled during VOCALS-REx. This area not only marks the poleward edge of the subtropical stratocumulus cloud regime (thus acting as a source of transient disturbances) but is also one of the most active upwelling centers and source of surface ocean kinetic energy along the Chilean coast. To fill such an observational gap, a small, brief, but highly focused field experiment was conducted in late spring 2009 in the near-shore region around 30° S. The Chilean Upwelling Experiment (CUpEx) was endorsed by VOCALS as a regional component. CUpEx included long-term monitoring, an intensive two-week field campaign and off-shore research flights. Our goal was to obtain an atmospheric/oceanic dataset with enough temporal and spatial coverage to be able to document (a) the mean diurnal cycles of the lower-troposphere and upper-ocean in a region of complex topography and coastline geometry, and (b) the ocean-atmosphere response to the rapid changes in coastal winds from strong, upwelling-favorable equatorward flow (southerly winds) to downwelling-favorable poleward flow (northerly winds). In this paper we describe the measurement platforms and sampling strategy, and provide an observational overview, highlighting some key mean-state and transient features.

  7. What shapes mesoscale wind anomalies in coastal upwelling zones?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boe, Julien [University of California, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); CNRS/CERFACS, URA 1875, Toulouse (France); Hall, Alex; Qu, Xin; Kapnick, Sarah B. [University of California, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Colas, Francois; McWilliams, James C.; Kurian, Jaison [University of California, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Observational studies have shown that mesoscale variations in sea surface temperature may induce mesoscale variations in wind. In eastern subtropical upwelling regions such as the California coast, this mechanism could be of great importance for the mean state and variability of the climate system. In coastal regions orography also creates mesoscale variations in wind, and the orographic effect may extend more than 100 km offshore. The respective roles of SST/wind links and coastal orography in shaping mesoscale wind variations in nearshore regions is not clear. We address this question in the context of the California Upwelling System, using a high-resolution regional numerical modeling system coupling the WRF atmospheric model to the ROMS oceanic model, as well as additional uncoupled experiments to quantify and separate the effects of SST/wind links and coastal orography on mesoscale wind variations. After taking into account potential biases in the representation of the strength of SST/wind links by the model, our results suggest that the magnitude of mesoscale wind variations arising from the orographic effects is roughly twice that of wind variations associated with mesoscale SST anomalies. This indicates that even in this region where coastal orography is complex and leaves a strong imprint on coastal winds, the role of SST/winds links in shaping coastal circulation and climate cannot be neglected. (orig.)

  8. Undiscovered natural gas resources Total Petroleum System unit boundaries for Bangladesh (tps8bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This coverage includes arcs, polygons, and polygon labels that describe the Total Petroleum System boundaries of the natural gas resources of Bangladesh. This...

  9. THE DYNAMICS OF SINE-GORDON SYSTEM WITH DIRICHLET BOUNDARY CONDITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yingdong; Li Zhengyuan

    2000-01-01

    We prove the existence of the global attractor of Sine-Gordon system with Dirichlet boundary condition and show the attractor is the unique steady state when the damping constant and the diffusion constant are sufficiently large.

  10. Blow-up estimates for semilinear parabolic systems coupled in an equation and a boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明新

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the blow-up rate estimates of solutions for semilinear parabolic systems coupled in an equation and a boundary condition. The upper and lower bounds of blow-up rates have been obtained.

  11. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS OF BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR A SYSTEM OF NONLINEAR ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiHongyu; SunJingxian

    2005-01-01

    By using topological method, we study a class of boundary value problem for a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Under suitable conditions,we prove the existence of positive solution of the problem.

  12. Aquifer Boundary of the Wood River Valley Aquifer System, South-Central Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains the boundary of the Wood River Valley aquifer system as modified and expanded from that defined by Skinner and others (2007): It has been...

  13. Numerical Bifurcation Diagram for the Two-Dimensional Boundary-fed CDIMA System

    CERN Document Server

    Setayeshgar, S

    1999-01-01

    We present numerical solution of the chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction-diffusion system in two dimensions in a boundary-fed system using a realistic model. The bifurcation diagram for the transition from non-symmetry breaking structures along boundary feed gradients to transverse symmetry breaking patterns in a single layer is numerically determined. We find this transition to be discontinuous. We make connection with earlier results and discuss prospects for future work.

  14. Exact Synchronization for a Coupled System of Wave Equations with Dirichlet Boundary Controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatsien LI; Bopeng RAO

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,the exact synchronization for a coupled system of wave equations with Dirichlet boundary controls and some related concepts are introduced.By means of the exact null controllability of a reduced coupled system,under certain conditions of compatibility,the exact synchronization,the exact synchronization by groups,and the exact null controllability and synchronization by groups are all realized by suitable boundary controls.

  15. Boundary conditions for star matter and other periodic fermionic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulminelli, F.; Furuta, T.; Juillet, O.; Leclercq, C.

    2011-12-01

    Bulk fermionic matter, as can be notably found in supernova matter and neutrons stars, is subject to correlations of infinite range due to the antisymmetrization of the N-body wave function, which cannot be explicitly accounted for in a practical simulation. This problem is usually addressed in condensed matter physics by means of the so-called twist averaged boundary condition method. A different ansatz based on the localized Wannier representation has been proposed in the context of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. In this paper we work out the formal relation between the two approaches. We show that, while the two coincide when working with exact eigenstates of the N-body Hamiltonian, differences appear in the case of variational approaches, which are currently used for the description of stellar matter. Some model applications with fermionic molecular dynamics are shown.

  16. Effects of Seasonal Upwelling on Inorganic and Organic Matter Dynamics in the Water Column of Eastern Pacific Coral Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhldreier, Ines; Sánchez-Noguera, Celeste; Rixen, Tim; Cortés, Jorge; Morales, Alvaro; Wild, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf of Papagayo at the northern Pacific coast of Costa Rica experiences pronounced seasonal changes in water parameters caused by wind-driven coastal upwelling. While remote sensing and open water sampling already described the physical nature of this upwelling, the spatial and temporal effects on key parameters and processes in the water column have not been investigated yet, although being highly relevant for coral reef functioning. The present study investigated a range of water parameters on two coral reefs with different exposure to upwelling (Matapalo and Bajo Rojo) in a weekly to monthly resolution over one year (May 2013 to April 2014). Based on air temperature, wind speed and water temperature, three time clusters were defined: a) May to November 2013 without upwelling, b) December 2013 to April 2014 with moderate upwelling, punctuated by c) extreme upwelling events in February, March and April 2014. During upwelling peaks, water temperatures decreased by 7°C (Matapalo) and 9°C (Bajo Rojo) to minima of 20.1 and 15.3°C respectively, while phosphate, ammonia and nitrate concentrations increased 3 to 15-fold to maxima of 1.3 μmol PO43- L-1, 3.0 μmol NH4+ L-1 and 9.7 μmol NO3- L-1. This increased availability of nutrients triggered several successive phytoplankton blooms as indicated by 3- (Matapalo) and 6-fold (Bajo Rojo) increases in chlorophyll a concentrations. Particulate organic carbon and nitrogen (POC and PON) increased by 40 and 70% respectively from February to April 2014. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) increased by 70% in December and stayed elevated for at least 4 months, indicating high organic matter release by primary producers. Such strong cascading effects of upwelling on organic matter dynamics on coral reefs have not been reported previously, although likely impacting many reefs in comparable upwelling systems. PMID:26560464

  17. Tracking "Large" or "Smal": Boundaries and their Consequences for Veterinary Students within the Tracking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermilya, Jenny R.

    In this dissertation, I use 42 in-depth qualitative interviews with veterinary medical students to explore the experience of being in an educational program that tracks students based on the species of non-human animals that they wish to treat. Specifically, I examine how tracking produces multiple boundaries for veterinary students. The boundaries between different animal species produce consequences for the treatment of those animals; this has been well documented. Using a symbolic interactionist perspective, my research extends the body of knowledge on species boundaries by revealing other consequences of this boundary work. For example, I analyze the symbolic boundaries involved in the gendering of animals, practitioners, and professions. I also examine how boundaries influence the collective identity of students entering an occupation segmented into various specialties. The collective identity of veterinarian is one characterized by care, thus students have to construct different definitions of care to access and maintain the collective identity. The tracking system additionally produces consequences for the knowledge created and reproduced in different areas of animal medicine, creating a system of power and inequality based on whose knowledge is privileged, how, and why. Finally, socially constructed boundaries generated from tracking inevitably lead to cases that do not fit. In particular, horses serve as a "border species" for veterinary students who struggle to place them into the tracking system. I argue that border species, like other metaphorical borders, have the potential to challenge discourses and lead to social change.

  18. Characterization of upwelling phenomenon along the Italian coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orasi, Arianna; Morucci, Sara; Rinaldi, Eleonora; Bignami, Francesco; Inghilesi, Roberto; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2013-04-01

    In order to investigate wind-driven upwelling along the Italian coasts, preliminary wind data provided by the ISPRA Italian Tide Gauge Measurement Network (RMN) have been analyzed. In a further step, MyOcean Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data have been analyzed in order to define an SST index for wind-driven coastal upwelling assessment. At first, hourly wind data for the period 2009 - 2011 have been used in order to provide the statistical distribution and the wind rose plots at each RMN station. In particular, wind direction and speed have been selected in order to find upwelling-favorable areas and periods of time. E.g. wind directions in the sector between North and West in the Tyrrhenian Sea and between South and East in the Adriatic Sea have been defined as upwelling favorable, the wind sector being defined as the ± 30° arc around the direction parallel to the coast. Moreover only wind speeds greater than 3.0 m/s have been considered as significant for upwelling. For each location, the number of selected data has been divided by the total number of recorded wind data, thus obtaining a sort of upwelling frequency, which allows to define areas mostly exposed to upwelling. Once these areas were defined, satellite SST data have been used as a proxy to study the changes in upwelling intensity, since upwelling waters are colder than surrounding waters. So, in a given satellite SST image the upwelling event is identifiable through SST minima along the coasts. Finally, the SST upwelling index has been defined; also, this index has been "weighted" with wind intensity and direction indicating upwelling conditions obtained from the RMN wind dataset, to better distinguish between upwelling-favorable and downwelling-favorable conditions at each RMN site.

  19. Invariance of decay rate with respect to boundary conditions in thermoelastic Timoshenko systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M. S.; Jorge Silva, M. A.; Ma, T. F.; Muñoz Rivera, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    This paper is mainly concerned with the polynomial stability of a thermoelastic Timoshenko system recently introduced by Almeida Júnior et al. (Z Angew Math Phys 65(6):1233-1249, 2014) that proved, in the general case when equal wave speeds are not assumed, different polynomial decay rates depending on the boundary conditions, namely, optimal rate {t^{-1/2}} for mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition and rate {t^{-1/4}} for full Dirichlet boundary condition. Here, our main achievement is to prove the same polynomial decay rate {t^{-1/2}} (corresponding to the optimal one) independently of the boundary conditions, which improves the existing literature on the subject. As a complementary result, we also prove that the system is exponentially stable under equal wave speeds assumption. The technique employed here can probably be applied to other kind of thermoelastic systems.

  20. Habitable Zone Boundaries: Implications for our Solar System and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Kopparapu, R.; Harman, C.; Batalha, N. E.; Haqq-Misra, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    The successful completion of NASA's Kepler Mission has led to renewed interest in the definition and boundaries of the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ), where liquid water can be stable on a planet's surface. Goldblatt et al. [1] showed that the runaway greenhouse effect, which defines the inner edge of the HZ, depends critically on absorption coefficients of H2O obtained from the new HITEMP database. Kopparapu et al. [2,3] followed up on this observation by recalculating HZ boundaries using HITEMP coefficients. This caused the inner edge to move out to 0.99 AU in their (fully saturated, cloud-free) 1-D climate model. Leconte et al. [4] then used a 3-D climate model to show that the inner edge moves back in to 0.95 AU when relative humidity and clouds are taken into account. In their model, however, the upper stratosphere remained cold and dry, making it difficult to explain how Venus lost its water. But Leconte et al. only looked at surface temperatures up to ~330 K. At somewhat higher surface temperatures (350 K), our own 1-D model predicts that the stratosphere should indeed become wet [5]. Towards the outer edge of the HZ, it now appears that planets should undergo limit cycles involving global glaciation, CO2 buildup from volcanism, and CO2 drawdown from weathering [6,7]. If supplemented with volcanic H2 [8], such cycles could explain how early Mars could have been cold much of the time and yet have experienced enough warm periods to carve the observed fluvial features. Results from a new model of this process will be discussed. Refs: 1. Goldblatt, C., Robinson, T. D., Zahnle, K. J., & Crisp, D. 2013, Nature Geoscience, 6, 661 2. Kopparapu, R. K., et al. 2013, Astrophysical Journal, 765 3. ---. 2013, Astrophysical Journal, 770 4. Leconte, J., Forget, F., Charnay, B., Wordsworth, R., & Pottier, A. 2013, Nature, 504, 268 5. Kasting, J. F., Chen, H., & Kopparapu, R. K. in prep., Ap J Lett 6. Kadoya, S., & Tajika, E. 2014, Astrophysical Journal, 790 7. Menou, K

  1. Upwelling radiance at 976 nm measured from space using the OPALS CCD camera on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kovalik, Joseph M.; Oaida, Bogdan V.; Abrahamson, Matthew; Wright, Malcolm W.

    2015-03-01

    The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) Flight System on-board the International Space Station uses a charge coupled device (CCD) camera to detect a beacon laser from Earth. Relative measurements of the background contributed by upwelling radiance under diverse illumination conditions and varying surface terrain is presented. In some cases clouds in the field-of-view allowed a comparison of terrestrial and cloud-top upwelling radiance. In this paper we will report these measurements and examine the extent of agreement with atmospheric model predictions.

  2. Magnetic field effect on the liquidus boundary of Bi-Mn binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Yoshifuru; Koyama, Keiichi; Oikawa, Katsunari; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    The magnetic field effect (MFE) on liquidus boundary of Bi-Mn binary system was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and the computer coupling of phase diagram method (CALPHAD). The liquidus boundary for Bi-18at.%Mn and Bi-24at.%Mn rose clearly by the application of the magnetic fields. The MFE for liquidus boundary temperature Tliq changed from ΔTliq∝B2 to ΔTliq∝B because of the large increase of the peritectic temperature from BiMn and BiMn1.08 by the application of magnetic field.

  3. A NON-UNIFORM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL WITH THE BOUNDARY-FITTING ORTHOGONAL COORDINATE SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D non-uniform sediment mathmatical model in the boundary-fitting orthogonal coordinate system was developed in this paper. The governing equations, the numerical scheme, the boundary conditions, the movable boundary technique and the numerical solutions were presented. The model was verified by the data of the reach 25km upstream the Jialingjiang estuary and the 44km long main stream of the Chongqing reach of the Yangtze river. The calculated results show that, the water elevation, the velocity distribution and the river bed deformation are in agreement with the measured data.

  4. ALmost EXact boundary conditions for transient Schrödinger-Poisson system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lei; Pang, Gang; Tang, Shaoqiang; Arnold, Anton

    2016-05-01

    For the Schrödinger-Poisson system, we propose an ALmost EXact (ALEX) boundary condition to treat accurately the numerical boundaries. Being local in both space and time, the ALEX boundary conditions are demonstrated to be effective in suppressing spurious numerical reflections. Together with the Crank-Nicolson scheme, we simulate a resonant tunneling diode. The algorithm produces numerical results in excellent agreement with those in Mennemann et al. [1], yet at a much reduced complexity. Primary peaks in wave function profile appear as a consequence of quantum resonance, and should be considered in selecting the cut-off wave number for numerical simulations.

  5. Artificial ocean upwelling utilizing the energy of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Artificial upwelling can bring cold water from below the thermocline to the sea surface. Vershinsky, Pshenichnyy, and Soloviev (1987) developed a prototype device, utilizing the energy of surface waves to create an upward flow of water in the tube. This is a wave-inertia pump consisting of a vertical tube, a valve, and a buoy to keep the device afloat. An outlet valve at the top of the unit synchronizes the operation of the device with surface waves and prevents back-splashing. A single device with a 100 m long and 1.2 m diameter tube is able to produce up to 1 m3s-1 flow of deep water to the surface. With a 10 oC temperature difference over 100 m depth, the negative heat supply rate to the sea surface is 42 MW, which is equivalent to a 42 Wm-2 heat flux, if distributed over 1 km2 area. Such flux is comparable to the average net air-sea flux. A system of artificial upwelling devices can cool down the sea surface, modify climate on a regional scale and possibly help mitigate hurricanes. The cold water brought from a deeper layer, however, has a larger density than the surface water and therefore has a tendency to sink back down. In this work, the efficiency of wave-inertia pumps and climatic consequences are estimated for different environmental conditions using a computational fluid dynamics model.

  6. Convergence in comparable almost periodic reaction-diffusion systems with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Feng Cao; Yelai Fu

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we study the asymptotic dynamics in nonmonotone comparable almost periodic reaction-diffusion systems with Dirichlet boundary condition, which are comparable with uniformly stable strongly order-preserving system. By appealing to the theory of skew-product semiflows, we obtain the asymptotic almost periodicity of uniformly stable solutions to the comparable reaction-diffusion system.

  7. Convergence in comparable almost periodic reaction-diffusion systems with Dirichlet boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we study the asymptotic dynamics in nonmonotone comparable almost periodic reaction-diffusion systems with Dirichlet boundary condition, which are comparable with uniformly stable strongly order-preserving system. By appealing to the theory of skew-product semiflows, we obtain the asymptotic almost periodicity of uniformly stable solutions to the comparable reaction-diffusion system.

  8. LOCAL CLASSICAL SOLUTION OF FREE BOUNDARY PROBLEM FOR A COUPLED SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohua; Yi Fahuai; Yang Zhou

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers a two-phase free boundary problem for coupled system including one parabolic equation and two elliptic equations. The problem comes from the discussion of a growth model of self-maintaining protocell in multidimensional case. The local classical solution of the problem with free boundary Γ:y = g(x, t) between two domains is being seeked. The local existence and uniqueness of the problem will be proved in multidimensional case.

  9. GLOBAL CLASSICAL SOLUTION OF FREE BOUNDARY PROBLEM FOR A COUPLED SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangXiaohua; YiFahuai

    2003-01-01

    A two-phase free boundary problem for coupled system including three elliptic equations is considered.The problem comes from the discussion of a growth model of self-maintaining protocell in multidimensional case,The global classical solution of the problem with free boundary.Γ:y=g(x,t) betwwn two domains is under search.The global existence and uniqueness of a quasi-stationary problem are proved in multidimensional case.

  10. Has upwelling strengthened along worldwide coasts over 1982-2010?

    OpenAIRE

    Varela, R; Álvarez, I.; Santos, F.;  deCastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in coastal upwelling strength have been widely studied since 1990 when Bakun proposed that global warming can induce the intensification of upwelling in coastal areas. Whether present wind trends support this hypothesis remains controversial, as results of previous studies seem to depend on the study area, the length of the time series, the season, and even the database used. In this study, temporal and spatial trends in the coastal upwelling regime worldwide were investigated during ...

  11. Upwelling of Arctic pycnocline associated with shear motion of sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, M. G.; Kwok, R.; Robins, R.; Coon, M.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution radar imagery shows that the dynamic response of winter sea ice to gradients in large-scale surface wind stress is often localized along quasi-linear fractures hundreds of kilometers long. Relative shearing motion across these narrow fractures can exceed 10 cm/s. In one event recorded during the drift of the SHEBA ice camp, we observed an intense zone of pycnocline upwelling (approx.14 m) associated with significant shear motion near the camp, while upward turbulent heat flux in the ocean boundary layer reached nearly 400 W/sq m, an order of magnitude greater than at any other time during the year-long drift. We attribute the upwelling to Ekman pumping associated with concentrated ice shear. Over the entire Arctic Ocean sea ice cover, this process could be responsible for significant heat exchange between the cold surface layer and warmer subsurface water at the ubiquitous fractures resulting from large-scale atmosphere-ice interactions.

  12. Stratigraphic modeling of organic matter distribution and preservation in deep marine environment. Case of a margin with pelagic sedimentation: the coastal upwelling system of Benguela (Namibia, Western South Africa); Modelisation stratigraphique de la distribution et de la preservation de la matiere organique en milieu marin profond. Cas d'une marge a sedimentation pelagique: systeme d'upwelling cotier du Benguela (Namibie, Afrique du Sud Ouest)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tranier, J.

    2006-06-15

    In order to develop stratigraphic modelling of organic matter distribution and preservation in marine environment, the methodology established, uses three modelling softwares. We make use of a 3D stratigraphic model, DIONISOS, which allows to build margin thanks to sediment input and transport and thanks to basin deformation. Biogenic sediments are introduced in DIONISOS after their production modelling by two coupled models, ROMS and NPZD. ROMS is a physical model which allows to simulate upwelling dynamics thanks to wind strength exerted on ocean surface and to margin morphology. NPZD models relationships (photosynthesis, grazing, excretion, mortality, re-mineralization, etc.) between four boxes: nutrients, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus. Nutrients availability (model inputs) and flux intensity between boxes are controlled by upwelling dynamics, i-e ROMS. Thanks to these three softwares, organic matter can be modelled from its production to its fossilization considering the influence of various factors as upwelling intensity, nutrients availability, chemical compounds of water mass and oxygenation of water column, species competition (diatoms and coccolithophoridae), margin morphology and eustatism. After testing sensibility of the various parameters of the three models, we study their capacity for reproduce biogenic sedimentation and simulate climatic cycle effect on organic matter distribution on a passive continental margin: the Namibian margin (Southwest Africa). They are validated comparing results with core data from this margin. (author)

  13. Diffusive boundary layers over varying topography

    KAUST Repository

    Dell, R. W.

    2015-03-25

    Diffusive bottom boundary layers can produce upslope flows in a stratified fluid. Accumulating observations suggest that these boundary layers may drive upwelling and mixing in mid-ocean ridge flank canyons. However, most studies of diffusive bottom boundary layers to date have concentrated on constant bottom slopes. We present a study of how diffusive boundary layers interact with various idealized topography, such as changes in bottom slope, slopes with corrugations and isolated sills. We use linear theory and numerical simulations in the regional ocean modeling system (ROMS) model to show changes in bottom slope can cause convergences and divergences within the boundary layer, in turn causing fluid exchanges that reach far into the overlying fluid and alter stratification far from the bottom. We also identify several different regimes of boundary-layer behaviour for topography with oceanographically relevant size and shape, including reversing flows and overflows, and we develop a simple theory that predicts the regime boundaries, including what topographies will generate overflows. As observations also suggest there may be overflows in deep canyons where the flow passes over isolated bumps and sills, this parameter range may be particularly significant for understanding the role of boundary layers in the deep ocean.

  14. Role of Ekman Transport Versus Ekman Pumping in Driving Summer Upwelling in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dakui; WANG Hui; LI Ming; LIU Guimei; WU Xiangyu

    2013-01-01

    Relative roles of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping in driving summer upwelling in the South China Sea (SCS) are examined using QuikSCAT scatterometer wind data.The major upwelling regions in the SCS are the coastal regions east and southeast of Vietnam (UESEV),east and southeast of Hainan Island (UESEH),and southeast of Guangdong province (USEG).It is shown that the Ekman transport due to alongshore winds and Ekman pumping due to offshore wind stress curl play different roles in the three upwelling systems.In UESEV,Ekman pumping and Ekman transport are equally important in generating upwelling.The Ekman transport increases linearly from 0.49 Sv in May to 1.23 Sv in August,while the Ekman pumping increases from 0.36 to 1.22 Sv during the same period.In UESEH,the mean estimates of Ekman transport and Ekman pumping are 0.14 and 0.07 Sv,respectively,indicating that 33% of the total wind-driven upwelling is due to Ekman pumping.In USEG,the mean Ekman transport is 0.041 Sv with the peak occurring in July,while Ekman pumping is much smaller (0.003 on average),indicating that the upwelling in this area is primarily driven by Ekman transport.In the summers of 2003 and 2007 following E1 Ni(n)o-Southem Oscillation (ENSO) events,both Ekman transport and Ekman pumping decrease in UESEV due to the abnormally weak southwest monsoon.During the same events,however,Ekman transport is slightly enhanced and Ekman pumping is weakened in UESEH and USEG.

  15. Paleoenvironmental changes across the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in the northern Clarence valley, southeastern Marlborough, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strata outcropping in Mead and Branch Streams, northern Clarence valley, provide important records of pelagic-hemipelagic sedimentation through the Cretaceous-Paleocene transition in a southern high-latitude, upwelling system flanking a carbonate platform. The two stream sections, 13C) indicate that high biological productivity continued across the K/T boundary and through the biosiliceous episode. Siliceous plankton thrived in the Marlborough upwelling zone during the Early Paleocene. Fluctuations in abundance and lithofacies can be related to significant changes in sea level, which may be the result of local tectonic or global climate changes. The delayed recovery of calcareous plankton after mass extinction at the K/T boundary, in both outer neritic and bathyal settings, indicates a relatively cool oceanic regime for the first 1.5 m.y. of the Paleocene. (author). 68 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Performance of Numerical Boundary Condition based on Active Wave Absorption System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trouch, P.; Rouck, J. de; Frigaard, Peter

    2001-01-01

    that was first developed in the context of physical wave flume experiments, using a wave paddle. The method applies to regular and irregular waves. Velocities are measured at one location inside the computational domain. The reflected wave train is separated from the incident wave field in front of a structure......The implementation and performance of a new active wave generating‐absorbing boundary condition for a numerical model based on the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method for tracking free surfaces is presented. This numerical boundary condition AWAVOF is based on an active wave absorption system...... by means of digital filtering and subsequent superposition of the measured velocity signals. The incident wave signal is corrected, so that the reflected wave is effectively absorbed at the boundary. The effectiveness of the active wave generating‐absorbing boundary condition is proved using numerical...

  17. Orographic shaping of US West Coast wind profiles during the upwelling season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Hall, Alex; McWilliams, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of nearshore winds in eastern boundary current systems is affected by orography, coastline shape, and air-sea interaction. These lead to a weakening of the wind close to the coast: the so-called wind drop-off. In this study, regional atmospheric simulations over the US West Coast are used to demonstrate monthly characteristics of the wind drop-off and assess the mechanisms controlling it. Using a long-term simulation, we show the wind drop-off has spatial and seasonal variability in both its offshore extent and intensity. The offshore extent varies from around 10 to 80 km from the coast and the wind reduction from 10 to 80 %. We show that when the mountain orography is combined with the coastline shape of a cape, it has the biggest influence on wind drop-off. The primary associated processes are the orographically-induced vortex stretching and the surface drag related to turbulent momentum flux divergence that has an enhanced drag coefficient over land. Orographically-induced tilting/twisting can also be locally significant in the vicinity of capes. The land-sea drag difference acts as a barrier to encroachment of the wind onto the land through turbulent momentum flux divergence. It turns the wind parallel to the shore and slightly reduces it close to the coast. Another minor factor is the sharp coastal sea surface temperature front associated with upwelling. This can weaken the surface wind in the coastal strip by shallowing the marine boundary layer and decoupling it from the overlying troposphere.

  18. Triple fixed-sign solutions in modelling a system with Hermite boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wong Patricia JY; Soh YC

    2005-01-01

    We consider the following system of differential equations , , together with Hermite boundary conditions , , , , where , for , and . By using different fixed point theorems, we offer criteria for the existence of three solutions of the system which are of "prescribed signs" on the interval .

  19. Boundaries of the homologous phases in Sb–Te and Bi–Te binary alloy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kifune, K., E-mail: k.kifune.yw@cc.it-hiroshima.ac.jp [Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Research Center for Condensed Matter Physics, 2-1-1 Miyake, Saeki-ku, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Tachizawa, T.; Kanaya, H.; Kubota, Y. [Osaka Prefecture University, Graduate School of Science, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Yamada, N. [Kyoto University, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsunaga, T. [Panasonic Corporation, Advanced Research Division, Osaka 571-8501 (Japan)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Phase boundary of the homologous phase in Sb–Te is fixed at Sb{sub 20}Te{sub 3} compound. • Crystal structure of Sb{sub 20}Te{sub 3} is refined by the 4D structure analysis. • Phase boundary of the homologous phase in Bi–Te is fixed at Bi{sub 8}Te{sub 3} compound. • Crystal structure of Bi{sub 8}Te{sub 3} is refined by the 4D structure analysis. • Difference between Sb–Te and Bi–Te systems are proposed. - Abstract: Sb–Te and Bi–Te binary systems have long-period stacking structures called homologous phases. Within these structures, two types of fundamental structural units change their numbers according to their composition, and the stacking periods also change systematically. X-ray powder diffraction data on bulk specimens with different compositions reveal both the phase boundaries of the homologous phases and the structures of the boundary phases. The boundary phases are Sb{sub 20}Te{sub 3} in the Sb–Te system and Bi{sub 8}Te{sub 3} in the Bi–Te system.

  20. Blow-up estimates for semilinear parabolic systems coupled in an equation and a boundary condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Mingxin(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Wang, S., Wang, M. X., Xie, C. H., Reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear boundary conditions, Z. angew. Math.Phys., 1997, 48(6): 994-1001.[2]Fila, M., Quittner, P., The blow-up rate for a semilinear parabolic system, J. Math. Anal. Appl., 1999, 238: 468-476.[3]Hu, B., Remarks on the blow-up estimate for solutions of the heat equation with a nonlinear boundary condition, Differential Integral Equations, 1996, 9(5): 891-901.[4]Hu, B. , Yin, H. M., The profile near blow-up time for solution of the heat equation with a nonlinear boundary condition,Trans. of Amer. Math. Soc., 1994, 346: 117-135.[5]Amann, H., Parabolic equations and nonlinear boundary conditions, J. of Diff. Eqns., 1988, 72: 201-269.[6]Deng, K., Blow-up rates for parabolic systems, Z. angew. Math. Phys. ,1996, 47: 132-143.[7]Fila, M., Levine, H. A., On critical exponents for a semilinear parabolic system coupled in an equation and a boundary condition, J. Math. Anal. Appl., 1996, 204: 494-521.

  1. Bifurcation for Second-Order Hamiltonian Systems with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Faraci; Antonio Iannizzotto

    2008-01-01

    Through variational methods, we study nonautonomous systems of second-order ordinary differential equations with periodic boundary conditions. First, we deal with a nonlinear system, depending on a function $u$ , and prove that the set of bifurcation points for the solutions of the system is not ${\\sigma{}} $ -compact. Then, we deal with a linear system depending on a real parameter ${\\lambda{}}>0$ and on a function $u$ , and prove that there exists ${{\\lambda{}}}^{{_\\ast}} $ such that the se...

  2. Investigation on the choice of boundary conditions and shape functions for flexible multi-body system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ke-Qi; Liu, Jin-Yang

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine the correctness and efficiency of the choice of boundary conditions when using assumed mode approach to simulate flexible multi-body systems. The displacement field due to deformation is approximated by the Rayleigh-Ritz assumed modes in floating frame of reference (FFR) formulation. The deformations obtained by the absolute nodal coordinate (ANC) formulation which are transformed by two sets of reference coordinates are introduced as a criterion to verify the accuracy of the simulation results by using the FFR formulation. The relationship between the deformations obtained from different boundary conditions is revealed. Numerical simulation examples demonstrate that the assumed modes with cantilevered-free, simply-supported and free-free boundary conditions without inclusion of rigid body modes are suitable for simulation of flexible multi-body system with large over all motion, and the same physical deformation can be obtained using those mode functions, differ only by a coordinate transformation. It is also shown that when using mode shapes with statically indeterminate boundary conditions, significant error may occur. Furthermore, the slider crank mechanism with rigid crank is accurate enough for investigating boundary condition problem of flexible multi-body system, which cost significant less simulating time. The project was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (10872126) and the Research Fund of the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (20100073110007).

  3. Investigation on the choice of boundary conditions and shape functions for flexible multi-body system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Qi Pan; Jin-Yang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to examine the correctness and efficiency of the choice of boundary conditions when using assumed mode approach to simulate flexible multi-body systems.The displacement field due to deformation is approximated by the Rayleigh-Ritz assumed modes in floating frame of reference (FFR) formulation.The deformations obtained by the absolute nodal coordinate (ANC) formulation which are transformed by two sets of reference coordinates are introduced as a criterion to verify the accuracy of the simulation results by using the FFR formulation.The relationship between the deformations obtained from different boundary conditions is revealed.Numerical simulation examples demonstrate that the assumed modes with cantilevered-free,simply-supported and freefree boundary conditions without inclusion of rigid body modes are suitable for simulation of flexible multi-body system with large over all motion,and the same physical deformation can be obtained using those mode functions,differ only by a coordinate transformation.It is also shown that when using mode shapes with statically indeterminate boundary conditions,significant error may occur.Furthermore,the slider crank mechanism with rigid crank is accurate enough for investigating boundary condition problem of flexible multi-body system,which cost significant less simulating time.

  4. Evidence of Upwelling along Peninsular Malaysia during Southwest Monsoon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryabor, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Upwelling off the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia (PM) was detected from recent cruise data collected during the southwest monsoon. Thermocline lifting was observed at 104˚E from a number of parallel transects. To confirm the presence of upwelling, satellite remote sensing data were used...

  5. A study on the development of automatic economic profit and loss calculation system for maritime boundary delimitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the maritime boundary delimitation is important for the purpose of securing marine resources, in addition to the aspect of maritime security, interest in maritime boundary delimitation to help national benefits are increasing over the world. In Korea, the importance of maritime boundary delimitation with the neighbouring countries is also increasing in practice. The quantity of obtainable marine resources depending on maritime boundary acts as an important factor for maritime boundary delimitation. Accordingly, a study is required to calculate quantity of our obtainable marine resources depending on maritime boundary delimitation. This study intends to calculate obtainable marine resources depending on various maritime boundary scenarios insisted by several countries. It mainly aims at developing a GIS-based automation system to be utilized for decision making of the maritime boundary delimitation. For this target, it has designed a module using spatial analysis technique to automatically calculate profit and loss waters area of each country upon maritime boundary and another module to estimate economic profits and losses obtained by each country using the calculated waters area and pricing information of the marine resources. By linking both the designed modules, it has implemented an automatic economic profit and loss calculation system for the GIS-based maritime boundary delimitation. The system developed from this study automatically calculate quantity of the obtainable marine resources of a country for the maritime boundary to be added and created in the future. Thus, it is expected to support decision making for the maritime boundary negotiators

  6. On the boundaries of quantum integrability for the spin-1/2 Richardson–Gaudin system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss a generalised version of Sklyanin's Boundary Quantum Inverse Scattering Method applied to the spin-1/2, trigonometric sl(2) case, for which both the twisted-periodic and boundary constructions are obtained as limiting cases. We then investigate the quasi-classical limit of this approach leading to a set of mutually commuting conserved operators which we refer to as the trigonometric, spin-1/2 Richardson–Gaudin system. We prove that the rational limit of the set of conserved operators for the trigonometric system is equivalent, through a change of variables, rescaling, and a basis transformation, to the original set of trigonometric conserved operators. Moreover, we prove that the twisted-periodic and boundary constructions are equivalent in the trigonometric case, but not in the rational limit

  7. Simulation of a free-surface and seepage face using boundary-fitted coordinate system method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Kun; Leap, Darrell I.

    1997-09-01

    The boundary-fitted coordinate (BFC) system method is applied to simulate steady groundwater seepage with a free-surface and seepage face using the finite-difference method. The BFC system method eliminates the difficulty of fitting finite-difference grids to a changeable free-surface which is not known a priori but will be obtained as part of a solution. Also, grid generation with this approach is simpler than with the finite-element method. At each iterative sweep, the changeable free-surface becomes a part of the boundary-fitted grid lines, making boundary condition implementation easy and accurate. An example problem demonstrating the simulation procedure and numerical results compares very well with the analytical solution.

  8. Systemic effects of geoengineering by terrestrial carbon dioxide removal on carbon related planetary boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Vera; Donges, Jonathan; Lucht, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework as proposed by Rockström et al. (2009) provides guidelines for ecological boundaries, the transgression of which is likely to result in a shift of Earth system functioning away from the relatively stable Holocene state. As the climate change boundary is already close to be transgressed, several geoengineering (GE) methods are discussed, aiming at a reduction of atmospheric carbon concentrations to control the Earth's energy balance. One of the proposed GE methods is carbon extraction from the atmosphere via biological carbon sequestration. In case mitigation efforts fail to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, this form of GE could act as potential measure to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. We here study the possible influences of human interactions in the Earth system on carbon related planetary boundaries in the form of geoengineering (terrestrial carbon dioxide removal). We use a conceptual model specifically designed to investigate fundamental carbon feedbacks between land, ocean and atmosphere (Anderies et al., 2013) and modify it to include an additional geoengineering component. With that we analyze the existence and stability of a safe operating space for humanity, which is here conceptualized in three of the 9 proposed dimensions, namely climate change, ocean acidification and land-use. References: J. M. Anderies et al., The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries. Environ. Res. Lett., 8(4):044048 (2013) J. Rockström et al., A safe operating space for humanity. Nature 461 (7263), 472-475 (2009)

  9. Parallel striatal and hippocampal systems for landmarks and boundaries in spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeller, Christian F; King, John A; Burgess, Neil

    2008-04-15

    How the memory systems centered on the hippocampus and dorsal striatum interact to support behavior remains controversial. We used functional MRI while people learned the locations of objects by collecting and replacing them over multiple trials within a virtual environment comprising a landmark, a circular boundary, and distant cues for orientation. The relative location of landmark and boundary was occasionally changed, with specific objects paired with one or other cue, allowing dissociation of learning and performance relative to either cue. Right posterior hippocampal activation reflected learning and remembering of boundary-related locations, whereas right dorsal striatal activation reflected learning and remembering of landmark-related locations. Within the right hippocampus, anterior processing of environmental change (spatial novelty) was dissociated from posterior processing of location. Behavioral studies show that landmark-related learning obeys associative reinforcement, whereas boundary-related learning is incidental [Doeller CF, Burgess N (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:5909-5914]. The distinct incidental hippocampal processing of boundaries is suggestive of a "geometric module" or "cognitive map" and may explain the hippocampal support of incidental/observational learning in "declarative" or "episodic" memory versus the striatal support of trial-and-error learning in "procedural" memory. Finally, the hippocampal and striatal systems appear to combine "bottom-up," simply influencing behavior proportional to their activations, without direct interaction, with "top-down" ventromedial prefrontal involvement when both are similarly active. PMID:18408152

  10. Chaotic dynamics of one-dimensional systems with periodic boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Miller, Bruce N.

    2014-12-01

    We provide appropriate tools for the analysis of dynamics and chaos for one-dimensional systems with periodic boundary conditions. Our approach allows for the investigation of the dependence of the largest Lyapunov exponent on various initial conditions of the system. The method employs an effective approach for defining the phase-space distance appropriate for systems with periodic boundaries and allows for an unambiguous test-orbit rescaling in the phase space required to calculate the Lyapunov exponents. We elucidate our technique by applying it to investigate the chaotic dynamics of a one-dimensional plasma with periodic boundaries. Exact analytic expressions are derived for the electric field and potential using Ewald sums, thereby making it possible to follow the time evolution of the plasma in simulations without any special treatment of the boundary. By employing a set of event-driven algorithms, we calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent, the radial distribution function, and the pressure by following the evolution of the system in phase space without resorting to numerical manipulation of the equations of motion. Simulation results are presented and analyzed for the one-dimensional plasma with a view to examining the dynamical and chaotic behavior exhibited by small and large versions of the system.

  11. Influences of upwelling and downwelling winds on red tide bloom dynamics in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John P.; Fischer, Andrew M.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Gower, James F. R.; King, Stephanie A.; Marin, Roman, III; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2009-03-01

    It has recently been shown that inner shelf waters of NE Monterey Bay, California function as an "extreme bloom incubator", frequently developing dense "red tide" blooms that can rapidly spread. Located within the California Current upwelling system, this open bay is strongly influenced by oceanographic dynamics resulting from cycles of upwelling favorable winds and their relaxation and/or reversal. Different wind forcing causes influx of different water types that originate outside the bay: cold nutrient-rich waters during upwelling and warm nutrient-poor waters during relaxation. In this study, we examine how the bay's bloom incubation area can interact with highly variable circulation to cause red tide spreading, dispersal and retention. This examination of processes is supported by satellite, airborne and in situ observations of a major dinoflagellate bloom during August and September of 2004. Remote sensing of high spatial, temporal and spectral resolution shows that the bloom originated in the NE bay, where it was highly concentrated in a narrow band along a thermal front. Upwelling circulation rapidly spread part of the bloom, mixing cool waters of an upwelling filament with warm bloom source waters as they spread. Vertical migration of the dinoflagellate populations was mapped by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys through the spreading bloom. Following bloom expansion, a two-day wind reversal forced intrusion of warm offshore waters that dispersed much of the bloom. Upwelling winds then resumed, and the bloom was further dispersed by an influx of cold water. Throughout these oceanographic responses to changing winds, an intense bloom persisted in sheltered waters of the NE bay, where extreme blooms are most frequent and intense. Microscopic examination of surface phytoplankton samples from the central bay showed that spreading of the bloom from the NE bay and mixing with regional water masses resulted in significantly increased abundance of

  12. Travelling waves in boundary-controlled, non-uniform, cascaded lumped systems

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, William; Zhu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    A companion paper in this conference considers travelling and standing waves in cascaded, lumped, mass-spring systems, controlled by two boundary actuators, one at each end, when the system is uniform. It first proposes definitions of waves in finite lumped systems. It then shows how to control the actuators to establish desired waves from rest, and maintain them despite disturbances. The present paper extends this work to the more general, non-uniform case, when mass and sp...

  13. Travelling waves in boundary-controlled, non-uniform, cascaded lumped systems

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, William; Zhu, Ming

    2012-01-01

    A companion paper considers travelling and standing waves in cascaded, lumped, mass-spring systems, controlled by two boundary actuators, one at each end, when the system is uniform. It first proposes definitions of waves in finite lumped systems. It then shows how to control the actuators to establish desired waves from rest, and to maintain them despite disturbances. The present paper extends this work to the more general, non-uniform case, when mass and spring values can ...

  14. Insights into the Microbial and Viral Dynamics of a Coastal Downwelling-Upwelling Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bueno Gregoracci

    Full Text Available Although previous studies have described opposing states in upwelling regions, i.e., the rise of cold nutrient-rich waters and prevalence of surface warm nutrient-poor waters, few have addressed the transition from one state to the other. This study aimed to describe the microbial and viral structure during this transition and was able to obtain the taxonomic and metabolic compositions as well as physical-chemical data. This integrated approach allowed for a better understanding of the dynamics of the downwelling upwelling transition, suggesting that a wealth of metabolic processes and ecological interactions are occurring in the minute fractions of the plankton (femto, pico, nano. These processes and interactions included evidence of microbial predominance during downwelling (with nitrogen recycling and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis, different viral predation pressures over primary production in different states (cyanobacteria vs eukaryotes, and a predominance of diatoms and selected bacterial and archaeal groups during upwelling (with the occurrence of a wealth of nitrogen metabolism involving ammonia. Thus, the results provided insights into which microbes, viruses and microbial-mediated processes are probably important in the functioning of upwelling systems.

  15. Insights into the Microbial and Viral Dynamics of a Coastal Downwelling-Upwelling Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoracci, Gustavo Bueno; Soares, Ana Carolina Dos Santos; Miranda, Milene Dias; Coutinho, Ricardo; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have described opposing states in upwelling regions, i.e., the rise of cold nutrient-rich waters and prevalence of surface warm nutrient-poor waters, few have addressed the transition from one state to the other. This study aimed to describe the microbial and viral structure during this transition and was able to obtain the taxonomic and metabolic compositions as well as physical-chemical data. This integrated approach allowed for a better understanding of the dynamics of the downwelling upwelling transition, suggesting that a wealth of metabolic processes and ecological interactions are occurring in the minute fractions of the plankton (femto, pico, nano). These processes and interactions included evidence of microbial predominance during downwelling (with nitrogen recycling and aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis), different viral predation pressures over primary production in different states (cyanobacteria vs eukaryotes), and a predominance of diatoms and selected bacterial and archaeal groups during upwelling (with the occurrence of a wealth of nitrogen metabolism involving ammonia). Thus, the results provided insights into which microbes, viruses and microbial-mediated processes are probably important in the functioning of upwelling systems. PMID:26327119

  16. Multiple Positive Solutions of Boundary Value Problems for Systems of Nonlinear Third-Order Differential Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaohong LI; Xiaoyan ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we consider boundary value problems for systems of nonlinear thirdorder differential equations.By applying the fixed point theorems of cone expansion and compression of norm type and Leggett-Williams fixed point theorem,the existence of multiple positive solutions is obtained.As application,we give some examples to demonstrate our results.

  17. Positive Solutions for a Class of Coupled System of Singular Three-Point Boundary Value Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Naseer Ahmad Asif; Rahmat Ali Khan

    2009-01-01

    Existence of positive solutions for a coupled system of nonlinear three-point boundary value problems of the type , , , , , , , is established. The nonlinearities , are continuous and may be singular at , and/or , while the parameters , satisfy . An example is also included to show the applicability of our result.

  18. Trigonometric series adapted for the study of Dirichlet boundary-value problems of Lame systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boubakeur Merouani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have used trigonometric series for describing the solutions to elliptic equations in a plane sector; for example, the study of the biharmonic operator with different boundary conditions, can be found in [2,9,10]. The main goal of this article is to adapt those techniques for the study of Lame systems in a sector.

  19. Trigonometric series adapted for the study of Dirichlet boundary-value problems of Lame systems

    OpenAIRE

    Boubakeur Merouani; Razika Boufenouche

    2015-01-01

    Several authors have used trigonometric series for describing the solutions to elliptic equations in a plane sector; for example, the study of the biharmonic operator with different boundary conditions, can be found in [2,9,10]. The main goal of this article is to adapt those techniques for the study of Lame systems in a sector.

  20. Symmetric solutions of singular nonlocal boundary value problems for systems of differential equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Ping; YAO Jianli

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the existence of symmetric solutions of singular nonlocal boundary value problems for systems of differential equations. Our analysis relies on a nonlinear alternative of Leray - schauder type. Our results presented here unify, generalize and significantly improve many known results in the literature.

  1. Clinical simulation as a boundary object in design of health IT-systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine Loft; Jensen, Sanne; Lyng, Karen Marie

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are very complex, holding numerous stakeholders with various approaches and goals towards the design of health IT-systems. Some of these differences may be approached by applying the concept of boundary objects in a participatory IT-design process. Traditionally clinical ...

  2. Methodology for identifying boundaries of systems important to safety in CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therrien, S.; Komljenovic, D.; Therrien, P.; Ruest, C.; Prevost, P.; Vaillancourt, R. [Hydro-Quebec, Nuclear Generating Station Gentilly-2, Becancour, Quebec (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed to identify the boundaries of the systems important to safety (SIS) at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hydro-Quebec. The SIS boundaries identification considers nuclear safety only. Components that are not identified as important to safety are systematically identified as related to safety. A global assessment process such as WANO/INPO AP-913 'Equipment Reliability Process' will be needed to implement adequate changes in the management rules of those components. The paper depicts results in applying the methodology to the Shutdown Systems 1 and 2 (SDS 1, 2), and to the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS). This validation process enabled fine tuning the methodology, performing a better estimate of the effort required to evaluate a system, and identifying components important to safety of these systems. (author)

  3. The minimal habitat size for spreading in a weak competition system with two free boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Hong

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we focus on the dynamics for a Lotka-Volterra type weak competition system with two free boundaries, where free boundaries which may intersect each other as time evolves are used to describe the spreading of two competing species, respectively. In the weak competition case, the dynamics of this model can be classified into four cases, which forms a spreading-vanishing quartering. The notion of the minimal habitat size for spreading is introduced to determine if species can always spread. Some sufficient conditions for spreading and vanishing are established. Also, when spreading occurs, some rough estimates for spreading speed and the long-time behavior of solutions are established.

  4. Dynamic boundary controls of a rotating body-beam system with time-varying angular velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Boumediène Chentouf

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with feedback stabilization of a flexible beam clamped at a rigid body and free at the other end. We assume that there is no damping and the rigid body rotates with a nonconstant angular velocity. To stabilize this system, we propose a feedback law which consists of a control torque applied on the rigid body and either a dynamic boundary control moment or a dynamic boundary control force or both of them applied at the free end of the beam. Then it is ...

  5. Travelling waves in boundary-controlled, non-uniform, cascaded lumped systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, William J.; Zhu, Ming

    2013-08-01

    A companion paper considers travelling and standing waves in cascaded, lumped, mass-spring systems, controlled by two boundary actuators, one at each end, when the system is uniform. It first proposes definitions of waves in finite lumped systems. It then shows how to control the actuators to establish desired waves from rest, and to maintain them despite disturbances. The present paper extends this work to the more general, non-uniform case, when mass and spring values can be arbitrary. A special "bi-uniform" case is first studied, consisting of two different uniform cascaded systems in series, with an obvious, uncontrolled, impedance mismatch where they meet. The paper shows how boundary actuator control systems can be designed to establish, and robustly maintain, apparently pure travelling waves of constant amplitude in either the first or the second uniform section, in each case with an appropriate, partial, standing wave pattern in the other section. Then a more general non-uniform case is studied. A definition of a "pure travelling wave" in non-uniform systems is proposed. Curiously, it does not imply constant amplitude motion. It does however yield maximum power transfer between boundary actuators. The definition, and its implementation in a control system, involves extending the notions of "pure" travelling waves, of standing waves, and of input and output impedances of sources and loads, when applied to non-uniform lumped systems. Practical, robust control strategies are presented for all cases.

  6. Flow system boundary by D'Agnese and others (1997) for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system study, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the flow-system boundary encompassing the regional ground-water flow model by D'Agnese and others (1997). The boundary encompasses an...

  7. CALL FOR PAPERS: Topical issue on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gabriel; Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.

    2004-05-01

    The past few years have seen a growing interest in quantum mechanical systems with moving boundaries. One of its manifestations was the First International Workshop on Problems with Moving Boundaries organized by Professor J Dittrich in Prague in October 2003. Another event in this series will be the (first) International Workshop on the Dynamical Casimir Effect in Padua in June 2004, organized by Professor G Carugno (see webpage www.pd.infn.it/casimir/ for details). As Guest Editors we invite researchers working in any area related to moving boundaries to contribute to a Topical Issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics on the nonstationary Casimir effect and quantum systems with moving boundaries. Our intention is to cover a wide range of topics. In particular, we envisage possible contributions in the following areas: Theoretical and experimental studies on quantum fields in cavities with moving boundaries and time-dependent media. This area includes, in particular, various manifestations of the nonstationary (dynamical) Casimir effect, such as creation of quanta and modifications of Casimir force due to the motion of boundaries. Other relevant subjects are: generation and evolution of nonclassical states of fields and moving mirrors; interaction between quantized fields and atoms in cavities with moving boundaries; decoherence and entanglement due to the motion of boundaries; field quantization in nonideal cavities with moving boundaries taking into account losses and dispersion; nano-devices with moving boundaries. Quantum particles in domains confined with moving boundaries. This area includes: new exact and approximate solutions of the evolution equations (Schrödinger, Klein-Gordon, Dirac, Fokker-Planck, etc); quantum carpets and revivals; escape and tunnelling through moving barriers; evolution of quantum packets in the presence of moving boundaries; ultracold atoms (ions) in traps with moving boundaries. The topical issue is scheduled

  8. R\\'enyi entanglement entropies of descendant states in critical systems with boundaries: conformal field theory and spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, Luca; Pálmai, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the R\\'enyi entanglement entropies of descendant states in critical one-dimensional systems with boundaries, that map to boundary conformal field theories (CFT) in the scaling limit. We unify the previous CFT approaches to describe primary and descendant states in systems with both open and closed boundaries. We apply the technique to critical systems belonging to different universality classes with non-trivial boundary conditions that preserve conformal invariance, and compare the results to numerical data obtained on finite spin chains.

  9. Bifurcation for Second-Order Hamiltonian Systems with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Faraci

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Through variational methods, we study nonautonomous systems of second-order ordinary differential equations with periodic boundary conditions. First, we deal with a nonlinear system, depending on a function u, and prove that the set of bifurcation points for the solutions of the system is not σ-compact. Then, we deal with a linear system depending on a real parameter λ>0 and on a function u, and prove that there exists λ∗ such that the set of the functions u, such that the system admits nontrivial solutions, contains an accumulation point.

  10. Stability result of the Timoshenko system with delay and boundary feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-06

    Our interest in this paper is to analyse the asymptotic behaviour of a Timoshenko beam system together with two boundary controls, with delay terms in the first and second equation. Assuming the weights of the delay are small enough, we show that the system is well-posed using the semigroup theory. Furthermore, we introduce a Lyapunov functional that gives the exponential decay of the total energy. © 2012 The author.

  11. ON SOLVING PERIODIC BOUNDARY PROBLEM OF SEMILINEAR SYSTEMS WITH A ONE-PARAMETER IMBEDDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国庆; 傅冬生; 沈祖和

    2003-01-01

    The paper is concerned with solving periodic boundary problem of semilinear systems,which will be differentiably embedded into an one-parameter family of operators.The solution of the systems is then found by continuing the solution curve of operator homotopy.When the Newton-Kantorovich's procedure is applied to the corresponding operator equations,an efficient algorithm is derived.Finally,the theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the numerical examples.

  12. Cooperative Behavior in Driven Lattice Systems with Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Mark Jule Jr.

    1998-01-01

    We explore the nature of driven stochastic lattice systems with non-periodic boundary conditions. The systems consist of particle and holes which move by exchanges of nearest neighbor particle-hole pairs. These exchanges are controlled by the energetics associated with an internal Hamiltonian, an external drive and a stochastic coupling to a heat reservoir. The effect of the drive is to bias particle-hole exchanges along the field in such a way that a particle current ...

  13. On angular momentum balance for particle systems with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    The well-known issue with the absence of conservation of angular momentum in classical particle systems with periodic boundary conditions is addressed. It is shown that conventional theory based on Noether's theorem fails to explain the simplest possible example, notably jumps of angular momentum in the case of single particle moving in a periodic cell. It is suggested to consider the periodic cell as an open system, exchanging mass, momentum, angular momentum, and energy with surrounding cel...

  14. Computational quantum-classical boundary of complex and noisy quantum systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on...

  15. To a sustainable energy supply system in the Netherlands. Energetic, economic, and environmental boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this essay energetic, economic, and environmental boundaries are presented, for the use of the renewable energy source biomass for CHP production in the Netherlands. After a general overview of global fossil fuel demand/reserves, its resulting environmental consequences, and the substituting possibilities for renewable energy sources (section 2), the possibilities for a new technological (r)evolution are presented in section 3. In this section items such as sustainable development and industrial ecology are introduced, which result to criteria for a global sustainable energy supply system. The specific Dutch energy supply/power production system, together with the Dutch governmental policy concerning the introduction of renewable energy sources, is presented in section 4. The potential role of the most promising renewable energy source in the Netherlands, viz. biomass, in the future Dutch sustainable energy supply system, together with its energetic, economic, and environmental boundaries, is presented in section 5., closing this essay. 22 refs

  16. A system level boundary scan controller board for VME applications [to CERN experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, N; Da Silva, J C

    2000-01-01

    This work is the result of a collaboration between INESC and LIP in the CMS experiment being conducted at CERN. The collaboration addresses the application of boundary scan test at system level namely the development of a VME boundary scan controller (BSC) board prototype and the corresponding software. This prototype uses the MTM bus existing in the VME64* backplane to apply the 1149.1 test vectors to a system composed of nineteen boards, called here units under test (UUTs). A top-down approach is used to describe our work. The paper begins with some insights about the experiment being conducted at CERN, proceed with system level considerations concerning our work and with some details about the BSC board. The results obtained so far and the proposed work is reviewed in the end of this contribution. (11 refs).

  17. Upwelling Index, 60N 149W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  18. Upwelling Index, 51N 131W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  19. Upwelling Index, 21N 107W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  20. Upwelling Index, 42N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  1. Upwelling Index, 30N 119W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  2. Upwelling Index, 36N 122W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  3. Upwelling Index, 27N 116W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  4. Upwelling Index, 57N 137W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  5. Upwelling Index, 54N 134W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  6. Upwelling Index, 48N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  7. Upwelling Index, 39N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  8. Upwelling Index, 24N 113W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  9. Upwelling Index, 33N 119W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  10. Upwelling Index, 45N 125W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  11. Upwelling Index, 60N 146W, 6-hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Upwelling index computed from 1-degree FNMOC sea level pressure for 15 locations off the North American West Coast at each 3 degrees of latitude from 21N to 60N....

  12. Dynamic Analysis of HSDB System and Evaluation of Boundary Non-linearity through Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chandrakar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with mechanical design and development of high speed digital board (HSDB system which consists of printed circuit board (PCB with all electronic components packaged inside the cavity for military application. The military environment poses a variety of extreme dynamic loading conditions, namely, quasi static, vibration, shock and acoustic loads that can seriously degrade or even cause failure of electronics. The vibrational requirement for the HSDB system is that the natural frequency should be more than 200 Hz and sustain power spectrum density of 14.8 Grms in the overall spectrum. Structural integrity of HSDB is studied in detail using finite element analysis (FEA tool against the dynamic loads and configured the system. Experimental vibration tests are conducted on HSDB with the help of vibration shaker and validated the FE results. The natural frequency and maximum acceleration response computed from vibration tests for the configured design were found. The finite element results show a good correlation with the experiment results for the same boundary conditions. In case of fitment scenario of HSDB system, it is observed that the influence of boundary non-linearity during experiments. This influence of boundary non-linearity is evaluated to obtain the closeout of random vibration simulation results.

  13. Interannual variability in the PFEG coastal upwelling indices

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Heather A.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous studies examine decadal-scale variability in basin-scale parameters in the Northern Pacific. Characterizing such interannual-to-interdecadal variability is essential to identifying long-term climate changes. The Pacific Fisheries Environmental Group (PFEG) coastal upwelling indices display variability on these time scales and may help explain the mechanisms responsible for such climate variability. ... In this study, examination of 49-year time series of monthly mean upwelling indice...

  14. The relationship between Arabian Sea upwelling and Indian monsoon revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, X; B. Hünicke; N. Tim; E. Zorita

    2015-01-01

    Studies based on upwelling indices (sediment records, sea-surface temperature and wind) suggest that upwelling along the western coast of Arabian Sea is strongly affected by the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). In order to examine this relationship directly, we employ the vertical water mass transport produced by the eddy-resolving global ocean simulation STORM driven by meteorological reanalysis over the last 61 years. With its very high spatial resolution (10 ...

  15. GLOBAL C1 SOLUTION TO THE INITIAL-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR DIAGONAL HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS WITH LINEARLY DEGENERATE CHARACTERISTICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ta-tsien(李大潜); Peng Yue-Jun

    2003-01-01

    Abstract We prove that the C0 boundedness of solution impliesthe global existence and uniqueness of C1 solution to the initial-boundary value problem for linearly degenerate quasilinear hyperbolic systems of diagonal form with nonlinear boundary conditions. Thus, if the C1 solution to the initial-boundary value problem blows up in a finite time, then the solution itself must tend to the infinity at the starting point of singularity.

  16. Monotone methods for solving a boundary value problem of second order discrete system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuan-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a pair of upper and lower solutions is introduced for a boundary value problem of second order discrete system. A comparison result is given. An existence theorem for a solution is established in terms of upper and lower solutions. A monotone iterative scheme is proposed, and the monotone convergence rate of the iteration is compared and analyzed. The numerical results are given.

  17. Periodic Solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson System with Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bostan, Mihai; Poupaud, Frédéric

    1998-01-01

    We study the Vlasov-Poisson system with time periodic boundary conditions. For small data we prove existence of weak periodic solutions in any space dimension. In the one dimensional case the result is stronger: we obtain existence of mild solution and uniqueness of this solution when the data are smooth. It is necessary to impose a non vanishing condition for the incoming velocities in order to control the life-time of particles in the domain.

  18. Periodic Solutions of the 1D Vlasov-Maxwell System with Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Bostan, Mihai

    1998-01-01

    We study the 1D Vlasov-Maxwell system with time periodic boundary conditions in its classical and relativistic form. For small data we prove existence of weak periodic solutions. It is necessary to impose non vanishing conditions for the incoming velocities in order to control the life-time of particles in the domain. In order to preserve the periodicity, another condition of vanishing the time average of the incoming current is imposed.

  19. Nontrivial Solutions of Superquadratic Hamiltonian Systems with Lagrangian Boundary Conditions and the L-index Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong LI; Chungen LIU

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors study the existence of nontrivial solutions for the Hamiltonian systems z(t) = J▽H(t, z(t)) with Lagrangian boundary conditions, where (H)(t,z) = 1/2((B)(t)z,z) + (H)(t,z), (B)(t) is a semipositive symmetric continuous matrix and (H) satisfies a superquadratic condition at infinity. We also obtain a result about the L-index.

  20. Determination of the carbon budget of a pasture: effect of system boundaries and flux uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Raphael; Bretscher, Daniel; Münger, Andreas; Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof

    2016-05-01

    Carbon (C) sequestration in the soil is considered as a potential important mechanism to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the agricultural sector. It can be quantified by the net ecosystem carbon budget (NECB) describing the change of soil C as the sum of all relevant import and export fluxes. NECB was investigated here in detail for an intensively grazed dairy pasture in Switzerland. Two budget approaches with different system boundaries were applied: NECBtot for system boundaries including the grazing cows and NECBpast for system boundaries excluding the cows. CO2 and CH4 exchange induced by soil/vegetation processes as well as direct emissions by the animals were derived from eddy covariance measurements. Other C fluxes were either measured (milk yield, concentrate feeding) or derived based on animal performance data (intake, excreta). For the investigated year, both approaches resulted in a small near-neutral C budget: NECBtot -27 ± 62 and NECBpast 23 ± 76 g C m-2 yr-1. The considerable uncertainties, depending on the approach, were mainly due to errors in the CO2 exchange or in the animal-related fluxes. The comparison of the NECB results with the annual exchange of other GHG revealed CH4 emissions from the cows to be the major contributor in terms of CO2 equivalents, but with much lower uncertainty compared to NECB. Although only 1 year of data limit the representativeness of the carbon budget results, they demonstrate the important contribution of the non-CO2 fluxes depending on the chosen system boundaries and the effect of their propagated uncertainty in an exemplary way. The simultaneous application and comparison of both NECB approaches provides a useful consistency check for the carbon budget determination and can help to identify and eliminate systematic errors.

  1. Blow up at the hyperbolic boundary for a 2x2 system arising from chemical engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bourdarias, Christian; Gisclon, Marguerite; Junca, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    We consider an initial boundary value problem for a 2x2 system of conservation laws modeling heatless adsorption of a gaseous mixture with two species and instantaneous exchange kinetics, close to the system of Chromatography. In this model the velocity is not constant because the sorption effect is taken into account. Exchanging the roles of the x, t variables we obtain a strictly hyperbolic system with a zero eigenvalue. Our aim is to construct a solution with a velocity which blows up at t...

  2. Variability in biological responses influenced by upwelling events in the Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Habeebrehman, H.; Prabhakaran, M.P.; Jacob, J.; Sabu, P.; Jayalakshmi, K.J.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Revichandran, C.

    in the P. Sabu, K.J. Jayalakshmi, Systems er.com/locate/jmarsys compared to the surrounding area (Mantora et al.,1993). As a consequence of this enrichment, a high productivity occurs in the Arabian Sea during the season. The upwelling phenomenon... (LSM) summer monsoon. , Table 2 Phytoplankton species identified during the different phases of summer monsoon in the southeastern Arabian Sea Class: Bacillariophyceae Order: Dinophysales Family: RhizosoleniaceaeOrder: Biddulphiales Family...

  3. Phytoplankton community and environmental correlates in a coastal upwelling zone along western Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Kang, Jian-hua; Ye, You-yin; Lin, Geng-ming; Yang, Qing-liang; Lin, Mao

    2016-02-01

    Upwelling system in western Taiwan Strait is important for facilitating the fishery production. This study investigated hydro-chemical properties, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton species composition, three-dimensional (horizontal, vertical and transect) distribution of phytoplankton abundance, as well as phytoplankton annual variation and the correlation of phytoplankton community with the upwelling of underlying current and nutrients according to samples of Fujian-Guangdong coastal upwelling zone in western Taiwan Strait from August 27 to September 8, 2009. The results manifest that the nutrient-rich cold and high salinity current on the continental shelf of South China Sea upwells to the Fujian-Guangdong coastal waters through Taiwan Bank and the surging strength to surface is weak while strong at 30-m layer. The thermohaline center of coastal upwelling shifts to the east of Dongshan Island and expanded to offshore waters in comparison with previous records. A total of 137 phytoplankton species belonging to 59 genera in 4 phyla are identified excluding the unidentified species. Diatom is the first major group and followed by dinoflagellate. Cyanobacteria mainly composed by three Trichodesmium species account for a certain proportions, while Chrysophyta are only found in offshore waters. The dominant species include Thalassionema nitzschioides, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Thalassionema frauenfeldii, Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima, Rhizosolenia styliformis, Chaetoceros curvisetus, Diplopsalis lenticula and Trichodesmium thiebautii. Phytoplankton community mainly consists of eurythermal and eurytopic species, followed by warm-water species, tropic high-salinity species and oceanic eurythermic species in order. Phytoplankton abundance ranges from 1.00 × 102 ind./L ~ 437.22 × 102 ind./L with an average of 47.36 × 102 ind./L. For vertical distribution, maximum abundance is found at 30 m-depth and the surface comes second. Besides, the abundance below 30 m

  4. Global Weak Solutions of Initial Boundary Value Problem for Boltzmann-Poisson System with Absorbing Boundary%具吸收边界的Bolzmann-Poisson方程组初边值问题的整体弱解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔国忠; 张志平; 江成顺

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with the initial boundary value problem for the BoltzmannPoisson system, which arises in semiconductor physics, with absorbing boundary. The global existence of weak solutions is proved by using the stability of velocity averages and the compactness results on L1-theory under weaker conditons on initial boundary values.

  5. Attraction basins as gauges of robustness against boundary conditions in biological complex systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Demongeot

    Full Text Available One fundamental concept in the context of biological systems on which researches have flourished in the past decade is that of the apparent robustness of these systems, i.e., their ability to resist to perturbations or constraints induced by external or boundary elements such as electromagnetic fields acting on neural networks, micro-RNAs acting on genetic networks and even hormone flows acting both on neural and genetic networks. Recent studies have shown the importance of addressing the question of the environmental robustness of biological networks such as neural and genetic networks. In some cases, external regulatory elements can be given a relevant formal representation by assimilating them to or modeling them by boundary conditions. This article presents a generic mathematical approach to understand the influence of boundary elements on the dynamics of regulation networks, considering their attraction basins as gauges of their robustness. The application of this method on a real genetic regulation network will point out a mathematical explanation of a biological phenomenon which has only been observed experimentally until now, namely the necessity of the presence of gibberellin for the flower of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana to develop normally.

  6. Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems Theory: The Case of the Missing Boundary Equilibrium Bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S. J.; Homer, M. E.; Jeffrey, M. R.; Szalai, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present two codimension-one bifurcations that occur when an equilibrium collides with a discontinuity in a piecewise smooth dynamical system. These simple cases appear to have escaped recent classifications. We present them here to highlight some of the powerful results from Filippov's book Differential Equations with Discontinuous Righthand Sides (Kluwer, 1988). Filippov classified the so-called boundary equilibrium collisions without providing their unfolding. We show the complete unfolding here, for the first time, in the particularly interesting case of a node changing its stability as it collides with a discontinuity. We provide a prototypical model that can be used to generate all codimension-one boundary equilibrium collisions, and summarize the elements of Filippov's work that are important in achieving a full classification.

  7. PERIODIC BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF QUASILINEAR SYSTEM%拟线性系统周期边值问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The existence and uniqueness results about quasilinear periodic boundary value problems are established by using the global inverse function theorem and the result about the existence and uniquencess of periodic solutions for the periodic boundary value problem of nonhomogeneous linear periodic system.

  8. A Reaction-diffusion System with Nonlinear Absorption Terms and Boundary Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with a reaction-diffusion system with nonlinear absorption terms and boundary flux. As results of interactions among the six nonlinear terms in the system, some sufficient conditions on global existence and finite time blow-up of the solutions are described via all the six nonlinear exponents appearing in the six nonlinear terms. In addition, we also show the influence of the coefficients of the absorption terms as well as the geometry of the domain to the global existence and finite time blow-up of the solutions for some cases. At last, some numerical results are given.

  9. Characteristic finite difference method and application for moving boundary value problem of coupled system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yi-rang; LI Chang-feng; YANG Cheng-shun; HAN Yu-ji

    2008-01-01

    The coupled system of multilayer dynamics of fluids in porous media is to describe the history of oil-gas transport and accumulation in basin evolution. It is of great value in rational evaluation of prospecting and exploiting oil-gas resources. The mathematical model can be described as a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations with moving boundary values. A kind of characteristic finite difference schemes is put forward, from which optimal order estimates in l2 norm are derived for the error in the approximate solutions. The research is important both theoretically and practically for the model analysis in the field, the model numerical method and software development.

  10. A study of the entanglement in systems with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Panagiotou, E.; Tzoumanekas, C.; Lambropoulou, S.; Millett, K. C.; Theodorou, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    We define the local periodic linking number, LK, between two oriented closed or open chains in a system with three-dimensional periodic boundary conditions. The properties of LK indicate that it is an appropriate measure of entanglement between a collection of chains in a periodic system. Using this measure of linking to assess the extent of entanglement in a polymer melt we study the effect of CReTA algorithm on the entanglement of polyethylene chains. Our numerical results show that the sta...

  11. Effects from magnetic boundary conditions in superconducting-magnetic proximity systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Baker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A superconductor-magnetic proximity system displays singlet-triplet pair correlations in the magnetization as a function of inhomogeneities of the magnetic profile. We discuss how the magnetic boundary conditions affects differently the curvature and winding number of rotating magnetizations in the three commonly used structures to generate long range triplet components: an exchange spring, a helical structure and a misaligned magnetic multilayer. We conclude that the choice of the system is dictated by the goal one wishes to achieve in designing a spintronic device but note that only the exchange spring presently offers an experimentally realizable magnetic profile that is tunable.

  12. Many-body position operator in lattice fermionic systems with periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetenyi, Balazs [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Mathematisches Institut, Fakultaet fuer Mathematik, Informatik und Statistik, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 39, Muenchen 80333 (Germany)], E-mail: hetenyi@itp.tugraz.at

    2009-10-16

    A total position operator X in the position representation is derived for lattice fermionic systems with periodic boundary conditions. The operator is shown to be Hermitian, the generator of translations in momentum space, and its time derivative is shown to correspond to the total current operator in a periodic system. The operator is such that its moments can be calculated up to any order. To demonstrate its utility finite size scaling is applied to the Brinkman-Rice transition as well as to metallic and insulating Gutzwiller wavefunctions. (fast track communication)

  13. Modelling the upwelling offthe east Hainan Island coast in summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Peng; Gu, Yanzhen; Li, Peiliang; Wu, Kejian

    2016-03-01

    A synoptic-scale upwelling event that developed offthe east coast of the Hainan Island (EHIU) in the summer of 2010 is defined well via processing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sea surface temperature (SST) data. The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) with high spatial resolution has been used to investigate this upwelling event. By comparing the ROMS results against tide station data, Argo float profiles and MODIS SST, it is confirmed that the ROMS reproduces the EHIU well. The cooler-water core (CWC) distinguished by waters stress curl that dominated the east Qiongzhou Strait mouth area suppressed the intensity of the CWC by 0.2-0.4°C. Further, nonlinear interaction between tidal currents and wind stress enhanced vertical mixing greatly, which would benefit the development of the CWC.

  14. Lagrangian studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing relationships in a coastal upwelling ecosystem off Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael R.; Ohman, Mark D.; Goericke, Ralf; Stukel, Michael R.; Tsyrklevich, Kate

    2009-12-01

    Experimental studies of phytoplankton growth and grazing processes were conducted in the coastal upwelling system off Point Conception, California to test the hypothesis that phytoplankton growth and grazing losses determine, to first order, the local dynamics of phytoplankton in the upwelling circulation. Eight experiments of 3-5 days each were conducted over the course of two cruises in May-June 2006 and April 2007 following the trajectories of satellite-tracked drifters. Rates of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing were determined by daily in situ dilution incubations at 8 depths spanning the euphotic zone. Mesozooplankton grazing was assessed by gut fluorescence analysis of animals collected from net tows through the euphotic zone. We compared directly the net rates of change observed for the ambient phytoplankton community to the net growth rates predicted from experimental determinations of each process rate. The resulting relationship accounted for 91% of the variability observed, providing strong support for the growth-grazing hypothesis. In addition, grazing by mesozooplankton was unexpectedly high and variable, driving a substantial positive to negative shift in phytoplankton net rate of change between years despite comparable environmental conditions and similar high growth rates and suggesting strong top-down control potential. The demonstrated agreement between net ambient and experimental community changes is an important point of validation for using field data to parameterize models. Data sets of this type may provide an important source of new information and rate constraints for developing better coupled biological-physical models of upwelling system dynamics.

  15. An Examination of the Effect of Boundary Layer Ingestion on Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, James L.; Kim, Huyn Dae; Brown, Gerald V.; Chu, Julio

    2011-01-01

    A Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) system differs from other propulsion systems by the use of electrical power to transmit power from the turbine to the fan. Electrical power can be efficiently transmitted over longer distances and with complex topologies. Also the use of power inverters allows the generator and motors speeds to be independent of one another. This decoupling allows the aircraft designer to place the core engines and the fans in locations most advantageous for each. The result can be very different installation environments for the different devices. Thus the installation effects on this system can be quite different than conventional turbofans where the fan and core both see the same installed environments. This paper examines a propulsion system consisting of two superconducting generators, each driven by a turboshaft engine located so that their inlets ingest freestream air, superconducting electrical transmission lines, and an array of superconducting motor driven fan positioned across the upper/rear fuselage area of a hybrid wing body aircraft in a continuous nacelle that ingests all of the upper fuselage boundary layer. The effect of ingesting the boundary layer on the design of the system with a range of design pressure ratios is examined. Also the impact of ingesting the boundary layer on off-design performance is examined. The results show that when examining different design fan pressure ratios it is important to recalculate of the boundary layer mass-average Pt and MN up the height for each inlet height during convergence of the design point for each fan design pressure ratio examined. Correct estimation of off-design performance is dependent on the height of the column of air measured from the aircraft surface immediately prior to any external diffusion that will flow through the fan propulsors. The mass-averaged Pt and MN calculated for this column of air determine the Pt and MN seen by the propulsor inlet. Since the height

  16. Boundary Wall Shear Measurement with an Automated LDV-Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarress, Darius; Jeon, David; Svitek, Pavel; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Wall shear stress is one of the most important measurements in boundary layer flows. Getting wall shear measurements is generally quite difficult due to the need to measure very close to the wall, where poor optical access, particle seeding, and wall effects can bias the results. To simplify that process, a novel system was developed by Measurement Science Enterprise (MSE). The microPro consists of a 12 mm diameter miniLDV attached to a micro-translation stage assembled inside a sealed housing. The microPro automatically locates the wall and measures the mean flow speed profile from a point as close as 50 microns from the window. Accurate estimate of the mean wall shear is obtained from the calculation of the wall velocity gradient obtained from the velocity profile data. We measured wall shear stress on a boundary layer plate mounted in a water tunnel across a range of Reynolds numbers and compared the results against skin friction coefficient models. We also introduced bubbles into the boundary layer to measure the change in wall shear stress with changing void fraction. The measurements show good agreement with established data. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research (Grant ONR-N00014-11-1-0031) and MSE.

  17. Methane emissions from the upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kock

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Coastal upwelling regions have been indentified as sites of enhanced CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The coastal upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa is one of the most biologically productive regions of the world's ocean but its CH4 emissions have not been quantified so far. More than 1000 measurements of atmospheric and dissolved CH4 in the surface layer in the upwelling area off Mauritania were performed as part of the German SOPRAN (Surface Ocean Processes in the Anthropocene study during two cruises in March/April 2005 (P320/1 and February 2007 (P348. During P348 enhanced CH4 saturations of up to 179% were found close to the coast and were associated with upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water. An area-weighted, seasonally adjusted estimate yielded overall annual CH4 emissions in the range from 0.7 to 1.4 Gg CH4. Thus the upwelling area off Mauritania represents a regional hot spot of CH4 emissions but seems to be of minor importance for the global oceanic CH4 emissions.

  18. Chemical hydrography of coastal upwelling in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Baodong; WANG Xiulin

    2007-01-01

    Based on the field data obtained during cruises on the shelf of the East China Sea from 1997 to 1999, seasonal variations of coastal upwelling on the inner shelf are discussed by using cross-shelf transect profiles and horizontal distributions of chemical and hydrographic variables. Results show that the coastal upwelling was year-round, but the areas and intensities of the upwelling were quite different in season. The coastal upwelling occurred in all of the coastal areas of the region in spring and summer, but in autumn only in the area off Zhejiang Province, and in winter in the area off Fujian Province. It was the strongest in summer and the weakest in winter. Geographically, it was the strongest in the area off Zhejiang Province and the weakest in the southmost or northmost parts of the East China Sea.The estimated nutrient fluxes upward into euphotic zone through coastal upwelling were quite large, especially for phosphate, which contributed significantly to primary production and improved the nutrient structure of the coastal ecosystem in the East China Sea.

  19. Methane emissions from the upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kock

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Coastal upwelling regions have been identified as sites of enhanced CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The coastal upwelling area off Mauritania (NW Africa is one of the most biologically productive regions of the world's ocean but its CH4 emissions have not been quantified so far. More than 1000 measurements of atmospheric and dissolved CH4 in the surface layer in the upwelling area off Mauritania were performed as part of the German SOPRAN (Surface Ocean Processes in the Anthropocene study during two cruises in March/April 2005 (P320/1 and February 2007 (P348. During P348 enhanced CH4 saturations of up to 200% were found close to the coast and were associated with upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water. An area-weighted, seasonally adjusted estimate yielded overall annual CH4 emissions in the range from 1.6 to 2.9 Gg CH4. Thus the upwelling area off Mauritania represents a regional hot spot of CH4 emissions but seems to be of minor importance for the global oceanic CH4 emissions.

  20. New microprofiling and micro sampling system for water saturated environmental boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, Anne-Lena; Duester, Lars; Ecker, Dennis; Ternes, Thomas A

    2014-07-15

    The spatial high resolution of a microprofiling system was combined with the multi element capability of ICP-MS to enable a better understanding of element distributions and related processes across environmental boundary layers. A combination of a microprofiling system with a new micro filtration probe head connected to a pump and a fraction collector (microprofiling and micro sampling system, missy) is presented. This enables for the first time a direct, dynamic, and high resolution automatic sampling of small water volumes (system as well as (iv) exemplary results of a sediment water interface are delivered. On the basis of this, potentials, possible sources of errors, and future applications of the new missy are discussed.

  1. Solution Transformations and Their Effects on the Systems with Open Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Guo-Xing; ZHAO Xian-Lin

    2002-01-01

    The solution transformations and properties of the R-matrices for two-component systems uner these transformations are analyzed in details.Not all transformed R-matrices can be put into the Skalyanin's formalism.For those R-matrices with all required properties,the effects of solution transformations to the six- and eight-vertex systems with open boundary conditions are discussed.These effects can be one of the following types: The Hamiltonian is invariant or transposition-invariant or made in a similarity transformation,or its coupling coefficients are multiplied by an overall factor,or the spin of the system is rotated around the z axis or/and reflected with respect to some plane.In these cases,the transformed systems remain to be integrable.

  2. Isotopic and enzymatic analyses of planktonic nitrogen utilisation in the vicinity of Cape Sines (Portugal) during weak upwelling activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawyk, Gerd; Coste, Bernard; Collos, Yves; Rodier, Martine

    1997-01-01

    ) absolute and Chl a-specific nitrate uptake rates (10.4 nM h -1, 7.5 nmol μ -1 h -1) compared to the mean rates during weak upwelling (1.7 nM h -1, 1.5 nmol μ -1 h -1). From a comparison with the neighbouring Moroccan upwelling, it is assumed that new production in the Portuguese upwelling averages 50 nM h -1. Thus, this upwelling would rank with the northwest African upwelling system off Cape Blanc or with the Californian upwelling at Point Conception for the capacity of new production, but seems to be much less efficient (seven-fold) than the highly permanent Peru upwelling.

  3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOGISTIC STRATEGY IN THE BOUNDARIES OF LOGISTIC BUSINESS PROCESS IMPROVEMENT OF ENERGY SYSTEM COMPANIES

    OpenAIRE

    Sankov, V.; Tayakina, E.

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the problems concerning the methods of logistic strategy development in the boundaries of logistic business process improvement of energy system companies. It is stated that logistic methods in solving the strategy problems are important.

  4. Boundary of the area contributing flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set defines the boundary of the area contributing ground-water flow to the Death Valley regional ground-water flow-system (DVRFS) model domain....

  5. On the Existence of Hydrodynamic Instability in Single Diffusive Bottom Heavy Systems with Permeable Boundaries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Gupta; R G Shandil

    2011-11-01

    We utilize the reformulated equations of the classical theory, as derived by Banerjee et al.(J. Math. Anal. Appl. 175 (1993) 458), to establish mathematically, the existence of hydrodynamic instability in single diffusive bottom heavy systems, when considered in the more general framework of the boundary conditions of the type specified by Beavers and Joseph (J. Fluid Mech. 30 (1967) 197), in the parameter regime $T_0_2>1$, where $T_0$ and 2 being some properly chosen mean temperature and coefficient of specific heat (at constant volume) variation due to temperature variation respectively.

  6. A computer program for generating two-dimensional boundary-fitted orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche `Ezio Clementel`, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1997-11-01

    A numerical method is described which generates an orthogonal curvilinear mesh, subject to the constraint that mesh lines are matched to all boundaries of a closed, simply connected two-dimensional region of arbitrary shape. The method is based on the solution, by an iterative finite-difference technique, of an elliptic differential system of equations for the Cartesian coordinates of the orthogonal grid nodes. The interior grid distribution is controlled by a technique which ensures that coordinate lines can be concentrated as desired. Examples of orthogonal meshes inscribed in various geometrical figures are included.

  7. Analisys of Hamiltonian Boundary Value Methods (HBVMs) for the numerical solution of polynomial Hamiltonian dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brugnano, Luigi; Trigiante, Donato

    2009-01-01

    One main issue, when numerically integrating autonomous Hamiltonian systems, is the long-term conservation of some of its invariants, among which the Hamiltonian function itself. For example, it is well known that standard (even symplectic) methods can only exactly preserve quadratic Hamiltonians. In this paper, a new family of methods, called Hamiltonian Boundary Value Methods (HBVMs), is introduced and analyzed. HBVMs are able to exactly preserve, in the discrete solution, Hamiltonian functions of polynomial type of arbitrarily high degree. These methods turn out to be symmetric, perfectly $A$-stable, and can have arbitrarily high order. A few numerical tests confirm the theoretical results.

  8. Influence of upwelling saline groundwater on iron and manganese cycling in the Rio Grande floodplain aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Matthew F. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: matthew.f.kirk@gmail.com; Crossey, Laura J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Newell, Dennis L. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bowman, Robert S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Salinity contributions from upwelling groundwater significantly degrade water quality in the Rio Grande, a major source of water for the southwestern USA. This study considers the influence of this upwelling water on the geochemistry and microbiology of the Rio Grande floodplain alluvial aquifer. The composition of surface water, groundwater, and floodplain sediment samples collected from three transects in the Socorro Basin was examined. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was also used to examine microbial biomass samples. The distribution of salinity in the floodplain groundwater largely reflects the configuration of local groundwater flow and mixing of two major water sources, deeply-sourced saline groundwater and river water. Microbial populations in the shallow aquifer consume O{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} and serve to redistribute metal oxides from the saturated zone to locations of groundwater discharge at the surface and possibly near the water table. The upwelling saline groundwater affects floodplain microbial processes by transporting reduced metals and organic electron donors to the alluvial aquifer system. This enhances metal reduction in the saturated zone and ultimately metal oxidation at or near the surface. Geochemical modeling suggests that mixing of the saline groundwater with more dilute water in the floodplain creates conditions more favorable for metal oxidation to occur and thereby influences the distribution of metal oxides.

  9. Defining Hydrogeological Boundaries for Mountain Front Recharge (MFR) Predictions in Multi-Catchment Mountainous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson-Welch, L. A.; Allen, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Cross-catchment groundwater flow in mountainous watersheds results from the development of local, intermediate, and regional groundwater flow pathways in multi-catchment systems. As such, hydrogeological analysis (e.g. water balance calculations and numerical modelling) to assess contributions of groundwater to mountain front recharge (MFR) must consider the choice of boundaries based on hydrological divides. Numerical 3-dimensional hydrogeological modelling was completed using FeFlow (DHI-WASY), for conceptual regional-scale multi-catchment systems; extending from a watershed boundary to a mountain front. The modelled systems were designed to represent major ridge and valley configurations observed in mountainous watersheds including: nested, adjacent, disconnected, non-parallel, and parallel catchments. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity scenarios were simulated; with the heterogeneous scenario including a shallow zone of higher hydraulic conductivity bedrock overlying less permeable bedrock. The influence of cross-catchment flow in the development of groundwater flow pathways contributing to MFR was examined. The results provide a basis for identifying topographic scenarios where contributions to MFR may originate outside hydrological divides. This understanding will contribute to improving MFR predictions using both the numerical modelling approach and the water balance approach.

  10. Numerical bifurcation diagram for the two-dimensional boundary-fed chlorine-dioxide–iodine–malonic-acid system

    OpenAIRE

    Setayeshgar, S.; Cross, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    We present a numerical solution of the chlorine-dioxide–iodine–malonic-acid reaction-diffusion system in two dimensions in a boundary-fed system using a realistic model. The bifurcation diagram for the transition from nonsymmetry-breaking structures along boundary feed gradients to transverse symmetry-breaking patterns in a single layer is numerically determined. We find this transition to be discontinuous. We make a connection with earlier results and discuss prospects for future work.

  11. Why productive upwelling areas are often sources rather than sinks of CO2? – a comparative study on eddy upwellings in the South China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jiao

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine upwelling regions are known to be productive in carbon fixation and thus thought to be sinks of CO2, whereas many upwelling areas in the ocean are actually sources rather than sinks of CO2. To address this paradox, multiple biogeochemical parameters were investigated at two cyclonic-eddy-induced upwelling sites CE1 and CE2 in the western South China Sea. The results showed that upwelling can exert significant influences on biological activities in the euphotic zone and can either increase or decrease particulate organic carbon (POC export flux depending on upwelling conditions such as the magnitude, timing, and duration of nutrient input and consequent microbial activities. At CE2 the increase of phytoplankton biomass caused by the upwelled nutrients resulted in increase of POC export flux compared to non-eddy reference sites, while at CE1 the microbial respiration of organic carbon stimulated by the upwelled nutrients significantly contributed to the attenuation of POC export flux, aggravating outgassing of CO2. These results suggest that on top of upwelled dissolved inorganic carbon release, microbial activities stimulated by upwelled nutrients and phytoplankton labile organic carbon can play a critical role for a marine upwelling area to be a source rather than a sink of CO2. Meanwhile, we point out that even though an upwelling region is outgassing, carbon sequestration still takes place through the POC-based biological pump as well as the refractory dissolved organic carbon (RDOC-based microbial carbon pump.

  12. Mn seasonal upwellings recorded in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Langlet

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of anoxic deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a 2-years-long geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were put in perspective against laser ablation ICP-MS profiles of Mn in five aragonitic shells from the same lake location. Skeletal Mn profiles in 3 shells are very similar and dominated by episodic peaks that matched the Mn increase recorded in surface waters during the 2002 upwelling, while a shell collected during 2003 dry season detect both 2002 and 2003 upwelling events. Larger shells showing an extremely reduced growth display more than 8Mn peaks suggesting at least an 8 years record of seasonal changes in water composition.

  13. Modelling Upwelling Irradiance using Secchi disk depth in lake ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio ROSSI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple model for upwelling irradiance has been developed. The model represents the relationship between Photosynthetically Active Radiation diffuse attenuation coefficients and Secchi disk depth described with a physical-mathematical expression. This physical mathematical expression allows the evaluation of the sub surface upwelling irradiance that was generated by the interaction between downwelling irradiance and the water column. The validation of the relation was performed using experimental data collected from five different aquatic ecosystems at different latitudes, solar elevations and irradiance levels. We found a good linear, positive correlation between the theoretical and measured upwelling irradiance (R2 = 0.96. The residues were well distributed, around the null value, according a Gaussian curve (R2 = 0.92. The results confirm the importance and the versatility of the Secchi disk measurements for aquatic optics.

  14. Mn seasonal upwellings recorded in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlet, D.; Alleman, L. Y.; Plisnier, P.-D.; Hughes, H.; André, L.

    2006-09-01

    Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of anoxic deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a 2-years-long geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were put in perspective against laser ablation ICP-MS profiles of Mn in five aragonitic shells from the same lake location. Skeletal Mn profiles in 3 shells are very similar and dominated by episodic peaks that matched the Mn increase recorded in surface waters during the 2002 upwelling, while a shell collected during 2003 dry season detect both 2002 and 2003 upwelling events. Larger shells showing an extremely reduced growth display more than 8Mn peaks suggesting at least an 8 years record of seasonal changes in water composition.

  15. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance in a nonequilibrium nonhomogeneous atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Subramanian, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of vibrational nonequilibrium upon upwelling infrared radiance from the earth's atmosphere is investigated. By employing the line-by-line model for spectral absorption, heating rates and upwelling radiances are calculated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions in the spectral range of 4.7 micron CO and 3.3 micron CH4 bands. Heating rates are calculated also for the 15 micron CO2 band and are compared with other available results in the literature. For the spectral range of the CO fundamental band, the influence of different parameters on the upwelling radiance is investigated. It is found that for CO the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) is not justified at tropospheric temperatures and pressures. If the resonance effects of CO-N2 collisions are considered, then the assumption of LTE is justified up to 60 kilometers. This information is very useful for measurement of atmospheric pollutants, earth radiation budget studies and climate modeling, and infrared signature works.

  16. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance from earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. K.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Basic equations for calculating the upwelling atmospheric radiation are presented which account for various sources of radiation coming out at the top of the atmosphere. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance models (line-by-line and quasi-random band model) and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittance and radiance are discussed in detail. By employing the Lorentz line-by-line and quasi-random computer programs, model calculations were made to determine the upwelling radiance and signal change in the wave number interval of CO fundamental band. These results are useful in determining the effects of different interfering molecules, water vapor profiles, ground temperatures, and ground emittances on the upwelling radiance and signal change. This information is of vital importance in establishing the feasibility of measuring the concentrations of pollutants in the atmosphere from a gas filter correlation instrument flown on an aircraft or mounted on a satellite.

  17. Dynamics of transient upwelling across the tropical tropopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, W. J.; Abalos, M.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical upwelling is a fundamental component of the stratospheric Brewer Dobson circulation (BDC), influencing temperatures, water vapor and chemical constituents throughout the global stratosphere. There is a substantial component of sub-seasonal variability in upwelling, with strong effects on temperatures and tracers in the tropical lower stratosphere. Upwelling diagnosed using momentum balance calculations from ERAinterim data demonstrate that transience is linked to the effects of extratropical wave forcing, with centers of action in the high latitude winter stratosphere and in the subtropical upper troposphere of both hemispheres. Zonal mean wind tendencies are an important part of communicating the remote wave forcing to the deep tropics. Dynamical patterns reflect clear differences in forcing the shallow vs. deep branches of the BDC; the shallow branch is most correlated with wave forcing in the subtropical upper troposphere, while the deep branch is mainly influenced by high latitude planetary waves.

  18. The Role of Shelf Break Upwelling Along the East Coast of the US in the Coastal Carbon Cycle: A Model's Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, S. A.; Mahadevan, A.; Archer, D.

    2008-12-01

    The coastal ocean is highly productive because it has several sources of nutrients: rivers, sediments and the open ocean. Although the East Coast of the United States is not an upwelling regime, its continental shelf is supplied by nutrients from the open ocean. Instead of traditional upwelling, a persistent front at the continental shelf break regulates the source of nutrients by interactions with the bottom boundary layer and the winds via a mechanism referred to as "shelf break upwelling." Shelf break upwelling also leads to ventilation of carbon dioxide and methane from coastal waters. A three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, 2km resolution model with idealized bathymetry is used to simulate the shelf and shelf-break front circulations of an archetypical passive margin off the eastern coast of the United States. The model is adapted for the coastal setting from a model developed for open ocean fronts after Mahadevan et al, (1996a) and Mahadevan et al, (1996b) and is ground-truthed using data from the Mid- Atlantic Bight. We diagnose the pathways for nutrient supply and ventilation using a series of idealized tracers including nutrient, gas and bottom boundary layer tracers We find that the location of the foot of the front determines the source waters for the shelf break upwelling. In response to Southerly winds, the foot of the front moves onshore. Conversely, the foot moves offshore in response to Northerly winds. Targeted tracer results indicate that the source waters for upwelling depend on the direction of the wind: Southerly winds bring slope bottom water to the shelf, while Northerly winds bring up shelf bottom boundary layer water. The upwelling flux is sensitive to the duration as well as the magnitude of wind events. The physics and geochemistry of the bottom boundary layer and the shelf break front are not resolved in global-scale carbon cycle models, yet they appear to play a strong role in the coastal carbon cycle. Mahadevan, A., J. Oliger, and R

  19. THE ARTIFICIAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS FOR NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE COMPLEX AMPLITUDE IN A COUPLED BAY-RIVER SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou-de Han; Xin Wen

    2004-01-01

    We consider the numerical approximations of the complex amplitude in a coupled bay-river system in this work. One half-circumference is introduced as the artificial boundary in the open sea, and one segment is introduced as the artificial boundary in the river if the river is semi-infinite. On the artificial boundary a sequence of high-order artificial boundary conditions are proposed. Then the original problem is solved in a finite computational domain, which is equivalent to a variational problem. The numerical approximations for the original problem are obtained by solving the variational problem with the finite element method. The numerical examples show that the artificial boundary conditions given in this work are very effective.

  20. Solution of linear systems in arterial fluid mechanics computations with boundary layer mesh refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manguoglu, Murat; Takizawa, Kenji; Sameh, Ahmed H.; Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    2009-10-01

    Computation of incompressible flows in arterial fluid mechanics, especially because it involves fluid-structure interaction, poses significant numerical challenges. Iterative solution of the fluid mechanics part of the equation systems involved is one of those challenges, and we address that in this paper, with the added complication of having boundary layer mesh refinement with thin layers of elements near the arterial wall. As test case, we use matrix data from stabilized finite element computation of a bifurcating middle cerebral artery segment with aneurysm. It is well known that solving linear systems that arise in incompressible flow computations consume most of the time required by such simulations. For solving these large sparse nonsymmetric systems, we present effective preconditioning techniques appropriate for different stages of the computation over a cardiac cycle.

  1. Coefficient of Variation Estimates for the Plate Boundary Fault System of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasi, G. P.; Scharer, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The number of high-quality paleoseismic records on major strike-slip faults of California has increased in recent years to the point that patterns in earthquake recurrence are emerging. The degree of predictability in time intervals between ground-rupturing earthquakes can be measured by the CoV (coefficient of variation). The CoV approximately normalizes for mean recurrence, and is thus useful to isolate the temporal variability of earthquake records. CoV estimates are themselves uncertain because input dates are actually probability distributions and because paleoseismic records are short and not necessarily representative samples from the underlying recurrence distribution. Radiocarbon dating uncertainty can be incorporated by sampling from event PDFs and compiling sample CoV estimates. Uncertainty due to the brevity of the site event record is larger, and neglect of it can lead to improbable estimates. Long records are now available on the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in Southern California, and the San Andreas and Hayward faults in northern California. These faults accommodate most of the Pacific-North American relative plate motion in their respective regions. CoV estimates from sites with 8 or more events cluster around 0.63, but are as low as 0.4 for the southern Hayward fault. Sites with fewer events give similar estimates, though with lower resolution. The one prominent outlier, Burro Flats, with a CoV near 1.0, is in a region of severe fault complexity and rapid fault-normal compression. Quasi-periodic recurrence is emerging as a general property for these plate boundary faults. Some individual site records allow that, at low probabilities, recurrence could be random in time. When the ensemble is considered together, however, it is improbable that we would see the observed degree of agreement among boundary fault paleoseismic records; the more likely explanation is that quasi-periodic recurrence is a real property of the boundary fault system.

  2. Brunet-Derrida particle systems, free boundary problems and Wiener-Hopf equations

    CERN Document Server

    Durrett, Rick

    2009-01-01

    We consider a branching-selection system in $\\rr$ with $N$ particles which give birth independently at rate 1 and where after each birth the leftmost particle is erased, keeping the number of particles constant. We show that, as $N\\to\\infty$, the empirical measure process associated to the system converges in distribution to a deterministic measure-valued process whose densities solve a free boundary integro-differential equation. We also show that this equation has a unique traveling wave solution traveling at speed $c$ or no such solution depending on whether $c>a$ or $c\\leq a$, where $a$ is the asymptotic speed of the branching random walk obtained by ignoring the removal of the leftmost particles in our process. The traveling wave solutions correspond to solutions of Wiener-Hopf equations.

  3. Numerical continuation methods for dynamical systems path following and boundary value problems

    CERN Document Server

    Krauskopf, Bernd; Galan-Vioque, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Path following in combination with boundary value problem solvers has emerged as a continuing and strong influence in the development of dynamical systems theory and its application. It is widely acknowledged that the software package AUTO - developed by Eusebius J. Doedel about thirty years ago and further expanded and developed ever since - plays a central role in the brief history of numerical continuation. This book has been compiled on the occasion of Sebius Doedel''s 60th birthday. Bringing together for the first time a large amount of material in a single, accessible source, it is hoped that the book will become the natural entry point for researchers in diverse disciplines who wish to learn what numerical continuation techniques can achieve. The book opens with a foreword by Herbert B. Keller and lecture notes by Sebius Doedel himself that introduce the basic concepts of numerical bifurcation analysis. The other chapters by leading experts discuss continuation for various types of systems and objects ...

  4. On the Boundaries of Trust and Security in Computing and Communications Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib Khan

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes trust and security in computing and communications systems. While in human-life, trust usually has some kind of commonly understood meaning, in the realm of computing and communications systems, it could be interpreted differently in different environments and settings. On the other hand, security is about making sure that the participating entities are legitimate in a communication event or incident so that the core requirements of privacy, integrity, and authenticity are maintained. This notion is also true for our human life, even for example entering a house needs legitimacy of a person. Some boundary lines preserve the security; otherwise an unwanted access is called a 'security breach'. The intent of this article is to compare and discuss these two terms with our societal behavior and understanding amongst entities. To illustrate these issues especially in computing and communications world, some of the innovating and recent technologies are discussed which demand trust and securit...

  5. THE UPWIND FINITE DIFFERENCE METHOD FOR MOVING BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM OF COUPLED SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yirang

    2011-01-01

    Coupled system of multilayer dynamics of fluids in porous media is to describe the history of oil-gas transport and accumulation in basin evolution. It is of great value in rational evaluation of prospecting and exploiting oil-gas resources. The mathematical model can be described as a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations with moving boundary values. The upwind finite difference schemes applicable to parallel arith- metic are put forward and two-dimensional and three-dimensional schemes are used to form a complete set. Some techniques, such as change of variables, calculus of variations, multiplicative commutation rule of difference operators, decomposition of high order dif- ference operators and prior estimates, are adopted. The estimates in 12 norm are derived to determine the error in the approximate solution. This method was already applied to the numerical simulation of migration-accumulation of oil resources.

  6. Open Innovation and the Erosion of the Traditional Information Systems Project's Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbanna, Amany

    This paper examines the notion of open innovation and its implication on information systems management. It investigates a project of an enterprise resource planning system implementation in an international organization to unravel the resemblance with the open innovation model. The study shows that the conceptualization of ERP project as an open innovation could reveal the complex architecture of today's organization from which the ERP project cannot be isolated. It argues that the traditional boundaries around IS projects are dissolving and the relationship between what used to be outside and what used to be inside the project is increasingly blurred. The study calls for a different perspective of project management that goes beyond single and multiple project management to scan the open space of innovation and actively look for partners, competitors, and collaborators.

  7. Dynamical property of nucleation in spin crossover depending on the system boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Masamichi [Computational Materials Science Center, National Institute of Material Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Boukheddaden, Kamel; Varret, Francois [Groupe d' Etudes de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS-Universite de Versailles/St. Quentin en Yvelines, F78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Miyashita, Seiji, E-mail: nishino.masamichi@nims.go.j [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    We investigate dynamical properties of nucleation from a photoinduced excited high-spin state. Applying a molecular dynamics method to a model with elastic interactions, we found that the boundary condition plays an important role in the nucleation. Different from the periodic boundary, in which no clustering occurs, when the boundary is open, clustering tends to occur from the boundary. It can induce domain structures as phase separation.

  8. UPWELLING AND SEDIMENTATION DYNAMICS Ⅲ: COINCIDENCE OF UPWELLING AREAS WITH MUD PATCHES IN NORTH HEMISPHERE SHELF SEAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞重光; 胡敦欣

    2002-01-01

    The determinant role of upwelling in fine sediment patches is examined from the viewpoints of physical process and biological process respectively. It is pointed out that physical and biological processes are usually coexistent and interact with each other during the sedimentation of suspended matters. This study used available figures showing the circulation pattern and surface sediment distribution in the whole China Seas, the Gulf of Maine, the Irish Sea and the North Sea, and additional data to verify that wherever upwelling exists on the continental shelf, mud must occur; and that wherever downwelling occurs, coarse sediment substitutes for mud.

  9. Computational Investigation of a Boundary-Layer Ingesting Propulsion System for the Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Brennan T.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Schmitz, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines potential propulsive and aerodynamic benefits of integrating a Boundary-Layer Ingestion (BLI) propulsion system into a typical commercial aircraft using the Common Research Model (CRM) geometry and the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System (TetrUSS). The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment is used to generate engine conditions for CFD analysis. Improvements to the BLI geometry are made using the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. Previous studies have shown reductions of up to 25% in terms of propulsive power required for cruise for other axisymmetric geometries using the BLI concept. An analysis of engine power requirements, drag, and lift coefficients using the baseline and BLI geometries coupled with the NPSS model are shown. Potential benefits of the BLI system relating to cruise propulsive power are quantified using a power balance method, and a comparison to the baseline case is made. Iterations of the BLI geometric design are shown and any improvements between subsequent BLI designs presented. Simulations are conducted for a cruise flight condition of Mach 0.85 at an altitude of 38,500 feet and an angle of attack of 2 deg for all geometries. A comparison between available wind tunnel data, previous computational results, and the original CRM model is presented for model verification purposes along with full results for BLI power savings. Results indicate a 14.4% reduction in engine power requirements at cruise for the BLI configuration over the baseline geometry. Minor shaping of the aft portion of the fuselage using CDISC has been shown to increase the benefit from Boundary-Layer Ingestion further, resulting in a 15.6% reduction in power requirements for cruise as well as a drag reduction of eighteen counts over the baseline geometry.

  10. Bifurcations of Eigenvalues of Gyroscopic Systems with Parameters Near Stability Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seyranian, Alexander P.; Kliem, Wolfhard

    1999-01-01

    . It is shown that the bifurcation (splitting) of double eigenvalues is closely related to the stability, flutter and divergence boundaries in the parameter space. Normal vectors to these boundaries are derived using only information at a boundary point: eigenvalues, eigenvectors and generalized eigenvectors...

  11. Influence of monsoon upwelling on the planktonic foraminifera off Oman during Late Quaternary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Planktonic foraminifer abundances, fluxes, test sizes, and coiling properties are influenced in various ways by the southwest monsoon winds and associated upwelling in the western Arabian Sea. The influence of monsoon driven upwelling...

  12. Distributed Plate Boundary Deformation Across the San Andreas Fault System, Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, M.; Titus, S. J.; Demets, C.; Tikoff, B.

    2007-12-01

    Plate boundaries are now recognized as broad zones of complex deformation as opposed to narrow zones with discrete offsets. When assessing how plate boundary deformation is accommodated, both spatially and temporally, it is therefore crucial to understand the relative contribution of the discrete and distributed components of deformation. The creeping segment of the San Andreas fault is an ideal location to study the distribution of plate boundary deformation for several reasons. First, the geometry of the fault system in central California is relatively simple. Plate motion is dominated by slip along the relatively linear strike-slip San Andreas fault, but also includes lesser slip along the adjacent and parallel Hosgri-San Gregorio and Rinconada faults, as well as within the borderlands between the three fault strands. Second, the aseismic character of the San Andreas fault in this region allows for the application of modern geodetic techniques to assess creep rates along the fault and across the region. Third, geologic structures within the borderlands are relatively well-preserved allowing comparison between modern and ancient rates and styles of deformation. Continuous GPS stations, alignment arrays surveys, and other geodetic methods demonstrate that approximately 5 mm/yr of distributed slip is accumulated (on top of the fault slip rate) across a 70-100 km wide region centered on the San Andreas fault. New campaign GPS data also suggest 2-5 mm/yr of deformation in the borderlands. These rates depend on the magnitude of the coseismic and postseismic corrections that must be made to our GPS time series to compensate for the 2003 San Simeon and 2004 Parkfield earthquakes, which rupture faults outside, but near the edges of our GPS network. The off-fault deformation pattern can be compared to the style of permanent deformation recorded in the geologic record. Fold and thrust belts in the borderlands are better developed in the Tertiary sedimentary rocks west of

  13. Tracer dynamics in a single-file system with absorbing boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, Artem; Chvosta, Petr

    2014-02-01

    The paper addresses the single-file diffusion in the presence of an absorbing boundary. The emphasis is on an interplay between the hard-core interparticle interaction and the absorption process. The resulting dynamics exhibits several qualitatively new features. First, starting with the exact probability density function for a given particle (a tracer), we study the long-time asymptotics of its moments. Both the mean position and the mean-square displacement are controlled by dynamical exponents which depend on the initial order of the particle in the file. Second, conditioning on nonabsorption, we study the distribution of long-living particles. In the conditioned framework, the dynamical exponents are the same for all particles, however, a given particle possesses an effective diffusion coefficient which depends on its initial order. After performing the thermodynamic limit, the conditioned dynamics of the tracer is subdiffusive, the generalized diffusion coefficient D(1/2) being different from that reported for the system without absorbing boundary.

  14. LIFE-SPAN OF CLASSICAL SOLUTIONS OF INITIAL-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR FIRST ORDER QUASILINEAR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Hong

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the mixed initial-boundary value problem for quasilinear hyperbolic systems with nonlinear boundary conditions in a half-unbounded domain {(t, x)| t ≥ 0, x≥ 0}. Under the assumption that the positive eigenvalues are not all weakly linearly degenerate,we obtain the blow-up phenomenon of the first order derivatives of C1 solution with small and decaying initial data. We also give precise estimate of the life-span of C1 solution.

  15. Coastal upwelling observed by multi-satellite sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiaoMing; LI XiaoFeng; HE MingXia

    2009-01-01

    Coastal upwelling phenomenon along the China coast in the Yellow Sea during August 2007 is studied using ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data, NOAA Advanced AVHRR series Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data, and NASA QuikSCAT Scatterometer ocean surface wind data. A dark pattern in an ASAR image is interpreted as coastal upwelling. This is because the natural biogenic slicks associated with coastal upwelling damp the Bragg waves on the sea surface and thus make the surface smoother. Most of the incoming radar energy is reflected in the forward direction. As a result, the radar backscatter signal is very weak. Analyzing the concurrent AVHRR SST Image, we find that the dark pattern in the ASAR image is indeed corresponding to the low SST area. The wind retrieval in the slicks dominant region is biased due to the low Normaliced Radar Cross Section (NRCS) associated with the coastal upwelling. We applied a SST correction to the NRCS values to improve the accuracy of wind retrieval from ASAR data.

  16. Upwelling O(+) ion source characteristics. [in polar magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Lockwood, M.; Chandler, M. O.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Chappell, C. R.; Persoon, A.; Sugiura, M.

    1986-01-01

    The characteristics of an upwelling ion source are discussed. A typical upwelling event is analyzed using Dynamic Explorer 1 satellite retarding ion mass spectrometer (RIMS) observations of the low-energy plasma, and energetic ion and local electromagnetic field observations. The RIMS spectrograms of the O(+) ion species, radial and axial head data for O(+), and spin plan O(+) distribution functions are examined. The features of the upwelling observed include: (1) transverse ion heating to temperature of 100,000 K, (2) large outward flows of O(+), (3) enhanced flow of H(+) and He (+), (4) moderately strong field-aligned current sheets, (5) an associated intense eastward convection channel, and (6) strong wave emissions in the range near and below the proton gyrofrequency. The association between the upwelling O(+) signature and auroral current is investigated. Plasma wave and electric field environments are studied and plasma flows and densities are derived. It is noted that the mechanism for ion heating which defines the source region for these polar ion outflows is related to field-aligned currents and an associated auroral convection channel or jet.

  17. Evaluation of upwelling infrared radiance from the earth's troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Gupta, S. K.

    1976-01-01

    Basic equations for calculating the upwelling atmospheric radiance are presented. Theoretical formulation of the transmittance models (line-by-line and quasi-random band) and computational procedures for the evaluation of transmittance and radiance are discussed. This information is useful in the interpretation of the data obtained from measuring gaseous pollutants in the troposphere.

  18. Coastal upwelling observed by multi-satellite sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Coastal upwelling phenomenon along the China coast in the Yellow Sea during August 2007 is studied using ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) data, NOAA Advanced AVHRR series Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data,and NASA QuikSCAT Scatterometer ocean surface wind data. A dark pattern in an ASAR image is interpreted as coastal upwelling. This is because the natural biogenic slicks associated with coastal upwelling damp the Bragg waves on the sea surface and thus make the surface smoother. Most of the incoming radar energy is reflected in the forward direction. As a result, the radar backscatter signal is very weak. Analyzing the concurrent AVHRR SST image, we find that the dark pattern in the ASAR image is indeed corresponding to the low SST area. The wind retrieval in the slicks dominant region is biased due to the low Normalised Radar Cross Section (NRCS) associated with the coastal upwelling. We applied a SST correction to the NRCS values to improve the accuracy of wind retrieval from ASAR data.

  19. Coastal upwelling activity on the Pacific shelf of the Baja California Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    O. Zaytsev; Cervantes Duarte, Rafael; Montante, Orzo; Gallegos García, A.

    2003-01-01

    High primary productivity on the Pacific coast of the Baja California Peninsula is usually related to coastal upwelling activity that injects nutrients into the euphotic zone in response to prevailing longshore winds (from the northwest to north). The upwelling process has maximum intensity from April to June, with the coastal upwelling index varying from 50 to 300 m3/s per 100 m of coastline. Along the entire coast of the peninsula, the upwelling intensity changes in accordance with local wi...

  20. Variability in upwelling across the tropical tropopause and correlations with tracers in the lower stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abalos; W. J. Randel; E. Serrano

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variability of the upwelling near the tropical tropopause on daily to annual timescales is investigated using three different estimates computed from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. These include upwelling archived by the reanalysis, plus estimates derived from thermodynamic and momentum balance calculations. Substantial variability in upwelling is observed on both seasonal and sub-seasonal timescales, and the three estimates show reasonably good agreement. Tropical upwelling should exer...

  1. Mechanisms of near-surface current and upwelling variability in the tropical Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Hüttl, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    The upwelling regions of the eastern equatorial oceans provide not only sources of cold water in a relatively warm environment but also influence the atmospheric circulation and the biological productivity in the tropics. However, the sources of the upwelling waters are well known only for the equatorial upwelling but remained unclear for the off-equatorial upwelling in the Guinea and Angola Dome. A main aspect of this work is to contribute to the understanding of the mean pathways into these...

  2. Variability in upwelling across the tropical tropopause and correlations with tracers in the lower stratosphere

    OpenAIRE

    M. Abalos; W. J. Randel; E. Serrano

    2012-01-01

    Temporal variability of the upwelling near the tropical tropopause on daily to annual timescales is investigated using three different estimates computed from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. These include upwelling archived by the reanalysis, plus estimates derived from thermodynamic and momentum balance calculations. Substantial variability in upwelling is observed on both seasonal and sub-seasonal time scales, and the three estimates show reasonably good agreement. Tropical upwelling sho...

  3. Strongly coupled dynamics of fluids and rigid-body systems with the immersed boundary projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengjie; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2015-08-01

    A strong coupling algorithm is presented for simulating the dynamic interactions between incompressible viscous flows and rigid-body systems in both two- and three-dimensional problems. In this work, the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow are solved on a uniform Cartesian grid by the vorticity-based immersed boundary projection method of Colonius and Taira. Dynamical equations for arbitrary rigid-body systems are also developed. The proposed coupling method attempts to unify the treatment of constraints in the fluid and structure-the incompressibility of the fluid, the linkages in the rigid-body system, and the conditions at the interface-through the use of Lagrange multipliers. The resulting partitioned system of equations is solved with a simple relaxation scheme, based on an identification of virtual inertia from the fluid. The scheme achieves convergence in only 2 to 5 iterations per time step for a wide variety of mass ratios. The formulation requires that only a subset of the discrete fluid equations be solved in each iteration. Several two- and three-dimensional numerical tests are conducted to validate and demonstrate the method, including a falling cylinder, flapping of flexible wings, self-excited oscillations of a system of many linked plates in a free stream, and passive pivoting of a finite aspect ratio plate under the influence of gravity in a free stream. The results from the current method are compared with previous experimental and numerical results and good agreement is achieved.

  4. Acceleration of multiple solution of a boundary value problem involving a linear algebraic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazizov, Talgat R.; Kuksenko, Sergey P.; Surovtsev, Roman S.

    2016-06-01

    Multiple solution of a boundary value problem that involves a linear algebraic system is considered. New approach to acceleration of the solution is proposed. The approach uses the structure of the linear system matrix. Particularly, location of entries in the right columns and low rows of the matrix, which undergo variation due to the computing in the range of parameters, is used to apply block LU decomposition. Application of the approach is considered on the example of multiple computing of the capacitance matrix by method of moments used in numerical electromagnetics. Expressions for analytic estimation of the acceleration are presented. Results of the numerical experiments for solution of 100 linear systems with matrix orders of 1000, 2000, 3000 and different relations of variated and constant entries of the matrix show that block LU decomposition can be effective for multiple solution of linear systems. The speed up compared to pointwise LU factorization increases (up to 15) for larger number and order of considered systems with lower number of variated entries.

  5. Did Cooling of Subthermocline Waters Help Establish Modern Upwelling Regions? Evidence rom ODP Site 716 in the Indian Ocean: Subthermocline δ18O Record Does Not Exceed General Cooling Trend of the Global Deep Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, S.; Polissar, P. J.; deMenocal, P. B.

    2012-12-01

    The modern Indian Ocean exhibits a strong sea surface temperature gradient between the upwelling zone in the northwest Arabian Sea and the central warm pool. However, during the Pliocene, this temperature difference was essentially nonexistent. The shift in Indian Ocean sea surface temperature patterns parallels those in ocean basins worldwide—modern upwelling zones were dramatically warmer in the Pliocene and cooled around 2 million years ago, which had significant implications for regional precipitation patterns. Whether this cooling was due to stronger upwelling, colder subthermocline waters or other factors is not yet known. We analyzed the δ18O of benthic foraminifera from ODP site 716 in the Indian Ocean to test whether cooling of subthermocline waters contributed to cooling of the Arabian Sea upwelling region. Currently, bottom water at this 533 meter-deep site ventilates the thermocline and eventually upwells in the northwest Arabian Sea. We used the stable oxygen isotopic composition of the benthic foraminifera Uvigerina proboscidea and Cibicidoides spp. to infer changes in the temperature of bottom water at site 716. Our benthic record exhibits a ~1.5‰ secular shift over the past 4.5 million years, indicating cooling of bottom waters. The benthic δ18O trend at site 716 parallels the record from the deep ocean suggesting cooling of shallow waters was comparable to that observed in abyssal waters. The onset of cooling precedes the shift observed in upwelling regions by ~0.5 million years suggesting that colder subsurface waters were not the proximal cause of cooler upwelling regions. Cooler subsurface waters were likely a precondition that primed the system to amplify any changes in upwelling, but increased wind-driven upwelling at 2 million years initiated the establishment of the modern cold upwelling regions.

  6. Formation of magnetic filaments at the boundaries of the magnetospheres of solar system planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory of localized spontaneous reconnection at the boundaries of the magnetospheres of solar-system planets with strong intrinsic magnetic field is given in the paper. Such forms of reconnection (flux transfer events - FTE) resulting in formation of magnetic filaments are observed by sattelites near the magnetosphgeres of Mercury, Earth and Jupiter. The physical factors controlling the temporal and spatial scales of this phenomenon in dependence on the distance from the Sun (the parameters of the solar wind) and the planetary magnetic dipole moment are discussed. the theoretical estimates of characteristic diameters of magnetic filaments λE ∼ 5000 km, λM ∼ 500 km, λJ ∼ 13000 km for the Earth, Mercury and Jupiter agree satisfactorily with the experimental data. In conclusion, the typical FTE parameters for Saturn and some other astrophysical objects are evaluated

  7. ADFE METHOD WITH HIGH ACCURACY FOR NONLINEAR PARABOLIC INTEGRO-DIFFERENTIAL SYSTEM WITH NONLINEAR BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔霞

    2002-01-01

    Alternating direction finite element (ADFE) scheme for d-dimensional nonlinear system of parabolic integro-differential equations is studied. By using a local approximation based on patches of finite elements to treat the capacity term qi(u), decomposition of the coefficient matrix is realized; by using alternating direction, the multi-dimensional problem is reduced to a family of single space variable problems, calculation work is simplified; by using finite element method, high accuracy for space variant is kept; by using inductive hypothesis reasoning, the difficulty coming from the nonlinearity of the coefficients and boundary conditions is treated; by introducing Ritz-Volterra projection, the difficulty coming from the memory term is solved. Finally, by using various techniques for priori estimate for differential equations, the unique resolvability and convergence properties for both FE and ADFE schemes are rigorously demonstrated, and optimal H1 and L2norm space estimates and O((△t)2) estimate for time variant are obtained.

  8. Coupled-rearrangement-channels calculation of the three-body system under the absorbing boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwasaki M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We formulate the absorbing boundary condition (ABC in the coupled rearrangement-channels variational method (CRCVM for the three-body problem. The absorbing potential is introduced in the system of the identical three-bosons, on which the boson symmetry is explicitly imposed by considering the rearrangement channels. The resonance parameters and the strength of the monopole breakup are calculated by the CRCVM + ABC method, and the results are compared with the complex scaling method (CSM. We have found that the results of the ABC method are consistent with the CSM results. The effect of the boson symmetry, which is often neglected in the calculation of the triple α reactions, is also discussed.

  9. Family of singular solutions in a SUSY bulk-boundary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Shoichi; Murayama, Akihiro

    2004-08-01

    A set of classical solutions of a singular type is found in a 5D SUSY bulk-boundary system. The "parallel" configuration, where the whole components of fields or branes are parallel in the iso-space, naturally appears. It has three free parameters related to the scale freedom in the choice of the brane-matter sources and the "free" wave property of the extra component of the bulk-vector field. The solutions describe brane, anti-brane and brane-anti-brane configurations depending on the parameter choice. Some solutions describe the localization behaviour even after the non-compact limit of the extra space. Stableness is assured. Their meaning in the brane world physics is examined in relation to the stableness, localization, non-singular (kink) solution and the bulk Higgs mechanism.

  10. Family of Singular Solutions in A SUSY Bulk-Boundary System

    CERN Document Server

    Ichinose, S; Ichinose, Shoichi; Murayama, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    A set of classical solutions of a singular type is found in a 5D SUSY bulk-boundary system. The "parallel" configuration, where the whole components of fields or branes are parallel in the iso-space, naturally appears. It has three {\\it free} parameters related to the {\\it scale freedom} in the choice of the brane-matter sources and the {\\it "free" wave} property of the extra component of the bulk-vector field. The solutions describe brane, anti-brane and brane-anti-brane configurations depending on the parameter choice. Some solutions describe the localization behaviour even after the non-compact limit of the extra space. Stableness is assured. Their meaning in the brane world physics is examined in relation to the stableness, localization, non-singular (kink) solution and the bulk Higgs mechanism.

  11. Dual nature of localization in guiding systems with randomly corrugated boundaries: Anderson-type versus entropic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unified theory for the conductance of an infinitely long multimode quantum wire whose finite segment has randomly rough lateral boundaries is developed. It enables one to rigorously take account of all feasible mechanisms of wave scattering, both related to boundary roughness and to contacts between the wire rough section and the perfect leads within the same technical frameworks. The rough part of the conducting wire is shown to act as a mode-specific randomly modulated effective potential barrier whose height is governed essentially by the asperity slope. The mean height of the barrier, which is proportional to the average slope squared, specifies the number of conducting channels. Under relatively small asperity amplitude this number can take on arbitrary small, up to zero, values if the asperities are sufficiently sharp. The consecutive channel cut-off that arises when the asperity sharpness increases can be regarded as a kind of localization, which is not related to the disorder per se but rather is of entropic or (equivalently) geometric origin. The fluctuating part of the effective barrier results in two fundamentally different types of guided wave scattering, viz., inter- and intramode scattering. The intermode scattering is shown to be for the most part very strong except in the cases of (a) extremely smooth asperities, (b) excessively small length of the corrugated segment, and (c) the asperities sharp enough for only one conducting channel to remain in the wire. Under strong intermode scattering, a new set of conducting channels develops in the corrugated waveguide, which have the form of asymptotically decoupled extended modes subject to individual solely intramode random potentials. In view of this fact, two transport regimes only are realizable in randomly corrugated multimode waveguides, specifically, the ballistic and the localized regime, the latter characteristic of one-dimensional random systems. Two kinds of localization are thus shown to

  12. On an upwelling front, propagation of upwelling and vertical velocity in the eastern Arabian sea during monsoon, 1987

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Antony, M.K.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    A coastal upwelling front parallel to the coast and identifiable upto a depth of 75 m was observed between 12.5 and 16 degrees N along the eastern Arabian Sea in September, 1987 from closely spaced digital BT data. With a north-south slope...

  13. Feasibility of developing risk-based rankings of pressure boundary systems for inservice inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the Evaluation and Improvement of Non-destructive Examination Reliability for the In-service Inspection of Light Water Reactors Program sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to (1) assess current ISI techniques and requirements for all pressure boundary systems and components, (2) determine if improvements to the requirements are needed, and (3) if necessary, develop recommendations for revising the applicable ASME Codes and regulatory requirements. In evaluating approaches that could be used to provide a technical basis for improved inservice inspection plans, PNL has developed and applied a method that uses results of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) to establish piping system ISI requirements. In the PNL program, the feasibility of generic ISI requirements is being addressed in two phases. Phase I involves identifying and prioritizing the systems most relevant to plant safety. The results of these evaluations will be later consolidated into requirements for comprehensive inservice inspection of nuclear power plant components that will be developed in Phase II. This report presents Phase I evaluations for eight selected plants and attempts to compare these PRA-based inspection priorities with current ASME Section XI requirements for Class 1, 2 and 3 systems. These results show that there are generic insights that can be extrapolated from the selected plants to specific classes of light water reactors

  14. EXISTENCE OF POSITIVE SOLUTION TO TWO-POINT BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR A SYSTEM OF SECOND ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a two-point boundary value problem for a system of second order ordinary differential equations. Under some conditions, we show the existence of positive solution to the system of second order ordinary differential equa-tions.

  15. Casimir Force of Piston Systems with Arbitrary Cross Sections under Different Boundary Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ai-Min; CHEN Xiao-Song

    2009-01-01

    We study the Casimir force between two pistons under different boundary conditions inside an infinite cylinder with arbitrary cross section.It is found that the attractive or repulsive character of the Casimir force for a scalar field is determined only by the boundary condition along the longitudinal direction and is independent of the cross section,transverse boundary conditions and the mass of the field.Under symmetric Dirichlet-Dirichlet,Neumann-Neumann and periodic longitudinal boundary conditions the Casimir force is always attractive,but is repulsive under non-symmetric Dirichlet-Neumann and anti-periodic longitudinal boundary conditions.The Casimir force of the electromagnetic field in an ideal conductive piston is also investigated.This force is always attractive regardless of the shape of the cross section and the transverse boundary conditions.

  16. Electrostatic Interactions in Finite Systems treated with Periodic Boundary Conditions: Application to Linear-Scaling Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, N D M; Haynes, P D; Skylaris, C K

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparison of methods for treating the electrostatic interactions of finite, isolated systems within periodic boundary conditions (PBCs), within Density Functional Theory (DFT), with particular emphasis on linear-scaling (LS) DFT. Often, PBCs are not physically realistic but are an unavoidable consequence of the choice of basis set and the efficacy of using Fourier transforms to compute the Hartree potential. In such cases the effects of PBCs on the calculations need to be avoided, so that the results obtained represent the open rather than the periodic boundary. The very large systems encountered in LS-DFT make the demands of the supercell approximation for isolated systems more difficult to manage, and we show cases where the open boundary (infinite cell) result cannot be obtained from extrapolation of calculations from periodic cells of increasing size. We discuss, implement and test three very different approaches for overcoming or circumventing the effects of PBCs: truncation of the Coulomb ...

  17. The influence of a scaled boundary response on integral system transient behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaling relationships associated with the thermal-hydraulic response of a closed-loop system are applied to a calculational assessment of a feed-and-bleed recovery in a nuclear reactor integral effects test. The analysis demonstrates both the influence of scale on the system response and the ability of the thermal-hydraulics code to represent those effects. The qualitative response of the fluid is shown to be coupled to the behavior of the bounding walls through the energy equation. The results of the analysis described in this paper influence the determination of computer code applicability. The sensitivity of the code response to scaling variations introduced in the analysis is found to be appropriate with respect to scaling criteria determined from the scaling literature. Differences in the system response associated with different scaling criteria are found to be plausible and easily explained using well-known principles of heat transfer. Therefore, it is concluded that RELAP5/MOD2 can adequately represent the scaled effects of heat transfer boundary conditions of the thermal-hydraulic calculations through the mechanism of communicating walls. The results of the analysis also serve to clarify certain aspects of experiment and facility design

  18. Control Volume Analysis of Boundary Layer Ingesting Propulsion Systems With or Without Shock Wave Ahead of the Inlet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Dae; Felder, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The performance benefit of boundary layer or wake ingestion on marine and air vehicles has been well documented and explored. In this article, a quasi-one-dimensional boundary layer ingestion (BLI) benefit analysis for subsonic and transonic propulsion systems is performed using a control volume of a ducted propulsion system that ingests the boundary layer developed by the external airframe surface. To illustrate the BLI benefit, a relationship between the amount of BLI and the net thrust is established and analyzed for two propulsor types. One propulsor is an electric fan, and the other is a pure turbojet. These engines can be modeled as a turbofan with an infinite bypass ratio for the electric fan, and with a zero bypass ratio for the pure turbojet. The analysis considers two flow processes: a boundary layer being ingested by an aircraft inlet and a shock wave sitting in front of the inlet. Though the two processes are completely unrelated, both represent a loss of total pressure and velocity. In real applications, it is possible to have both processes occurring in front of the inlet of a transonic vehicle. Preliminary analysis indicates that the electrically driven propulsion system benefits most from the boundary layer ingestion and the presence of transonic shock waves, whereas the benefit for the turbojet engine is near zero or negative depending on the amount of total temperature rise across the engine.

  19. The Response of Phytoplankton Size Spectra and Chlorophyll Biomass to Wind-driven Coastal Upwelling off Northern California During the CoOP-WEST Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, F. P.; Dugdale, R. C.; Marchi, A.; Hogue, V.; Lassiter, A.; Lew, K.; Lorenzi, A.

    2002-12-01

    During the WEST (Wind Events and Shelf Transport) summer studies of the coastal upwelling region off Bodega Bay, CA, chlorophyll concentrations consistently reached phytoplankton bloom levels following wind driven upwelling events that resulted in high concentrations of pCO2 and nutrients. In most coastal upwelling areas, upwelled nitrate and high rates of new production lie close to the coast in a distinct plume, and their consequences (a band of enhanced chlorophyll) are propagated seaward far beyond the point where upwelled nutrients have been exhausted. Most likely grazing on advected diatoms results in release of regenerated N (ammonium and urea) that is taken up by the small-sized phytoplankton that out-compete diatoms for ammonium and consequently carry coastal new production offshore in the upper layer current system. However in the WEST study area the growing phytoplankton (showing high rates of new production) and productivity are retained on the shelf, and apparently transported alongshore rather than offshore most of the time. The elevated chlorophyll (reaching over 30 μg/l in June 2000) is made up of mostly larger phytoplankton cells with the diatom Chaetoceros spp. dominating during the bloom events. These cells may be grazed or sink and be carried in sub surface currents and re-entrained in the undercurrent, unlike smaller cells that remain in the upper layer. Surface distributions of chlorophyll and phytoplankton size spectra and fluorescence obtained using a CytoSense flow cytometer will be compared between upwelling spring cruises and a non upwelling winter cruise to the CoOP-WEST study site off Bodega Bay, CA.

  20. The role of Equatorial Undercurrent in sustaining the Eastern Indian Ocean upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gengxin; Han, Weiqing; Shu, Yeqiang; Li, Yuanlong; Wang, Dongxiao; Xie, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    By combining volume transport and salinity analysis from 1958 to 2014, this paper investigates how the transient Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) sustains the summer-fall equatorial eastern Indian Ocean (EIO) upwelling. On seasonal time scales, the EIO upwelling is mainly supplied by the salty water from the western basin through a buffering process: The winter-spring EUC carries the salty water from the western basin eastward, induces downwelling in the EIO, and pushes portion of the salty water below the central thermocline, which subsequently upwells to the central thermocline during summer-fall and sustains the EIO upwelling. On interannual time scales, enhanced upwelling occurs during positive Indian Ocean Dipole (+IOD) years. The strong summer-fall EUC associated with the +IOD supplies water for the intensified upwelling. This research provides new knowledge for basin-scale mass and property exchanges associated with the EIO upwelling, contributing to our understanding of three-dimensional ocean circulation and climate variability.

  1. The Effects of Climate Change on the Planting Boundary and Potential Yield for Different Rice Cropping Systems in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qing; YANG Xiao-guang; LIU Zhi-juan; DAI Shu-wei; LI Yong; XIE Wen-juan; CHEN Fu

    2014-01-01

    Based on climate data from 254 meteorological stations, this study estimated the effects of climate change on rice planting boundaries and potential yields in the southern China during 1951-2010. The results indicated a signiifcant northward shift and westward expansion of northern boundaries for rice planting in the southern China. Compared with the period of 1951-1980, the average temperature during rice growing season in the period of 1981-2010 increased by 0.4°C, and the northern planting boundaries for single rice cropping system (SRCS), early triple cropping rice system (ETCRS), medium triple cropping rice system (MTCRS), and late triple cropping rice system (LTCRS) moved northward by 10, 30, 52 and 66 km, respectively. In addition, compared with the period of 1951-1980, the suitable planting area for SRCS was reduced by 11%during the period of 1981-2010. However, the suitable planting areas for other rice cropping systems increased, with the increasing amplitude of 3, 8, and 10%for ETCRS, MTCRS and LTCRS, respectively. In general, the light and temperature potential productivity of rice decreased by 2.5%. Without considering the change of rice cultivars, the northern planting boundaries for different rice cropping systems showed a northward shift tendency. Climate change resulted in decrease of per unit area yield for SRCS and the annual average yields of ETCRS and LTCRS. Nevertheless, the overall rice production in the entire research area showed a decreasing trend even with the increasing trend of annual average yield for MTCRS.

  2. Implementation of a boundary layer heat flux parameterization into the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. McGrath-Spangler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a given amount of surface flux is inversely proportional to the depth of the boundary layer. Overshooting thermals that entrain free tropospheric air down into the boundary layer modify the characteristics and depth of the lower layer through the insertion of energy and mass. This alters the surface energy budget by changing the Bowen ratio and thereby altering the vegetative response and the surface boundary conditions. Although overshooting thermals are important in the physical world, their effects are unresolved in most regional models. A parameterization to include the effects of boundary layer entrainment was introduced into a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model (SiB-RAMS. The parameterization is based on a downward heat flux at the top of the boundary layer that is proportional to the heat flux at the surface. Results with the parameterization show that the boundary layer simulated is deeper, warmer, and drier than when the parameterization is turned off. These results alter the vegetative stress factors thereby changing the carbon flux from the surface. The combination of this and the deeper boundary layer change the concentration of carbon dioxide in the boundary layer.

  3. A free boundary problem for a reaction-diffusion system with nonlinear memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Zhigui; Ling, Zhi; Pedersen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We consider a integro-partial differential equation with a free boundary which appears in the theory of the nuclear dynamics. First, local existence and uniqueness are obtained by using the contraction mapping theorem. Then, the behavior of the free boundary and the blow-up criteria are obtained....

  4. Distribution and respiration of the high-latitude pelagic amphipod Themisto gaudichaudi in the Benguela Current in relation to upwelling intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auel, Holger; Ekau, Werner

    2009-12-01

    The cold and highly productive waters of coastal upwelling areas provide habitats for marine species usually occurring at higher latitudes and allow those species to extend their distribution ranges towards the equator into regions otherwise characterised by warm and oligotrophic sub-tropical waters. The pelagic hyperiid amphipod Themisto gaudichaudi has a circum-Antarctic epipelagic distribution pattern generally south of 35°S and plays an important role in Antarctic food webs as effective link from zooplankton secondary production to higher trophic levels including seabirds and marine mammals. In the cold and productive waters of the Benguela Current coastal upwelling system, the distribution range of the species extents far northward into the subtropics. The present study focuses on the distribution of T. gaudichaudi at the northernmost limit of its range in the Benguela upwelling system in relation to upwelling intensity and hydrographic conditions (sea surface temperature) based on time-series data from 2002 to 2008. Moreover, field data on life-history traits and respiration rates in relation to water temperature are combined to elucidate the environmental and physiological factors limiting the distribution range. Compared to Themisto populations from higher latitudes, the relatively higher water temperatures in the coastal upwelling region lead to higher respiration rates, faster growth, earlier sexual maturity and smaller body size.

  5. Chlorine isotope geochemistry of Icelandic thermal fluids: Implications for geothermal system behavior at divergent plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Andri; Barnes, Jaime D.

    2016-09-01

    The chlorine isotope composition of thermal fluids from Iceland were measured in order to evaluate the source of chlorine and possible chlorine isotope fractionation in geothermal systems at divergent plate boundaries. The geothermal systems studied have a wide range of reservoir temperatures from 40 to 437 °C and in-situ pH of 6.15 to 7.15. Chlorine concentrations range from 5.2 to 171 ppm and δ37 Cl values are -0.3 to + 2.1 ‰ (n = 38). The δ37 Cl values of the thermal fluids are interpreted to reflect the source of the chlorine in the fluids. Geothermal processes such as secondary mineral formation, aqueous and vapor speciation and boiling were found to have minimal effects on the δ37 Cl values. However, further work is needed on incorporation of Cl into secondary minerals and its effect on Cl isotope fractionation. Results of isotope geochemical modeling demonstrate that the range of δ37 Cl values documented in the natural thermal fluids can be explained by leaching of the basaltic rocks by meteoric source water under geothermal conditions. Magmatic gas partitioning may also contribute to the source of Cl in some cases. The range of δ37 Cl values of the fluids result mainly from the large range of δ37 Cl values observed for Icelandic basalts, which range from -0.6 to + 1.2 ‰.

  6. Applying different quality and safety models in healthcare improvement work: Boundary objects and system thinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of theoretical models can be applied to help guide quality improvement and patient safety interventions in hospitals. However there are often significant differences between such models and, therefore, their potential contribution when applied in diverse contexts. The aim of this paper is to explore how two such models have been applied by hospitals to improve quality and safety. We describe and compare the models: (1) The Organizing for Quality (OQ) model, and (2) the Design for Integrated Safety Culture (DISC) model. We analyze the theoretical foundations of the models, and show, by using a retrospective comparative case study approach from two European hospitals, how these models have been applied to improve quality and safety. The analysis shows that differences appear in the theoretical foundations, practical approaches and applications of the models. Nevertheless, the case studies indicate that the choice between the OQ and DISC models is of less importance for guiding the practice of quality and safety improvement work, as they are both systemic and share some important characteristics. The main contribution of the models lay in their role as boundary objects directing attention towards organizational and systems thinking, culture, and collaboration

  7. DESIGN OF LOW COST MARITIME BOUNDARY IDENTIFICATION DEVICE USING GPS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suresh Kumar,

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available GPS (Global Positioning System is increasingly being used for a wide range of applications. It provides reliable positioning, navigation, and timing services to worldwide users on a continuous basis in all weather, day and night, anywhere on or near the Earth. GPS is made up of three segments: Space, Control and User. GPS has become a widely used aid to navigation worldwide, and a useful tool for map-making, land surveying, commerce, scientific uses, tracking and surveillance, and hobbies such as geocaching and way marking. None of the present GPS systems satisfy the requirements for the safety of civilian navigation in the sea as the maritime boundary of a country cannotbe marked. This paper deals on the versatility and the usefulness of a GPS device in the sea. The main objective of the paper is to help the fishermen not to navigate beyond other country’s border. If a fisherman navigates beyond the country’s border, an alarm is generated indicating that the fisherman has crossed the border. Additionally, a GSM transmitter interface will send a message to base station located on the shore indicating that a vessel has crossed the border. Thus guards in the shore can assist and provide additional help to those fishermen if needed. Keeping in mind about lives of Indian fishermen, this device has been created to help them not to move beyond Indian. On the whole, it is an attempt to build a suitable device for the fishermen at a reasonably low cost.

  8. Nitrogen transfers and air-sea N2O fluxes in the upwelling off Namibia within the oxygen minimum zone: a 3-D model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As regions of high primary production and being often associated to Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs, Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS represent key regions for the oceanic nitrogen (N cycle. Indeed, by exporting the Organic Matter (OM and nutrients produced in the coastal region to the open ocean, EBUS can play an important role in sustaining primary production in subtropical gyres. Losses of fixed inorganic N, through denitrification and anammox processes and through nitrous oxide (N2O emissions to the atmosphere, take place in oxygen depleted environments such as EBUS, and alleviate the role of these regions as a source of N. In the present study, we developed a 3-D coupled physical/biogeochemical (ROMS/BioBUS model for investigating the full N budget in the Namibian sub-system of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS. The different state variables of a climatological experiment have been compared to different data sets (satellite and in situ observations and show that the model is able to represent this biogeochemical oceanic region. The N transfer is investigated in the Namibian upwelling system using this coupled model, especially in the Walvis Bay area between 22° S and 24° S where the OMZ is well developed (O2 2 l−1. The upwelling process advects 24.2 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of nitrate enriched waters over the first 100 m over the slope and over the continental shelf. The meridional advection by the alongshore Benguela current brings also nutrient-rich waters with 21.1 × 1010 mol N yr−1. 10.5 × 1010 mol N yr−1 of OM are exported outside of the continental shelf (between 0 and 100-m depth. 32.4% and 18.1% of this OM are exported by advection in the form of Dissolved and Particulate Organic Matters (DOM and POM, respectively, however vertical sinking of POM represents the main contributor (49.5% to OM export outside of the first 100-m depth of the water column on the continental shelf. The continental slope also represents a net N

  9. Offshore Wind Farm Wake Effect on Stratification and Coastal Upwelling

    OpenAIRE

    Bakhoday Paskyabi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interactions between an offshore wind farm, upper-ocean currents, and stratification are examined under shallow water conditions from a two-dimensional modeling standpoint. The modeling results from two numerical simulation runs provide new insights on the formation of downwind vortex streets and the adjustment of coastal processes, such as upwelling and stratification. The distorted farm-induced wind deficits are calculated by the concept of single- and multiple-wake model...

  10. Surface circulation and upwelling patterns around Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, A; Pattiaratchi, C. B.; E. M. S. Wijeratne

    2013-01-01

    Sri Lanka occupies a unique location within the equatorial belt in the northern Indian Ocean with the Arabian Sea on its western side and the Bay of Bengal on its eastern side. The region is characterised by bi-annually reversing monsoon winds resulting from seasonal differential heating and cooling of the continental land mass and the ocean. This study explored elements of the dynamics of the surface circulation and coastal upwelling in the waters around Sri Lanka using satellite imagery and...

  11. Mn seasonal upwellings recorded in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    OpenAIRE

    D. Langlet; Alleman, L. Y.; P.-D. Plisnier; Hughes, H; André, L.

    2006-01-01

    International audience Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of anoxic deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a 2-years-long geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were put in perspective against laser ablation ICP-MS profiles of Mn in five aragon...

  12. Manganese content records seasonal upwelling in Lake Tanganyika mussels

    OpenAIRE

    D. Langlet; Alleman, L. Y.; Plisnier, P.-D.; Hughes, H; André, L.

    2007-01-01

    International audience Biogenic productivity of Lake Tanganyika is highly dependent on seasonal upwellings of cold, oxygen-depleted, nutrient-rich deep waters. We investigated the shell of freshwater bivalve Pleiodon spekii as a geochemical archive of these periodic hydrological changes tuned by the monsoon regime. The results of a three-year-long limnological and geochemical survey of the coastal waters performed on the dissolved and particulate fractions were compared to LA-ICP-MS profil...

  13. The Asymptotic Behavior and the Quasineutral Limit for the Bipolar Euler-Poisson System with Boundary Effects and a Vacuum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeping LI

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,a one-dimensional bipolar Euler-Poisson system (a hydrodynamic model) from semiconductors or plasmas with boundary effects is considered.This system takes the form of Euler-Poisson with an electric field and frictional damping added to the momentum equations.The large-time behavior of uniformly bounded weak solutions to the initial-boundary value problem for the one-dimensional bipolar Euler-Poisson system is firstly presented.Next,two particle densities and the corresponding current momenta are verified to satisfy the porous medium equation and the classical Darcy's law time asymptotically.Finally,as a by-product,the quasineutral limit of the weak solutions to the initial-boundary value problem is investigated in the sense that the bounded L∞ entropy solution to the one-dimensional bipolar Euler-Poisson system converges to that of the corresponding one-dimensional compressible Euler equations with damping exponentially fast as t → +∞.As far as we know,this is the first result about the asymptotic behavior and the quasineutral limit for the one-dimensional bipolar Euler-Poisson system with boundary effects and a vacuum.

  14. Aragonite saturation state dynamics in a coastal upwelling zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Katherine E.; Degrandpre, Michael D.; Hales, Burke

    2013-06-01

    upwelling zones may be at enhanced risk from ocean acidification as upwelling brings low aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) waters to the surface that are further suppressed by anthropogenic CO2. ΩAr was calculated with pH, pCO2, and salinity-derived alkalinity time series data from autonomous pH and pCO2 instruments moored on the Oregon shelf and shelf break during different seasons from 2007 to 2011. Surface ΩAr values ranged between 0.66 ± 0.04 and 3.9 ± 0.04 compared to an estimated pre-industrial range of 1.0 ± 0.1 to 4.7 ± 0.1. Upwelling of high-CO2 water and subsequent removal of CO2 by phytoplankton imparts a dynamic range to ΩAr from ~1.0 to ~4.0 between spring and autumn. Freshwater input also suppresses saturation states during the spring. Winter ΩAr is less variable than during other seasons and is controlled primarily by mixing of the water column.

  15. Large Topographic Rises on Venus: Implications for Mantle Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Bindschandler, Duane L.; Senske, David A.

    1995-01-01

    Topographic rises on Venus have been identified that are interpreted to be the surface manifestation of mantle upwellings. These features are classified into groups based on their dominant morphology. Atla and Beta Regiones are classified as rift-dominated, Dione, western Eistla, Bell, and Imdr Regiones as volcano-dominated, and Themis, eastern Eistla, and central Eistla Regiones as corona-dominated. At several topographic rises, geologic indicators were identified that may provide evidence of uplifted topography (e.g., volcanic flow features trending upslope). We assessed the minimum contribution of volcanic construction to the topography of each rise, which in general represents less than 5% of the volume of the rise, similar to the volumes of edifices at terrestrial hotspot swells. The total melt volume at each rise is approximated to be 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 6) cu km. The variations in morphology, topography, and gravity signatures at topographic rises are not interpreted to indicate variations in stage of evolution of a mantle upwelling. Instead, the morphologic variations between the three classes of topographic rises are interpreted to indicate the varying influences of lithospheric structure, plume characteristics, and regional tectonic environment. Within each class, variations in topography, gravity, and amount of volcanism may be indicative of differing stages of evolution. The similarity between swell and volcanic volumes for terrestrial and Venusian hotspots implies comparable time-integrated plume strengths for individual upwellings on the two planets.

  16. Seasonal variability of phytoplankton fluorescence in relation to the Straits of Messina (Sicily tidal upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Azzaro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the Straits of Messina the large gradients of tidal displacements as well as the topographic constrictions determine the upwelling of deeper waters in the surface layer. This work describes the seasonal variability of surface distribution of phytoplankton biomass depending on upwelling phenomena. Temperature, salinity, nitrates and phytoplankton fluorescence were measured in 1994 and 1995 by continuous underway surface real-time measurements on board dedicated research boats. Each survey was performed following the dynamic phases of flooding and ebbing tides. Tidal currents are essentially southward during the high tide and northward during the low tide.

    During the low water slack, large spatial gradients of physical-chemical and biological parameters were mainly found, while in the high water slack a diffused phytoplankton fluorescence was observed only in autumn, in coincidence of a seasonal thermocline. Salinity, nitrate and chlorophyll-a fluorescence data revealed a significant positive intercorrelation, whereas they are inversely correlated with temperature. Generally, during winter, the upwelling distribution was limited to narrow zones, while in summer it involved the middle of the Straits and southern zones. During spring in the southern zone of the Straits, maximum of chlorophyll-a fluorescence was detected (May 1995, 0.32 µg-Chla l-1; in summer, when back and forth tidal movements become intense between the Tyrrhenian and the Ionian seas, values was everywhere lower.

    The data set from continuous and repeatable acquisition has allowed the study of different time-space scales in the Straits of Messina, a very strong dynamic environment.

    The Straits system can be compared to an "intermittent pump" which, during the different seasons, before enriched itself and then it provides nutrients to the surrounding basins.

  17. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  18. Electrostatic interactions in finite systems treated with periodic boundary conditions: application to linear-scaling density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Nicholas D M; Dziedzic, Jacek; Haynes, Peter D; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-11-28

    We present a comparison of methods for treating the electrostatic interactions of finite, isolated systems within periodic boundary conditions (PBCs), within density functional theory (DFT), with particular emphasis on linear-scaling (LS) DFT. Often, PBCs are not physically realistic but are an unavoidable consequence of the choice of basis set and the efficacy of using Fourier transforms to compute the Hartree potential. In such cases the effects of PBCs on the calculations need to be avoided, so that the results obtained represent the open rather than the periodic boundary. The very large systems encountered in LS-DFT make the demands of the supercell approximation for isolated systems more difficult to manage, and we show cases where the open boundary (infinite cell) result cannot be obtained from extrapolation of calculations from periodic cells of increasing size. We discuss, implement, and test three very different approaches for overcoming or circumventing the effects of PBCs: truncation of the Coulomb interaction combined with padding of the simulation cell, approaches based on the minimum image convention, and the explicit use of open boundary conditions (OBCs). We have implemented these approaches in the ONETEP LS-DFT program and applied them to a range of systems, including a polar nanorod and a protein. We compare their accuracy, complexity, and rate of convergence with simulation cell size. We demonstrate that corrective approaches within PBCs can achieve the OBC result more efficiently and accurately than pure OBC approaches.

  19. Finite difference method of first boundary problem for quasilinear parabolic systems ( Ⅳ)——Convergence of iteration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周毓麟; 沈隆钧; 袁光伟

    1997-01-01

    More work is done to study the explicit, weak and strong implicit difference solution for the first boundary problem of quasilinear parabolic system:where u, , and f are m-dimensional vector valued functions, A is an m × m positively definite matrix, and ut = For this problem, the convergence of iteration for the general difference schemes is proved.

  20. EXISTENCE AND NON-EXISTENCE OF GLOBAL SOLUTIONS OF A DEGENERATE PARABOLIC SYSTEM WITH NONLINEAR BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Fuqin; Wang Mingxin

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the non-negative solutions to a degenerate parabolic system with nonlinear boundary conditions in the multi-dimensional case.By the upper and lower solutions method, we give the conditions on the existence and non-existence of global solutions.

  1. Electrostatic interactions in finite systems treated with periodic boundary conditions: Application to linear-scaling density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Dziedzic, Jacek; Haynes, Peter D.; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-11-01

    We present a comparison of methods for treating the electrostatic interactions of finite, isolated systems within periodic boundary conditions (PBCs), within density functional theory (DFT), with particular emphasis on linear-scaling (LS) DFT. Often, PBCs are not physically realistic but are an unavoidable consequence of the choice of basis set and the efficacy of using Fourier transforms to compute the Hartree potential. In such cases the effects of PBCs on the calculations need to be avoided, so that the results obtained represent the open rather than the periodic boundary. The very large systems encountered in LS-DFT make the demands of the supercell approximation for isolated systems more difficult to manage, and we show cases where the open boundary (infinite cell) result cannot be obtained from extrapolation of calculations from periodic cells of increasing size. We discuss, implement, and test three very different approaches for overcoming or circumventing the effects of PBCs: truncation of the Coulomb interaction combined with padding of the simulation cell, approaches based on the minimum image convention, and the explicit use of open boundary conditions (OBCs). We have implemented these approaches in the ONETEP LS-DFT program and applied them to a range of systems, including a polar nanorod and a protein. We compare their accuracy, complexity, and rate of convergence with simulation cell size. We demonstrate that corrective approaches within PBCs can achieve the OBC result more efficiently and accurately than pure OBC approaches.

  2. GLOBAL WEAKLY DISCONTINUOUS SOLUTIONS TO A KIND OF MIXED INITIAL-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR INHOMOGENEOUS QUASILINEAR HYPERBOLIC SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Fei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the mixed initial-boundary value problem for inhomogeneous quasilinear hyperbolic systems in the domain D={(t,x)| t≥O,x≥O}.Under the assumption that the source term satisfies the matching condition,a sufficient condition to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of global weakly discontinuous solution is given.

  3. GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND BLOW-UP OF SOLUTIONS TO A NONLOCAL EVOLUTION p-LAPLACE SYSTEM WITH NONLINEAR BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xuesong; Gao Wenjie; Cao Jianwen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the global existence and blow-up of the solution to an evolution ρ-Laplace system with nonlinear sources and nonlinear boundary condition. The authors first establish the local existence of solutions, then give a necessary and sufficient condition on the global existence of the positive solution.

  4. Nonlinear Gulf Stream Interaction with the Deep Western Boundary Current System: Observations and a Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, David E.; Mehra, Avichal; Haney, Robert L.; Bowman, Malcolm J.; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2003-01-01

    Gulf Stream (GS) separation near its observed Cape Hatteras (CH) separation location, and its ensuing path and dynamics, is a challenging ocean modeling problem. If a model GS separates much farther north than CH, then northward GS meanders, which pinch off warm core eddies (rings), are not possible or are strongly constrained by the Grand Banks shelfbreak. Cold core rings pinch off the southward GS meanders. The rings are often re-absorbed by the GS. The important warm core rings enhance heat exchange and, especially, affect the northern GS branch after GS bifurcation near the New England Seamount Chain. This northern branch gains heat by contact with the southern branch water upstream of bifurcation, and warms the Arctic Ocean and northern seas, thus playing a major role in ice dynamics, thermohaline circulation and possible global climate warming. These rings transport heat northward between the separated GS and shelf slope/Deep Western Boundary Current system (DWBC). This region has nearly level time mean isopycnals. The eddy heat transport convergence/divergence enhances the shelfbreak and GS front intensities and thus also increases watermass transformation. The fronts are maintained by warm advection by the Florida Current and cool advection by the DWBC. Thus, the GS interaction with the DWBC through the intermediate eddy field is climatologically important.

  5. Morphotropic phase boundary and magnetoelastic behaviour in ferromagnetic Tb1-xGdxFe2 system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adil, Murtaza [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Yang, Sen [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Mi, Meng [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Zhou, Chao [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Wang, Jieqiong [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Zhang, Rui [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Liao, Xiaoqi [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Wang, Yu [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Ren, Xiaobing [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Song, Xiaoping [School of Sciences, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory for Nonequilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049, China; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA

    2015-03-30

    Morphotropic phase boundary (MPB), separating two ferroic phases of different crystal symmetries, has been studied extensively for its extraordinary enhancement of piezoelectricity in ferroelectrics. Based on the same mechanism, we have designed a magnetic MPB in the pseudobinary ferromagnetic system of Tb1-xGdxFe2 and the corresponding crystal structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostriction are explored. With the synchrotron x-ray diffractometry, the structure symmetry of TbFe2-rich compositions is detected to be rhombohedral (R) and that of GdFe2-rich compositions is tetragonal (T) below T-c. With the change of concentration, the value of magnetostriction of the samples changes monotonously, while the MPB composition Tb0.1Gd0.9Fe2, which corresponds to the coexistence of R and T phases, exhibits the maximum magnetization among all available compositions and superposition of magnetostriction behaviour of R and T phases. Our result of MPB phenomena in ferromagnets may provide an effective route to design functional magnetic materials with exotic properties. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Uniform blow-up profiles and boundary layer for a parabolic system with localized nonlinear reaction terms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Huiling; WANG; Mingxin

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the blow-up properties of the solution to a semilinear parabolic system with localized nonlinear reaction terms, subject to the null Dirichlet boundary condition. We first give sufficient conditions for that the classical solution blows up in the finite time, secondly give necessary conditions and a sufficient condition for that two components blow up simultaneously, and then obtain the uniform blow-up profiles in the interior. Finally we describe the asymptotic behavior of the blow-up solution in the boundary layer.

  7. The MORENA Project: Shelf-ocean exchanges and transport processes along the continental margin in the European coastal upwelling region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiuza, A.F.G. [Univ. de Lisboa (Portugal). Inst. de Oceanografia; Perez, F. [Inst. Investigaciones Marinas, Vigo (Spain); Johnson, J. [Univ. East Anglia (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The MORENA Project (Multidisciplinary Oceanographic Research in the Eastern Boundary of the North Atlantic) is sponsored by the CEC MAST-2 Programme and has as general objective to measure, understand and model shelf-ocean exchange in a typical coastal upwelling region of the eastern boundary layer of the subtropical ocean. This is being attained through a multidisciplinary approach aimed at the quantitative understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes involved in the transfer of matter (including salt, particulates, nutrients, organic compounds, biomass), momentum and energy across and along the shelf, the shelf break and the slope, in the Iberian region of the European Atlantic. MORENA has the following components: Observations, Modelling and Combined Analysis.

  8. Outer boundary of major discharge areas of Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The digital data set delineates the outer boundary of each major discharge area evaluated as part of the study. These areas were used to refine estimates of...

  9. INITIAL-BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM FOR THE LANDAU-LIFSHITZ SYSTEM WITH APPLIED FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Boling; Ding Shijin

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the existence and partial regularity of weak solution to the initial-boundary value problem of Landau-Lifshitz equations with applied fields in a 2D bounded domain are obtained by the penalty method.

  10. Positive Solutions for (n-1,1-Type Singular Fractional Differential System with Coupled Integral Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the positive solutions of the (n-1,1-type fractional differential system with coupled integral boundary conditions. The conditions for the existence of positive solutions to the system are established. In addition, we derive explicit formulae for the estimation of the positive solutions and obtain the unique positive solution when certain additional conditions hold. An example is then given to demonstrate the validity of our main results.

  11. Geodynamic constraints on deep-mantle buoyancy: Implications for thermochemical structure of LLSVP and large-scale upwellings under the Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, A. M.; Glisovic, P.; Grand, S. P.; Lu, C.; Simmons, N. A.; Rowley, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Convection-related data constrain lower-mantle density anomalies that contribute to mantle convective flow. These include global gravity and topography anomalies, plate motions and excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). Each datum possesses differing wavelength and depth dependent resolution of heterogeneity and thus the strongest constraints on density anomalies are obtained by jointly inverting all data in combination. The joint-inversions employ viscous response functions (i.e. geodynamic kernels) for a flowing mantle. Non-uniqueness is greatly reduced by including seismic and mineral physics data into the joint inversions. We present the results of inversions where seismic and geodynamic data are singly and jointly inverted to map density anomalies. Employing mineral physical data we estimate thermal and compositional contributions to density anomalies. We evaluate the extent to which "Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces" (LLSVP) are anomalous and we determine their impact on the global pattern of convective flow. The inversions yield consistent maps of lower-mantle flow (see figure) that are dominated by two large upwellings, under the Western Pacific (next to the Caroline microplate) and Eastern Pacific (under the East Pacific Rise). These hot upwellings effectively delimit the margins of the Pacific LLSVP, suggesting intrinsic negative buoyancy within this structure impedes large-scale upwellings in the mantle above. These two upwellings do not resemble classical mantle "plumes" found in simple isoviscous and isochemical convection models but their contribution to mass and heat transport across the lower mantle is significant and thus behave similarly to plumes. The large scale of these upwellings may be understood in terms of the high viscosity in the lower mantle, inferred from geodynamic constraints on mantle rheology. Very-long time convection simulations initiated with present-day structure inferred from these inversions show the two

  12. System for conversion between the boundary representation model and a constructive solid geometry model of an object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Noel C.; Emery, James D.; Smith, Maurice L.

    1988-04-05

    A system converts from the boundary representation of an object to the constructive solid geometry representation thereof. The system converts the boundary representation of the object into elemental atomic geometrical units or I-bodies which are in the shape of stock primitives or regularized intersections of stock primitives. These elemental atomic geometrical units are then represented in symbolic form. The symbolic representations of the elemental atomic geometrical units are then assembled heuristically to form a constructive solid geometry representation of the object usable for manufacturing thereof. Artificial intelligence is used to determine the best constructive solid geometry representation from the boundary representation of the object. Heuristic criteria are adapted to the manufacturing environment for which the device is to be utilized. The surface finish, tolerance, and other information associated with each surface of the boundary representation of the object are mapped onto the constructive solid geometry representation of the object to produce an enhanced solid geometry representation, particularly useful for computer-aided manufacture of the object.

  13. Long-term Variability of NorthWest African coastal upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Malick; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belen; Lazar, Alban

    2014-05-01

    The NorthWest African sea surface temperature variability can be due to changes in the coastal upwelling system, which in turn can be due to alterations in local winds, global winds induced by teleconnections and propagation of waves from wind burst in remote regions. The two last processes could be due in turn to changes in the sea surface temperature in extended regions remote from the upwelling region, as changes in Pacific SSTs associated with ENSO, or in the Equatorial Atlantic SSTs. This work demonstrates that the whole signal cannot be explained by local wind/Ekman pumping and large scale winds induced by teleconnections play an important role. Using observational data of SSTs and winds from atmospheric reanalysis, and applying different statistical technics, as correlation analysis, filtering and discriminant analysis, the different influences and its stationarity along the observational period are tested pointing to the non stationarity of El Niño influence in FMA and to other possible predictors influencing in the region.

  14. Reduced order models, inertial manifolds, and global bifurcations: searching instability boundaries in nuclear power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Antola, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.suarez@miem.gub.u, E-mail: rsuarez@ucu.edu.u [Universidad Catolica del Uruguay, Montevideo (Uruguay). Fac. de Ingenieria y Tecnologias. Dept. de Matematica; Ministerio de Industria, Energia y Mineria, Montevideo (Uruguay). Direccion General de Secretaria

    2011-07-01

    One of the goals of nuclear power systems design and operation is to restrict the possible states of certain critical subsystems to remain inside a certain bounded set of admissible states and state variations. In the framework of an analytic or numerical modeling process of a BWR power plant, this could imply first to find a suitable approximation to the solution manifold of the differential equations describing the stability behavior, and then a classification of the different solution types concerning their relation with the operational safety of the power plant. Inertial manifold theory gives a foundation for the construction and use of reduced order models (ROM's) of reactor dynamics to discover and characterize meaningful bifurcations that may pass unnoticed during digital simulations done with full scale computer codes of the nuclear power plant. The March-Leuba's BWR ROM is generalized and used to exemplify the analytical approach developed here. A nonlinear integral-differential equation in the logarithmic power is derived. Introducing a KBM Ansatz, a coupled set of two nonlinear ordinary differential equations is obtained. Analytical formulae are derived for the frequency of oscillation and the parameters that determine the stability of the steady states, including sub- and supercritical PAH bifurcations. A Bautin's bifurcation scenario seems possible on the power-flow plane: near the boundary of stability, a region where stable steady states are surrounded by unstable limit cycles surrounded at their turn by stable limit cycles. The analytical results are compared with recent digital simulations and applications of semi-analytical bifurcation theory done with reduced order models of BWR. (author)

  15. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current

    OpenAIRE

    John A. Barth; Menge, Bruce A.; Lubchenco, Jane; Chan, Francis; Bane, John M.; Kirincich, Anthony R.; McManus, Margaret A.; Nielsen, Karina J.; Pierce, Stephen D.; Washburn, Libe

    2007-01-01

    Wind-driven coastal ocean upwelling supplies nutrients to the euphotic zone near the coast. Nutrients fuel the growth of phytoplankton, the base of a very productive coastal marine ecosystem [Pauly D, Christensen V (1995) Nature 374:255–257]. Because nutrient supply and phytoplankton biomass in shelf waters are highly sensitive to variation in upwelling-driven circulation, shifts in the timing and strength of upwelling may alter basic nutrient and carbon fluxes through marine food webs. We sh...

  16. Simulation of nutrient transport from different depths during an upwelling event in the Gulf of Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Germo Väli; Victor Zhurbas; Jaan Laanemets; Jüri Elken

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulation experiments with a high-resolution circulation model were carried out to study nutrient transport from different depths to the surface 10-m layer during an upwelling event along the northern coast of the Gulf of Finland in July 1999. The initial nutrient distribution is based on field measurements performed in the north-western part of the Gulf. Wind forcing covering the period of the upwelling along the northern coast was turned through 180° to simulate an upwelling alon...

  17. Contribution à l'étude de l'upwelling du Pérou Chili

    OpenAIRE

    Croquette, Marie

    2007-01-01

    The upwelling and associated alongshore coastal currents variability (CPCC, Chile Peru coastal Current and PCUC, Peru-Chile Undercurrent) has been studied with satellite data and two numerical models. This study covers a large meridional extend: from Peru to Southern Chile (50°S). Variability characteristics in Peru and Chile are separated by a transition zone around 20°S where winds, upwelling and the PCUC are particularly weak. The origins of upwelling and PCUC waters have also been studied...

  18. Narrowing of the Upwelling Branch of the Brewer-Dobson Circulation and Hadley Cell in Chemistry-Climate Model Simulations of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Stolarski, Richard S.; Pawson, Steven; Newman, Paul A.; Waugh, Darryn

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the width of the upwelling branch of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and Hadley cell in the 21st Century are investigated using simulations from a coupled chemistry-climate model. In these model simulations the tropical upwelling region narrows in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The narrowing of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is caused by an equatorward shift of Rossby wave critical latitudes and Eliassen-Palm flux convergence in the subtropical lower stratosphere. In the troposphere, the model projects an expansion of the Hadley cell's poleward boundary, but a narrowing of the Hadley cell's rising branch. Model results suggest that eddy forcing may also play a part in the narrowing of the rising branch of the Hadley cell.

  19. Coastal Upwelling and Deep Fog: 50-year Worldwide Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koracin, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    An analysis is presented of the marine fog distribution based upon the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) ship observations taken during 1950-2007. Deep fog occurrence is reported in routine weather reports that are encoded in an ICOADS ship observation. Occurrence is estimated by the number of deep fog observations divided by the total present weather observations in a one-degree area centered on latitude and longitude grid point intersections. The mean fog occurrence for the summer (June-July-August) 1950-2007 was computed for each one degree point for the world. There are five major world locations with coastal SST minimums due to wind driven upwelling. Four of these are during the local summer on the eastern side of a semi-permanent anticyclone on eastern sides of northern and southern mid-latitudes of the Pacifica and the Atlantic. The fifth is during the SW monsoon in the Indian Ocean. For all five of these locations, the deep fog occurrence is at maximum during the upwelling season, with the greatest occurrences concentrated along the coast and isolated over the SST minimum. For the five coastal fog maxima, the greatest and longest duration occurrence along coast occurrence is associated with the coldest sea surface temperature and longest along coast occurrence, which is along N. California- S. Oregon. In contrast, the lowest occurrence of fog and the least along coast occurrence is associated with the warmest sea surface temperatures and least along coast occurrence along the SE Arabian Peninsula. The remaining three zones, Peru-Chile, NW Africa, and SW Africa are between the two extremes in fog occurrence, along coast coverage and sea surface temperature. Peru-Chile is more complex than the others as the Peru upwelling and fog appears the more dominant although ship observations are sparse along Chile.

  20. Domoic acid production near California coastal upwelling zones, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, V L.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Adams, Nicolaus G.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Bill, Brian D.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Stehr, Carla M.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Wekell, John C.(National Marine Fisheries Service); Moeller, Peter (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Busman, Mark (National Ocean Service, Marine Biotoxins Program); Woodruff, Dana L.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2000-01-01

    Sea lion mortalities in central California during May and June 1998 were traced to their ingestion of sardines and anchovies that had accumulated the neurotoxin domoic acid. The detection of toxin in urine, feces, and stomach contents of several sea lions represents the first proven occurrence of domoic acid transfer through the food chain to a marine mammal. The pennate diatoms, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and P. australis, were the dominant, toxin-producing phytoplankton constituting algal blooms near Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Oceano Dunes, areas where sea lions with neurological symptoms stranded. Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia were also found near Morrow Bay, Point Conception, Point Arguello, and Santa Barbara, demonstrating that these species were widespread along the central California coast in June 1998. Measurements of domoic acid during three cruises in early June showed the highest cellular toxin levels in P. multiseries near Point A?o Nuevo and in P. australis from Morro w Bay. Maximum cellular domoic acid levels were observed within 20 km of the coast between 0 and 5 m depth, although toxin was also measured to depths of 40 m. Hydrographic data indicated that the highest toxin levels and greatest numbers of toxic cells were positioned in water masses associated with upwelling zones near coastal headlands. Nutrient levels at these sites were less than those typically measured during periods of active upwelling, due to the 1998 El Ni?o event. The flow of cells and/or nutrients from coastal headlands into embayments where cells can multiply in a stratified environment is a possible mechanism of bloom development along the central California coast. This coupling of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia growth near upwelling zones with physical processes involved in cell transport will be understood only when long-term measurements are made at several key coastal locations, aiding in our capability to predict domoic-acid producing algal blooms.

  1. The profile of upwelling 11-micron radiance through the atmospheric boundary layer overlying the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Denise E.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the gradient of 11-micron radiance from the ocean surface were made with spaceborne AVHRR and with radiometers carried on research vessels in California and east Florida waters. The results obtained for the radiance gradient at a variety of atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with radiative transfer calculations, suggesting that there was no significant error in the water vapor absorption parameters used in the calculations. The results confirm earlier predictions that, for a typical viewing factor (i.e., zenith angle 60 deg) and for mid-latitude standard water vapor conditions, the 11-micron radiant flux measured by a spaceborne sensor will be dominated by the atmospheric contribution to the total outgoing radiation in this 'window' region.

  2. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  3. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. E. Arntz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available To a certain degree, Eastern Boundary Current (EBC ecosystems are similar: Cold bottom water from moderate depths, rich in nutrients, is transported to the euphotic zone by a combination of trade winds, Coriolis force and Ekman transport. The resultant high primary production fuels a rich secondary production in the upper pelagic and nearshore zones, but where O2 exchange is restricted, it creates oxygen minimum zones (OMZs at shelf and upper slope (Humboldt and Benguela Current or slope depths (California Current. These hypoxic zones host a specifically adapted, small macro- and meiofauna together with giant sulphur bacteria that use nitrate to oxydise H2S. In all EBC, small polychaetes, large nematodes and other opportunistic benthic species have adapted to the hypoxic conditions and co-exist with sulphur bacteria, which seem to be particularly dominant off Peru and Chile. However, a massive reduction of macrobenthos occurs in the core of the OMZ. In the Humboldt Current area the OMZ ranges between <100 and about 600 m, with decreasing thickness in a poleward direction. The OMZ merges into better oxygenated zones towards the deep sea, where large cold-water mega- and macrofauna occupy a dominant role as in the nearshore strip. The Benguela Current OMZ has a similar upper limit but remains shallower. It also hosts giant sulphur bacteria but little is known about the benthic fauna. However, sulphur eruptions and intense hypoxia might preclude the coexistence of significant mega- und macrobenthos. Conversely, off North America the upper limit of the OMZ is considerably deeper (e.g., 500–600 m off California and Oregon, and the lower boundary may exceed 1000m. The properties described are valid for very cold and cold (La Niña and "normal" ENSO conditions with effective upwelling of nutrient-rich bottom water. During warm (El Niño episodes, warm water masses of low oxygen concentration from oceanic and equatorial regions enter the upwelling

  4. El Niño and similar perturbation effects on the benthos of the Humboldt, California, and Benguela Current upwelling ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, W. E.; Gallardo, V. A.; Gutiérrez, D.; Isla, E.; Levin, L. A.; Mendo, J.; Neira, C.; Rowe, G. T.; Tarazona, J.; Wolff, M.

    2006-03-01

    To a certain degree, Eastern Boundary Current (EBC) ecosystems are similar: Cold bottom water from moderate depths, rich in nutrients, is transported to the euphotic zone by a combination of trade winds, Coriolis force and Ekman transport. The resultant high primary production fuels a rich secondary production in the upper pelagic and nearshore zones, but where O2 exchange is restricted, it creates oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) at shelf and upper slope (Humboldt and Benguela Current) or slope depths (California Current). These hypoxic zones host a specifically adapted, small macro- and meiofauna together with giant sulphur bacteria that use nitrate to oxydise H2S. In all EBC, small polychaetes, large nematodes and other opportunistic benthic species have adapted to the hypoxic conditions and co-exist with sulphur bacteria, which seem to be particularly dominant off Peru and Chile. However, a massive reduction of macrobenthos occurs in the core of the OMZ. In the Humboldt Current area the OMZ ranges between fauna. However, sulphur eruptions and intense hypoxia might preclude the coexistence of significant mega- und macrobenthos. Conversely, off North America the upper limit of the OMZ is considerably deeper (e.g., 500-600 m off California and Oregon), and the lower boundary may exceed 1000m. The properties described are valid for very cold and cold (La Niña and "normal") ENSO conditions with effective upwelling of nutrient-rich bottom water. During warm (El Niño) episodes, warm water masses of low oxygen concentration from oceanic and equatorial regions enter the upwelling zones, bringing a variety of (sub)tropical immigrants. The autochthonous benthic fauna emigrates to deeper water or poleward, or suffers mortality. However, some local macrofaunal species experience important population proliferations, presumably due to improved oxygenation (in the southern hemisphere), higher temperature tolerance, reduced competition or the capability to use different food. Both

  5. Estimation of velocity boundaries in basement - sedimentary layer system of Yokohama region by means of nonstationary ray decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagishi, M.; Kinoshita, S.

    2011-12-01

    We estimated the velocity boundaries in a sedimentary layer-basement system in Yokohama by applying nonstationary ray decomposition method (NRDM) to the strong motion data recorded at the Yokohama dense strong motion array (YKH array). NRDM is a method to estimate the velocity boundaries of real layered structure from surface recordings by decomposing power of an SH-wave into instantaneous power of wave associated with rays in a homogeneous half space. The estimated results obtained by applying this method to seismograms are represented as a function of lapse time and depth time, which is travel time from surface toward depth-direction. A total of 10080 surface seismograms obtained at the YKH array for the 128 earthquakes that occurred in the Kanto area from 2000 to 2010 were used. The recordings were measured by acceleration seismometers. The data were obtained for the events having JMA magnitudes in the range of from 2.8 to 6.5. NRDM was applied to the transverse component data of velocity seismogram. Since the seismograms obtained at the YKH array predominate in high frequencies due to the weak subsurface structure, we applied bandpass filtering to the seismograms by using several intrinsic mode functions that are narrowband signals with different center frequencies. After such a processing, the data were converted to analytic signals, and then, the signals were used to estimate the instantaneous power by means of Wigner-Ville distribution. We have estimated the velocity boundaries in sediment in Yokohama region using 37 sites which were located in a rectangular area with a width of 4 km and a length of 40 km south-southeast of the FCH array. We were able to estimate two velocity boundaries, one in sediment (K-M) and the other being the upper boundary of the pre-Tertiary basement (M-B). On the whole, the upper boundary of the pre-Tertiary basement is dipping toward the south-southeast. The estimated depth times at K-M and M-B were from 1.5 to 2.2 s and from 2

  6. Nitrate reducing activity pervades surface waters during upwelling.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, S.O.; Halarnekar, R.; Malik, A.; Vijayan, V.; Varik, S.; RituKumari; Jineesh V.K.; Gauns, M.U.; Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    of the main limiting nutrients in the oceans (Dufour et al., 1999). Increased concentration of NO3- from upwelled waters in the euphotic zone supports higher primary production which in turn could cascade to the tertiary trophic level. Moreover, low... using 10 nM thymidine. TdR incorporation was terminated by addition of 5% TCA (Trichloroacetic acid). The samples were kept at 4 °C for 30 min prior to centrifugation. The tubes were centrifuged for 10 min at 16000 xg after which the supernatant...

  7. Spatial and temporal seasonal trends in coastal upwelling off Northwest Africa, 1981-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Cropper, T.E; Hanna, E; Bigg, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal coastal upwelling was analyzed along the NW African coastline (11-35°N) from 1981 to 2012. Upwelling magnitudes are calculated by wind speed indices, sea-surface temperature indices and inferred from meteorological station, sea-surface height and vertical water column transport data. A permanent annual upwelling regime is documented across 21-35°N and a seasonal regime across 12-19°N, in accordance with the climatology of previous studies. Upwelling regions were split into three zone...

  8. A continuum framework for grain boundary diffusion in thin film/substrate systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayas, Can; van der Giessen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A two-dimensional continuum model is developed for stress relaxation in thin films through grain boundary (GB) diffusion. When a thin film with columnar grains is subjected to thermal stress, stress gradients along the GBs are relaxed by diffusion of material from the film surface into the GBs. The

  9. On preconditioning techniques for dense linear systems arising from singular boundary integral equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ke [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We study various preconditioning techniques for the iterative solution of boundary integral equations, and aim to provide a theory for a class of sparse preconditioners. Two related ideas are explored here: singularity separation and inverse approximation. Our preliminary conclusion is that singularity separation based preconditioners perform better than approximate inverse based while it is desirable to have both features.

  10. Existence of global solutions to free boundary value problems for bipolar Navier-Stokes-Possion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the free boundary value problem for one-dimensional compressible bipolar Navier-Stokes-Possion (BNSP equations with density-dependent viscosities. For general initial data with finite energy and the density connecting with vacuum continuously, we prove the global existence of the weak solution. This extends the previous results for compressible NS [27] to NSP.

  11. Determination of γ′+γ / γ Phase Boundary in Ni-Al-Cr System Using DTA Thermal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciąg T.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties at elevated temperature, in modern alloys based on intermetallic phase Ni3Al are connected with phase composition, especially with proportion of ordered phase γ′ (L12 and disordered phase γ (A1. In this paper, analysis of one key systems for mentioned alloys - Ni-Al-Cr, is presented. A series of alloys with chemical composition originated from Ni-rich part of Ni-Al-Cr system was prepared. DTA thermal analysis was performed on all samples. Based on shape of obtained curves, characteristic for continuous order-disorder transition, places of course of phase boundaries γ′+γ / γ were determined. Moreover, temperature of melting and freezing of alloys were obtained. Results of DTA analysis concerning phase boundary γ′+γ / γ indicated agreement with results obtained by authors using calorimetric solution method.

  12. Trophic connectivity between offshore upwelling and the inshore food web of Banc d'Arguin (Mauritania): New insights from isotopic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carlier, A.; Chauvaud, L.; van der Geest, M.; Le Loc'h, F.; Le Duff, M.; Vernet, M.; Raffray, J.; Diakhate, D.; Labrosse, P.; Wagué, A.; Le Goff, C.; Gohin, F.; Chapron, B.; Clavier, J.

    2015-01-01

    Banc d'Arguin (BA), Mauritania, is a nationally protected shallow gulf > 10,000 km2 between the Sahara desert and the upwelling system off the Mauritanian coast. In the southeast, BA consists of a 500 km2 tidal flat, the most important wintering site for shorebirds using the East Atlantic Flyway. Th

  13. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Distributed Data Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G.; Eakins, J.; Hodgkinson, K.; Matykiewicz, J.; Beldyk, M.; Blackman, B.; Boler, F.; Henderson, B.; Hoyt, B.; Lee, E.; Persson, E.; Smith, J.; Torrez, D.; Wright, J.; Jackson, M.; Meertens, C.

    2007-05-01

    EarthScope is an ambitious multi-year project funded by the United States National Science Foundation to explore the structure and dynamics of the North American continent using a wide range of geophysical methods. The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), being built by UNAVCO, is the geodetic component of EarthScope, and will comprise 880 continuous GPS stations, 103 borehole strainmeter stations, 28 tiltmeters, and five laser strainmeters; in addition, PBO will manage data for 209 existing GPS stations and 11 GPS stations installed by the USArray segment of EarthScope. As of February 2007, 561 of these stations have been installed. PBO data flow is managed from the PBO Boulder Network Operations Center (NOC), located at UNAVCO Headquarters. Automated systems at the NOC retrieve data from our stations at least daily, monitor the status of the network and alert operators to problems, and pass data on for analysis, archiving, and distribution. Real-time network status can be found at http:pboweb.unavco.org/soh_map. PBO's analysis centers generate high-quality derived data products from PBO raw data. Two centers, at Central Washington University and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, process raw GPS data to produce initial PBO GPS products including network solutions and station position time series, andthese products are combined by the Analysis Center Coordinator at MIT to produce the official PBO GPS products. Two analysis centers, at UNAVCO's Socorro office and the University of California, San Diego, process data from the PBO borehole and laser strainmeter networks and produce cleaned time series of shear, areal, and linear strain, Earth tides, pore fluid pressure, and other parameters. The UNAVCO Facility archives and distributes all PBO GPS data products and runs a secondary archive offsite; to date, these centers hold more than 2.5 TB of PBO products. The IRIS Data Management Center and Northern California Earthquake Data Center archive and

  14. Global existence and blow-up of solutions to a parabolic system with nonlocal sources and boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with a semi-linear parabolic system with nonlinear nonlocal sources and nonlocal boundaries.By using super-and sub-solution techniques,we first give the sufficient conditions that the classical solution exists globally and blows up in a finite time respectively,and then give the necessary and sufficient conditions that two components u and v blow up simultaneously.Finally,the uniform blow-up profiles in the interior are presented.

  15. Global existence and blow-up of solutions to a parabolic system with nonlocal sources and boundaries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-hua KONG; Ming-xin WANG

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with a semi-linear parabolic system with nonlinear nonlocal sources and nonlocal boundaries. By using super- and sub-solution techniques, we first give the sufficient conditions that the classical solution exists globally and blows up in a finite time respectively, and then give the necessary and sufficient conditions that two components u and v blow up simultaneously. Finally, the uniform blow-up profiles in the interior are presented.

  16. Southern Ocean warming delayed by circumpolar upwelling and equatorward transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Kyle C.; Marshall, John; Scott, Jeffery R.; Donohoe, Aaron; Newsom, Emily R.

    2016-07-01

    The Southern Ocean has shown little warming over recent decades, in stark contrast to the rapid warming observed in the Arctic. Along the northern flank of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, however, the upper ocean has warmed substantially. Here we present analyses of oceanographic observations and general circulation model simulations showing that these patterns--of delayed warming south of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and enhanced warming to the north--are fundamentally shaped by the Southern Ocean's meridional overturning circulation: wind-driven upwelling of unmodified water from depth damps warming around Antarctica; greenhouse gas-induced surface heat uptake is largely balanced by anomalous northward heat transport associated with the equatorward flow of surface waters; and heat is preferentially stored where surface waters are subducted to the north. Further, these processes are primarily due to passive advection of the anomalous warming signal by climatological ocean currents; changes in ocean circulation are secondary. These findings suggest the Southern Ocean responds to greenhouse gas forcing on the centennial, or longer, timescale over which the deep ocean waters that are upwelled to the surface are warmed themselves. It is against this background of gradual warming that multidecadal Southern Ocean temperature trends must be understood.

  17. The reduction of biological production induced by mesoscale mixing: a modelling study in the Benguela upwelling

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Carrasco, Ismael; Hernández-García, Emilio; Garçon, Veronique; López, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies, both based on remote sensed data and coupled models, showed a reduction of biological productivity due to vigorous horizontal mixing in upwelling systems. In order to better understand this phenomenon, we have considered a system of oceanic flow in the Benguela area coupled with a simple biogeochemical model of Nutrient-Phyto-Zooplankton (NPZ) type. For the flow three different surface velocity fields are considered: one derived from satellite altimetry data, and the other two from a regional numerical model at two different spatial resolutions. We computed horizontal particle dispersion in terms of Lyapunov Exponents, and analyzed their correlations with phytoplankton concentrations. Our modelling approach confirms that in the south Benguela, there is a reduction of biological activity when stirring is increased. Two-dimensional offshore advection seems to be the dominant process involved. In the northern area, other factors not taken into account in our simulation are influencing the ecosyst...

  18. Zooplankton Responses to Low-Oxygen Condition upon a Shallow Oxygen Minimum Zone in the Upwelling Region off Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, P.; Escribano, R.

    2015-12-01

    A shallow oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) is a critical component in the coastal upwelling ecosystem off Chile. This OMZ causes oxygen-deficient water entering the photic layer and affecting plankton communities having low tolerance to hypoxia. Variable, and usually species-dependent, responses of zooplankton to hypoxia condition can be found. Most dominant species avoid hypoxia by restricting their vertical distribution, while others can temporarily enter and even spent part of their life cycle within the OMZ. Whatever the case, low-oxygen conditions appear to affect virtually all vital rates of zooplankton, such as mortality, fecundity, development and growth and metabolism, and early developmental stages seem more sensitive, with significant consequences for population and community dynamics. For most study cases, these effects are negative at individual and population levels. Observations and predictions upon increasing upwelling intensity over the last 20-30 years indicate a gradual shoaling of the OMZ, and so that an expected enhancement of these negative effects of hypoxia on the zooplankton community. Unknown processes of adaptation and community-structure adjustments are expected to take place with uncertain consequences for the food web of this highly productive eastern boundary current ecosystem.

  19. Mathematical model of complex technical asymmetric system based on numerical-analytical boundary elements method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina V. Lazareva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mathematical model of asymmetric support structure frame type is built on the basis of numerical-analytical boundary elements method (BEM. To describe the design scheme used is the graph theory. Building the model taken into account is the effect of frame members restrained torsion, which presence is due to the fact that these elements are thin-walled. The built model represents a real object as a two-axle semi-trailer platform. To implement the BEM algorithm obtained are analytical expressions of the fundamental functions and vector load components. The effected calculations are based on the semi-trailer two different models, using finite elements and boundary elements methods. The analysis showed that the error between the results obtained on the basis of two numerical methods and experimental data is about 4%, that indicates the adequacy of the proposed mathematical model.

  20. Changes in optical characteristics of surface microlayers hint to photochemically and microbially mediated DOM turnover in the upwelling region off the coast of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgani, Luisa; Engel, Anja

    2016-04-01

    The coastal upwelling system off the coast of Peru is characterized by high biological activity and a pronounced subsurface oxygen minimum zone, as well as associated emissions of atmospheric trace gases such as N2O, CH4 and CO2. From 3 to 23 December 2012, R/V Meteor (M91) cruise took place in the Peruvian upwelling system between 4.59 and 15.4° S, and 82.0 to 77.5° W. During M91 we investigated the composition of the sea-surface microlayer (SML), the oceanic uppermost boundary directly subject to high solar radiation, often enriched in specific organic compounds of biological origin like chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and marine gels. In the SML, the continuous photochemical and microbial recycling of organic matter may strongly influence gas exchange between marine systems and the atmosphere. We analyzed SML and underlying water (ULW) samples at 38 stations focusing on CDOM spectral characteristics as indicator of photochemical and microbial alteration processes. CDOM composition was characterized by spectral slope (S) values and excitation-emission matrix fluorescence (EEMs), which allow us to track changes in molecular weight (MW) of DOM, and to determine potential DOM sources and sinks. Spectral slope S varied between 0.012 to 0.043 nm-1 and was quite similar between SML and ULW, with no significant differences between the two compartments. Higher S values were observed in the ULW of the southern stations below 15° S. By EEMs, we identified five fluorescent components (F1-5) of the CDOM pool, of which two had excitation/emission characteristics of amino-acid-like fluorophores (F1, F4) and were highly enriched in the SML, with a median ratio SML : ULW of 1.5 for both fluorophores. In the study region, values for CDOM absorption ranged from 0.07 to 1.47 m-1. CDOM was generally highly concentrated in the SML, with a median enrichment with respect to the ULW of 1.2. CDOM composition and changes in spectral slope properties suggested a local

  1. First-order Phase Transitions in Finite Systems I: Periodic Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Medved

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review rigorous results on the finite-size effect near first-order phase transitions at which a two-phase coexistence takes place. We consider a large class of statistical mechanical models in (hypercubic volumes with periodic boundary conditions at low temperatures. The results show a universal behavior of the asymptotic smoothing of the phase transition discontinuities. The determination of the transition point from

  2. First-order Phase Transitions in Finite Systems I: Periodic Boundary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Medved

    2005-01-01

    We briefly review rigorous results on the finite-size effect near first-order phase transitions at which a two-phase coexistence takes place. We consider a large class of statistical mechanical models in (hyper)cubic volumes with periodic boundary conditions at low temperatures. The results show a universal behavior of the asymptotic smoothing of the phase transition discontinuities. The determination of the transition point from

  3. LOTOS: A Proposed Lower Tropospheric Observing System from the Land Surface through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, S. A.; Lee, W. C.; Carbone, R. E.; Oncley, S.; Brown, W. O. J.; Spuler, S.; Horst, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in sensor capabilities, but also in electronics, optics, RF communication, and off-the-grid power are enabling new measurement paradigms. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is considering new sensors, new deployment modes, and integrated observing strategies to address challenges in understanding within the atmospheric boundary layer and the underlying coupling to the land surface. Our vision is of a network of deployable observing sites, each with a suite of complementary instruments that measure surface-atmosphere exchange, and the state and evolution of the boundary layer. EOL has made good progress on distributed surface energy balance and flux stations, and on boundary layer remote sensing of wind and water vapor, all suitable for deployments of combined instruments and as network of such sites. We will present the status of the CentNet surface network development, the 449-MHz modular wind profiler, and a water vapor and temperature profiling differential absorption lidar (DIAL) under development. We will further present a concept for a test bed to better understand the value of these and other possible instruments in forming an instrument suite flexible for multiple research purposes.

  4. On the Robin-Transmission Boundary Value Problems for the Nonlinear Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman and Navier-Stokes Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohr, Mirela; de Cristoforis, Massimo Lanza; Wendland, Wolfgang L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study a boundary value problem of Robin-transmission type for the nonlinear Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman and Navier-Stokes systems in two adjacent bounded Lipschitz domains in {{{R}}n (nin {2,3})}, with linear transmission conditions on the internal Lipschitz interface and a linear Robin condition on the remaining part of the Lipschitz boundary. We also consider a Robin-transmission problem for the same nonlinear systems subject to nonlinear transmission conditions on the internal Lipschitz interface and a nonlinear Robin condition on the remaining part of the boundary. For each of these problems we exploit layer potential theoretic methods combined with fixed point theorems in order to show existence results in Sobolev spaces, when the given data are suitably small in {L^2}-based Sobolev spaces or in some Besov spaces. For the first mentioned problem, which corresponds to linear Robin and transmission conditions, we also show a uniqueness result. Note that the Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy equation is a nonlinear equation that describes saturated porous media fluid flows.

  5. Flow patterns and boundary conditions for inlet and outlet conduits of large pump system with low head

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐磊; 陆伟刚; 陆林广; 董雷; 王兆飞

    2014-01-01

    The flow patterns in the inlet and outlet conduits have a decisive effect on the safe, stable, and highly efficient operation of the pump in a large pumping station with low head. The numerical simulation of three-dimensional (3D) turbulence flow in conduits is an important method to study the hydraulic performance and conduct an optimum hydraulic design for the conduits. With the analyses of the flow patterns in the inlet and outlet conduits, the boundary conditions of the numerical simulation for them can be determined. The main obtained conclusions are as follows: (i) Under normal operation conditions, there is essentially no pre-swirl flow at the impeller chamber inlet of an axial-flow pump system, based on which the boundary condition at the inlet conduit may be defined. (ii) The circulation at the guide vane outlet of an axial-flow pump system has a great effect on the hydraulic performance of the outlet conduit, and there is optimum circulation for the performance. Therefore, it is strongly suggested to design the guide vane according to the optimum circulation. (iii) The residual circulation at the guide vane outlet needs to be considered for the inlet boundary condition of the outlet conduit, and the value of the circulation may be measured in a specially designed test model.

  6. Plankton dynamics in a cyclonic eddy in the Southern California Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenillat, Fanny; Franks, Peter J. S.; Rivière, Pascal; Capet, Xavier; Grima, Nicolas; Blanke, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    The California Current System is an eastern boundary upwelling system (EBUS) with high biological production along the coast. Oligotrophic offshore waters create cross-shore gradients of biological and physical properties, which are affected by intense mesoscale eddy activity. The influence of eddies on ecosystem dynamics in EBUS is still in debate. To elucidate the mechanisms that influence the dynamics of ecosystems trapped in eddies, and the relative contribution of horizontal and vertical advection in determining local production, we analyze a particular cyclonic eddy using Lagrangian particle-tracking analyses of numerical Eulerian. The eddy formed in a coastal upwelling system; coastal waters trapped in the eddy enabled it to leave the upwelling region with high concentrations of plankton and nutrients. The ecosystem was initially driven mainly by recycling of biological material. As the eddy moved offshore, production in its core was enhanced compared to eddy exterior waters through Ekman pumping of nitrate from below the euphotic zone; this Ekman pumping was particularly effective due to the shallow nitracline in the eddy compared to eddy exterior waters. Both eddy trapping and Ekman pumping helped to isolate and maintain the ecosystem productivity in the eddy core. This study shows the importance of cyclonic eddies for biological production in EBUS: they contribute both to the redistribution of the coastal upwelling ecosystem and are local regions of enhanced new production. Together, these processes impact cross-shore gradients of important biological properties.

  7. Response of Mytilus edulis to enhanced phytoplankton availibility by controlled upwelling in an oligographic fjord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strohmeier, T.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Duinker, A.; Rosland, R.; Jansen, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in oligotrophic coastal regions has been proposed as a means of increasing phytoplankton and, subsequently, bivalve aquaculture production. This was tested as part of a large-scale upwelling experiment in an oligotrophic environment (Lysefjord, No

  8. Seasonality in Planktic Foraminifera of the Central California Coastal Upwelling Region

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, C.V.; Russell, A. D.; Gaylord, B. P.; Jahncke, J.; Hill, T M

    2016-01-01

    The association between planktic foraminiferal assemblages and local hydrography make foraminifera invaluable proxies for environmental conditions. Modern foraminiferal seasonality is important for interpreting fossil distributions and shell geochemistry as paleoclimate proxies. Understanding this seasonality in an active upwelling area is also critical for anticipating which species may be vulnerable to future changes in upwelling intensity and ocean acidification. Two ye...

  9. How marine upwelling influences the distribution of Artemesia longinaris (Decapoda: Penaeoidea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Sancinetti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Upwelling events can occur in most of the oceans altering the water physical, chemical and sediment conditions and consequently the species communities dwelling the areas. For better understanding the behavior of populations inhabiting upwelling regions, the spatial and temporal distribution of a Penaeoidea shrimp was studied correlating it with the abiotic factors that vary during upwelling and non-upwelling periods in an area under influence of Cabo Frio upwelling. Bottom salinity and temperature, organic matter and sediment type from each station were sampled from March 2008 to February 2010, in six stations located between 5 and 45 m depth. The lowest temperatures were recorded during spring and summer for both years with temperature values lower than 19ºC. A total of 26,466 Artemesia longinaris shrimps were captured mainly in 10-35 m depth. Upwelling periods showed significant differences in abundance in relation to non-upwelling periods. The spatial distribution among stations varied according to the temperature with higher abundance in stations with values between 19 and 21ºC. The highest abundance of A. longinaris was recorded in spring and summer when intrusions of the cold waters of South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW were frequent. Thus, the effect of cold water of SACW boosted by the upwelling was a determinant factor in the spatial and temporal distribution of A. longinaris in the studied region.

  10. DETERMINATION OF EFFICIENCY INDICES PERTAINING TO DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATION OF TRANS-BOUNDARY TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Kopko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the system efficiency requires a special approach in terms of its level, content and interrelations with an external environment. In this regard logistic  systems are rather complicated that consist of a number of service sub-systems and designed at various levels.  Such system complexity requires a development of an efficient mechanism for its design and operation of objects of the trans-boundary transport logistics. The efficiency of the trans-boundary transport and logistic systems (TTLS can be described by a number of cost and physical indicators reflecting both market and traditional approaches. The TTLS have their own peculiar features concerning determination of efficiency that are related with the state regulation set of processes occurring  at border crossings. In order to assess the current operational process it is necessary to apply an index system which pays a special attention to a transport capability due to the TTLS specificity. While planning a custom automotive processing at a border checkpoint there is no need to aspire for an immediate passage of all vehicles by all means. The basic requirement is to maintain a transport capability in the operational zone. Thus an irregularity of incoming vehicles at border crossing points is smoothed out by regulating priorities pertaining to requirements of custom processing while using an urgency function of cargo transportation thereby ensuring an optimal operation of a customs post.

  11. Are large macroalgal blooms necessarily bad? Nutrient impacts on seagrass in upwelling-influenced estuaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessing-Lewis, Margot L; Hacker, Sally D; Menge, Bruce A; McConville, Sea-oh; Henderson, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    Knowledge of nutrient pathways and their resulting ecological interactions can alleviate numerous environmental problems associated with nutrient increases in both natural and managed systems. Although not unique, coastal systems are particularly prone to complex ecological interactions resulting from nutrient inputs from both the land and sea. Nutrient inputs to coastal systems often spur ulvoid macroalgal blooms, with negative consequences for seagrasses, primarily through shading, as well as through changes in local biogeochemistry. We conducted complementary field and mesocosm experiments in an upwelling-influenced estuary, where marine-derived nutrients dominate, to understand the direct and indirect effects of nutrients on the macroalgal-eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) interaction. In the field experiment, we found weak evidence that nutrients and/or macroalgal treatments had a negative effect on eelgrass. However, in the mesocosm experiment, we found that a combination of nutrient and macroalgal treatments led to strongly negative eelgrass responses, primarily via indirect effects associated with macroalgal additions. Together, increased total light attenuation and decreased sediment oxygen levels were associated with larger effects on eelgrass than shading alone, which was evaluated using mimic algae treatments that did not alter sediment redox potential. Nutrient addition in the mesocosms directly affected seagrass density; biomass, and morphology, but not as strongly as macroalgae. We hypothesize that the contrary results from these parallel experiments are a consequence of differences in the hydrodynamics between field and mesocosm settings. We suggest that the high rates of water movement and tidal submersion of our intertidal field experiments alleviated the light reduction and negative biogeochemical changes in the sediment associated with macroalgal canopies, as well as the nutrient effects observed in the mesocosm experiments. Furthermore, adaptation

  12. Simulations of membranes and other interfacial systems using P2(1) and Pc periodic boundary conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Elizabeth A.; Venable, Richard M.; Pastor, Richard W.; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the ease and utility of simulating heterogeneous interfacial systems with P2(1) and Pc periodic boundary conditions which allow, for example, lipids in a membrane to switch leaflets. In preliminary tests, P2(1) was shown to yield equivalent results to P1 in simulations of bulk water, a water/vacuum interface, and pure DPPC bilayers with an equal number of lipids per leaflet; equivalence of Pc and P1 was also demonstrated for the former two systems. P2(1) was further tested in s...

  13. Design of optical systems using derivatives of rays: derivatives of variable vector of spherical boundary surfaces with respect to system variable vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2013-10-20

    A computational scheme based on differential geometry was proposed in a previous study [Appl. Opt.52, 4151 (2013)] for determining the first- and second-order derivative matrices of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a flat boundary surface. The present study extends this methodology to the case of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a spherical boundary surface. The validity of the proposed approach is demonstrated using two retro-reflectors for illustration purposes. The results show that the proposed method provides an effective means of determining the search direction required to minimize the merit function during the optimization stage of the optical system design process.

  14. Bacterial and Archaeal Communities Variability Associated with Upwelling and Anthropogenic Pressures in the Protection Area of Arraial do Cabo (Cabo Frio region - RJ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Souza, Sergio A; Araújo, Fábio V; Cury, Juliano C; Jesus, Hugo E; Pereira, Gilberto C; Guimarães, Jean R D; Peixoto, Raquel S; Dávila, Alberto M R; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2015-09-01

    Upwelling systems contain a high diversity of pelagic microorganisms and their composition and activity are defined by factors like temperature and nutrient concentration. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique was used to verify the spatial and temporal genetic variability of Bacteria and Archaea in two stations of the Arraial do Cabo coastal region, one under upwelling pressure and another under anthropogenic pressure. In addition, biotic and abiotic variables were measured in surface and deep waters from three other stations between these stations. Six samplings were done during a year and adequately represented the degrees of upwelling and anthropogenic pressures to the system. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed negative correlations between the concentrations of ammonia and phosphorous with prokaryotic secondary production and the total heterotrophic bacteria. PCA also showed negative correlation between temperature and the abundance of prokaryotic cells. Bacterial and archaeal compositions were changeable as were the oceanographic conditions, and upwelling had a regional pressure while anthropogenic pressure was punctual. We suggest that the measurement of prokaryotic secondary production was associated with both Bacteria and Archaea activities, and that substrate availability and temperature determine nutrients cycling. PMID:26375020

  15. Stable isotope analysis challenges wasp-waist food web assumptions in an upwelling pelagic ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Daniel J; Carlisle, Aaron B; Dewar, Heidi; Snodgrass, Owyn E; Litvin, Steven Y; Micheli, Fiorenza; Block, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    Eastern boundary currents are often described as 'wasp-waist' ecosystems in which one or few mid-level forage species support a high diversity of larger predators that are highly susceptible to fluctuations in prey biomass. The assumption of wasp-waist control has not been empirically tested in all such ecosystems. This study used stable isotope analysis to test the hypothesis of wasp-waist control in the southern California Current large marine ecosystem (CCLME). We analyzed prey and predator tissue for δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N and used Bayesian mixing models to provide estimates of CCLME trophic dynamics from 2007-2010. Our results show high omnivory, planktivory by some predators, and a higher degree of trophic connectivity than that suggested by the wasp-waist model. Based on this study period, wasp-waist models oversimplify trophic dynamics within the CCLME and potentially other upwelling, pelagic ecosystems. Higher trophic connectivity in the CCLME likely increases ecosystem stability and resilience to perturbations. PMID:22977729

  16. Initial observation of upwelling along east coast of Peninsular Malaysia musica gratis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhir, M.; Tanggang, F.

    2013-12-01

    There is no published evidence of upwelling in coastal area along the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia. However numbers of recent cruise data collected during the southwest monsoon found features of thermocline lifting and isolated cooler temperature water along the coast, These sign was observed along the 104°E from numbers of parallel transects. To confirm the presence of upwelling, satellite remote sensing data was used, and numerical model experiments were conducted. Cooler sea-surface temperature along the coast was observed from both in-situ and satellite data, while upward movement in the vertical profiles agreed with the location of upwelling from both in-situ and satellite data. Moreover, these data also show that the upwelled water band along the 104°E longitude stretch approximately 650 km long. Initially, southwesterly wind during this season is believed to be the important mechanism that contributed to this wind-induced Ekman upwelling. musica gratis

  17. Regulation of bacterial sulfate reduction and hydrogen sulfide fluxes in the central Namibian coastal upwelling zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Jørgensen, BB; Neumann, K.;

    2003-01-01

    and the low capacity to oxidize and trap sulfide. The inner shelf break marks the seaward border of sulfidic bottom waters, and separates two different regimes of bacterial sulfate reduction. In the sulfidic bottom waters on the shelf, up to 55% of sulfide oxidation is mediated by the large nitrate......The coastal upwelling system off central Namibia is one of the most productive regions of the oceans and is characterized by frequently occurring shelf anoxia with severe effects for the benthic life and fisheries. We present data on water column dissolved oxygen, sulfide, nitrate and nitrite, pore...... water profiles for dissolved,sulfide and sulfate, S-35-sulfate reduction rates, as well as bacterial counts of large sulfur bacteria from 20 stations across the continental shelf and slope. The stations covered two transects and included the inner shelf with its anoxic and extremely oxygen...

  18. Tidally induced upwelling off Yangtze River estuary and in Zhejiang coastal waters in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    MASNUM wave-tide-circulation coupled numerical model (MASNUM coupled model, hereinafter) is de-veloped based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). Both POM and MASNUM coupled model are ap-plied in the numerical simulation of the upwelling off Yangtze River estuary and in Zhejiang coastal waters in summer. The upwelling mechanisms are analyzed from the viewpoint of tide, and a new mechanism is proposed. The study suggests that the tidally inducing mechanism of the upwelling in-cludes two dynamic aspects: the barotropic and the baroclinic process. On the one hand, the residual currents induced by barotropic tides converge near the seabed, and upwelling is generated to maintain mass conservation. The climbing of the residual currents along the sea bottom slope also contributes to the upwelling. On the other hand, tidal mixing plays a very important role in inducing the upwelling in the baroclinic sea circumstances. Strong tidal mixing leads to conspicuous front in the coastal waters. The considerable horizontal density gradient across the front elicits a secondary circulation clinging to the tidal front, and the upwelling branch appears near the frontal zone. Numerical experiments are de-signed to determine the importance of tide in inducing the upwelling. The results indicate that tide is a key and dominant inducement of the upwelling. Experiments also show that coupling calculation of the four main tidal constituents (M2, S2, K1, and O1), rather than dealing with the single M2 constituent, im-proves the modeling precision of the barotropic tide-induced upwelling.

  19. Tidally induced upwelling off Yangtze River estuary and in Zhejiang coastal waters in summer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(ü) XinGang; QIAO FangLi; XIA ChangShui; YUAN YeLi

    2007-01-01

    MASNUM wave-tide-circulation coupled numerical model(MASNUM coupled model,hereinafter)is developed based on the Princeton Ocean Model (POM).Both POM and MASNUM coupled model are applied in the numerical simulation of the upwelling off Yangtze River estuary and in Zhejiang coastal waters in summer.The upwelling mechanisms are analyzed from the viewpoint of tide,and a new mechanism is proposed.The study suggests that the tidally inducing mechanism of the upwelling includes two dynamic aspects:the barotropic and the baroclinic process.On the one hand,the residual currents induced by barotropic tides converge near the seabed,and upwelling is generated to maintain mass conservation.The climbing of the residual currents along the sea bottom slope also contributes to the upwelling.On the other hand,tidal mixing plays a very important role in inducing the upwelling in the baroclinic sea circumstances.Strong tidal mixing leads to conspicuous front in the coastal waters.The considerable horizontal density gradient across the front elicits a secondary circulation clinging to the tidal front,and the upwelling branch appears near the frontal zone.Numerical experiments are designed to determine the importance of tide in inducing the upwelling.The results indicate that tide is a key and dominant inducement of the upwelling.Experiments also show that coupling calculation of the four main tidal constituents (M2,S2,K1,and O1),rather than dealing with the single M2 constituent,improves the modeling precision of the barotropic tide-induced upwelling.

  20. Differential responses of calcifying and non-calcifying epibionts of a brown macroalga to present-day and future upwelling pCO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Saderne

    Full Text Available Seaweeds are key species of the Baltic Sea benthic ecosystems. They are the substratum of numerous fouling epibionts like bryozoans and tubeworms. Several of these epibionts bear calcified structures and could be impacted by the high pCO2 events of the late summer upwellings in the Baltic nearshores. Those events are expected to increase in strength and duration with global change and ocean acidification. If calcifying epibionts are impacted by transient acidification as driven by upwelling events, their increasing prevalence could cause a shift of the fouling communities toward fleshy species. The aim of the present study was to test the sensitivity of selected seaweed macrofoulers to transient elevation of pCO2 in their natural microenvironment, i.e. the boundary layer covering the thallus surface of brown seaweeds. Fragments of the macroalga Fucus serratus bearing an epibiotic community composed of the calcifiers Spirorbis spirorbis (Annelida and Electra pilosa (Bryozoa and the non-calcifier Alcyonidium hirsutum (Bryozoa were maintained for 30 days under three pCO2 conditions: natural 460 ± 59 µatm, present-day upwelling1193 ± 166 µatm and future upwelling 3150 ± 446 µatm. Only the highest pCO2 caused a significant reduction of growth rates and settlement of S. spirorbis individuals. Additionally, S. spirorbis settled juveniles exhibited enhanced calcification of 40% during daylight hours compared to dark hours, possibly reflecting a day-night alternation of an acidification-modulating effect by algal photosynthesis as opposed to an acidification-enhancing effect of algal respiration. E. pilosa colonies showed significantly increased growth rates at intermediate pCO2 (1193 µatm but no response to higher pCO2. No effect of acidification on A. hirsutum colonies growth rates was observed. The results suggest a remarkable resistance of the algal macro-epibionts to levels of acidification occurring at present day upwellings in the Baltic

  1. A numerical investigation of the atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast over the coastal upwelling region of Cabo Frio, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourado, M. [Departamento de Meteorologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Pelotas RS (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcelo_dourado@ufpel.edu.br; Pereira de Oliveira, A. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, (Brazil)

    2008-01-15

    An one-dimensional atmospheric second order closure model, coupled to an oceanic mixed layer model, is used to investigate the short term variation of the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers in the coastal upwelling area of Cabo Frio, Brazil (23 degrees Celsius S, 42 degrees Celsius 08' W). The numerical simulations were carried out to evaluate the impact caused by the thermal contrast between atmosphere and ocean on the vertical extent and other properties of both atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers. The numerical simulations were designed taking as reference the observations carried out during the passage of a cold front that disrupted the upwelling regime in Cabo Frio in July of 1992. The simulations indicated that in 10 hours the mechanical mixing, sustained by a constant background flow of 10 m s-1, increases the atmospheric boundary layer in 214 m when the atmosphere is initially 2 K warmer than the ocean (positive thermal contrast observed during upwelling regime). For an atmosphere initially -2 K colder than the ocean (negative thermal contrast observed during passage of the cold front), the incipient thermal convection intensifies the mechanical mixing increasing the vertical extent of the atmospheric boundary layer in 360 m. The vertical evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is consistent with the observations carried out in Cabo Frio during upwelling condition. When the upwelling is disrupted, the discrepancy between the simulated and observed atmospheric boundary layer heights in Cabo Frio during July of 1992 increases considerably. During the period of 10 hours, the simulated oceanic mixed layer deepens 2 m and 5.4 m for positive and negative thermal contrasts of 2 K and -2 K, respectively. In the latter case, the larger vertical extent of the oceanic mixed layer is due to the presence of thermal convection in the atmospheric boundary layer, which in turn is associated to the absence of upwelling caused by the passage of cold fronts

  2. From dynamic to static Large Deviations in boundary driven exclusion particle systems.

    CERN Document Server

    Bodineau, T

    2002-01-01

    We consider the large deviations for the stationary measures associated to a boundary driven symmetric simple exclusion process. Starting from the large deviations for the hydrodynamics and following the Freidlin and Wentzell's strategy, we prove that the rate function is given by the quasi--potential of the Freidlin and Wentzell theory. This result is motivated by the recent developments on the non-equilibrium stationary measures by Derrida, Lebowitz and Speer and the more closely related dynamical approach by Bertini, De Sole, Gabrielli, Jona Lasinio, Landim.

  3. Productivity cycles in the coastal upwelling area off Concepción: The importance of diatoms and bacterioplankton in the organic carbon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Paulina; Daneri, Giovanni; Cuevas, L. Antonio; González, Humberto E.; Jacob, Bárbara; Lizárraga, Lorena; Menschel, Eduardo

    2007-11-01

    Recurrent coastal upwelling is recognized as one of the main factors promoting the exceptionally high productivity of the Humboldt Current System. Herein, we study time series data of gross primary production (2003-2006) and its fluctuation in relation to seasonal changes in the light and nutrient field of the Concepción upwelling ecosystem. Concurrent measurements of gross primary production, community respiration, bacterial secondary production, and sedimentation rates allowed a characterization of the main carbon fluxes and pathways in the study area. The integrated values of gross primary production were higher during the upwelling period (>1 g C m -2 d -1; October-April; that is, early spring to early austral fall). Seasonal changes in the system were also reflected in community respiration, organic matter sedimentation, and bacterial production rates, which varied along with the gross primary production. The significant correlation between gross primary production and community respiration (Spearman, r = 0.7; p 6 g C m -2 d -1) were consistently associated with maximum biomass levels of Skeletonema costatum and Thalassiosira subtilis. We observed a positive correlation between gross primary production and the sedimentation of intact diatom cells (Spearman, r = 0.5, p < 0.05, n = 17). Our data suggest that, in the Concepción upwelling ecosystem, bacteria utilize an important fraction of the gross primary production. If our interpretations are correct, they leave unanswered the question of how the system supports the extremely high fish biomass levels, therein pointing out the system’s limited capacity to buffer the evasion of CO 2 following upwelling.

  4. WELL-POSEDNESS OF A FREE BOUNDARY PROBLEM IN THE LIMIT OF SLOW-DIFFUSION FAST-REACTION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xinfu; Gao Congyu

    2006-01-01

    We consider a free boundary problem obtained from the asymptotic limit of a FitzHugh-Nagumo system, or more precisely, a slow-diffusion, fast-reaction equation governing a phase indicator, coupled with an ordinary differential equation governing a control variable v. In the range (-1, 1), the v value controls the speed of the propagation of phase boundaries (interfaces) and in the mean time changes with dynamics depending on the phases. A new feature included in our formulation and thus made our model different from most of the contemporary ones is the nucleation phenomenon: a phase switch occurs whenever v elevates to 1 or drops to -1. For this free boundary problem, we provide a weak formulation which allows the propagation,annihilation, and nucleation of interfaces, and excludes interfaces from having (spacetime) interior points. We study, in the one space dimension setting, the existence,uniqueness, and non-uniqueness of weak solutions. A few illustrating examples are also included.

  5. The intraplate Euphrates fault system-Palmyrides mountain belt junction and relationship to Arabian plate boundary tectonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sawaf

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available We interpret seismic data and well logs to indicate that the Euphrates graben, intersecting orthogonally with the Palmyride mountains, is an intraplate transtensional feature that probably developed in response to plate boundary stress created by a latest Cretaceous convergence event along the present-day northern boundary of the Arabian plate. The principal stress direction is proposed to lie generally parallel to the graben; hence, it may have formed as a tear in the Arabian crust while, as previously documented, the Palmyride region under- went shortening and uplift. Arabian plate boundary tectonism as well as shorteningin the Palmyrides were pe- riodically active during the entire Cenozoic, especially in Neogene and Quaternary time. However, the normal fault motions that formed the Euphrates graben were not active within the study area after the end of the Cre- taceous, and were most active during the Campanian-Maastl.ichtian. A broad, Cenozoic depression overlying the Euphrates graben and most of Eastern Syria is possibly related to the Mesopotamian foredeep that devel- oped in response to the nearby Zagros continental collision zone during Neogene and Quaternary time. Cenozoic strike-slip faults lie between the Euphrates graben and the Palmyrides belt and may kinematically separate the Palmyrides from the Euphrates system.

  6. Hot mantle upwelling across the 660 beneath Yellowstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmandt, Brandon; Dueker, Kenneth; Humphreys, Eugene; Hansen, Steven

    2012-05-01

    P-to-s receiver functions mapped to depth through P and S body-wave tomography models image continuous 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the area covered by USArray prior to the year 2011. Mean depths to the 410 and 660 km discontinuities of 410 and 656 km imply a mantle transition zone that is about 4 km thicker than the global average and hence has a slightly cooler mean temperature and/or enhanced water content. Compared to the mean 660 depth beneath this ~ 2000 km wide area, the 660 beneath the Yellowstone hotspot is deflected upward by 12-18 km over an area about 200 km wide. This is the most anomalous shallowing of the 660 imaged and its horizontal extent is similar to the area where P and S tomography image low-velocity mantle extending from the top of the transition zone to about 900 km depth. Together, these results indicate a high-temperature, plume-like upwelling extending across the 660. The depth of 410 km discontinuity beneath the Yellowstone region is within 5 km of the mean depth implying that the plume is vertically heterogeneous and possibly discontinuous. Tomography indicates a similar vertically heterogeneous thermal plume. The irregular plume structure may be intrinsic to the dynamics of upwelling through the transition zone, or distortion may be caused by subduction-induced mantle flow. Topography of the 410 and 660 confirms that subducted slabs beneath the western U.S. are highly segmented, as inferred from recent tomography studies. We find no evidence of regionally pervasive velocity discontinuities between 750 and 1400 km depth. The plume's depth of origin within the lower mantle remains uncertain.

  7. Proposed Auxiliary Boundary Stratigraphic Section and Point (ASSP) for the base of the Ordovician System at Lawson Cove, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James F.; Evans, Kevin R.; Ethington, Raymond L.; Freeman, Rebecca; Loch, James D.; Repetski, John E.; Ripperdan, Robert; Taylor, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The Global boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Ordovician System is at the First Appearance Datum (FAD) of the conodont Iapetognathus fluctivagus at Green Point in Newfoundland, Canada. Strata there are typical graptolitic facies that were deposited near the base of the continental slope.We propose establishing an Auxiliary boundary Stratotype Section and Point (ASSP) at the FAD of I. fluctivagus at the Lawson Cove section in the Ibex area of Millard County, Utah, USA. There, strata consist of typical shelly facies limestones that were deposited on a tropical carbonate platform and contain abundant conodonts, trilobites, brachiopods, and other fossil groups. Cambrian and Ordovician strata in this area are ~5300m thick, with the Lawson Cove section spanning 243m in three overlapping segments. Six other measured and studied sections in the area show stratigraphic relationships similar to those at Lawson Cove. Faunas have been used to divide these strata into 14 conodont and 7 trilobite zonal units. The widespread olenid trilobite Jujuyaspis occurs ~90cm above the proposed boundary at Lawson Cove; this genus is generally regarded as earliest Ordovician. Rhynchonelliform and linguliform brachiopods are common to abundant and are useful for correlation. The FAD of Iapetognathus fluctivagus and occurrences of Jujuyaspis and the Lower Ordovician planktonic graptolite Anisograptus matanensis all occur within a 2.4m interval of strata at a nearby section. Non-biological correlation tools include a detailed sequence stratigraphic classification and a detailed carbon-isotope profile. Especially useful for correlation is a positive 13C excursion peak ~15cm below the proposed boundary horizon. All of these correlation tools form an integrated framework that makes the Lawson Cove section especially useful as an ASSP for global correlation of strata with faunas typical of shallow, warm-water, shelly facies.

  8. Identification of upwelling areas in the Oman Sea Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Satellite-derived sea-surface temperature, TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) sea-level anomalies (SLAs), modeled wind data, and hydrodynamic data from World Ocean Database were used to characterize the upwelling along the Oman Sea coasts during 2002 - 2012. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the satellite-derived sea-surface temperature (SST) shows the first mode affected by upwelling processes, which represents a biannual variability. In addition, the SST shows the upwelling front moving offshore with the development of Southwest (SW) Monsoon in early June. SST shows the persistence of cold upwelling waters for nearly a month after the end of the SW Monsoon within the bays along the Oman coast. TOPEX/POSEIDON SLAs indicate that with the onset of the SW Monsoon, a 30-cm drop in height is observed along the Oman coast associated the presence of the cool upwelled waters. This drop in height sets up a horizontal pressure gradient and results in a compensating along-shore, northeastward flowing, geostrophic current (East Arabian Current) during the SW Monsoon. Similarly, the altimeter data slow an offshore decrease in height during the Northeast (NE) Monsoon, indicating a seasonal reversal in direction of the East Oman Currents with flow to the southwest. The following upwelling characteristics are identified for the Oman upwelling zone: 1- Upwelling zones have seen along Oman and Pakistan coasts and in the western coasts, like Iran, persistent upwelling zones are not available. 2- Upwelling zones along Oman coasts are more persistent and developed than in Pakistan coastal area. 3- Upwelling in the Oman and East Pakistan coasts starts with SW-Monsoon and will developed in the mid-August, adjusted with summer cooling. 4- Along Oman Sea, upwelling zones were developed between Rasal-Haddad and the southern bay. Mean SST during SW-Monsoon is about 22 °C. 5-Waters with temperature about 23°C were upwelled from depth 50-75 m along Oman coasts, and about 50 m along Pakistan coasts. 6

  9. The Mono Arch, eastern Sierra region, California: Dynamic topography associated with upper-mantle upwelling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    A broad, topographic flexure localized east of and over the central and southern Sierra Nevada, herein named the Mono Arch, apparently represents crustal response to lithospheric and/or upper-mantle processes, probably dominated by mantle upwelling within the continental interior associated Pacific-North American plate-boundary deformation. This zone of flexure is identified through comparison between the topographic characteristics of the active Cascade volcanic arc and backarc regions with the analogous former arc and backarc in the Sierra Nevada and eastern Sierra Nevada. Serial topographic profiles measured normal to the modern Cascade backarc reveal an accordance of topographic lows defined by valley floors with an average minimum elevation of ???1400-1500m for over 175km to the southeast. Although the accordance drops in elevation slightly to the south, the modern Cascade backarc region is remarkably level, and is characterized by relief up to ???750m above this baseline elevation. By contrast, serial topographic profiles over the former arc and backarc transitions of the eastern Sierra region exhibit a regional anticlinal warping defined by accordant valley floors and by a late Miocene-early Pliocene erosion surface and associated deposits. The amplitude of this flexure above regionally flat baseline elevations to the east varies spatially along the length of the former Sierran arc, with a maximum of ???1000m centred over the Bridgeport Basin. The total zone of flexure is approximately 350km long N-S and 100km wide E-W, and extends from Indian Wells Valley in the south to the Sonora Pass region in the north. Previous geophysical, petrologic, and geodetic studies suggest that the Mono Arch overlies a zone of active mantle upwelling. This region also represents a zone crustal weakness formerly exploited by the middle-to-late Miocene arc and is presently the locus of seismic and volcanic activities. This seismic zone, which lies east of the Sierra Nevada block

  10. A theory of the infinite horizon LQ-problem for composite systems of PDEs with boundary control

    CERN Document Server

    Acquistapace, Paolo; Lasiecka, Irena

    2012-01-01

    We study the infinite horizon Linear-Quadratic problem and the associated algebraic Riccati equations for systems with unbounded control actions. The operator-theoretic context is motivated by composite systems of Partial Differential Equations (PDE) with boundary or point control. Specific focus is placed on systems of coupled hyperbolic/parabolic PDE with an overall `predominant' hyperbolic character, such as, e.g., some models for thermoelastic or fluid-structure interactions. While unbounded control actions lead to Riccati equations with unbounded (operator) coefficients, unlike the parabolic case solvability of these equations becomes a major issue, owing to the lack of sufficient regularity of the solutions to the composite dynamics. In the present case, even the more general theory appealing to estimates of the singularity displayed by the kernel which occurs in the integral representation of the solution to the control system fails. A novel framework which embodies possible hyperbolic components of th...

  11. Boundary transfer matrices and boundary quantum KZ equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaar, Bart, E-mail: Bart.Vlaar@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    A simple relation between inhomogeneous transfer matrices and boundary quantum Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov (KZ) equations is exhibited for quantum integrable systems with reflecting boundary conditions, analogous to an observation by Gaudin for periodic systems. Thus, the boundary quantum KZ equations receive a new motivation. We also derive the commutativity of Sklyanin’s boundary transfer matrices by merely imposing appropriate reflection equations, in particular without using the conditions of crossing symmetry and unitarity of the R-matrix.

  12. Extended cubic B-spline method for solving a linear system of second-order boundary value problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilat, Ahmed Salem; Hamid, Nur Nadiah Abd; Ismail, Ahmad Izani Md

    2016-01-01

    A method based on extended cubic B-spline is proposed to solve a linear system of second-order boundary value problems. In this method, two free parameters, [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], play an important role in producing accurate results. Optimization of these parameters are carried out and the truncation error is calculated. This method is tested on three examples. The examples suggest that this method produces comparable or more accurate results than cubic B-spline and some other methods.

  13. MULTIGRID ALGORITHM FOR THE COUPLING SYSTEM OF NATURAL BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD AND FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR UNBOUNDED DOMAIN PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Zhang; Dehao Yu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, some V-cycle multigrid algorithms are presented for the coupling system arising from the discretization of the Dirichlet exterior problem by coupling the natural boundary element method and finite element method. The convergence of these multigrid algorithms is obtained even with only one smoothing on all levels. The rate of convergence is found uniformly bounded independent of the number of levels and the mesh sizes of all levels, which indicates that these multigrid algorithms are optimal. Some numerical results are also reported.

  14. High temperature metamorphism in the conductive boundary layer adjacent to a rhyolite intrusion in the Krafla geothermal system, Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    P. Schiffman; Zierenberg, RA; Mortensen, AK; Frioleifsson, GO; Elders, WA

    2014-01-01

    A rhyolite magma body within the Krafla geothermal system that was encountered at a depth of 2.1km during drilling of the IDDP-1 borehole is producing high temperature metamorphism within a conductive boundary layer (CBL) in adjacent host rocks. Cuttings recovered during drilling within a few meters of the intrusive contact in IDDP-1 are mainly comprised of granoblastic hornfelses, the rock type which confirms the presence of the CBL at the base of the IDDP-1 bore hole. The two pyroxenes in t...

  15. Transient dynamics in electric power system with dc transmission: Fractal growth in stability boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Susuki, Yoshihiko; Hikihara, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    The paper is concerned with transient dynamics and stability of an electric power system with DC transmission. Nowadays, DC transmission systems are widely applied to conventional electric power systems. However, the transient dynamics of AC/DC power systems, affected by the active power that flows into DC transmissions, is not entirely understood. The paper derives a non-symmetrical swing equation system to analyse the transient dynamics of an AC/DC power system. The non-symmetry implies a u...

  16. Anode flooding characteristics as design boundary for a hydrogen supply system for automotive polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenssen, Dirk; Berger, Oliver; Krewer, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    An automotive fuel cell is investigated to define the design boundaries for an automotive hydrogen supply system with regard to anode flooding. The flooding characteristics of the fuel cell anode at various operating conditions (hydrogen flow rate, pressure, temperature, current density) are analyzed by in-situ and ex-situ measurements. Stable operation conditions are identified and a relation to the operating conditions is established. For adequate water removal, a minimum Reynolds number in the gas channels has to be adjusted. Using this information, different hydrogen supply system designs are compared in their compliance with the stability requirements. It is shown that passive hydrogen supply systems do not achieve all fuel cell requirements regarding power density, lifetime and robustness.

  17. Long-term trends of upwelling and impacts on primary productivity in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickart, Robert S.; Schulze, Lena M.; Moore, G. W. K.; Charette, Matthew A.; Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert; Danielson, Seth L.

    2013-09-01

    Using a previously established wind proxy for upwelling along the North Slope of Alaska, we examine the interannual to decadal variability in upwelling as well as the climatological monthly trends. The ability of the upwelling to trigger phytoplankton blooms via upward nitrate flux from the halocline is then investigated using data from a moored array together with the proxy. The 70-year record of wind speed from the Barrow, Alaska meteorological station (1941-2010) reveals that strong upwelling events - lasting at least 4 days and exceeding 10 m/s during the storm - occur throughout the year. On average there are 9-10 upwelling events per year, and the number and strength of events has increased over the last 25 years. The low-frequency variability in the upwelling co-varies with previously documented Arctic climate trends, but there is no significant correlation with various high latitude atmospheric indices. There are two seasonal peaks in the occurrence of upwelling, in May and November. The role of the Beaufort High and Aleutian Low in driving the upwelling is investigated using NCEP reanalysis fields. Fluctuations in both of these centers of action contribute to the enhanced winds, and the location of the Aleutian Low storm track plays a key role in the seasonal variability of the upwelling. The upward nitrate flux due to storms in the open water period can account for new primary production that is on par with carbon fixed during the summer growing season in the absence of storms. Evidence from satellite ocean color data of such wind-induced phytoplankton blooms is presented.

  18. Response of Mytilus edulis to enhanced phytoplankton availability by controlled upwelling in an oligotrophic fjord

    OpenAIRE

    Strohmeier, Tore; Strand, Oivind; ALUNNO-BRUSCIA, Marianne; Duinker, Arne; Rosland, Rune; Aure, Jan; Erga, Svein R.; Naustvoll, Lars J.; Jansen, Henrice M.; Cranford, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in oligotrophic coastal regions has been proposed as a means of increasing phytoplankton and, subsequently, bivalve aquaculture production. This was tested as part of a large-scale upwelling experiment in an oligotrophic environment (Lysefjord, Norway). The mean chlorophyll a concentration in the upwelling area was consistently higher than at the control site (mean ± SD: 3.3 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 0.6 mg Chl a m-3, respectively) during the 4 mo of...

  19. Biological and oceanographic upwelling indicators at Cabo Frio (RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleyci A. O. Moser

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton biomass, chemical parameters and hydrology were studied in a transect 101.6 km long off Cabo Frio (RJ, Southeast Brazil, during summer (December 29 to 31, 1991 and winter (June 27 to 30, 1992. Wind induced upwelling events are frequently observed in the area during summer, becoming rare during winter. By the summer cruise a bloom of phytoplankton was observed in surface, close to the coast, with chlorophyll concentrations reaching 25.55 mg Chl-a m-3, uncoupled from the cold, nutrient rich waters of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW, found below 40 m depth. During the winter cruise, the SACW raised at the surface waters in front of Cabo Frio depicting an upwelling event. However, in spite of high surface nitrate concentrations (up to 7.7 f.1M chlorophyll-a were lower than 2 mg Chl-a m-3. The phytoplankton biomass, meteorological and hydrological data suggest a probable upwelling event immediately before the summer cruise, and an ongoing one during winter time. Cluster analyses and principal component analyses (PCA were applied to summer and winter data, pointing out multidimensional fronts in the area during both seasons.A biomassa fitoplanctônica, parâmetros químicos e hidrologia foram estudadas em um transecto de 101,6 Km ao largo de Cabo Frio, (RJ Brasil, durante o verão (Dezembro 29 a 31, 1991 e inverno (Junho 27 a 30, 1992. Nesta área, eventos de ressurgência induzidos pelo vento são comuns durante o verão, tornando-se mais raros durante o inverno. Durante o período de verão uma floração de fitoplâncton foi observada na superfície próximo ao continente, apresentando um máximo de clorofila-a igual a 25,55 mg Cl-a m'3 desacoplado das águas frias e ricas em nutrientes da Água Central do Atlântico Sul (ACAS, presente abaixo de 40 m. Durante o inverno, a ACAS alcançou a superflcie em frente a Cabo Frio, caracterizando um evento de ressurgência. Entretanto, apesar das altas concentrações de nitrato na superf

  20. Study of Baffle Boundary and System Parameters on Liquid-Solid Coupling Vibration of Rectangular Liquid-Storage Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the vibration problem of liquid-solid coupling of rectangular liquid-storage structure with horizontal elastic baffle, ignoring the influence of surface gravity wave, two different velocity potential functions corresponding to the liquid above and below the elastic baffle are assumed; based on the theory of mathematical equation and energy method, the formulas of basic frequency of liquid-solid coupling vibration system are derived, the baffle joined to the tank wall with 3 kinds of boundary conditions, namely, four edges simply supported, two opposite edges clamped and two opposite edges simply supported, and four edges clamped; the influence rules of baffle length-width ratio, the ratio of baffle height to liquid level, baffle elastic modulus, baffle density, baffle thickness, and liquid density on the coupling vibration performance are studied. The results show that the frequency of the clamped boundary is minimum; the influences of baffle length-width ratio and relative height on the basic frequency are much greater than that of the other system parameters; the relation between baffle length-width ratio and the frequency is exponential, while baffle relative height has a parabola relation with the frequency; the larger the baffle length-width ratio, the closer the baffle to the liquid level; the coupling frequency will be reduced more obviously.

  1. Seasonal variations in groundwater upwelling zones in a Danish lowland stream analyzed using Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matheswaran, Karthikeyan; Blemmer, Morten; Rosbjerg, Dan;

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of groundwater inflows in a stream reach plays a major role in controlling the stream temperature, a vital component shaping the riverine ecosystem. In this study, the Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system was installed in a small Danish lowland stream, Elverdamsåen......, antecedent precipitation and presence of fractured clayey till in the stream reach were deemed as the vital factors causing apparent seasonal variation in the locations of upwelling zones, prompting use of DTS not only in preconceived scenarios of large diurnal temperature change but rather a long...

  2. Exploring the potential of the RPA system SUMO for multipurpose boundary-layer missions during the BLLAST campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuder, Joachim; Båserud, Line; Jonassen, Marius O.; Kral, Stephan T.; Müller, Martin

    2016-06-01

    In June and July 2011 the RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) SUMO (Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer) performed a total number of 299 scientific flights during the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) campaign in southern France. Three different types of missions were performed: vertical profiling of the mean meteorological parameters (temperature, humidity and wind), horizontal surveys of the surface temperature and horizontal transects for the estimation of turbulence. The manuscript provides an introduction to the corresponding SUMO operations, including regulatory issues and the coordination of manned and unmanned airborne operations for boundary-layer research that have been pioneered during the BLLAST campaign. The main purpose of the SUMO flight strategy was atmospheric profiling at high temporal resolution. A total of 168 profile flights were performed during the campaign with typically more than 10 flights per Intensive Observational Period (IOP) day. The collected data allow for a detailed study of boundary-layer structure and dynamics and will be used for further analysis, e.g. the determination of profiles of sensible and latent heat fluxes. First, tests of a corresponding method have shown very promising results and have provided surface-flux values in close agreement with those from ground-based eddy-covariance measurements. In addition, 74 horizontal surveys of the IR emission of the surface were performed at altitudes of around 65 m. Each of those surveys covers a typical area of around 1 km2 and allows for an estimation of the surface-temperature variability, important information for the assessment of the heterogeneity of the surface forcing as a function of soil and vegetation properties. The comparison with other surface-temperature measurements shows that the raw data of the airborne and ground observations can differ considerably, but that even a very simple multiple regression method can reduce those

  3. Understanding the nature of mantle upwelling beneath East-Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civiero, Chiara; Hammond, James; Goes, Saskia; Ahmed, Abdulhakim; Ayele, Atalay; Doubre, Cecile; Goitom, Berhe; Keir, Derek; Kendall, Mike; Leroy, Sylvie; Ogubazghi, Ghebrebrhan; Rumpker, Georg; Stuart, Graham

    2014-05-01

    The concept of hot upwelling material - otherwise known as mantle plumes - has long been accepted as a possible mechanism to explain hotspots occurring at Earth's surface and it is recognized as a way of removing heat from the deep Earth. Nevertheless, this theory remains controversial since no one has definitively imaged a plume and over the last decades several other potential mechanisms that do not require a deep mantle source have been invoked to explain this phenomenon, for example small-scale convection at rifted margins, meteorite impacts or lithospheric delamination. One of the best locations to study the potential connection between hotspot volcanism at the surface and deep mantle plumes on land is the East African Rift (EAR). We image seismic velocity structure of the mantle below EAR with higher resolution than has been available to date by including seismic data recorded by stations from many regional networks ranging from Saudi Arabia to Tanzania. We use relative travel-time tomography to produce P- velocity models from the surface down into the lower mantle incorporating 9250 ray-paths in our model from 495 events and 402 stations. We add smaller earthquakes (4.5 poorly sampled regions in order to have a more uniform data coverage. The tomographic results allow us to image structures of ~ 100-km length scales to ~ 1000 km depth beneath the northern East-Africa rift (Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Yemen) with good resolution also in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle. Our observations provide evidence that the shallow mantle slow seismic velocities continue trough the transition zone and into the lower mantle. In particular, the relatively slow velocity anomaly beneath the Afar Depression extends up to depths of at least 1000 km depth while another low-velocity anomaly beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift seems to be present in the upper mantle only. These features in the lower mantle are isolated with a diameter of about 400 km indicating deep

  4. IMPROVEMENT OF ACCURACY OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER DIFFERENTIAL APPROXIMATION METHOD FOR MULTI DIMENSIONAL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF AUTO-ADAPTABLE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential approximation is derived from radiation transfer equation by averaging over the solid angle. It is one of the more effective methods for engineering calculations of radia- tive heat transfer in complex three-dimensional thermal power systems with selective and scattering media. The new method for improvement of accuracy of the differential approximation based on using of auto-adaptable boundary conditions is introduced in the paper. The  efficiency  of  the  named  method  is  proved  for  the  test  2D-systems.  Self-consistent auto-adaptable boundary conditions taking into consideration the nonorthogonal component of the incident to the boundary radiation flux are formulated. It is demonstrated that taking in- to consideration of the non- orthogonal incident flux in multi-dimensional systems, such as furnaces, boilers, combustion chambers improves the accuracy of the radiant flux simulations and to more extend in the zones adjacent to the edges of the chamber.Test simulations utilizing the differential approximation method with traditional boundary conditions, new self-consistent boundary conditions and “precise” discrete ordinates method were performed. The mean square errors of the resulting radiative fluxes calculated along the boundary of rectangular and triangular test areas were decreased 1.5–2 times by using auto- adaptable boundary conditions. Radiation flux gaps in the corner points of non-symmetric sys- tems are revealed by using auto-adaptable boundary conditions which can not be obtained by using the conventional boundary conditions.

  5. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    in the period of post-acquisition when their organization is being integrated into the acquiring MNC. The paper contributes to the literature on boundary spanning in three ways: First, by illustrating that boundary spanning is performed by numerous organizational actors in a variety of positions in MNCs......, inclusively by locals in subsidiaries. Second, by showing that boundary spanning is ‘situated’ in the sense that its result depends on the kind of knowledge to be transmitted and the attitude of the receivers. A third contribution is methodological. The study illustrates that combining bottom-up grounded...

  6. Reconstruction of upwelling intensity and paleo-nutrient gradients in the northwest Arabian Sea derived from stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of planktic foraminifera.

    OpenAIRE

    C. Moos

    2000-01-01

    The Asian Monsoon system dominates the climate over large areas of the Asian and Indian continents and the rainfall prevailing during SW-monsoon is decisive for the agriculture of the entire region. The atmospheric monsoon system dominates the oceanographic surface circulation of the northern Indian Ocean and causes strong upwelling off Somalia and Arabia during SW-monsoon and makes the northwestern Arabian Sea to one of the most productive areas in the world oceans. Thus, productivity and nu...

  7. Neumann boundary controllability of the Gear-Grimshaw system with critical size restrictions on the spatial domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capistrano-Filho, Roberto A.; Gallego, Fernando A.; Pazoto, Ademir F.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the boundary controllability of the Gear-Grimshaw system posed on a finite domain (0, L), with Neumann boundary conditions: ut + uu_x+u_{xxx} + a v_{xxx} + a_1vv_x+a_2 (uv)_x =0, & {in} (0,L)× (0,T), c v_t +rv_x +vv_x+abu_{xxx} +v_{xxx}+a_2buu_x+a_1b(uv)_x =0, &{in} (0,L)× (0,T), u_{xx}(0,t)=h_0(t), u_x(L,t)=h_1(t), u_{xx}(L,t)=h_2(t), &{in} (0,T), v_{xx}(0,t)=g_0(t), v_x(L,t)=g_1(t), v_{xx}(L,t)=g_2(t), &{in} (0,T), u(x,0)= u^0(x), quad v(x,0)= v^0(x), & {in} (0,L). We first prove that the corresponding linearized system around the origin is exactly controllable in {(L^2(0,L))^2} when h 2( t) = g 2( t) = 0. In this case, the exact controllability property is derived for any L > 0 with control functions {h_0, g_0 in H^{-1/3}(0,T)} and {h_1, g_1in L^2(0,T)}. If we change the position of the controls and consider {h_0(t)=h_2(t)=0} (resp. {g_0(t)=g_2(t)=0)}, we obtain the result with control functions {g_0, g_2in H^{-1/3}(0,T)} and {h_1, g_1in L^2(0,T)} if and only if the length L of the spatial domain (0, L) does not belong to a countable set. In all cases, the regularity of the controls are sharp in time. If only one control act in the boundary condition, {h_0(t)=g_0(t)=h_2(t)=g_2(t)=0} and g 1( t) = 0 (resp. h 1( t) = 0), the linearized system is proved to be exactly controllable for small values of the length L and large time of control T. Finally, the nonlinear system is shown to be locally exactly controllable via the contraction mapping principle, if the associated linearized systems are exactly controllable.

  8. Modelling of Continental Lithosphere Breakup and Rifted Margin Formation in Response to an Upwelling Divergent Flow Field Incorporating a Temperature Dependent Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymms, V. J.; Kusznir, N. J.

    2005-05-01

    We numerically model continental lithosphere deformation leading to breakup and sea floor spreading initiation in response to an imposed upwelling and divergent flow field applied to continental lithosphere and asthenosphere. The model is used to predict rifted continental margin lithosphere thinning and temperature structure. Model predictions are compared with observed rifted margin structure for four diverse case studies. Prior to application of the upwelling divergent flow field the continental lithosphere is undeformed with a uniform temperature gradient. The upwelling divergent flow field is defined kinematically using boundary conditions consisting of the upwelling velocity Vz at the divergence axis and the half divergence rate Vx . The resultant velocity field throughout the continuum is computed using finite element (FE) code incorporating a Newtonian temperature dependent rheology. The flow field is used to advect the continental lithosphere material and lithospheric and asthenospheric temperatures. Viscosity structure is hence modified and the velocities change correspondingly in a feedback loop. We find the kinematic boundary conditions Vz and Vx to be of first order importance. A high Vz/Vx (greater than10), corresponding to buoyancy assisted flow, leads to minimal mantle exhumation and a well defined continent ocean transition consistent with observations at volcanic margins. For Vz/Vx near unity, corresponding to plate boundary driven divergence, mantle exhumation over widths of up to 100 km is predicted which is consistent with observations at non-volcanic margins. The FE method allows the upwelling velocity Vz to be propagated upwards from the top of the asthenosphere to the Earth's surface without the requirement of imposing Vx. When continental breakup is achieved the half divergence velocity Vx can be applied at the lithosphere surface and the upwelling velocity Vz left free. We find this time and space dependent set of boundary conditions is

  9. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  10. Simulations of membranes and other interfacial systems using P2(1) and Pc periodic boundary conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Elizabeth A; Venable, Richard M; Pastor, Richard W; Brooks, Bernard R

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate the ease and utility of simulating heterogeneous interfacial systems with P2(1) and Pc periodic boundary conditions which allow, for example, lipids in a membrane to switch leaflets. In preliminary tests, P2(1) was shown to yield equivalent results to P1 in simulations of bulk water, a water/vacuum interface, and pure DPPC bilayers with an equal number of lipids per leaflet; equivalence of Pc and P1 was also demonstrated for the former two systems. P2(1) was further tested in simulations involving the spreading of an octane film on water, and equilibration of a DPPC bilayer from an initial condition containing different numbers of lipids in the two leaflets. Lastly, a simulation in P2(1) of a DOPC/melittin membrane showed significant passage of lipids to the melittin-containing leaflet from the initial distribution, and lends insight into the condensation of lipids by melittin. PMID:11964222

  11. Le Chatelier Principle for Out-of-Equilibrium and Boundary-Driven Systems: Application to Dynamical Phase Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpielberg, O; Akkermans, E

    2016-06-17

    A stability analysis is presented for boundary-driven and out-of-equilibrium systems in the framework of the hydrodynamic macroscopic fluctuation theory. A Hamiltonian description is proposed which allows us to thermodynamically interpret the additivity principle. A necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of the additivity principle is obtained as an extension of the Le Chatelier principle. These stability conditions result from a diagonal quadratic form obtained using the cumulant generating function. This approach allows us to provide a proof for the stability of the weakly asymmetric exclusion process and to reduce the search for stability to the solution of two coupled linear ordinary differential equations instead of nonlinear partial differential equations. Additional potential applications of these results are discussed in the realm of classical and quantum systems. PMID:27367375

  12. Le Chatelier Principle for Out-of-Equilibrium and Boundary-Driven Systems: Application to Dynamical Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpielberg, O.; Akkermans, E.

    2016-06-01

    A stability analysis is presented for boundary-driven and out-of-equilibrium systems in the framework of the hydrodynamic macroscopic fluctuation theory. A Hamiltonian description is proposed which allows us to thermodynamically interpret the additivity principle. A necessary and sufficient condition for the validity of the additivity principle is obtained as an extension of the Le Chatelier principle. These stability conditions result from a diagonal quadratic form obtained using the cumulant generating function. This approach allows us to provide a proof for the stability of the weakly asymmetric exclusion process and to reduce the search for stability to the solution of two coupled linear ordinary differential equations instead of nonlinear partial differential equations. Additional potential applications of these results are discussed in the realm of classical and quantum systems.

  13. A study on the role of grain boundary engineering in promoting high-cycle fatigue resistance and improving reliability in nickel base superalloys for propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yong

    High-cycle fatigue, involving the premature initiation and/or rapid propagation of small cracks to failure due to high-frequency (vibratory) loading, remains the principal cause of failures in military gas-turbine propulsion systems. The objective of this study is to examine whether the resistance to high-cycle fatigue failures can be enhanced by grain-boundary engineering, i.e., through the modification of the spatial distribution and topology of the grain boundaries in the microstructure. While grain boundary engineering has been used to obtain significant improvements in intergranular corrosion and cracking, creep and cavitation behavior, toughness and plasticity, cold-work embrittlement, and weldability, only very limited, but positive, results exist for fatigue. Accordingly, using a commercial polycrystalline nickel base gamma/gamma' superalloy, ME3, as a typical engine disk material, sequential thermomechanical processing, involving alternate cycles of strain and annealing, is used to (i) modify the proportion of special grain boundaries, and (ii) interrupt the connectivity of the random boundaries in the grain boundary network. The processed microstructures are then subjected to fracture-mechanics based high cycle fatigue testing to evaluate how the crack initiation and small- and large-crack growth properties are affected and to examine how the altered grain boundary population and connectivity can influence growth rates and overall lifetimes. The effect of such grain-boundary engineering on the fatigue-crack-propagation behavior of large (˜8 to 20 mm), through-thickness cracks at 25, 700, and 800°C was examined. Although there was little influence of an increased special boundary fraction at ambient temperatures, the resistance to near-threshold crack growth was definitively improved at elevated temperatures, with fatigue threshold-stress intensities some 10 to 20% higher than at 25°C, concomitant with a lower proportion (˜20%) of intergranular

  14. Further influence of the eastern boundary on the seasonal variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Johanna; Schmidt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The seasonal cycle of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) at 26.5 N has been shown to arise predominantly from sub-surface density variations at the Eastern boundary. Here, we suggest that these sub-surface density variations have their origin in the seasonal variability of the Canary Current system, in particular the Poleward Undercurrent (PUC). We use a high-resolution ocean model (STORM) for which we show that the seasonal variability resembles observations for both sub-surface density variability and meridional transports. In particular, the STORM model simulation density variations at the eastern boundary show seasonal variations reaching down to well over 1000m, a pattern that most model simulations systematically underestimate. We find that positive wind stress curl anomalies in late summer and already within one degree off the eastern boundary result -through water column stretching- in strong transport anomlies in PUC in fall, coherent down to 1000m depth. Simultaneously with a westward propagation of these transport anomalies, we find in winter a weak PUC between 200 m and 500m, and southward transports between 600m and 1300m. This variability is in agreement with the observationally-based suggestion of a seasonal reversal of the meridional transports at intermediate depths. Our findings extend earlier studies which suggested that the seasonal variability at of the meridional transports across 26N is created by changes in the basin-wide thermocline through wind-driven upwelling at the eastern boundary analyzing wind stress curl anomalies 2 degrees off the eastern boundary. Our results suggest that the investigation of AMOC variability and particular its seasonal cycle modulations require the analysis of boundary wind stress curl and the upper ocean transports within 1 degree off the eastern boundary. These findings also implicate that without high-resolution coverage of the eastern boundary, coarser model simulation might not fully

  15. Ekman Upwelling, QuikSCAT SeaWinds, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes science quality Ekman current (in zonal, meridional, and modulus sets) and Ekman upwelling data. This data begins with wind velocity...

  16. Ekman Upwelling, METOP ASCAT, 0.25 degrees, Global, Near Real Time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA CoastWatch distributes near real time Ekman current (in zonal, meridional, and modulus sets) and Ekman upwelling data. This data begins with wind velocity...

  17. A Comparison of the Role of Episode Nutrient Supply on Pathways of Carbon in Upwelling Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. E.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient supply is episode in the ocean even in regions of fairly high and continuous nutrient supply, such as coastal upwelling regimes. The structure of the ecosystem depends on nutrient availability and the different requirements of phytoplankton cells.

  18. Upwelling at the ice edge - A mechanism for deep water formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkinen, Sirpa

    1987-01-01

    This study sets forward a hypothesis which anticipates deep water formation due to ice edge upwelling. The upwelling can raise thermocline waters (the lower Arctic Intermediate Water) to the surface or near it, where the water is exposed to cooling, evaporation, mixing, and oxygenation. Thus, upwelling can act as a preconditioning mechanism for deep convection. The conjecture would also explain the salinity range of the Greenland Sea Deep Water if the upper and lower Arctic Intermediate Water masses are mixed so that the latter has at least an 80-percent contribution. It is also anticipated that the convection events induced by ice edge upwelling during winter season could give rise to a new deep water annual production rate consistent with observations.

  19. Observational evidence of upwelling off the southwest coast of India during June-July 2006

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lekshmi, S.; Smitha, B.R.; Revichandran, C.

    transects off Thiruvananthapuram (8.5 degrees N) and off Koilam (9 degrees N), during June 25th-6th July 2006. Observed upwelling parameters (local temperature anomalies, salinity, isothermal layer depth (ILD), Mixed Layer Depth (MLD), isotherm slope...

  20. An immersed-boundary method for flow-structure interaction in biological systems with application to phonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Mittal, Rajat; Zheng, Xudong; Bielamowicz, Steven A; Walsh, Raymond J; Hahn, James K

    2008-11-20

    A new numerical approach for modeling a class of flow-structure interaction problems typically encountered in biological systems is presented. In this approach, a previously developed, sharp-interface, immersed-boundary method for incompressible flows is used to model the fluid flow and a new, sharp-interface Cartesian grid, immersed boundary method is devised to solve the equations of linear viscoelasticity that governs the solid. The two solvers are coupled to model flow-structure interaction. This coupled solver has the advantage of simple grid generation and efficient computation on simple, single-block structured grids. The accuracy of the solid-mechanics solver is examined by applying it to a canonical problem. The solution methodology is then applied to the problem of laryngeal aerodynamics and vocal fold vibration during human phonation. This includes a three-dimensional eigen analysis for a multi-layered vocal fold prototype as well as two-dimensional, flow-induced vocal fold vibration in a modeled larynx. Several salient features of the aerodynamics as well as vocal-fold dynamics are presented. PMID:19936017